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Sample records for pathogenic anti-cd4 immunity

  1. Protection of xenografts by a combination of immunoisolation and a single dose of anti-CD4 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, A W; Georgiou, H M; Zhan, Y; Brady, J L; Lew, A M

    2001-01-01

    Immunoisolation is the separation of transplanted cells from cells of the immune system using a semipermeable membrane. Using one such immunoisolation capsule-the TheraCyte device-we have assessed the survival of encapsulated xenogeneic tissue in vivo as well as the contribution of CD4+ve T cells to encapsulated xenograft rejection. The foreign body reaction to the TheraCyte capsule in vivo was assessed by transplanting empty capsules into normal mice. These capsules elicit a foreign body response by the host animal. Encapsulated CHO, NIT-1, and PK-15 cells were placed in culture and in immunodeficient mice to investigate their growth characteristics in the TheraCyte device. These cell lines survive both in culture and in immunodeficient SCID mice. Xenogeneic PK cells were also transplanted into normal C57BL/6 mice. These cells do not survive in normal mice despite the absence of direct contact between infiltrating and encapsulated cells. In addition, the survival of encapsulated cells in mice treated with a single dose of anti-CD4 antibody was examined. This was assessed using two systems: 1) histological analysis of capsule sections; 2) a quantitative luciferase reporter system using PK cells transfected to express luciferase. In both cases, anti-CD4 antibody contributed to prolonged encapsulated xenogeneic cell survival. Encapsulated xenogeneic cells survive in immunodeficient mice but not normal mice. Treatment of normal mice with anti-CD4 antibody results in prolonged survival of xenogeneic cells that can be measured using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the contribution of CD4+ve T cells to encapsulated xenograft rejection.

  2. Mucosal immunity to pathogenic intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Behnsen, Judith; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly dynamic environment in which the host constantly interacts with trillions of commensal microorganisms, known as the microbiota, and periodically interacts with pathogens of diverse nature. In this Review, we discuss how mucosal immunity is controlled in response to enteric bacterial pathogens, with a focus on the species that cause morbidity and mortality in humans. We explain how the microbiota can shape the immune response to pathogenic bacteria, and we detail innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that drive protective immunity against these pathogens. The vast diversity of the microbiota, pathogens and immune responses encountered in the intestines precludes discussion of all of the relevant players in this Review. Instead, we aim to provide a representative overview of how the intestinal immune system responds to pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Pathogen recognition in the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Himanshu; Kawai, Taro; Akira, Shizuo

    2009-04-28

    Immunity against microbial pathogens primarily depends on the recognition of pathogen components by innate receptors expressed on immune and non-immune cells. Innate receptors are evolutionarily conserved germ-line-encoded proteins and include TLRs (Toll-like receptors), RLRs [RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I)-like receptors] and NLRs (Nod-like receptors). These receptors recognize pathogens or pathogen-derived products in different cellular compartments, such as the plasma membrane, the endosomes or the cytoplasm, and induce the expression of cytokines, chemokines and co-stimulatory molecules to eliminate pathogens and instruct pathogen-specific adaptive immune responses. In the present review, we will discuss the recent progress in the study of pathogen recognition by TLRs, RLRs and NLRs and their signalling pathways.

  4. Pathogen Pressure Puts Immune Defense into Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrocks, Nicholas P. C.; Matson, Kevin D.; Tieleman, B. Irene

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which organisms can protect themselves from disease depends on both the immune defenses they maintain and the pathogens they face. At the same time, immune systems are shaped by the antigens they encounter, both over ecological and evolutionary time. Ecological immunologists often

  5. Regulatory T cells and immunity to pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Barry T; Suvas, Susmit

    2007-09-01

    Immune responses to pathogens are modulated by one or more types of cells that perform a regulatory function. Some cells with this function, such as CD4+ Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells (nTreg), pre-exist prior to infections whereas others may be induced as a consequence of infection (adaptive Treg). With pathogens that have a complex pathogenesis, multiple types of regulatory cells could influence the outcome. One major property of Treg is to help minimize collateral tissue damage that can occur during immune reactions to a chronic infection. The consequence is less damage to the host but in such situations the pathogen is likely to establish persistence. In some cases, a fine balance is established between Treg responses, effector components of immunity and the pathogen. Treg responses to pathogens may also act to hamper the efficacy of immune control. This review discusses these issues as well as the likely mechanisms by which various pathogens can signal the participation of Treg during infection.

  6. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Minimal contribution of cell-bound antibodies to the immunoscintigraphy of inflamed joints with 99mTc-anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinne, R.W.; Palombo-Kinne, E.; Wolski, A.; Wolf, F.; Emmrich, F.; Becker, W.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The cellular joint infiltrate in rheumatoid arthritis patients is rich in CD4-positive T-helper lymphocytes and macrophages, rendering anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) suitable for specific immunoscintigraphy of human/experimental arthritis. Following intravenous injection, however, mAbs are present both in the free form and bound to CD4-positive, circulating monocytes and T-cells. Thus, the present study aimed at analyzing the relative contribution of the free and the cell-bound component to the imaging of inflamed joints in experimental adjuvant arthritis (AA). Methods: AA rat pertioneal macrophages or lymph node T-cells were incubated in vitro with saturating amounts of 99mTc-anti-CD4 mAb (W3/25) and injected i.v. into rats with AA. Results: In vitro release of 99m Tc-anti-CD4 mAb from the cells was limited (on average 1.57%/h for macrophages and 0.84%/h for T-cells). Following i.v. injection, whole body/joints scans and tissue measurements showed only negligible accumulation of radioactivity in inflamed ankle joints (tissue: 0.22 and 0.34% of the injected activity, respectively), whereas the radioactivity was concentrated in liver (tissue: 79% and 71%, respectively), kidney, and urinary bladder. Unlike macrophages, however, anti-CD4 mAb-coated T-cells significantly accumulated in lymphoid organs, the inflamed synovial membrane of the ankle joints, as well as in elbow and knee joints. Conclusion: While the overall contribution of cell-bound mAbs to the imaging of arthritic joints with anti-CD4 mAbs is minimal, differential accumulation of macrophages and T-cells in lymphoid organs and the inflamed synovial membrane indicates preferential migration patterns of these 2 cell populations in arthritic rats. Although only validated for 99m Tc-anti-CD4 mAbs, extrapolation of the results to other anticellular mAbs with similar affinity for their antigen may be possible. (orig.) [de

  8. Plastic Transcriptomes Stabilize Immunity to Pathogen Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Corwin, Jason A; Copeland, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    To respond to pathogen attack, selection and associated evolution has led to the creation of plant immune system that are a highly effective and inducible defense system. Central to this system are the plant defense hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) and crosstalk between the two...

  9. Plastic transcriptomes stabilize immunity to pathogen diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Corwin, Jason A.; Copeland, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    To respond to pathogen attack, selection and associated evolution has led to the creation of plant immune system that are a highly effective and inducible defense system. Central to this system are the plant defense hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) and crosstalk between the two...

  10. ImmunoPET Imaging of Murine CD4+ T Cells Using Anti-CD4 Cys-Diabody: Effects of Protein Dose on T Cell Function and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freise, Amanda C; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Salazar, Felix B; Lu, Xiang; Tavaré, Richard; Wu, Anna M

    2017-08-01

    preclinical disease models. Future approaches to minimizing biological effects may include the creation of monovalent fragments or selecting anti-CD4 antibodies which target alternative epitopes.

  11. Modeling the intracellular pathogen-immune interaction with cure rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Balram; Dubey, Preeti; Dubey, Uma S.

    2016-09-01

    Many common and emergent infectious diseases like Influenza, SARS, Hepatitis, Ebola etc. are caused by viral pathogens. These infections can be controlled or prevented by understanding the dynamics of pathogen-immune interaction in vivo. In this paper, interaction of pathogens with uninfected and infected cells in presence or absence of immune response are considered in four different cases. In the first case, the model considers the saturated nonlinear infection rate and linear cure rate without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells and without immune response. The next model considers the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells while all other terms are same as in the first case. The third model incorporates innate immune response, humoral immune response and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediated immune response with cure rate and without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells. The last model is an extension of the third model in which the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells has been considered. Positivity and boundedness of solutions are established to ensure the well-posedness of the problem. It has been found that all the four models have two equilibria, namely, pathogen-free equilibrium point and pathogen-present equilibrium point. In each case, stability analysis of each equilibrium point is investigated. Pathogen-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when basic reproduction number is less or equal to unity. This implies that control or prevention of infection is independent of initial concentration of uninfected cells, infected cells, pathogens and immune responses in the body. The proposed models show that introduction of immune response and cure rate strongly affects the stability behavior of the system. Further, on computing basic reproduction number, it has been found to be minimum for the fourth model vis-a-vis other models. The analytical findings of each model have been exemplified by

  12. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeli eMelotto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens.

  13. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination) and chromatin remodeling that contribute to plant immunity against pathogens. Functions of key histone-modifying and chromatin remodeling enzymes are discussed. PMID:26388882

  14. Immune Evasion Strategies of Pathogens in Macrophages: the Potential for Limiting Pathogen Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuwei; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Zhang, Shujun

    2017-01-01

    Preventing pathogen transmission to a new host is of major interest to the immunologist and could benefit from a detailed investigation of pathogen immune evasion strategies. The first line of defense against pathogen invasion is provided by macrophages. When they sense pathogens, macrophages initiate signals to inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) subsequently mediating phagocytosis and inflammation. The macrophage immune machinery classically includes two subsets: the activated M1 and the activated M2 that respond accordingly in diverse immune challenges. The lipid and glycogen metabolic pathways work together with the lysosome to help the mature phagosome to degrade and eliminate intracellular pathogens in macrophages. The viral evasion strategies are even more complex due to the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis. However, pathogens evolve several strategies to camouflage themselves against immune responses in order to ensure their survival, replication and transmission. These strategies include the muting of PRRs initiated inflammatory responses, attenuation of M1 and/or induction of M2 macrophages, suppression of autophago-lysosomal formation, interference with lipid and glycogen metabolism, and viral mediation of autophagy and apoptosis cross-talk to enhance viral replication. This review focuses on pathogen immune evasion methods and on the strategies used by the host against camouflaged pathogens.

  15. Immune system handling time may alter the outcome of competition between pathogens and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspoon, Philip B; Banton, Sydney; Mideo, Nicole

    2018-06-14

    Predators may be limited in their ability to kill prey (i.e., have type II or III functional responses), an insight that has had far-reaching consequences in the ecological literature. With few exceptions, however, this possibility has not been extended to the behaviour of immune cells, which kill pathogens much as predators kill their prey. Rather, models of the within-host environment have tended to tacitly assume that immune cells have an unlimited ability to target and kill pathogens (i.e., a type I functional response). Here we explore the effects of changing this assumption on infection outcomes (i.e., pathogen loads). We incorporate immune cell handling time into an ecological model of the within-host environment that considers both the predatory nature of the pathogen-immune cell interaction as well as competition between immune cells and pathogens for host resources. Unless pathogens can preempt immune cells for host resources, adding an immune cell handling time increases equilibrium pathogen load. We find that the shape of the relationship between energy intake and pathogen load can change: with a type I functional response, pathogen load is maximised at intermediate inputs, while for a type II or III functional response, pathogen load is solely increasing. With a type II functional response, pathogen load can fluctuate rather than settling to an equilibrium, a phenomenon unobserved with type I or III functional responses. Our work adds to a growing literature highlighting the role of resource availability in host-parasite interactions. Implications of our results for adaptive anorexia are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effector-triggered immunity: from pathogen perception to robust defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Tsuda, Kenichi; Parker, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    In plant innate immunity, individual cells have the capacity to sense and respond to pathogen attack. Intracellular recognition mechanisms have evolved to intercept perturbations by pathogen virulence factors (effectors) early in host infection and convert it to rapid defense. One key to resistance success is a polymorphic family of intracellular nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) receptors that detect effector interference in different parts of the cell. Effector-activated NLRs connect, in various ways, to a conserved basal resistance network in order to transcriptionally boost defense programs. Effector-triggered immunity displays remarkable robustness against pathogen disturbance, in part by employing compensatory mechanisms within the defense network. Also, the mobility of some NLRs and coordination of resistance pathways across cell compartments provides flexibility to fine-tune immune outputs. Furthermore, a number of NLRs function close to the nuclear chromatin by balancing actions of defense-repressing and defense-activating transcription factors to program cells dynamically for effective disease resistance.

  17. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warinner, Christina; Matias Rodrigues, João F.; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y.; Tito, Raul Y.; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars; Samaniego Castruita, José Alfredo; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian; Olsen, Jesper V.; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M.; Collins, Matthew J.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize: (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) the first evidence of ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, “red-complex” pathogens, and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity, and diet, thereby extending the direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  18. Insect immunity shows specificity in protection upon secondary pathogen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadd, Ben M; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2006-06-20

    Immunological memory in vertebrates, conferring lasting specific protection after an initial pathogen exposure, has implications for a broad spectrum of evolutionary, epidemiological, and medical phenomena . However, the existence of specificity in protection upon secondary pathogen exposure in invertebrates remains controversial . To separate this functional phenomenon from a particular mechanism, we refer to it as specific immune priming. We investigate the presence of specific immune priming in workers of the social insect Bombus terrestris. Using three bacterial pathogens, we test whether a prior homologous pathogen exposure gives a benefit in terms of long-term protection against a later challenge, over and above a heterologous combination. With a reciprocally designed initial and second-exposure protocol (i.e., all combinations of bacteria were tested), we demonstrate, even several weeks after the clearance of a first exposure, increased protection and narrow specificity upon secondary exposure. This demonstrates that the invertebrate immune system is functionally capable of unexpectedly specific and durable induced protection. Ultimately, despite general broad differences between vertebrates and invertebrates, the ability of both immune systems to show specificity in protection suggests that their immune defenses have found comparable solutions to similar selective pressures over evolutionary time.

  19. Immune responses of Helicoverpa armigera to different kinds of pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xiao-Fan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects react against pathogens through innate immunity. The cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (H. armigera is an important defoliator and an extremely destructive pest insect of many crops. The elucidation of the mechanism of the immune response of H. armigera to various pathogens can provide a theoretical basis for new approaches to biologically control this pest. Results Four kinds of pathogens Bacillus thuringiensis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, and Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus harbored green fluorescence protein and polyhedron (AcMNPV-GFP were used to challenge the insect. The cellular and humoral immune responses to the pathogens were analyzed in the challenged H. armigera. The results show that in the five kinds of haemocytes, only granulocytes phagocytized the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. All haemocytes can be infected by AcMNPV. Fourteen immune-related genes including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs such as peptidoglycan recognition proteins (HaPGRP and HaPGRP C and Gram-Negative Bacteria-Binding Protein (HaGNBP, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs such as cecropin-1, 2 and 3 (HaCec-1, 2 and 3, lysozyme (HaLys, attacin (HaAtt, gallerimycin-like (HaGall, gloverin-like (HaGlo, moricin-like (HaMor, cobatoxin-like (HaCob, galiomicin-like (HaGali, and immune inducible protein (HaIip appeared in different expression profiles to different pathogen infections. The transcripts of 13 immune related genes (except HaPGRPC are obviously up-regulated by Gram-positive bacteria. HaCec-1 and 3, HaMor, HaAtt, HaLys, HaIip, HaPGRP and HaGNBP are greatly up-regulated after fungal infection. HaGNBP, HaCec-2, HaGall, HaGlo, HaMor, HaCob, HaGali obviously increased in Gram-negative bacterial infection. Only five genes, HaGNBP, HaCec-1, HaGali, HaGlo, and HaLys, are weakly up-regulated after viral infection. The AMP transcripts had higher expression levels than the

  20. Dynamic intervention: pathogen disarmament of mitochondrial-based immune surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Robin L; Blanke, Steven R

    2014-11-12

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Suzuki et al. (2014) describe a Vibrio cholerae Type-III-secreted effector that targets mitochondrial dynamics to dampen host innate immune signaling. This suggests that mammalian hosts possess surveillance mechanisms to monitor pathogen-mediated alterations in the integrity of normal cellular processes and organelles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of the tick immune system with transmitted pathogens

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    Ondrej eHajdusek

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are hematophagous arachnids transmitting a wide variety of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, and protozoans to their vertebrate hosts. The tick vector competence has to be intimately linked to the ability of transmitted pathogens to evade tick defense mechanisms encountered on their route through the tick body comprising midgut, hemolymph, salivary glands or ovaries. Tick innate immunity is, like in other invertebrates, based on an orchestrated action of humoral and cellular immune responses. The direct antimicrobial defense in ticks is accomplished by a variety of small molecules such as defensins, lysozymes or by tick-specific antimicrobial compounds such as microplusin/hebraein or 5.3-kDa family proteins. Phagocytosis of the invading microbes by tick hemocytes seems to be mediated by the primordial complement-like system composed of thioester-containing proteins, fibrinogen-related lectins and convertase-like factors. Moreover, an important role in survival of the ingested microbes seems to be played by host proteins and redox balance maintenance in the tick midgut. Here, we summarize recent knowledge about the major components of tick immune system and focus on their interaction with the relevant tick-transmitted pathogens, represented by spirochetes (Borrelia, rickettsiae (Anaplasma, and protozoans (Babesia. Availability of the tick genomic database and feasibility of functional genomics based on RNA interference greatly contribute to the understanding of molecular and cellular interplay at the tick-pathogen interface and may provide new targets for blocking the transmission of tick pathogens.

  2. Immune response in the lungs following oral immunization with bacterial lysates of respiratory pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruedl, C; Frühwirth, M; Wick, G; Wolf, H

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the local immune response of the BALB/c mouse respiratory tract after oral immunization with a bacterial lysate of seven common respiratory pathogens. After two immunization on five consecutive days, we examined the immunoglobulin (immunoglobulin G [IgG], IgM, and IgA) secretion rates of cells isolated from the lungs and compared them with those of spleen cells of orally immunized and nonimmunized animals by using a new test system based on time-resolved fluorescence. The...

  3. Immunity to intestinal pathogens: lessons learned from Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Salmonella are a common source of food or water-borne infection and cause a wide range of clinical disease in human and animal hosts. Salmonella are relatively easy to culture and manipulate in a laboratory setting, and the infection of laboratory animals induces robust innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, immunologists have frequently turned to Salmonella infection models to expand understanding of immunity to intestinal pathogens. In this review, I summarize current knowledge of innate and adaptive immunity to Salmonella and highlight features of this response that have emerged from recent studies. These include the heterogeneity of the antigen-specific T-cell response to intestinal infection, the prominence of microbial mechanisms to impede T and B-cell responses, and the contribution of non-cognate pathways for elicitation of T-cell effector functions. Together, these different issues challenge an overly simplistic view of host-pathogen interaction during mucosal infection but also allow deeper insight into the real-world dynamic of protective immunity to intestinal pathogens. PMID:24942689

  4. [Effect of vitamine A on mice immune response induced by specific periodontal pathogenic bacteria-immunization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Xiao-Jia; Liu, Hong-Li; DU, Li-Li; Toshihisa, Kawai

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vitamine-A deficiency on the induction of specific periodontal pathogenic bacteria A. actinomycetetemcomitans(Aa) immunization. BALB/c mice were fed with vitamine A-depleted diet or control regular diet throughout the whole experiment period. After 2 weeks, immunized formalin-killed Aa to build immunized models, 6 weeks later, sacrificed to determine specific antibody-IgG, IgM and sub-class IgG antibody titers in serum, and concentration of IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α and RANKL in T cell supernatant were measured by ELISA and T cell proliferation was measured by cintilography. SPSS 11.5 software package was used for statistical analysis. The levels of whole IgG and IgM antibody which were immunized by Aa significantly elevated, non-immune group was unable to produce any antibody. Compared with Aa immunized+RD group, the level of whole IgG in Aa immunized+VAD group was significantly higher (Pvitamin-A diet can increase the immunized mice's susceptibility to periodontal pathogenic bacteria and trigger or aggravate immune inflammatory response. Adequate vitamin A is an important factor in maintaining body health. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (Grant No.20092139) and Science and Technology Program of Shenyang Municipality (Grant No.F10-149-9-32).

  5. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak

    2014-01-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral...... cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction...... calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past....

  6. Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-05-14

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease-G-protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.

  7. Plasticity in early immune evasion strategies of a bacterial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Quentin; Smith, Alexis A; Yang, Xiuli; Koci, Juraj; Foor, Shelby D; Cramer, Sarah D; Zhuang, Xuran; Dwyer, Jennifer E; Lin, Yi-Pin; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Marques, Adriana; Leong, John M; Anguita, Juan; Pal, Utpal

    2018-04-17

    Borrelia burgdorferi is one of the few extracellular pathogens capable of establishing persistent infection in mammals. The mechanisms that sustain long-term survival of this bacterium are largely unknown. Here we report a unique innate immune evasion strategy of B. burgdorferi , orchestrated by a surface protein annotated as BBA57, through its modulation of multiple spirochete virulent determinants. BBA57 function is critical for early infection but largely redundant for later stages of spirochetal persistence, either in mammals or in ticks. The protein influences host IFN responses as well as suppresses multiple host microbicidal activities involving serum complement, neutrophils, and antimicrobial peptides. We also discovered a remarkable plasticity in BBA57-mediated spirochete immune evasion strategy because its loss, although resulting in near clearance of pathogens at the inoculum site, triggers nonheritable adaptive changes that exclude detectable nucleotide alterations in the genome but incorporate transcriptional reprograming events. Understanding the malleability in spirochetal immune evasion mechanisms that ensures their host persistence is critical for the development of novel therapeutic and preventive approaches to combat long-term infections like Lyme borreliosis.

  8. The Quantitative Basis of the Arabidopsis Innate Immune System to Endemic Pathogens Depends on Pathogen Genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A Corwin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B. cinerea, we identified a total of 2,982 genes associated with quantitative resistance using lesion area and 3,354 genes associated with camalexin production as measures of the interaction. Most genes were associated with resistance to a specific Botrytis isolate, which demonstrates the influence of pathogen genetic variation in analyzing host quantitative resistance. While known resistance genes, such as receptor-like kinases (RLKs and nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs, were found to be enriched among associated genes, they only account for a small fraction of the total genes associated with quantitative resistance. Using publically available co-expression data, we condensed the quantitative resistance associated genes into co-expressed gene networks. GO analysis of these networks implicated several biological processes commonly connected to disease resistance, including defense hormone signaling and ROS production, as well as novel processes, such as leaf development. Validation of single gene T-DNA knockouts in a Col-0 background demonstrate a high success rate (60% when accounting for differences in environmental and Botrytis genetic variation. This study shows that the genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system is extremely complex and is likely able to sense and respond to differential virulence among pathogen

  9. Tailoring the Immune Response via Customization of Pathogen Gene Expression.

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    Runco, Lisa M; Stauft, Charles B; Coleman, J Robert

    2014-01-01

    The majority of studies focused on the construction and reengineering of bacterial pathogens have mainly relied on the knocking out of virulence factors or deletion/mutation of amino acid residues to then observe the microbe's phenotype and the resulting effect on the host immune response. These knockout bacterial strains have also been proposed as vaccines to combat bacterial disease. Theoretically, knockout strains would be unable to cause disease since their virulence factors have been removed, yet they could induce a protective memory response. While knockout strains have been valuable tools to discern the role of virulence factors in host immunity and bacterial pathogenesis, they have been unable to yield clinically relevant vaccines. The advent of synthetic biology and enhanced user-directed gene customization has altered this binary process of knockout, followed by observation. Recent studies have shown that a researcher can now tailor and customize a given microbe's gene expression to produce a desired immune response. In this commentary, we highlight these studies as a new avenue for controlling the inflammatory response as well as vaccine development.

  10. Immune evasion strategies of ranaviruses and innate immune responses to these emerging pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayfer, Leon; Andino, Francisco De Jesús; Chen, Guangchun; Chinchar, Gregory V; Robert, Jacques

    2012-07-01

    Ranaviruses (RV, Iridoviridae) are large double-stranded DNA viruses that infect fish, amphibians and reptiles. For ecological and commercial reasons, considerable attention has been drawn to the increasing prevalence of ranaviral infections of wild populations and in aquacultural settings. Importantly, RVs appear to be capable of crossing species barriers of numerous poikilotherms, suggesting that these pathogens possess a broad host range and potent immune evasion mechanisms. Indeed, while some of the 95-100 predicted ranavirus genes encode putative evasion proteins (e.g., vIFα, vCARD), roughly two-thirds of them do not share significant sequence identity with known viral or eukaryotic genes. Accordingly, the investigation of ranaviral virulence and immune evasion strategies is promising for elucidating potential antiviral targets. In this regard, recombination-based technologies are being employed to knock out gene candidates in the best-characterized RV member, Frog Virus (FV3). Concurrently, by using animal infection models with extensively characterized immune systems, such as the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, it is becoming evident that components of innate immunity are at the forefront of virus-host interactions. For example, cells of the macrophage lineage represent important combatants of RV infections while themselves serving as targets for viral infection, maintenance and possibly dissemination. This review focuses on the recent advances in the understanding of the RV immune evasion strategies with emphasis on the roles of the innate immune system in ranaviral infections.

  11. Immune Recognition of the Epidemic Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Burkholderia dolosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Damien; Weatherholt, Molly; Clark, Bradley; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Renaud, Diane; Scott, David; Skurnik, David; Priebe, Gregory P; Pier, Gerald; Gerard, Craig; Yoder-Himes, Deborah R

    2017-06-01

    Burkholderia dolosa caused an outbreak in the cystic fibrosis (CF) clinic at Boston Children's Hospital from 1998 to 2005 and led to the infection of over 40 patients, many of whom died due to complications from infection by this organism. To assess whether B. dolosa significantly contributes to disease or is recognized by the host immune response, mice were infected with a sequenced outbreak B. dolosa strain, AU0158, and responses were compared to those to the well-studied CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa In parallel, mice were also infected with a polar flagellin mutant of B. dolosa to examine the role of flagella in B. dolosa lung colonization. The results showed a higher persistence in the host by B. dolosa strains, and yet, neutrophil recruitment and cytokine production were lower than those with P. aeruginosa The ability of host immune cells to recognize B. dolosa was then assessed, B. dolosa induced a robust cytokine response in cultured cells, and this effect was dependent on the flagella only when bacteria were dead. Together, these results suggest that B. dolosa can be recognized by host cells in vitro but may avoid or suppress the host immune response in vivo through unknown mechanisms. B. dolosa was then compared to other Burkholderia species and found to induce similar levels of cytokine production despite being internalized by macrophages more than Burkholderia cenocepacia strains. These data suggest that B. dolosa AU0158 may act differently with host cells and is recognized differently by immune systems than are other Burkholderia strains or species. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Immune response in the lungs following oral immunization with bacterial lysates of respiratory pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedl, C; Frühwirth, M; Wick, G; Wolf, H

    1994-03-01

    We have investigated the local immune response of the BALB/c mouse respiratory tract after oral immunization with a bacterial lysate of seven common respiratory pathogens. After two immunization on five consecutive days, we examined the immunoglobulin (immunoglobulin G [IgG], IgM, and IgA) secretion rates of cells isolated from the lungs and compared them with those of spleen cells of orally immunized and nonimmunized animals by using a new test system based on time-resolved fluorescence. The procedure followed the principle of the classical ELISPOT test with nitrocellulose-bottomed microtiter plates, but europium (Eu3+)-linked streptavidin rather than enzyme-conjugated streptavidin was used, with the advantage of quantifying secreted immunoglobulins instead of detecting single antibody-secreting cells. Lymphocytes isolated from the lungs of treated animals revealed significant increases in total and antigen-specific IgA synthesis compared with the rates of the controls, whereas IgG and IgM production rates showed no remarkable differences. In addition, the sera of treated mice revealed higher antigen-specific IgA titers but not increased IgM and IgG levels. We conclude that priming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue with bacterial antigens of pneumotropic microorganisms can elicit an enhanced IgA response in a distant mucosal effector site, such as the respiratory tract, according to the concept of a common mucosa-associated immune system.

  13. The race between infection and immunity - how do pathogens set the pace?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribiero, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Infection is often referred to as a race between pathogen and immune response. This metaphor suggests that slower growing pathogens should be more easily controlled. However, a growing body ofevidence shows that many chronic infections are caused by failure to control slow growing pathogens. The slow growth of pathogens appears to directly affect the kinetics of the immune response. Compared with the response to fast growing pathogens, the T cell response to slow pathogens is delayed in its initiation, lymphocyte expansion is slow and the response often fails to clear the pathogen, leading to chronic infection. Understanding the 'rules ofthe race' for slow growing pathogens has important implications for vaccine design and immune control of many chronic infections.

  14. Social immunity and the superorganism: Behavioral defenses protecting honey bee colonies from pathogens and parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) have a number of traits that effectively reduce the spread of pathogens and parasites throughout the colony. These mechanisms of social immunity are often analogous to the individual immune system. As such social immune defences function to protect the colony or superorga...

  15. Children with asthma by school age display aberrant immune responses to pathogenic airway bacteria as infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2014-01-01

    childhood asthma. We hypothesized that children with asthma have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. ObjectiveWe aimed to assess the bacterial immune response in asymptomatic infants and the association with later development of asthma by age 7 years. MethodsThe Copenhagen...... was assessed based on the pattern of cytokines produced and T-cell activation. ResultsThe immune response to pathogenic bacteria was different in infants with asthma by 7 years of age (P = .0007). In particular, prospective asthmatic subjects had aberrant production of IL-5 (P = .008), IL-13 (P = .057), IL-17...... (P = .001), and IL-10 (P = .028), whereas there were no differences in T-cell activation or peripheral T-cell composition. ConclusionsChildren with asthma by school age exhibited an aberrant immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We propose that an abnormal immune response to pathogenic...

  16. DMPD: Innate immune sensing of pathogens and danger signals by cell surface Toll-likereceptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17275324 Innate immune sensing of pathogens and danger signals by cell surface Toll... Show Innate immune sensing of pathogens and danger signals by cell surface Toll-likereceptors. PubmedID 172...75324 Title Innate immune sensing of pathogens and danger signals by cell surface

  17. Abscisic Acid as Pathogen Effector and Immune Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Laurens; Pollier, Jacob; Goossens, Alain; Beyaert, Rudi; Staal, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a sesquiterpene signaling molecule produced in all kingdoms of life. To date, the best known functions of ABA are derived from its role as a major phytohormone in plant abiotic stress resistance. Different organisms have developed different biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways related to ABA. Despite this, there are also intriguing common themes where ABA often suppresses host immune responses and is utilized by pathogens as an effector molecule. ABA also seems to play an important role in compatible mutualistic interactions such as mycorrhiza and rhizosphere bacteria with plants, and possibly also the animal gut microbiome. The frequent use of ABA in inter-species communication could be a possible reason for the wide distribution and re-invention of ABA as a signaling molecule in different organisms. In humans and animal models, it has been shown that ABA treatment or nutrient-derived ABA is beneficial in inflammatory diseases like colitis and type 2 diabetes, which confer potential to ABA as an interesting nutraceutical or pharmacognostic drug. The anti-inflammatory activity, cellular metabolic reprogramming, and other beneficial physiological and psychological effects of ABA treatment in humans and animal models has sparked an interest in this molecule and its signaling pathway as a novel pharmacological target. In contrast to plants, however, very little is known about the ABA biosynthesis and signaling in other organisms. Genes, tools and knowledge about ABA from plant sciences and studies of phytopathogenic fungi might benefit biomedical studies on the physiological role of endogenously generated ABA in humans. PMID:28469630

  18. Immunity to current H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses: From vaccines to adaptive immunity in wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the 2014-2015 outbreaks of H5N2 and H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the U.S., studies were performed to assess the immunity required for protection against future outbreaks should they occur. We assessed the ability of vaccines to induce protection of chickens and turkeys...

  19. Trachoma: protective and pathogenic ocular immune responses to Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Hu

    Full Text Available Trachoma, caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct, is the leading infectious blinding disease worldwide. Chronic conjunctival inflammation develops in childhood and leads to eyelid scarring and blindness in adulthood. The immune response to Ct provides only partial protection against re-infection, which can be frequent. Moreover, the immune response is central to the development of scarring pathology, leading to loss of vision. Here we review the current literature on both protective and pathological immune responses in trachoma. The resolution of Ct infection in animal models is IFNγ-dependent, involving Th1 cells, but whether this is the case in human ocular infection still needs to be confirmed. An increasing number of studies indicate that innate immune responses arising from the epithelium and other innate immune cells, along with changes in matrix metalloproteinase activity, are important in the development of tissue damage and scarring. Current trachoma control measures, which are centred on repeated mass antibiotic treatment of populations, are logistically challenging and have the potential to drive antimicrobial resistance. A trachoma vaccine would offer significant advantages. However, limited understanding of the mechanisms of both protective immunity and immunopathology to Ct remain barriers to vaccine development.

  20. The quantitative basis of the Arabidopsis innate immune system to endemic pathogens depends on pathogen genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corwin, Jason A; Copeland, Daniel; Feusier, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used the Arabido......The most established model of the eukaryotic innate immune system is derived from examples of large effect monogenic quantitative resistance to pathogens. However, many host-pathogen interactions involve many genes of small to medium effect and exhibit quantitative resistance. We used....... cinerea, we identified a total of 2,982 genes associated with quantitative resistance using lesion area and 3,354 genes associated with camalexin production as measures of the interaction. Most genes were associated with resistance to a specific Botrytis isolate, which demonstrates the influence...... genes associated with quantitative resistance. Using publically available co-expression data, we condensed the quantitative resistance associated genes into co-expressed gene networks. GO analysis of these networks implicated several biological processes commonly connected to disease resistance...

  1. Children with asthma by school age display aberrant immune responses to pathogenic airway bacteria as infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Brix, Susanne; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Birch, Sune; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Bisgaard, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent chronic lung disease that commonly originates in early childhood. Colonization of neonatal airways with the pathogenic bacterial strains Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is associated with increased risk of later childhood asthma. We hypothesized that children with asthma have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We aimed to assess the bacterial immune response in asymptomatic infants and the association with later development of asthma by age 7 years. The Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood birth cohort was followed prospectively, and asthma was diagnosed at age 7 years. The immune response to H influenzae, M catarrhalis, and S pneumoniae was analyzed in 292 infants using PBMCs isolated and stored since the age of 6 months. The immune response was assessed based on the pattern of cytokines produced and T-cell activation. The immune response to pathogenic bacteria was different in infants with asthma by 7 years of age (P = .0007). In particular, prospective asthmatic subjects had aberrant production of IL-5 (P = .008), IL-13 (P = .057), IL-17 (P = .001), and IL-10 (P = .028), whereas there were no differences in T-cell activation or peripheral T-cell composition. Children with asthma by school age exhibited an aberrant immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We propose that an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria colonizing the airways in early life might lead to chronic airway inflammation and childhood asthma. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. C-type lectins: their network and roles in pathogen recognition and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Sabine; Raulf, Marie-Kristin; Lepenies, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) represent the most complex family of animal/human lectins that comprises 17 different groups. During evolution, CTLs have developed by diversification to cover a broad range of glycan ligands. However, ligand binding by CTLs is not necessarily restricted to glycans as some CTLs also bind to proteins, lipids, inorganic molecules, or ice crystals. CTLs share a common fold that harbors a Ca 2+ for contact to the sugar and about 18 invariant residues in a phylogenetically conserved pattern. In vertebrates, CTLs have numerous functions, including serum glycoprotein homeostasis, pathogen sensing, and the initiation of immune responses. Myeloid CTLs in innate immunity are mainly expressed by antigen-presenting cells and play a prominent role in the recognition of a variety of pathogens such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, myeloid CTLs such as the macrophage inducible CTL (Mincle) or Clec-9a may also bind to self-antigens and thus contribute to immune homeostasis. While some CTLs induce pro-inflammatory responses and thereby lead to activation of adaptive immune responses, other CTLs act as inhibitory receptors and dampen cellular functions. Since CTLs are key players in pathogen recognition and innate immunity, targeting CTLs may be a promising strategy for cell-specific delivery of drugs or vaccine antigens and to modulate immune responses.

  3. Interaction of the tick immune system with transmitted pathogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajdušek, Ondřej; Šíma, Radek; Ayllón, N.; Jalovecká, M.; Pernes, J.; de la Fuente, J.; Kopáček, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, Jul 2013 (2013), a26 ISSN 2235-2988 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/2136; GA ČR GA13-11043S; GA ČR GP13-27630P; GA ČR GP13-12816P; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Anaplasma * Babesia * Borrelia * antimicrobial peptides * innate immunity * phagocytosis * tick * tick-borne diseases Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.620, year: 2013

  4. Immunity, suicide or both? Ecological determinants for the combined evolution of anti-pathogen defense systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Jaime; Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-03-13

    Parasite-host arms race is one of the key factors in the evolution of life. Most cellular life forms, in particular prokaryotes, possess diverse forms of defense against pathogens including innate immunity, adaptive immunity and programmed cell death (altruistic suicide). Coevolution of these different but interacting defense strategies yields complex evolutionary regimes. We develop and extensively analyze a computational model of coevolution of different defense strategies to show that suicide as a defense mechanism can evolve only in structured populations and when the attainable degree of immunity against pathogens is limited. The general principle of defense evolution seems to be that hosts do not evolve two costly defense mechanisms when one is sufficient. Thus, the evolutionary interplay of innate immunity, adaptive immunity and suicide, leads to an equilibrium state where the combination of all three defense strategies is limited to a distinct, small region of the parameter space. The three strategies can stably coexist only if none of them are highly effective. Coupled adaptive immunity-suicide systems, the existence of which is implied by the colocalization of genes for the two types of defense in prokaryotic genomes, can evolve either when immunity-associated suicide is more efficacious than other suicide systems or when adaptive immunity functionally depends on the associated suicide system. Computational modeling reveals a broad range of outcomes of coevolution of anti-pathogen defense strategies depending on the relative efficacy of different mechanisms and population structure. Some of the predictions of the model appear compatible with recent experimental evolution results and call for additional experiments.

  5. Siderophore-based immunization strategy to inhibit growth of enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassone-Corsi, Martina; Chairatana, Phoom; Zheng, Tengfei; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Edwards, Robert A; George, Michael D; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2016-11-22

    Infections with Gram-negative pathogens pose a serious threat to public health. This scenario is exacerbated by increases in antibiotic resistance and the limited availability of vaccines and therapeutic tools to combat these infections. Here, we report an immunization approach that targets siderophores, which are small molecules exported by enteric Gram-negative pathogens to acquire iron, an essential nutrient, in the host. Because siderophores are nonimmunogenic, we designed and synthesized conjugates of a native siderophore and the immunogenic carrier protein cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). Mice immunized with the CTB-siderophore conjugate developed anti-siderophore antibodies in the gut mucosa, and when mice were infected with the enteric pathogen Salmonella, they exhibited reduced intestinal colonization and reduced systemic dissemination of the pathogen. Moreover, analysis of the gut microbiota revealed that reduction of Salmonella colonization in the inflamed gut was accompanied by expansion of Lactobacillus spp., which are beneficial commensal organisms that thrive in similar locales as Enterobacteriaceae. Collectively, our results demonstrate that anti-siderophore antibodies inhibit Salmonella colonization. Because siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is a virulence trait shared by many bacterial and fungal pathogens, blocking microbial iron acquisition by siderophore-based immunization or other siderophore-targeted approaches may represent a novel strategy to prevent and ameliorate a broad range of infections.

  6. PKA/KIN-1 mediates innate immune responses to bacterial pathogens in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2017-11-01

    The genetically tractable organism Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model animal for the study of host innate immunity. Although the intestine and the epidermis of C. elegans that is in contact with pathogens are likely to function as sites for the immune function, recent studies indicate that the nervous system could control innate immunity in C. elegans. In this report, we demonstrated that protein kinase A (PKA)/KIN-1 in the neurons contributes to resistance against Salmonella enterica infection in C. elegans. Microarray analysis revealed that PKA/KIN-1 regulates the expression of a set of antimicrobial effectors in the non-neuron tissues, which are required for innate immune responses to S. enterica. Furthermore, PKA/KIN-1 regulated the expression of lysosomal genes during S. enterica infection. Our results suggest that the lysosomal signaling molecules are involved in autophagy by controlling autophagic flux, rather than formation of autophagosomes. As autophagy is crucial for host defense against S. enterica infection in a metazoan, the lysosomal pathway also acts as a downstream effector of the PKA/KIN-1 signaling for innate immunity. Our data indicate that the PKA pathway contributes to innate immunity in C. elegans by signaling from the nervous system to periphery tissues to protect the host against pathogens.

  7. Isotope-based immunological techniques. Their use in assessment of immune competence and the study of immune responses to pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffus, W.P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of isotope-based techniques on both assessment of immune competence and immune response to pathogens is discussed. Immunodeficiencies acquired as a result of factors like malnutrition and concomitant disease can severely affect not only attempts to intensify and improve production but also successful immune response against important vaccines such as rinderpest and foot-and-mouth disease. Isotope-based techniques, with their accuracy, speed and small sample volume, are ideally suited for assessing immunocompetence. One of the main drawbacks remains antigen purity, an area where research should now be concentrated. Lymphocyte transformation is widely used to assess cell-mediated immuno-competence but techniques to assess biological functions such as phagocytosis and cell-mediated cytotoxicity could more usefully reflect immune status. These latter techniques utilize isotopes such as 3 H, 14 C, 32 P and 125 I. Investigation of specific cell-mediated immune response often requires a labelled target. Suitable isotopes such as 51 Cr, 99 Tcsup(m), 75 Se and 3 H are compared for their capacity to label both mammalian and parasite targets. Suggestions are made on a number of areas of research that might usefully be encouraged and supported in order to improve applied veterinary immunology in tropical countries. (author)

  8. Early immune response patterns to pathogenic bacteria are associated to increased risk of lower respiratory infections in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, N. H.; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Rasmussen, Mette Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal colonisation of the airways with respiratory pathogens is associated with increased risk of lower respiratory infections (LRI) in early childhood (1). Therefore, we hypothesized that children developing LRI have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We aimed...... to characterise the systemic immune response to pathogenic bacteria at the age of 6 months and study the association with incidence of LRI during the first 3 years of life....

  9. Immune Recognition of Latency-insitigating Pathogens by Human Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov

    for society. Consequently there is a pressing need to search for new treatment strategies. Nowadays it is known that HIV-1 and Mtb have acquired the ability to escape the removal from the body by exploiting the immune system for their own benefits. Dendritic cells (DCs) determine the way the immune response......Latent infections with the human pathogenic microorganisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are creating some of the most devastating pandemics to date, with great impact on the infected people’s lives, their expected lifetime, as well as general costs...... unfolds by signaling other immune cells how to respond. An early deregulation of the DCs may therefore propagate into detrimental effects in later stages of the immune response, and may permit HIV-1 and Mtb to become latent. Hence, understanding the way HIV-1 and Mtb interacts with DCs could lead to novel...

  10. Enterobacterial envelope proteins and their participation in pathogenicity and antibacterial immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Witkowska

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The problems concerning the pathogenicity and virulence of some bacteria of the [i]Enterobacteriaceae[/i] family are described. The structure and functional variety of the outer membrane proteins on the cell surface are presented as potent immunogens based on the structure of the cell envelope. These proteins participate in stabilization of the membrane structure and adhesion to other cells, are receptors for bacteriophages, and play a key role in signal transduction, intracellular transport, and energy transformation processes ensuring proper cell functioning. Moreover, these proteins have a protective function against immune reactions of the infected organism. Referring to current literature data, the authors’ own results are reviewed on the methodology of isolating outer membrane proteins and their participation in pathogenicity with regard to molecular mimicry. The isolated and characterized 45-kDa enolase-like protein expressing similarity to human enolase should not be a component of vaccine, although it is considered a diagnostic marker of tissue damage. Presented are also results of studies on the role of the outer membrane protein OMP38, recognized by the human immune system as an important factor in antibacterial immunity. OMP38 is considered an antigen and carrier in conjugate vaccines, but also a specific diagnostic marker of immune deficiencies useful in monitoring the level of immunity against bacteria of the [i]Enterobacteriaceae[/i] family.

  11. The Immune Response against Acinetobacter baumannii, an Emerging Pathogen in Nosocomial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Patiño, María Guadalupe; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Licona-Limón, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the etiologic agent of a wide range of nosocomial infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and skin infections. Over the last 45 years, an alarming increase in the antibiotic resistance of this opportunistic microorganism has been reported, a situation that hinders effective treatments. In order to develop effective therapies against A. baumannii it is crucial to understand the basis of host–bacterium interactions, especially those concerning the immune response of the host. Different innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells have been identified as important effectors in the defense against A. baumannii; among them, neutrophils represent a key immune cell indispensable for the control of the infection. Several immune strategies to combat A. baumannii have been identified such as recognition of the bacteria by immune cells through pattern recognition receptors, specifically toll-like receptors, which trigger bactericidal mechanisms including oxidative burst and cytokine and chemokine production to amplify the immune response against the pathogen. However, a complete picture of the protective immune strategies activated by this bacteria and its potential therapeutic use remains to be determined and explored. PMID:28446911

  12. Interchromosomal Transfer of Immune Regulation During Infection of Barley with the Powdery Mildew Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Surana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew pathogens colonize over 9500 plant species, causing critical yield loss. The Ascomycete fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh, causes powdery mildew disease in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.. Successful infection begins with penetration of host epidermal cells, culminating in haustorial feeding structures, facilitating delivery of fungal effectors to the plant and exchange of nutrients from host to pathogen. We used expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL analysis to dissect the temporal control of immunity-associated gene expression in a doubled haploid barley population challenged with Bgh. Two highly significant regions possessing trans eQTL were identified near the telomeric ends of chromosomes (Chr 2HL and 1HS. Within these regions reside diverse resistance loci derived from barley landrace H. laevigatum (MlLa and H. vulgare cv. Algerian (Mla1, which associate with the altered expression of 961 and 3296 genes during fungal penetration of the host and haustorial development, respectively. Regulatory control of transcript levels for 299 of the 961 genes is reprioritized from MlLa on 2HL to Mla1 on 1HS as infection progresses, with 292 of the 299 alternating the allele responsible for higher expression, including Adaptin Protein-2 subunit μ AP2M and Vesicle Associated Membrane Protein VAMP72 subfamily members VAMP721/722. AP2M mediates effector-triggered immunity (ETI via endocytosis of plasma membrane receptor components. VAMP721/722 and SNAP33 form a Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment Protein REceptor (SNARE complex with SYP121 (PEN1, which is engaged in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP-triggered immunity via exocytosis. We postulate that genes regulated by alternate chromosomal positions are repurposed as part of a conserved immune complex to respond to different pathogen attack scenarios.

  13. Interchromosomal Transfer of Immune Regulation During Infection of Barley with the Powdery Mildew Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Priyanka; Xu, Ruo; Fuerst, Gregory; Chapman, Antony V. E.; Nettleton, Dan; Wise, Roger P.

    2017-01-01

    Powdery mildew pathogens colonize over 9500 plant species, causing critical yield loss. The Ascomycete fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh), causes powdery mildew disease in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Successful infection begins with penetration of host epidermal cells, culminating in haustorial feeding structures, facilitating delivery of fungal effectors to the plant and exchange of nutrients from host to pathogen. We used expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis to dissect the temporal control of immunity-associated gene expression in a doubled haploid barley population challenged with Bgh. Two highly significant regions possessing trans eQTL were identified near the telomeric ends of chromosomes (Chr) 2HL and 1HS. Within these regions reside diverse resistance loci derived from barley landrace H. laevigatum (MlLa) and H. vulgare cv. Algerian (Mla1), which associate with the altered expression of 961 and 3296 genes during fungal penetration of the host and haustorial development, respectively. Regulatory control of transcript levels for 299 of the 961 genes is reprioritized from MlLa on 2HL to Mla1 on 1HS as infection progresses, with 292 of the 299 alternating the allele responsible for higher expression, including Adaptin Protein-2 subunit μ AP2M and Vesicle Associated Membrane Protein VAMP72 subfamily members VAMP721/722. AP2M mediates effector-triggered immunity (ETI) via endocytosis of plasma membrane receptor components. VAMP721/722 and SNAP33 form a Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment Protein REceptor (SNARE) complex with SYP121 (PEN1), which is engaged in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity via exocytosis. We postulate that genes regulated by alternate chromosomal positions are repurposed as part of a conserved immune complex to respond to different pathogen attack scenarios. PMID:28790145

  14. TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2 mediate immune recognition of putative newly identified periodontal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesan, Julie; Jiao, Yizu; Schaff, Riley A; Hao, Jie; Morelli, Thiago; Kinney, Janet S; Gerow, Elizabeth; Sheridan, Rachel; Rodrigues, Vinicius; Paster, Bruce J; Inohara, Naohiro; Giannobile, William V

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that results from the interaction between the oral microbiota and the host immunity. Although the innate immune response is important for disease initiation and progression, the innate immune receptors that recognize both classical and putative periodontal pathogens that elicit an immune response have not been elucidated. By using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM), we identified multiple predominant oral bacterial species in human plaque biofilm that strongly associate with severe periodontitis. Ten of the identified species were evaluated in greater depth, six being classical pathogens and four putative novel pathogens. Using human peripheral blood monocytes (HPBM) and murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type (WT) and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific and MyD88 knockouts (KOs), we demonstrated that heat-killed Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, Selenomonas infelix, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia mediate high immunostimulatory activity. Campylobacter concisus, C. rectus, and S. infelix exhibited robust TLR4 stimulatory activity. Studies using mesothelial cells from WT and NOD1-specific KOs and NOD2-expressing human embryonic kidney cells demonstrated that Eubacterium saphenum, Eubacterium nodatum and Filifactor alocis exhibit robust NOD1 stimulatory activity, and that Porphyromonas endodontalis and Parvimonas micra have the highest NOD2 stimulatory activity. These studies allowed us to provide important evidence on newly identified putative pathogens in periodontal disease pathogenesis showing that these bacteria exhibit different immunostimulatory activity via TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01154855). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plum pox virus capsid protein suppresses plant pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Valerie; Candresse, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    The perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by immune receptors launches defence mechanisms referred to as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Successful pathogens must suppress PTI pathways via the action of effectors to efficiently colonize their hosts. So far, plant PTI has been reported to be active against most classes of pathogens, except viruses, although this defence layer has been hypothesized recently as an active part of antiviral immunity which needs to be suppressed by viruses for infection success. Here, we report that Arabidopsis PTI genes are regulated upon infection by viruses and contribute to plant resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV). Our experiments further show that PPV suppresses two early PTI responses, the oxidative burst and marker gene expression, during Arabidopsis infection. In planta expression of PPV capsid protein (CP) was found to strongly impair these responses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis, revealing its PTI suppressor activity. In summary, we provide the first clear evidence that plant viruses acquired the ability to suppress PTI mechanisms via the action of effectors, highlighting a novel strategy employed by viruses to escape plant defences. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  16. Predictive validity and immune cell involvement in the pathogenesis of piroxicam-accelerated colitis in interleukin-10 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgersen, Kristine; Kvist, Peter Helding; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Holm, Thomas Lindebo

    2014-07-01

    Piroxicam administration is a method for induction of enterocolitis in interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10 k.o.) mice. The piroxicam-accelerated colitis (PAC) IL-10 k.o. model combines a dysregulated immune response against the gut microbiota with a decreased mucosal integrity. The predictive validity and pathogenic mechanisms of the model have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, IL-10 k.o. mice received piroxicam in the chow, and model qualification was performed by examining the efficacy of prophylactic anti-IL-12/23p40 monoclonal antibody (mAb), anti-TNFα mAb, cyclosporine A (CsA) and oral prednisolone treatment. To evaluate cell involvement in the disease pathogenesis, specific cell subsets were depleted by treatment with anti-CD4 mAb, anti-CD8 mAb or clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. T cell receptor co-stimulation was blocked by CTLA4-Ig. Cytokine profiling ELISAs and calprotectin immunohistochemistry were performed on colon tissue. Treatments with anti-IL-12/23p40 mAb and CsA prevented disease in PAC IL-10 k.o. mice and reduced IFNγ, IL-17A, MPO and calprotectin levels in colon. Anti-TNFα mAb treatment caused amelioration of selected clinical parameters. No effect of prednisolone was detected. Depletion of CD8(+) cells tended to increase mortality, whereas treatment with anti-CD4 mAb or CTLA4-Ig had no significant effect on disease development. Clodronate liposome treatment induced a loss of body weight; nevertheless macrophage depletion was associated with a significant reduction in colonic pathology. In conclusion, reference drugs with known efficacy in severe inflammatory bowel disease were efficacious in the PAC IL-10 k.o. model. Our data indicate that in this model macrophages are a main driver of colitis, whereas CD4(+) cells are not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathogen-induced maternal effects result in enhanced immune responsiveness across generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B; Hays, Nicole; Biro, Colette; Kemos, James; Zaman, Muizz; Murray, Joseph; Gezahegn, Bruck; Smith, Wendy

    2017-05-01

    Parental investment theory postulates that adults can accurately perceive cues from their surroundings, anticipate the needs of future offspring based on those cues, and selectively allocate nongenetic resources to their progeny. Such context-dependent parental contributions can result in phenotypically variable offspring. Consistent with these predictions, we show that bacterially exposed Manduca sexta mothers oviposited significantly more variable embryos (as measured by mass, volume, hatching time, and hatching success) relative to naïve and control mothers. By using an in vivo "clearance of infection" assay, we also show that challenged larvae born to heat-killed- or live- Serratia -injected mothers, supported lower microbial loads and cleared the infection faster than progeny of control mothers. Our data support the notion that mothers can anticipate the future pathogenic risks and immunological needs of their unborn offspring, providing progeny with enhanced immune protection likely through transgenerational immune priming. Although the inclusion of live Serratia into oocytes does not appear to be the mechanism by which mothers confer protection to their young, other mechanisms, including epigenetic modifications in the progeny due to maternal pathogenic stress, may be at play. The adaptive nature of maternal effects in the face of pathogenic stress provides insights into parental investment, resource allocation, and life-history theories and highlights the significant role that pathogen-induced maternal effects play as generators and modulators of evolutionary change.

  18. Suppression of immune-mediated liver injury after vaccination with attenuated pathogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yunhua; Wang, Ying; Xu, Lingyun

    2007-05-15

    Cell vaccination via immunization with attenuated pathogenic cells is an effective preventive method that has been successfully applied in several animal models of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis (CIH) is a commonly used experimental model to study immune-mediated liver injury. Multiple cell types including T lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of CIH. In this study, we used attenuated spleen lymphocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes as vaccines to investigate whether they could induce protective immune responses to prevent mice from developing CIH. We found that mice receiving such vaccination before CIH induction developed much milder diseases, exhibited a lower level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) released into their plasma and had less inflammatory lesions in their livers. Such CIH-suppression is dose- and frequency-dependent. The suppressive effect was associated with inhibition of several major inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

  19. Complement and innate immune evasion strategies of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shanshan; Skerka, Christine; Kurzai, Oliver; Zipfel, Peter F

    2013-12-15

    Candida albicans is a medically important fungus that can cause a wide range of diseases ranging from superficial infections to disseminated disease, which manifests primarily in immuno-compromised individuals. Despite the currently applied anti-fungal therapies, both mortality and morbidity caused by this human pathogenic fungus are still unacceptably high. Therefore new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to prevent fungal infection. In order to define new targets for combating fungal disease, there is a need to understand the immune evasion strategies of C. albicans in detail. In this review, we summarize different sophisticated immune evasion strategies that are utilized by C. albicans. The description of the molecular mechanisms used for immune evasion does on one hand help to understand the infection process, and on the other hand provides valuable information to define new strategies and diagnostic approaches to fight and interfere with Candida infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Challenges and Strategies for Proteome Analysis of the Interaction of Human Pathogenic Fungi with Host Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Thomas; Luo, Ting; Schmidt, Hella; Shopova, Iordana; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2015-12-14

    Opportunistic human pathogenic fungi including the saprotrophic mold Aspergillus fumigatus and the human commensal Candida albicans can cause severe fungal infections in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. The first line of defense against opportunistic fungal pathogens is the innate immune system. Phagocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils and dendritic cells are an important pillar of the innate immune response and have evolved versatile defense strategies against microbial pathogens. On the other hand, human-pathogenic fungi have sophisticated virulence strategies to counteract the innate immune defense. In this context, proteomic approaches can provide deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of host immune cells with fungal pathogens. This is crucial for the identification of both diagnostic biomarkers for fungal infections and therapeutic targets. Studying host-fungal interactions at the protein level is a challenging endeavor, yet there are few studies that have been undertaken. This review draws attention to proteomic techniques and their application to fungal pathogens and to challenges, difficulties, and limitations that may arise in the course of simultaneous dual proteome analysis of host immune cells interacting with diverse morphotypes of fungal pathogens. On this basis, we discuss strategies to overcome these multifaceted experimental and analytical challenges including the viability of immune cells during co-cultivation, the increased and heterogeneous protein complexity of the host proteome dynamically interacting with the fungal proteome, and the demands on normalization strategies in terms of relative quantitative proteome analysis.

  1. ANALYSIS OF IMMUNE RESPONSES ON TRANSGENIC TIGER SHRIMP (Penaeus monodon AGAINST PATHOGENIC BACTERIUM Vibrio harveyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Parenrengi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vibriosis is one of main diseases of the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon infected by pathogenic bioluminous bacterium Vibrio harveyi that can cause mass mortalities in shrimp culture. The bacteria can also trigger the disease white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. An effort to produce shrimp disease-resistant strains has been done through transgenesis technology with antiviral gene transfection. By this technology, it is expected an increase in the immune response of shrimp in a variety of diseasecausing pathogens. This study aimed to determine the immune responses (total haemocytes, haemocyte differentiation, and phenoloxydase activity of transgenic tiger shrimp against pathogenic bacterium V. harveyi. Research using completely randomized design, which consists of two treatments and three replications. Test animals being used were transgenic and non-transgenic shrimp with size, weight 3.93±1.25 g and a total length of 7.59±0.87 cm. Treatments being tested were the injection of bacterium V. harveyi (density of 5x106 cfu/mL of 0.1 mL/individual on transgenic (A and non-transgenic shrimp (B. Immune response parameters such as total haemocytes, haemocyte differentiation, and phenoloxydase activity were observed on day 1, 3, and 6 days after challenging. Data were analyzed using t-test by SPSS software. The results showed that the total haemocyte of transgenic shrimp was not significantly different (P>0.05 from non-transgenic shrimp, but haemocyte differentiation and phenoloxydase activity were significantly different (P<0.05 especially on sixth days after being exposed to the bioluminescent bacteria. The study results implied that transgenic shrimp has a better immune response compared than non-transgenic shrimp.

  2. Pathogen entrapment by transglutaminase--a conserved early innate immune mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Clotting systems are required in almost all animals to prevent loss of body fluids after injury. Here, we show that despite the risks associated with its systemic activation, clotting is a hitherto little appreciated branch of the immune system. We compared clotting of human blood and insect hemolymph to study the best-conserved component of clotting systems, namely the Drosophila enzyme transglutaminase and its vertebrate homologue Factor XIIIa. Using labelled artificial substrates we observe that transglutaminase activity from both Drosophila hemolymph and human blood accumulates on microbial surfaces, leading to their sequestration into the clot. Using both a human and a natural insect pathogen we provide functional proof for an immune function for transglutaminase (TG. Drosophila larvae with reduced TG levels show increased mortality after septic injury. The same larvae are also more susceptible to a natural infection involving entomopathogenic nematodes and their symbiotic bacteria while neither phagocytosis, phenoloxidase or-as previously shown-the Toll or imd pathway contribute to immunity. These results firmly establish the hemolymph/blood clot as an important effector of early innate immunity, which helps to prevent septic infections. These findings will help to guide further strategies to reduce the damaging effects of clotting and enhance its beneficial contribution to immune reactions.

  3. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture.

  4. The innate immune and systemic response in honey bees to a bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Leonard J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a major paradox in our understanding of honey bee immunity: the high population density in a bee colony implies a high rate of disease transmission among individuals, yet bees are predicted to express only two-thirds as many immunity genes as solitary insects, e.g., mosquito or fruit fly. This suggests that the immune response in bees is subdued in favor of social immunity, yet some specific immune factors are up-regulated in response to infection. To explore the response to infection more broadly, we employ mass spectrometry-based proteomics in a quantitative analysis of honey bee larvae infected with the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Newly-eclosed bee larvae, in the second stage of their life cycle, are susceptible to this infection, but become progressively more resistant with age. We used this host-pathogen system to probe not only the role of the immune system in responding to a highly evolved infection, but also what other mechanisms might be employed in response to infection. Results Using quantitative proteomics, we compared the hemolymph (insect blood of five-day old healthy and infected honey bee larvae and found a strong up-regulation of some metabolic enzymes and chaperones, while royal jelly (food and energy storage proteins were down-regulated. We also observed increased levels of the immune factors prophenoloxidase (proPO, lysozyme and the antimicrobial peptide hymenoptaecin. Furthermore, mass spectrometry evidence suggests that healthy larvae have significant levels of catalytically inactive proPO in the hemolymph that is proteolytically activated upon infection. Phenoloxidase (PO enzyme activity was undetectable in one or two-day-old larvae and increased dramatically thereafter, paralleling very closely the age-related ability of larvae to resist infection. Conclusion We propose a model for the host response to infection where energy stores and metabolic enzymes are regulated in concert with direct

  5. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M.; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy. PMID:27886076

  6. An Overview of Pathogen Recognition Receptors for Innate Immunity in Dental Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hyun Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs are a class of germ line-encoded receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. The activation of PRRs is crucial for the initiation of innate immunity, which plays a key role in first-line defense until more specific adaptive immunity is developed. PRRs differ in the signaling cascades and host responses activated by their engagement and in their tissue distribution. Currently identified PRR families are the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, the C-type lectin receptors (CLRs, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, the retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors (RLRs, and the AIM2-like receptor (ALR. The environment of the dental pulp is substantially different from that of other tissues of the body. Dental pulp resides in a low compliance root canal system that limits the expansion of pulpal tissues during inflammatory processes. An understanding of the PRRs in dental pulp is important for immunomodulation and hence for developing therapeutic targets in the field of endodontics. Here we comprehensively review recent finding on the PRRs and the mechanisms by which innate immunity is activated. We focus on the PRRs expressed on dental pulp and periapical tissues and their role in dental pulp inflammation.

  7. Tomato immune receptor Ve1 recognizes effector of multiple fungal pathogens uncovered by genome and RNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de R.; Esse, van H.P.; Maruthachalam, K.; Bolton, M.D.; Santhanam, P.; Keykha Saber, M.; Zhang, Z.; Usami, T.; Lievens, B.; Subbarao, K.V.; Thomma, B.

    2012-01-01

    Fungal plant pathogens secrete effector molecules to establish disease on their hosts, and plants in turn use immune receptors to try to intercept these effectors. The tomato immune receptor Ve1 governs resistance to race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and

  8. Network Analysis Reveals a Common Host–Pathogen Interaction Pattern in Arabidopsis Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many plant pathogens secrete virulence effectors into host cells to target important proteins in host cellular network. However, the dynamic interactions between effectors and host cellular network have not been fully understood. Here, an integrative network analysis was conducted by combining Arabidopsis thaliana protein–protein interaction network, known targets of Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effectors, and gene expression profiles in the immune response. In particular, we focused on the characteristic network topology of the effector targets and differentially expressed genes (DEGs. We found that effectors tended to manipulate key network positions with higher betweenness centrality. The effector targets, especially those that are common targets of an individual effector, tended to be clustered together in the network. Moreover, the distances between the effector targets and DEGs increased over time during infection. In line with this observation, pathogen-susceptible mutants tended to have more DEGs surrounding the effector targets compared with resistant mutants. Our results suggest a common plant–pathogen interaction pattern at the cellular network level, where pathogens employ potent local impact mode to interfere with key positions in the host network, and plant organizes an in-depth defense by sequentially activating genes distal to the effector targets.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinases operate redundantly in Arabidopsis immunity against necrotrophic and biotrophic fungal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puyan Zhao

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are evolutionarily conserved and multifunctional effector molecules playing pivotal roles in development and homeostasis. In this study we explored the involvement of the five Arabidopsis thaliana At-MMPs in plant defence against microbial pathogens. Expression of At2-MMP was most responsive to inoculation with fungi and a bacterial pathogen followed by At3-MMP and At5-MMP, while At1-MMP and At4-MMP were non-responsive to these biotic stresses. Loss-of-function mutants for all tested At-MMPs displayed increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and double mutant at2,3-mmp and triple mutant at2,3,5-mmp plants developed even stronger symptoms. Consistent with this, transgenic Arabidopsis plants that expressed At2-MMP constitutively under the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter showed enhanced resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen. Similarly, resistance to the biotrophic Arabidopsis powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces orontii was also compromised particularly in the at2,3-mmp / at2,3,5-mmp multiplex mutants, and increased in At2-MMP overexpressor plants. The degree of disease resistance of at-mmp mutants and At2-MMP overexpressor plants also correlated positively with the degree of MAMP-triggered callose deposition in response to the bacterial flagellin peptide flg22, suggesting that matrix metalloproteinases contribute to pattern-triggered immunity (PTI in interactions of Arabidopsis with necrotrophic and biotrophic pathogens.

  10. Immunity induced shortly after DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against rhabdoviruses protects against heterologous virus but not against bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2002-01-01

    whereas no increased survival was found upon challenge with bacterial pathogens. Within two months after vaccination, the cross-protection disappeared while the specific immunity to homologous virus remained high. The early immunity induced by the DNA vaccines thus appeared to involve short-lived non......It was recently reported that DNA vaccination of rainbow trout fingerlings against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) induced protection within 8 days after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA. In order to analyse the specificity of this early immunity, fish were vaccinated with plasmid...... DNA encoding the VHSV or the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein genes and later challenged with homologous or heterologous pathogens. Challenge experiments revealed that immunity established shortly after vaccination was cross-protective between the two viral pathogens...

  11. Effects of co-occurring Wolbachia and Spiroplasma endosymbionts on the Drosophila immune response against insect pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokal, Upasana; Yadav, Shruti; Atri, Jaishri; Accetta, Julia; Kenney, Eric; Banks, Katherine; Katakam, Akash; Jaenike, John; Eleftherianos, Ioannis

    2016-02-09

    Symbiotic interactions between microbes and animals are common in nature. Symbiotic organisms are particularly common in insects and, in some cases, they may protect their hosts from pathogenic infections. Wolbachia and Spiroplasma endosymbionts naturally inhabit various insects including Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies. Therefore, this symbiotic association is considered an excellent model to investigate whether endosymbiotic bacteria participate in host immune processes against certain pathogens. Here we have investigated whether the presence of Wolbachia alone or together with Spiroplasma endosymbionts in D. melanogaster adult flies affects the immune response against the virulent insect pathogen Photorhabdus luminescens and against non-pathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria. We found that D. melanogaster flies carrying no endosymbionts, those carrying both Wolbachia and Spiroplasma, and those containing Wolbachia only had similar survival rates after infection with P. luminescens or Escherichia coli bacteria. However, flies carrying both endosymbionts or Wolbachia only contained higher numbers of E. coli cells at early time-points post infection than flies without endosymbiotic bacteria. Interestingly, flies containing Wolbachia only had lower titers of this endosymbiont upon infection with the pathogen P. luminescens than uninfected flies of the same strain. We further found that the presence of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma in D. melanogaster up-regulated certain immune-related genes upon infection with P. luminescens or E. coli bacteria, but it failed to alter the phagocytic ability of the flies toward E. coli inactive bioparticles. Our results suggest that the presence of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma in D. melanogaster can modulate immune signaling against infection by certain insect pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. Results from such studies are important for understanding the molecular basis of the interactions between endosymbiotic bacteria of insects

  12. Let's Tie the Knot: Marriage of Complement and Adaptive Immunity in Pathogen Evasion, for Better or Worse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kaila M; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Gorham, Ronald D

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is typically regarded as an effector arm of innate immunity, leading to recognition and killing of microbial invaders in body fluids. Consequently, pathogens have engaged in an arms race, evolving molecules that can interfere with proper complement responses. However, complement is no longer viewed as an isolated system, and links with other immune mechanisms are continually being discovered. Complement forms an important bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. While its roles in innate immunity are well-documented, its function in adaptive immunity is less characterized. Therefore, it is no surprise that the field of pathogenic complement evasion has focused on blockade of innate effector functions, while potential inhibition of adaptive immune responses (via complement) has been overlooked to a certain extent. In this review, we highlight past and recent developments on the involvement of complement in the adaptive immune response. We discuss the mechanisms by which complement aids in lymphocyte stimulation and regulation, as well as in antigen presentation. In addition, we discuss microbial complement evasion strategies, and highlight specific examples in the context of adaptive immune responses. These emerging ties between complement and adaptive immunity provide a catalyst for future discovery in not only the field of adaptive immune evasion but in elucidating new roles of complement.

  13. Let’s Tie the Knot: Marriage of Complement and Adaptive Immunity in Pathogen Evasion, for Better or Worse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kaila M.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Gorham, Ronald D.

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is typically regarded as an effector arm of innate immunity, leading to recognition and killing of microbial invaders in body fluids. Consequently, pathogens have engaged in an arms race, evolving molecules that can interfere with proper complement responses. However, complement is no longer viewed as an isolated system, and links with other immune mechanisms are continually being discovered. Complement forms an important bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. While its roles in innate immunity are well-documented, its function in adaptive immunity is less characterized. Therefore, it is no surprise that the field of pathogenic complement evasion has focused on blockade of innate effector functions, while potential inhibition of adaptive immune responses (via complement) has been overlooked to a certain extent. In this review, we highlight past and recent developments on the involvement of complement in the adaptive immune response. We discuss the mechanisms by which complement aids in lymphocyte stimulation and regulation, as well as in antigen presentation. In addition, we discuss microbial complement evasion strategies, and highlight specific examples in the context of adaptive immune responses. These emerging ties between complement and adaptive immunity provide a catalyst for future discovery in not only the field of adaptive immune evasion but in elucidating new roles of complement. PMID:28197139

  14. A Plant Immune Receptor Detects Pathogen Effectors that Target WRKY Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Panagiotis F; Duxbury, Zane; Huh, Sung Un; Ma, Yan; Segonzac, Cécile; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Cevik, Volkan; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Saucet, Simon B; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Menke, Frank L H; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2015-05-21

    Defense against pathogens in multicellular eukaryotes depends on intracellular immune receptors, yet surveillance by these receptors is poorly understood. Several plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immune receptors carry fusions with other protein domains. The Arabidopsis RRS1-R NB-LRR protein carries a C-terminal WRKY DNA binding domain and forms a receptor complex with RPS4, another NB-LRR protein. This complex detects the bacterial effectors AvrRps4 or PopP2 and then activates defense. Both bacterial proteins interact with the RRS1 WRKY domain, and PopP2 acetylates lysines to block DNA binding. PopP2 and AvrRps4 interact with other WRKY domain-containing proteins, suggesting these effectors interfere with WRKY transcription factor-dependent defense, and RPS4/RRS1 has integrated a "decoy" domain that enables detection of effectors that target WRKY proteins. We propose that NB-LRR receptor pairs, one member of which carries an additional protein domain, enable perception of pathogen effectors whose function is to target that domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bifidobacterial surface-exopolysaccharide facilitates commensal-host interaction through immune modulation and pathogen protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Saranna; Hall, Lindsay J.; Cronin, Michelle; Zomer, Aldert; MacSharry, John; Goulding, David; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Shanahan, Fergus; Nally, Kenneth; Dougan, Gordon; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria comprise a significant proportion of the human gut microbiota. Several bifidobacterial strains are currently used as therapeutic interventions, claiming various health benefits by acting as probiotics. However, the precise mechanisms by which they maintain habitation within their host and consequently provide these benefits are not fully understood. Here we show that Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 produces a cell surface-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS), the biosynthesis of which is directed by either half of a bidirectional gene cluster, thus leading to production of one of two possible EPSs. Alternate transcription of the two opposing halves of this cluster appears to be the result of promoter reorientation. Surface EPS provided stress tolerance and promoted in vivo persistence, but not initial colonization. Marked differences were observed in host immune response: strains producing surface EPS (EPS+) failed to elicit a strong immune response compared with EPS-deficient variants. Specifically, EPS production was shown to be linked to the evasion of adaptive B-cell responses. Furthermore, presence of EPS+ B. breve reduced colonization levels of the gut pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Our data thus assigns a pivotal and beneficial role for EPS in modulating various aspects of bifidobacterial–host interaction, including the ability of commensal bacteria to remain immunologically silent and in turn provide pathogen protection. This finding enforces the probiotic concept and provides mechanistic insights into health-promoting benefits for both animal and human hosts. PMID:22308390

  16. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    recombinant rabies viruses carrying only the CDV attachment protein according to the same immunization scheme died. Irrespective of the CDV antigens used, all animals developed protective titers against rabies virus, illustrating that a bivalent rabies virus-based vaccine against CDV induces protective immune responses against both pathogens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Age, pathogen exposure, but not maternal care shape offspring immunity in an insect with facultative family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelweith, Fanny; Körner, Maximilian; Foitzik, Susanne; Meunier, Joël

    2017-03-07

    To optimize their resistance against pathogen infection, individuals are expected to find the right balance between investing into the immune system and other life history traits. In vertebrates, several factors were shown to critically affect the direction of this balance, such as the developmental stage of an individual, its current risk of infection and/or its access to external help such as parental care. However, the independent and/or interactive effects of these factors on immunity remain poorly studied in insects. Here, we manipulated maternal presence and pathogen exposure in families of the European earwig Forficula auricularia to measure whether and how the survival rate and investment into two key immune parameters changed during offspring development. The pathogen was the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum and the immune parameters were hemocyte concentration and phenol/pro-phenoloxidase enzyme activity (total-PO). Our results surprisingly showed that maternal presence had no effect on offspring immunity, but reduced offspring survival. Pathogen exposure also lowered the survival of offspring during their early development. The concentration of hemocytes and the total-PO activity increased during development, to be eventually higher in adult females compared to adult males. Finally, pathogen exposure overall increased the concentration of hemocytes-but not the total-PO activity-in adults, while it had no effect on these measures in offspring. Our results show that, independent of their infection risk and developmental stage, maternal presence does not shape immune defense in young earwigs. This reveals that pathogen pressure is not a universal evolutionary driver of the emergence and maintenance of post-hatching maternal care in insects.

  18. Interferon production and immune response induction in pathogenic rabies virus-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcovistz, R; Leal, E C; De Souza Matos, D C [Departamento de Immunologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Caixa Postal 926, 21045 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsiang, H [Service Rage, Istitut Pasteur, Paris (France)

    1994-08-01

    Pathogenic parental rabies virus strain CVS (challenge virus standard) and its apathogenic variant RV194-2 were shown to differ in their ability to induce interferon (IFN) and immune response of the host. After intracerebral inoculation. IFN and antibody production was higher in the RV194-2 virus-infected mice than in the CVS infection. The enhancement of 2-5A synthetase activity, an IFN-mediated enzyme marker, showed biochemical evidence that IFN is active in both apathogenic and pathogenic infections. On the other hand, spontaneous proliferation in vitro of thymocytes and splenocytes from CVS virus-infected mice was strongly inhibited in contrast to the RV194-2 infection. In the CVS infection, the thymocyte proliferation However, in the RV194-2 infection, the thymocyte proliferation was higher than of the splenocytes. These results suggest a better performance of T-cell response to the RV194-2 infection. This fact can be critical for an enhancement of antibody production in the apathogenic infection and subsequent virus clearance from the brain of RV194-2 virus-infected mice. (author) 1 fig., 3 tabs., 32 refs.

  19. Beneficial and Harmful Interactions of Antibiotics with Microbial Pathogens and the Host Innate Immune System

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    Ronald Anderson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In general antibiotics interact cooperatively with host defences, weakening and decreasing the virulence of microbial pathogens, thereby increasing vulnerability to phagocytosis and eradication by the intrinsic antimicrobial systems of the host. Antibiotics, however, also interact with host defences by several other mechanisms, some harmful, others beneficial. Harmful activities include exacerbation of potentially damaging inflammatory responses, a property of cell-wall targeted agents, which promotes the release of pro-inflammatory microbial cytotoxins and cell-wall components. On the other hand, inhibitors of bacterial protein synthesis, especially macrolides, possess beneficial anti-inflammatory/cytoprotective activities, which result from interference with the production of microbial virulence factors/cytotoxins. In addition to these pathogen-directed, anti-inflammatory activities, some classes of antimicrobial agent possess secondary anti-inflammatory properties, unrelated to their conventional antimicrobial activities, which target cells of the innate immune system, particularly neutrophils. This is a relatively uncommon, potentially beneficial property of antibiotics, which has been described for macrolides, imidazole anti-mycotics, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Although of largely unproven significance in the clinical setting, increasing awareness of the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory properties of antibiotics may contribute to a more discerning and effective use of these agents.

  20. The Cell Wall of the Human Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus: Biosynthesis, Organization, Immune Response, and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latgé, Jean-Paul; Beauvais, Anne; Chamilos, Georgios

    2017-09-08

    More than 90% of the cell wall of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus comprises polysaccharides. Biosynthesis of the cell wall polysaccharides is under the control of three types of enzymes: transmembrane synthases, which are anchored to the plasma membrane and use nucleotide sugars as substrates, and cell wall-associated transglycosidases and glycosyl hydrolases, which are responsible for remodeling the de novo synthesized polysaccharides and establishing the three-dimensional structure of the cell wall. For years, the cell wall was considered an inert exoskeleton of the fungal cell. The cell wall is now recognized as a living organelle, since the composition and cellular localization of the different constitutive cell wall components (especially of the outer layers) vary when the fungus senses changes in the external environment. The cell wall plays a major role during infection. The recognition of the fungal cell wall by the host is essential in the initiation of the immune response. The interactions between the different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and cell wall pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) orientate the host response toward either fungal death or growth, which would then lead to disease development. Understanding the molecular determinants of the interplay between the cell wall and host immunity is fundamental to combatting Aspergillus diseases.

  1. Regulation of NO synthesis, local inflammation, and innate immunity to pathogens by BET family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienerroither, Sebastian; Rauch, Isabella; Rosebrock, Felix; Jamieson, Amanda M; Bradner, James; Muhar, Matthias; Zuber, Johannes; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Transcriptional activation of the Nos2 gene, encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), during infection or inflammation requires coordinate assembly of an initiation complex by the transcription factors NF-κB and type I interferon-activated ISGF3. Here we show that infection of macrophages with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes caused binding of the BET proteins Brd2, Brd3, and, most prominently, Brd4 to the Nos2 promoter and that a profound reduction of Nos2 expression occurred in the presence of the BET inhibitor JQ1. RNA polymerase activity at the Nos2 gene was regulated through Brd-mediated C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation at serine 5. Underscoring the critical importance of Brd for the regulation of immune responses, application of JQ1 reduced NO production in mice infected with L. monocytogenes, as well as innate resistance to L. monocytogenes and influenza virus. In a murine model of inflammatory disease, JQ1 treatment increased the colitogenic activity of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). The data presented in our study suggest that BET protein inhibition in a clinical setting poses the risk of altering the innate immune response to infectious or inflammatory challenge.

  2. Peptidoglycan and muropeptides from pathogens Agrobacterium and Xanthomonas elicit plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbs, Gitte; Silipo, Alba; Aslam, Shazia

    2008-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PGN) is a unique and essential structural part of the bacterial cell wall. PGNs from two contrasting Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria elicited components characteristic of the innate immune system in Arabidopsis thaliana, such as transcription of the defense gene PR1, oxidat...

  3. Let's tie the knot : Marriage of complement and adaptive immunity in pathogen evasion, for better or worse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Kaila M.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Gorham, Ronald D.

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is typically regarded as an effector arm of innate immunity, leading to recognition and killing of microbial invaders in body fluids. Consequently, pathogens have engaged in an arms race, evolving molecules that can interfere with proper complement responses. However,

  4. Gut symbiotic microbes imprint intestinal immune cells with the innate receptor SLAMF4 which contributes to gut immune protection against enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabinian, Allison; Sinsimer, Daniel; Tang, May; Jang, Youngsoon; Choi, Bongkum; Laouar, Yasmina; Laouar, Amale

    2018-05-01

    Interactions between host immune cells and gut microbiota are crucial for the integrity and function of the intestine. How these interactions regulate immune cell responses in the intestine remains a major gap in the field. We have identified the signalling lymphocyte activation molecule family member 4 (SLAMF4) as an immunomodulator of the intestinal immunity. The aim is to determine how SLAMF4 is acquired in the gut and what its contribution to intestinal immunity is. Expression of SLAMF4 was assessed in mice and humans. The mechanism of induction was studied using GFP tg bone marrow chimaera mice, lymphotoxin α and TNLG8A-deficient mice, as well as gnotobiotic mice. Role in immune protection was revealed using oral infection with Listeria monocytogenes and Cytobacter rodentium . SLAMF4 is a selective marker of intestinal immune cells of mice and humans. SLAMF4 induction occurs directly in the intestinal mucosa without the involvement of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Gut bacterial products, particularly those of gut anaerobes, and gut-resident antigen-presenting cell (APC) TNLG8A are key contributors of SLAMF4 induction in the intestine. Importantly, lack of SLAMF4 expression leads the increased susceptibility of mice to infection by oral pathogens culminating in their premature death. SLAMF4 is a marker of intestinal immune cells which contributes to the protection against enteric pathogens and whose expression is dependent on the presence of the gut microbiota. This discovery provides a possible mechanism for answering the long-standing question of how the intertwining of the host and gut microbial biology regulates immune cell responses in the gut. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Children developing asthma by school-age display aberrant immune responses to pathogenic airway bacteria as infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent chronic lung disease that commonly originates in early childhood. Colonisation of neonatal airways with the pathogenic bacterial strains H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae is associated with increased risk of later childhood asthma. We hypothesized that c...... that children developing asthma have an abnormal immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We aimed to assess the bacterial immune response in asymptomatic infants and the association with later development of asthma by age 7 years.......Asthma is a highly prevalent chronic lung disease that commonly originates in early childhood. Colonisation of neonatal airways with the pathogenic bacterial strains H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae is associated with increased risk of later childhood asthma. We hypothesized...

  6. Foliar aphid feeding recruits rhizosphere bacteria and primes plant immunity against pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria in pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boyoung; Lee, Soohyun; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2012-07-01

    Plants modulate defence signalling networks in response to different biotic stresses. The present study evaluated the effect of a phloem-sucking aphid on plant defence mechanisms in pepper (Capsicum annuum) during subsequent pathogen attacks on leaves and rhizosphere bacteria on roots. Plants were pretreated with aphids and/or the chemical trigger benzothiadiazol (BTH) 7 d before being challenged with two pathogenic bacteria, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria (Xav) as a compatible pathogen and X. axonopodis pv. glycines (Xag) as an incompatible (non-host) pathogen. Disease severity was noticeably lower in aphid- and BTH + aphid-treated plants than in controls. Although treatment with BTH or aphids alone did not affect the hypersensitive response (HR) against Xag strain 8ra, the combination treatment had a synergistic effect on the HR. The aphid population was reduced by BTH pretreatment and by combination treatment with BTH and bacterial pathogens in a synergistic manner. Analysis of the expression of the defence-related genes Capsicum annum pathogenesis-related gene 9 (CaPR9), chitinase 2 (CaCHI2), SAR8·2 and Lipoxygenase1 (CaLOX1) revealed that aphid infestation resulted in the priming of the systemic defence responses against compatible and incompatible pathogens. Conversely, pre-challenge with the compatible pathogen Xav on pepper leaves significantly reduced aphid numbers. Aphid infestation increased the population of the beneficial Bacillus subtilis GB03 but reduced that of the pathogenic Ralstonia solanacearum SL1931. The expression of defence-related genes in the root and leaf after aphid feeding indicated that the above-ground aphid infestation elicited salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling throughout the whole plant. The findings of this study show that aphid feeding elicits plant resistance responses and attracts beneficial bacterial populations to help the plant cope with subsequent pathogen attacks.

  7. Small non-coding RNAs: new insights in modulation of host immune response by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria possess intricate regulatory networks that temporally control the production of virulence factors, and enable the bacteria to survive and proliferate within host cell. Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have been identified as important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological contexts. Recent research has shown bacterial sRNAs involved in growth and development, cell proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, cell signaling and immune response through regulating protein–protein interactions or via their ability to base pair with RNA and DNA. In this review, we provide a brief overview of mechanism of action employed by immune-related sRNAs, their known functions in immunity, and how they can be integrated into regulatory circuits that govern virulence, which will facilitates to understand pathogenesis and the development of novel, more effective therapeutic approaches to treat infections caused by intracellular bacterial pathogens.

  8. Always one step ahead: How pathogenic bacteria use the type III secretion system to manipulate the intestinal mucosal immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchès Olivier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The intestinal immune system and the epithelium are the first line of defense in the gut. Constantly exposed to microorganisms from the environment, the gut has complex defense mechanisms to prevent infections, as well as regulatory pathways to tolerate commensal bacteria and food antigens. Intestinal pathogens have developed strategies to regulate intestinal immunity and inflammation in order to establish or prolong infection. The organisms that employ a type III secretion system use a molecular syringe to deliver effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. These effectors target the host cell cytoskeleton, cell organelles and signaling pathways. This review addresses the multiple mechanisms by which the type III secretion system targets the intestinal immune response, with a special focus on pathogenic E. coli.

  9. The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is genetically monomorphic and under strong selection to evade tomato immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongman Cai

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, genome sequencing of many isolates of genetically monomorphic bacterial human pathogens has given new insights into pathogen microevolution and phylogeography. Here, we report a genome-based micro-evolutionary study of a bacterial plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only 267 mutations were identified between five sequenced isolates in 3,543,009 nt of analyzed genome sequence, which suggests a recent evolutionary origin of this pathogen. Further analysis with genome-derived markers of 89 world-wide isolates showed that several genotypes exist in North America and in Europe indicating frequent pathogen movement between these world regions. Genome-derived markers and molecular analyses of key pathogen loci important for virulence and motility both suggest ongoing adaptation to the tomato host. A mutational hotspot was found in the type III-secreted effector gene hopM1. These mutations abolish the cell death triggering activity of the full-length protein indicating strong selection for loss of function of this effector, which was previously considered a virulence factor. Two non-synonymous mutations in the flagellin-encoding gene fliC allowed identifying a new microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP in a region distinct from the known MAMP flg22. Interestingly, the ancestral allele of this MAMP induces a stronger tomato immune response than the derived alleles. The ancestral allele has largely disappeared from today's Pto populations suggesting that flagellin-triggered immunity limits pathogen fitness even in highly virulent pathogens. An additional non-synonymous mutation was identified in flg22 in South American isolates. Therefore, MAMPs are more variable than expected differing even between otherwise almost identical isolates of the same pathogen strain.

  10. Pathogen-mimicking vaccine delivery system designed with a bioactive polymer (inulin acetate) for robust humoral and cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunny; Kesharwani, Siddharth S; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Bakkari, Mohammed Ali; Tummala, Hemachand

    2017-09-10

    New and improved vaccines are needed against challenging diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, Ebola, influenza, AIDS, and cancer. The majority of existing vaccine adjuvants lack the ability to significantly stimulate the cellular immune response, which is required to prevent the aforementioned diseases. This study designed a novel particulate based pathogen-mimicking vaccine delivery system (PMVDS) to target antigen-presenting-cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells. The uniqueness of PMVDS is that the polymer used to prepare the delivery system, Inulin Acetate (InAc), activates the innate immune system. InAc was synthesized from the plant polysaccharide, inulin. PMVDS provided improved and persistent antigen delivery to APCs as an efficient vaccine delivery system, and simultaneously, activated Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR-4) on APCs to release chemokine's/cytokines as an immune-adjuvant. Through this dual mechanism, PMVDS robustly stimulated both the humoral (>32 times of IgG1 levels vs alum) and the cell-mediated immune responses against the encapsulated antigen (ovalbumin) in mice. More importantly, PMVDS stimulated both cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells of cell-mediated immunity to provide tumor (B16-ova-Melanoma) protection in around 40% of vaccinated mice and significantly delayed tumor progression in rest of the mice. PMVDS is a unique bio-active vaccine delivery technology with broader applications for vaccines against cancer and several intracellular pathogens, where both humoral and cellular immune responses are desired. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Allelic barley MLA immune receptors recognize sequence-unrelated avirulence effectors of the powdery mildew pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xunli; Kracher, Barbara; Saur, Isabel M L; Bauer, Saskia; Ellwood, Simon R; Wise, Roger; Yaeno, Takashi; Maekawa, Takaki; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2016-10-18

    Disease-resistance genes encoding intracellular nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) are key components of the plant innate immune system and typically detect the presence of isolate-specific avirulence (AVR) effectors from pathogens. NLR genes define the fastest-evolving gene family of flowering plants and are often arranged in gene clusters containing multiple paralogs, contributing to copy number and allele-specific NLR variation within a host species. Barley mildew resistance locus a (Mla) has been subject to extensive functional diversification, resulting in allelic resistance specificities each recognizing a cognate, but largely unidentified, AVR a gene of the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). We applied a transcriptome-wide association study among 17 Bgh isolates containing different AVR a genes and identified AVR a1 and AVR a13 , encoding candidate-secreted effectors recognized by Mla1 and Mla13 alleles, respectively. Transient expression of the effector genes in barley leaves or protoplasts was sufficient to trigger Mla1 or Mla13 allele-specific cell death, a hallmark of NLR receptor-mediated immunity. AVR a1 and AVR a13 are phylogenetically unrelated, demonstrating that certain allelic MLA receptors evolved to recognize sequence-unrelated effectors. They are ancient effectors because corresponding loci are present in wheat powdery mildew. AVR A1 recognition by barley MLA1 is retained in transgenic Arabidopsis, indicating that AVR A1 directly binds MLA1 or that its recognition involves an evolutionarily conserved host target of AVR A1 Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome-wide sequence variation among the Bgh isolates provides evidence for Bgh population structure that is partially linked to geographic isolation.

  12. Multiple candidate effectors from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis suppress host plant immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Fabro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Oomycete pathogens cause diverse plant diseases. To successfully colonize their hosts, they deliver a suite of effector proteins that can attenuate plant defenses. In the oomycete downy mildews, effectors carry a signal peptide and an RxLR motif. Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa causes downy mildew on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis. We investigated if candidate effectors predicted in the genome sequence of Hpa isolate Emoy2 (HaRxLs were able to manipulate host defenses in different Arabidopsis accessions. We developed a rapid and sensitive screening method to test HaRxLs by delivering them via the bacterial type-three secretion system (TTSS of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000-LUX (Pst-LUX and assessing changes in Pst-LUX growth in planta on 12 Arabidopsis accessions. The majority (~70% of the 64 candidates tested positively contributed to Pst-LUX growth on more than one accession indicating that Hpa virulence likely involves multiple effectors with weak accession-specific effects. Further screening with a Pst mutant (ΔCEL showed that HaRxLs that allow enhanced Pst-LUX growth usually suppress callose deposition, a hallmark of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. We found that HaRxLs are rarely strong avirulence determinants. Although some decreased Pst-LUX growth in particular accessions, none activated macroscopic cell death. Fewer HaRxLs conferred enhanced Pst growth on turnip, a non-host for Hpa, while several reduced it, consistent with the idea that turnip's non-host resistance against Hpa could involve a combination of recognized HaRxLs and ineffective HaRxLs. We verified our results by constitutively expressing in Arabidopsis a sub-set of HaRxLs. Several transgenic lines showed increased susceptibility to Hpa and attenuation of Arabidopsis PTI responses, confirming the HaRxLs' role in Hpa virulence. This study shows TTSS screening system provides a useful tool to test whether

  13. The innate immunity of guinea pigs against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Wei Wei; Zhang, Zhaowei; Liu, Jing; Li, Jing; Sun, Lijuan; Sun, Weiyang; Jiao, Peirong; Sang, Xiaoyu; Ren, Zhiguang; Yu, Zhijun; Li, Yuanguo; Feng, Na; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Hualei; Yang, Songtao; Zhao, Yongkun; Zhang, Xuemei; Wilker, Peter R; Liu, WenJun; Liao, Ming; Chen, Hualan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-05-02

    H5N1 avian influenza viruses are a major pandemic concern. In contrast to the highly virulent phenotype of H5N1 in humans and many animal models, guinea pigs do not typically display signs of severe disease in response to H5N1 virus infection. Here, proteomic and transcriptional profiling were applied to identify host factors that account for the observed attenuation of A/Tiger/Harbin/01/2002 (H5N1) virulence in guinea pigs. RIG-I and numerous interferon stimulated genes were among host proteins with altered expression in guinea pig lungs during H5N1 infection. Overexpression of RIG-I or the RIG-I adaptor protein MAVS in guinea pig cell lines inhibited H5N1 replication. Endogenous GBP-1 expression was required for RIG-I mediated inhibition of viral replication upstream of the activity of MAVS. Furthermore, we show that guinea pig complement is involved in viral clearance, the regulation of inflammation, and cellular apoptosis during influenza virus infection of guinea pigs. This work uncovers features of the guinea pig innate immune response to influenza that may render guinea pigs resistant to highly pathogenic influenza viruses.

  14. Pathogen exploitation of an abscisic acid- and jasmonate-inducible MAPK phosphatase and its interception by Arabidopsis immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Akira; Berens, Matthias L; Nobori, Tatsuya; Anver, Shajahan; Fukumoto, Kaori; Winkelmüller, Thomas M; Takeda, Atsushi; Becker, Dieter; Tsuda, Kenichi

    2017-07-11

    Phytopathogens promote virulence by, for example, exploiting signaling pathways mediated by phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonate (JA). Some plants can counteract pathogen virulence by invoking a potent form of immunity called effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Here, we report that ABA and JA mediate inactivation of the immune-associated MAP kinases (MAPKs), MPK3 and MPK6, in Arabidopsis thaliana ABA induced expression of genes encoding the protein phosphatases 2C (PP2Cs), HAI1 , HAI2 , and HAI3 through ABF/AREB transcription factors. These three HAI PP2Cs interacted with MPK3 and MPK6 and were required for ABA-mediated MPK3/MPK6 inactivation and immune suppression. The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato ( Pto ) DC3000 activates ABA signaling and produces a JA-mimicking phytotoxin, coronatine (COR), that promotes virulence. We found that Pto DC3000 induces HAI1 through COR-mediated activation of MYC2, a master transcription factor in JA signaling. HAI1 dephosphorylated MPK3 and MPK6 in vitro and was necessary for COR-mediated suppression of MPK3/MPK6 activation and immunity. Intriguingly, upon ETI activation, A. thaliana plants overcame the HAI1-dependent virulence of COR by blocking JA signaling. Finally, we showed conservation of induction of HAI PP2Cs by ABA and JA in other Brassicaceae species. Taken together, these results suggest that ABA and JA signaling pathways, which are hijacked by the bacterial pathogen, converge on the HAI PP2Cs that suppress activation of the immune-associated MAPKs. Also, our data unveil interception of JA-signaling activation as a host counterstrategy against the bacterial suppression of MAPKs during ETI.

  15. Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity and resistance to the root pathogen Phytophthora parasitica in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroque, Mathieu; Belmas, Elodie; Martinez, Thomas; Vergnes, Sophie; Ladouce, Nathalie; Lafitte, Claude; Gaulin, Elodie; Dumas, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    The cellulose binding elicitor lectin (CBEL) of the genus Phytophthora induces necrosis and immune responses in several plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the role of CBEL-induced responses in the outcome of the interaction is still unclear. This study shows that some of CBEL-induced defence responses, but not necrosis, required the receptor-like kinase BAK1, a general regulator of basal immunity in Arabidopsis, and the production of a reactive oxygen burst mediated by respiratory burst oxidases homologues (RBOH). Screening of a core collection of 48 Arabidopsis ecotypes using CBEL uncovered a large variability in CBEL-induced necrotic responses. Analysis of non-responsive CBEL lines Ws-4, Oy-0, and Bla-1 revealed that Ws-4 and Oy-0 were also impaired in the production of the oxidative burst and expression of defence genes, whereas Bla-1 was partially affected in these responses. Infection tests using two Phytophthora parasitica strains, Pp310 and Ppn0, virulent and avirulent, respectively, on the Col-0 line showed that BAK1 and RBOH mutants were susceptible to Ppn0, suggesting that some immune responses controlled by these genes, but not CBEL-induced cell death, are required for Phytophthora parasitica resistance. However, Ws-4, Oy-0, and Bla-1 lines were not affected in Ppn0 resistance, showing that natural variability in CBEL responsiveness is not correlated to Phytophthora susceptibility. Overall, the results uncover a BAK1- and RBOH-dependent CBEL-triggered immunity essential for Phytophthora resistance and suggest that natural quantitative variation of basal immunity triggered by conserved general elicitors such as CBEL does not correlate to Phytophthora susceptibility.

  16. USING OF MOUSE MODEL TO ANALYZE IMMUNE RESPONSE TO INFECTIOUS PATHOGENS BY THE METHODS OF CLASSICAL GENETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Poltorak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Identification and studying of numerous functions of all genes of the human beings is one of the main objects of modern biological science. Due to high level of homology between mouse and human genomes the important role to reach above mentioned goal belongs to the mouse model which using in the classical genetics increase in connection with appearance of different inbred mouse lines. For instance, the differences in immune response to infectious pathogens in various mouse lines were used many times to determine immunologically competent genes. That is why the contribution of mouse model in understanding of the mechanisms of immune response to infectious pathogens is difficult to overestimate. In the current review some of the most successful and well known examples of mouse using in studies of anti-infectious response are described.

  17. Antibody-mediated immunity to the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii is Fc receptor- and complement-independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinzen Robert A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii causes the zoonosis Q fever. The intracellular niche of C. burnetii has led to the assumption that cell-mediated immunity is the most important immune component for protection against this pathogen. However, passive immunization with immune serum can protect naïve animals from challenge with virulent C. burnetii, indicating a role for antibody (Ab in protection. The mechanism of this Ab-mediated protection is unknown. Therefore, we conducted a study to determine whether Fc receptors (FcR or complement contribute to Ab-mediated immunity (AMI to C. burnetii. Results Virulent C. burnetii infects and replicates within human dendritic cells (DC without inducing their maturation or activation. We investigated the effects of Ab opsonized C. burnetii on human monocyte-derived and murine bone marrow-derived DC. Infection of DC with Ab-opsonized C. burnetii resulted in increased expression of maturation markers and inflammatory cytokine production. Bacteria that had been incubated with naïve serum had minimal effect on DC, similar to virulent C. burnetii alone. The effect of Ab opsonized C. burnetii on DC was FcR dependent as evidenced by a reduced response of DC from FcR knockout (FcR k/o compared to C57Bl/6 (B6 mice. To address the potential role of FcR in Ab-mediated protection in vivo, we compared the response of passively immunized FcR k/o mice to the B6 controls. Interestingly, we found that FcR are not essential for AMI to C. burnetii in vivo. We subsequently examined the role of complement in AMI by passively immunizing and challenging several different strains of complement-deficient mice and found that AMI to C. burnetii is also complement-independent. Conclusion Despite our data showing FcR-dependent stimulation of DC in vitro, Ab-mediated immunity to C. burnetii in vivo is FcR-independent. We also found that passive immunity to this pathogen is independent of

  18. TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2 Mediate Immune Recognition of Putative Newly-Identified Periodontal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaff, Riley A.; Hao, Jie; Morelli, Thiago; Kinney, Janet S.; Gerow, Elizabeth; Sheridan, Rachel; Rodrigues, Vinicius; Paster, Bruce J.; Inohara, Naohiro; Giannobile, William V.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Periodontitis is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that results from the interaction between the oral microbiota and the host immunity. While the innate immune response is important for disease initiation and progression, the innate immune receptors that recognize both classical and putative periodontal pathogens that elicit an immune response have not been elucidated. By using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM), we identified multiple predominant oral bacterial species in human plaque biofilm that strongly associate with severe periodontitis. Ten of the identified species were evaluated in greater depth, 6 being classical pathogens and 4 putative novel pathogens. Using human peripheral blood monocytes (HPBM) and murine bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type (WT) and toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific and MyD88 knockouts (KOs), we demonstrated that heat-killed Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, Selenomonas infelix, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia mediate high immunostimulatory activity. C. concisus, C. rectus, and S. infelix exhibited robust TLR4 stimulatory activity. Studies using mesothelial cells from WT and NOD1-specific KOs and NOD2-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells demonstrated that Eubacterium saphenum, Eubacterium nodatum and Filifactor alocis exhibit robust NOD1 stimulatory activity, and that Porphyromonas endodontalis and Parvimonas micra have the highest NOD2-stimulatory activity. These studies allowed us to provide important evidence on newly-identified putative pathogens in periodontal disease pathogenesis showing that these bacteria exhibit different immunostimulatory activity via TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01154855). PMID:26177212

  19. Plastic Transcriptomes Stabilize Immunity to Pathogen Diversity: The Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Networks within the Arabidopsis/Botrytis Pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Corwin, Jason A; Copeland, Daniel; Feusier, Julie; Eshbaugh, Robert; Chen, Fang; Atwell, Susana; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2017-11-01

    To respond to pathogen attack, selection and associated evolution has led to the creation of plant immune system that are a highly effective and inducible defense system. Central to this system are the plant defense hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) and crosstalk between the two, which may play an important role in defense responses to specific pathogens or even genotypes. Here, we used the Arabidopsis thaliana - Botrytis cinerea pathosystem to test how the host's defense system functions against genetic variation in a pathogen. We measured defense-related phenotypes and transcriptomic responses in Arabidopsis wild-type Col-0 and JA- and SA-signaling mutants, coi1-1 and npr1-1 , individually challenged with 96 diverse B. cinerea isolates. Those data showed genetic variation in the pathogen influences on all components within the plant defense system at the transcriptional level. We identified four gene coexpression networks and two vectors of defense variation triggered by genetic variation in B. cinerea This showed that the JA and SA signaling pathways functioned to constrain/canalize the range of virulence in the pathogen population, but the underlying transcriptomic response was highly plastic. These data showed that plants utilize major defense hormone pathways to buffer disease resistance, but not the metabolic or transcriptional responses to genetic variation within a pathogen. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Variations of immune parameters in the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus after infection with enteritis pathogen of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Xiao, Dongxue

    2016-03-01

    Enteritis has been increasingly recognized as one of the major obstacles for the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus mass culture success. In the present study, the intestinal bacteria strains of the lined seahorses H. erectus suffered from enteritis were isolated, then their pathogenicities were confirmed by artificial infection, and one pathogenic bacteria strain named DS3 was obtained. The median lethal dose (LD50) of strain DS3 for 10 days was determined. The seahorses with different infection levels of uninfected (control), early stage of infection (ESI) and late stage of infection (LSI) were respectively sampled at 0, 3, 6 and 9 days post infection, and 12 immune parameters in the plasma were analyzed. The strain DS3 identified with a biochemical test combined with a molecular method was Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and its LD50 for 10 days was 1.3 × 10(3) cfu/fish. Six parameters including monocytes/leucocytes, leucocytes phagocytic rate, interleukin-2, interferon-α, lysozyme and immunoglobulin M exhibited a generally similar variation trend: highest in the control, second in the ESI and lowest in the LSI throughout the entire experiment. In view of the infection level of V. parahaemolyticus to H. erectus is largely decided by the seahorse's own immune capacity, therefore, these immune parameters were high in the non- or slightly infected seahorses, and low in the severely infected individuals may be an indicator for immune level. These immune parameters may be reliable indicators for the juvenile and broodstock quality assessment. Moreover, clarification of the enteritis pathogen also provides guidances for targeted medicine choice for the lined seahorse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Potent innate immune response to pathogenic leptospira in human whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marga G A Goris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. The bacteria enter the human body via abraded skin or mucous membranes and may disseminate throughout. In general the clinical picture is mild but some patients develop rapidly progressive, severe disease with a high case fatality rate. Not much is known about the innate immune response to leptospires during haematogenous dissemination. Previous work showed that a human THP-1 cell line recognized heat-killed leptospires and leptospiral LPS through TLR2 instead of TLR4. The LPS of virulent leptospires displayed a lower potency to trigger TNF production by THP-1 cells compared to LPS of non-virulent leptospires. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the host response and killing of virulent and non-virulent Leptospira of different serovars by human THP-1 cells, human PBMC's and human whole blood. Virulence of each leptospiral strain was tested in a well accepted standard guinea pig model. Virulent leptospires displayed complement resistance in human serum and whole blood while in-vitro attenuated non-virulent leptospires were rapidly killed in a complement dependent manner. In vitro stimulation of THP-1 and PBMC's with heat-killed and living leptospires showed differential serovar and cell type dependence of cytokine induction. However, at low, physiological, leptospiral dose, living virulent complement resistant strains were consistently more potent in whole blood stimulations than the corresponding non-virulent complement sensitive strains. At higher dose living virulent and non-virulent leptospires were equipotent in whole blood. Inhibition of different TLRs indicated that both TLR2 and TLR4 as well as TLR5 play a role in the whole blood cytokine response to living leptospires. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, in a minimally altered system as human whole blood, highly virulent Leptospira are potent inducers of the cytokine response.

  2. Responses to a warming world: Integrating life history, immune investment, and pathogen resistance in a model insect species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughton, Alice M; O'Connor, Cian O; Knell, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    Environmental temperature has important effects on the physiology and life history of ectothermic animals, including investment in the immune system and the infectious capacity of pathogens. Numerous studies have examined individual components of these complex systems, but little is known about how they integrate when animals are exposed to different temperatures. Here, we use the Indian meal moth ( Plodia interpunctella ) to understand how immune investment and disease resistance react and potentially trade-off with other life-history traits. We recorded life-history (development time, survival, fecundity, and body size) and immunity (hemocyte counts, phenoloxidase activity) measures and tested resistance to bacterial ( E. coli ) and viral ( Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus) infection at five temperatures (20-30°C). While development time, lifespan, and size decreased with temperature as expected, moths exhibited different reproductive strategies in response to small changes in temperature. At cooler temperatures, oviposition rates were low but tended to increase toward the end of life, whereas warmer temperatures promoted initially high oviposition rates that rapidly declined after the first few days of adult life. Although warmer temperatures were associated with strong investment in early reproduction, there was no evidence of an associated trade-off with immune investment. Phenoloxidase activity increased most at cooler temperatures before plateauing, while hemocyte counts increased linearly with temperature. Resistance to bacterial challenge displayed a complex pattern, whereas survival after a viral challenge increased with rearing temperature. These results demonstrate that different immune system components and different pathogens can respond in distinct ways to changes in temperature. Overall, these data highlight the scope for significant changes in immunity, disease resistance, and host-parasite population dynamics to arise from small

  3. RFX Transcription Factor DAF-19 Regulates 5-HT and Innate Immune Responses to Pathogenic Bacteria in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunju; Xu, Lu; Sze, Ji Ying

    2013-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans the Toll-interleukin receptor domain adaptor protein TIR-1 via a conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade induces innate immunity and upregulates serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis gene tph-1 in a pair of ADF chemosensory neurons in response to infection. Here, we identify transcription factors downstream of the TIR-1 signaling pathway. We show that common transcription factors control the innate immunity and 5-HT biosynthesis. We demonstrate that a cysteine to tyrosine substitution in an ARM motif of the HEAT/Arm repeat region of the TIR-1 protein confers TIR-1 hyperactivation, leading to constitutive tph-1 upregulation in the ADF neurons, increased expression of intestinal antimicrobial genes, and enhanced resistance to killing by the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. A forward genetic screen for suppressors of the hyperactive TIR-1 led to the identification of DAF-19, an ortholog of regulatory factor X (RFX) transcription factors that are required for human adaptive immunity. We show that DAF-19 concerts with ATF-7, a member of the activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP response element-binding B (CREB) family of transcription factors, to regulate tph-1 and antimicrobial genes, reminiscent of RFX-CREB interaction in human immune cells. daf-19 mutants display heightened susceptibility to killing by PA14. Remarkably, whereas the TIR-1-MAPK-DAF-19/ATF-7 pathway in the intestinal immunity is regulated by DKF-2/protein kinase D, we found that the regulation of tph-1 expression is independent of DKF-2 but requires UNC-43/Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II. Our results suggest that pathogenic cues trigger a common core-signaling pathway via tissue-specific mechanisms and demonstrate a novel role for RFX factors in neuronal and innate immune responses to infection. PMID:23505381

  4. Comparative innate immune interactions of human and bovine secretory IgA with pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Alison J; Cakebread, Julie; Callaghan, Megan; Harris, Paul; Brunt, Rachel; Anderson, Rachel C; Armstrong, Kelly M; Haigh, Brendan

    2017-03-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) from milk contributes to early colonization and maintenance of commensal/symbiotic bacteria in the gut, as well as providing defence against pathogens. SIgA binds bacteria using specific antigenic sites or non-specifically via its glycans attached to α-heavy-chain and secretory component. In our study, we tested the hypothesis that human and bovine SIgA have similar innate-binding activity for bacteria. SIgAs, isolated from human and bovine milk, were incubated with a selection of commensal, pathogenic and probiotic bacteria. Using flow cytometry, we measured numbers of bacteria binding SIgA and their level of SIgA binding. The percentage of bacteria bound by human and bovine SIgA varied from 30 to 90% depending on bacterial species and strains, but was remarkably consistent between human and bovine SIgA. The level of SIgA binding per bacterial cell was lower for those bacteria that had a higher percentage of SIgA-bound bacteria, and higher for those bacteria that had lower percentage of SIgA-bound bacteria. Overall, human and bovine SIgA interacted with bacteria in a comparable way. This contributes to longer term research about the potential benefits of bovine SIgA for human consumers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The mouse cortical meninges are the site of immune responses to many different pathogens, and are accessible to intravital imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Jonathan A; Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J; Myburgh, Elmarie; Brewer, James M

    2017-08-15

    A wide range of viral and microbial infections are known to cause meningitis, and there is evidence that the meninges are the gateway to pathogenic invasion of the brain parenchyma. Hence observation of these regions has wide application to understanding host-pathogen interactions. Interactions between pathogens and cells of the immune response can be modified by changes in their environment, such as suppression of the flow of blood and lymph, and, particularly in the case of the meninges, with their unsupported membranes, invasive dissection can alter the tissue architecture. For these reasons, intravital imaging through the unperforated skull is the method of choice. We give a protocol for a simple method of two-photon microscopy through the thinned cortical skull of the anesthetized mouse to enable real-time imaging with sub-micron resolution through the meninges and into the superficial brain parenchyma. In reporter mice in which selected cell types express fluorescent proteins, imaging after infection with fluorescent pathogens (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Trypanosoma brucei or Plasmodium berghei) has shown strong recruitment to the cortical meninges of immune cells, including neutrophils, T cells, and putative dendritic cells and macrophages. Without special labeling, the boundaries between the dura mater, the leptomeninx, and the parenchyma are not directly visualized in intravital two-photon microscopy, but other landmarks and characteristics, which we illustrate, allow the researcher to identify the compartment being imaged. While most infectious meningitides are localized mainly in the dura mater, others involve recruitment of immune cells to the leptomeninx. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune response of macrophages from young and aged mice to the oral pathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Frank C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory gum disease that in severe cases leads to tooth loss. Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg is a bacterium closely associated with generalized forms of periodontal disease. Clinical onset of generalized periodontal disease commonly presents in individuals over the age of 40. Little is known regarding the effect of aging on inflammation associated with periodontal disease. In the present study we examined the immune response of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMM from young (2-months and aged (1-year and 2-years mice to Pg strain 381. Pg induced robust expression of cytokines; tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, and IL-10, chemokines; neutrophil chemoattractant protein (KC, macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α and regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES, as well as nitric oxide (NO, measured as nitrite, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 from BMM of young mice. BMM from the 2-year age group produced significantly less TNF-α, IL-6 and NO in response to Pg as compared with BMM from 2-months and 1-year of age. We did not observe any difference in the levels of IL-1β, IL-10 and PGE2 produced by BMM in response to Pg. BMM from 2-months and 1-year of age produced similar levels of all chemokines measured with the exception of MCP-1, which was reduced in BMM from 1-year of age. BMM from the 2-year group produced significantly less MCP-1 and MIP-1α compared with 2-months and 1-year age groups. No difference in RANTES production was observed between age groups. Employing a Pg attenuated mutant, deficient in major fimbriae (Pg DPG3, we observed reduced ability of the mutant to stimulate inflammatory mediator expression from BMMs as compared to Pg 381, irrespective of age. Taken together these results support senescence as an important facet of the reduced immunological response observed by BMM of aged host to the

  7. Evaluation of pathogenic potential of Rickettsia amblyommii in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and protective immunity against Rickettsia rickettsii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas Mejias, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenic potential of R. amblyommii 9-CC-3-1 is evaluated in guinea pigs, through measurements of temperature, weight and behavioral observations; also, the detection of bacteria in different organs. The protective immunity that this bacterium can offer in guinea pigs is evaluated, against a subsequent infection with pathogenic strain of R. rickettsii NRH-2010. The production of specific IgG antibodies, mild disease and the presence of the bacterium to testicular level in guinea pigs is evidenced, before experimental infection, with isolation of R. amblyommii 9-CC-3-1, indicating mild or localized infection and production of response immune against R. amblyommii. Immuno protection offered by the strain R. rickettsii NRH-2010 is evidenced to a subsequent infection of a pathogenic strain of R. rickettsii NRH-2010. The decrease of symptoms and severity of the disease has been evident; but, without prevent infection caused by R. rickettsii in guinea pigs. The tropism of R. amblyommii 9-CC-3-1 has been, possibly, a causative agent of infection and clinical pictures by spotted fevers [es

  8. DMPD: Toll-like receptors and the host defense against microbial pathogens: bringingspecificity to the innate-immune system. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15075354 Toll-like receptors and the host defense against microbial pathogens: brin...oc Biol. 2004 May;75(5):749-55. Epub 2004 Jan 14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors and the host defense again...immune system. PubmedID 15075354 Title Toll-like receptors and the host defense against microbial pathogens:

  9. Pathogens Use and Abuse MicroRNAs to Deceive the Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flór, Thomas B.; Blom, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRs) play a role in the survival and amplification of viruses, bacteria and other pathogens. There are various ways in which pathogens can benefit from miR-directed alterations in protein translation and signal transduction. Members of the

  10. Transcriptional control of drug resistance, virulence and immune system evasion in pathogenic fungi: a cross-species comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pais

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a central role in the referred mechanisms in the human fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. Current knowledge on the activity of the transcription factors characterized in each of these pathogenic fungal species will be addressed. Particular focus is given to their mechanisms of activation, regulatory targets and phenotypic outcome. The review further provides an evaluation on the conservation of transcriptional circuits among different fungal pathogens, highlighting the pathways that translate common or divergent traits among these species in what concerns their drug resistance, virulence and host immune evasion features. It becomes evident that the regulation of transcriptional networks is complex and presents significant variations among different fungal pathogens. Only the oxidative stress regulators Yap1 and Skn7 are conserved among all studied species; while some transcription factors, involved in nutrient homeostasis, pH adaptation, drug resistance and morphological switching are present in several, though not all species. Interestingly, in some cases not very homologous transcription factors display orthologous functions, whereas some homologous proteins have diverged in terms of their function in different species. A few cases of species specific transcription factors are also observed.

  11. Transcriptional Control of Drug Resistance, Virulence and Immune System Evasion in Pathogenic Fungi: A Cross-Species Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Pedro; Costa, Catarina; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Romão, Daniela; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a central role in the referred mechanisms in the human fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis , and Candida tropicalis . Current knowledge on the activity of the transcription factors characterized in each of these pathogenic fungal species will be addressed. Particular focus is given to their mechanisms of activation, regulatory targets and phenotypic outcome. The review further provides an evaluation on the conservation of transcriptional circuits among different fungal pathogens, highlighting the pathways that translate common or divergent traits among these species in what concerns their drug resistance, virulence and host immune evasion features. It becomes evident that the regulation of transcriptional networks is complex and presents significant variations among different fungal pathogens. Only the oxidative stress regulators Yap1 and Skn7 are conserved among all studied species; while some transcription factors, involved in nutrient homeostasis, pH adaptation, drug resistance and morphological switching are present in several, though not all species. Interestingly, in some cases not very homologous transcription factors display orthologous functions, whereas some homologous proteins have diverged in terms of their function in different species. A few cases of species specific transcription factors are also observed.

  12. Production and immune response of recombinant Hsp60 and Hsp70 from the salmon pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN WILHELM

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated and sequenced the genes encoding the heat shock proteins 60 (Hsp60 and 70 (Hsp70 of the salmon pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis. The sequence analysis revealed the expected two open reading frames that encode proteins with calculated molecular weights of 60,060 and 70,400. The proteins exhibit a 70-80% homology with other known prokaryotic Hsp60 and Hsp70 sequences. The coding regions have been expressed in E. coli as thioredoxin fusion proteins. Both recombinant proteins were shown to elicit a humoral response when injected intraperitoneally in Atlantic salmon and also conferred protection to fish challenged with P. salmonis. The present data will facilitate further studies on the involvement of heat shock proteins in protective immunity of fish to infection by P. salmonis and their potential use in recombinants vaccines against this intracellular pathogen.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Caused by Lipoprotein Accumulation Suppresses Immunity against Bacterial Pathogens and Contributes to Immunosenescence

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    Jogender Singh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress response pathway that is activated upon increased unfolded and/or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and enhanced ER stress response prolongs life span and improves immunity. However, the mechanism by which ER stress affects immunity remains poorly understood. Using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that mutations in the lipoproteins vitellogenins, which are homologs of human apolipoprotein B-100, resulted in upregulation of the UPR. Lipoprotein accumulation in the intestine adversely affects the immune response and the life span of the organism, suggesting that it could be a contributing factor to immunosenescence. We show that lipoprotein accumulation inhibited the expression of several immune genes encoding proteins secreted by the intestinal cells in an IRE-1-independent manner. Our studies provide a mechanistic explanation for adverse effects caused by protein aggregation and ER stress on immunity and highlight the role of an IRE-1-independent pathway in the suppression of the expression of genes encoding secreted proteins.

  14. Proteomics and its applications to aquaculture in China: infection, immunity, and interaction of aquaculture hosts with pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2013-01-01

    China is the largest fishery producer worldwide in term of its aquaculture output, and plays leading and decisive roles in international aquaculture development. To improve aquaculture output further and promote aquaculture business development, infectious diseases and immunity of fishes and other aquaculture species must be studied. In this regard, aquaculture proteomics has been widely carried out in China to get a better understanding of aquaculture host immunity and microbial pathogenesis as well as host-pathogen interactions, and to identify novel disease targets and vaccine candidates for therapeutic interventions. These proteomics studies include development of novel methods, assays, and advanced concepts in order to characterize proteomics mechanisms of host innate immune defense and microbial pathogenesis. This review article summarizes some recently published technical approaches and their applications to aquaculture proteomics with an emphasis on the responses of aquaculture animals to bacteria, viruses, and other aqua-environmental stresses, and development of broadly cross-protective vaccine candidates. The reviewed articles are those that have been published in international peer reviewed journals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  16. Immune responses of mature chicken bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells infected with Newcastle disease virus strains with differing pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Bin; Zhu, Wenxian; Li, Yaling; Gao, Pei; Liang, Jianpeng; Liu, Di; Ding, Chan; Liao, Ming; Kang, Yinfeng; Ren, Tao

    2018-06-01

    Infection of chickens with virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is associated with severe pathology and increased morbidity and mortality. The innate immune response contributes to the pathogenicity of NDV. As professional antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) play a unique role in innate immunity. However, the contribution of DCs to NDV infection has not been investigated in chickens. In this study, we selected two representative NDV strains, i.e., the velogenic NDV strain Chicken/Guangdong/GM/2014 (GM) and the lentogenic NDV strain La Sota, to investigate whether NDVs could infect LPS-activated chicken bone-derived marrow DCs (mature chicken BM-DCs). We compared the viral titres and innate immune responses in mature chicken BM-DCs following infection with those strains. Both NDV strains could infect mature chicken BM-DC, but the GM strain showed stronger replication capacity than the La Sota strain in mature chicken BM-DCs. Gene expression profiling showed that MDA5, LGP2, TLR3, TLR7, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, IL-8, CCL5, IL-10, IL-12, MHC-I, and MHC-II levels were altered in mature DCs after infection with NDVs at all evaluated times postinfection. Notably, the GM strain triggered stronger innate immune responses than the La Sota strain in chicken BM-DCs. However, both strains were able to suppress the expression of some cytokines, such as IL-6 and IFN-α, in mature chicken DCs at 24 hpi. These data provide a foundation for further investigation of the role of chicken DCs in NDV infection.

  17. Stealth proteins: in silico identification of a novel protein family rendering bacterial pathogens invisible to host immune defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sperisen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  18. Stealth Proteins: In Silico Identification of a Novel Protein Family Rendering Bacterial Pathogens Invisible to Host Immune Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  19. Involvement of Activating NK Cell Receptors and Their Modulation in Pathogen Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are endowed with cell-structure-sensing receptors providing inhibitory protection from self-destruction (inhibitory NK receptors, iNKRs, including killer inhibitory receptors and other molecules and rapid triggering potential leading to functional cell activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, cytokine receptors, and activating NK cell receptors including natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, i.e., NKp46, NKp46, and NKp44. NCR and NKG2D recognize ligands on infected cells which may be endogenous or may directly bind to some structures derived from invading pathogens. In this paper, we address the known direct or indirect interactions between activating receptors and pathogens and their expression during chronic HIV and HCV infections.

  20. THE SPECTRUM OF BACTEREMIA PATHOGENS IN PATIENTS WITH IMMUNE DEFICIENCY STATES OF VARIOUS ORIGINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Polukhina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A comparative analysis of the results of bacteriological study of blood samples obtained from 1608 patients with secondary immunodeficiency of different origins has been conducted. It was established that within the spectrum of pathogens of bacteremia in these onco-urological profile patients, enterobacteria was the predominant one. In post–liver transplantation patients micromycete was predominant, and for wounded patients and victims with serious injuries staphylococci were more often isolated.

  1. IL-17-mediated immunity to the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Heather R.; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    IL-17 (IL-17A) has emerged as a key mediator of protection against extracellular microbes, but this cytokine also drives pathology in various autoimmune diseases. Overwhelming data in both humans and mice reveal a clear and surprisingly specific role for IL-17 in protection against the fungus Candida albicans, a commensal of the human oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract and reproductive mucosa. The IL-17 pathway regulates antifungal immunity through upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, neutrophil-recruiting chemokines such as CXCL1 and CXCL5 and antimicrobial peptides such as the defensins, which act in concert to limit fungal overgrowth. This review will focus on diseases caused by C. albicans, the role of IL-17-mediated immunity in candidiasis, and the implications for clinical therapies for both autoimmune conditions and fungal infections. PMID:26188072

  2. Platelets release pathogenic serotonin and return to circulation after immune complex-mediated sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Allaeys, Isabelle; Marcoux, Genevieve; Machlus, Kellie R; Mailhot, Benoit; Zufferey, Anne; Levesque, Tania; Becker, Yann; Tessandier, Nicolas; Melki, Imene; Zhi, Huiying; Poirier, Guy; Rondina, Matthew T; Italiano, Joseph E; Flamand, Louis; McKenzie, Steven E; Cote, Francine; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Khan, Waliul I; Flick, Matthew J; Newman, Peter J; Lacroix, Steve; Fortin, Paul R; Boilard, Eric

    2018-02-13

    There is a growing appreciation for the contribution of platelets to immunity; however, our knowledge mostly relies on platelet functions associated with vascular injury and the prevention of bleeding. Circulating immune complexes (ICs) contribute to both chronic and acute inflammation in a multitude of clinical conditions. Herein, we scrutinized platelet responses to systemic ICs in the absence of tissue and endothelial wall injury. Platelet activation by circulating ICs through a mechanism requiring expression of platelet Fcγ receptor IIA resulted in the induction of systemic shock. IC-driven shock was dependent on release of serotonin from platelet-dense granules secondary to platelet outside-in signaling by αIIbβ3 and its ligand fibrinogen. While activated platelets sequestered in the lungs and leaky vasculature of the blood-brain barrier, platelets also sequestered in the absence of shock in mice lacking peripheral serotonin. Unexpectedly, platelets returned to the blood circulation with emptied granules and were thereby ineffective at promoting subsequent systemic shock, although they still underwent sequestration. We propose that in response to circulating ICs, platelets are a crucial mediator of the inflammatory response highly relevant to sepsis, viremia, and anaphylaxis. In addition, platelets recirculate after degranulation and sequestration, demonstrating that in adaptive immunity implicating antibody responses, activated platelets are longer lived than anticipated and may explain platelet count fluctuations in IC-driven diseases.

  3. Xenopus-FV3 host-pathogen interactions and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Robert; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Jazz, Sanchez; Odalys, Torres-Luquis; Francisco, De Jesús Andino

    2017-11-01

    We first review fundamental insights into anti-ranavirus immunity learned with the Xenopus laevis/ranavirus FV3 model that are generally applicable to ectothermic vertebrates. We then further investigate FV3 genes involved in immune evasion. Focusing on FV3 knockout (KO) mutants defective for a putative viral caspase activation and recruitment domain-containing (CARD)-like protein (Δ64R-FV3), a β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase homolog (Δ52L-FV3), and an immediate-early18kDa protein (FV3-Δ18K), we assessed the involvement of these viral genes in replication, dissemination and interaction with peritoneal macrophages in tadpole and adult frogs. Our results substantiate the role of 64R and 52L as critical immune evasion genes, promoting persistence and dissemination in the host by counteracting type III IFN in tadpoles and type I IFN in adult frogs. Comparably, the substantial accumulation of genome copy numbers and exacerbation of type I and III IFN gene expression responses but deficient release of infectious virus suggests that 18K is a viral regulatory gene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cadmium-induced immune abnormality is a key pathogenic event in human and rat models of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Yinping; Zhang, Keke; Huang, Yanjun; Yan, Yan; Wang, Fan; Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao; Xu, Zhangye; Chen, Yongtao; Cheng, Xue; Li, Yong; Jiao, Jinyu; Ye, Duyun

    2016-11-01

    With increased industrial development, cadmium is an increasingly important environmental pollutant. Studies have identified various adverse effects of cadmium on human beings. However, the relationships between cadmium pollution and the pathogenesis of preeclampsia remain elusive. The objective of this study is to explore the effects of cadmium on immune system among preeclamptic patients and rats. The results showed that the cadmium levels in the peripheral blood of preeclamptic patients were significantly higher than those observed in normal pregnancy. Based on it, a novel rat model of preeclampsia was established by the intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) (0.125 mg of Cd/kg body weight) on gestational days 9-14. Key features of preeclampsia, including hypertension, proteinuria, placental abnormalities and small foetal size, appeared in pregnant rats after the administration of low-dose of CdCl2. Cadmium increased immunoglobulin production, mainly angiotensin II type 1-receptor-agonistic autoantibodies (AT1-AA), by increasing the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) in B cells. AID is critical for the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. In addition, angiotensin II type 1-receptor-agonistic autoantibody, which emerged recently as a potential pathogenic contributor to PE, was responsible for the deposition of complement component 5 (C5) in kidneys of pregnant rats via angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) activation. C5a is a fragment of C5 that is released during C5 activation. Selectively interfering with C5a signalling by a complement C5a receptor-specific antagonist significantly attenuated hypertension and proteinuria in Cd-injected pregnant rats. Our results suggest that cadmium induces immune abnormalities that may be a key pathogenic contributor to preeclampsia and provide new insights into treatment strategies of preeclampsia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Probiotic potential of Bacillus velezensis JW: Antimicrobial activity against fish pathogenic bacteria and immune enhancement effects on Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yanglei; Zhang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Fan; Liu, Huan; Yu, Lijun; Zha, Jiwei; Wang, Gaoxue

    2018-04-24

    This study evaluated the probiotic potential of B. velezensis JW through experimental and genomic analysis approaches. Strain JW showed antimicrobial activity against a broad range of fish pathogenic bacteria including Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida, Lactococcus garvieae, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Vibrio Parahemolyticus. Fish (Carassius auratus) were fed with the diets containing 0 (control), 10 7 , and 10 9  cfu/g of B. velezensis JW for 4 weeks. Various immune parameters were examined at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of post-feeding. Results showed that JW supplemented diets significantly increased acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity. The mRNA expression of immune-related genes in the head kidney of C. auratus was measured. Among them, the interferon gamma gene (IFN- γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) showed higher expression after 3 and 4 weeks of feeding (P velezensis JW has the potential to be developed as a probiotic agent in aquaculture. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Starvation and Imidacloprid Exposure Influence Immune Response by Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) to a Fungal Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joanna J; Castrillo, Louela A; Donzelli, Bruno G G; Hajek, Ann E

    2017-08-01

    In several insect systems, fungal entomopathogens synergize with neonicotinoid insecticides which results in accelerated host death. Using the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), an invasive woodborer inadvertently introduced into North America and Europe, we investigated potential mechanisms in the synergy between the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum Petch and the insecticide imidacloprid. A potential mechanism underlying this synergy could be imidacloprid's ability to prevent feeding shortly after administration. We investigated whether starvation would have an impact similar to imidacloprid exposure on the mortality of fungal-inoculated beetles. Using real-time PCR to quantify fungal load in inoculated beetles, we determined how starvation and pesticide exposure impacted beetles' ability to tolerate or resist a fungal infection. The effect of starvation and pesticide exposure on the encapsulation and melanization immune responses of the beetles was also quantified. Starvation had a similar impact on the survival of M. brunneum-inoculated beetles compared to imidacloprid exposure. The synergy, however, was not completely due to starvation, as imidacloprid reduced the beetles' melanotic encapsulation response and capsule area, while starvation did not significantly reduce these immune responses. Our results suggest that there are multiple interacting mechanisms involved in the synergy between M. brunneum and imidacloprid. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A role for CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells in immunity to Schistosoma mansoni induced by 20 krad-irradiated and Ro 11-3128-terminated infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignali, D.A.A.; Bickle, Q.D.; Taylor, M.G.; Crocker, P.; Cobbold, S.; Waldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    The role of CD4 + (L3/T4 + ) and CD8 + (Lyt-2 + ) T cells in immunity to Schistosoma mansoni induced by 20 krad-irradiated and Ro 11-terminated infections in mice was investigated directly by in vivo depletion of these subsets with cytotoxic rat monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Effective physical depletion was demonstrated by flow cytometric analysis and immunohistochemical staining. Functional depletion of helper activity following anti-CD4 treatment was indicated by an abrogation of concanavalin A(Con A)-induced colony-stimulating factor (CSF) release, while anti-CD8 treatment had no effect in these assays. Pre-existing S. mansoni-specific antibody levels were unaffected by anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 treatment. In vivo depletion of CD4 + T cells resulted in a dramatic reduction in immunity induced by one (up to 100%) and two (up to 70%) vaccinations with 20 krad-irradiated cercariae and also of resistance induced by Ro 11-attenuated infections (up to 100%). Depletion of CD8 + T cells had no effect on resistance induced by any of the vaccination protocols investigated. A correlation was observed between resistance and T cell-induced, macrophage-mediated killing of schistosomula in vitro, both of which were abrogated following anti-CD4 treatment but were unaffected by CD8 + T-cell depletion. The possible role of CD4 + T cells in vivo and the implications for vaccine development are discussed. (author)

  8. The Potato Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 is a Pathogen Dependent DNA-Deforming Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenyk, S.; Townsend, P.D.; Dixon, C.H.; Spies, G.B.; Campillo, A.S.E.; Slootweg, E.J.; Westerhof, L.B.; Gawehns, F.K.K.; Knight, M.R.; Sharples, G.J.; Goverse, A.; Palsson, L.O.; Takken, F.L.W.; Cann, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant NLR proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus, however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously we noted a structural homology between the NB domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1

  9. Humoral immunity to memory antigens and pathogens is maintained in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Nadezhda A; Dominguez-Medina, C Coral; Faustini, Sian E; Cook, Charlotte N; McClean, Andrew; Jesky, Mark D; Perez-Toledo, Marisol; Morgan, Matthew D; Richter, Alexandra G; Ferro, Charles J; Cockwell, Paul; Moss, Paul A; Henderson, Ian R; Harper, Lorraine; Cunningham, Adam F

    2018-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of infection and poorer responses to vaccination. This suggests that CKD patients have an impaired responsiveness to all antigens, even those first encountered before CKD onset. To examine this we evaluated antibody responses against two childhood vaccine antigens, tetanus (TT) and diphtheria toxoids (DT) and two common pathogens, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SEn) in two independent cohorts consisting of age-matched individuals with and without CKD. Sera were evaluated for antigen-specific IgG titres and the functionality of antibody to SEn was assessed in a serum bactericidal assay. Surprisingly, patients with CKD and control subjects had comparable levels of IgG against TT and DT, suggesting preserved humoral memory responses to antigens encountered early in life. Lipopolysaccharide-specific IgG titres and serum bactericidal activity in patients with CKD were also not inferior to controls. CMV-specific IgG titres in seropositive CKD patients were similar or even increased compared to controls. Therefore, whilst responses to new vaccines in CKD are typically lower than expected, antibody responses to antigens commonly encountered prior to CKD onset are not. The immunodeficiency of CKD is likely characterised by failure to respond to new antigenic challenges and efforts to improve patient outcomes should be focussed here.

  10. Synergistic parasite-pathogen interactions mediated by host immunity can drive the collapse of honeybee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Nazzi

    Full Text Available The health of the honeybee and, indirectly, global crop production are threatened by several biotic and abiotic factors, which play a poorly defined role in the induction of widespread colony losses. Recent descriptive studies suggest that colony losses are often related to the interaction between pathogens and other stress factors, including parasites. Through an integrated analysis of the population and molecular changes associated with the collapse of honeybee colonies infested by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, we show that this parasite can de-stabilise the within-host dynamics of Deformed wing virus (DWV, transforming a cryptic and vertically transmitted virus into a rapidly replicating killer, which attains lethal levels late in the season. The de-stabilisation of DWV infection is associated with an immunosuppression syndrome, characterized by a strong down-regulation of the transcription factor NF-κB. The centrality of NF-κB in host responses to a range of environmental challenges suggests that this transcription factor can act as a common currency underlying colony collapse that may be triggered by different causes. Our results offer an integrated account for the multifactorial origin of honeybee losses and a new framework for assessing, and possibly mitigating, the impact of environmental challenges on honeybee health.

  11. Formation, clearance, deposition, pathogenicity, and identification of biopharmaceutical-related immune complexes: review and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojko, Jennifer L; Evans, Mark G; Price, Shari A; Han, Bora; Waine, Gary; DeWitte, Mark; Haynes, Jill; Freimark, Bruce; Martin, Pauline; Raymond, James T; Evering, Winston; Rebelatto, Marlon C; Schenck, Emanuel; Horvath, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Vascular inflammation, infusion reactions, glomerulopathies, and other potentially adverse effects may be observed in laboratory animals, including monkeys, on toxicity studies of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and recombinant human protein drugs. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluation suggests these effects may be mediated by deposition of immune complexes (ICs) containing the drug, endogenous immunoglobulin, and/or complement components in the affected tissues. ICs may be observed in glomerulus, blood vessels, synovium, lung, liver, skin, eye, choroid plexus, or other tissues or bound to neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, or platelets. IC deposition may activate complement, kinin, and/or coagulation/fibrinolytic pathways and result in a systemic proinflammatory response. IC clearance is biphasic in humans and monkeys (first from plasma to liver and/or spleen, second from liver or spleen). IC deposition/clearance is affected by IC composition, immunomodulation, and/or complement activation. Case studies are presented from toxicity study monkeys or rats and indicate IHC-IC deposition patterns similar to those predicted by experimental studies of IC-mediated reactions to heterologous protein administration to monkeys and other species. The IHC-staining patterns are consistent with findings associated with generalized and localized IC-associated pathology in humans. However, manifestations of immunogenicity in preclinical species are generally not considered predictive to humans. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  12. Severe pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza disease due to pathogenic immune complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalvo, Ana Clara; Batalle, Juan P.; Lopez, M. Florencia; Krause, Jens C.; Klemenc, Jennifer; Zea, Johanna; Maskin, Bernardo; Bugna, Jimena; Rubinstein, Carlos; Aguilar, Leandro; Dalurzo, Liliana; Libster, Romina; Savy, Vilma; Baumeister, Elsa; Aguilar, Liliana; Cabral, Graciela; Font, Julia; Solari, Liliana; Weller, Kevin P.; Johnson, Joyce; Echavarria, Marcela; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Chappell, James D.; Crowe, James E.; Williams, John V.; Melendi, Guillermina A.; Polack, Fernando P.

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic influenza viruses often cause severe disease in middle-aged adults without preexistent co-morbidities. The mechanism of illness associated with severe disease in this age group is not well understood1–10. Here, we demonstrate preexisting serum antibody that cross-reacts with, but does not protect against 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in middle-aged adults. Non-protective antibody is associated with immune complex(IC)-mediated disease after infection. High titers of serum antibody of low avidity for H1-2009 antigen, and low avidity pulmonary ICs against the same protein were detected in severely ill patients. Moreover, C4d deposition - a sensitive marker of complement activation mediated by ICs- was present in lung sections of fatal cases. Archived lung sections from adults with confirmed fatal influenza 1957 H2N2 infection revealed a similar mechanism of illness. These observations provide a novel biological mechanism for the unusual age distribution of severe cases during influenza pandemics. PMID:21131958

  13. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Geun C; Choi, Hye K; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 μM and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR) gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved SA and JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen.

  14. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geun Cheol eSong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 M and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through SA, JA, and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis reveals the potential of highly pathogenic PRRS virus to modulate immune system activation related to host-pathogen and damage associated signaling in infected porcine monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the largest risks to the continued stability of the swine industry is by pathogens like porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) that can decimate production as it spreads among individuals. These infections can be low or highly pathogenic, and because it infects monocytic ...

  16. Conserved Patterns of Microbial Immune Escape: Pathogenic Microbes of Diverse Origin Target the Human Terminal Complement Inhibitor Vitronectin via a Single Common Motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresia Hallström

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of many microbes relies on their capacity to resist innate immunity, and to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host microbes have developed highly efficient and sophisticated complement evasion strategies. Here we show that different human pathogens including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, acquire the human terminal complement regulator vitronectin to their surface. By using truncated vitronectin fragments we found that all analyzed microbial pathogens (n = 13 bound human vitronectin via the same C-terminal heparin-binding domain (amino acids 352-374. This specific interaction leaves the terminal complement complex (TCC regulatory region of vitronectin accessible, allowing inhibition of C5b-7 membrane insertion and C9 polymerization. Vitronectin complexed with the various microbes and corresponding proteins was thus functionally active and inhibited complement-mediated C5b-9 deposition. Taken together, diverse microbial pathogens expressing different structurally unrelated vitronectin-binding molecules interact with host vitronectin via the same conserved region to allow versatile control of the host innate immune response.

  17. Meta-analysis of the Effects of Insect Vector Saliva on Host Immune Responses and Infection of Vector-Transmitted Pathogens: A Focus on Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ockenfels, Brittany; Michael, Edwin; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    A meta-analysis of the effects of vector saliva on the immune response and progression of vector-transmitted disease, specifically with regard to pathology, infection level, and host cytokine levels was conducted. Infection in the absence or presence of saliva in naïve mice was compared. In addition, infection in mice pre-exposed to uninfected vector saliva was compared to infection in unexposed mice. To control for differences in vector and pathogen species, mouse strain, and experimental de...

  18. Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing in Mammals and Teleost Fish: A Effective Strategy for the Regulation of Immune Responses Against Pathogen Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming Xian; Zhang, Jie

    2017-07-15

    Pre-mRNA splicing is the process by which introns are removed and the protein coding elements assembled into mature mRNAs. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an important source of transcriptome and proteome complexity through selectively joining different coding elements to form mRNAs, which encode proteins with similar or distinct functions. In mammals, previous studies have shown the role of alternative splicing in regulating the function of the immune system, especially in the regulation of T-cell activation and function. As lower vertebrates, teleost fish mainly rely on a large family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from various invading pathogens. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of alternative splicing of piscine PRRs including peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and their downstream signaling molecules, compared to splicing in mammals. We also discuss what is known and unknown about the function of splicing isoforms in the innate immune responses against pathogens infection in mammals and teleost fish. Finally, we highlight the consequences of alternative splicing in the innate immune system and give our view of important directions for future studies.

  19. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cell Interactions with Commensal and Pathogenic Bacteria: Potential Role in Antimicrobial Immunity in the Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Ghazarian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are unconventional CD3+CD161high T lymphocytes that recognize vitamin B2 (riboflavin biosynthesis precursor derivatives presented by the MHC-I related protein, MR1. In humans, their T cell receptor is composed of a Vα7.2-Jα33/20/12 chain, combined with a restricted set of Vβ chains. MAIT cells are very abundant in the liver (up to 40% of resident T cells and in mucosal tissues, such as the lung and gut. In adult peripheral blood, they represent up to 10% of circulating T cells, whereas they are very few in cord blood. This large number of MAIT cells in the adult likely results from their gradual expansion with age following repeated encounters with riboflavin-producing microbes. Upon recognition of MR1 ligands, MAIT cells have the capacity to rapidly eliminate bacterially infected cells through the production of inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-17 and cytotoxic effector molecules (perforin and granzyme B. Thus, MAIT cells may play a crucial role in antimicrobial defense, in particular at mucosal sites. In addition, MAIT cells have been implicated in diseases of non-microbial etiology, including autoimmunity and other inflammatory diseases. Although their participation in various clinical settings has received increased attention in adults, data in children are scarce. Due to their innate-like characteristics, MAIT cells might be particularly important to control microbial infections in the young age, when long-term protective adaptive immunity is not fully developed. Herein, we review the data showing how MAIT cells may control microbial infections and how they discriminate pathogens from commensals, with a focus on models relevant for childhood infections.

  20. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Spies, Gerhard B; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J; Westerhof, Lotte B; Gawehns, Fleur K K; Knight, Marc R; Sharples, Gary J; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2015-10-09

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  2. In Ovo Vaccination with Turkey Herpesvirus Hastens Maturation of Chicken Embryo Immune Responses in Specific-Pathogen-Free Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Isabel M; Faiz, Nik M; Cortes, Aneg L; Barbosa, Taylor; Villalobos, Tarsicio; Pandiri, Arun R

    2015-09-01

    Administration of Marek's disease (MD) vaccines in ovo has become a common practice for the poultry industry. Efficacy of MD vaccines is very high, even though they are administered to chicken embryos that are immunologically immature. We have recently demonstrated that in ovo vaccination with turkey herpesvirus (HVT) results in increased activation of T cells at hatch. Our previous results suggested that in ovo vaccination with HVT might have a positive impact not only on MD protection but also on the overall maturity of the developing immune system of the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of administration of HVT at 18 days of embryonation (ED) on the maturation of the embryo immune system. Four experiments were conducted in Specific-Pathogen-Free Avian Supplies (SPAFAS) chickens to evaluate the effect of administration of HVT at 18 ED on the splenic cell phenotypes at day of age (experiment 1) and on the ability of 1-day-old chickens to respond to various antigens compared with older birds (experiments 2 and 3). In addition, a fourth experiment was conducted to elucidate whether administration of other serotype's MD vaccines (CVI988 and SB-1) at 18 ED had the same effect as HVT on the spleen cell phenotypes at day of age. Our results demonstrated that 1-day-old chickens that had received HVT in ovo (1-day HVT) had higher percentages of CD45+, MHC-I+, CD45+MHC-I+, CD3+, MHC-II+, CD3+MHC-II+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ cells in the spleen than 1-day-old sham-inoculated chickens (1-day sham). Moreover, spleens of 1-day HVT chickens had greater percentages of CD45+MHC-I+ cells and equal or greater numbers of CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ cells than older unvaccinated chickens. In addition, administration of HVT at 18 ED rendered chicks at hatch more responsive to unrelated antigens such as concavalin A, phytohemagglutinin-L, and keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Administration of MD vaccines of other serotypes had an effect

  3. Intranasal immunization of baculovirus displayed hemagglutinin confers complete protection against mouse adapted highly pathogenic H7N7 reassortant influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subaschandrabose Rajesh Kumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Avian influenza A H7N7 virus poses a pandemic threat to human health because of its ability for direct transmission from domestic poultry to humans and from human to human. The wide zoonotic potential of H7N7 combined with an antiviral immunity inhibition similar to pandemic 1918 H1N1 and 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses is disconcerting and increases the risk of a putative H7N7 pandemic in the future, underlining the urgent need for vaccine development against this virus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we developed a recombinant vaccine by expressing the H7N7-HA protein on the surface of baculovirus (Bac-HA. The protective efficacy of the live Bac-HA vaccine construct was evaluated in a mouse model by challenging mice immunized intranasally (i.n. or subcutaneously (s.c. with high pathogenic mouse adapted H7N7 reassorted strain. Although s.c. injection of live Bac-HA induced higher specific IgG than i.n. immunization, the later resulted in an elevated neutralization titer. Interestingly, 100% protection from the lethal viral challenge was only observed for the mice immunized intranasally with live Bac-HA, whereas no protection was achieved in any other s.c. or i.n. immunized mice groups. In addition, we also observed higher mucosal IgA as well as increased IFN-γ and IL-4 responses in the splenocytes of the surviving mice coupled with a reduced viral titer and diminished histopathological signs in the lungs. CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that protection from high pathogenic H7N7 (NL/219/03 virus requires both mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice. The balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines is also required for the protection against the H7N7 pathogen. Intranasal administration of live Bac-HA induced all these immune responses and protected the mice from lethal viral challenge. Therefore, live Bac-HA is an effective vaccine candidate against H7N7 viral infections.

  4. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity.

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    Shi Qun Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  5. Association of serum Clara cell protein CC16 with respiratory infections and immune response to respiratory pathogens in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Marcin; Jurczyk, Janusz; Jarzębska, Marzanna; Moskwa, Sylwia; Makowska, Joanna S; Krysztofiak, Hubert; Kowalski, Marek L

    2014-04-15

    Respiratory epithelium integrity impairment caused by intensive exercise may lead to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clara cell protein (CC16) has anti-inflammatory properties and its serum level reflects changes in epithelium integrity and airway inflammation. This study aimed to investigate serum CC16 in elite athletes and to seek associations of CC16 with asthma or allergy, respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and immune response to respiratory pathogens. The study was performed in 203 Olympic athletes. Control groups comprised 53 healthy subjects and 49 mild allergic asthmatics. Serum levels of CC16 and IgG against respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were assessed. Allergy questionnaire for athletes was used to determine symptoms and exercise pattern. Current versions of ARIA and GINA guidelines were used when diagnosing allergic rhinitis and asthma, respectively. Asthma was diagnosed in 13.3% athletes, of whom 55.6% had concomitant allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis without asthma was diagnosed in 14.8% of athletes. Mean CC16 concentration was significantly lower in athletes versus healthy controls and mild asthmatics. Athletes reporting frequent RTIs had significantly lower serum CC16 and the risk of frequent RTIs was more than 2-fold higher in athletes with low serum CC16 (defined as equal to or less than 4.99 ng/ml). Athletes had significantly higher anti-adenovirus IgG than healthy controls while only non-atopic athletes had anti-parainfluenza virus IgG significantly lower than controls. In all athletes weak correlation of serum CC16 and anti-parainfluenza virus IgG was present (R = 0.20, p athletes a weak positive correlations of CC16 with IgG specific for respiratory syncytial virus (R = 0.29, p = 0.009), parainfluenza virus (R = 0.31, p = 0.01) and adenovirus (R = 0.27, p = 0.02) were seen as well. Regular high-load exercise is associated with decrease in serum CC16 levels. Athletes with decreased CC16 are

  6. Differences in pathogenicity, response to vaccination, and innate immune responses in different types of ducks infected with a virulent H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Caran; Wasilenko, Jamie; Adams, Sean C; Cardona, Carol J; To, Thanh Long; Nguyen, Tung; Spackman, Erica; Suarez, David L; Smith, Diane; Shepherd, Eric; Roth, Jason; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J

    2012-09-01

    In a previous study, we found clear differences in pathogenicity and response to vaccination against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI; HA dade 2.3.4) between Pekin (Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica) and Muscovy (Cairina moschata) ducks vaccinated using a commercial inactivated vaccine (Re-1). The objective of the present study was to further investigate the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in different species of ducks by examining clinical signs and innate immune responses to infection with a different strain of H5N1 HPAI virus (HA clade 1) in two domestic ducks, Pekin and Muscovy, and one wild-type duck, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Protection conferred by vaccination using the Re-1 vaccine against infection with this virus was also compared between Pekin and Muscovy ducks. Differences in pathogenicity were observed among the virus-infected ducks, as the Muscovy ducks died 2 days earlier than did the Pekin and mallard ducks, and they presented more-severe neurologic signs. Conversely, the Pekin and mallard ducks had significantly higher body temperatures at 2 days postinfection (dpi) than did the Muscovy ducks, indicating possible differences in innate immune responses. However, similar expression of innate immune-related genes was found in the spleens of virus-infected ducks at this time point. In all three duck species, there was up-regulation of IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-6, CCL19, RIG-I, and MHC class I and down-regulation of MHC class II, but variable expression of IL-18 and TLR7. As in our previous study, vaccinated Muscovy ducks showed less protection against virus infection than did Pekin ducks, as evidenced by the higher mortality and higher number of Muscovy ducks shedding virus when compared to Pekin ducks. In conclusion, infection with an H5N1 HPAI virus produced a systemic infection with high mortality in all three duck species; however, the disease was more severe in Muscovy ducks, which also had a poor response to vaccination. The

  7. Dobrava-Belgrade hantavirus from Germany shows receptor usage and innate immunity induction consistent with the pathogenicity of the virus in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Popugaeva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV is a European hantavirus causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS in humans with fatality rates of up to 12%. DOBV-associated clinical cases typically occur also in the northern part of Germany where the virus is carried by the striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius. However, the causative agent responsible for human illness has not been previously isolated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on characterization of a novel cell culture isolate from Germany obtained from a lung tissue of "spillover" infected yellow necked mouse (A. flavicollis trapped near the city of Greifswald. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated close clustering of the new strain, designated Greifswald/Aa (GRW/Aa with the nucleotide sequence obtained from a northern German HFRS patient. The virus was effectively blocked by specific antibodies directed against β3 integrins and Decay Accelerating Factor (DAF indicating that the virus uses same receptors as the highly pathogenic Hantaan virus (HTNV. In addition, activation of selected innate immunity markers as interferon β and λ and antiviral protein MxA after viral infection of A549 cells was investigated and showed that the virus modulates the first-line antiviral response in a similar way as HTNV. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, our study reveals novel data on DOBV receptor usage and innate immunity induction in relationship to virus pathogenicity and underlines the potency of German DOBV strains to act as human pathogen.

  8. The immune strategy and stress response of the Mediterranean species of the Bemisia tabaci complex to an orally delivered bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Rong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, a notorious agricultural pest, has complex relationships with diverse microbes. The interactions of the whitefly with entomopathogens as well as its endosymbionts have received great attention, because of their potential importance in developing novel whitefly control technologies. To this end, a comprehensive understanding on the whitefly defense system is needed to further decipher those interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a comprehensive investigation of the whitefly's defense responses to infection, via oral ingestion, of the pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using RNA-seq technology. Compared to uninfected whiteflies, 6 and 24 hours post-infected whiteflies showed 1,348 and 1,888 differentially expressed genes, respectively. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed that the mitogen associated protein kinase (MAPK pathway was activated after P. aeruginosa infection. Three knottin-like antimicrobial peptide genes and several components of the humoral and cellular immune responses were also activated, indicating that key immune elements recognized in other insect species are also important for the response of B. tabaci to pathogens. Our data also suggest that intestinal stem cell mediated epithelium renewal might be an important component of the whitefly's defense against oral bacterial infection. In addition, we show stress responses to be an essential component of the defense system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified for the first time the key immune-response elements utilized by B. tabaci against bacterial infection. This study provides a framework for future research into the complex interactions between whiteflies and microbes.

  9. Transcriptional Dynamics Driving MAMP-Triggered Immunity and Pathogen Effector-Mediated Immunosuppression in Arabidopsis Leaves Following Infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Laura A; Polanski, Krzysztof; de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Jayaraman, Siddharth; Bowden, Laura; Moore, Jonathan; Penfold, Christopher A; Jenkins, Dafyd J; Hill, Claire; Baxter, Laura; Kulasekaran, Satish; Truman, William; Littlejohn, George; Prusinska, Justyna; Mead, Andrew; Steinbrenner, Jens; Hickman, Richard; Rand, David; Wild, David L; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Smirnoff, Nick; Beynon, Jim; Denby, Katherine; Grant, Murray

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is integral to effective plant defense. Pathogen effectors act transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally to suppress defense responses. A major challenge to understanding disease and defense responses is discriminating between transcriptional reprogramming associated with microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity (MTI) and that orchestrated by effectors. A high-resolution time course of genome-wide expression changes following challenge with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and the nonpathogenic mutant strain DC3000hrpA- allowed us to establish causal links between the activities of pathogen effectors and suppression of MTI and infer with high confidence a range of processes specifically targeted by effectors. Analysis of this information-rich data set with a range of computational tools provided insights into the earliest transcriptional events triggered by effector delivery, regulatory mechanisms recruited, and biological processes targeted. We show that the majority of genes contributing to disease or defense are induced within 6 h postinfection, significantly before pathogen multiplication. Suppression of chloroplast-associated genes is a rapid MAMP-triggered defense response, and suppression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and induction of ubiquitin-related genes coincide with pathogen-induced abscisic acid accumulation. Specific combinations of promoter motifs are engaged in fine-tuning the MTI response and active transcriptional suppression at specific promoter configurations by P. syringae. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Heterologous prime-boost immunization of Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccines protected broiler chickens against highly pathogenic avian influenza and Newcastle disease viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Samal, Siba K

    2017-07-24

    Avian Influenza virus (AIV) is an important pathogen for both human and animal health. There is a great need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for AI infections in the field. Live-attenuated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vectored AI vaccines have shown to be effective, but preexisting antibodies to the vaccine vector can affect the protective efficacy of the vaccine in the field. To improve the efficacy of AI vaccine, we generated a novel vectored vaccine by using a chimeric NDV vector that is serologically distant from NDV. In this study, the protective efficacy of our vaccines was evaluated by using H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) strain A/Vietnam/1203/2004, a prototype strain for vaccine development. The vaccine viruses were three chimeric NDVs expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) protein in combination with the neuraminidase (NA) protein, matrix 1 protein, or nonstructural 1 protein. Comparison of their protective efficacy between a single and prime-boost immunizations indicated that prime immunization of 1-day-old SPF chicks with our vaccine viruses followed by boosting with the conventional NDV vector strain LaSota expressing the HA protein provided complete protection of chickens against mortality, clinical signs and virus shedding. Further verification of our heterologous prime-boost immunization using commercial broiler chickens suggested that a sequential immunization of chickens with chimeric NDV vector expressing the HA and NA proteins following the boost with NDV vector expressing the HA protein can be a promising strategy for the field vaccination against HPAIVs and against highly virulent NDVs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of H5 hemagglutinin vaccine antigen in common duckweed (Lemna minor) protects against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge in immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertran, Kateri; Thomas, Colleen; Guo, Xuan; Bublot, Michel; Pritchard, Nikki; Regan, Jeffrey T; Cox, Kevin M; Gasdaska, John R; Dickey, Lynn F; Kapczynski, Darrell R; Swayne, David E

    2015-07-09

    A synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1) (Indo/03) was expressed in aquatic plant Lemna minor (rLemna-HA). In Experiment 1, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.2μg or 2.3 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) mean chicken embryo infectious doses (EID50) of homologous virus strain. Both dosages of rLemna-HA conferred clinical protection and dramatically reduced viral shedding. Almost all the birds immunized with either dosage of rLemna-HA elicited HA antibody titers against Indo/03 antigen, suggesting an association between levels of anti-Indo/03 antibodies and protection. In Experiment 2, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on birds immunized with 0.9 μg or 2.2 μg HA and challenged with 10(6) EID50 of heterologous H5N1 virus strains A/chicken/Vietnam/NCVD-421/2010 (VN/10) or A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Birds challenged with VN/10 exhibited 100% survival regardless of immunization dosage, while birds challenged with PWT/06 had 50% and 30% mortality at 0.9 μg HA and 2.2 μg HA, respectively. For each challenge virus, viral shedding titers from 2.2 μg HA vaccinated birds were significantly lower than those from 0.9μg HA vaccinated birds, and titers from both immunized groups were in turn significantly lower than those from sham vaccinated birds. Even if immunized birds elicited HA titers against the vaccine antigen Indo/03, only the groups challenged with VN/10 developed humoral immunity against the challenge antigen. None (rLemna-HA 0.9 μg HA) and 40% (rLemna-HA 2.2 μg HA) of the immunized birds challenged with PWT/06 elicited pre-challenge antibody titers, respectively. In conclusion, Lemna-expressed HA demonstrated complete protective immunity against homologous challenge and suboptimal protection against heterologous challenge, the latter being similar to results from inactivated whole virus vaccines. Transgenic duckweed-derived HA could be a

  12. T cell immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Bülbül Başkan

    2013-01-01

    Since birth, our immune system is constantly bombarded with self-antigens and foreign pathogens. To stay healthy, complex immune strategies have evolved in our immune system to maintain self-tolerance and to defend against foreign pathogens. Effector T cells are the key players in steering the immune responses to execute immune functions. While effector T cells were initially identified to be immune promoting, recent studies unraveled negative regulatory functions of effector T cells...

  13. Perception of pathogenic or beneficial bacteria and their evasion of host immunity: pattern recognition receptors in the frontline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trdá, Lucie; Boutrot, F.; Claverie, J.; Brule, D.; Dorey, S.; Poinssot, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, APR 8 (2015) ISSN 1664-462X Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : plant-microbe interactions * innate immunity * evasion Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.495, year: 2015

  14. Insights into pathogenic events of HIV-associated Kaposi sarcoma and immune reconstitution syndrome related Kaposi sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemmer Johan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A decrease in the incidence of human immune deficiency virus-associated Kaposi sarcoma (HIV-KS and regression of some established HIV-KS lesions is evident after the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART, and is attributed to generalized immune restoration, to the reconstitution of human herpesvirus (HHV-8 specific cellular immune responses, and to the decrease in HIV Tat protein and HHV-8 loads following HAART. However, a small subset of HIV-seropositive subjects with a low CD4+ T cell count at the time of introduction of HAART, may develop HIV-KS as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS within 8 weeks thereafter.

  15. Chimeric avian paramyxovirus-based vector immunization against highly pathogenic avian influenza followed by conventional Newcastle disease vaccination eliminates lack of protection from virulent ND virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Steglich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we described a chimeric, hemagglutinin of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5 expressing Newcastle disease virus (NDV-based vector vaccine (chNDVFHNPMV8H5 in which NDV envelope glycoproteins were replaced by those of avian paramyxovirus-8 (APMV-8. This chimeric vaccine induced solid protection against lethal HPAIV H5N1 even in chickens with maternal antibodies against NDV (MDA+. However, due to the absence of the major NDV immunogens it failed to induce protection against Newcastle disease (ND. Here, we report on protection of MDA+ chickens against HPAI H5N1 and ND, by vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 either on day 1 or day seven after hatch, and subsequent immunization with live attenuated NDV seven days later. Vaccination was well tolerated and three weeks after immunization, challenge infections with highly pathogenic NDV as well as HPAIV H5N1 were carried out. All animals remained healthy without exhibiting any clinical signs, whereas non-vaccinated animals showed morbidity and mortality. Therefore, vaccination with chNDVFHNPMV8H5 can be followed by NDV vaccination to protect chickens from HPAIV as well as NDV, indicating that the antibody response against chNDVFHNPMV8H5 does not interfere with live ND vaccination.

  16. Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 surface exopolysaccharide production is a beneficial trait mediating commensal-host interaction through immune modulation and pathogen protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Saranna; Hall, Lindsay J; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria constitute a substantial proportion of the human gut microbiota. There are currently many bifidobacterial strains with claimed probiotic attributes. The mechanism through which these strains reside within their host and exert benefits to the host is far from fully understood. We have shown in the case of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 that a cell surface exopolysaccharide (EPS) plays a role in in vivo persistence. Biosynthesis of two possible EPSs is controlled by a bidirectional gene cluster which guides alternate EPS synthesis by means of a reorienting promoter. The presence of EPS impacts on host immune response: the wild type, EPS-positive B. breve UCC2003 efficiently evades the adaptive B-cell host response, while its isogenic, EPS-deficient equivalent elicits a strong adaptive immune response. Functionally, EPS positive strains were more resilient to presence of acid and bile and were responsible for reduced colonization levels of Citrobacter rodentium, a gut pathogen. In conclusion, we have found that EPS is important in host interactions and pathogen protection, the latter indicative of a probiotic ability for the EPS of B. breve UCC2003.

  17. Attenuation of Pathogenic Immune Responses during Infection with Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV/SIV) by the Tetracycline Derivative Minocycline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Julia L.; Szeto, Gregory L.; Engle, Elizabeth L.; Liao, Zhaohao; Shearer, Gene M.; Zink, M. Christine; Graham, David R.

    2014-01-01

    HIV immune pathogenesis is postulated to involve two major mechanisms: 1) chronic innate immune responses that drive T cell activation and apoptosis and 2) induction of immune regulators that suppress T cell function and proliferation. Both arms are elevated chronically in lymphoid tissues of non-natural hosts, which ultimately develop AIDS. However, these mechanisms are not elevated chronically in natural hosts of SIV infection that avert immune pathogenesis despite similarly high viral loads. In this study we investigated whether minocycline could modulate these pathogenic antiviral responses in non-natural hosts of HIV and SIV. We found that minocycline attenuated in vitro induction of type I interferon (IFN) and the IFN-stimulated genes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and PBMCs exposed to aldrithiol-2 inactivated HIV or infectious influenza virus. Activation-induced TRAIL and expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in isolated CD4+ T cells were also reduced by minocycline. Translation of these in vitro findings to in vivo effects, however, were mixed as minocycline significantly reduced markers of activation and activation-induced cell death (CD25, Fas, caspase-3) but did not affect expression of IFNβ or the IFN-stimulated genes IDO1, FasL, or Mx in the spleens of chronically SIV-infected pigtailed macaques. TRAIL expression, reflecting the mixed effects of minocycline on activation and type I IFN stimuli, was reduced by half, but this change was not significant. These results show that minocycline administered after infection may protect against aspects of activation-induced cell death during HIV/SIV immune disease, but that in vitro effects of minocycline on type I IFN responses are not recapitulated in a rapid progressor model in vivo. PMID:24732038

  18. Evidence for a cost of immunity when the crustacean Daphnia magna is exposed to the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Tom J; Killick, Stuart C

    2007-11-01

    The deployment of the immune system has the obvious potential to ameliorate infection outcomes, but immune responses can also harm hosts by either damaging host tissues or monopolizing resources, leading to enhanced mortality. To gain insight into such a 'cost of immunity' when the crustacean Daphnia magna is challenged with the bacterium Pasteuria ramosa, we measured survivorship among hosts that resisted infection following exposure to various strains and doses of the parasite. In the first of two experiments, these exposures were: single exposures with relatively non-aggressive strains, double exposures with non-aggressive strains, and exposure to aggressive strains. Mortality increased across this gradient of exposure. In a second experiment, we varied the dose of the most aggressive P. ramosa strain and found that resisting infection when a large dose was applied resulted in greater mortality than when a medium or low dose was applied. Assuming that resistance is accomplished with an immune response, and that more aggressive parasites and/or larger doses of parasites are more immunostimulatory, these data are compatible with a cost of immunity. Indeed, in terms of survival, resisting parasites can be more harmful than infection.

  19. Pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and protective immunity against Rickettsia rickettsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Juan J; Moreira-Soto, Andrés; Alvarado, Gilberth; Taylor, Lizeth; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Hun, Laya; Corrales-Aguilar, Eugenia; Morales, Juan Alberto; Troyo, Adriana

    2015-09-01

    'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' is a spotted fever group rickettsia that is not considered pathogenic, although there is serologic evidence of possible infection in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' in guinea pigs and determine its capacity to generate protective immunity against a subsequent infection with a local strain of Rickettsia rickettsii isolated from a human case. Six guinea pigs were inoculated with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' strain 9-CC-3-1 and two controls with cell culture medium. Health status was evaluated, and necropsies were executed at days 2, 4, and 13. Blood and tissues were processed by PCR to detect the gltA gene, and end titers of anti-'Candidatus R. amblyommii' IgG were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. To evaluate protective immunity, another 5 guinea pigs were infected with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' (IGPs). After 4 weeks, these 5 IGPs and 3 controls (CGPs) were inoculated with pathogenic R. rickettsii. Clinical signs and titers of anti-Rickettsia IgG were determined. IgG titers reached 1:512 at day 13 post-infection with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii'. On day 2 after inoculation, two guinea pigs had enlarged testicles and 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' DNA was detected in testicles. Histopathology confirmed piogranulomatous orchitis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate in the epididymis. In the protective immunity assay, anti-Rickettsia IgG end titers after R. rickettsii infection were lower in IGPs than in CGPs. IGPs exhibited only transient fever, while CGP showed signs of severe disease and mortality. R. rickettsii was detected in testicles and blood of CGPs. Results show that the strain 9-CC-3-1 of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' was able to generate pathology and an antibody response in guinea pigs. Moreover, its capacity to generate protective immunity against R. rickettsii may modulate the epidemiology and severity of Rocky

  20. The apolipoprotein L family of programmed cell death and immunity genes rapidly evolved in primates at discrete sites of host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Malik, Harmit S

    2009-05-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) is a human protein that confers immunity to Trypanosoma brucei infections but can be countered by a trypanosome-encoded antagonist SRA. APOL1 belongs to a family of programmed cell death genes whose proteins can initiate host apoptosis or autophagic death. We report here that all six members of the APOL gene family (APOL1-6) present in humans have rapidly evolved in simian primates. APOL6, furthermore, shows evidence of an adaptive sweep during recent human evolution. In each APOL gene tested, we found rapidly evolving codons in or adjacent to the SRA-interacting protein domain (SID), which is the domain of APOL1 that interacts with SRA. In APOL6, we also found a rapidly changing 13-amino-acid cluster in the membrane-addressing domain (MAD), which putatively functions as a pH sensor and regulator of cell death. We predict that APOL genes are antagonized by pathogens by at least two distinct mechanisms: SID antagonists, which include SRA, that interact with the SID of various APOL proteins, and MAD antagonists that interact with the MAD hinge base of APOL6. These antagonists either block or prematurely cause APOL-mediated programmed cell death of host cells to benefit the infecting pathogen. These putative interactions must occur inside host cells, in contrast to secreted APOL1 that trafficks to the trypanosome lysosome. Hence, the dynamic APOL gene family appears to be an important link between programmed cell death of host cells and immunity to pathogens.

  1. In Vivo Differences in the Virulence, Pathogenicity, and Induced Protective Immunity of wboA Mutants from Genetically Different Parent Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Niu, Jianrui; Wang, Shuangshan

    2013-01-01

    To explore the effects of the genetic background on the characteristics of wboA gene deletion rough mutants generated from different parent Brucella sp. strains, we constructed the rough-mutant strains Brucella melitensis 16 M-MB6, B. abortus 2308-SB6, B. abortus S19-RB6, and B. melitensis NI-NB6 and evaluated their survival, pathogenicity, and induced protective immunity in mice and sheep. In mice, the survival times of the four mutants were very different in the virulence assay, from less than 6 weeks for B. abortus S19-RB6 to 11 weeks for B. abortus 2308-SB6 and B. melitensis NI-NB6. However, B. abortus S19-RB6 and B. melitensis 16 M-MB6, with a shorter survival time in mice, offered better protection against challenges with B. abortus 2308 in protection tests than B. abortus 2308-SB6 and B. melitensis NI-NB6. It seems that the induced protective immunity of each mutant might not be associated with its survival time in vivo. In the cross-protection assay, both B. melitensis 16 M-MB6 and B. abortus S19-RB6 induced greater protection against homologous challenges than heterologous challenges. When pregnant sheep were inoculated with B. abortus S19-RB6 and B. melitensis 16 M-MB6, B. abortus S19-RB6 did not induce abortion, whereas B. melitensis 16 M-MB6 did. These results demonstrated the differences in virulence, pathogenicity, and protective immunity in vivo in the wboA deletion mutants from genetically different parent Brucella spp. and also indicated that future rough vaccine strain development could be promising if suitable parent Brucella strains and/or genes were selected. PMID:23239800

  2. Role of pathogen-derived cell wall carbohydrates and prostaglandin E2 in immune response and suppression of fish immunity by the oomycete Saprolegnia parasitica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Rodrigo; Wang, Tiehui; Duncan, Gary J; Skaar, Ida; Mélida, Hugo; Bulone, Vincent; van West, Pieter; Secombes, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Saprolegnia parasitica is a freshwater oomycete that is capable of infecting several species of fin fish. Saprolegniosis, the disease caused by this microbe, has a substantial impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. No sustainable treatment against saprolegniosis is available, and little is known regarding the host response. In this study, we examined the immune response of Atlantic salmon to S. parasitica infection and to its cell wall carbohydrates. Saprolegnia triggers a strong inflammatory response in its host (i.e., induction of interleukin-1β1 [IL-1β1], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha), while severely suppressing the expression of genes associated with adaptive immunity in fish, through downregulation of T-helper cell cytokines, antigen presentation machinery, and immunoglobulins. Oomycete cell wall carbohydrates were recognized by fish leukocytes, triggering upregulation of genes involved in the inflammatory response, similar to what is observed during infection. Our data suggest that S. parasitica is capable of producing prostaglandin [corrected] E2 (PGE2) in vitro, a metabolite not previously shown to be produced by oomycetes, and two proteins with homology to vertebrate enzymes known to play a role in prostaglandin biosynthesis have been identified in the oomycete genome. Exogenous PGE2 was shown to increase the inflammatory response in fish leukocytes incubated with cell wall carbohydrates while suppressing genes involved in cellular immunity (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and the IFN-γ-inducible protein [γ-IP]). Inhibition of S. parasitica zoospore germination and mycelial growth by two cyclooxygenase inhibitors (aspirin and indomethacin) also suggests that prostaglandins may be involved in oomycete development. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Infections with the Sexually Transmitted Pathogen Nosema apis Trigger an Immune Response in the Seminal Fluid of Honey Bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassl, Julia; Peng, Yan; Baer-Imhoof, Barbara; Welch, Mat; Millar, A Harvey; Baer, Boris

    2017-01-06

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) males are highly susceptible to infections with the sexually transmitted fungal pathogen Nosema apis. However, they are able to suppress this parasite in the ejaculate using immune molecules in the seminal fluid. We predicted that males respond to infections by altering the seminal fluid proteome to minimize the risk to sexually transmit the parasite to the queen and her colony. We used iTRAQ isotopic labeling to compare seminal fluid proteins from infected and noninfected males and found that N. apis infections resulted in significant abundance changes in 111 of the 260 seminal fluid proteins quantitated. The largest group of proteins with significantly changed abundances consisted of 15 proteins with well-known immune-related functions, which included two significantly more abundant chitinases in the seminal fluid of infected males. Chitinases were previously hypothesized to be involved in honey bee antifungal activity against N. apis. Here we show that infection with N. apis triggers a highly specific immune response in the seminal fluid of honey bee males.

  4. Immune escape mutants of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 selected using polyclonal sera: identification of key amino acids in the HA protein.

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    Ioannis Sitaras

    Full Text Available Evolution of Avian Influenza (AI viruses--especially of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI H5N1 subtype--is a major issue for the poultry industry. HPAI H5N1 epidemics are associated with huge economic losses and are sometimes connected to human morbidity and mortality. Vaccination (either as a preventive measure or as a means to control outbreaks is an approach that splits the scientific community, due to the risk of it being a potential driving force in HPAI evolution through the selection of mutants able to escape vaccination-induced immunity. It is therefore essential to study how mutations are selected due to immune pressure. To this effect, we performed an in vitro selection of mutants from HPAI A/turkey/Turkey/1/05 (H5N1, using immune pressure from homologous polyclonal sera. After 42 rounds of selection, we identified 5 amino acid substitutions in the Haemagglutinin (HA protein, most of which were located in areas of antigenic importance and suspected to be prone to selection pressure. We report that most of the mutations took place early in the selection process. Finally, our antigenic cartography studies showed that the antigenic distance between the selected isolates and their parent strain increased with passage number.

  5. Computational analyses of an evolutionary arms race between mammalian immunity mediated by immunoglobulin A and its subversion by bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pinheiro

    Full Text Available IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin isotype in mucosal tissues and external secretions, playing important roles both in defense against pathogens and in maintenance of commensal microbiota. Considering the complexity of its interactions with the surrounding environment, IgA is a likely target for diversifying or positive selection. To investigate this possibility, the action of natural selection on IgA was examined in depth with six different methods: CODEML from the PAML package and the SLAC, FEL, REL, MEME and FUBAR methods implemented in the Datamonkey webserver. In considering just primate IgA, these analyses show that diversifying selection targeted five positions of the Cα1 and Cα2 domains of IgA. Extending the analysis to include other mammals identified 18 positively selected sites: ten in Cα1, five in Cα2 and three in Cα3. All but one of these positions display variation in polarity and charge. Their structural locations suggest they indirectly influence the conformation of sites on IgA that are critical for interaction with host IgA receptors and also with proteins produced by mucosal pathogens that prevent their elimination by IgA-mediated effector mechanisms. Demonstrating the plasticity of IgA in the evolution of different groups of mammals, only two of the eighteen selected positions in all mammals are included in the five selected positions in primates. That IgA residues subject to positive selection impact sites targeted both by host receptors and subversive pathogen ligands highlights the evolutionary arms race playing out between mammals and pathogens, and further emphasizes the importance of IgA in protection against mucosal pathogens.

  6. Mechanisms of Host-Pathogen Protein Complex Formation and Bacterial Immune Evasion of Streptococcus suis Protein Fhb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueqin; Liu, Peng; Gan, Shuzhen; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-08-12

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2)-induced sepsis and meningitis are often accompanied by bacteremia. The evasion of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-mediated phagocytic clearance is central to the establishment of bacteremia caused by S. suis 2 and is facilitated by the ability of factor H (FH)-binding protein (Fhb) to bind FH on the bacterial surface, thereby impeding alternative pathway complement activation and phagocytic clearance. Here, C3b/C3d was found to bind to Fhb, along with FH, forming a large immune complex. The formation of this immune complex was mediated by domain II of Fhb via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which, to our knowledge, is a new type of interaction. Interestingly, Fhb was found to be associated with the cell envelope and also present in the culture supernatant, where secreted Fhb inhibited complement activation via interactions with domain II, thereby enhancing antiphagocytic clearance by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thus, Fhb is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement component C3 as well as FH and interferes with innate immune recognition in a secret protein manner. S. suis 2 therefore appears to have developed a new strategy to combat host innate immunity and enhance survival in host blood. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Mechanisms of Host-Pathogen Protein Complex Formation and Bacterial Immune Evasion of Streptococcus suis Protein Fhb*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueqin; Liu, Peng; Gan, Shuzhen; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2)-induced sepsis and meningitis are often accompanied by bacteremia. The evasion of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-mediated phagocytic clearance is central to the establishment of bacteremia caused by S. suis 2 and is facilitated by the ability of factor H (FH)-binding protein (Fhb) to bind FH on the bacterial surface, thereby impeding alternative pathway complement activation and phagocytic clearance. Here, C3b/C3d was found to bind to Fhb, along with FH, forming a large immune complex. The formation of this immune complex was mediated by domain II of Fhb via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which, to our knowledge, is a new type of interaction. Interestingly, Fhb was found to be associated with the cell envelope and also present in the culture supernatant, where secreted Fhb inhibited complement activation via interactions with domain II, thereby enhancing antiphagocytic clearance by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thus, Fhb is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement component C3 as well as FH and interferes with innate immune recognition in a secret protein manner. S. suis 2 therefore appears to have developed a new strategy to combat host innate immunity and enhance survival in host blood. PMID:27342778

  8. The roles of host and pathogen factors and the innate immune response in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingmin; Hirota, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the most common cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. The clinical manifestation of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is highly variable, from asymptomatic carriage, to mild self-limiting diarrhea, to the more severe pseudomembranous colitis. Furthermore, in extreme cases, colonic inflammation and tissue damage can lead to toxic megacolon, a condition requiring surgical intervention. C. difficile expresses two key virulence factors; the exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are glucosyltransferases that target host-cell monomeric GTPases. In addition, some hypervirulent strains produce a third toxin, binary toxin or C. difficile transferase (CDT), which may contribute to the pathogenesis of CDI. More recently, other factors such as surface layer proteins (SLPs) and flagellin have also been linked to the inflammatory responses observed in CDI. Although the adaptive immune response can influence the severity of CDI, the innate immune responses to C. difficile and its toxins play crucial roles in CDI onset, progression, and overall prognosis. Despite this, the innate immune responses in CDI have drawn relatively little attention from clinical researchers. Targeting these responses may prove useful clinically as adjuvant therapies, especially in refractory and/or recurrent CDI. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of how C. difficile and its toxins modulate innate immune responses that contribute to CDI pathogenesis. PMID:25242213

  9. Suppression or activation of immune responses by predicted secreted proteins of the soybean rust pathogen Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust fungi, such as Phakopsora pachyrhizi, are major threats to crop production. They form specialized haustoria that are intimately associated with plant cells. These haustoria have roles in acquiring nutrients and secreting effector proteins that manipulate host immune systems. Functional characte...

  10. Influence of maternal immunity on vaccine efficacy and susceptibility of one day old chicks against Egyptian highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwhab, E M; Grund, Christian; Aly, Mona M; Beer, Martin; Harder, Timm C; Hafez, Hafez M

    2012-02-24

    In Egypt, continuous circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses of clade 2.2.1 in vaccinated commercial poultry challenges strenuous control efforts. Here, vaccine-derived maternal AIV H5 specific immunity in one-day old chicks was investigated as a factor of vaccine failure in long-term blanket vaccination campaigns in broiler chickens. H5 seropositive one-day old chicks were derived from breeders repeatedly immunized with a commercial inactivated vaccine based on the Potsdam/H5N2 strain. When challenged using the antigenically related HPAIV strain Italy/98 (H5N2) clinical protection was achieved until at least 10 days post-hatch although virus replication was not fully suppressed. No protection at all was observed against the Egyptian HPAIV strain EGYvar/H5N1 representing a vaccine escape lineage. Other groups of chicks with maternal immunity were vaccinated once at 3 or 14 days of age using either the Potsdam/H5N2 vaccine or a vaccine based on EGYvar/H5N1. At day 35 of age these chicks were challenged with the Egyptian HPAIV strain EGYcls/H5N1 which co-circulates with EGYvar/H5N1 but does not represent an antigenic drift variant. The Potsdam/H5N2 vaccinated groups were not protected against EGYcls/H5N1 infection while, in contrast, the EGYvar/H5N1 vaccinated chicks withstand challenge with EGYvar/H5N1 infection. In addition, the results showed that maternal antibodies could interfere with the immune response when a homologous vaccine strain was used. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A Model of an Integrated Immune System Pathway in Homo sapiens and Its Interaction with Superantigen Producing Expression Regulatory Pathway in Staphylococcus aureus: Comparing Behavior of Pathogen Perturbed and Unperturbed Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Namrata; De, Rajat K.

    2013-01-01

    Response of an immune system to a pathogen attack depends on the balance between the host immune defense and the virulence of the pathogen. Investigation of molecular interactions between the proteins of a host and a pathogen helps in identifying the pathogenic proteins. It is necessary to understand the dynamics of a normally behaved host system to evaluate the capacity of its immune system upon pathogen attack. In this study, we have compared the behavior of an unperturbed and pathogen perturbed host system. Moreover, we have developed a formalism under Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) for the optimization of conflicting objective functions. We have constructed an integrated pathway system, which includes Staphylococcal Superantigen (SAg) expression regulatory pathway and TCR signaling pathway of Homo sapiens. We have implemented the method on this pathway system and observed the behavior of host signaling molecules upon pathogen attack. The entire study has been divided into six different cases, based on the perturbed/unperturbed conditions. In other words, we have investigated unperturbed and pathogen perturbed human TCR signaling pathway, with different combinations of optimization of concentrations of regulatory and signaling molecules. One of these cases has aimed at finding out whether minimization of the toxin production in a pathogen leads to the change in the concentration levels of the proteins coded by TCR signaling pathway genes in the infected host. Based on the computed results, we have hypothesized that the balance between TCR signaling inhibitory and stimulatory molecules can keep TCR signaling system into resting/stimulating state, depending upon the perturbation. The proposed integrated host-pathogen interaction pathway model has accurately reflected the experimental evidences, which we have used for validation purpose. The significance of this kind of investigation lies in revealing the susceptible interaction points that can take back the

  12. Discovery of new risk loci for IgA nephropathy implicates genes involved in immunity against intestinal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Scolari, Francesco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Choi, Murim; Verbitsky, Miguel; Fasel, David; Lata, Sneh; Prakash, Sindhuri; Shapiro, Samantha; Fischman, Clara; Snyder, Holly J.; Appel, Gerald; Izzi, Claudia; Viola, Battista Fabio; Dallera, Nadia; Vecchio, Lucia Del; Barlassina, Cristina; Salvi, Erika; Bertinetto, Francesca Eleonora; Amoroso, Antonio; Savoldi, Silvana; Rocchietti, Marcella; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Salvadori, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Magistroni, Riccardo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Bodria, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Allegri, Landino; Delsante, Marco; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Magnano, Andrea; Frasca, Giovanni; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Mignani, Renzo; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Di Landro, Domenico; Santoro, Domenico; Pani, Antonello; Polci, Rosaria; Feriozzi, Sandro; Chicca, Silvana; Galliani, Marco; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Zamboli, Pasquale; Maixnerová, Dita; Tesar, Vladimir; Eitner, Frank; Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen; Kovacs, Tibor; Nagy, Judit; Mucha, Krzysztof; Pączek, Leszek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Gale, Daniel; Barratt, Jonathan; Thibaudin, Lise; Berthoux, Francois; Canaud, Guillaume; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Panzer, Ulf; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Shin; Narita, Ichiei; Caliskan, Yasar; Xie, Jingyuan; Hou, Ping; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Wyatt, Robert J.; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A.; Feehally, John; Stengel, Benedicte; Cusi, Daniele; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of glomerulonephritis, with discovery and follow-up in 20,612 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We identified six novel genome-wide significant associations, four in ITGAM-ITGAX, VAV3 and CARD9 and two new independent signals at HLA-DQB1 and DEFA. We replicated the nine previously reported signals, including known SNPs in the HLA-DQB1 and DEFA loci. The cumulative burden of risk alleles is strongly associated with age at disease onset. Most loci are either directly associated with risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The geo-spatial distribution of risk alleles is highly suggestive of multi-locus adaptation and the genetic risk correlates strongly with variation in local pathogens, particularly helminth diversity, suggesting a possible role for host-intestinal pathogen interactions in shaping the genetic landscape of IgAN. PMID:25305756

  13. The Plant Immunity Regulating F-Box Protein CPR1 Supports Plastid Function in Absence of Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Hedtmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The redox imbalanced 6 mutant (rimb6 of Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated in a genetic screening approach for mutants with defects in chloroplast-to-nucleus redox signaling. It has an atypically low activation status of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin-A promoter in the seedling stage. rimb6 shows wildtype-like germination, seedling development and greening, but slower growth and reduced biomass in the rosette stage. Mapping of the casual mutation revealed that rimb6 carries a single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSER OF PATHOGENESIS RELATED (PR GENES 1, CPR1 (At4g12560, leading to a premature stop codon. CPR1 is known as a repressor of pathogen signaling and regulator of microtubule organization. Allelism of rimb6 and cpr1 revealed a function of CPR1 in chloroplast stress protection. Expression studies in pathogen signaling mutants demonstrated that CPR1-mediated activation of genes for photosynthesis and chloroplast antioxidant protection is, in contrast to activation of pathogen responses, regulated independently from PAD4-controlled salicylic acid (SA accumulation. We conclude that the support of plastid function is a basic, SA-independent function of CPR1.

  14. Functional characterization of a Nudix hydrolase AtNUDX8 upon pathogen attack indicates a positive role in plant immune responses.

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    Jose Pedro Fonseca

    Full Text Available Nudix hydrolases comprise a large gene family of twenty nine members in Arabidopsis, each containing a conserved motif capable of hydrolyzing specific substrates like ADP-glucose and NADH. Until now only two members of this family, AtNUDX6 and AtNUDX7, have been shown to be involved in plant immunity. RPP4 is a resistance gene from a multigene family that confers resistance to downy mildew. A time course expression profiling after Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis inoculation in both wild-type (WT and the rpp4 mutant was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in RPP4-mediated resistance. AtNUDX8 was one of several differentially expressed, downregulated genes identified. A T-DNA knockout mutant (KO-nudx8 was obtained from a Salk T-DNA insertion collection, which exhibited abolished AtNUDX8 expression. The KO-nudx8 mutant was infected separately from the oomycete pathogen Hpa and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326. The mutant displayed a significantly enhanced disease susceptibility to both pathogens when compared with the WT control. We observed a small, stunted phenotype for KO-nudx8 mutant plants when grown over a 12/12 hour photoperiod but not over a 16/8 hour photoperiod. AtNUDX8 expression peaked at 8 hours after the lights were turned on and this expression was significantly repressed four-fold by salicylic acid (SA. The expression of three pathogen-responsive thioredoxins (TRX-h2, TRX-h3 and TRX-h5 were downregulated at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant when compared with the WT. Furthermore, KO-nudx8 plants like the npr1 mutant, displayed SA hypersensitivity. Expression of a key SA biosynthetic gene ICS1 was repressed at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant suggesting that AtNUDX8 is involved in SA signaling in plants. Similarly, NPR1 and PR1 transcript levels were also downregulated at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant. This study shows that AtNUDX8 is involved in

  15. Loss of Anti-Viral Immunity by Infection with a Virus Encoding a Cross-Reactive Pathogenic Epitope

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Alex T.; Cornberg, Markus; Gras, Stephanie; Guillonneau, Carole; Rossjohn, Jamie; Trees, Andrew; Emonet, Sebastien; de la Torre, Juan C.; Welsh, Raymond M.; Selin, Liisa K.

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary The purpose of vaccination against viruses is to induce strong neutralizing antibody responses that inactivate viruses on contact and strong T cell responses that attack and kill virus-infected cells. Some viruses, however, like HIV and hepatitis C virus, are only weakly controlled by neutralizing antibody, so T cell immunity is very important for control of these infections. T cells recognize small virus-encoded peptides, called epitopes, presented on the surface of infected c...

  16. Systems-wide analyses of mucosal immune responses to Helicobacter pylori at the interface between pathogenicity and symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronsteiner, Barbara; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Philipson, Casandra; Viladomiu, Monica; Carbo, Adria; Abedi, Vida; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori is the dominant member of the gastric microbiota in over half of the human population of which 5–15% develop gastritis or gastric malignancies. Immune responses to H. pylori are characterized by mixed T helper cell, cytotoxic T cell and NK cell responses. The presence of Tregs is essential for the control of gastritis and together with regulatory CX3CR1+ mononuclear phagocytes and immune-evasion strategies they enable life-long persistence of H. pylori. This H. pylori-induced regulatory environment might contribute to its cross-protective effect in inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. Here we review host-microbe interactions, the development of pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses and how the latter contribute to H. pylori's role as beneficial member of the gut microbiota. Furthermore, we present the integration of existing and new data into a computational/mathematical model and its use for the investigation of immunological mechanisms underlying initiation, progression and outcomes of H. pylori infection. PMID:26939848

  17. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  18. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans—understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dühring, Sybille; Germerodt, Sebastian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important human pathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within the human host for a long time. However, alterations in the host environment can render C. albicans virulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and the human innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategies including immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation, pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. Furthermore, Computational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactions are highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. An outlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defense and evasion mechanisms is given. PMID:26175718

  19. Deletion of Repeats in the Alpha C Protein Enhances the Pathogenicity of Group B Streptococci in Immune Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gravekamp, C.; Rosner, Bernard; Madoff, L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The alpha C protein is a protective surface-associated antigen of group B streptococci (GBS). The prototype alpha C protein of GBS (strain A909) contains nine identical tandem repeats, each comprising 82 amino acids, flanked by N- and C-terminal domains. Clinical isolates of GBS show variable numbers of repeats with a normal distribution and a median of 9 to 10 repeats. Here, we show that escape mutants of GBS expressing one-repeat alpha C protein were 100-fold more pathogenic than GBS expres...

  20. Meta-analysis of the effects of insect vector saliva on host immune responses and infection of vector-transmitted pathogens: a focus on leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Ockenfels

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A meta-analysis of the effects of vector saliva on the immune response and progression of vector-transmitted disease, specifically with regard to pathology, infection level, and host cytokine levels was conducted. Infection in the absence or presence of saliva in naïve mice was compared. In addition, infection in mice pre-exposed to uninfected vector saliva was compared to infection in unexposed mice. To control for differences in vector and pathogen species, mouse strain, and experimental design, a random effects model was used to compare the ratio of the natural log of the experimental to the control means of the studies. Saliva was demonstrated to enhance pathology, infection level, and the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 in naïve mice. This effect was observed across vector/pathogen pairings, whether natural or unnatural, and with single salivary proteins used as a proxy for whole saliva. Saliva pre-exposure was determined to result in less severe leishmaniasis pathology when compared with unexposed mice infected either in the presence or absence of sand fly saliva. The results of further analyses were not significant, but demonstrated trends toward protection and IFN-γ elevation for pre-exposed mice.

  1. Meta-analysis of the effects of insect vector saliva on host immune responses and infection of vector-transmitted pathogens: a focus on leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenfels, Brittany; Michael, Edwin; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-10-01

    A meta-analysis of the effects of vector saliva on the immune response and progression of vector-transmitted disease, specifically with regard to pathology, infection level, and host cytokine levels was conducted. Infection in the absence or presence of saliva in naïve mice was compared. In addition, infection in mice pre-exposed to uninfected vector saliva was compared to infection in unexposed mice. To control for differences in vector and pathogen species, mouse strain, and experimental design, a random effects model was used to compare the ratio of the natural log of the experimental to the control means of the studies. Saliva was demonstrated to enhance pathology, infection level, and the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) in naïve mice. This effect was observed across vector/pathogen pairings, whether natural or unnatural, and with single salivary proteins used as a proxy for whole saliva. Saliva pre-exposure was determined to result in less severe leishmaniasis pathology when compared with unexposed mice infected either in the presence or absence of sand fly saliva. The results of further analyses were not significant, but demonstrated trends toward protection and IFN-γ elevation for pre-exposed mice.

  2. Determinant Variables, Enteric Pathogen Burden, Gut Function and Immune-related Inflammatory Biomarkers Associated With Childhood Malnutrition: A Prospective Case-Control Study in Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Aldo A M; Leite, Álvaro M; Di Moura, Alessandra; Lima, Noélia L; Soares, Alberto M; Abreu, Cláudia B; Filho, José Quirino; Mota, Rosa M S; Lima, Ila F N; Havt, Alexandre; Medeiros, Pedro H Q S; Prata, Mara M G; Guedes, Marjorie M; Cavalcante, Paloma A; Veras, Herlice N; Santos, Ana K S; Moore, Sean R; Pinkerton, Relana C; Houpt, Eric R; Guerrant, Richard L

    2017-12-01

    Malnutrition results in serious consequences for growth and cognitive development in children. We studied select child and maternal biologic factors, socioeconomic factors, enteric pathogenic burden and gut function biomarkers in 402 children 6-24 months of age in Northeastern Brazil. In this prospective case-control study, not being fed colostrum [odds ratio (OR): 3.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.73-6.26], maternal age ≥18 years (OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.10-3.22) and no electric fan (OR: 2.46, 95% CI: 1.22-4.96) or bicycle (OR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.10-2.95) in the household were positively associated, and higher birth weight (OR: 0.27, 95% CI: 0.19-0.38), larger head circumference (OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.66-0.82) and shortness of breath in the last 2 weeks (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.27-0.90) were negatively associated with malnutrition. Subclinical enteric pathogen infections were common, and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli infections were more prevalent in malnourished children (P = 0.045). Biomarkers such as the lactulose-mannitol test, myeloperoxidase, neopterin and calprotectin were highly elevated in both malnourished and nourished children. Nourished children had a better systemic immune response than the malnourished children, as detected by elevated serum amyloid A-1 and soluble cluster of differentiation protein 14 biomarkers (P malnutrition in children. There was a substantial subclinical enteric pathogen burden, particularly with enteroaggregative E. coli, in malnourished children.

  3. Anti-CD4 therapy for AIDS suggested by mathematical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Boucher, C.A.B.

    1996-01-01

    HIV-1 infection typically involves a long clinical latency stage during which CD4 counts decline slowly. For the later part of the clinical latency stage it was found recently that this is a highly dynamic phase characterized by rapid turnover rates. Clinical latency can therefore be considered as a

  4. Neurons versus herpes simplex virus: the innate immune interactions that contribute to a host–pathogen standoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Pamela C; Leib, David A

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a prevalent neurotropic virus, which establishes lifelong latent infections in the neurons of sensory ganglia. Despite our long-standing knowledge that HSV predominately infects sensory neurons during its life cycle, little is known about the neuronal antiviral response to HSV infection. Recent studies show that while sensory neurons have impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV infection, paracrine IFN signaling can potentiate a potent antiviral response. Additionally, antiviral autophagy plays an important role in neuronal control of HSV infection. Here we review the literature of antiviral signaling and autophagy in neurons, the mechanisms by which HSV can counteract these responses, and postulate how these two pathways may synergize to mediate neuronal control of HSV infection and yet result in lifelong persistence of the virus. PMID:26213562

  5. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans - Understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybille eDühring

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important humanpathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within thehuman host for a long time. Alterations in the host environment, however, can render C. albicansvirulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and thehuman innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategiesincluding immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation,pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. FurthermoreComputational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactionare highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. Anoutlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defenseand evasion mechanisms is given.

  6. Helicobacter pylori cholesteryl α-glucosides contribute to its pathogenicity and immune response by natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Approximately 10-15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer, while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT, which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18(-/- or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis.

  7. AMPK in Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Mesquita, Inês Morais; Moreira, Diana; Marques, Belém Sampaio; Laforge, Mireille; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Ludovico, Paula; Estaquier, Jérôme; Silvestre, Ricardo Jorge Leal

    2016-01-01

    During host–pathogen interactions, a complex web of events is crucial for the outcome of infection. Pathogen recognition triggers powerful cellular signaling events that is translated into the induction and maintenance of innate and adaptive host immunity against infection. In opposition, pathogens employ active mechanisms to manipulate host cell regulatory pathways toward their proliferation and survival. Among these, subversion of host cell energy metabolism by pathogens is currently recogn...

  8. Role of yqiC in the pathogenicity of Salmonella and innate immune responses of human intestinal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Chuan Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The yqiC gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium regulates bacterial growth at different temperatures and mice survival after infection. However, the role of yqiC in bacterial colonization and host immunity remains unknown. We infected human LS174T, Caco-2, HeLa, and THP-1 cells with S. Typhimurium wild-type SL1344, its yqiC mutant, and its complemented strain. Bacterial colonization and internalization in the four cell lines significantly reduced on yqiC depletion. Postinfection production of interleukin-8 and human β-defensin-3 in LS174T cells significantly reduced because of yqiC deleted in S. Typhimurium. The phenotype of yqiC mutant exhibited few and short flagella, fimbriae on the cell surface, enhanced biofilm formation, upregulated type-1 fimbriae expression, and reduced bacterial motility. Type-1 fimbriae, flagella, SPI-1, and SPI-2 gene expression was quantified using real-time PCR. The data show that deletion of yqiC upregulated fimA and fimZ expression and downregulated flhD, fliZ, invA, and sseB expression. Furthermore, thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography revealed the absence of menaquinone in the yqiC mutant, thus validating the importance of yqiC in the bacterial electron transport chain. Therefore, YqiC can negatively regulate FimZ for type-1 fimbriae expression and manipulate the functions of its downstream virulence factors including flagella, SPI-1, and SPI-2 effectors.

  9. Immunization of pregnant cows with Shiga toxin-2 induces high levels of specific colostral antibodies and lactoferrin able to neutralize E. coli O157:H7 pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Adriana; Sacerdoti, Flavia; Seyahian, E Abril; Amaral, Maria Marta; Fiorentino, Gabriela; Fernandez Brando, Romina; Vilte, Daniel A; Mercado, Elsa C; Palermo, Marina S; Cataldi, Angel; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina

    2018-03-20

    E. coli O157:H7 is a foodborne pathogen responsible for bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The objective of the present work was to evaluate the ability of colostral IgG obtained from Stx2-immunized cows to prevent against E. coli O157:H7 infection and Stx2 cytotoxicity. Hyperimmune colostrum (HC) was obtained from cows intramuscularly immunized with inactivated Stx2 or vehicle for controls. Colostral IgG was purified by affinity chromatography. Specific IgG antibodies against Stx2 and bovine lactoferrin (bLF) levels in HC and the corresponding IgG (HC-IgG/bLF) were determined by ELISA. The protective effects of HC-IgG/bLF against Stx2 cytotoxicity and adhesion of E. coli O157:H7 and its Stx2-negative mutant were analyzed in HCT-8 cells. HC-IgG/bLF prevention against E. coli O157:H7 was studied in human colon and rat colon loops. Protection against a lethal dose of E. coli O157:H7 was evaluated in a weaned mice model. HC-IgG/bLF showed high anti-Stx2 titers and high bLF levels that were able to neutralize the cytotoxic effects of Stx2 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HC-IgG/bLF avoided the inhibition of water absorption induced by E. coli O157:H7 in human colon and also the pathogenicity of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli O157:H7Δstx2 in rat colon loops. Finally, HC-IgG/bLF prevented in a 100% the lethality caused by E. coli O157:H7 in a weaned mice model. Our study suggests that HC-IgG/bLF have protective effects against E. coli O157:H7 infection. These beneficial effects may be due to specific anti-Stx2 neutralizing antibodies in combination with high bLF levels. These results allow us to consider HC-IgG/bLF as a nutraceutical tool which could be used in combination with balanced supportive diets to prevent HUS. However further studies are required before recommendations can be made for therapeutic and clinical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytokine regulation of immune tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Aini; Chen, Wenhao

    2014-01-01

    The immune system provides defenses against invading pathogens while maintaining immune tolerance to self-antigens. This immune homeostasis is harmonized by the direct interactions between immune cells and the cytokine environment in which immune cells develop and function. Herein, we discuss three non-redundant paradigms by which cytokines maintain or break immune tolerance. We firstly describe how anti-inflammatory cytokines exert direct inhibitory effects on immune cells to enforce immune ...

  11. Immune responses and interactions following simultaneous application of live Newcastle disease, infectious bronchitis and avian metapneumovirus vaccines in specific-pathogen-free chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Faez; Forrester, Anne; Baylis, Matthew; Lemiere, Stephane; Jones, Richard; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2015-02-01

    Interactions between live Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccines following simultaneous vaccination of day old specific pathogen free (SPF) chicks were evaluated. The chicks were divided into eight groups: seven vaccinated against NDV, aMPV and IBV (single, dual or triple) and one unvaccinated as control. Haemagglutination inhibition (HI) NDV antibody titres were similar across all groups but were above protective titres. aMPV vaccine when given with other live vaccines suppressed levels of aMPV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibodies. Cellular and local immunity induced by administration of NDV, aMPV or IBV vaccines (individually or together) showed significant increase in CD4+, CD8+ and IgA bearing B-cells in the trachea compared to the unvaccinated group. Differences between the vaccinated groups were insignificant. Simultaneous vaccination with live NDV, aMPV and IBV did not affect the protection conferred against aMPV or IBV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plant innate immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plants are invaded by an array of pathogens of which only a few succeed in causing disease. The attack by others is countered by a sophisticated immune system possessed by the plants. The plant immune system is broadly divided into two, viz. microbial-associated molecular-patterns-triggered immunity (MTI) and ...

  13. Do the Microbiota Influence Vaccines and Protective Immunity to Pathogens? Issues of Sovereignty, Federalism, and Points-Testing in the Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Spaces of the Host-Microbial Superorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Andrew J

    2018-02-01

    In contrast to live attenuated vaccines, which are designed to induce immunity through a time-limited bloom in systemic tissues, the microbiota is a persistent feature of body surfaces, especially the intestine. The immune responses to the microbiota are idiosyncratic depending on the niche intimacy of different taxa and generally adapt the host to avoid overgrowth and maintain mutualism rather than to eliminate the organisms of that taxon. Both the microbiota and the host have so much molecular cross talk controlling each other, that the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic spaces of the host-microbial superorganism are federal rather than sovereign. This molecular cross talk is vital for the immune system to develop its mature form. Nevertheless, the microbiota/host biomass spaces are rather well separated: The microbiota also limits colonization and penetration of pathogens through intense metabolic competition. Immune responses to those members of the microbiota mutually adapted to intimate association at mucosal surfaces have attractive potential durability, but for clinical use as persistent vehicles they would require personalization and engineered reversibility to manage the immune context and complications in individual human subjects. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. Aspergillus flavus infection triggered immune responses and host-pathogen cross-talks in groundnut during in-vitro seed colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxin contamination, caused by fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus, is a major quality and health problem delimiting the trade and consumption of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) worldwide. RNA-seq approach was deployed to understand the host-pathogen interaction by identifying differentially expr...

  15. The role of CD4+ T cells in cell-mediated immunity to LCMV: studies in MHC class I and class II deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1994-01-01

    Parameters of the virus-specific T-cell response were analysed in order to dissect the contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to cell-mediated immunity to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. In MHC class II deficient mice, initial T-cell responsiveness was not impaired, but virus clearance...... was delayed, and virus-specific Td activity declined more rapidly. Furthermore, class I restricted Tc memory appeared to be impaired in these mice. To directly evaluate the role of CD4+ cells in virus clearance and T-cell mediated inflammation, MHC class I deficient mice were also studied. No virus...... exudate. This low-grade response was associated with some degree of virus control as organ titres were lower in these animals than in matched T-cell deficient nu/nu mice or class I deficient mice treated with anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. This confirms that CD4+ cells are not needed to induce a virus...

  16. Boosting Immune Responses Against Bacterial Pathogens: In Vitro Analysis of Immunomodulators (In Vitro Analyse van de Stimulerende Werking van Verschillende Stoffen op het Immuunsysteem)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kleij, D. van der

    2007-01-01

    .... Three potential broad-spectrum therapeutics (MPL, MDP and ssPolyU) and their combinations were tested in an in vitro dendritic cell culture system, since dendritic cells play a central role in the development of immune...

  17. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eGijzen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  18. Immune response in domestic ducks following intradermal delivery of inactivated vaccine against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus adjuvanted with oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Seong-Su; Lee, Dong-Hun; Park, Jae-Keun; To, Eredene-Ochir; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Noh, Jin-Yong; Gomis, Susantha; Song, Chang-Seon

    2015-08-01

    Ducks are a natural reservoir for H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, which produces a range of clinical outcomes from asymptomatic infections to severe disease with mortality. Vaccination against HPAI is one of the few methods available for controlling avian influenza virus (AIV) infection in domestic ducks; therefore, it is necessary to improve vaccine efficacy against HPAI in domestic ducks. However, few studies have focused on enhancing the immune response by testing alternative administration routes and adjuvants. While attempting to maximize the efficacy of a vaccine, it is important to select an appropriate vaccine delivery route and adjuvant to elicit an enhanced immune response. Although several studies have indicated that the vaccination of ducks against HPAI viruses has offered protection against lethal virus challenge, the immunogenicity of the vaccine still requires improvement. In this study, we characterized the immune response following a novel vaccination strategy against H5N1 HPAI virus in domestic ducks. Our novel intradermal delivery system and the application of the cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) adjuvant allowed us to obtain information regarding the sustained vaccine immunity. Compared with the intramuscular route of vaccination, the intradermal route resulted in higher antibody titer as well as lower antibody deviation following secondary vaccination. In addition, the use of a CpG-ODN adjuvant had a dose-sparing effect on antibody titer. Furthermore, when a high dose of antigen was used, the CpG-ODN-adjuvanted vaccine maintained a high mean antibody titer. This data demonstrates that intradermal immunization combined with administration of CpG-ODN as an adjuvant may be a promising strategy for improving vaccine efficacy in domestic ducks. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Experimental and Field Results Regarding Immunity Induced by a Recombinant Turkey Herpesvirus H5 Vector Vaccine Against H5N1 and Other H5 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardin, Yannick; Palya, Vilmos; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; El-Attrache, John; Bonfante, Francesco; Wit, Sjaak de; Kapczynski, Darrell; Kilany, Walid Hamdy; Rauw, Fabienne; Steensels, Mieke; Soejoedono, Retno D

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) virus (HPAIV) is one of the possible complementary means available for affected countries to control AI when the disease has become, or with a high risk of becoming, endemic. Efficacy of the vaccination against AI relies essentially, but not exclusively, on the capacity of the vaccine to induce immunity against the targeted virus (which is prone to undergo antigenic variations), as well as its capacity to overcome interference with maternal immunity transmitted by immunized breeding hens to their progeny. This property of the vaccine is a prerequisite for its administration at the hatchery, which assures higher and more reliable vaccine coverage of the populations than vaccination at the farm. A recombinant vector vaccine (Vectormune® AI), based on turkey herpesvirus expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an H5N1 HPAIV as an insert, has been used in several experiments conducted in different research laboratories, as well as in controlled field trials. The results have demonstrated a high degree of homologous and cross protection against different genetic clades of the H5N1 HPAIV. Furthermore, vaccine-induced immunity was not impaired by the presence of passive immunity, but on the contrary, cumulated with it for improved early protection. The demonstrated levels of protection against the different challenge viruses exhibited variations in terms of postchallenge mortality, as well as challenge virus shedding. The data presented here highlight the advantages of this vaccine as a useful and reliable tool to complement biosecurity and sanitary policies for better controlling the disease due to HPAIV of H5 subtypes, when the vaccination is applied as a control measure.

  20. Vaccination with an Attenuated Mutant of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Induces Pathogen-Specific CD4+ T Cell Immunity and Protection from Tick-Transmitted Wild-Type Challenge in the Canine Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi L McGill

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen and the causative agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Transmitted by the Amblyomma americanum tick, E. chaffeensis also causes disease in several other vertebrate species including white-tailed deer and dogs. We have recently described the generation of an attenuated mutant strain of E. chaffeensis, with a mutation in the Ech_0660 gene, which is able to confer protection from secondary, intravenous-administered, wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in dogs. Here, we extend our previous results, demonstrating that vaccination with the Ech_0660 mutant protects dogs from physiologic, tick-transmitted, secondary challenge with wild-type E. chaffeensis; and describing, for the first time, the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by Ech_0660 mutant vaccination and wild-type E. chaffeensis infection in the canine host. Both vaccination and infection induced a rise in E. chaffeensis-specific antibody titers and a significant Th1 response in peripheral blood as measured by E. chaffeensis antigen-dependent CD4+ T cell proliferation and IFNγ production. Further, we describe for the first time significant IL-17 production by peripheral blood leukocytes from both Ech_0660 mutant vaccinated animals and control animals infected with wild-type E. chaffeensis, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for IL-17 and Th17 cells in the immune response to rickettsial pathogens. Our results are a critical first step towards defining the role of the immune system in vaccine-induced protection from E. chaffeensis infection in an incidental host; and confirm the potential of the attenuated mutant clone, Ech_0660, to be used as a vaccine candidate for protection against tick-transmitted E. chaffeensis infection.

  1. Pulmonary immunization of chickens using non-adjuvanted spray-freeze dried whole inactivated virus vaccine completely protects against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Ben; Tonnis, Wouter F.; Murugappan, Senthil; Rottier, Peter; Koch, Guus; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Huckriede, Anke; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a major threat to public health as well as to the global poultry industry. Most fatal human infections are caused by contact with infected poultry. Therefore, preventing the virus from entering the poultry population is a priority. This is,

  2. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  3. Comparison of the cytokine immune response to pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 1B/O:8 and 2/O:9 in susceptible BALB/C and resistant C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Gu, Wenpeng; Qiu, Haiyan; Xia, Shengli; Zheng, Han; Xiao, Yuchun; Liang, Junrong; Jing, Huaiqi

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the lethality of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotypes 1B/O:8 and 2/O:9 in susceptible BALB/C and resistant C57BL/6 mice; the cytokine alterations and histopathological changes were observed comparing the two strains in BALB/C mice. The data showed the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for the pathogenic Y. enterocolitica bioserotype 1B/O:8 was 10³ cfu in both BALB/C and C57BL/6 mice; while the LD50 for the 2/O:9 was 10⁸ cfu in BALB/C mice and 10⁹ cfu in C57BL/6 mice, a large difference. After infection with the two strains in BALB/C mice, GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), IFN-γ (interferon-γ), IL-1β (interleukin-1β), IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) appeared as a cytokine storm in a short period, reached peak values, and then quickly decreased. This appeared important for the immune response and cytokine immunopathogenesis in pathogenic Y. enterocolitica infections. In the initial infection stage, GM-CSF, IL-6, and TNF-α of 2/O:9 were higher than 1B/O:8; and subsequently the status was reversed. However, levels of IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 following infection with 1B/O:8 were always higher than with 2/O:9. The histopathological changes in the liver and spleen in BALB/C mice infected with the two strains were similar at different times and doses. These observations show the different immunological effects and changes for pathogenic Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8 and 2/O:9 infections using the mouse model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hepatic gene expression changes in pigs experimentally infected with the lung pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae as analysed with an innate immunity focused microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge on gene expression in the liver during respiratory infections is limited although it is well-established that this organ is an important site of synthesis of several systemic innate immune components as response to infections. In the present study, the early transcriptional hepatic...... in initiating and orchestrating the innate immune response to A. pleuropneumoniae infection. Keywords: acute phase protein, hepatic transcriptional response, innate defence, gene expression, pig...... differentially expressed. A large group of these genes encoded proteins involved in the acute phase response, including serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, haptoglobin and tumor necrosis factor-a the expression of which were all found to be up-regulated and glutathione S-transferase, transthyretin...

  5. Vitamin E, immunity, and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    A normally functioning immune system is critical for the body to fight and eliminate invading pathogens from the environment. On the other hand, the immune system also protects the body from internal risks such as neoplasia growing within and autoimmune responses that attack self. The immune system ...

  6. AMPK in Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Inês; Moreira, Diana; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Laforge, Mireille; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Ludovico, Paula; Estaquier, Jérôme; Silvestre, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    During host-pathogen interactions, a complex web of events is crucial for the outcome of infection. Pathogen recognition triggers powerful cellular signaling events that is translated into the induction and maintenance of innate and adaptive host immunity against infection. In opposition, pathogens employ active mechanisms to manipulate host cell regulatory pathways toward their proliferation and survival. Among these, subversion of host cell energy metabolism by pathogens is currently recognized to play an important role in microbial growth and persistence. Extensive studies have documented the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, a central cellular hub involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, in host-pathogen interactions. Here, we highlight the most recent advances detailing how pathogens hijack cellular metabolism by suppressing or increasing the activity of the host energy sensor AMPK. We also address the role of lower eukaryote AMPK orthologues in the adaptive process to the host microenvironment and their contribution for pathogen survival, differentiation, and growth. Finally, we review the effects of pharmacological or genetic AMPK modulation on pathogen growth and persistence.

  7. Differential immune response of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at early developmental stages (larvae and fry) against the bacterial pathogen Yersinia ruckeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Raida, Martin Kristian; Kania, Per Walter

    2012-01-01

    . We exposed 17 and 87 days post hatch larvae and fry (152 and 1118 degree days post hatch; avg. wt. 70 and 770 mg, respectively) to the bacterial pathogen, Yersinia ruckeri for 4 h by bath challenge. Samples were taken at 4, 24, 72 and 96 h post exposure for qPCR and immunohistochemical analyses...... to elucidate the immune response mounted by these young fish. Larvae showed no mortality although infected larvae at 48 h post exposure showed hyperaemia in the mouth region and inflammation on the dorsal side of the body. Gene expression studies showed an up-regulation of iNOS and IL-22 in infected larvae 24...... h post exposure but most of the investigated genes did not show any difference between infected and uninfected larvae. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated a high expression of IgT molecules in gills and CD8 positive cells in thymus of both infected and uninfected larvae. Infection of rainbow...

  8. CD40 Ligand Deficient C57BL/6 Mouse Is a Potential Surrogate Model of Human X-Linked Hyper IgM (X-HIGM Syndrome for Characterizing Immune Responses against Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Lopez-Saucedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with X-HIGM syndrome fail to express functional CD40 ligand; consequently they cannot mount effective protective antibody responses against pathogenic bacteria. We evaluated, compared, and characterized the humoral immune response of wild type (WT and C57-CD40L deficient (C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium. Basal serum isotype levels were similar for IgM and IgG3 among mice, while total IgG and IgG2b concentrations were significantly lower in C57-CD40L−/− mice compared with WT. Essentially IgG1 and IgG2c levels were detectable only in WT mice. C57-CD40L−/− animals, orally inoculated with 2×109 CFU, presented several clinical manifestations since the second week of infection and eventually died. In contrast at this time point no clinical manifestations were observed among C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with 1×107 CFU. Infection was subclinical in WT mice inoculated with either bacterial dose. The serum samples from infected mice (1×107 CFU, collected at day 14 after infection, had similar C. rodentium-specific IgM titres. Although C57-CD40L−/− animals had lower IgG and IgG2b titres than WT mice, C57-CD40L−/− mice sera displayed complement-mediated bactericidal activity against C. rodentium. C. rodentium-infected C57-CD40L−/− mice are capable of producing antibodies that are protective. C57-CD40L−/− mouse is a useful surrogate model of X-HIGM syndrome for studying immune responses elicited against pathogens.

  9. Humanized HLA-DR4 mice fed with the protozoan pathogen of oysters Perkinsus marinus (Dermo do not develop noticeable pathology but elicit systemic immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wathsala Wijayalath

    Full Text Available Perkinsus marinus (Phylum Perkinsozoa is a marine protozoan parasite responsible for "Dermo" disease in oysters, which has caused extensive damage to the shellfish industry and estuarine environment. The infection prevalence has been estimated in some areas to be as high as 100%, often causing death of infected oysters within 1-2 years post-infection. Human consumption of the parasites via infected oysters is thus likely to occur, but to our knowledge the effect of oral consumption of P. marinus has not been investigated in humans or other mammals. To address the question we used humanized mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules and lacking expression of mouse MHC-class II molecules (DR4.EA(0 in such a way that CD4 T cell responses are solely restricted by the human HLA-DR4 molecule. The DR4.EA(0 mice did not develop diarrhea or any detectable pathology in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs following single or repeated feedings with live P. marinus parasites. Furthermore, lymphocyte populations in the gut associated lymphoid tissue and spleen were unaltered in the parasite-fed mice ruling out local or systemic inflammation. Notably, naïve DR4.EA(0 mice had antibodies (IgM and IgG reacting against P. marinus parasites whereas parasite specific T cell responses were undetectable. Feeding with P. marinus boosted the antibody responses and stimulated specific cellular (IFNγ immunity to the oyster parasite. Our data indicate the ability of P. marinus parasites to induce systemic immunity in DR4.EA(0 mice without causing noticeable pathology, and support rationale grounds for using genetically engineered P. marinus as a new oral vaccine platform to induce systemic immunity against infectious agents.

  10. Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to the immune system, the gastrointestinal tract and defence against pathogenic microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to update the guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to gut and immune function published in 2011. Since then, the NDA Panel has completed the evaluation...... the shortcomings that prevented the substantiation of these claims. The general document represents the views of the NDA Panel based on the experience gained to date with the evaluation of health claims, and it may be further updated, as appropriate, in the light of experiences gained from the evaluation...

  11. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  12. Infection Structure–Specific Expression of β-1,3-Glucan Synthase Is Essential for Pathogenicity of Colletotrichum graminicola and Evasion of β-Glucan–Triggered Immunity in Maize[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Garcia, Ely; Deising, Holger B.

    2013-01-01

    β-1,3-Glucan and chitin are the most prominent polysaccharides of the fungal cell wall. Covalently linked, these polymers form a scaffold that determines the form and properties of vegetative and pathogenic hyphae. While the role of chitin in plant infection is well understood, the role of β-1,3-glucan is unknown. We functionally characterized the β-1,3-glucan synthase gene GLS1 of the maize (Zea mays) pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola, employing RNA interference (RNAi), GLS1 overexpression, live-cell imaging, and aniline blue fluorochrome staining. This hemibiotroph sequentially differentiates a melanized appressorium on the cuticle and biotrophic and necrotrophic hyphae in its host. Massive β-1,3-glucan contents were detected in cell walls of appressoria and necrotrophic hyphae. Unexpectedly, GLS1 expression and β-1,3-glucan contents were drastically reduced during biotrophic development. In appressoria of RNAi strains, downregulation of β-1,3-glucan synthesis increased cell wall elasticity, and the appressoria exploded. While the shape of biotrophic hyphae was unaffected in RNAi strains, necrotrophic hyphae showed severe distortions. Constitutive expression of GLS1 led to exposure of β-1,3-glucan on biotrophic hyphae, massive induction of broad-spectrum defense responses, and significantly reduced disease symptom severity. Thus, while β-1,3-glucan synthesis is required for cell wall rigidity in appressoria and fast-growing necrotrophic hyphae, its rigorous downregulation during biotrophic development represents a strategy for evading β-glucan–triggered immunity. PMID:23898035

  13. Innate immune response against an oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces invadans in common carp (Cyprinus carpio), a fish resistant to epizootic ulcerative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manoj K; Pradhan, Pravata K; Sood, Neeraj; Chaudhary, Dharmendra K; Verma, Dev K; Chauhan, U K; Punia, Peyush; Jena, Joy K

    2016-03-01

    Infection with Aphanomyces invadans, also known as epizootic ulcerative syndrome, is a destructive disease of freshwater and brackishwater fishes. Although more than 130 species of fish have been confirmed to be susceptible to this disease, some of the commercially important fish species like common carp, milk fish and tilapia are reported to be resistant. Species that are naturally resistant to a particular disease, provide a potential model to study the mechanisms of resistance against that disease. In the present study, following experimental infection with A. invadans in common carp Cyprinus carpio, sequential changes in various innate immune parameters and histopathological alterations were monitored. Some of the studied innate immunity parameters viz. respiratory burst, alternative complement and total antiproteases activities of the infected common carp were higher compared to control fish, particularly at early stages of infection. On the other hand, some parameters such as myeloperoxidase, lysozyme and alpha-2 macroglobulin activities were not altered. Histopathological examination of the muscle at the site of injection revealed well developed granulomas at 12 days post infection, with subsequent regeneration of muscle fibers. From the results, it could be inferred that innate defense mechanisms of common carp are able to neutralize the virulence factors secreted by A. invadans, thereby, preventing its invasive spread and containing the infection. The results obtained here will help to better understand the mechanisms underlying resistance against A. invadans infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Alzheimer's Disease: APP, Gamma Secretase, APOE, CLU, CR1, PICALM, ABCA7, BIN1, CD2AP, CD33, EPHA1, and MS4A2, and Their Relationships with Herpes Simplex, C. Pneumoniae, Other Suspect Pathogens, and the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Carter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease susceptibility genes, APP and gamma-secretase, are involved in the herpes simplex life cycle, and that of other suspect pathogens (C. pneumoniae, H. pylori, C. neoformans, B. burgdorferri, P. gingivalis or immune defence. Such pathogens promote beta-amyloid deposition and tau phosphorylation and may thus be causative agents, whose effects are conditioned by genes. The antimicrobial effects of beta-amyloid, the localisation of APP/gamma-secretase in immunocompetent dendritic cells, and gamma secretase cleavage of numerous pathogen receptors suggest that this network is concerned with pathogen disposal, effects which may be abrogated by the presence of beta-amyloid autoantibodies in the elderly. These autoantibodies, as well as those to nerve growth factor and tau, also observed in Alzheimer's disease, may well be antibodies to pathogens, due to homology between human autoantigens and pathogen proteins. NGF or tau antibodies promote beta-amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary tangles, or cholinergic neuronal loss, and, with other autoantibodies, such as anti-ATPase, are potential agents of destruction, whose formation is dictated by sequence homology between pathogen and human proteins, and thus by pathogen strain and human genes. Pathogen elimination in the ageing population and removal of culpable autoantibodies might reduce the incidence and offer hope for a cure in this affliction.

  15. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlink, Sarah N; Lager, Kelly M; Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Miller, Laura C; Vorwald, Ann C; Yang, Han-Chun; Kehrli, Marcus E; Faaberg, Kay S

    2016-10-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or limit secondary bacterial infections are desired to reduce the impact of this virus on animal health. Neutrophils play a major role in combatting infection; they can act as phagocytes as well as produce and release lytic enzymes that have potent antimicrobial effects leading to the destruction and clearance of bacterial pathogens. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that controls the production, differentiation and function of granulocytes (including neutrophils) from the bone marrow. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that encoding porcine G-CSF in a replication-defective adenovirus (Ad5-G-CSF) and delivering a single dose to pigs induced a neutrophilia lasting more than two weeks. As secondary bacterial infection is a common occurrence following PRRSV infection, particularly following challenge with highly pathogenic (HP)-PRRSV, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a single prophylactic dose of adenovirus-encoded G-CSF to mitigate secondary bacterial disease associated with HP-PRRSV infection. Administration of Ad5-G-CSF induced a significant neutrophilia as expected. However, between 1 and 2days following HP-PRRSV challenge the number of circulating neutrophils decreased dramatically in the HP-PRRSV infected group, but not the non-infected Ad5-G-CSF group. Ad5-G-CSF administration induced monocytosis as well, which was also reduced by HP-PRRSV challenge. There was no difference in the progression of disease between the Ad5-G-CSF and Ad5-empty groups following HP-PRRSV challenge, with pneumonia and systemic bacterial infection occurring in both treatment groups. Given the impact of HP-PRRSV infection on the

  16. Two distinct CXC chemokine receptors (CXCR3 and CXCR4) from the big-belly seahorse Hippocampus abdominalis: Molecular perspectives and immune defensive role upon pathogenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Oh, Minyoung; Bathige, S D N K; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Lee, Jehee

    2017-06-01

    CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) and 4 (CXCR4) are members of the seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor family, involved in pivotal physiological functions. In this study, seahorse CXCR3 and CXCR4 (designated as HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4) cDNA sequences were identified from the transcriptome library and subsequently molecularly characterized. HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 encoded 363 and 373 amino acid long polypeptides, respectively. The HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 deduced proteins have typical structural features of chemokine receptors, including seven transmembrane domains and a G protein coupled receptors family 1 profile with characteristic DRY motifs. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of these two CXC chemokine receptors revealed a close relationship to their corresponding teleost counterparts. Quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed that HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 were ubiquitously expressed in all the tested tissues, with highest expression levels in blood cells. The seahorse blood cells and kidney HaCXCR3 and HaCXCR4 mRNA expressions were differently modulated when challenged with Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, lipopolysaccharide, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, confirming their involvement in post immune responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabd...

  18. Transient Transcriptional Regulation of the CYS-C1 Gene and Cyanide Accumulation upon Pathogen Infection in the Plant Immune Response1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  19. Self-consuming innate immunity in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-induced hypersensitive response (HR) is a hallmark of plant innate immunity. HR PCD is triggered upon recognition of pathogen effector molecules by host immune receptors either directly or indirectly via effector modulation of host targets...

  20. Tick Innate Immunity.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Petr; Hajdušek, Ondřej; Burešová, Veronika; Daffre, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 708, - (2010), 137-162 ISSN 0065-2598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/2136; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : tick * pathogen transmission * innate immunity Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.379, year: 2010

  1. Introduction of OX40 ligand into lymphoma cells elicits anti-lymphoma immunity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hitomi; Hori, Toshiyuki; Yanagita, Soshi; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Uchiyama, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    OX40, a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, and its ligand (OX40L) play crucial roles in induction and maintenance of integrated T cell immune response. Engagement of OX40L delivers a costimulatory signal to T cells. In this study, we investigated whether inoculation of OX40L-transfected EL4, a murine T cell lymphoma cell line, could induce anti-lymphoma immunity in mice. Female C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with 1 x 10(5) cells of parental EL4, OX40L-transfected EL4 (EL4-OX40L), or mock control vector-transfected EL4 (EL4-mock), and then the tumor size, overall survival, CTL activity of spleen cells, and the immunohistochemistry were compared. While both parental EL4 and EL4-mock grew rapidly, EL4-OX40L was rejected or grew slower than parental EL4 or EL4-mock. Pretreatment of mice with either anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 mAb accelerated the growth of EL4-OX40L, suggesting that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were involved in anti-lymphoma immunity. The immunohistochemical study revealed the infiltration of CD8+ T cells into the tumor of EL4-OX40L. In vitro CTL assay demonstrated that spleen cells of mice that had rejected EL4-OX40L had significant cytotoxic activity against parental EL4. The gene transfer of OX40L into lymphoma cells is an eligible and efficient modality to induce anti-lymphoma immunity.

  2. Functional aspects of the adaptive immune system in arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.T.S.L.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is the part of the immune system that is highly specific and generates memory resulting in a fast and specific immune response upon a second infection with the same pathogen. However, when this response is specific for a part of the body itself instead of a pathogen,

  3. Pathogen disgust and interpersonal personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kupfer, Tom R.; Tybur, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    The behavioral immune system includes motivational systems for avoiding contact with pathogens, including those transmitted by other people. Motivations to avoid others may depend not only on the perceived risk of infection but also on perceived benefits of social interaction. Based on this idea, we

  4. Immune Repertoire Characteristics and Dynamics in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiao

    The diversity of T and B cells in terms of their receptors is huge in the invertebrate’s immune system, to provide broad protection against the vast diversity of pathogens. Immune repertoire is defined as the sum of total subtypes that makes the organism’s immune system, either T cell receptor or...

  5. Cellular immune responses to respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    When a respiratory virus successfully infects the lungs, cascades of immune responses are initiated aimed to remove the pathogen. Immediate non-specific protection is provided by the innate immune system and this reduces the viral load during the first days of infection. The adaptive immune response

  6. Effect of three pathogenic vibrio infections on the non-specific immunity of croaker, Pseudosciaena crocea%三种致病弧菌感染对大黄鱼非特异性免疫功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思源; 葛明峰; 胡亚萍; 蔡林婷; 王国良

    2012-01-01

    Ulcer disease, which caused by the pathogens such as Vibrio alginolytkus, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus according to the researches, is the most common, wide spreading and harmful disease of cage cultured croaker, Pseudosciaena crocea. In this research, we set 3 experimental groups with injections of 0.2 cm3 Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, respectively, besides a control group treated with a same dose of normal saline. At the intervals ofO, 1,2,4,7, 10, 13, 16 and 20 days after infection, blood leucocytes , NBT-positive cells and lysozyme level were taken and measured for the influence on the croaker' s non-specific immunity function under the pressure of 3 pathogenic vibrio . The results show that the change of blood physiological signs in the croaker mainly occurred 1 ~ 7 days after infection. At the initial stage, each experimental group had a significantly increase in white blood cell and NBT positive cell number (p <0.05). The percentage of lymphocyte and neutrophilic granulocyte decreased with an increasing percentage of monocyte (p <0.05). Thereafter, white blood cells started to decline and the percentage of lymphocyte and neutrophilic granulocyte started to increased. Seven days after infection, the number of varied blood cells didn' t change significantly any more, and the group infected by vibrio heavily had an obvious significant change of blood physiological signs and NBT positive cell number. The activity of lysozyme in serum was higher than spleen, but both of them were first increased and then decreased, at last they went to an accordant tendency. So we conclude that the activation of stress response and non-specific immunity function' s happened at the early stage of infection. The pathogenic vibrio showed different influences, with a time lag, on the non-specific immunity.%溶藻弧菌(Vibrio alginolyticus)、哈维氏弧菌(Vibrio harveyi)、副溶血弧菌(Vibrio parahaemolyticus

  7. Recombinant Vaccinia Virus: Immunization against Multiple Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkus, Marion E.; Piccini, Antonia; Lipinskas, Bernard R.; Paoletti, Enzo

    1985-09-01

    The coding sequences for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen, the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, and the influenza virus hemagglutinin were inserted into a single vaccinia virus genome. Rabbits inoculated intravenously or intradermally with this polyvalent vaccinia virus recombinant produced antibodies reactive to all three authentic foreign antigens. In addition, the feasibility of multiple rounds of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus was demonstrated.

  8. Heme Synthesis and Acquisition in Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Choby, Jacob E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens require the iron-containing cofactor heme to cause disease. Heme is essential to the function of hemoproteins, which are involved in energy generation by the electron transport chain, detoxification of host immune effectors, and other processes. During infection, bacterial pathogens must synthesize heme or acquire heme from the host; however, host heme is sequestered in high-affinity hemoproteins. Pathogens have evolved elaborate strategies to acquire heme from host source...

  9. [Exosomes and Immune Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Naohiro

    2017-05-01

    In addition to the cytokines and cytotoxic granules, exosomes have been known as the intercellular communicator and cytotoxic missile of immune cells for the past decade. It has been well known that mature dendritic cell(DC)-derived exosomes participate in the T cell and natural killer(NK)cell activation, while immature DCs secrete tolerogenic exosomes for regulatory T(Treg)cell generation. Treg cell-derived EVs act as a suppressor against pathogenic type-1 T helper(Th1)cell responses. CD8+ T cells produce tumoricidal exosomes for preventing tumor invasion and metastasis transiently after T cell receptor(TCR)-mediated stimulation. Thus, immune cells produce functional exosomes in the activation state- and/or differentiation stage-dependent manner. In this review, the role of immune cell-derived exosomes will be introduced, focusing mainly on immune reaction against tumor.

  10. Xanthomonas campestris lipooligosaccharides trigger innate immunity and oxidative burst in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proietti, S; Giangrande, C; Amoresano, A; Pucci, P; Molinaro, A; Bertini, L; Caporale, C; Caruso, C

    2014-01-01

    Plants lack the adaptive immunity mechanisms of jawed vertebrates, so they rely on innate immune responses to defense themselves from pathogens. The plant immune system perceives the presence of pathogens by recognition of molecules known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). PAMPs have

  11. Spreading of multiple epidemics with cross immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekermann, Florian; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-09-01

    Pathogen-host relationships are the result of an ongoing coevolutionary race where the immune system of the host attempts to eliminate the pathogen, while the successful pathogen mutates to become invisible for the host's immune system. We here propose a minimal pathogen-host evolution model that takes into account cross immunization and allows for evolution of a spatially heterogeneous immune status of a population of hosts. With only the mutation rate as a determining parameter, the model allows us to produce an evolutionary tree of diseases which is highly branched, but hardly ever splits into separate long-lived trunks. Side branches remain short lived and seldom diverge to the extent of losing all cross immunizations.

  12. Pathogen intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSteinert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behaviour, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behaviour, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies.

  13. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Urbanization Increases Pathogen Pressure on Feral and Managed Honey Bees

    OpenAIRE

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Appler, R. Holden; L?pez-Uribe, Margarita M.; Tarpy, David R.; Frank, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Given the role of infectious disease in global pollinator decline, there is a need to understand factors that shape pathogen susceptibility and transmission in bees. Here we ask how urbanization affects the immune response and pathogen load of feral and managed colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus), the predominant economically important pollinator worldwide. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured expression of 4 immune genes and relative abundance of 10 honey bee pathogens....

  15. Interaction of pathogens with host cholesterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Dmitri; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Pathogens of different taxa, from prions to protozoa, target cellular cholesterol metabolism to advance their own development and to impair host immune responses, but also causing metabolic complications, for example, atherosclerosis. This review describes recent findings of how pathogens do it. A common theme in interaction between pathogens and host cholesterol metabolism is pathogens targeting lipid rafts of the host plasma membrane. Many intracellular pathogens use rafts as an entry gate, taking advantage of the endocytic machinery and high abundance of outward-looking molecules that can be used as receptors. At the same time, disruption of the rafts' functional capacity, achieved by the pathogens through a number of various means, impairs the ability of the host to generate immune response, thus helping pathogen to thrive. Pathogens cannot synthesize cholesterol, and salvaging host cholesterol helps pathogens build advanced cholesterol-containing membranes and assembly platforms. Impact on cholesterol metabolism is not limited to the infected cells; proteins and microRNAs secreted by infected cells affect lipid metabolism systemically. Given an essential role that host cholesterol metabolism plays in pathogen development, targeting this interaction may be a viable strategy to fight infections, as well as metabolic complications of the infections.

  16. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) (CNCM I-1225) and improving immune defence against pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 896), and protection, of the skin from UV-induced damage (ID 900) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) (CNCM I-1225) and improving immune defence against pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms, and protection of the skin from UV-induced damage. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States...

  17. Innate immunity in vertebrates: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera Romo, Mario; Pérez-Martínez, Dayana; Castillo Ferrer, Camila

    2016-06-01

    Innate immunity is a semi-specific and widely distributed form of immunity, which represents the first line of defence against pathogens. This type of immunity is critical to maintain homeostasis and prevent microbe invasion, eliminating a great variety of pathogens and contributing with the activation of the adaptive immune response. The components of innate immunity include physical and chemical barriers, humoral and cell-mediated components, which are present in all jawed vertebrates. The understanding of innate defence mechanisms in non-mammalian vertebrates is the key to comprehend the general picture of vertebrate innate immunity and its evolutionary history. This is also essential for the identification of new molecules with applications in immunopharmacology and immunotherapy. In this review, we describe and discuss the main elements of vertebrate innate immunity, presenting core findings in this field and identifying areas that need further investigation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Innate immunity in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Cheryl M

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder. T helper(h)1 and Th17 lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis through the release of inflammatory cytokines that promote further recruitment of immune cells, keratinocyte proliferation and sustained inflammation. The innate immune system is the first line of defence against infection and plays a crucial role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. The presence of innate immune cells and their products in psoriatic skin plaques suggests a role for innate immunity in this disease. In addition, the innate immune system can direct the development of pathogenic Th cells in psoriasis. In this article, we will summarise the role of the innate immune system in psoriasis with particular emphasis on the role of cytokines, signalling pathways and cells of the innate immune system.

  19. Childhood Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  20. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  1. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    OpenAIRE

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the extracellular fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum serves as a model system to study host resistance and susceptibility in plant-pathogen interactions. Resistance to C. fulvum in tomato plants follows the ge...

  2. Immunization Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... room/fact-sheets/detail/immunization-coverage","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... Plan Global Health Observatory (GHO) data - Immunization More information on vaccines and immunization News 1 in 10 ...

  3. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis by innate immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple innate immune cells have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inadequate adaptive immune responses in the murine intestine. Additionally, several innate immune subsets, which promote Th1 and Th17 responses and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, have recently been identified in the human intestinal mucosa. The demonstration of both murine and human intestinal innate immune subsets contributing to regulation of adaptive immunity emphasizes the conserved innate immune functions across species and might promote development of the intestinal innate immunity-based clinical therapy.

  4. Curating the innate immunity interactome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynn, David J

    2010-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defence against invading pathogens and is regulated by complex signalling and transcriptional networks. Systems biology approaches promise to shed new light on the regulation of innate immunity through the analysis and modelling of these networks. A key initial step in this process is the contextual cataloguing of the components of this system and the molecular interactions that comprise these networks. InnateDB (http:\\/\\/www.innatedb.com) is a molecular interaction and pathway database developed to facilitate systems-level analyses of innate immunity.

  5. Foodborne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bintsis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogens are causing a great number of diseases with significant effects on human health and economy. The characteristics of the most common pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium perfringens, Cronobacter sakazakii, Esherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Staphylococccus aureus, Vibrio spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica, viruses (Hepatitis A and Noroviruses and parasites (Cyclospora cayetanensis, Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis, together with some important outbreaks, are reviewed. Food safety management systems based on to classical hazard-based approach has been proved to be inefficient, and risk-based food safety approach is now suggested from leading researchers and organizations. In this context, a food safety management system should be designed in a way to estimate the risks to human health from food consumption and to identify, select and implement mitigation strategies in order to control and reduce these risks. In addition, the application of suitable food safety education programs for all involved people in the production and consumption of foods is suggested.

  6. Long-chain inulin for stimulating an immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Paulus; Vogt, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a long chain inulin for influencing the immune response against a pathogen. The invention also relates to a combination comprising a long chain inulin and a vaccine for influencing the immune response against a pathogen, wherein the long chain inulin is orally administrated.

  7. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  8. Immunizing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jody Macdonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the complex contexts within which Canadian health professionals engage in immunizing children and focuses on the Canadian practice guidelines and current scientific evidence that direct Canadian health professional competencies. The article begins by presenting two current global vaccine initiatives and links these to immunization in Canada. A selected literature review identifies current best immunization practices. With the purpose of promoting quality improvement, three key Canadian immunization competencies for health professional are highlighted: communication with parents, including those who are experiencing vaccine hesitancy; administration of immunizing agents; and documentation of immunizations. Health professionals are encouraged to reflect on immunization competencies and ensure evidence-based practices underpin vaccine delivery in their primary care settings.

  9. Targeting of the hydrophobic metabolome by pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, J Bernd; Kaloyanova, Dora V; Strating, Jeroen R P; van Hellemond, Jaap J; van der Schaar, Hilde M; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Brouwers, Jos F

    2015-05-01

    The hydrophobic molecules of the metabolome - also named the lipidome - constitute a major part of the entire metabolome. Novel technologies show the existence of a staggering number of individual lipid species, the biological functions of which are, with the exception of only a few lipid species, unknown. Much can be learned from pathogens that have evolved to take advantage of the complexity of the lipidome to escape the immune system of the host organism and to allow their survival and replication. Different types of pathogens target different lipids as shown in interaction maps, allowing visualization of differences between different types of pathogens. Bacterial and viral pathogens target predominantly structural and signaling lipids to alter the cellular phenotype of the host cell. Fungal and parasitic pathogens have complex lipidomes themselves and target predominantly the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from the host cell lipidome, resulting in the generation of eicosanoids by either the host cell or the pathogen. Thus, whereas viruses and bacteria induce predominantly alterations in lipid metabolites at the host cell level, eukaryotic pathogens focus on interference with lipid metabolites affecting systemic inflammatory reactions that are part of the immune system. A better understanding of the interplay between host-pathogen interactions will not only help elucidate the fundamental role of lipid species in cellular physiology, but will also aid in the generation of novel therapeutic drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Altering the balance between immune activation versus regulation in the skin to promote CD8+ T-cell activity within epithelial cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bridge, Jennifer A.; Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Steptoe, Raymond

    . The expression, in a mouse model (“E7”), of the HPV16 E7 gene in keratinocytes under the control of the K14 promoter, leads to a local immune suppressive environment, as evidenced by the lack of graft rejection when E7 skin grafts are placed on WT recipient mice. Furthermore, well healed (>30 days) E7 skin...... did not reject. As in the WT mice however, rejection could be induced through the coadministration of an anti-CD4 antibody. The data suggest that the removal of a CD4+, non T-reg cell, leads to CD8+ T-cell activity in the skin as evidenced by E7 skin graft destruction....... grafts are not rejected when mice are immunised with E7 peptide in combination with Quil A- or CASAC-based adjuvants. This is despite a substantial increase in E7 peptide/H-2Db pentamer staining in the blood, and marked killing of E7-peptide expressing TC-1 cells when injected i.v., confirming that CD8 T...

  11. Mechanisms regulating skin immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasparakis, Manolis; Haase, Ingo; Nestle, Frank O

    2014-05-01

    Immune responses in the skin are important for host defence against pathogenic microorganisms. However, dysregulated immune reactions can cause chronic inflammatory skin diseases. Extensive crosstalk between the different cellular and microbial components of the skin regulates local immune responses to ensure efficient host defence, to maintain and restore homeostasis, and to prevent chronic disease. In this Review, we discuss recent findings that highlight the complex regulatory networks that control skin immunity, and we provide new paradigms for the mechanisms that regulate skin immune responses in host defence and in chronic inflammation.

  12. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  13. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K; Laing, Kerry J; Winton, James R

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  14. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen K. Purcell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  15. Immune functions in crustaceans: lessons from flies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stet, R.J.M.; Arts, J.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years insects, notably Drosophila, have emerged as a popular model for studying immune responses to bacterial and fungal pathogens. Due to the availability of the complete genome sequence, genome-wide scans of immune responses have been performed using microarray analyses. These analyses

  16. Early nutrition and immunity - progress and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calder, Philip C.; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne; de Jong, Esther C.; Dupont, Christophe; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Frokiaer, Hanne; Heinrich, Joachim; Garn, Holger; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lack, Gideon; Mattelio, Gianluca; Renz, Harald; Sangild, Per T.; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Stulnig, Thomas M.; Thymann, Thomas; Wold, Agnes E.; Koletzko, Berthold

    2006-01-01

    The immune system exists to protect the host against pathogenic organisms and highly complex pathways of recognition, response, elimination and memory have evolved in order to fulfil this role. The immune system also acts to ensure tolerance to 'self', to food and other environmental components, and

  17. Models of Caenorhabditis elegans infection by bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jennifer R; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model host for studying the relationship between the animal innate immune system and a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Extensive genetic and molecular tools are available in C. elegans, facilitating an in-depth analysis of host defense factors and pathogen virulence factors. Many of these factors are conserved in insects and mammals, indicating the relevance of the nematode model to the vertebrate innate immune response. Here, we describe pathogen assays for a selection of the most commonly studied bacterial and fungal pathogens using the C. elegans model system.

  18. Hormonal signaling in plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caarls, L.

    2016-01-01

    Insect hervivores and pathogens are a major problem in agriculture and therefore, control of these pests and diseases is essential. For this, understanding the plant immune response can be instrumental. The plant hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) play an essential role in defense

  19. Immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorobetea, D.; Svensson Frej, M.; Grencis, R.

    2018-01-01

    Numerous species of nematodes have evolved to inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans, with over a billion of the world's population infected with at least one species. These large multicellular pathogens present a considerable and complex challenge to the host immune system give...

  20. Unique aspects of the perinatal immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhivaki, Dania; Lo-Man, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The early stages of life are associated with increased susceptibility to infection, which is in part due to an ineffective immune system. In the context of infection, the immune system must be stimulated to provide efficient protection while avoiding insufficient or excessive activation. Yet, in early life, age-dependent immune regulation at molecular and cellular levels contributes to a reduced immunological fitness in terms of pathogen clearance and response to vaccines. To enable microbial colonization to be tolerated at birth, epigenetic immune cell programming and early life-specific immune regulatory and effector mechanisms ensure that vital functions and organ development are supported and that tissue damage is avoided. Advancement in our understanding of age-related remodelling of immune networks and the consequent tuning of immune responsiveness will open up new possibilities for immune intervention and vaccine strategies that are designed specifically for early life.

  1. Uncovering plant-pathogen crosstalk through apoplastic proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunois, Bertrand; Jeandet, Philippe; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dorey, Stéphan; Cordelier, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens have evolved by developing different strategies to infect their host, which in turn have elaborated immune responses to counter the pathogen invasion. The apoplast, including the cell wall and extracellular space outside the plasma membrane, is one of the first compartments where pathogen-host interaction occurs. The plant cell wall is composed of a complex network of polysaccharides polymers and glycoproteins and serves as a natural physical barrier against pathogen invasion. The apoplastic fluid, circulating through the cell wall and intercellular spaces, provides a means for delivering molecules and facilitating intercellular communications. Some plant-pathogen interactions lead to plant cell wall degradation allowing pathogens to penetrate into the cells. In turn, the plant immune system recognizes microbial- or damage-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or DAMPs) and initiates a set of basal immune responses, including the strengthening of the plant cell wall. The establishment of defense requires the regulation of a wide variety of proteins that are involved at different levels, from receptor perception of the pathogen via signaling mechanisms to the strengthening of the cell wall or degradation of the pathogen itself. A fine regulation of apoplastic proteins is therefore essential for rapid and effective pathogen perception and for maintaining cell wall integrity. This review aims to provide insight into analyses using proteomic approaches of the apoplast to highlight the modulation of the apoplastic protein patterns during pathogen infection and to unravel the key players involved in plant-pathogen interaction.

  2. A possible tradeoff between developmental rate and pathogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    related tradeoffs is that they are mediated via the conflict- ... Keywords. life-history evolution; tradeoff; development time; immune function; pathogen; Drosophila. Journal of Genetics .... This work was supported in parts by funds from Depart-.

  3. Efferocytosis of Pathogen-Infected Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Karaji

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The prompt and efficient clearance of unwanted and abnormal cells by phagocytes is termed efferocytosis and is crucial for organism development, maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and regulation of the immune system. Dying cells are recognized by phagocytes through pathways initiated via “find me” signals, recognition via “eat me” signals and down-modulation of regulatory “don’t eat me” signals. Pathogen infection may trigger cell death that drives phagocytic clearance in an immunologically silent, or pro-inflammatory manner, depending on the mode of cell death. In many cases, efferocytosis is a mechanism for eliminating pathogens and pathogen-infected cells; however, some pathogens have subverted this process and use efferocytic mechanisms to avoid innate immune detection and assist phagocyte infection. In parallel, phagocytes can integrate signals received from infected dying cells to elicit the most appropriate effector response against the infecting pathogen. This review focuses on pathogen-induced cell death signals that drive infected cell recognition and uptake by phagocytes, and the outcomes for the infected target cell, the phagocyte, the pathogen and the host.

  4. Heme Synthesis and Acquisition in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choby, Jacob E; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-08-28

    Bacterial pathogens require the iron-containing cofactor heme to cause disease. Heme is essential to the function of hemoproteins, which are involved in energy generation by the electron transport chain, detoxification of host immune effectors, and other processes. During infection, bacterial pathogens must synthesize heme or acquire heme from the host; however, host heme is sequestered in high-affinity hemoproteins. Pathogens have evolved elaborate strategies to acquire heme from host sources, particularly hemoglobin, and both heme acquisition and synthesis are important for pathogenesis. Paradoxically, excess heme is toxic to bacteria and pathogens must rely on heme detoxification strategies. Heme is a key nutrient in the struggle for survival between host and pathogen, and its study has offered significant insight into the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Deceptive Imprinting and Immune Refocusing in Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large number of the world’s most widespread and problematic pathogens evade host immune responses by inducing strain specific immunity to immunodominant epitopes with high mutation rates capable of altering antigenic profiles. The immune system appears to be decoyed into reacting to these immunod...

  6. Integration of the immune system: a complex adaptive supersystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisman, Mark V.

    2001-10-01

    Immunity to pathogenic organisms is a complex process involving interacting factors within the immune system including circulating cells, tissues and soluble chemical mediators. Both the efficiency and adaptive responses of the immune system in a dynamic, often hostile, environment are essential for maintaining our health and homeostasis. This paper will present a brief review of one of nature's most elegant, complex adaptive systems.

  7. Regulation of innate and adaptive immunity by the commensal microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Jarchum, Irene; Pamer, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    The microbial communities that inhabit the intestinal tract are essential for mammalian health. Communication between the microbiota and the host establishes and maintains immune homeostasis, enabling protective immune responses against pathogens while preventing adverse inflammatory responses to harmless commensal microbes. Specific bacteria, such as segmented filamentous bacteria, Clostridium species, and Bacteroides fragilis, are key contributors to immune homeostasis in the gut. The cellu...

  8. Modulation of the innate immune responses in the striped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, most of the innate non-specific immune responses are inducible though they are constitutive of fish immune system exhibiting a basal level of activity even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Keywords: Aeromonas hydrophila, Experimental challenge, Innate immune response, Striped snakehead murrel ...

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  10. Corneal rat-to-mouse xenotransplantation and the effects of anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 treatment on cytokine and nitric oxide production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pindjáková, Jana; Vítová, Andrea; Krulová, Magdalena; Zajícová, Alena; Filipec, M.; Holáň, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 7 (2005), s. 854-862 ISSN 0934-0874 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7816; GA MZd(CZ) NI7531; GA ČR GP310/02/D162; GA ČR(CZ) GD310/03/H147; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 300; GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : corneal xenotransplantation * cytokines * nitric oxide Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.797, year: 2005

  11. Preparation of anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody-conjugated magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) particles and their application on CD4+ lymphocyte separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimpha, Nuttaporn; Chaleawlert-umpon, Saowaluk; Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2011-03-15

    Novel immunomagnetic particles have been prepared for separation of CD4(+) lymphocytes. The magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 5-6 nm were first synthesized by co-precipitation from ferrous and ferric iron solutions and subsequently encapsulated with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) by precipitation polymerization. Monoclonal antibody specific to CD4 molecules expressed on CD4(+) lymphocytes was conjugated to the surface of magnetic PGMA particles through covalent bonding between epoxide functional groups on the particle surface and primary amine groups of the antibodies. The generated immunomagnetic particles have successfully separated CD4(+) lymphocytes from whole blood with over 95% purity. The results indicated that these particles can be employed for cell separation and provide a strong potential to be applied in various biomedical applications including diagnosis, and monitoring of human diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Immune Evasion, Immunopathology and the Regulation of the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Faivre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Costs and benefits of the immune response have attracted considerable attention in the last years among evolutionary biologists. Given the cost of parasitism, natural selection should favor individuals with the most effective immune defenses. Nevertheless, there exists huge variation in the expression of immune effectors among individuals. To explain this apparent paradox, it has been suggested that an over-reactive immune system might be too costly, both in terms of metabolic resources and risks of immune-mediated diseases, setting a limit to the investment into immune defenses. Here, we argue that this view neglects one important aspect of the interaction: the role played by evolving pathogens. We suggest that taking into account the co-evolutionary interactions between the host immune system and the parasitic strategies to overcome the immune response might provide a better picture of the selective pressures that shape the evolution of immune functioning. Integrating parasitic strategies of host exploitation can also contribute to understand the seemingly contradictory results that infection can enhance, but also protect from, autoimmune diseases. In the last decades, the incidence of autoimmune disorders has dramatically increased in wealthy countries of the northern hemisphere with a concomitant decrease of most parasitic infections. Experimental work on model organisms has shown that this pattern may be due to the protective role of certain parasites (i.e., helminths that rely on the immunosuppression of hosts for their persistence. Interestingly, although parasite-induced immunosuppression can protect against autoimmunity, it can obviously favor the spread of other infections. Therefore, we need to think about the evolution of the immune system using a multidimensional trade-off involving immunoprotection, immunopathology and the parasitic strategies to escape the immune response.

  13. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  14. Enhancing crop innate immunity: new promising trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Yao eHuang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to potentially pathogenic microbes present in their surrounding environment. Due to the activation of the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI response that largely relies on accurate detection of pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, plants are resistant to the majority of potential pathogens. However, adapted pathogens may avoid recognition or repress plant PTI and resulting diseases significantly affect crop yield worldwide. PTI provides protection against a wide range of pathogens. Reinforcement of PTI through genetic engineering may thus generate crops with broad-spectrum field resistance. In this review, new approaches based on fundamental discoveries in PTI to improve crop immunity are discussed. Notably, we highlight recent studies describing the interfamily transfer of PRRs or key regulators of PTI signalling.

  15. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate

  16. Urbanization Increases Pathogen Pressure on Feral and Managed Honey Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Youngsteadt

    Full Text Available Given the role of infectious disease in global pollinator decline, there is a need to understand factors that shape pathogen susceptibility and transmission in bees. Here we ask how urbanization affects the immune response and pathogen load of feral and managed colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus, the predominant economically important pollinator worldwide. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured expression of 4 immune genes and relative abundance of 10 honey bee pathogens. We also measured worker survival in a laboratory bioassay. We found that pathogen pressure on honey bees increased with urbanization and management, and the probability of worker survival declined 3-fold along our urbanization gradient. The effect of management on pathogens appears to be mediated by immunity, with feral bees expressing immune genes at nearly twice the levels of managed bees following an immune challenge. The effect of urbanization, however, was not linked with immunity; instead, urbanization may favor viability and transmission of some disease agents. Feral colonies, with lower disease burdens and stronger immune responses, may illuminate ways to improve honey bee management. The previously unexamined effects of urbanization on honey-bee disease are concerning, suggesting that urban areas may favor problematic diseases of pollinators.

  17. Urbanization Increases Pathogen Pressure on Feral and Managed Honey Bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Appler, R Holden; López-Uribe, Margarita M; Tarpy, David R; Frank, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Given the role of infectious disease in global pollinator decline, there is a need to understand factors that shape pathogen susceptibility and transmission in bees. Here we ask how urbanization affects the immune response and pathogen load of feral and managed colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus), the predominant economically important pollinator worldwide. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured expression of 4 immune genes and relative abundance of 10 honey bee pathogens. We also measured worker survival in a laboratory bioassay. We found that pathogen pressure on honey bees increased with urbanization and management, and the probability of worker survival declined 3-fold along our urbanization gradient. The effect of management on pathogens appears to be mediated by immunity, with feral bees expressing immune genes at nearly twice the levels of managed bees following an immune challenge. The effect of urbanization, however, was not linked with immunity; instead, urbanization may favor viability and transmission of some disease agents. Feral colonies, with lower disease burdens and stronger immune responses, may illuminate ways to improve honey bee management. The previously unexamined effects of urbanization on honey-bee disease are concerning, suggesting that urban areas may favor problematic diseases of pollinators.

  18. Cerebral Innate Immunity in Drosophila Melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Leung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster has a rich history that includes ground-breaking discoveries in pathogen detection and signaling. These studies revealed the evolutionary conservation of innate immune pathways and mechanisms of pathogen detection, resulting in an explosion of findings in the innate immunity field. In D. melanogaster, studies have focused primarily on responses driven by the larval fat body and hemocytes, analogs to vertebrate liver and macrophages, respectively. Aside from pathogen detection, many recent mammalian studies associate innate immune pathways with development and disease pathogenesis. Importantly, these studies stress that the innate immune response is integral to maintain central nervous system (CNS health. Microglia, which are the vertebrate CNS mononuclear phagocytes, drive vertebrate cerebral innate immunity. The invertebrate CNS contains microglial-like cells-ensheathing glia and reticular glia-that could be used to answer basic questions regarding the evolutionarily conserved innate immune processes in CNS development and health. A deeper understanding of the relationship between D. melanogaster phagocytic microglial-like cells and vertebrate microglia will be key to answering basic and translational questions related to cerebral innate immunity.

  19. Convergent and Divergent Signaling in PAMP-Triggered Immunity and Effector-Triggered Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yujun; van Wersch, Rowan; Zhang, Yuelin

    2018-04-01

    Plants use diverse immune receptors to sense pathogen attacks. Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors localized on the plasma membrane leads to PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Detection of pathogen effectors by intracellular or plasma membrane-localized immune receptors results in effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Despite the large variations in the magnitude and duration of immune responses triggered by different PAMPs or pathogen effectors during PTI and ETI, plasma membrane-localized immune receptors activate similar downstream molecular events such as mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, oxidative burst, ion influx, and increased biosynthesis of plant defense hormones, indicating that defense signals initiated at the plasma membrane converge at later points. On the other hand, activation of ETI by immune receptors localized to the nucleus appears to be more directly associated with transcriptional regulation of defense gene expression. Here, we review recent progress in signal transductions downstream of different groups of plant immune receptors, highlighting the converging and diverging molecular events.

  20. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa D Cunha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis.

  1. Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI) database contains emerging pathogens information from the local Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). The EPI software...

  2. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the

  3. Immunity booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Ioan; Titescu, Gheorghe; Tamaian, Radu; Haulica, Ion; Bild, Walther

    2002-01-01

    The immunity booster is, according to its patent description, microbiologically pure water with an D/(D+H) isotopic concentration of 100 ppm, with physical-chemical characteristics similar to those of distilled water. It is obtained by sterilization of a mixture of deuterium depleted water, with a 25 ppm isotopic concentration, with distilled water in a volume ratio of 4:6. Unlike natural immunity boosters (bacterial agents as Bacillus Chalmette-Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum; lipopolysaccharides; human immunoglobulin) or synthetical products (levamysol; isoprinosyne with immunostimulating action), which cause hypersensitivity and shocks, thrill, fever, sickness and the immunity complex disease, the water of 100 ppm D/(D + H) isotopic concentration is a toxicity free product. The testing for immune reaction of the immunity booster led to the following results: - an increase of cell action capacity in the first immunity shielding stage (macrophages), as evidenced by stimulation of a number of essential characterizing parameters, as well as of the phagocytosis capacity, bactericide capacity, and opsonic capacity of serum; - an increase of the number of leucocyte particularly of the granulocyte in peripheral blood, produced especially when medullar toxic agents like caryolysine are used; - it hinders the effect of lowering the number of erythrocytes in peripheral blood produced by experimentally induced chronic inflammation; - an increase of nonspecific immunity defence capacity against specific bacterial aggression of both Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae 558 ) and of the Gram-negative ones (Klebsiella pneumoniae 507 ); - an increase of immunity - stimulating activity (proinflamatory), like that of levamisole as evidenced by the test of stimulation of experimentally induced inflammation by means of carrageenan. The following advantages of the immunity booster are stressed: - it is toxicity free and side effect free; - can be orally administrated as

  4. Sculpting humoral immunity through dengue vaccination to enhance protective immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne eCrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important mosquito transmitted viral pathogens infecting humans. DENV infection produces a spectrum of disease, most commonly causing a self-limiting flu-like illness known as dengue fever; yet with increased frequency, manifesting as life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Waning cross-protective immunity from any of the four dengue serotypes may enhance subsequent infection with another heterologous serotype to increase the probability of DHF. Decades of effort to develop dengue vaccines are reaching the finishing line with multiple candidates in clinical trials. Nevertheless, concerns remain that imbalanced immunity, due to the prolonged prime-boost schedules currently used in clinical trials, could leave some vaccinees temporarily unprotected or with increased susceptibility to enhanced disease. Here we develop a DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 DNA vaccine with the immunodominant cross-reactive B cell epitopes associated with immune enhancement removed. We compare wild-type (WT with this cross-reactivity reduced (CRR vaccine and demonstrate that both vaccines are equally protective against lethal homologous DENV-1 challenge. Under conditions mimicking natural exposure prior to acquiring protective immunity, WT vaccinated mice enhanced a normally sub-lethal heterologous DENV-2 infection resulting in DHF-like disease and 95% mortality in AG129 mice. However, CRR vaccinated mice exhibited redirected serotype-specific and protective immunity, and significantly reduced morbidity and mortality not differing from naïve mice. Thus, we demonstrate in an in vivo DENV disease model, that non-protective vaccine-induced immunity can prime vaccinees for enhanced DHF-like disease and that CRR DNA immunization significantly reduces this potential vaccine safety concern. The sculpting of immune memory by the modified vaccine and resulting redirection of humoral immunity provide insight into DENV vaccine induced immune

  5. Evaluation and Comparison of the Pathogenicity and Host Immune Responses Induced by a G2b Taiwan Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (Strain Pintung 52) and Its Highly Cell-Culture Passaged Strain in Conventional 5-Week-Old Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yen-Chen; Kao, Chi-Fei; Chang, Chia-Yu; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Tsai, Pei-Shiue; Pang, Victor Fei; Chiou, Hue-Ying; Peng, Ju-Yi; Cheng, Ivan-Chen; Chang, Hui-Wen

    2017-05-19

    A genogroup 2b (G2b) porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) Taiwan Pintung 52 (PEDVPT) strain was isolated in 2014. The pathogenicity and host antibody responses elicited by low-passage (passage 5; PEDVPT-P5) and high-passage (passage 96; PEDVPT-P96) PEDVPT strains were compared in post-weaning PEDV-seronegative pigs by oral inoculation. PEDVPT-P5-inoculation induced typical diarrhea during 1-9 days post inoculation with fecal viral shedding persisting for 26 days. Compared to PEDVPT-P5, PEDVPT-P96 inoculation induced none-to-mild diarrhea and lower, delayed fecal viral shedding. Although PEDVPT-P96 elicited slightly lower neutralizing antibodies and PEDV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) titers, a reduction in pathogenicity and viral shedding of the subsequent challenge with PEDVPT-P5 were noted in both PEDVPT-P5- and PEDVPT-P96-inoculated pigs. Alignment and comparison of full-length sequences of PEDVPT-P5 and PEDVPT-P96 revealed 23 nucleotide changes and resultant 19 amino acid substitutions in non-structure proteins 2, 3, 4, 9, 14, 15, spike, open reading frame 3 (ORF3), and membrane proteins with no detectable deletion or insertion. The present study confirmed the pathogenicity of the PEDVPT isolate in conventional post-weaning pigs. Moreover, data regarding viral attenuation and potency of induced antibodies against PEDVPT-P5 identified PEDVPT-P96 as a potential live-attenuated vaccine candidate.

  6. Innate immunity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ronnie Anderson is Director of the Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity. ... field have included macrophage, T cell, cytokine and cytokine activated killer cell interactions .... monocytes, mast cells, lymphocytes, eccrine.

  7. Immune regulation by microbiome metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang H

    2018-03-22

    Commensal microbes and the host immune system have been co-evolved for mutual regulation. Microbes regulate the host immune system, in part, by producing metabolites. A mounting body of evidence indicates that diverse microbial metabolites profoundly regulate the immune system via host receptors and other target molecules. Immune cells express metabolite-specific receptors such as P2X 7 , GPR41, GPR43, GPR109A, aryl hydrocarbon receptor precursor (AhR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), TGR5 and other molecular targets. Microbial metabolites and their receptors form an extensive array of signals to respond to changes in nutrition, health and immunological status. As a consequence, microbial metabolite signals contribute to nutrient harvest from diet, and regulate host metabolism and the immune system. Importantly, microbial metabolites bidirectionally function to promote both tolerance and immunity to effectively fight infection without developing inflammatory diseases. In pathogenic conditions, adverse effects of microbial metabolites have been observed as well. Key immune-regulatory functions of the metabolites, generated from carbohydrates, proteins and bile acids, are reviewed in this article. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Childhood immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Sandra; Schillaci, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine childhood immunization levels relative to the number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses in Ontario. DESIGN Retrospective comparative analysis of publicly available data on immunization coverage levels and the relative number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses. SETTING Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Seven-year-old children, family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses in Ontario. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The association between immunization coverage levels and the relative number of family physicians, pediatricians, and public health nurses. RESULTS We found correlations between immunization coverage levels and the relative number (ie, per 1000 Ontario residents) of family physicians (ρ = 0.60) and pediatricians (ρ = 0.70) and a lower correlation with the relative number of public health nurses (ρ = 0.40), although none of these correlations was significant. A comparison of temporal trends illustrated that variation in the relative number of family physicians and pediatricians in Ontario was associated with similar variation in immunization coverage levels. CONCLUSION Increasing the number of family physicians and pediatricians might help to boost access to immunizations and perhaps other components of cost-saving childhood preventive care. PMID:19910599

  9. Are there differences in immune function between continental and insular birds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matson, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    Generally, immune system architecture varies with different environments, which presumably reflect different pathogen pressures. Specifically, populations from relatively disease-free, oceanic islands are expected to exhibit reorganized immune systems, which might be characterized by attenuated

  10. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribot, Wilson J; Panchal, Rekha G; Brittingham, Katherine C; Ruthel, Gordon; Kenny, Tara A; Lane, Douglas; Curry, Bob; Hoover, Timothy A; Friedlander, Arthur M; Bavari, Sina

    2006-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are very important for pulmonary innate immune responses against invading inhaled pathogens because they directly kill the organisms and initiate a cascade of innate and adaptive immune responses...

  11. Signaling Mechanisms in Pattern-Triggered Immunity (PTI)

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean; Colcombet, Jean; Hirt, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    In nature, plants constantly have to face pathogen attacks. However, plant disease rarely occurs due to efficient immune systems possessed by the host plants. Pathogens are perceived by two different recognition systems that initiate the so-called pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI), both of which are accompanied by a set of induced defenses that usually repel pathogen attacks. Here we discuss the complex network of signaling pathways occurring during PTI, focusing on the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases. © 2015 The Author.

  12. A novel approach for differentiating pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira based on molecular fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Zhang, Cuicai; Zhang, Huifang; Li, Xiuwen; Jiang, Xiugao; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-04-24

    disease that has become an important public health problem. Traditional serological methods are the gold standard for the detection of pathogenic strains of Leptospira. However, serological procedures are cumbersome, require more complex experimental techniques, and are based on a large number of international and domestic reference strains. Additionally, these experiments involve the immunization of animals with antigens from different serotypes to produce immune serum, and improper techniques may result in a rapid decrease in antibody titer, which would affect the final results. It is difficult to perform cumbersome detection procedures in a basic laboratory. Therefore, the use of conventional serological methods is limited, which significantly impacts daily leptospirosis epidemic surveillance, prevention, and control. Molecular biology methods, such as 16S rRNA and PCR-based methods, can be used to identify the pathogenic Leptospira. However, DNA extraction and gene sequencing methods are laborious and time consuming. Therefore, more rapid and reliable high-throughput identification methods are urgently needed for the clinical diagnosis of leptospirosis to improve epidemic control. Here, molecular fingerprinting technique was use to identify the pathogenicity. We constructed the reference spectra database and the super reference spectra of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira, which can rapidly identified Leptospira at the species level and the pathogenicity of these isolates can be simultaneously confirmed. Furthermore, the protein components of Leptospira pathogenicity were revealed. These findings thus provide a new way for Leptospira pathogenicity identification. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. [Evasion of anti-infectious immunity by Brucella - A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wurong; Yang, Yongjie

    2016-05-04

    Brucellosis, caused by Brucella species, is a worldwide zoonosis. As facultative intracellular pathogens, Brucella possess non-classical virulence factor, but its virulence is very powerful and can elicit chronic infections of both animals and humans. Evasion of host anti-infectious immunity is a prerequisite for chronic infections, this ability appears increasingly crucial for Brucella virulence. As successful pathogens, Brucella can escape or suppress innate immunity and modulate adaptive immunity to establish long lasting infections in host cells. In this review, we address the molecular mechanisms of Brucella to evade anti-infectious immunity. This will shed new insights on Brucella virulence and will, potentially, open new prophylactic avenues.

  14. Life span, testis damage and immune cell populations of spleen in C57BL mice with neutron irradiation by lying flat pose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ki Jung; kim, Myung Sup; Kyung, Yoo Bo [KAERI, Taejon (Korea)

    2003-10-01

    This study deals with the biological effects of black mouse (C57BL) irradiated with neutron irradiation by using Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility in HANARO reactor. These include mortality, body wt., hair color, testis volume, sperm count and immune cell populations in mouse spleen after 80 days later by thermal neutron irradiation. Six week old C57BL male mice were irradiated with neutron irradiation for 1 hr or 2 hrs (flux : 1.036739E +09). These irradiat ion doses estimated 15Gy and 30Gy, respectively. Survival days and hair color in mice was checked. On day 80 after irradiation, testis were taken for volume and sperm count. Also spleen was taken for FACS and spleen cells were isolatd and discarded RBC by treating with lysising solution. These cells were placed on ice and immunofluorescence staining was performed. Phycoerythrin (PE )-anti-CD3e, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-anti-CD4, and FITC-anti-CD8 were added, then the immunostaining cells were incubated on ice for 40 min. The resulting cells were washed with a PBS buffer 3 times and analyzed using a Flow cytometer. All experimental animals survived over 90 days but in case of 30 Gy neutron irradiation, black mice hair were changed white color on the center of the back. Neutron irradiation of black mice show similar in damage of spleen immune cells by subpopulation of T helper and T cytotoxic cells compared to the control non - irradiated group. These results show that treatment of neutron irradiation without boron compounds for 2 hrs in mice can survive over 90 days with hair color change from black to white. Damaged spleen cells recover after long time by irradiation but testis volume and no. of sperm are not recover compared to the normal group in response to neutron irradiation.

  15. Life span, testis damage and immune cell populations of spleen in C57BL mice with neutron irradiation by lying flat pose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ki Jung; kim, Myung Sup; Kyung, Yoo Bo

    2003-01-01

    This study deals with the biological effects of black mouse (C57BL) irradiated with neutron irradiation by using Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility in HANARO reactor. These include mortality, body wt., hair color, testis volume, sperm count and immune cell populations in mouse spleen after 80 days later by thermal neutron irradiation. Six week old C57BL male mice were irradiated with neutron irradiation for 1 hr or 2 hrs (flux : 1.036739E +09). These irradiat ion doses estimated 15Gy and 30Gy, respectively. Survival days and hair color in mice was checked. On day 80 after irradiation, testis were taken for volume and sperm count. Also spleen was taken for FACS and spleen cells were isolatd and discarded RBC by treating with lysising solution. These cells were placed on ice and immunofluorescence staining was performed. Phycoerythrin (PE )-anti-CD3e, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-anti-CD4, and FITC-anti-CD8 were added, then the immunostaining cells were incubated on ice for 40 min. The resulting cells were washed with a PBS buffer 3 times and analyzed using a Flow cytometer. All experimental animals survived over 90 days but in case of 30 Gy neutron irradiation, black mice hair were changed white color on the center of the back. Neutron irradiation of black mice show similar in damage of spleen immune cells by subpopulation of T helper and T cytotoxic cells compared to the control non - irradiated group. These results show that treatment of neutron irradiation without boron compounds for 2 hrs in mice can survive over 90 days with hair color change from black to white. Damaged spleen cells recover after long time by irradiation but testis volume and no. of sperm are not recover compared to the normal group in response to neutron irradiation

  16. Molecular and Functional Neuroscience in Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Valentin A; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Tracey, Kevin J

    2018-04-26

    The nervous system regulates immunity and inflammation. The molecular detection of pathogen fragments, cytokines, and other immune molecules by sensory neurons generates immunoregulatory responses through efferent autonomic neuron signaling. The functional organization of this neural control is based on principles of reflex regulation. Reflexes involving the vagus nerve and other nerves have been therapeutically explored in models of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, and recently in clinical settings. The brain integrates neuro-immune communication, and brain function is altered in diseases characterized by peripheral immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here we review the anatomical and molecular basis of the neural interface with immunity, focusing on peripheral neural control of immune functions and the role of the brain in the model of the immunological homunculus. Clinical advances stemming from this knowledge within the framework of bioelectronic medicine are also briefly outlined.

  17. Post-translational modification of host proteins in pathogen-triggered defence signalling in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat to global food production. Similar to animals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognize pathogens and swiftly activate defence. To activate a rapid response, receptor-mediated pathogen perception and subsequent downstream signalling

  18. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation

  19. The cell-mediated immunity of Drosophila melanogaster: hemocyte lineages, immune compartments, microanatomy and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honti, Viktor; Csordás, Gábor; Kurucz, Éva; Márkus, Róbert; Andó, István

    2014-01-01

    In the animal kingdom, innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. The dangers of microbial and parasitic attacks are countered by similar mechanisms, involving the prototypes of the cell-mediated immune responses, the phagocytosis and encapsulation. Work on Drosophila has played an important role in promoting an understanding of the basic mechanisms of phylogenetically conserved modules of innate immunity. The aim of this review is to survey the developments in the identification and functional definition of immune cell types and the immunological compartments of Drosophila melanogaster. We focus on the molecular and developmental aspects of the blood cell types and compartments, as well as the dynamics of blood cell development and the immune response. Further advances in the characterization of the innate immune mechanisms in Drosophila will provide basic clues to the understanding of the importance of the evolutionary conserved mechanisms of innate immune defenses in the animal kingdom. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gut immunity in Lepidopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Yang, Bing; Huang, Wuren; Dobens, Leonard; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-11-01

    Lepidopteran insects constitute one of the largest fractions of animals on earth, but are considered pests in their relationship with man. Key to the success of this order of insects is its ability to digest food and absorb nutrition, which takes place in the midgut. Because environmental microorganisms can easily enter Lepidopteran guts during feeding, the innate immune response guards against pathogenic bacteria, virus and microsporidia that can be devoured with food. Gut immune responses are complicated by both resident gut microbiota and the surrounding peritrophic membrane and are distinct from immune responses in the body cavity, which depend on the function of the fat body and hemocytes. Due to their relevance to agricultural production, studies of Lepidopteran insect midgut and immunity are receiving more attention, and here we summarize gut structures and functions, and discuss how these confer immunity against different microorganisms. It is expected that increased knowledge of Lepidopteran gut immunity may be utilized for pest biological control in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative efficacy of a phytogenic feed additive and an antibiotic growth promoter on production performance, caecal microbial population and humoral immune response of broiler chickens inoculated with enteric pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshi Wati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the efficacy of a commercially available phytogenic feed additive (PFA and an antibiotic growth promoter, which was bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD, on performance, nutrient retention, caecal colonization of bacteria and humoral immune responses against Newcastle disease in broiler chickens challenged orally with Salmonella enteritidis and Escherichia coli. One-day-old male Cobb 400 broiler chicks (n = 120 were fed with 1 a negative control (NC diet, which is the basal diet without any added growth promoter, 2 a positive control (PC diet, the basal diet supplemented with BMD, 500 mg/kg and 3 a diet supplemented with PFA (150 mg/kg for 39 days and the birds were inoculated with S. enteritidis and E. coli on d 28. Supplementation of PFA improved body weight, feed conversion ratio, retention of N and crude fiber, increased fecal moisture content and decreased digesta transit time as compared with the NC and PC groups (P < 0.01. Both the PC and the PFA was found to be equally effective in controlling the surge in numbers of Salmonella and E. coli following oral inoculation of these bacteria as compared with the NC group (P < 0.05 at 24 h past inoculation. Caecal content analysis on d 39 indicated lower numbers of Salmonella, E. coli and Clostridium in the PC and PFA groups as compared with the NC group (P < 0.05. The number of Lactobacillus in the PFA group was higher than those in the NC and PC groups (P < 0.05. Humoral immune response, measured as hemagglutination inhibition titer against Newcastle disease, was better in the PC and PFA groups compared with the NC group (P < 0.05 at d 21 but the difference did not last till d 39. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio was narrower (P < 0.001 and alkaline phosphatase activity was higher (P < 0.01 in the PFA group as compared with the NC and PC groups on d 39. It was concluded that the PFA, which is animal, environment and consumer friendly, may be used as an

  2. Immune function in arctic mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desforges, Jean-Pierre; Jasperse, Lindsay; Jensen, Trine Hammer

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a vital part of the rapid and non-specific immune defense against invading pathogens and tumor cells. This study evaluated NK cell-like activity by flow cytometry for the first time in three ecologically and culturally important Arctic mammal species: polar bear (Ursus...... the effector:target cell ratio increased. Comparing NK activity between fresh and cryopreserved mouse lymphocytes revealed little to no difference in function, highlighting the applicability of cryopreserving cells in field studies. The evaluation of this important innate immune function in Arctic mammals can...... contribute to future population health assessments, especially as pollution-induced suppression of immune function may increase infectious disease susceptibility....

  3. Immune response to H pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Giovanni; Reyes, Victor E; Beswick, Ellen J

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer, attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium. PMID:17007009

  4. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Immune System Print en español El sistema inmunitario Whether you're stomping through the showers ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  5. Immunizing Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Vaccines aren’t just for kids; adults also need to get immunized. Overall, far too many people 19 years and older aren’t getting the vaccines they need and remain unprotected. In this podcast, Dr. Walter Williams discuss the importance of adults being fully vaccinated.

  6. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by the ...

  7. Novel intravaginal nanomedicine for the targeted delivery of saquinavir to CD4+ immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang S

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sidi Yang,1,2 Yufei Chen,1,2 Kaien Gu,1,2 Alicia Dash,1,2 Casey L Sayre,1 Neal M Davies,1 Emmanuel A Ho1,2 1Faculty of Pharmacy, 2Laboratory for Drug Delivery and Biomaterials, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Abstract: The goal of this study was to develop and characterize an intravaginal nanomedicine for the active targeted delivery of saquinavir (SQV to CD4+ immune cells as a potential strategy to prevent or reduce HIV infection. The nanomedicine was formulated into a vaginal gel to provide ease in self-administration and to enhance retention within the vaginal tract. SQV-encapsulated nanoparticles (SQV-NPs were prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid(PLGA and conjugated to antihuman anti-CD4 antibody. Antibody-conjugated SQV-NPs (Ab-SQV-NPs had an encapsulation efficiency (EE% of 74.4% ± 3.7% and an antibody conjugation efficiency (ACE% of 80.95% ± 1.10%. Over 50% of total loaded SQV was released from NPs over 3 days. NPs were rapidly taken up by Sup-T1 cells, with more than a twofold increase in the intracellular levels of SQV when delivered by Ab-SQV-NPs in comparison to controls 1 hour post-treatment. No cytotoxicity was observed when vaginal epithelial cells were treated for 24 hours with drug-free Ab-NPs (1,000 µg/mL, 1% HEC placebo gel (200 mg/mL, or 1% HEC gel loaded with drug-free Ab-NPs (5 mg NPs/g gel, 200 mg/mL of gel mixture. Overall, we described an intravaginal nanomedicine that is nontoxic and can specifically deliver SQV into CD4+ immune cells. This platform may demonstrate potential utility in its application as postexposure prophylaxis for the treatment or reduction of HIV infection, but further studies are required. Keywords: nanoparticles, saquinavir, antibody conjugation, intravaginal gel, HIV/AIDS, microbicide

  8. Adaptive Immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Mukaremera

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex is a group of fungal pathogens with different phenotypic and genotypic diversity that cause disease in immunocompromised patients as well as in healthy individuals. The immune response resulting from the interaction between Cryptococcus and the host immune system is a key determinant of the disease outcome. The species C. neoformans causes the majority of human infections, and therefore almost all immunological studies focused on C. neoformans infections. Thus, this review presents current understanding on the role of adaptive immunity during C. neoformans infections both in humans and in animal models of disease.

  9. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  10. Mechanisms and pathways of innate immune activation and regulation in health and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jun; Chen, Yongjun; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Research on innate immune signaling and regulation has recently focused on pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) and their signaling pathways. Members of PRRs sense diverse microbial invasions or danger signals, and initiate innate immune signaling pathways, leading to proinflammatory cytokines production, which, in turn, instructs adaptive immune response development. Despite the diverse functions employed by innate immune signaling to respond to a variety of different pathogens, the innate immune response must be tightly regulated. Otherwise, aberrant, uncontrolled immune responses will lead to harmful, or even fatal, consequences. Therefore, it is essential to better discern innate immune signaling and many regulators, controlling various signaling pathways, have been identified. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in our understanding of the activation and regulation of innate immune signaling in the host response to pathogens and cancer.

  11. Functional analysis of tomato immune receptor Ve1 and recognition of Verticillium effector Ave1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to the animal innate immune system, plants employ extracellular leucine rich repeat (eLRR)-containing cell surface receptors to recognize conserved molecular structures that are derived from microbial pathogens. A number of these immune receptors, as well as the corresponding pathogen

  12. Immunizations for Preterm Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations For Preterm Babies Safety & ...

  13. Weakened Immune Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Weakened Immune Systems Safety & Prevention ...

  14. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & ...

  15. Signalling through C-type lectin receptors: shaping immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Gringhuis, Sonja I.

    2009-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed by dendritic cells are crucial for tailoring immune responses to pathogens. Following pathogen binding, CLRs trigger distinct signalling pathways that induce the expression of specific cytokines which determine T cell polarization fates. Some CLRs can induce

  16. Host-pathogen interplay of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane M; Li, Wei; Bauer, Margaret E

    2010-02-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted infection chancroid, is primarily a pathogen of human skin. During infection, H. ducreyi thrives extracellularly in a milieu of professional phagocytes and other antibacterial components of the innate and adaptive immune responses. This review summarizes our understanding of the interplay between this pathogen and its host that leads to development and persistence of disease. H. ducreyi expresses key virulence mechanisms to resist host defenses. The secreted LspA proteins are tyrosine-phosphorylated by host kinases, which may contribute to their antiphagocytic effector function. The serum resistance and adherence functions of DsrA map to separate domains of this multifunctional virulence factor. An influx transporter protects H. ducreyi from killing by the antimicrobial peptide LL37. Regulatory genes have been identified that may coordinate virulence factor expression during disease. Dendritic cells and natural killer cells respond to H. ducreyi and may be involved in determining the differential outcomes of infection observed in humans. A human model of H. ducreyi infection has provided insights into virulence mechanisms that allow this human-specific pathogen to survive immune pressures. Components of the human innate immune system may also determine the ultimate fate of H. ducreyi infection by driving either clearance of the organism or an ineffective response that allows disease progression.

  17. Potentially pathogenic, pathogenic, and allergenic moulds in the urban soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Dragutin A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of soil mould populations that can compromise the human immune system was evaluated in experimental plots located at different distances (100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 m from the main source of pollution - the Podgorica Aluminum Plant. Soil samples were collected in July and October 2008 from three different plot zones at a depth of 0-10 cm. The count of potentially pathogenic, keratinolytic and allergenic (melaninogenic moulds was assessed, which can significantly contribute to both diagnosis and prophylaxis. The count of medically important moulds was higher in the urban soil than in the unpolluted (control soil. Their count decreased with increasing distance from the main pollution source (PAP. Their abundance in the soil was considerably higher in autumn than in spring.

  18. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive....... The recognition that dietary nutrients and microbial communities in the intestine influence both mucosal and systemic immune cell development and function as well as immune-mediated disease has led to an explosion of literature in mucosal immunology in recent years and a growing interest in the functionality...

  19. Exploring the Homeostatic and Sensory Roles of the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rafael Elias; Marques, Pedro Elias; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-01-01

    Immunology developed under the notion of the immune system exists to fight pathogens. Recently, the discovery of interactions with commensal microbiota that are essential to human health initiated a change in this old paradigm. Here, we argue that the immune system has major physiological roles extending far beyond defending the host. Immune and inflammatory responses share the core property of sensing, defining the immune system also as a sensory system. The inference with the immune system collects, interprets, and stores information, while creating an identity of self, places it in close relationship to the nervous system, which suggests that these systems may have a profound evolutionary connection.

  20. Regional specialization within the intestinal immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowat, Allan M.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly...... implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in the body. In this Review, we detail the anatomical and physiological distinctions that are observed in the small and large intestines, and we suggest how these may account for the diversity in the immune apparatus that is seen throughout...... the intestine. We describe how the distribution of innate, adaptive and innate-like immune cells varies in different segments of the intestine and discuss the environmental factors that may influence this. Finally, we consider the implications of regional immune specialization for inflammatory disease...

  1. Recent Advances in Aptamers Targeting Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Piao-Ping

    2017-02-01

    The immune system plays important role in protecting the organism by recognizing non-self molecules from pathogen such as bacteria, parasitic worms, and viruses. When the balance of the host defense system is disturbed, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and inflammation occur. Nucleic acid aptamers are short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or RNA ligands that interact with complementary molecules with high specificity and affinity. Aptamers that target the molecules involved in immune system to modulate their function have great potential to be explored as new diagnostic and therapeutic agents for immune disorders. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of aptamers targeting immune system. The selection of aptamers with superior chemical and biological characteristics will facilitate their application in the diagnosis and treatment of immune disorders.

  2. Glucosinolate metabolites required for an Arabidopsis innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Nicole K; Adio, Adewale M; Denoux, Carine; Jander, Georg; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2009-01-02

    The perception of pathogen or microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules by plants triggers a basal defense response analogous to animal innate immunity and is defined partly by the deposition of the glucan polymer callose at the cell wall at the site of pathogen contact. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling in Arabidopsis mutants, coupled with the monitoring of pathogen-triggered callose deposition, have identified major roles in pathogen response for the plant hormone ethylene and the secondary metabolite 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate. Two genes, PEN2 and PEN3, are also necessary for resistance to pathogens and are required for both callose deposition and glucosinolate activation, suggesting that the pathogen-triggered callose response is required for resistance to microbial pathogens. Our study shows that well-studied plant metabolites, previously identified as important in avoiding damage by herbivores, are also required as a component of the plant defense response against microbial pathogens.

  3. Glucosinolate Metabolites Required for an Arabidopsis Innate Immune Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Nicole K.; Adio, Adewale M.; Denoux, Carine; Jander, Georg; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The perception of pathogen or microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules by plants triggers a basal defense response analogous to animal innate immunity, and is defined in part by the deposition of the glucan polymer callose at the cell wall at the site of pathogen contact. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling in Arabidopsis mutants, coupled with the monitoring of pathogen triggered callose deposition, have identified major roles in pathogen response for the plant hormone ethylene and the secondary metabolite 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate. Two genes, PEN2 and PEN3, are also necessary for resistance to pathogens and are required for both callose deposition and glucosinolate activation, suggesting that the pathogen triggered callose response is required for resistance to microbial pathogens. Our study shows that well-studied plant metabolites, previously identified as important in avoiding damage by herbivores, are also required as a component of the plant defense response against microbial pathogens. PMID:19095898

  4. Contrasting invertebrate immune defense behaviors caused by a single gene, the Caenorhabditis elegans neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakad, Rania; Snoek, Basten; Yang, Wentao; Ellendt, S.; Schneider, Franziska; Mohr, T.G.; Rösingh, Lone; Masche, Anna C.; Rosenstiel, P.C.; Dierking, K.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Background: The invertebrate immune system comprises physiological mechanisms, physical barriers and also behavioral responses. It is generally related to the vertebrate innate immune system and widely believed to provide
    nonspecific defense against pathogens, whereby the response to different

  5. Contrasting invertebrate immune defense behaviors caused by a single gene, the Caenorhabditis elegans neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakad, Rania; Snoek, L.B.; Yang, Wentao; Ellendt, S.; Schneider, Franziska; Mohr, T.G.; Rösingh, Lone; Masche, Anna C.; Rosenstiel, P.C.; Dierking, K.; Kammenga, J.E.; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Background The invertebrate immune system comprises physiological mechanisms, physical barriers and also behavioral responses. It is generally related to the vertebrate innate immune system and widely believed to provide nonspecific defense against pathogens, whereby the response to different

  6. Contrasting invertebrate immune defense behaviors caused by a single gene, the Caenorhabditis elegans neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakad, Rania; Snoek, L Basten; Yang, Wentao; Ellendt, Sunna; Schneider, Franziska; Mohr, Timm G; Rösingh, Lone; Masche, Anna C; Rosenstiel, Philip C; Dierking, Katja; Kammenga, Jan E; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The invertebrate immune system comprises physiological mechanisms, physical barriers and also behavioral responses. It is generally related to the vertebrate innate immune system and widely believed to provide nonspecific defense against pathogens, whereby the response to different

  7. Social barriers to pathogen transmission in wild animal populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehle, C.

    1995-03-01

    Diseases and pathogens are receiving increasing recognition as sources of mortality in animal populations. Immune system strength is clearly important in fending off pathogen attack. Physical barriers to pathogen entry are also important. Various individual behaviors are efficacious in reducing contact with diseases and pests. This paper focuses on a fourth mode of defense: social barriers to transmission. Various social behaviors have pathogen transmission consequences. Selective pressures on these social behaviors may therefore exist. Effects on pathogen transmission of mating strategies, social avoidance, group size, group isolation, and other behaviors are explored. It is concluded that many of these behaviors may have been affected by selection pressures to reduce transmission of pathogens. 84 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Eicosanoid-mediated immunity in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicosanoid is a collective term for oxygenated metabolites of C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. As seen in mammals, eicosanoids play crucial roles in mediating various physiological processes, including immune responses, in insects. Upon microbial pathogen infection, non-self recognition signals are ...

  9. Innate immune signalling of the zebrafish embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockhammer, Oliver W.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade the study of the innate immune system has gained renewed scientific momentum as a result of the discovery of essential receptor families, such as the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, that are required for pathogen recognition. These receptors detect specific molecular structures

  10. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Michael R.; Filler, Scott G.; Schmidt, Clint S.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Edwards, John E.; Hennessey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future “third generation” vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high-priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologs found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that (1) afford protective efficacy; (2) target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; (3) cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunological niche; and/or (4) overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre-clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3) where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target S

  11. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Yeaman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future 3rd generation vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologues found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that 1 afford protective efficacy; 2 target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; 3 cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunologic niche; and/or 4 overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre–clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in preclinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3 where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target

  12. An Immunization Strategy Based on Propagation Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ubiquity of smart phones, wearable equipment, and wireless sensors, the topologies of networks composed by them change along with time. The immunization strategies in which network immune nodes are chosen by analyzing the static aggregation network topologies have been challenged. The studies about interaction propagations between two pathogens show that the interaction can change propagation threshold and the final epidemic size of each other, which provides a new thinking of immunization method. The eradication or inhibition of the virus can be achieved through the spread of its opposite party. Here, we put forward an immunization strategy whose implementation does not depend on the analysis of network topology. The immunization agents are randomly placed on a few of individuals of network and spread out from these individuals on network in a propagation method. The immunization agents prevent virus infecting their habitat nodes with certain immune success rate. The analysis and simulation of evolution equation of the model show that immune propagation has a significant impact on the spread threshold and steady-state density of virus on a finite size of BA networks. Simulations on some real-world networks also suggest that the immunization strategy is feasible and effective.

  13. Network properties of robust immunity in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Tsuda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Two modes of plant immunity against biotrophic pathogens, Effector Triggered Immunity (ETI and Pattern-Triggered Immunity (PTI, are triggered by recognition of pathogen effectors and Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs, respectively. Although the jasmonic acid (JA/ethylene (ET and salicylic acid (SA signaling sectors are generally antagonistic and important for immunity against necrotrophic and biotrophic pathogens, respectively, their precise roles and interactions in ETI and PTI have not been clear. We constructed an Arabidopsis dde2/ein2/pad4/sid2-quadruple mutant. DDE2, EIN2, and SID2 are essential components of the JA, ET, and SA sectors, respectively. The pad4 mutation affects the SA sector and a poorly characterized sector. Although the ETI triggered by the bacterial effector AvrRpt2 (AvrRpt2-ETI and the PTI triggered by the bacterial MAMP flg22 (flg22-PTI were largely intact in plants with mutations in any one of these genes, they were mostly abolished in the quadruple mutant. For the purposes of this study, AvrRpt2-ETI and flg22-PTI were measured as relative growth of Pseudomonas syringae bacteria within leaves. Immunity to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria brassicicola was also severely compromised in the quadruple mutant. Quantitative measurements of the immunity levels in all combinatorial mutants and wild type allowed us to estimate the effects of the wild-type genes and their interactions on the immunity by fitting a mixed general linear model. This signaling allocation analysis showed that, contrary to current ideas, each of the JA, ET, and SA signaling sectors can positively contribute to immunity against both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. The analysis also revealed that while flg22-PTI and AvrRpt2-ETI use a highly overlapping signaling network, the way they use the common network is very different: synergistic relationships among the signaling sectors are evident in PTI, which may amplify the signal

  14. Inflammasome/IL-1β Responses to Streptococcal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N. LaRock

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation mediated by the inflammasome and the cytokine IL-1β are some of the earliest and most important alarms to infection. These pathways are responsive to the virulence factors that pathogens use to subvert immune processes, and thus are typically activated only by microbes with potential to cause severe disease. Among the most serious human infections are those caused by the pathogenic streptococci, in part because these species numerous strategies for immune evasion. Since the virulence factor armament of each pathogen is unique, the role of IL-1β and the pathways leading to its activation varies for each infection. This review summarizes the role of IL-1β during infections caused by streptococcal pathogens, with emphasis on emergent mechanisms and concepts countering paradigms determined for other organisms.

  15. [The role of the innate immune system in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, T; Kaesler, S; Skabytska, Y; Biedermann, T

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms how the innate immune system detects microbes and mounts a rapid immune response have been more and more elucidated in the past years. Subsequently it has been shown that innate immunity also shapes adaptive immune responses and determines their quality that can be either inflammatory or tolerogenic. As atopic dermatitis is characterized by disturbances of innate and adaptive immune responses, colonization with pathogens and defects in skin barrier function, insight into mechanisms of innate immunity has helped to understand the vicious circle of ongoing skin inflammation seen in atopic dermatitis patients. Elucidating general mechanisms of the innate immune system and its functions in atopic dermatitis paves the way for developing new therapies. Especially the novel insights into the human microbiome and potential functional consequences make the innate immune system a very fundamental and promising target. As a result atopic dermatitis manifestations can be attenuated or even resolved. These currently developed strategies will be introduced in the current review.

  16. Chemokine-mediated immune responses in the female genital tract mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruaz, Maud; Luster, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    The genital tract mucosa is the site where sexually transmitted infections gain entry to the host. The immune response at this site is thus critical to provide innate protection against pathogens that are seen for the very first time as well as provide long-term pathogen-specific immunity, which would be required for an effective vaccine against sexually transmitted infection. A finely regulated immune response is therefore required to provide an effective barrier against pathogens without compromising the capacity of the genital tract to allow for successful conception and fetal development. We review recent developments in our understanding of the immune response in the female genital tract to infectious pathogens, using herpes simplex virus-2, human immunodeficiency virus-1 and Chlamydia trachomatis as examples, with a particular focus on the role of chemokines in orchestrating immune cell migration necessary to achieve effective innate and adaptive immune responses in the female genital tract.

  17. Organization of an optimal adaptive immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Aleksandra; Mayer, Andreas; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Mora, Thierry

    The repertoire of lymphocyte receptors in the adaptive immune system protects organisms from a diverse set of pathogens. A well-adapted repertoire should be tuned to the pathogenic environment to reduce the cost of infections. I will discuss a general framework for predicting the optimal repertoire that minimizes the cost of infections contracted from a given distribution of pathogens. The theory predicts that the immune system will have more receptors for rare antigens than expected from the frequency of encounters and individuals exposed to the same infections will have sparse repertoires that are largely different, but nevertheless exploit cross-reactivity to provide the same coverage of antigens. I will show that the optimal repertoires can be reached by dynamics that describes the competitive binding of antigens by receptors, and selective amplification of stimulated receptors.

  18. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  19. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira . Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira , have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  20. Entomopathogenic Fungi: New Insights into Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, T M; Coates, C J; Dubovskiy, I M; Ratcliffe, N A

    2016-01-01

    Although many insects successfully live in dangerous environments exposed to diverse communities of microbes, they are often exploited and killed by specialist pathogens. Studies of host-pathogen interactions (HPI) provide valuable insights into the dynamics of the highly aggressive coevolutionary arms race between entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) and their arthropod hosts. The host defenses are designed to exclude the pathogen or mitigate the damage inflicted while the pathogen responds with immune evasion and utilization of host resources. EPF neutralize their immediate surroundings on the insect integument and benefit from the physiochemical properties of the cuticle and its compounds that exclude competing microbes. EPF also exhibit adaptations aimed at minimizing trauma that can be deleterious to both host and pathogen (eg, melanization of hemolymph), form narrow penetration pegs that alleviate host dehydration and produce blastospores that lack immunogenic sugars/enzymes but facilitate rapid assimilation of hemolymph nutrients. In response, insects deploy an extensive armory of hemocytes and macromolecules, such as lectins and phenoloxidase, that repel, immobilize, and kill EPF. New evidence suggests that immune bioactives work synergistically (eg, lysozyme with antimicrobial peptides) to combat infections. Some proteins, including transferrin and apolipophorin III, also demonstrate multifunctional properties, participating in metabolism, homeostasis, and pathogen recognition. This review discusses the molecular intricacies of these HPI, highlighting the interplay between immunity, stress management, and metabolism. Increased knowledge in this area could enhance the efficacy of EPF, ensuring their future in integrated pest management programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Interface between Fungal Biofilms and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Kernien

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biofilms are communities of adherent cells surrounded by an extracellular matrix. These biofilms are commonly found during infection caused by a variety of fungal pathogens. Clinically, biofilm infections can be extremely difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to antifungals and host defenses. Biofilm formation can protect fungal pathogens from many aspects of the innate immune system, including killing by neutrophils and monocytes. Altered immune recognition during this phase of growth is also evident by changes in the cytokine profiles of monocytes and macrophages exposed to biofilm. In this manuscript, we review the host response to fungal biofilms, focusing on how these structures are recognized by the innate immune system. Biofilms formed by Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus have received the most attention and are highlighted. We describe common themes involved in the resilience of fungal biofilms to host immunity and give examples of biofilm defenses that are pathogen-specific.

  2. Theoretical analysis of the evolution of immune memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Carsten

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of an immune system to remember pathogens improves the chance of the host to survive a second exposure to the same pathogen. This immunological memory has evolved in response to the pathogen environment of the hosts. In vertebrates, the memory of previous infection is physiologically accomplished by the development of memory T and B cells. Many questions concerning the generation and maintenance of immunological memory are still debated. Is there a limit to how many memory cells a host can generate and maintain? If there is a limit, how should new cells be incorporated into a filled memory compartment? And how many different pathogens should the immune system remember? Results In this study, we examine how memory traits evolve as a response to different pathogen environments using an individual-based model. We find that even without a cost related to the maintenance of a memory pool, the positive effect of bigger memory pool sizes saturates. The optimal diversity of a limited memory pool is determined by the probability of re-infection, rather than by the prevalence of a pathogen in the environment, or the frequency of exposure. Conclusions Relating immune memory traits to the pathogen environment of the hosts, our population biological framework sheds light on the evolutionary determinants of immune memory.

  3. Manipulation of innate immunity by a bacterial secreted peptide: Lantibiotic nisin Z is selectively immunomodulatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindrachuk, J.; Jenssen, H.; Elliott, M.; Breukink, E.J.; Hancock, R.E.W.; et al., [No Value

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity is triggered by a variety of bacterial molecules, resulting in both protective and potentially harmful proinflammatory responses. Further, innate immunity also provides a mechanism for the maintenance of homeostasis between the host immune system and symbiotic or non-pathogenic

  4. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Intestinal Disease. The role of bacterial products, food components and drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol-Schoenmakers, M.

    2009-01-01

    The challenge of the mucosal gut associated immune system is to remain unresponsive to food products and commensal microbiota, while mounting an appropriate immune response towards pathogens. This implicates the necessity of tight immune regulation within the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT).

  5. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  6. Potatoes, pathogens and pests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazebnik, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Currently, fungicides are necessary to protect potato crops against late blight, Phytophthora infestans, one of the world’s most damaging crop pathogens. The introgression of plant resistance genes from wild potato species targeted specifically to the late blight pathogen into

  7. Food-borne pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemand, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Salmonella scare reinforced the importance of never taking chances when it comes to controlling pathogens. The issue has been resolved by radurisation. The article deals with the various pathogens that can effect food and argues the case for radurisation in dealing with them. It also looks at some of the other food products that can be treated using this process

  8. Stressor Controllability and Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-17

    susceptibility to infectious disease . In E. Kurstak, P. V. Morozov, & Z. P. Lipowski (Eds.), Viruses , immunity, and mental health. Plenum Press, in press. w...following inmunization . a. ELISA Procedure. We-Tsof a flat bottomed microtiter plate (NUNC, certified Immunopla.e I) were coated with KLH (0.2 mi/well, 0.5 mg...because the, rats were being infected with viruses and other agents tnat could alter proliferation. We thus began to purchase pathogen-free animals and

  9. Necroptotic signaling in adaptive and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jennifer V; Chen, Helen C; Walsh, Craig M

    2014-11-01

    The vertebrate immune system is highly dependent on cell death for efficient responsiveness to microbial pathogens and oncogenically transformed cells. Cell death pathways are vital to the function of many immune cell types during innate, humoral and cellular immune responses. In addition, cell death regulation is imperative for proper adaptive immune self-tolerance and homeostasis. While apoptosis has been found to be involved in several of these roles in immunity, recent data demonstrate that alternative cell death pathways are required. Here, we describe the involvement of a programmed form of cellular necrosis called "necroptosis" in immunity. We consider the signaling pathways that promote necroptosis downstream of death receptors, type I transmembrane proteins of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. The involvement of necroptotic signaling through a "RIPoptosome" assembled in response to innate immune stimuli or genotoxic stress is described. We also characterize the induction of necroptosis following antigenic stimulation in T cells lacking caspase-8 or FADD function. While necroptotic signaling remains poorly understood, it is clear that this pathway is an essential component to effective vertebrate immunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evolution of transgenerational immunity in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeault, R; Garnier, R; Rivero, A; Gandon, S

    2016-09-28

    Over a decade ago, the discovery of transgenerational immunity in invertebrates shifted existing paradigms on the lack of sophistication of their immune system. Nonetheless, the prevalence of this trait and the ecological factors driving its evolution in invertebrates remain poorly understood. Here, we develop a theoretical host-parasite model and predict that long lifespan and low dispersal should promote the evolution of transgenerational immunity. We also predict that in species that produce both philopatric and dispersing individuals, it may pay to have a plastic allocation strategy with a higher transgenerational immunity investment in philopatric offspring because they are more likely to encounter locally adapted pathogens. We review all experimental studies published to date, comprising 21 invertebrate species in nine different orders, and we show that, as expected, longevity and dispersal correlate with the transfer of immunity to offspring. The validity of our prediction regarding the plasticity of investment in transgenerational immunity remains to be tested in invertebrates, but also in vertebrate species. We discuss the implications of our work for the study of the evolution of immunity, and we suggest further avenues of research to expand our knowledge of the impact of transgenerational immune protection in host-parasite interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Pathogen inactivation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J P R; Transue, S; Snyder, E L

    2006-01-01

    The desire to rid the blood supply of pathogens of all types has led to the development of many technologies aimed at the same goal--eradication of the pathogen(s) without harming the blood cells or generating toxic chemical agents. This is a very ambitious goal, and one that has yet to be achieved. One approach is to shun the 'one size fits all' concept and to target pathogen-reduction agents at the Individual component types. This permits the development of technologies that might be compatible with, for example, plasma products but that would be cytocidal and thus incompatible with platelet concentrates or red blood cell units. The technologies to be discussed include solvent detergent and methylene blue treatments--designed to inactivate plasma components and derivatives; psoralens (S-59--amotosalen) designed to pathogen-reduce units of platelets; and two products aimed at red blood cells, S-303 (a Frale--frangible anchor-linker effector compound) and Inactine (a binary ethyleneimine). A final pathogen-reduction material that might actually allow one material to inactivate all three blood components--riboflavin (vitamin B2)--is also under development. The sites of action of the amotosalen (S-59), the S-303 Frale, Inactine, and riboflavin are all localized in the nucleic acid part of the pathogen. Solvent detergent materials act by dissolving the plasma envelope, thus compromising the integrity of the pathogen membrane and rendering it non-infectious. By disrupting the pathogen's ability to replicate or survive, its infectivity is removed. The degree to which bacteria and viruses are affected by a particular pathogen-reducing technology relates to its Gram-positive or Gram-negative status, to the sporulation characteristics for bacteria, and the presence of lipid or protein envelopes for viruses. Concerns related to photoproducts and other breakdown products of these technologies remain, and the toxicology of pathogen-reduction treatments is a major ongoing area

  12. The Tick Microbiome: Why Non-pathogenic Microorganisms Matter in Tick Biology and Pathogen Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah I. Bonnet

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ticks are among the most important vectors of pathogens affecting humans and other animals worldwide. They do not only carry pathogens however, as a diverse group of commensal and symbiotic microorganisms are also present in ticks. Unlike pathogens, their biology and their effect on ticks remain largely unexplored, and are in fact often neglected. Nonetheless, they can confer multiple detrimental, neutral, or beneficial effects to their tick hosts, and can play various roles in fitness, nutritional adaptation, development, reproduction, defense against environmental stress, and immunity. Non-pathogenic microorganisms may also play a role in driving transmission of tick-borne pathogens (TBP, with many potential implications for both human and animal health. In addition, the genetic proximity of some pathogens to mutualistic symbionts hosted by ticks is evident when studying phylogenies of several bacterial genera. The best examples are found within members of the Rickettsia, Francisella, and Coxiella genera: while in medical and veterinary research these bacteria are traditionally recognized as highly virulent vertebrate pathogens, it is now clear to evolutionary ecologists that many (if not most Coxiella, Francisella, and Rickettsia bacteria are actually non-pathogenic microorganisms exhibiting alternative lifestyles as mutualistic ticks symbionts. Consequently, ticks represent a compelling yet challenging system in which to study microbiomes and microbial interactions, and to investigate the composition, functional, and ecological implications of bacterial communities. Ultimately, deciphering the relationships between tick microorganisms as well as tick symbiont interactions will garner invaluable information, which may aid in the future development of arthropod pest and vector-borne pathogen transmission control strategies.

  13. Processes for managing pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfree, Alan; Farrell, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Wastewater contains human, animal, and plant pathogens capable of causing viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections. There are several routes whereby sewage pathogens may affect human health, including direct contact, contamination of food crops, zoonoses, and vectors. The range and numbers of pathogens in municipal wastewater vary with the level of endemic disease in the community, discharges from commercial activities, and seasonal factors. Regulations to control pathogen risk in the United States and Europe arising from land application of biosolids are based on the concept of multiple barriers to the prevention of transmission. The barriers are (i) treatment to reduce pathogen content and vector attraction, (ii) restrictions on crops grown on land to which biosolids have been applied, and (iii) minimum intervals following application and grazing or harvesting. Wastewater treatment reduces number of pathogens in the wastewater by concentrating them with the solids in the sludge. Although some treatment processes are designed specifically to inactivate pathogens, many are not, and the actual mechanisms of microbial inactivation are not fully understood for all processes. Vector attraction is reduced by stabilization (reduction of readily biodegradable material) and/or incorporation immediately following application. Concerns about health risks have renewed interest in the effects of treatment (on pathogens) and advanced treatment methods, and work performed in the United States suggests that Class A pathogen reduction can be achieved less expensively than previously thought. Effective pathogen risk management requires control to the complete chain of sludge treatment, biosolids handling and application, and post-application activities. This may be achieved by adherence to quality management systems based on hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) principles.

  14. Single-cell technologies to study the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proserpio, Valentina; Mahata, Bidesh

    2016-02-01

    The immune system is composed of a variety of cells that act in a coordinated fashion to protect the organism against a multitude of different pathogens. The great variability of existing pathogens corresponds to a similar high heterogeneity of the immune cells. The study of individual immune cells, the fundamental unit of immunity, has recently transformed from a qualitative microscopic imaging to a nearly complete quantitative transcriptomic analysis. This shift has been driven by the rapid development of multiple single-cell technologies. These new advances are expected to boost the detection of less frequent cell types and transient or intermediate cell states. They will highlight the individuality of each single cell and greatly expand the resolution of current available classifications and differentiation trajectories. In this review we discuss the recent advancement and application of single-cell technologies, their limitations and future applications to study the immune system. © 2015 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The immune response against Candida spp. and Sporothrix schenckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, José A; Pérez-García, Luis A; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the main causative agent of systemic candidiasis, a condition with high mortality rates. The study of the interaction between C. albicans and immune system components has been thoroughly studied and nowadays there is a model for the anti-C. albicans immune response; however, little is known about the sensing of other pathogenic species of the Candida genus. Sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis, and thus far there is limited information about its interaction with the immune system. In this paper, we review the most recent information about the immune sensing of species from genus Candida and S. schenckii. Thoroughly searches in scientific journal databases were performed, looking for papers addressing either Candida- or Sporothrix-immune system interactions. There is a significant advance in the knowledge of non-C. albicans species of Candida and Sporothrix immune sensing; however, there are still relevant points to address, such as the specific contribution of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for sensing by different immune cells and the immune receptors involved in such interactions. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Prediction of molecular mimicry candidates in human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxey, Andrew C; McConkey, Brendan J

    2013-08-15

    Molecular mimicry of host proteins is a common strategy adopted by bacterial pathogens to interfere with and exploit host processes. Despite the availability of pathogen genomes, few studies have attempted to predict virulence-associated mimicry relationships directly from genomic sequences. Here, we analyzed the proteomes of 62 pathogenic and 66 non-pathogenic bacterial species, and screened for the top pathogen-specific or pathogen-enriched sequence similarities to human proteins. The screen identified approximately 100 potential mimicry relationships including well-characterized examples among the top-scoring hits (e.g., RalF, internalin, yopH, and others), with about 1/3 of predicted relationships supported by existing literature. Examination of homology to virulence factors, statistically enriched functions, and comparison with literature indicated that the detected mimics target key host structures (e.g., extracellular matrix, ECM) and pathways (e.g., cell adhesion, lipid metabolism, and immune signaling). The top-scoring and most widespread mimicry pattern detected among pathogens consisted of elevated sequence similarities to ECM proteins including collagens and leucine-rich repeat proteins. Unexpectedly, analysis of the pathogen counterparts of these proteins revealed that they have evolved independently in different species of bacterial pathogens from separate repeat amplifications. Thus, our analysis provides evidence for two classes of mimics: complex proteins such as enzymes that have been acquired by eukaryote-to-pathogen horizontal transfer, and simpler repeat proteins that have independently evolved to mimic the host ECM. Ultimately, computational detection of pathogen-specific and pathogen-enriched similarities to host proteins provides insights into potentially novel mimicry-mediated virulence mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth / For Kids / Quiz: Immune System Print How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About Us ...

  18. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedule for Adults (19 Years of Age and ... diseases that can be prevented by vaccines . 2018 Immunization Schedule Recommended Vaccinations for Adults by Age and ...

  19. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Immunizations Immunizations and African Americans African American adults are less ... 19 to 35 months had comparable rates of immunization. African American women are as likely to have ...

  20. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  1. RNA-Binding Proteins in Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Woloshen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant defence responses against pathogen infection are crucial to plant survival. The high degree of regulation of plant immunity occurs both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Once transcribed, target gene RNA must be processed prior to translation. This includes polyadenylation, 5′capping, editing, splicing, and mRNA export. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs have been implicated at each level of RNA processing. Previous research has primarily focused on structural RNA-binding proteins of yeast and mammals; however, more recent work has characterized a number of plant RBPs and revealed their roles in plant immune responses. This paper provides an update on the known functions of RBPs in plant immune response regulation. Future in-depth analysis of RBPs and other related players will unveil the sophisticated regulatory mechanisms of RNA processing during plant immune responses.

  2. The conservative physiology of the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Vaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Current immunological opinion disdains the necessity to define global interconnections between lymphocytes and regards natural autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells as intrinsically pathogenic. Immunological theories address the recognition of foreignness by independent clones of lymphocytes, not the relations among lymphocytes or between lymphocytes and the organism. However, although extremely variable in cellular/molecular composition, the immune system preserves as invariant a set of essential relations among its components and constantly enacts contacts with the organism of which it is a component. These invariant relations are reflected, for example, in the life-long stability of profiles of reactivity of immunoglobulins formed by normal organisms (natural antibodies. Oral contacts with dietary proteins and the intestinal microbiota also result in steady states that lack the progressive quality of secondary-type reactivity. Autoreactivity (natural autoantibody and autoreactive T cell formation is also stable and lacks the progressive quality of clonal expansion. Specific immune responses, currently regarded as the fundament of the operation of the immune system, may actually result from transient interruptions in this stable connectivity among lymphocytes. More permanent deficits in interconnectivity result in oligoclonal expansions of T lymphocytes, as seen in Omenn's syndrome and in the experimental transplantation of a suboptimal diversity of syngeneic T cells to immunodeficient hosts, which also have pathogenic consequences. Contrary to theories that forbid autoreactivity as potentially pathogenic, the physiology of the immune system is conservative and autoreactive. Pathology derives from failures of these conservative mechanisms.

  3. Feast or famine: the host-pathogen battle over amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjia J; Rubin, Eric J

    2013-07-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens often rely on their hosts for essential nutrients. Host cells, in turn, attempt to limit nutrient availability, using starvation as a mechanism of innate immunity. Here we discuss both host mechanisms of amino acid starvation and the diverse adaptations of pathogens to their nutrient-deprived environments. These processes provide both key insights into immune subversion and new targets for drug development. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  5. NEW ASPECTS OF ANTI-INFECTION IMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Kisseleva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Four types of adaptive immune response which are regulated by different T-cell populations, namely Th1, Th2, Th17 and T regs have been described. At the first time classification is based on the difference in transcription factors but not due to diversity of cytokines produced. Each population of T-lymphocytes possesses a set of unique transcription factors and directions of cell signaling. Each type of immune responses plays a key role in the protection against certain types of pathogens. The Th1-response is important against intracellular bacteria and fungi, the Th17 — against extracellular, the Th2 — against yeasts and protozoa. T-regulatory cells control all types of immune responses. Diversity of immune response mechanisms occurs due to involvement of different effector cells. The Th1-type of response is connected with macrophage activation, Th2-cells cooperate with B-lymphocytes as well as attract eosinophils and mast cells. Th17 lymphocytes stimulate neutrophils and epithelial cells. T-cell differentiation is directed by the cytokines produced by innate immune cells. Phagocytes recognize molecular patterns at the surface of pathogens via pattern-recognition receptors (PRR, become activated and synthesize cytokines. Pathogen plays important role in this process while instructing dendritic cells. Pathogen dials a special code from a number of phagocyte surface receptors, which is named as «combinatory» recognition. Phagocytes possess several different types of activation and synthesize different cytokines that direct T-lymphocytes to a certain type of differentiation.

  6. Immunization Action Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Favorites ACIP Recommendations Package Inserts Additional Immunization Resources Photos Adult Vaccination Screening Checklists Ask the ...

  7. Innate and intrinsic antiviral immunity in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Ogawa, Youichi; Aoki, Rui; Shimada, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    As the body's most exposed interface with the environment, the skin is constantly challenged by potentially pathogenic microbes, including viruses. To sense the invading viruses, various types of cells resident in the skin express many different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) such as C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and cytosolic DNA sensors, that can detect the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of the viruses. The detection of viral PAMPs initiates two major innate immune signaling cascades: the first involves the activation of the downstream transcription factors, such as interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1), which cooperate to induce the transcription of type I interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The second signaling pathway involves the caspase-1-mediated processing of IL-1β and IL-18 through the formation of an inflammasome complex. Cutaneous innate immunity including the production of the innate cytokines constitutes the first line of host defence that limits the virus dissemination from the skin, and also plays an important role in the activation of adaptive immune response, which represents the second line of defence. More recently, the third immunity "intrinsic immunity" has emerged, that provides an immediate and direct antiviral defense mediated by host intrinsic restriction factors. This review focuses on the recent advances regarding the antiviral immune systems, highlighting the innate and intrinsic immunity against the viral infections in the skin, and describes how viral components are recognized by cutaneous immune systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of kefir fractions on innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinderola, Gabriel; Perdigon, Gabriela; Duarte, Jairo; Thangavel, Deepa; Farnworth, Edward; Matar, Chantal

    2006-01-01

    Innate immunity that protects against pathogens in the tissues and circulation is the first line of defense in the immune reaction, where macrophages have a critical role in directing the fate of the infection. We recently demonstrated that kefir modulates the immune response in mice, increasing the number of IgA+ cells in the intestinal and bronchial mucosa and the phagocytic activity of peritoneal and pulmonary macrophages. The aim of this study was to further characterize the immunomodulating capacity of the two fractions of kefir (F1: solids including bacteria and F2: liquid supernatant), by studying the cytokines produced by cells from the innate immune system: peritoneal macrophages and the adherent cells from Peyer's patches. BALB/c mice were fed either kefir solid fraction (F1) or kefir supernatant (F2) for 2, 5 or 7 consecutive days. The number of cytokine (IL-1alpha, IFNgamma, TNFalpha, IL-6 and IL-10) producing cells was determined on peritoneal macrophages and adherent cells from Peyer's patches. Both kefir fractions (F1 and F2) induced similar cytokine profiles on peritoneal macrophages (only TNFalpha and IL-6 were up-regulated). All cytokines studied on adherent cells from Peyer's patches were enhanced after F1 and F2 feeding, except for IFNgamma after F2 administration. Moreover, the percentage of IL-10+cells induced by fraction F2 on adherent cells from Peyer's patches was significantly higher than the one induced by fraction F1. Different components of kefir have an in vivo role as oral biotherapeutic substances capable of stimulating immune cells of the innate immune system, to down-regulate the Th2 immune phenotype or to promote cell-mediated immune responses against tumours and also against intracellular pathogenic infections.

  9. Regionalized Development and Maintenance of the Intestinal Adaptive Immune Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agace, William Winston; McCoy, Kathy D.

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal immune system has the daunting task of protecting us from pathogenic insults while limiting inflammatory responses against the resident commensal microbiota and providing tolerance to food antigens. This role is particularly impressive when one considers the vast mucosal surface...... and changing landscape that the intestinal immune system must monitor. In this review, we highlight regional differences in the development and composition of the adaptive immune landscape of the intestine and the impact of local intrinsic and environmental factors that shape this process. To conclude, we...... review the evidence for a critical window of opportunity for early-life exposures that affect immune development and alter disease susceptibility later in life....

  10. Immune response induction in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    The primary function of the immune response is protection of the host against infection with pathogens, including viruses. Since viruses can infect any tissue of the body, including the central nervous system (CNS), it is logical that cells of the immune system should equally have access to all...... tissues. Nevertheless, the brain and spinal cord are noted for their lack of immune presence. Relative to other organ systems, the CNS appears immunologically privileged. Furthermore, when immune responses do occur in the CNS, they are frequently associated with deleterious effects such as inflammatory...

  11. Can wheat bran mitigate malnutrition and enteric pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child malnutrition is a complex global problem, of which lack of food is only one component. Enteric pathogens and malnutrition work in a cyclic manner to depress a child’s intestinal immunity, while decreasing nutrient absorption. This cycle leads to stunting, wasting, and death. Often malnourished...

  12. RNA ‘Information Warfare’ in Pathogenic and Mutualistic Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaloner, Thomas; Kan, van Jan A.L.; Grant-Downton, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory non-coding RNAs are emerging as key players in host–pathogen interactions. Small RNAs such as microRNAs are implicated in regulating plant transcripts involved in immunity and defence. Surprisingly, RNAs with silencing properties can be translocated from plant hosts to various invading

  13. Pathogenic potential of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic food-borne pathogen causing listeriosis especially among immune-compromised persons. Its high rate of morbidity and mortality has classed the organism among the top watch list in foods. It is known to produce several virulence factors which aid its survival in harsh conditions ...

  14. Genetic characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms of periodontal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, A; Chen, C; Honma, K; Li, C; Settem, R P; Sharma, A

    2014-05-01

    Periodontal disease is caused by a group of bacteria that utilize a variety of strategies and molecular mechanisms to evade or overcome host defenses. Recent research has uncovered new evidence illuminating interesting aspects of the virulence of these bacteria and their genomic variability. This paper summarizes some of the strategies utilized by the major species - Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis - implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Whole-genome sequencing of 14 diverse A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has revealed variations in their genetic content (ranging between 0.4% and 19.5%) and organization. Strikingly, isolates from human periodontal sites showed no genomic changes during persistent colonization. T. forsythia manipulates the cytokine responses of macrophages and monocytes through its surface glycosylation. Studies have revealed that bacterial surface-expressed O-linked glycans modulate T-cell responses during periodontal inflammation. Periodontal pathogens belonging to the "red complex" consortium express neuraminidases, which enables them to scavenge sialic acid from host glycoconjugates. Analysis of recent data has demonstrated that the cleaved sialic acid acts as an important nutrient for bacterial growth and a molecule for the decoration of bacteria surfaces to help evade the host immune attack. In addition, bacterial entry into host cells is also an important prerequisite for the lifestyle of periodontal pathogens such as P. gingivalis. Studies have shown that, after its entry into the cell, this bacterium uses multiple sorting pathways destined for autophagy, lysosomes, or recycling pathways. In addition, P. gingivalis releases outer membrane vesicles which enter cells via endocytosis and cause cellular functional impairment.

  15. Convergent Evolution of Pathogen Effectors toward Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling Networks in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwa, Nam-Soo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2017-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have evolved protein effectors to promote virulence and cause disease in host plants. Pathogen effectors delivered into plant cells suppress plant immune responses and modulate host metabolism to support the infection processes of pathogens. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as cellular signaling molecules to trigger plant immune responses, such as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity. In this review, we discuss recent insights into the molecular functions of pathogen effectors that target multiple steps in the ROS signaling pathway in plants. The perception of PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors leads to the rapid and strong production of ROS through activation of NADPH oxidase Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs (RBOHs) as well as peroxidases. Specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly interact with plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat receptors to induce ROS production and the hypersensitive response in plant cells. By contrast, virulent pathogens possess effectors capable of suppressing plant ROS bursts in different ways during infection. PAMP-triggered ROS bursts are suppressed by pathogen effectors that target mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. Moreover, pathogen effectors target vesicle trafficking or metabolic priming, leading to the suppression of ROS production. Secreted pathogen effectors block the metabolic coenzyme NADP-malic enzyme, inhibiting the transfer of electrons to the NADPH oxidases (RBOHs) responsible for ROS generation. Collectively, pathogen effectors may have evolved to converge on a common host protein network to suppress the common plant immune system, including the ROS burst and cell death response in plants.

  16. Convergent Evolution of Pathogen Effectors toward Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling Networks in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Soo Jwa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens have evolved protein effectors to promote virulence and cause disease in host plants. Pathogen effectors delivered into plant cells suppress plant immune responses and modulate host metabolism to support the infection processes of pathogens. Reactive oxygen species (ROS act as cellular signaling molecules to trigger plant immune responses, such as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI and effector-triggered immunity. In this review, we discuss recent insights into the molecular functions of pathogen effectors that target multiple steps in the ROS signaling pathway in plants. The perception of PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors leads to the rapid and strong production of ROS through activation of NADPH oxidase Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homologs (RBOHs as well as peroxidases. Specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly interact with plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat receptors to induce ROS production and the hypersensitive response in plant cells. By contrast, virulent pathogens possess effectors capable of suppressing plant ROS bursts in different ways during infection. PAMP-triggered ROS bursts are suppressed by pathogen effectors that target mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. Moreover, pathogen effectors target vesicle trafficking or metabolic priming, leading to the suppression of ROS production. Secreted pathogen effectors block the metabolic coenzyme NADP-malic enzyme, inhibiting the transfer of electrons to the NADPH oxidases (RBOHs responsible for ROS generation. Collectively, pathogen effectors may have evolved to converge on a common host protein network to suppress the common plant immune system, including the ROS burst and cell death response in plants.

  17. Extracts against Various Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritika Chauhan

    2013-07-01

    The present study shows that tested lichen Parmotrema sp. extracts demonstrated a strong antimicrobial effect. That suggests the active components from methanol extracts of the investigated lichen Parmotrema sp. can be used as natural antimicrobial agent against pathogens.

  18. Evolution of microbial pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiRita, Victor J; Seifert, H. Steven

    2006-01-01

    ... A. Hogan vvi ■ CONTENTS 8. Evolution of Pathogens in Soil Rachel Muir and Man-Wah Tan / 131 9. Experimental Models of Symbiotic Host-Microbial Relationships: Understanding the Underpinnings of ...

  19. Indicators for waterborne pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens, National Research Council

    2004-01-01

    ... not practical or feasible to monitor for the complete spectrum of microorganisms that may occur in water, and many known pathogens are difficult to detect directly and reliably in water samples.Â...

  20. Host–Pathogen Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.A.; Schokker, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    The outcome of an infection is determined by numerous interactions between hosts and pathogens occurring at many different biological levels, ranging from molecule to population. To develop new control strategies for infectious diseases in livestock species, appropriate methodologies are needed

  1. Honeybee immunity and colony losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nazzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decline of honeybee colonies and their eventual collapse is a widespread phenomenon in the Northern hemisphere of the globe, which severely limits the beekeeping industry. This dramatic event is associated with an enhanced impact of parasites and pathogens on honeybees, which is indicative of reduced immunocompetence. The parasitic mite Varroa destructor and the vectored viral pathogens appear to play a key-role in the induction of this complex syndrome. In particular, the Deformed Wing Virus (DWV is widespread and is now considered, along with Varroa, one of the major causes of bee colony losses. Several lines of evidence indicate that this mite/DWV association severely affects the immune system of honeybees and makes them more sensitive to the action of other stress factors. The molecular mechanisms underpinning these complex interactions are currently being investigated and the emerging information has allowed the development of a new functional model, describing how different stress factors may synergistically concur in the induction of bee immune alteration and health decline. This provides a new logical framework in which to interpret the proposed multifactorial origin of bee colony losses and sets the stage for a more comprehensive and integrated analysis of the effect that multiple stress agents may have on honeybees.

  2. Modulation of immune homeostasis by commensal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Littman, Dan R.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria form a resident community that has co-evolved with the mammalian host. In addition to playing important roles in digestion and harvesting energy, commensal bacteria are crucial for the proper functioning of mucosal immune defenses. Most of these functions have been attributed to the presence of large numbers of “innocuous” resident bacteria that dilute or occupy niches for intestinal pathogens or induce innate immune responses that sequester bacteria in the lumen, thus quenching excessive activation of the mucosal immune system. However it has recently become obvious that commensal bacteria are not simply beneficial bystanders, but are important modulators of intestinal immune homeostasis and that the composition of the microbiota is a major factor in pre-determining the type and robustness of mucosal immune responses. Here we review specific examples of individual members of the microbiota that modify innate and adaptive immune responses, and we focus on potential mechanisms by which such species-specific signals are generated and transmitted to the host immune system. PMID:21215684

  3. Innate and Adaptive Immunity to Mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghuman, Harlene; Voelz, Kerstin

    2017-09-05

    Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection characterised by rapid filamentous growth, which leads to angioinvasion, thrombosis, and tissue necrosis. The high mortality rates (50-100%) associated with mucormycosis are reflective of not only the aggressive nature of the infection and the poor therapeutics currently employed, but also the failure of the human immune system to successfully clear the infection. Immune effector interaction with Mucorales is influenced by the developmental stage of the mucormycete spore. In a healthy immune environment, resting spores are resistant to phagocytic killing. Contrarily, swollen spores and hyphae are susceptible to damage and degradation by macrophages and neutrophils. Under the effects of immune suppression, the recruitment and efficacy of macrophage and neutrophil activity against mucormycetes is considerably reduced. Following penetration of the endothelial lining, Mucorales encounter platelets. Platelets adhere to both mucormycete spores and hyphae, and exhibit germination suppression and hyphal damage capacity in vitro. Dendritic cells are activated in response to Mucorales hyphae only, and induce adaptive immunity. It is crucial to further knowledge regarding our immune system's failure to eradicate resting spores under intact immunity and inhibit fungal growth under immunocompromised conditions, in order to understand mucormycosis pathogenicity and enhance therapeutic strategies for mucormycosis.

  4. The ubiquitin editing enzyme A20 maintains immune homeostasis and prevents autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares, Rita M.

    2010-01-01

    Dissertation presented to obtain the Doctorate degree (Ph.D.) in Biology at Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica da Universidade Nova de Lisboa The immune system is vital to ensure the surveillance of organisms against pathogens or malignant cells. However, the negative regulation of the immune system is equally essential, and defects in the termination of immune signals can result in autoimmunity and other pathologies. The functioning of the immune system results from the integrati...

  5. Exploiting immune cell metabolic machinery for functional HIV cure and the prevention of inflammaging

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Clovis S.; Palchaudhuri, Riya; Albargy, Hassan; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2018-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in immunology suggests that metabolic reprogramming and immune cell activation and functions are intricately linked. Viral infections, such as HIV infection, as well as cancer force immune cells to undergo major metabolic challenges. Cells must divert energy resources in order to mount an effective immune response. However, the fact that immune cells adopt specific metabolic programs to provide host defense against intracellular pathogens and how this metabolic shift impa...

  6. The postnatal development of the mucosal immune system and mucosal tolerance in domestic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey , Mick; Haverson , Karin

    2006-01-01

    International audience; The mucosal immune system is exposed to a range of antigens associated with pathogens, to which it must mount active immune responses. However, it is also exposed to a large number of harmless antigens associated with food and with commensal microbial flora, to which expression of active, inflammatory immune responses to these antigens is undesirable. The mucosal immune system must contain machinery capable of evaluating the antigens to which it is exposed and mounting...

  7. No Genetic Tradeoffs between Hygienic Behaviour and Individual Innate Immunity in the Honey Bee, Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Harpur, Brock A.; Chernyshova, Anna; Soltani, Arash; Tsvetkov, Nadejda; Mahjoorighasrodashti, Mohammad; Xu, Zhixing; Zayed, Amro

    2014-01-01

    Many animals have individual and social mechanisms for combating pathogens. Animals may exhibit short-term physiological tradeoffs between social and individual immunity because the latter is often energetically costly. Genetic tradeoffs between these two traits can also occur if mutations that enhance social immunity diminish individual immunity, or vice versa. Physiological tradeoffs between individual and social immunity have been previously documented in insects, but there has been no stu...

  8. Skin immune sentinels in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Frank O; Di Meglio, Paola; Qin, Jian-Zhong; Nickoloff, Brian J

    2009-10-01

    Human skin and its immune cells provide essential protection of the human body from injury and infection. Recent studies reinforce the importance of keratinocytes as sensors of danger through alert systems such as the inflammasome. In addition, newly identified CD103(+) dendritic cells are strategically positioned for cross-presentation of skin-tropic pathogens and accumulating data highlight a key role of tissue-resident rather than circulating T cells in skin homeostasis and pathology. This Review focuses on recent progress in dissecting the functional role of skin immune cells in skin disease.

  9. Social cues trigger differential immune investment strategies in a non-social insect, Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Joe D; Siva-Jothy, Michael T; Evison, Sophie E F

    2018-02-01

    Social immunization (SI) is a horizontal transfer of immunity that protects naive hosts against infection following exposure to infected nestmates. While mainly documented in eusocial insects, non-social species also share similar ecological features which favour the development of group-level immunity. Here, we investigate SI in Tenebrio molitor by pairing naive females with a pathogen-challenged conspecific for 72 h before measuring a series of immune and fitness traits. We found no evidence for SI, as beetles who cohabited with a live pathogen-challenged conspecific were not better protected against bacterial challenge. However, exposure to a heat-killed-bacteria-challenged conspecific appeared to increase pathogen tolerance, which manifested in differential fitness investment. Our results together suggest that T. molitor do respond to immune-related cues in the social environment, despite not showing a classic immunization response as predicted. © 2018 The Author(s).

  10. Human pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayidou, Stavria; Ioannidou, Eleni; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has been the invertebrate model organism of choice for the study of innate immune responses during the past few decades. Many Drosophila–microbe interaction studies have helped to define innate immunity pathways, and significant effort has been made lately to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Here we catalog 68 bacterial, fungal, and viral species studied in flies, 43 of which are relevant to human health. We discuss studies of human pathogens in flies revealing not only the elicitation and avoidance of immune response but also mechanisms of tolerance, host tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and predisposition to cancer. Prominent among those is the emerging pattern of intestinal regeneration as a defense response induced by pathogenic and innocuous bacteria. Immunopathology mechanisms and many microbial virulence factors have been elucidated, but their relevance to human health conventionally necessitates validation in mammalian models of infection. PMID:24398387

  11. Evolutionary perspectives on innate immunity from the study of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dennis H; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2005-02-01

    Genetic and functional genomic approaches have begun to define the molecular determinants of pathogen resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans. Conserved signal transduction components are required for pathogen resistance, including a Toll/IL-1 receptor domain adaptor protein that functions upstream of a conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway. We suggest that this pathway is an ancestral innate immune signaling pathway present in the common ancestor of nematodes, arthropods and vertebrates, which is likely to predate the involvement of canonical Toll signaling pathways in innate immunity. We anticipate that the study of pathogen resistance in C. elegans will continue to provide evolutionary and mechanistic insights into the signal transduction and physiology of innate immunity.

  12. VPS9a activates the Rab5 GTPase ARA7 to confer distinct pre- and postinvasive plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Eggert; Jürgens, Gerd; Thordal-Christensen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Plant innate immunity can effectively prevent the proliferation of filamentous pathogens. Papilla formation at the site of attack is essential for preinvasive immunity; in postinvasive immunity, the encasement of pathogen structures inside host cells can hamper disease. Whereas papillae are highly...... (Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Surprisingly, VPS9a acts in addition to two previously well-described innate immunity components and thus represents an additional step in the regulation of how plants resist pathogens. We found VPS9a to be important for delivering membrane material...

  13. Bacterial toxins as pathogen weapons against phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edo Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favour microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signalling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  14. Differential lung NK cell responses in avian influenza virus infected chickens correlate with pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, C.A.; de Geus, E.D.; van Haarlem, D.A.; van de Haar, P.M.; Löndt, B.Z; Graham, S.P.; Göbel, T.W.; van Eden, W.; Brookes, S.M.; Vervelde, L.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of chickens with low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus results in mild clinical signs while infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses causes death of the birds within 36–48 hours. Since natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to play an important role in influenza-specific immunity, we hypothesise that NK cells are involved in this difference in pathogenicity. To investigate this, the role of chicken NK-cells in LPAI virus infection was studied. Next...

  15. Our Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note ... who are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  16. Cross-protective immunity to Leishmania amazonensis is mediated by CD4+ and CD8+-epitopes of Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase terminal domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlei eNico

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Nucleoside hydrolase of Leishmania donovani (NH36 is a phylogenetic marker of high homology among Leishmania parasites. In mice and dog vaccination NH36 induces a CD4+ T cell-driven protective response against Leishmania chagasi infection directed against its C-terminal domain (F3. The C-terminal and N-terminal domain vaccines also decreased the footpad lesion caused by Leishmania amazonensis. We studied the basis of the crossed immune response using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin for mice prophylaxis against L. amazonensis. The F1 (amino acids 1-103 and F3 peptide (amino acids 199-314 vaccines enhanced the IgG and IgG2a anti-NH36 antibodies to similar levels. The F3 vaccine induced the strongest DTH response, the highest proportions of NH36-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after challenge and the highest expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α. The F1 vaccine, on the other hand, induced a weaker but significant DTH response and a mild enhancement of IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. The in vivo depletion with anti-CD4 or CD8 monoclonal antibodies disclosed that cross-protection against L. amazonensis infection was mediated by a CD4+ T cell response directed against the C-terminal domain (75% of reduction of the size of footpad lesion followed by a CD8+ T cell response against the N-terminal domain of NH36 (57% of reduction of footpad lesions. Both vaccines were capable of inducing long-term cross-immunity. The amino acid sequence of NH36 showed 93% identity to the sequence of the NH A34480 of L. amazonensis which also showed the presence of completely conserved predicted epitopes for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in F1 domain, and of CD4+ epitopes differing in a single amino acid, in F1 and F3 domains. The identification of the C-terminal and N-terminal domains as the targets of the immune response to NH36 in the model of L. amazonesis infection represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine

  17. Staphylococcal Immune Evasion Proteins: Structure, Function, and Host Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koymans, Kirsten J; Vrieling, Manouk; Gorham, Ronald D; van Strijp, Jos A G

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a successful human and animal pathogen. Its pathogenicity is linked to its ability to secrete a large amount of virulence factors. These secreted proteins interfere with many critical components of the immune system, both innate and adaptive, and hamper proper immune functioning. In recent years, numerous studies have been conducted in order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of evasion molecules with the host immune system. Structural studies have fundamentally contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms of action of the individual factors. Furthermore, such studies revealed one of the most striking characteristics of the secreted immune evasion molecules: their conserved structure. Despite high-sequence variability, most immune evasion molecules belong to a small number of structural categories. Another remarkable characteristic is that S. aureus carries most of these virulence factors on mobile genetic elements (MGE) or ex-MGE in its accessory genome. Coevolution of pathogen and host has resulted in immune evasion molecules with a highly host-specific function and prevalence. In this review, we explore how these shared structures and genomic locations relate to function and host specificity. This is discussed in the context of therapeutic options for these immune evasion molecules in infectious as well as in inflammatory diseases.

  18. A review of the immune molecules in the sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhuang; Li, Hui; Wang, Xiuli; Li, Xia; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jing; Liu, Cenjie

    2015-05-01

    It is very important to identify and characterize the immune-related genes that respond to pathogens. Until recently, only some of the immune-related genes in sea cucumbers had been characterized. Their expression patterns after pathogen challenges have been analyzed via expressed sequence tag libraries, microarray studies and proteomic approaches. These genes include lectins, antimicrobial peptides, lysozyme, enzymes, clotting protein, pattern recognition proteins, Toll receptors, complement C3 and other humoral factors that might participate in the innate immune system of sea cucumbers. Although the participation of some of these immune molecules in the sea cucumber's innate immune defense against invading pathogens has been demonstrated, the functions of many of the molecules remain unclear. This review focuses on the discovery and functional characterization of the immune-related molecules from the sea cucumber for the first time and provides new insights into the immune mechanisms of the sea cucumber, which opens new possibilities for developing drugs for novel anti-bacterial and antiviral applications in fisheries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evasion of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Respiratory Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storisteanu, Daniel M L; Pocock, Joanna M; Cowburn, Andrew S; Juss, Jatinder K; Nadesalingam, Angalee; Nizet, Victor; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2017-04-01

    The release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is a major immune mechanism intended to capture pathogens. These histone- and protease-coated DNA structures are released by neutrophils in response to a variety of stimuli, including respiratory pathogens, and have been identified in the airways of patients with respiratory infection, cystic fibrosis, acute lung injury, primary graft dysfunction, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. NET production has been demonstrated in the lungs of mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Since the discovery of NETs over a decade ago, evidence that "NET evasion" might act as an immune protection strategy among respiratory pathogens, including group A Streptococcus, Bordetella pertussis, and Haemophilus influenzae, has been growing, with the majority of these studies being published in the past 2 years. Evasion strategies fall into three main categories: inhibition of NET release by down-regulating host inflammatory responses; degradation of NETs using pathogen-derived DNases; and resistance to the microbicidal components of NETs, which involves a variety of mechanisms, including encapsulation. Hence, the evasion of NETs appears to be a widespread strategy to allow pathogen proliferation and dissemination, and is currently a topic of intense research interest. This article outlines the evidence supporting the three main strategies of NET evasion-inhibition, degradation, and resistance-with particular reference to common respiratory pathogens.

  20. Immunity in the moss Physcomitrella patens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressendorff, Simon

    model system, we identify and create targeted knock out of nine Physcomitrella homologs of defense related Arabidopsis genes. The knock-out lines are assessed for altered immune responses to a range of different pathogens. We find that at least one Physcomitrella mitogen activated protein kinase (MPK...... molecular patterns (MAMPs) including fungal chitin and bacterial MAMPs. The knock out of PpMPK4A renders the moss more susceptible to the pathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola and fails to accumulate several defense related transcripts and ROS production upon treatment with fungal...... to MAMP-triggered immunity, and the moss may use other signaling components to respond to abiotic stresses. In addition, a Physcomitrella knock-out of a homolog of the autophagy related gene ATG5 provides the first analysis of autophagy in non-vascular plants. PpATG5 knock-out mutants show clear signs...

  1. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions.

  2. Immune-Modulating Perspectives for Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manuela Rosado

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs on the immune system have received a considerable interest, not only to investigate possible negative health impact but also to explore the possibility to favorably modulate immune responses. To generate beneficial responses, the immune system should eradicate pathogens while “respecting” the organism and tolerating irrelevant antigens. According to the current view, damage-associated molecules released by infected or injured cells, or secreted by innate immune cells generate danger signals activating an immune response. These signals are also relevant to the subsequent activation of homeostatic mechanisms that control the immune response in pro- or anti-inflammatory reactions, a feature that allows modulation by therapeutic treatments. In the present review, we describe and discuss the effects of extremely low frequency (ELF-EMF and pulsed EMF on cell signals and factors relevant to the activation of danger signals and innate immunity cells. By discussing the EMF modulating effects on cell functions, we envisage the use of EMF as a therapeutic agent to regulate immune responses associated with wound healing.

  3. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  4. Caste-, sex-, and age-dependent expression of immune-related genes in a Japanese subterranean termite, Reticulitermes speratus

    OpenAIRE

    Mitaka, Yuki; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Matsuura, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Insects protect themselves from microbial infections through innate immune responses, including pathogen recognition, phagocytosis, the activation of proteolytic cascades, and the synthesis of antimicrobial peptides. Termites, eusocial insects inhabiting microbe-rich wood, live in closely-related family groups that are susceptible to shared pathogen infections. To resist pathogenic infection, termite families have evolved diverse immune adaptations at both individual and societal levels, and ...

  5. Lung Homeostasis: Influence of Age, Microbes, and the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Clare M; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2017-04-18

    Pulmonary immune homeostasis is maintained by a network of tissue-resident cells that continually monitor the external environment, and in health, instruct tolerance to innocuous inhaled particles while ensuring that efficient and rapid immune responses can be mounted against invading pathogens. Here we review the multiple pathways that underlie effective lung immunity in health, and discuss how these may be affected by external environmental factors and contribute to chronic inflammation during disease. In this context, we examine the current understanding of the impact of the microbiota in immune development and function and in the setting of the threshold for immune responses that maintains the balance between tolerance and chronic inflammation in the lung. We propose that host interactions with microbes are critical for establishing the immune landscape of the lungs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of Cortistatin in the Stressed Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Mario; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is faced with the daunting job of defending the organism against invading pathogens, while at the same time preserving the body integrity and maintaining tolerance to its own tissues. Loss of self-tolerance compromises immune homeostasis and leads to the onset of autoimmune disorders. The identification of endogenous factors that control immune tolerance and inflammation is a key goal for immunologists. Evidences from the last decade indicate that the neuropeptide cortistatin is one of the endogenous factors. Cortistatin is produced by immune cells and through its binding to various receptors, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory actions and participates in the maintenance of immune tolerance at multiple levels, especially in immunological disorders. Cortistatin emerges as a key element in the bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune systems aimed at regulating body homeostasis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Growth versus immunity--a redirection of the cell cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Ruth; Schäfer, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Diseases caused by plant pathogens significantly reduce growth and yield in agricultural crop production. Raising immunity in crops is therefore a major aim in breeding programs. However, efforts to enhance immunity are challenged by the occurrence of growth inhibition triggered by immunity that can be as detrimental as diseases. In this review, we will propose molecular models to explain the inhibitory growth-immunity crosstalk. We will briefly discuss why the resource reallocation model might not represent the driving force for the observed growth-immunity trade-offs. We suggest a model in which immunity redirects and initiates hormone signalling activities that can impair plant growth by antagonising cell cycle regulation and meristem activities. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Immune and genetic gardening of the intestinal microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jonathan P.; Braun, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system – consisting of adaptive and innate immune cells as well as the epithelium – is profoundly influenced by its microbial environment. There is now growing evidence that the converse is also true, that the immune system shapes the composition of the intestinal microbiome. During conditions of health, this bidirectional interaction achieves a homeostasis in which inappropriate immune responses to nonpathogenic microbes are averted and immune activity suppresses blooms of potentially pathogenic microbes (pathobionts). Genetic alteration in immune/epithelial function can affect host gardening of the intestinal microbiome, contributing to the diversity of intestinal microbiota within a population and in some cases allowing for unfavorable microbial ecologies (dysbiosis) that confer disease susceptibility. PMID:24613921

  9. Pathogenic mechanisms of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Masa, Roland; Venkei, Annamária; Mészáros, Sándor; Minarovits, Janos

    2017-06-01

    We wished to overview recent data on a subset of epigenetic changes elicited by intracellular bacteria in human cells. Reprogramming the gene expression pattern of various host cells may facilitate bacterial growth, survival, and spread. DNA-(cytosine C5)-methyltransferases of Mycoplasma hyorhinis targeting cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides and a Mycobacterium tuberculosis methyltransferase targeting non-CpG sites methylated the host cell DNA and altered the pattern of gene expression. Gene silencing by CpG methylation and histone deacetylation, mediated by cellular enzymes, also occurred in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. M. tuberculosis elicited cell type-specific epigenetic changes: it caused increased DNA methylation in macrophages, but induced demethylation, deposition of euchromatic histone marks and activation of immune-related genes in dendritic cells. A secreted transposase of Acinetobacter baumannii silenced a cellular gene, whereas Mycobacterium leprae altered the epigenotype, phenotype, and fate of infected Schwann cells. The 'keystone pathogen' oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis induced local DNA methylation and increased the level of histone acetylation in host cells. These epigenetic changes at the biofilm-gingiva interface may contribute to the development of periodontitis. Epigenetic regulators produced by intracellular bacteria alter the epigenotype and gene expression pattern of host cells and play an important role in pathogenesis.

  10. Viral pathogen discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Charles Y

    2015-01-01

    Viral pathogen discovery is of critical importance to clinical microbiology, infectious diseases, and public health. Genomic approaches for pathogen discovery, including consensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarrays, and unbiased next-generation sequencing (NGS), have the capacity to comprehensively identify novel microbes present in clinical samples. Although numerous challenges remain to be addressed, including the bioinformatics analysis and interpretation of large datasets, these technologies have been successful in rapidly identifying emerging outbreak threats, screening vaccines and other biological products for microbial contamination, and discovering novel viruses associated with both acute and chronic illnesses. Downstream studies such as genome assembly, epidemiologic screening, and a culture system or animal model of infection are necessary to establish an association of a candidate pathogen with disease. PMID:23725672

  11. Smuggling across the border: how arthropod-borne pathogens evade and exploit the host defense system of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Quentin; Jaulhac, Benoit; Boulanger, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    The skin is a critical barrier between hosts and pathogens in arthropod-borne diseases. It harbors many resident cells and specific immune cells to arrest or limit infections by secreting inflammatory molecules or by directly killing pathogens. However, some pathogens are able to use specific skin cells and arthropod saliva for their initial development, to hide from the host immune system, and to establish persistent infection in the vertebrate host. A better understanding of the initial mechanisms taking place in the skin should allow the development of new strategies to fight these vector-borne pathogens that are spread worldwide and are of major medical importance.

  12. Highly pathogenic avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayne, D E; Suarez, D L

    2000-08-01

    Highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza (AI) (HPAI) is an extremely contagious, multi-organ systemic disease of poultry leading to high mortality, and caused by some H5 and H7 subtypes of type A influenza virus, family Orthomyxoviridae. However, most AI virus strains are mildly pathogenic (MP) and produce either subclinical infections or respiratory and/or reproductive diseases in a variety of domestic and wild bird species. Highly pathogenic avian influenza is a List A disease of the Office International des Epizooties, while MPAI is neither a List A nor List B disease. Eighteen outbreaks of HPAI have been documented since the identification of AI virus as the cause of fowl plague in 1955. Mildly pathogenic avian influenza viruses are maintained in wild aquatic bird reservoirs, occasionally crossing over to domestic poultry and causing outbreaks of mild disease. Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses do not have a recognised wild bird reservoir, but can occasionally be isolated from wild birds during outbreaks in domestic poultry. Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses have been documented to arise from MPAI viruses through mutations in the haemagglutinin surface protein. Prevention of exposure to the virus and eradication are the accepted methods for dealing with HPAI. Control programmes, which imply allowing a low incidence of infection, are not an acceptable method for managing HPAI, but have been used during some outbreaks of MPAI. The components of a strategy to deal with MPAI or HPAI include surveillance and diagnosis, biosecurity, education, quarantine and depopulation. Vaccination has been used in some control and eradication programmes for AI.

  13. Exploring NAD+ metabolism in host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Inês; Varela, Patrícia; Belinha, Ana; Gaifem, Joana; Laforge, Mireille; Vergnes, Baptiste; Estaquier, Jérôme; Silvestre, Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a vital molecule found in all living cells. NAD(+) intracellular levels are dictated by its synthesis, using the de novo and/or salvage pathway, and through its catabolic use as co-enzyme or co-substrate. The regulation of NAD(+) metabolism has proven to be an adequate drug target for several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative or inflammatory diseases. Increasing interest has been given to NAD(+) metabolism during innate and adaptive immune responses suggesting that its modulation could also be relevant during host-pathogen interactions. While the maintenance of NAD(+) homeostatic levels assures an adequate environment for host cell survival and proliferation, fluctuations in NAD(+) or biosynthetic precursors bioavailability have been described during host-pathogen interactions, which will interfere with pathogen persistence or clearance. Here, we review the double-edged sword of NAD(+) metabolism during host-pathogen interactions emphasizing its potential for treatment of infectious diseases.

  14. Immune Response to Dengue and Zika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngono, Annie Elong; Shresta, Sujan

    2018-04-26

    Flaviviruses such as dengue (DENV), yellow fever (YFV), West Nile (WNV), and Zika (ZIKV) are human pathogens of global significance. In particular, DENV causes the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral diseases in humans, and ZIKV emerged from obscurity into the spotlight in 2016 as the etiologic agent of congenital Zika syndrome. Owing to the recent emergence of ZIKV as a global pandemic threat, the roles of the immune system during ZIKV infections are as yet unclear. In contrast, decades of DENV research implicate a dual role for the immune system in protection against and pathogenesis of DENV infection. As DENV and ZIKV are closely related, knowledge based on DENV studies has been used to prioritize investigation of ZIKV immunity and pathogenesis, and to accelerate ZIKV diagnostic, therapeutic, and vaccine design. This review discusses the following topics related to innate and adaptive immune responses to DENV and ZIKV: the interferon system as the key mechanism of host defense and viral target for immune evasion, antibody-mediated protection versus antibody-dependent enhancement, and T cell-mediated protection versus original T cell antigenic sin. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the balance between immune-mediated protection and pathogenesis during DENV and ZIKV infections is critical toward development of safe and effective DENV and ZIKV therapeutics and vaccines.

  15. Natural evolution, disease, and localization in the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive vertebrate immune system is a wonder of modern evolution. Under most circumstances, the dynamics of the immune system is well-matched to the dynamics of pathogen growth during a typical infection. Some pathogens, however, have evolved escape mechanisms that interact in subtle ways with the immune system dynamics. In addition, negative interactions the immune system, which has evolved over 400 000 000 years, and vaccination,which has been practiced for only 200 years, are possible. For example,vaccination against the flu can actually increase susceptibility to the flu in the next year. As another example, vaccination against one of the four strains of dengue fever typically increases susceptibility against the other three strains. Immunodominance also arises in the immune system control of nascent tumors--the immune system recognizes only a small subset of the tumor specific antigens, and the rest are free to grow and cause tumor growth. In this talk, I present a physical theory of original antigenic sin and immunodominance. How localization in the immune system leads to the observed phenomena is discussed. 1) M. W. Deem and H. Y. Lee, ``Sequence Space Localization in the Immune System Response to Vaccination and Disease,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 068101

  16. Skin innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available All multicellular organisms protect themselves from external universe and microorganisms by innate immune sytem that is constitutively present. Skin innate immune system has several different components composed of epithelial barriers, humoral factors and cellular part. In this review information about skin innate immune system and its components are presented to the reader. Innate immunity, which wasn’t adequately interested in previously, is proven to provide a powerfull early protection system, control many infections before the acquired immunity starts and directs acquired immunity to develop optimally

  17. Diverse novel functions of neutrophils in immunity, inflammation, and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Mocsai, A.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils have long been considered simple suicide killers at the bottom of the hierarchy of the immune response. That view began to change 10–20 yr ago, when the sophisticated mechanisms behind how neutrophils locate and eliminate pathogens and regulate immunity and inflammation were discovered. The last few years witnessed a new wave of discoveries about additional novel and unexpected functions of these cells. Neutrophils have been proposed to participate in protection against intracellu...

  18. Captive and free-living red knots Calidris canutus exhibit differences in non-induced immunity that suggest different immune strategies in different environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buehler, Deborah M.; Piersma, Theunis; Tieleman, B. Irene

    Experiments on captive animals, in which conditions can be controlled, are useful for examining complex biological phenomena such as immune function. Such experiments have increased our understanding of immune responses in the context of trade-offs and pathogen pressure. However, few studies have

  19. Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application. PMID:23144763

  20. Immunopathology of highly virulent pathogens: insights from Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Carisa A; Sullivan, Nancy J; Nabel, Gary J

    2007-11-01

    Ebola virus is a highly virulent pathogen capable of inducing a frequently lethal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. Accumulating evidence indicates that the virus actively subverts both innate and adaptive immune responses and triggers harmful inflammatory responses as it inflicts direct tissue damage. The host immune system is ultimately overwhelmed by a combination of inflammatory factors and virus-induced cell damage, particularly in the liver and vasculature, often leading to death from septic shock. We summarize the mechanisms of immune dysregulation and virus-mediated cell damage in Ebola virus-infected patients. Future approaches to prevention and treatment of infection will be guided by answers to unresolved questions about interspecies transmission, molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, and protective adaptive and innate immune responses to Ebola virus.

  1. Impact of methamphetamine on infection and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A Salamanca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of methamphetamine (METH use is estimated at ~35 million people worldwide, with over 10 million users in the United States. METH use elicits a myriad of social consequences and the behavioral impact of the drug is well understood. However, new information has recently emerged detailing the devastating effects of METH on host immunity, increasing the acquisition of diverse pathogens and exacerbating the severity of disease. These outcomes manifest as modifications in protective physical and chemical defenses, pro-inflammatory responses, and the induction of oxidative stress pathways. Through these processes, significant neurotoxicities arise, and, as such, chronic abusers with these conditions are at a higher risk for heightened consequences. METH use also influences the adaptive immune response, permitting the unrestrained development of opportunistic diseases. In this review, we discuss recent literature addressing the impact of METH on infection and immunity, and identify areas ripe for future investigation.

  2. The Hippo Pathway: Immunity and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zaid; J Janse van Rensburg, Helena; Yang, Xiaolong

    2018-03-28

    Since its discovery, the Hippo pathway has emerged as a central signaling network in mammalian cells. Canonical signaling through the Hippo pathway core components (MST1/2, LATS1/2, YAP and TAZ) is important for development and tissue homeostasis while aberrant signaling through the Hippo pathway has been implicated in multiple pathologies, including cancer. Recent studies have uncovered new roles for the Hippo pathway in immunology. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms by which Hippo signaling in pathogen-infected or neoplastic cells affects the activities of immune cells that respond to these threats. We further discuss how Hippo signaling functions as part of an immune response. Finally, we review how immune cell-intrinsic Hippo signaling modulates the development/function of leukocytes and propose directions for future work.

  3. Potential use of salivary markers for longitudinal monitoring of inflammatory immune responses to vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Pei Wen; Garssen, Johan; Sandalova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination, designed to trigger a protective immune response against infection, is a trigger for mild inflammatory responses. Vaccination studies can address the question of inflammation initiation, levels, and resolution as well as its regulation for respective studied pathogens. Such studies

  4. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  5. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle composition-dependent activation of the innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, Afshin; Beskers, Joep; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Bindels, Tim H E; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P M; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated and successfully implemented as vaccines. They contain pathogen associated molecular patterns including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capable of triggering innate immunity. However, Neisseria meningitidis contains an

  6. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): pathogenesis and interaction with the immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review addresses important issues of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection, immunity, pathogenesis and control. Worldwide PRRS is the most economically important infectious disease of pigs. We highlight the latest information on viral genome structure, pathogenic...

  7. SUMO-, MAPK- and resistance protein-signaling converge at transcription complexes that regulate plant innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den H.A.; Takken, F.L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Upon pathogen perception plant innate immune receptors activate various signaling pathways that trigger host defenses. PAMP-triggered defense signaling requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which modulate the activity of transcription factors through phosphorylation. Here, we

  8. SUMO-, MAPK-, and resistance protein-signaling converge at transcription complexes that regulate plant innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Burg, H.A.; Takken, F.L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Upon pathogen perception plant innate immune receptors activate various signaling pathways that trigger host defenses. PAMP-triggered defense signaling requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which modulate the activity of transcription factors through phosphorylation. Here, we

  9. Human pathogen avoidance adaptations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tybur, J.M.; Lieberman, D.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, researchers have become increasingly interested in the adaptations guiding the avoidance of disease-causing organisms. Here we discuss the latest developments in this area, including a recently developed information-processing model of the adaptations underlying pathogen

  10. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host’s defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  12. Functions of innate immune cells and commensal bacteria in gut homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal immune system remains unresponsive to beneficial microbes and dietary antigens while activating pro-inflammatory responses against pathogens for host defence. In intestinal mucosa, abnormal activation of innate immunity, which directs adaptive immune responses, causes the onset and/or progression of inflammatory bowel diseases. Thus, innate immunity is finely regulated in the gut. Multiple innate immune cell subsets have been identified in both murine and human intestinal lamina propria. Some innate immune cells play a key role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis by preventing inappropriate adaptive immune responses while others are associated with the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation through development of Th1 and Th17 cells. In addition, intestinal microbiota and their metabolites contribute to the regulation of innate/adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, perturbation of microbiota composition can trigger intestinal inflammation by driving inappropriate immune responses. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Immune System Print en español El sistema inmunitario The immune system, which is made up ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  14. Immunity's ancient arms

    OpenAIRE

    Litman, Gary W.; Cannon, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse receptors on two types of cell mediate adaptive immunity in jawed vertebrates. In the lamprey, a jawless vertebrate, immunity is likewise compartmentalized but the molecular mechanics are very different.

  15. [Immune system and tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  17. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM ...

  18. Immunizations for adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubion, Stephanie S; Larkin, Lisa C

    2016-12-01

    Immunizations protect individual persons and contribute to public health by reducing morbidity and mortality associated with common infectious diseases. In this Practice Pearl, we review guidelines for adult immunizations and recent and potential changes in vaccines.

  19. Ironing Out the Wrinkles in Host Defense: Interactions between Iron Homeostasis and Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijian; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for both microbial pathogens and their mammalian hosts. Changes in iron availability and distribution have significant effects on pathogen virulence and on the immune response to infection. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of iron metabolism have shed new light on how alterations in iron homeostasis both contribute to and influence innate immunity. In this article, we review what is currently known about the role of iron in the response to infection. PMID:20375603

  20. Purification and proteomics of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Ana eHerweg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain pathogenic bacteria adopt an intracellular lifestyle and proliferate in eukaryotic host cells. The intracellular niche protects the bacteria from cellular and humoral components of the mammalian immune system, and at the same time, allows the bacteria to gain access to otherwise restricted nutrient sources. Yet, intracellular protection and access to nutrients comes with a price, i.e. the bacteria need to overcome cell-autonomous defense mechanisms, such as the bactericidal endocytic pathway. While a few bacteria rupture the early phagosome and escape into the host cytoplasm, most intracellular pathogens form a distinct, degradation-resistant and replication-permissive membranous compartment. Intracellular bacteria that form unique pathogen vacuoles include Legionella, Mycobacterium, Chlamydia, Simkania and Salmonella species. In order to understand the formation of these pathogen niches on a global scale and in a comprehensive and quantitative manner, an inventory of compartment-associated host factors is required. To this end, the intact pathogen compartments need to be isolated, purified and biochemically characterized. Here, we review recent progress on the isolation and purification of pathogen-modified vacuoles and membranes, as well as their proteomic characterization by mass spectrometry and different validation approaches. These studies provide the basis for further investigations on the specific mechanisms of pathogen-driven compartment formation.

  1. Autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Fei; Snyder, John Hugh; Shi, Huan-Bin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents in vacuoles. Plant pathogenic fungi develop special infection structures and/or secrete a range of enzymes to invade their plant hosts. It has been demonstrated that monitoring autophagy processes can be extremely useful in visualizing the sequence of events leading to pathogenicity of plant pathogenic fungi. In this review, we introduce the molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy. In addition, we explore the relationship between autophagy and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. Finally, we discuss the various experimental strategies available for use in the study of autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno...

  3. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  4. Induction of antitumor immunity through xenoplacental immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agadjanyan Michael G

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically cancer vaccines have yielded suboptimal clinical results. We have developed a novel strategy for eliciting antitumor immunity based upon homology between neoplastic tissue and the developing placenta. Placenta formation shares several key processes with neoplasia, namely: angiogenesis, activation of matrix metalloproteases, and active suppression of immune function. Immune responses against xenoantigens are well known to break self-tolerance. Utilizing xenogeneic placental protein extracts as a vaccine, we have successfully induced anti-tumor immunity against B16 melanoma in C57/BL6 mice, whereas control xenogeneic extracts and B16 tumor extracts where ineffective, or actually promoted tumor growth, respectively. Furthermore, dendritic cells were able to prime tumor immunity when pulsed with the placental xenoantigens. While vaccination-induced tumor regression was abolished in mice depleted of CD4 T cells, both CD4 and CD8 cells were needed to adoptively transfer immunity to naïve mice. Supporting the role of CD8 cells in controlling tumor growth are findings that only freshly isolated CD8 cells from immunized mice were capable of inducing tumor cell caspases-3 activation ex vivo. These data suggest feasibility of using xenogeneic placental preparations as a multivalent vaccine potently targeting not just tumor antigens, but processes that are essential for tumor maintenance of malignant potential.

  5. Immune defense mechanisms in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-02-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells provide an essential line of defense for Caernohabditis elegans against ingested pathogens. Because nematodes consume microorganisms as their food source, there has presumably been selection pressure to evolve and maintain immune defense mechanisms within the intestinal epithelium. Here we review recent advances that further define the immune signaling network within these cells and suggest mechanisms used by the nematode to monitor for infection. In reviewing studies of pathogenesis that use this simple model system, we hope to illustrate some of the basic principles of epithelial immunity that may also be of relevance in higher order hosts. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Prevalence of local immune response against oral infection in a Drosophila/Pseudomonas infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Liehl

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens have developed multiple strategies that allow them to exploit host resources and resist the immune response. To study how Drosophila flies deal with infectious diseases in a natural context, we investigated the interactions between Drosophila and a newly identified entomopathogen, Pseudomonas entomophila. Flies orally infected with P. entomophila rapidly succumb despite the induction of both local and systemic immune responses, indicating that this bacterium has developed specific strategies to escape the fly immune response. Using a combined genetic approach on both host and pathogen, we showed that P. entomophila virulence is multi-factorial with a clear differentiation between factors that trigger the immune response and those that promote pathogenicity. We demonstrate that AprA, an abundant secreted metalloprotease produced by P. entomophila, is an important virulence factor. Inactivation of aprA attenuated both the capacity to persist in the host and pathogenicity. Interestingly, aprA mutants were able to survive to wild-type levels in immune-deficient Relish flies, indicating that the protease plays an important role in protection against the Drosophila immune response. Our study also reveals that the major contribution to the fly defense against P. entomophila is provided by the local, rather than the systemic immune response. More precisely, our data points to an important role for the antimicrobial peptide Diptericin against orally infectious Gram-negative bacteria, emphasizing the critical role of local antimicrobial peptide expression against food-borne pathogens.

  7. Evolution of microbial pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Morschhäuser, J; Köhler, G; Ziebuhr, W; Blum-Oehler, G; Dobrindt, U; Hacker, J

    2000-01-01

    Various genetic mechanisms including point mutations, genetic rearrangements and lateral gene transfer processes contribute to the evolution of microbes. Long-term processes leading to the development of new species or subspecies are termed macroevolution, and short-term developments, which occur during days or weeks, are considered as microevolution. Both processes, macro- and microevolution need horizontal gene transfer, which is particularly important for the development of pathogenic micr...

  8. Alternatives to conventional vaccines--mediators of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, D P; Liley, H G; Minchinton, R M

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines have been described as "weapons of mass protection". The eradication of many diseases is testament to their utility and effectiveness. Nevertheless, many vaccine preventable diseases remain prevalent because of political and economic barriers. Additionally, the effects of immaturity and old age, therapies that incapacitate the adaptive immune system and the multitude of strategies evolved by pathogens to evade immediate or sustained recognition by the mammalian immune system are barriers to the effectiveness of existing vaccines or development of new vaccines. In the front line of defence against the pervasiness of infection are the elements of the innate immune system. Innate immunity is under studied and poorly appreciated. However, in the first days after entry of a pathogen into the body, our entire protective response is dependant upon the various elements of our innate immune repertoire. In spite of its place as our initial defence against infection, attention is only now turning to strategies which enhance or supplement innate immunity. This review examines the need for and potential of innate immune therapies.

  9. An extracellular subtilase switch for immune priming in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Ramírez

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, induced resistance associates with acquisition of a priming state of the cells for a more effective activation of innate immunity; however, the nature of the components for mounting this type of immunological memory is not well known. We identified an extracellular subtilase from Arabidopsis, SBT3.3, the overexpression of which enhances innate immune responses while the loss of function compromises them. SBT3.3 expression initiates a durable autoinduction mechanism that promotes chromatin remodeling and activates a salicylic acid(SA-dependent mechanism of priming of defense genes for amplified response. Moreover, SBT3.3 expression-sensitized plants for enhanced expression of the OXI1 kinase gene and activation of MAP kinases following pathogen attack, providing additional clues for the regulation of immune priming by SBT3.3. Conversely, in sbt3.3 mutant plants pathogen-mediated induction of SA-related defense gene expression is drastically reduced and activation of MAP kinases inhibited. Moreover, chromatin remodeling of defense-related genes normally associated with activation of an immune priming response appear inhibited in sbt3.3 plants, further indicating the importance of the extracellular SBT3.3 subtilase in the establishment of immune priming. Our results also point to an epigenetic control in the regulation of plant immunity, since SBT3.3 is up-regulated and priming activated when epigenetic control is impeded. SBT3.3 represents a new regulator of primed immunity.

  10. Engineering synthetic vaccines using cues from natural immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Darrell J.; Swartz, Melody A.; Szeto, Gregory L.

    2013-11-01

    Vaccines aim to protect against or treat diseases through manipulation of the immune response, promoting either immunity or tolerance. In the former case, vaccines generate antibodies and T cells poised to protect against future pathogen encounter or attack diseased cells such as tumours; in the latter case, which is far less developed, vaccines block pathogenic autoreactive T cells and autoantibodies that target self tissue. Enormous challenges remain, however, as a consequence of our incomplete understanding of human immunity. A rapidly growing field of research is the design of vaccines based on synthetic materials to target organs, tissues, cells or intracellular compartments; to co-deliver immunomodulatory signals that control the quality of the immune response; or to act directly as immune regulators. There exists great potential for well-defined materials to further our understanding of immunity. Here we describe recent advances in the design of synthetic materials to direct immune responses, highlighting successes and challenges in prophylactic, therapeutic and tolerance-inducing vaccines.

  11. Kidney and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-03-01

    Innate immune system is an important modulator of the inflammatory response during infection and tissue injury/repair. The kidney as a vital organ with high energy demand plays a key role in regulating the disease related metabolic process. Increasing research interest has focused on the immune pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. However, innate immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and a few innate lymphocytes, as well as the complement system are essential for renal immune homeostasis and ensure a coordinated balance between tissue injury and regeneration. The innate immune response provides the first line of host defense initiated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), together with inflammasomes responsible for early innate immune response. Although the innate immune system is well studied, the research on the detailed relationship between innate immunity and kidney is still very limited. In this review, we will focus on the innate immune sensing system in renal immune homeostasis, as well as the corresponding pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. The pivotal roles of innate immunity in renal injury and regeneration with special emphasis on kidney disease related immunoregulatory mechanism are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of the immune response in pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature review presents modern data on the pathogen-associated molecular structures of Staphylococcus aureus and its role in the occurrence of pneumonia: activation and modulation of the immune response, oxidative and metabolic stress, apoptosis. Particular attention is paid to the factors of virulence of the pathogen, which can induce an inflammatory process without activating the image-recognition receptors.

  13. Alternative Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Cadavid Gutierrez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune system in animals is a complex network of molecules, cells and tissues that coordinately maintain the physiological and genetic integrity of the organism. Traditionally, two classes of immunity have been considered, the innate immunity and the adaptive immunity. The former is ancestral, with limited variability and low discrimination. The latter is highly variable, specific and limited to jawed vertebrates. Adaptive immunity is based on antigen receptors that rearrange somatically to generate a nearly unlimited diversity of molecules. Likely, this mechanism of somatic recombination arose as a consequence of a horizontal transfer of transposons and transposases from bacterial genomes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates. The recent discovery in jawless vertebrates and invertebrates of alternative adaptive immune mechanisms, suggests during evolution different animal groups have found alternative solutions to the problem of immune recognition.

  14. The Role of Non-specific and Specific Immune Systems in Poultry against Newcastle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND is caused by avian paramyxovirus-1 which belong to Avulavirus genus and Paramyxoviridae family. The birds have abnormalities in humoral (bursa fabricius and cellular (thymus and spleen lymphoid organs. Lesions decrease the immune system. Immune system consists of non-specific and specific immune systems. The main components of non-specific immunity are physical and chemical barrier (feather and skin or mucosa, phagocytic cells (macrophages and natural killer, protein complement and the mediator of inflammation and cytokines. Interferons (IFNs belong to a group of cytokines that play a major role in the nonspecific or innate (natural immunity. The virulent ND virus encodes protein of V gene can be suppressed IFN type I. This leads to non-specific immune system fail to respond to the virulent strains resulting in severe pathogenicity. The defense mechanism of the host is replaced by specific immunity (adaptive immunity when natural immunity fails to overcome the infection. The specific immune system consists of humoral mediated immunity (HMI and cell-mediated immunity (CMI. The cells of immune system that react specifically with the antigen are B lymphocytes producing the antibodies, T lymphocytes that regulate the synthesis of antibodies and T cells as effector or the direct cytotoxic cells. Both non-specific and specific immunities are complementary against the invasion of ND virus in the birds. The objective of this article is to discuss the role of non specific and specific immune system in ND.

  15. The role of gut microbiota in immune homeostasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Jung; Wu, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Keeping a delicate balance in the immune system by eliminating invading pathogens, while still maintaining self-tolerance to avoid autoimmunity, is critical for the body's health. The gut microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to its host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Moreover, it has recently become obvious that alterations of these gut microbial communities can cause immune dysregulation, leading to autoimmune disorders. Here we review the advances in our understanding of how the gut microbiota regulates innate and adaptive immune homeostasis, which in turn can affect the development of not only intestinal but also systemic autoimmune diseases. Exploring the interaction of gut microbes and the host immune system will not only allow us to understand the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases but will also provide us new foundations for the design of novel immuno- or microbe-based therapies.

  16. [The role of protein glycosylation in immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ząbczyńska, Marta; Pocheć, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most frequent post-translational modifications of proteins. The majority of cell surface and secreted proteins involved in immune response is glycosylated. The structural diversity of glycans depends on monosaccharide composition, type of glycosidic linkage and branching. These structural modifications determine a great variability of glycoproteins. The oligosaccharide components of proteins are regulated mostly by expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases and many environmental factors. Glycosylation influences the function of all immune cells. Glycans play a crucial role in intercellular contacts and leukocytes migration. These interactions are important in activation and proliferation of leukocytes and during immune response. The key immune proteins, such as TCR, MHC, TLR and antibodies are glycosylated. Sugars on the surface of pathogens and self-surface glycoproteins are recognized by special carbohydrate binding proteins called lectins. Changes of glycan structure are common in many pathological processes occurring in immune system, therefore they are used as molecular markers of different diseases.

  17. Cheetahs have a stronger constitutive innate immunity than leopards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Sonja K; Hofer, Heribert; Courtiol, Alexandre; Melzheimer, Jörg; Dehnhard, Martin; Czirják, Gábor Á; Wachter, Bettina

    2017-03-23

    As a textbook case for the importance of genetics in conservation, absence of genetic variability at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is thought to endanger species viability, since it is considered crucial for pathogen resistance. An alternative view of the immune system inspired by life history theory posits that a strong response should evolve in other components of the immune system if there is little variation in the MHC. In contrast to the leopard (Panthera pardus), the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has a relatively low genetic variability at the MHC, yet free-ranging cheetahs are healthy. By comparing the functional competence of the humoral immune system of both species in sympatric populations in Namibia, we demonstrate that cheetahs have a higher constitutive innate but lower induced innate and adaptive immunity than leopards. We conclude (1) immunocompetence of cheetahs is higher than previously thought; (2) studying both innate and adaptive components of immune systems will enrich conservation science.

  18. Cannabinoids and Innate Immunity: Taking a Toll on Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Downer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biologically active components of cannabis have therapeutic potential in neuroinflammatory disorders due to their anti-inflammatory propensity. Cannabinoids influence immune function in both the peripheral and the central nervous system (CNS, and the components of the cannabinoid system, the cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids, have been detected on immune cells as well as in brain glia. Neuroinflammation is the complex innate immune response of neural tissue to control infection and eliminate pathogens, and Toll-like receptors (TLRs, a major family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that mediate innate immunity, have emerged as players in the neuroinflammatory processes underpinning various CNS diseases. This review will highlight evidence that cannabinoids interact with the immune system by impacting TLR-mediated signaling events, which may provide cues for devising novel therapeutic approaches for cannabinoid ligands.

  19. Role of Osmolytes in Regulating Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Tarun; Yadav, Manisha; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host organism from diverse range of pathogenic microbes that are themselves constantly evolving. It is a complex network of cells, humoral factors, chemokines and cytokines. Dysregulation of immune system results in various kinds of immunological disorders. There are several external agents which govern the regulation of immune system. Recent studies have indicated the role of osmolytes in regulation of various immunological processes such as Ag-Ab interaction, Ig assembly, Ag presentation etc. In this present review, we have systematically discussed the role of osmolytes involved in regulation of several key immunological processes. Osmolytes are involved in the regulation of several key immunological processes such as immunoglobulin assembly and folding, immune cells proliferation, regulation of immune cells function, Ag-Ab interaction, antigen presentation, inflammatory response and protection against photo-immunosuppression. Hence, osmolytes and their transporters might be used as potential drug and drug targets respectively. This review is therefore designed to help clinicians in development of osmolyte based therapeutic strategies in the treatment of various immunological disorders. Appropriate future perspectives have also been included.

  20. Metallothioneins: Emerging Modulators in Immunity and Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Subramanian Vignesh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins (MTs are a family of metal-binding proteins virtually expressed in all organisms including prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, invertebrates and mammals. These proteins regulate homeostasis of zinc (Zn and copper (Cu, mitigate heavy metal poisoning, and alleviate superoxide stress. In recent years, MTs have emerged as an important, yet largely underappreciated, component of the immune system. Innate and adaptive immune cells regulate MTs in response to stress stimuli, cytokine signals and microbial challenge. Modulation of MTs in these cells in turn regulates metal ion release, transport and distribution, cellular redox status, enzyme function and cell signaling. While it is well established that the host strictly regulates availability of metal ions during microbial pathogenesis, we are only recently beginning to unravel the interplay between metal-regulatory pathways and immunological defenses. In this perspective, investigation of mechanisms that leverage the potential of MTs to orchestrate inflammatory responses and antimicrobial defenses has gained momentum. The purpose of this review, therefore, is to illumine the role of MTs in immune regulation. We discuss the mechanisms of MT induction and signaling in immune cells and explore the therapeutic potential of the MT-Zn axis in bolstering immune defenses against pathogens.

  1. Exploiting immune cell metabolic machinery for functional HIV cure and the prevention of inflammaging [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Clovis S. Palmer; Riya Palchaudhuri; Hassan Albargy; Mohamed Abdel-Mohsen; Suzanne M. Crowe

    2018-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in immunology suggests that metabolic reprogramming and immune cell activation and functions are intricately linked. Viral infections, such as HIV infection, as well as cancer force immune cells to undergo major metabolic challenges. Cells must divert energy resources in order to mount an effective immune response. However, the fact that immune cells adopt specific metabolic programs to provide host defense against intracellular pathogens and how this metabolic shift impa...

  2. Energetic and developmental costs of mounting an immune response in greenfinches (Carduelis chloris)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amat, Juan A.; Aguilera, Eduardo; Visser, G. Henk

    It is assumed that there is a trade-off between the costs allocated to mounting an immune defence and those allocated to costly functions such as breeding and moulting. The physiological basis for this is that mounting an immune response to pathogen challenge has energetic and/or nutrient costs

  3. Viral respiratory infections and the maturation of nasal immune responses in infants: the VIGALL study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.J. van Benten (Inesz)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe human body has an extensive defence mechanism (immune system) for coping with pathogens. It is regulated by signalling molecules called cytokines. Cytokines are produced by various cells of the immune system such as leucocytes (e.g. T-cells and macrophages) but also by nasal and

  4. Sex-specific consequences of an induced immune response on reproduction in a moth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, A.; Staudacher, H.; Schmalz, A.; Heckel, D.G.; Groot, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune response induction benefits insects in combatting infection by pathogens. However, organisms have a limited amount of resources available and face the dilemma of partitioning resources between immunity and other life-history traits. Since males and females differ in their life

  5. MECHANISMS OF ANTIINFECTIOUS FUNCTIONS OF INNATE IMMUNITY: ROLE OF TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Suskov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the main role of toll-like receptors of innate immunity for pathogen recognition; signaling; production of inflammatory response. Also Interrelation of innate and adaptive Immunity in conditions of pathology and organ transplantation were considered. 

  6. Neuroendocrine-immune interaction: regulation of inflammation via G-protein coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Aa, van der L.M.; Chadzinska, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine- and immune systems interact in a bi-directional fashion to communicate the status of pathogen recognition to the brain and the immune response is influenced by physiological changes. The network of ligands and their receptors involved includes cytokines and chemokines,

  7. The receptor kinase FER is a RALF-regulated scaffold controlling plant immune signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegmann, Martin; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Smakowska-Luzan, Elwira; Rovenich, Hanna; Lehner, Anita; Holton, Nicholas; Belkhadir, Youssef; Zipfel, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    In plants, perception of invading pathogens involves cell-surface immune receptor kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis SITE-1 PROTEASE (S1P) cleaves endogenous RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR (RALF) propeptides to inhibit plant immunity. This inhibition is mediated by the malectin-like receptor

  8. Modelling the innate immune response against avian influenza virus in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.J.; Fischer, E.A.J.; Jansen, C.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Spekreijse, D.; Vervelde, L.; Backer, J.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Koets, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    At present there is limited understanding of the host immune response to (low pathogenic) avian influenza virus infections in poultry. Here we develop a mathematical model for the innate immune response to avian influenza virus in chicken lung, describing the dynamics of viral load,

  9. Influence of the gastrointestinal microbiota on development of the immune system in young animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, E.; Williams, B.A.; Smidt, H.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Mosenthin, R.

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of adult mammals is colonized by a complex and dynamic community of microorganisms. Most protection against potential pathogens occurs via a mucosal immune system involving mechanisms of innate immunity as well as a secondary lymphoid organ, the gut-associated

  10. Modelling the Innate Immune Response against Avian Influenza Virus in Chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T J; Fischer, E A J; Jansen, C A; Rebel, J M J; Spekreijse, D; Vervelde, L; Backer, J A; de Jong, M.C.M.; Koets, A P

    2016-01-01

    At present there is limited understanding of the host immune response to (low pathogenic) avian influenza virus infections in poultry. Here we develop a mathematical model for the innate immune response to avian influenza virus in chicken lung, describing the dynamics of viral load, interferon-α, -β

  11. A short history of research on immunity to infectious diseases in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muiswinkel, van W.B.; Nakao, M.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the history of research on immunity to infectious diseases of fish in the period between 1965 and today. Special attention is paid to those studies, which are dealing with the interaction between immune system and invading pathogens in bony fish. Moreover, additional biographic

  12. Measuring polio immunity to plan immunization activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorman, Arend; Lyons, Hil M

    2016-11-21

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is closer than ever to achieving a polio-free world. Immunization activities must still be carried out in non-endemic countries to maintain population immunity at levels which will stop poliovirus from spreading if it is re-introduced from still-infected areas. In areas where there is no active transmission of poliovirus, programs must rely on surrogate indicators of population immunity to determine the appropriate immunization activities, typically caregiver-reported vaccination history obtained from non-polio acute flaccid paralysis patients identified through polio surveillance. We used regression models to examine the relationship between polio vaccination campaigns and caregiver-reported polio vaccination history. We find that in many countries, vaccination campaigns have a surprisingly weak impact on these commonly used indicators. We conclude that alternative criteria and data, such as routine immunization indicators from vaccination records or household surveys, should be considered for planning polio vaccination campaigns, and that validation of such surrogate indicators is necessary if they are to be used as the basis for program planning and risk assessment. We recommend that the GPEI and similar organizations consider or continue devoting additional resources to rigorously study population immunity and campaign effectiveness in at-risk countries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Cis- and trans-zeatin differentially modulate plant immunity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grosskinsky, D. K.; Edelsbrunner, K.; Pfeifhofer, H.; van der Graaff, E.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2013), "e24798.1"-"e24798.4" ISSN 1559-2324 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Pseudomonas syringae * cytokinin * phytohormone * plant defense * plant immunity * plant pathogen interaction * plant resistance * tobacco * zeatin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  14. Infection and immunity against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff

    2016-01-01

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, causing white spot disease, is a serious pathogen in aquaculture as well as for the ornamental fish industry. In carp, channel catfish and rainbow trout the immune responses against the parasite have been partly elucidated and these species are able to acquire a high...

  15. Immune defence strategies of generalist and specialist insect herbivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, A.; Kopka, I.; Vogel, H.; Zipfel, P.; Heckel, D.G.; Groot, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological immunology examines the adaptive responses of animals to pathogens in relation to other environmental factors and explores the consequences of trade-offs between investment in immune function and other life-history traits. Among species of herbivorous insects, diet breadth may vary

  16. Molecular mimicry in pauci-immune focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kain, R.; Exner, M.; Brandes, R.

    2008-01-01

    develop antibodies to rat and human LAMP-2. Finally, we show that infections with fimbriated pathogens are common before the onset of FNGN. Thus, FimH-triggered autoimmunity to LAMP-2 provides a previously undescribed clinically relevant molecular mechanism for the development of pauci-immune FNGN....

  17. Protein-linked glycans in periodontal bacteria: prevalence and role at the immune interface

    OpenAIRE

    Settem, Rajendra P.; Honma, Kiyonobu; Stafford, Graham P.; Sharma, Ashu

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification with complex glycans is increasingly being recognized in many pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, and is now thought to be central to the successful life-style of those species in their respective hosts. This review aims to convey current knowledge on the extent of protein glycosylation in periodontal pathogenic bacteria and its role in the modulation of the host immune responses. The available data show that surface glycans of periodontal bacteria orchestrate dendrit...

  18. Vitamin C and Immune Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitra C. Carr

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C is an essential micronutrient for humans, with pleiotropic functions related to its ability to donate electrons. It is a potent antioxidant and a cofactor for a family of biosynthetic and gene regulatory enzymes. Vitamin C contributes to immune defense by supporting various cellular functions of both the innate and adaptive immune system. Vitamin C supports epithelial barrier function against pathogens and promotes the oxidant scavenging activity of the skin, thereby potentially protecting against environmental oxidative stress. Vitamin C accumulates in phagocytic cells, such as neutrophils, and can enhance chemotaxis, phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species, and ultimately microbial killing. It is also needed for apoptosis and clearance of the spent neutrophils from sites of infection by macrophages, thereby decreasing necrosis/NETosis and potential tissue damage. The role of vitamin C in lymphocytes is less clear, but it has been shown to enhance differentiation and proliferation of B- and T-cells, likely due to its gene regulating effects. Vitamin C deficiency results in impaired immunity and higher susceptibility to infections. In turn, infections significantly impact on vitamin C levels due to enhanced inflammation and metabolic requirements. Furthermore, supplementation with vitamin C appears to be able to both prevent and treat respiratory and systemic infections. Prophylactic prevention of infection requires dietary vitamin C intakes that provide at least adequate, if not saturating plasma levels (i.e., 100–200 mg/day, which optimize cell and tissue levels. In contrast, treatment of established infections requires significantly higher (gram doses of the vitamin to compensate for the increased inflammatory response and metabolic demand.

  19. Quantitative risk assessment: an emerging tool for emerging foodborne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Lammerding, A. M.; Paoli, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    New challenges to the safety of the food supply require new strategies for evaluating and managing food safety risks. Changes in pathogens, food preparation, distribution, and consumption, and population immunity have the potential to adversely affect human health. Risk assessment offers a framework for predicting the impact of changes and trends on the provision of safe food. Risk assessment models facilitate the evaluation of active or passive changes in how foods are produced, processed, d...

  20. Enhancement of host defense against pathogens by antimicrobial peptides : a new approach to combat microbial drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Does, Anne Margaretha van der

    2011-01-01

    Due to their abilities to eliminate pathogens and modulate host’s immune responses, antimicrobial peptides are considered as potential alternatives for the treatment of infections with (multi-drug resistant) pathogens. In this thesis the immunomodulatory actions of two peptides have been

  1. Homing of immune cells: role in homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ailsa L; Ng, Siew C; Mann, Elizabeth; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar; Bernardo, David; Knight, Stella C

    2010-11-01

    Rather like a satellite navigation system directing a vehicle to a particular destination defined by post-code, immune cells have homing molecules or "immune post-codes" enabling them to be recruited to specific organs, such as the intestine or skin. An efficient system would be designed such that the site of entry of an antigen influences the homing of effector T cells back to the appropriate organ. For example, to mount an immune response against an intestinal pathogen, T cells with a propensity to home to the gut to clear the infection would be induced. In health, there is such a sophisticated and finely tuned system in operation, enabling an appropriate balance of immune activity in different anatomical compartments. In disease states such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is characterized by intestinal inflammation and often an inflammatory process involving other organs such as skin, joints, liver, and eye, there is accumulating evidence that there is malfunction of this immune cell trafficking system. The clinical importance of dysregulated immune cell trafficking in IBD is reflected in recently proven efficacious therapies that target trafficking pathways such as natalizumab, an α4 integrin antibody, and Traficet-EN, a chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) antagonist. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the homing of immune cells to different tissues, in particular the intestine, and focus on alterations in immune cell homing pathways in IBD. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the immune post-code system would assist in achieving the goal of tissue-specific immunotherapy.

  2. Friends and foes of tuberculosis: modulation of protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighenti, Susanna; Joosten, Simone A

    2018-05-27

    Protective immunity in tuberculosis (TB) is subject of debate in the TB research community, as this is key to fully understand TB pathogenesis and to develop new promising tools for TB diagnosis and prognosis as well as a more efficient TB vaccine. IFN-γ producing CD4 + T cells are key in TB control, but may not be sufficient to provide protection. Additional subsets have been identified that contribute to protection such as multifunctional and cytolytic T cell subsets, including classical and non-classical T cells as well as novel innate immune cell subsets resulting from trained immunity. However, to define protective immune responses against TB, the complexity of balancing TB immunity also has to be considered. In this review, insights in effector cell immunity and how this is modulated by regulatory cells, associated comorbidities and the host microbiome is discussed. We systematically map how different suppressive immune cell subsets may affect effector cell responses at the local site of infection. We also dissect how common co-morbidities such as HIV, helminthes and diabetes may bias protective TB immunity towards pathogenic and regulatory responses. Finally, also the composition and diversity of the microbiome in the lung and gut could affect host TB immunity. Understanding these various aspects of the immunological balance in the human host is fundamental to prevent TB infection and disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Trichomoniasis immunity and the involvement of the purinergic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Braz Menezes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In the urogenital tract, innate immunity is accomplished by a defense physical barrier constituted by epithelial cells, mucus, and acidic pH. During infection, immune cells, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines, and adaptive immunity evolve in the reproductive tract, and a proinflammatory response is generated to eliminate the invading extracellular pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. However, the parasite has developed complex evolutionary mechanisms to evade the host immune response through cysteine proteases, phenotypic variation, and molecular mimicry. The purinergic system constitutes a signaling cellular net where nucleotides and nucleosides, enzymes, purinoceptors and transporters are involved in almost all cells and tissues signaling pathways, especially in central and autonomic nervous systems, endocrine, respiratory, cardiac, reproductive, and immune systems, during physiological as well as pathological processes. The involvement of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis biology and infection has been demonstrated and this review highlights the participation of this signaling pathway in the parasite immune evasion strategies. Keywords: Trichomoniasis, Innate immune response, Adaptive immune response, Evasion mechanisms, Purinergic signaling

  4. [Environmental pollutants as adjuvant factors of immune system derived diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Irina

    2017-06-01

    The main task of the immune system is to protect the body against invading pathogens. To be able to do so, immune cells must be able to recognize and combat exogenous challenges and at the same time tolerate body-borne structures. A complex regulatory network controls the sensitive balance between defense and tolerance. Perturbation of this network ultimately leads to the development of chronic inflammation, such as allergies, autoimmune reactions, and infections, because the immune system is no longer able to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens. Environmental pollutants can cause such perturbations by affecting the function of immune cells in such a way that they would react hypersensitively against allergens and the body's own structures, respectively, or that they would be no longer able to adequately combat pathogens. This indirect effect is also known as adjuvant effect. For pesticides, heavy metals, wood preservatives, or volatile organic compounds such adjuvant effects are well known. Examples of the mechanism by which environmental toxins contribute to chronic inflammatory diseases are manifold and will be discussed along asthma and allergies.While the immune system of healthy adults is typically well able to distinguish between foreign and endogenous substances even under adverse environmental conditions, that of children would react much more sensible upon comparable environmental challenges. To prevent priming for diseases by environmental cues during that highly sensitive period of early childhood children are to be particularly protected.

  5. The Immune System Out of Shape? : Shaping of adaptive immunity by persistent viral infections in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van den Heuvel (Diana)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractDuring pregnancy, a fetus is protected from a large part of the pathogens of the environment. As a result, a newborn’s immune system is immature and unexperienced, and mainly composed of innate leukocytes and naive lymphocytes. Immunological memory, and concomitant functional

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  7. The behavioural immune system and the psychology of human sociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Mark

    2011-12-12

    Because immunological defence against pathogens is costly and merely reactive, human anti-pathogen defence is also characterized by proactive behavioural mechanisms that inhibit contact with pathogens in the first place. This behavioural immune system comprises psychological processes that infer infection risk from perceptual cues, and that respond to these perceptual cues through the activation of aversive emotions, cognitions and behavioural impulses. These processes are engaged flexibly, producing context-contingent variation in the nature and magnitude of aversive responses. These processes have important implications for human social cognition and social behaviour-including implications for social gregariousness, person perception, intergroup prejudice, mate preferences, sexual behaviour and conformity. Empirical evidence bearing on these many implications is reviewed and discussed. This review also identifies important directions for future research on the human behavioural immune system--including the need for enquiry into underlying mechanisms, additional behavioural consequences and implications for human health and well-being.

  8. Secondary immune response of rainbow trout following repeated immersion vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaafar, R. M.; Al-Jubury, A.; Chettri, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    Teleosts are able to raise a protective immune response, comprising both innate and adaptive elements, against various pathogens. This is the basis for a widespread use of vaccines, administered as injection or immersion, in the aquaculture industry. It has been described that repeated injection...... vaccination of fish raises a secondary immune response, consisting of rapid, accelerated and increased antibody reaction. This study reports how rainbow trout responds to repeated immersion vaccination against yersiniosis (ERM) caused by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia ruckeri. It was found that rainbow trout...... does not raise a classical secondary response following repeated immersion vaccination. Serum antibody titres were merely slightly increased even after three immunizations, using 30-s immersion into a bacterin consisting of formalin-inactivated Y. ruckeri (serotype O1, biotypes 1 and 2), performed over...

  9. Secondary immune response of rainbow trout following repeated immersion vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaafar, R. M.; Al-Jubury, Azmi; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Teleosts are able to raise a protective immune response, comprising both innate and adaptive elements, against various pathogens. This is the basis for a widespread use of vaccines, administered as injection or immersion, in the aquaculture industry. It has been described that repeated injection...... vaccination of fish raises a secondary immune response, consisting of rapid, accelerated and increased antibody reaction. This study reports how rainbow trout responds to repeated immersion vaccination against yersiniosis (ERM) caused by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia ruckeri. It was found that rainbow trout...... does not raise a classical secondary response following repeated immersion vaccination. Serum antibody titres were merely slightly increased even after three immunizations, using 30-s immersion into a bacterin consisting of formalin-inactivated Y. ruckeri (serotype O1, biotypes 1 and 2), performed over...

  10. Characterization of the interaction between the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and the model host C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karina T.; Nielsen, Jesper S.; Hansen, Annie A.

    In nature, C. elegans lives in the soil and feeds on bacteria. This constant contact with soil-borne microbes suggests that nematodes must have evolved protective responses against pathogens which makes the worm an attractive host-pathogen model for exploring their innate immune response....... In addition, C. elegans is a promising model for the identification of novel virulence factors in various pathogens. A large number of human, animal, plant and insect pathogens have been shown to kill the worm, when C. elegans was allowed to feed on pathogens in stead of its normal laboratory diet [1......]. However, the mechanisms that lead to the shortened life span of the worm have been shown to be very different depending on the nature of the pathogen. Examples include Yersinia pestis, which forms a biofilm layer on the cuticle of C. elegans thus inhibiting feeding [2], enteropathogenic Escherichia coli...

  11. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  12. Regulation of immune responses and tolerance: the microRNA perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Zheng; Schaffert, Steven; Fragoso, Rita; Loh, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Much has been learned about the molecular and cellular components critical for the control of immune responses and tolerance. It remains a challenge, however, to control the immune response and tolerance at the system level without causing significant toxicity to normal tissues. Recent studies suggest that microRNA (miRNA) genes, an abundant class of non-coding RNA genes that produce characteristic approximately 22 nucleotides small RNAs, play important roles in immune cells. In this article, we discuss emerging knowledge regarding the functions of miRNA genes in the immune system. We delve into the roles of miRNAs in regulating signaling strength and threshold, homeostasis, and the dynamics of the immune response and tolerance during normal and pathogenic immunological conditions. We also present observations based on analyzes of miR-181 family genes that indicate the potential functions of primary and/ or precursor miRNAs in target recognition and explore the impact of these findings on target identification. Finally, we illustrate that despite the subtle effects of miRNAs on gene expression, miRNAs have the potential to influence the outcomes of normal and pathogenic immune responses by controlling the quantitative and dynamic aspects of immune responses. Tuning miRNA functions in immune cells, through gain- and loss-of-function approaches in mice, may reveal novel approach to restore immune equilibrium from pathogenic conditions, such as autoimmune disease and leukemia, without significant toxicity. PMID:23550642

  13. Innate scavenger receptor-A regulates adaptive T helper cell responses to pathogen infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Xu, Lei; Li, Wei; Jin, Xin; Song, Xian; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhu, Jifeng; Zhou, Sha; Li, Yong; Zhang, Weiwei; Dong, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Xiaowei; Liu, Feng; Bai, Hui; Chen, Qi; Su, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    The pattern recognition receptor (PRR) scavenger receptor class A (SR-A) has an important function in the pathogenesis of non-infectious diseases and in innate immune responses to pathogen infections. However, little is known about the role of SR-A in the host adaptive immune responses to pathogen infection. Here we show with mouse models of helminth Schistosoma japonicum infection and heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulation that SR-A is regulated by pathogens and suppresses IRF5 nuclear translocation by direct interaction. Reduced abundance of nuclear IRF5 shifts macrophage polarization from M1 towards M2, which subsequently switches T-helper responses from type 1 to type 2. Our study identifies a role for SR-A as an innate PRR in regulating adaptive immune responses. PMID:28695899

  14. Unraveling plant responses to bacterial pathogens through proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Zimaro, Tamara

    2011-11-03

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause diseases in important crops and seriously and negatively impact agricultural production. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants resist bacterial infection at the stage of the basal immune response or mount a successful specific R-dependent defense response is crucial since a better understanding of the biochemical and cellular mechanisms underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches to crops with increased biotic resistance. In recent years, proteomics has been used to gain in-depth understanding of many aspects of the host defense against pathogens and has allowed monitoring differences in abundance of proteins as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes, protein activation/inactivation, and turnover. Proteomics also offers a window to study protein trafficking and routes of communication between organelles. Here, we summarize and discuss current progress in proteomics of the basal and specific host defense responses elicited by bacterial pathogens. Copyright 2011 Tamara Zimaro et al.

  15. Unraveling plant responses to bacterial pathogens through proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Zimaro, Tamara; Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S.; Gehring, Christoph A; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2011-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause diseases in important crops and seriously and negatively impact agricultural production. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants resist bacterial infection at the stage of the basal immune response or mount a successful specific R-dependent defense response is crucial since a better understanding of the biochemical and cellular mechanisms underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches to crops with increased biotic resistance. In recent years, proteomics has been used to gain in-depth understanding of many aspects of the host defense against pathogens and has allowed monitoring differences in abundance of proteins as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes, protein activation/inactivation, and turnover. Proteomics also offers a window to study protein trafficking and routes of communication between organelles. Here, we summarize and discuss current progress in proteomics of the basal and specific host defense responses elicited by bacterial pathogens. Copyright 2011 Tamara Zimaro et al.

  16. Beyond R0 Maximisation: On Pathogen Evolution and Environmental Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Sébastien; Metz, Johan A J

    2018-06-01

    A widespread tenet is that evolution of pathogens maximises their basic reproduction ratio, R 0 . The breakdown of this principle is typically discussed as exception. Here, we argue that a radically different stance is needed, based on evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) arguments that take account of the 'dimension of the environmental feedback loop'. The R 0 maximisation paradigm requires this feedback loop to be one-dimensional, which notably excludes pathogen diversification. By contrast, almost all realistic ecological ingredients of host-pathogen interactions (density-dependent mortality, multiple infections, limited cross-immunity, multiple transmission routes, host heterogeneity, and spatial structure) will lead to multidimensional feedbacks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Plant Responses to Pathogen Attack: Small RNAs in Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Waqar; Noman, Ali; Qasim, Muhammad; Wang, Liande

    2018-02-08

    Small RNAs (sRNA) are a significant group of gene expression regulators for multiple biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, many sRNA silencing pathways produce extensive array of sRNAs with specialized roles. The evidence on record advocates for the functions of sRNAs during plant microbe interactions. Host sRNAs are reckoned as mandatory elements of plant defense. sRNAs involved in plant defense processes via different pathways include both short interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) that actively regulate immunity in response to pathogenic attack via tackling pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and other effectors. In response to pathogen attack, plants protect themselves with the help of sRNA-dependent immune systems. That sRNA-mediated plant defense responses play a role during infections is an established fact. However, the regulations of several sRNAs still need extensive research. In this review, we discussed the topical advancements and findings relevant to pathogen attack and plant defense mediated by sRNAs. We attempted to point out diverse sRNAs as key defenders in plant systems. It is hoped that sRNAs would be exploited as a mainstream player to achieve food security by tackling different plant diseases.

  18. Pathogen-Reactive T Helper Cell Analysis in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Ebner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in studying host–pathogen interactions in human-relevant large animal models such as the pig. Despite the progress in developing immunological reagents for porcine T cell research, there is an urgent need to directly assess pathogen-specific T cells—an extremely rare population of cells, but of upmost importance in orchestrating the host immune response to a given pathogen. Here, we established that the activation marker CD154 (CD40L, known from human and mouse studies, identifies also porcine antigen-reactive CD4+ T lymphocytes. CD154 expression was upregulated early after antigen encounter and CD4+CD154+ antigen-reactive T cells coexpressed cytokines. Antigen-induced expansion and autologous restimulation enabled a time- and dose-resolved analysis of CD154 regulation and a significantly increased resolution in phenotypic profiling of antigen-responsive cells. CD154 expression identified T cells responding to staphylococcal Enterotoxin B superantigen stimulation as well as T cells responding to the fungus Candida albicans and T cells specific for a highly prevalent intestinal parasite, the nematode Ascaris suum during acute and trickle infection. Antigen-reactive T cells were further detected after immunization of pigs with a single recombinant bacterial antigen of Streptococcus suis only. Thus, our study offers new ways to study antigen-specific T lymphocytes in the pig and their contribution to host–pathogen interactions.

  19. Molecular mimicry modulates plant host responses to pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald, Pamela; Joe, Anna

    2018-01-25

    Pathogens often secrete molecules that mimic those present in the plant host. Recent studies indicate that some of these molecules mimic plant hormones required for development and immunity. This Viewpoint reviews the literature on microbial molecules produced by plant pathogens that functionally mimic molecules present in the plant host. This article includes examples from nematodes, bacteria and fungi with emphasis on RaxX, a microbial protein produced by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. RaxX mimics a plant peptide hormone, PSY (plant peptide containing sulphated tyrosine). The rice immune receptor XA21 detects sulphated RaxX but not the endogenous peptide PSY. Studies of the RaxX/XA21 system have provided insight into both host and pathogen biology and offered a framework for future work directed at understanding how XA21 and the PSY receptor(s) can be differentially activated by RaxX and endogenous PSY peptides. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Candida albicans infection of Caenorhabditis elegans induces antifungal immune defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans yeast cells are found in the intestine of most humans, yet this opportunist can invade host tissues and cause life-threatening infections in susceptible individuals. To better understand the host factors that underlie susceptibility to candidiasis, we developed a new model to study antifungal innate immunity. We demonstrate that the yeast form of C. albicans establishes an intestinal infection in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas heat-killed yeast are avirulent. Genome-wide, transcription-profiling analysis of C. elegans infected with C. albicans yeast showed that exposure to C. albicans stimulated a rapid host response involving 313 genes (124 upregulated and 189 downregulated, ~1.6% of the genome many of which encode antimicrobial, secreted or detoxification proteins. Interestingly, the host genes affected by C. albicans exposure overlapped only to a small extent with the distinct transcriptional responses to the pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that there is a high degree of immune specificity toward different bacterial species and C. albicans. Furthermore, genes induced by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were strongly over-represented among the genes downregulated during C. albicans infection, suggesting that in response to fungal pathogens, nematodes selectively repress the transcription of antibacterial immune effectors. A similar phenomenon is well known in the plant immune response, but has not been described previously in metazoans. Finally, 56% of the genes induced by live C. albicans were also upregulated by heat-killed yeast. These data suggest that a large part of the transcriptional response to C. albicans is mediated through "pattern recognition," an ancient immune surveillance mechanism able to detect conserved microbial molecules (so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or PAMPs. This study provides new information on the evolution and regulation of the innate