WorldWideScience

Sample records for passive ventilation systems

  1. Passive ventilation systems with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    with little energy consumption and with satisfying indoor climate. The concept is based on using passive measures like stack and wind driven ventilation, effective night cooling and low pressure loss heat recovery using two fluid coupled water-to-air heat exchangers developed at the Technical University......In building design the requirements for energy consumption for ventilation, heating and cooling and the requirements for increasingly better indoor climate are two opposing factors. This paper presents the schematic layout and simulation results of an innovative multifunc-tional ventilation concept...... of Denmark. Through building integration in high performance offices the system is optimized to incorporate multiple functions like heating, cooling and ventilation, thus saving the expenses of separate cooling and heating systems. The simulation results are derived using the state-of-the-art building...

  2. Passive ventilation systems with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    with little energy consumption and with satisfying indoor climate. The concept is based on using passive measures like stack and wind driven ventilation, effective night cooling and low pressure loss heat recovery using two fluid coupled water-to-air heat exchangers developed at the Technical University...... simulation program ESP-r to model the heat and air flows and the results show the feasibility of the proposed ventilation concept in terms of low energy consumption and good indoor climate....

  3. Ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossler

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with - controlled area ventilation systems - ventilation systems for switchgear-building and control-room - other ventilation systems for safety equipments - service systems for ventilation systems. (orig./RW)

  4. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  5. Advanced simulations of energy demand and indoor climate of passive ventilation systems with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    with little energy consumption and with satisfying indoor climate. The concept is based on using passive measures like stack and wind driven ventilation, effective night cooling and low pressure loss heat recovery using two fluid coupled water-to-air heat exchangers developed at the Technical University...... simulation program ESP-r to model the heat and air flows and the results show the feasibility of the proposed ventilation concept in terms of low energy consumption and good indoor climate....

  6. Passive Smoking in a Displacement Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The aim of this research is to see if the displacement ventilation principle can protect a person from exposure to passive tobacco smoking. This is done by full-scale experiments with two breathing thermal manikins, smoke visualisations, and tracer gas measurements. In some situations, exhaled...... smoke will stratify in a certain height due to the vertical temperature gradient. This horizontal layer of exhaled tobacco smoke may lead to exposure. In other situations, the smoke is mixed into the upper zone, and the passive smoker is protected to some extent by the displacement principle...

  7. Reducing indoor radon concentrations by passive subslab ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiranek, M.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of our study was to establish whether passive soil ventilation systems installed under existing houses have an effect on indoor radon concentrations. Experiments were conducted in two single-family houses. The soil ventilation under each house consists of the network of flexible perforated pipes laid into the layer of coarse gravel of the minimal thickness 150 mm. Soil air from the perforated pipes is ventilated by means of the vertical exhaust pipe that runs through the heated part of the house and ends above the roof of the house. At the top of the vertical exhaust a wind turbine is mounted in order to improve the stack effect during the windy weather .In addition to the soil ventilation both houses were provided with new floors composed of concrete slab and radon proof insulation made of LDPE membrane. The efficiency of passive soil ventilation systems varies within the year in dependence on the temperature gradient and wind speed. Preliminary results indicate that temperature gradient predominates. However the maximum under-pressure at the base of the vertical exhaust pipe caused by temperature differences is not so high. During one-year observation period the maximum temperature related under-pressure was only -8 Pa. The wind effect starts to be noticeable for speeds higher than 5 m/s and more apparent becomes for speeds above 10 m/s. The maximum values of under-pressure due to wind forces were measured within the range - 20 Pa and -30 Pa for wind speeds from 20 m/s to 25 m/s. Quite significant variations of the subslab under-pressure within one day were observed. The maximum under pressure was measured at late night or early morning when the outdoor temperature was the lowest. Annual variations were also confirmed. During the winter the temperature gradient is higher than in the summer time and thus the subslab under-pressure is consistently higher in the winter. Preliminary results indicate that passive soil ventilation systems with

  8. VENTILATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a project to develop a systems analysis of ventilation technology and provide a state-of-the-art assessment of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) research needs. (NOTE: Ventilation technology is defined as the hardware necessary to bring outdoor ...

  9. Protective garment ventilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, R. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A method and apparatus for ventilating a protective garment, space suit system, and/or pressure suits to maintain a comfortable and nontoxic atmosphere within is described. The direction of flow of a ventilating and purging gas in portions of the garment may be reversed in order to compensate for changes in environment and activity of the wearer. The entire flow of the ventilating gas can also be directed first to the helmet associated with the garment.

  10. Passive Cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, Heinrich; Heiselberg, Per

    coefficients below about 4 W/m2K. Heat transfer during night-time ventilation in case of mixing and displacement ventilation was investigated in a full scale test room at Aalborg University. In the experiments the temperature efficiency of the ventilation was determined. Based on the previous re-sults a method...... are still hesitant to apply passive cooling techniques. As night-time ventilation is highly dependent on climatic conditions, a method for quantifying the climatic cooling potential was developed and the impact of climate warming was investigated. Although a clear decrease was found, significant potential...... will remain, especially if night-time ventilation is applied in combination with other cooling methods. Building energy simulations showed that the performance of night-time ventilation is also affected by the heat transfer at internal room surfaces, as the cooling effect is very limited for heat transfer...

  11. Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Svendsen, Sv Aa Højgaard

    1999-01-01

    The note concerns ventilation in residential buildings. Describes components in ventilation systems, electric energy consumption and different ventilation systems with heat exchanger.......The note concerns ventilation in residential buildings. Describes components in ventilation systems, electric energy consumption and different ventilation systems with heat exchanger....

  12. Measurements of waste tank passive ventilation rates using tracer gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Remund, K.M.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of ventilation rate studies of eight passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks using tracer gases. Head space ventilation rates were determined for Tanks A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, S-102, U-103, and U-105 using sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and/or helium (He) as tracer gases. Passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of several key safety issues. These safety issues are associated with the rates of flammable gas production and ventilation, the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out, and the estimation of organic solvent waste surface areas. This tracer gas study involves injecting a tracer gas into the tank headspace and measuring its concentration at different times to establish the rate at which the tracer is removed by ventilation. Tracer gas injection and sample collection were performed by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation and/or Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Characterization Project Operations. Headspace samples were analyzed for He and SF 6 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The tracer gas method was first demonstrated on Tank S-102. Tests were conducted on Tank S-102 to verify that the tracer gas was uniformly distributed throughout the tank headspace before baseline samples were collected, and that mixing was sufficiently vigorous to maintain an approximately uniform distribution of tracer gas in the headspace during the course of the study. Headspace samples, collected from a location about 4 in away from the injection point and 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection of He and SF 6 , indicated that both tracer gases were rapidly mixed. The samples were found to have the same concentration of tracer gases after 1 hour as after 24 hours, suggesting that mixing of the tracer gas was essentially complete within 1 hour

  13. Application of Breathing Architectural Members to the Natural Ventilation of a Passive Solar House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soon Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficient operation of a passive solar house requires an efficient ventilation system to prevent the loss of energy and provide the required ventilation rates. This paper proposes the use of “breathing architectural members” (BAMs as passive natural ventilation devices to achieve much improved ventilation and insulation performance compared to mechanical ventilation. Considering the importance of evaluating the ventilation and insulation performances of the members, we also propose numerical models for predicting the heat and air movements afforded by the members. The numerical model was validated by comparison with experimental results. The effectiveness of the BAMs was also verified by installation in houses located in an area with warm climate. For this purpose, chamber experiments were performed using samples of the BAMs, as well as numerical simulations to assess natural ventilation and heat load. The main findings of the study are as follows: (1 the one-dimensional chamber experiments confirmed the validity of the numerical models for predicting the heat and air movements afforded by the BAMs. Comparison of the experimental and calculated values for the temperature of air that flowed into the room from outside revealed a difference of less than 5%; (2 observations of the case studies in which BAMs were installed in the ceilings and exterior walls of Tokyo model houses revealed good annual ventilation and energy-saving effects. When BAMs with an opening area per unit area of A = 0.002 m2/m2 were applied to three surfaces, the required ventilation rate was 0.5 ACH (air changes per hour, and this was achieved consistently. Compared to a house with general insulation and conventional mechanical ventilation, heating load was reduced by 15.3%–40.2% depending on the BAM installation points and the differing areas of the house models.

  14. How to Plan Ventilation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John H.

    1963-01-01

    Ventilation systems for factory safety demand careful planning. The increased heat loads and new processes of industry have introduced complex ventilation problems in--(1) ventilation supply, (2) duct work design, (3) space requirements, (4) hood face velocities, (5) discharge stacks, and (6) building eddies. This article describes and diagrams…

  15. Comparison of Active and Passive Humidifiers on Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dilek Mersin Özcanoğlu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To research the effectiveness on humidifying, respiratory mechanics, bacterial colonization and infection rates of continuous usage for 96 hours of active and passive humidifiers which are used for heating and moisturizing the inspired gases in patients under mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods: Adult patients who are expected to support at least 4 days under mechanical ventilation, excluding patients with primary lung disease and sepsis, are included in the research. Patients are separated in two groups as a passive humidifier group (heat moisture exchange filter (n=16 and an active humidifier group (n=14. In passive humidifier group, humidifier is used continuously for 96 hours without change. In active humidifier group moisturizing is obtained by using sterile distilled water in heated humidifier. Patients whose demographic characteristics were recorded and first 24 hour APACHE II scores were calculated, were taking chest X-Ray’s daily. Respiratory mechanics measurements were recorded twice a day which were watched in Servo300A ventilators respiratory mechanics monitor, in patients under volume controlled ventilation. The amount of moisture and liquidity of the secretion in endotracheal tube were recorded and scored visually. The endotracheal aspiration samples at the beginning and at the end of 96th hour and respiratory circuits ventilator side sample taken at 96th hour were studied microbiologically. Cultures and colonial counts were studied at Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty Microbiology Laboratory. Results: There were no significant difference in two groups by demographic data, APACHE II scores and illness diagnoses. In passive humidifier group, respiratory mechanics showed no significant difference between the beginning and the 4th day (p>0.05. In active humidifier group when MAP, PEEPtot, EEF, Rins, Rexp values showed no significant difference between the beginning and the 4th day but PIP values showed significant

  16. Apartment building built to passive-house standard with solar balanced ventilation system; Mehrfamilien-Passivhaus mit solarem Luftsystem. Lueftung/Luftheizung/WRG/Solarfassade an der Rychenbergstrasse, Winterthur - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guetermann, A.

    2002-04-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with an apartment building in Winterthur, Switzerland, built to passive-house standards and equipped with a solar balanced ventilation system. The building and its convective solar facade are described, as are the fan-assisted, balanced ventilation systems used. The operation of the systems in winter, during transitional periods and in summer is discussed. Domestic hot water preparation is looked at. The energy balance of the building is examined, as is the economic viability of the energy systems. The building, its energy installations and the measurement concept used are considered in detail. Finally, the findings of the study are summarised and commented on.

  17. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Max H.

    2011-01-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outd...

  18. Passive Design Strategies to Enhance Natural Ventilation in Buildings "Election of Passive Design Strategies to Achieve Natural Ventilation in Iraqi Urban Environment with Hot Arid Climate"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada M.Ismael Abdul Razzaq Kamoona

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available the natural ventilation in buildings is one of effective strategies for achieving energy efficiency in buildings by employing methods and ways of passive design, as well as its efficiency in providing high ranges of thermal comfort for occupants in buildings and raises their productivity. Because the concept of natural ventilation for many people confined to achieve through the windows and openings only, become necessary to provide this research to demonstrate the various passive design strategies for natural ventilation. Then, research problem: Insufficient knowledge about the importance and mechanism of the application of passive design strategies for natural ventilation in buildings. The research objective is: Analysis of passive design strategies to achieve natural ventilation in buildings, for the purpose of the proper selection of them to Iraqi urban environment. Accordingly, the research included two parts: First, the theoretical part, which dealt with the conceptual framework of natural ventilation and deriving the most important aspects in it, in order to adopted as a base for the practical part of the research. Second: the practical part, which analyzed examples of buildings projects that employed various design strategies for natural ventilation, according to the theoretical framework that has been drawn. The main conclusion is, Necessity to adopt various passive design strategies for natural ventilation in Iraqi urban environment with hot dry climate, as they have a significant impact in reducing the energy consumption for the purposes of ventilation and cooling, as well as for its efficiency in improving air quality in indoor environments of buildings.

  19. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  20. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  1. Demand Controlled Ventilation in a Combined Ventilation and Radiator System

    OpenAIRE

    Hesaraki, Arefeh; Holmberg, Sture

    2013-01-01

    With growing concerns for efficient and sustainable energy treatment in buildings there is a need for balanced and intelligent ventilation solutions. This paper presents a strategy for demand controlled ventilation with ventilation radiators, a combined heating and ventilation system. The ventilation rate was decreased from normal requirements (per floor area) of 0.375 l·s-1·m-2 to 0.100 l·s-1·m-2 when the residence building was un-occupied. The energy saving potential due to decreased ventil...

  2. CANDU passive shutdown systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, R S; Olmstead, R A [AECL CANDU, Sheridan Park Research Community, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-01

    CANDU incorporates two diverse, passive shutdown systems, independent of each other and from the reactor regulating system. Both shutdown systems function in the low pressure, low temperature, moderator which surrounds the fuel channels. The shutdown systems are functionally different, physically separate, and passive since the driving force for SDS1 is gravity and the driving force for SDS2 is stored energy. The physics of the reactor core itself ensures a degree of passive safety in that the relatively long prompt neutron generation time inherent in the design of CANDU reactors tend to retard power excursions and reduces the speed required for shutdown action, even for large postulated reactivity increases. All passive systems include a number of active components or initiators. Hence, an important aspect of passive systems is the inclusion of fail safe (activated by active component failure) operation. The mechanisms that achieve the fail safe action should be passive. Consequently the passive performance of the CANDU shutdown systems extends beyond their basic modes of operation to include fail safe operation based on natural phenomenon or stored energy. For example, loss of power to the SDS1 clutches results in the drop of the shutdown rods by gravity, loss of power or instrument air to the injection valves of SDS2 results in valve opening via spring action, and rigorous self checking of logic, data and timing by the shutdown systems computers assures a fail safe reactor trip through the collapse of a fluctuating magnetic field or the discharge of a capacitor. Event statistics from operating CANDU stations indicate a significant decrease in protection system faults that could lead to loss of production and elimination of protection system faults that could lead to loss of protection. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the passive shutdown systems employed by CANDU. (author). 4 figs, 3 tabs.

  3. Analytical and experimental analysis of a low-pressure heat exchanger suitable for passive ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2011-01-01

    AbstractA core element in sustainable ventilation systems is the heat recovery system. Conventional heat recovery systems have a high pressure drop that acts as blockage to naturally driven airflow. The heat recovery system we propose here consists of two separated air-to-liquid heat exchangers...... interconnected by a liquid loop powered by a pump ideal as a component in a heat recovery system for passive ventilation systems. This paper describes the analytical framework and the experimental development of one exchanger in the liquid-loop. The exchanger was constructed from the 8mm plastic tubing...... that is commonly used in water-based floor-heating systems. The pressure loss and temperature exchange efficiency was measured. For a design airflow rate of 560L/s, the pressure loss was 0.37Pa and the efficiency was 75.6%. The experimental results agree well with the literature or numerical fluid calculations...

  4. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  5. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. 111.103-1 Section 111.103-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must...

  6. Passive containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleimola, F.W.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a containment system that provides complete protection entirely by passive means for the loss of coolant accident in a nuclear power plant and wherein all stored energy released in the coolant blowdown is contained and absorbed while the nuclear fuel is prevented from over-heating by a high containment back-pressure and a reactor vessel refill system. The primary containment vessel is restored to a high sub-atmospheric pressure within a few minutes after accident initiation and the decay heat is safely transferred to the environment while radiolytic hydrogen is contained by passive means. 20 claims, 14 figures

  7. Ventilation system in fire modelization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero Garcia, S.

    2012-01-01

    There is a model of fire in an enclosure formed by two rooms. In one of them, it will cause the fire and check how the system of ventilation in different configurations responds. In addition, the behavior of selected targets, which will be a configuration of cables similar to those found in nuclear power stations will be analyzed.

  8. Analysis of Natural Ventilation in a Passive House Located in Cold Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    in Vejle during cooling season, in the months of June, July and August. The dwelling belongs to a Danish project of passive houses denominated Komfort Husene, where its occupants claim there is no thermal comfort in summer time. The results show that the use of natural ventilation helps to reduce......This article shows the potential of using natural ventilation as a passive method of cooling buildings that are located in cold climate countries using Denmark as a case study. The energy saving potential of natural ventilation is found by performing thermal simulations of a household located...

  9. 14 CFR 252.9 - Ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ventilation systems. 252.9 Section 252.9... REGULATIONS SMOKING ABOARD AIRCRAFT § 252.9 Ventilation systems. Air carriers shall prohibit smoking whenever the ventilation system is not fully functioning. Fully functioning for this purpose means operating so...

  10. Improvements of uranium mine ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changrong; Zhou Xinghuo; Liu Zehua; Wang Zhiyong

    2007-01-01

    Ventilation has been proved to be a main method to eliminate radon and its daughters in uranium mines. According to the practical rectifications of uranium mine ventilation system, the improved measures are summarized. (authors)

  11. Passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, N.; Manz, H. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Duebendorf (Switzerland); Heiselberg, P. [Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2008-07-01

    Due to an overall trend towards an increasing cooling energy demand in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising concept. However, because of uncertainties in thermal comfort predictions, architects and engineers are still hesitant to apply passive cooling techniques. As night-time ventilation is highly dependent on climatic conditions, a method for quantifying the climatic cooling potential was developed and the impact of climate warming was investigated. Although a clear temperature decrease was found, significant potential will remain, especially if night-time ventilation is applied in combination with other cooling methods. Building energy simulations showed that the performance of night-time ventilation is also affected by the heat transfer at internal room surfaces, as the cooling effect is very limited due to heat transfer coefficients below about 4 W/m{sup 2}K. Heat transfer during night-time ventilation in case of mixing and displacement ventilation was investigated in a full scale test room at Aalborg University. In the experiments the temperature efficiency of the ventilation was determined. Based on the previous results a method for estimating the potential for cooling by night-time ventilation at an early stage of design was developed. (author)

  12. Ventilation-air conditioning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi.

    1991-01-01

    Heretofore, in ventilation-air conditioning systems in a nuclear power plant, exhaust gases from each of the ventilation-air conditioning systems of a reactor building, a turbine building, a waste processing building are joined and they are released into atmosphere from the top of a high main exhaustion stack. In order to build such a high main exhaustion stack, a considerable construction cost is required and, in addition, there is a worry of lacking balance with surrounding scenery. Then, in the present invention, exhaust gases are heated by waste heat in a turbine during their introduction from the ventilation-air conditioning facility in the building of a power plant to the main exhaust stack. With such a constitution, since the exhaust gases are heated and their temperature is elevated, they uprise by natural convection when they are released from the top of the main exhaustion stack to the atmosphere. Accordingly, they are released to a level higher than the conventional case in view of the volume of the blower which sends the exhaust gases under pressure, to diffuse them to the atmosphere more sufficiently compared with a conventional case. Further, the height of the main exhaustion stack can be reduced, enabling to minimize the cost for moving the blower. (T.M.)

  13. Concept research on general passive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xu; Yang Yanhua; Zheng Mingguang

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarized the current passive techniques used in nuclear power plants. Through classification and analysis, the functional characteristics and inherent identification of passive systems were elucidated. By improving and extending the concept of passive system, the general passive concept was proposed, and space and time relativity was discussed and assumption of general passive system were illustrated. The function of idealized general passive system is equivalent with the current passive system, but the design of idealized general passive system is more flexible. (authors)

  14. Passive magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  15. Ventilation system design for educational facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsafty, A.F.; Abo Elazm, M.M. [Arab Academy for Science, Alexandria (Egypt). Technology and Maritime Transport; Safwan, M. [Arab Academy for Science, Cairo (Egypt). Technology and Maritime Transport

    2010-07-01

    In order to maintain acceptable indoor air quality levels in classrooms, high ventilation rates are needed to dilute the concentration of indoor contaminants, resulting in higher energy consumption for the operation of mechanical ventilation systems. Three factors are usually considered when determining the adequate ventilation rate for classrooms in educational facilities. These include the maximum population served in the classroom; carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) production rate by occupants; and outdoor air conditions. CO{sub 2} concentrations usually indicate the rate of ventilation required. This paper presented a newly developed computer software program for determining the ventilation rates needed to enhance indoor air quality and to maintain CO{sub 2} concentration within the recommended levels by ANSI/ASHRAE standards for best student performance. This paper also presented design curves for determining the ventilation rates and air changes per hour required for the ventilated educational zone. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  16. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  17. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  18. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  19. 46 CFR 153.312 - Ventilation system standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation system standards. 153.312 Section 153.312... Handling Space Ventilation § 153.312 Ventilation system standards. A cargo handling space ventilation system must meet the following: (a) A ventilation system exhaust duct must discharge no less than 10 m...

  20. A NEW EXHAUST VENTILATION SYSTEM DESIGN SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Asilian Mahabady

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A Microsoft Windows based ventilation software package is developed to reduce time-consuming and boring procedure of exhaust ventilation system design. This program Assure accurate and reliable air pollution control related calculations. Herein, package is tentatively named Exhaust Ventilation Design Software which is developed in VB6 programming environment. Most important features of Exhaust Ventilation Design Software that are ignored in formerly developed packages are Collector design and fan dimension data calculations. Automatic system balance is another feature of this package. Exhaust Ventilation Design Software algorithm for design is based on two methods: Balance by design (Static pressure balance and design by Blast gate. The most important section of software is a spreadsheet that is designed based on American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists calculation sheets. Exhaust Ventilation Design Software is developed so that engineers familiar with American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists datasheet can easily employ it for ventilation systems design. Other sections include Collector design section (settling chamber, cyclone, and packed tower, fan geometry and dimension data section, a unit converter section (that helps engineers to deal with units, a hood design section and a Persian HTML help. Psychometric correction is also considered in Exhaust Ventilation Design Software. In Exhaust Ventilation Design Software design process, efforts are focused on improving GUI (graphical user interface and use of programming standards in software design. Reliability of software has been evaluated and results show acceptable accuracy.

  1. Positioning Your Library for Solar (and Financial) Gain. Improving Energy Efficiency, Lighting, and Ventilation with Primarily Passive Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    This article stresses the importance of building design above technology as a relatively inexpensive way to reduce energy costs for a library. Emphasis is placed on passive solar design for heat and daylighting, but also examines passive ventilation and cooling, green roofs, and building materials. Passive design is weighed against technologies…

  2. Climatic potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artmann, N.; Manz, H.; Heiselberg, P.

    2007-01-01

    Due to an overall trend towards less heating and more cooling demands in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising technique, particularly for commercial buildings in the moderate or cold climates of Central, Eastern and Northern Europe. The basic concept involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink that is available during the occupancy period. In this study, the potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation was evaluated by analysing climatic data, without considering any building-specific parameters. An approach for calculating degree-hours based on a variable building temperature - within a standardized range of thermal comfort - is presented and applied to climatic data of 259 stations all over Europe. The results show a high potential for night-time ventilative cooling over the whole of Northern Europe and still significant potential in Central, Eastern and even some regions of Southern Europe. However, due to the inherent stochastic properties of weather patterns, a series of warmer nights can occur at some locations, where passive cooling by night-time ventilation alone might not be sufficient to guarantee thermal comfort

  3. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condensate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-29

    Preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Condensate System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides a collection point for condensate generated by the W-030 primary vent offgas cooling system serving tanks AYIOI, AY102, AZIOI, AZI02. The system is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell and consists of a condensate seal pot, sampling features, a drain line to existing Catch Tank 241-AZ-151, and a cell sump jet pump. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  4. Position paper - primary ventilation system configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalpiaz, E.L.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on the configuration of the primary ventilation system. This configuration will be used on the waste storage tanks currently being designed for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The primary ventilation system provides a single treatment train and exhaust fan for each waste storage tank. The ventilation systems from each of two tanks are grouped with an additional treatment train and exhaust fan that function as backup to either of the two systems

  5. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heredia, Elizabeth [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cohn, Sebastian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Noris, Federico [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Logue, Jennifer [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hotchi, Toshifumi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This report documents experiments performed in three homes to assess the methodology used to determine air exchange rates using passive tracer techniques. The experiments used four different tracer gases emitted simultaneously but implemented with different spatial coverage in the home. Two different tracer gas sampling methods were used. The results characterize the factors of the execution and analysis of the passive tracer technique that affect the uncertainty in the calculated air exchange rates. These factors include uncertainties in tracer gas emission rates, differences in measured concentrations for different tracer gases, temporal and spatial variability of the concentrations, the comparison between different gas sampling methods, and the effect of different ventilation conditions.

  6. REVERSIBLE VENTILATION SYSTEM FOR ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Yu. Kravchuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives To consider the possibility of applying the principle of reversing air flows for a centralised ventilation system; to develop a specific scheme for air exchange reversible ventilation, which will take into account the peculiarities of the microclimate of administrative buildings; to select the type of filling of the air-permeable element and justify this choice; to determine the conditions for changing the direction of air movement in the ventilation system and the area of its application; to form a list of equipment necessary for the operation of such a system; to consider the influence of supply and exhaust devices on the heat and humidity regime of claddings. Methods  To achieve this goal, the published thematic material was reviewed and a patent search carried out using Russian and European databases. Data on mathematical modelling of filtration in porous media and experimental results were used. A method for ventilating rooms in administrative building using the reversal of movement of supply and exhaust air streams along the same channels was applied. Results  Schemas for reversible ventilation systems are presented and their modes of operation considered. It is established that the idea of reversing ventilation flows has not yet been applied in the development of centralised ventilation systems. Based on these published materials, it was concluded that the proposed design of supply and exhaust devices can be used in practice. An original air exchange scheme for the ventilation of administrative buildings and design of supply and exhaust devices for this system are proposed. The conditions for changing the operating modes of the system and the scope of its application are determined. Conclusion The use of the proposed ventilation system allows normative air exchange to be provided without using a supply unit during the cold season. This application of airflow reversal allows the potential of natural forces to be used

  7. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  8. Modelling and Simulation of Volume Controlled Mechanical Ventilation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume controlled mechanical ventilation system is a typical time-delay system, which is applied to ventilate patients who cannot breathe adequately on their own. To illustrate the influences of key parameters of the ventilator on the dynamics of the ventilated respiratory system, this paper firstly derived a new mathematical model of the ventilation system; secondly, simulation and experimental results are compared to verify the mathematical model; lastly, the influences of key parameters of ventilator on the dynamics of the ventilated respiratory system are carried out. This study can be helpful in the VCV ventilation treatment and respiratory diagnostics.

  9. General design guide for ventilation systems for fuel reprocessing plants, September 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    General safety, occupied area ventilation systems, process area ventilation systems, exhaust ventilation and filtration systems, ventilation system construction and layout ventilation system testing and monitoring, and the quality assurance program are discussed

  10. Effect of a passive exhalation port on tracheostomy ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Molena, Beatrice; Iovino, Silvia; Gallan, Federico; Turato, Cristian; Marchese-Ragona, Rosario

    2018-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients often require long-term tracheostomy ventilation (LT-TV) because of progressive ventilatory failure. Although widely used for non-invasive ventilation (NIV), passive exhalation port systems have not been gaining popularity for TV because of the possibility of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) rebreathing. The current study set out to investigate the effect of a Whisper Swivel connector in comparison to an active exhalation valve on gas exchange and symptoms in ALS patients requiring LT-TV. A prospective randomized controlled trial was carried out to compare the clinical outcome of ten ALS patients receiving LT-TV by means of a Trilogy 100 ventilator with a Whisper Swivel passive exhalation port (group A) and of 10 ALS patients connected to an Airox Legendair ventilator with an active exhalation valve (group B). The study's main outcome measure was CO 2 retention at the 30-day follow-up assessment. One patient in each of the two cohorts showed significant CO 2 retention. At the 30-day assessment, scores on the following measures were not significantly different in the two groups: the Borg dyspnea scale {2 [1-3] vs. 1 [1-3]; P=0.2891}, the visual analogue scale (VAS) dyspnea {20 [10-85] vs. 20 [0-50]; P=0.8571}, the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) {8 [4-10] vs. 5.5 [0-12]; P=0.1443}, the EuroQol-VAS (EQ-VAS) {55 [50-80] vs. 50 [30-80]; P=0.4593} and the relative stress scale (RSS) {49 [30-65] vs. 52 [25-64]; P=0.8650}. At the 3-month follow-up assessment, the numbers of hospitalizations and deaths were likewise similar in the two groups. The efficacy of the Whisper Swivel connector is similar to that of an active exhalation valve in ALS patients undergoing LT-TV.

  11. Underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strever, M.T.; Wallace, K.G. Jr.; McDaniel, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the design and installation of an underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This facility is designed to demonstrate safe underground disposal of U.S. defense generated transuranic nuclear waste. To improve the operability of the ventilation system, an underground remote monitoring and control system was designed and installed. The system consists of 15 air velocity sensors and 8 differential pressure sensors strategically located throughout the underground facility providing real-time data regarding the status of the ventilation system. In addition, a control system was installed on the main underground air regulators. The regulator control system gives indication of the regulator position and can be controlled either locally or remotely. The sensor output is displayed locally and at a central surface location through the site-wide Central Monitoring System (CMS). The CMS operator can review all sensor data and can remotely operate the main underground regulators. Furthermore, the Virtual Address Extension (VAX) network allows the ventilation engineer to retrieve real-time ventilation data on his personal computer located in his workstation. This paper describes the types of sensors selected, the installation of the instrumentation, and the initial operation of the remote monitoring system

  12. 33 CFR 183.610 - Powered ventilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Powered ventilation system. 183... (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Ventilation § 183.610 Powered ventilation system... must: (1) Be open to the atmosphere, or (2) Be ventilated by an exhaust blower system. (b) Each exhaust...

  13. 46 CFR 153.310 - Ventilation system type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation system type. 153.310 Section 153.310... Handling Space Ventilation § 153.310 Ventilation system type. A cargo handling space must have a permanent forced ventilation system of the exhaust type. ...

  14. Technology Solutions Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the normal leakage paths through the building envelope disappear. Researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. In this project, the CARB team evaluated the four different strategies for providing make-up air to multifamily residential buildings and developed guidelines to help contractors and building owners choose the best ventilation systems.

  15. Fires in large scale ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; White, B.W.; Nichols, B.D.; Smith, P.R.; Leslie, I.H.; Fenton, D.L.; Gunaji, M.V.; Blythe, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience gained simulating fires in large scale ventilation systems patterned after ventilation systems found in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The series of experiments discussed included: (1) combustion aerosol loading of 0.61x0.61 m HEPA filters with the combustion products of two organic fuels, polystyrene and polymethylemethacrylate; (2) gas dynamic and heat transport through a large scale ventilation system consisting of a 0.61x0.61 m duct 90 m in length, with dampers, HEPA filters, blowers, etc.; (3) gas dynamic and simultaneous transport of heat and solid particulate (consisting of glass beads with a mean aerodynamic diameter of 10μ) through the large scale ventilation system; and (4) the transport of heat and soot, generated by kerosene pool fires, through the large scale ventilation system. The FIRAC computer code, designed to predict fire-induced transients in nuclear fuel cycle facility ventilation systems, was used to predict the results of experiments (2) through (4). In general, the results of the predictions were satisfactory. The code predictions for the gas dynamics, heat transport, and particulate transport and deposition were within 10% of the experimentally measured values. However, the code was less successful in predicting the amount of soot generation from kerosene pool fires, probably due to the fire module of the code being a one-dimensional zone model. The experiments revealed a complicated three-dimensional combustion pattern within the fire room of the ventilation system. Further refinement of the fire module within FIRAC is needed. (orig.)

  16. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  17. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  18. Modeling and Control of Livestock Ventilation Systems and Indoor Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Zhuang; Heiselberg, Per; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    The hybrid ventilation systems have been widely used for livestock barns to provide optimum indoor climate by controlling the ventilation rate and air flow distribution within the ventilated building structure. The purpose of this paper is to develop models for livestock ventilation systems and i...

  19. Ventilation system for 99Mo production apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumo, Mishiroku; Okane, Shougo; Sorita, Takami; Aoyama, Saburou

    1978-04-01

    In production of 20 Ci 99 Mo from 235 U fission, about 120 Ci of radioiodine ( 131 I, 132 I, and 133 I) is involved. To remove airborne radioiodine from the exhaust air from production apparatus and minimize radioiodine release to the atmosphere, the ventilation system is equipped with 2 units of Model-FD charcoal filter (KI 3 -Impregnated charcoal 2 inch thick of Barnebey-Cheney Co.). From September 1976 to December 1977, 21 runs of 99 Mo production involving airborne radioiodine were carried out. The ventilation system was operated continuously for the whole 15 months period; variation in removal efficiency of airborne radioiodine from the exhaust air stream was observed. In the runs valuable experiences were gained in operation and maintenance of the ventilation system including activated charcoal filter and health-physics management of such facility. Following are the results: (1) Airborne radioiodine from 99 Mo production apparatus is reduced to 10 -3 % of the original quantity. (2) When the ventilation system is operated at a maximum air flow rate through the filter, the average efficiency during 15 months is over 98%. (3) Airborne radioiodine released from 99 Mo production apparatus to the ventilation system is less than 5% particulate iodine and alkyl iodines and more than 95% inorganic iodine. (4) Airborne radioiodine released from the stack is less than 28 μCi/run, which is below the limit in regulations on Radioisotope Production Laboratory. (auth.)

  20. Fire protection in ventilation systems and in case of fire operating ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitzelsberger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The fire risks in ventilation systems are discussed. It follows a survey of regulations on fire prevention and fire protection in ventilation systems and smoke and heat exhaust systems applicable to nuclear installations in the Federal Republic of Germany. Fire protection concepts for normal systems and for systems operating also in case of fire will be given. Several structural elements for fire protection in those systems will be illustrated with regard to recent research findings

  1. Climatic potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, H.; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Due to an overall trend towards less heating and more cooling demands in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising technique, particularly for commercial buildings in the moderate or cold climates of Central......, without considering any building-specific parameters. An approach for calculating degree-hours based on a variable building temperature - within a standardized range of thermal comfort - is presented and applied to climatic data of 259 stations all over Europe. The results show a high potential for night...

  2. Potential risk for bacterial contamination in conventional reused ventilator systems and disposable closed ventilator-suction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Chi; Lin, Hui-Ling; Liao, Fang-Chun; Wang, Sing-Siang; Chang, Hsiu-Chu; Hsu, Hung-Fu; Chen, Sue-Hsien; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the difference in bacterial contamination between conventional reused ventilator systems and disposable closed ventilator-suction systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination rates of the reused and disposable ventilator systems, and the association between system disconnection and bacterial contamination of ventilator systems. The enrolled intubated and mechanically ventilated patients used a conventional reused ventilator system and a disposable closed ventilator-suction system, respectively, for a week; specimens were then collected from the ventilator circuit systems to evaluate human and environmental bacterial contamination. The sputum specimens from patients were also analyzed in this study. The detection rate of bacteria in the conventional reused ventilator system was substantially higher than that in the disposable ventilator system. The inspiratory and expiratory limbs of the disposable closed ventilator-suction system had higher bacterial concentrations than the conventional reused ventilator system. The bacterial concentration in the heated humidifier of the reused ventilator system was significantly higher than that in the disposable ventilator system. Positive associations existed among the bacterial concentrations at different locations in the reused and disposable ventilator systems, respectively. The predominant bacteria identified in the reused and disposable ventilator systems included Acinetobacter spp., Bacillus cereus, Elizabethkingia spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Stenotrophomonas (Xan) maltophilia. Both the reused and disposable ventilator systems had high bacterial contamination rates after one week of use. Disconnection of the ventilator systems should be avoided during system operation to decrease the risks of environmental pollution and human exposure, especially for the disposable ventilator system. ClinicalTrials.gov PRS / NCT03359148.

  3. Project Design Concept - Primary Ventilation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation (TFRSO), Project W-3 14 was established to provide upgrades that would improve the reliability and extend the system life of portions of the waste transfer, electrical, ventilation, instrumentation and control systems for the Hanford Site Tank Farms. An assessment of the tank farm system was conducted and the results are documented in system assessment reports. Based on the deficiencies identified in the tank farm system assessment reports, and additional requirements analysis performed in support of the River Protection Project (RPP), an approved scope for the TFRSO effort was developed and documented in the Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), WHC-SD-W314-RPT-003, Rev. 4. The USSR establishes the need for the upgrades and identifies the specific equipment to be addressed by this project. This Project Design Concept (PDC) is in support of the Phase 2 upgrades and provides an overall description of the operations concept for the W-314 Primary Ventilation Systems. Actual specifications, test requirements, and procedures are not included in this PDC. The PDC is a ''living'' document, which will be updated throughout the design development process to provide a progressively more detailed description of the W-314 Primary Ventilation Systems design. The Phase 2 upgrades to the Primary Ventilation Systems shall ensure that the applicable current requirements are met for: Regulatory Compliance; Safety; Mission Requirements; Reliability; and Operational Requirements

  4. Discussion for management of ventilation system in uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianjie; Ren Jianjun; Hu Penghua

    2014-01-01

    Radon exhaustion and ventilation are surely regarded as key links for safety production and radiation protection in underground uranium mines, and the crucial point to achieve safety production goals lies in timely and accurately adjusting and controlling of ventilation technical measures and ventilation system management with the changing operation conditions of mines. This paper proposes corresponding countermeasures based on the respectively systematical analysis of daily ventilation management, ventilation facilities and structures management, and ventilation system information management in uranium mines. Furthermore, standardized management approaches and suggestions are put forward to realize standardization of uranium mines' ventilation management and radon exhaustion technique. (authors)

  5. Advanced design of local ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulmala, I. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Safety Technology

    1997-12-31

    Local ventilation is widely used in industry for controlling airborne contaminants. However, the present design practices of local ventilation systems are mainly based on empirical equations and do not take quantitatively into account the various factors affecting the performance of these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and limitations of more advanced fluid mechanical methods to the design and development of local ventilation systems. The most important factors affecting the performance of local ventilation systems were determined and their effect was studied in a systematic manner. The numerical calculations were made with the FLUENT computer code and they were verified by laboratory experiments, previous measurements or analytical solutions. The results proved that the numerical calculations can provide a realistic simulation of exhaust openings, effects of ambient air flows and wake regions. The experiences with the low-velocity local supply air showed that these systems can also be modelled fairly well. The results were used to improve the efficiency and thermal comfort of a local ventilation unit and to increase the effective control range of exhaust hoods. In the simulation of the interaction of a hot buoyant source and local exhaust, the predicted capture efficiencies were clearly higher than those observed experimentally. The deviations between measurements and non-isothermal flow calculations may have partly been caused by the inability to achieve grid independent solutions. CFD simulations is an advanced and flexible tool for designing and developing local ventilation. The simulations can provide insight into the time-averaged flow field which may assist us in understanding the observed phenomena and to explain experimental results. However, for successful calculations the applicability and limitations of the models must be known. (orig.) 78 refs.

  6. A hybrid energy efficient building ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calay, Rajnish Kaur; Wang, Wen Chung

    2013-01-01

    The present paper presents a high performance cooling/heating ventilation system using a rotary heat exchanger (RHE), together with a reverse-cycle heat pump (RCHP) that can be integrated with various heat sources. Energy consumption in the building sector is largely dominated by the energy consumed in maintaining comfortable conditions indoors. For example in many developed countries the building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems consume up to 50% of the total energy consumed in buildings. Therefore energy efficient HVAC solutions in buildings are critical for realising CO 2 targets at local and global level. There are many heating/cooling concepts that rely upon renewable energy sources and/or use natural low temperature heat sources in the winter and heat sinks in the summer. In the proposed system, waste energy from the exhaust air stream is used to precondition the outdoor air before it is supplied into the building. The hybrid system provides heating in the winter and cooling in the summer without any need for additional heating or cooling devices as required in conventional systems. Its performance is better than a typical reheat or air conditioning system in providing the same indoor air quality (IAQ) levels. It is shown that an energy saving up to 60% (heat energy) is achieved by using the proposed hybrid system in building ventilation applications. -- Highlights: • Hybrid ventilation system: the hybrid ventilation system uses a rotating regenerator and a reversible heat pump. • Heat recovery: heat recovery from exhaust air stream by rotary wheel type heat exchanger. • Reversible cycle heat pump (RCHP): additional heating or cooling of the supply air is provided by the RCHP. • Energy efficiency: energy savings of up to 60% using the proposed system are achievable

  7. Nuclear waste repository ventilation system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Hensel, E.C.; Leslie, I.H.; Schultheis, T.M.; Walls, J.R.; Gregory, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ventilation studies of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant described in this article were performed by personnel from New Mexico State University in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Westinghouse Corporation. The following research tasks were performed: 1) High-efficiency particulate air filters of the type used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were loaded with salt aerosol from the site, 2) Filter resistance as a function of salt mass and flow rate was established for later use in computer simulations, 3) Filter efficiency was measured during the loading tests to establish a relation between efficiency and salt loading, 4) The structural strength of the salt-loaded high-efficiency filters was investigated by subjecting the filters to pressure transients of the types expected from fires, explosions and tornados, 5) Computer codes, obtained from Los Alamos National Laboratory, were used to model the ventilation systems and study their response to accident-induced pressure transients and heat fluxes, 6) Partial verification of the computer simulations was obtained by comparing normal operation of the ventilation systems to predicted normal operation, 7) A feasibility study using model-based control of the ventilation systems was initiated and will be completed during the second year of the project. (author) 12 figs., 16 refs

  8. Dimensionless study on dynamics of pressure controlled mechanical ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yan; Niu, Jinglong; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of mechanical ventilation system can be referred in pulmonary diagnostics and treatments. In this paper, to conveniently grasp the essential characteristics of mechanical ventilation system, a dimensionless model of mechanical ventilation system is presented. For the validation of the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator is proposed. Through the simulation and experimental studies on the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system, firstly, the mathematical model is proved to be authentic and reliable. Secondly, the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system are obtained. Last, the influences of key parameters on the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system are illustrated. The study provides a novel method to study the dynamic of mechanical ventilation system, which can be referred in the respiratory diagnostics and treatment.

  9. Dimensionless study on dynamics of pressure controlled mechanical ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yan; Niu, Jinglong; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing [Beihang University, Beijing (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Dynamics of mechanical ventilation system can be referred in pulmonary diagnostics and treatments. In this paper, to conveniently grasp the essential characteristics of mechanical ventilation system, a dimensionless model of mechanical ventilation system is presented. For the validation of the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator is proposed. Through the simulation and experimental studies on the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system, firstly, the mathematical model is proved to be authentic and reliable. Secondly, the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system are obtained. Last, the influences of key parameters on the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system are illustrated. The study provides a novel method to study the dynamic of mechanical ventilation system, which can be referred in the respiratory diagnostics and treatment.

  10. Potential energy savings with personalized ventilation coupled with passive chilled beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyubenova, Velina S.; Holsøe, Jan W.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2011-01-01

    Personalized ventilation (PV) is an individually controlled air distribution system aimed at improving inhaled air quality and thermal comfort of each occupant. Numerous studies have shown that PV may improve occupants’ health, comfort and performance in comparison with traditional total volume air...... saving especially in spaces where occupants spend most of the time at their workplace....

  11. 46 CFR 154.1200 - Mechanical ventilation system: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: General. 154.1200 Section... CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1200 Mechanical ventilation system: General. (a...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1205 - Mechanical ventilation system: Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. 154.1205... CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Area: Mechanical Ventilation System § 154.1205 Mechanical ventilation system: Standards. (a...

  13. Calculations of energy consumption in ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreslins, Andris; Ramata, Anna [Riga Technical University (Latvia)], e-mail: kreslins@rbf.rtu.lv, email: Anna.Ramata@rtu.lv

    2011-07-01

    Energy cost is an important economic factor in the food industry production process. With the rising price of energy, a reduction in energy consumption would greatly impact production and the end product. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for optimizing energy consumption. A comparison between a traditional ventilation system and a mechanical system was carried out; the necessary enthalpy for heating the air supply and thermal energy consumption were calculated and compared for both systems during the heating season, from October to April, using climatological data for Latvia. Results showed that energy savings of 46% to 87% can be achieved by applying the methodology in the design of industrial buildings; in addition, a well-designed ventilation system increases the workers' productivity. This study presented a methodology which can optimize energy consumption in the food industry sector.

  14. Ventilation patterns of the songbird lung/air sac system during different behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Rebecca; Goller, Franz

    2013-10-01

    Unidirectional, continuous airflow through the avian lung is achieved through an elaborate air sac system with a sequential, posterior to anterior ventilation pattern. This classical model was established through various approaches spanning passively ventilated systems to mass spectrometry analysis of tracer gas flow into various air sacs during spontaneous breathing in restrained ducks. Information on flow patterns in other bird taxa is missing, and these techniques do not permit direct tests of whether the basic flow pattern can change during different behaviors. Here we use thermistors implanted into various locations of the respiratory system to detect small pulses of tracer gas (helium) to reconstruct airflow patterns in quietly breathing and behaving (calling, wing flapping) songbirds (zebra finch and yellow-headed blackbird). The results illustrate that the basic pattern of airflow in these two species is largely consistent with the model. However, two notable differences emerged. First, some tracer gas arrived in the anterior set of air sacs during the inspiration during which it was inhaled, suggesting a more rapid throughput through the lung than previously assumed. Second, differences in ventilation between the two anterior air sacs emerged during calling and wing flapping, indicating that adjustments in the flow pattern occur during dynamic behaviors. It is unclear whether this modulation in ventilation pattern is passive or active. This technique for studying ventilation patterns during dynamic behaviors proves useful for establishing detailed timing of airflow and modulation of ventilation in the avian respiratory system.

  15. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE VENTILATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.J. Garrett

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface ventilation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998)

  16. Design guidelines for natural ventilation systems in tertiary sector buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Van Moeseke, Geoffrey; Bruyère, Isabelle; De Herde, André; CISBAT 2005: Renewables in a changing climate

    2005-01-01

    Parameters determining efficiency of natural ventilation systems are numerous. The most important are architecture and system design. This article get onto both but focuses on system design. Through dynamic simulations it shows that natural ventilation management has a large impact on energy saving but most of all on thermal comfort. Natural ventilation techniques are also weighted against hybrid solutions and high efficiency mechanical cooling solutions. Natural ventilation techniques show t...

  17. Ventilation systems in houses. Special issue; Woonhuisventilatie. Special

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Op ' t Veld, P.; Van der Aa, A. [Cauberg-Huygen Raadgevend Ingenieurs, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Verschoor, M.J.E. [Afdeling Koudetechniek en Warmtepompen, TNO Milieu, Energie en Procesinnovatie TNO-MEP, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Van Gulik, L.H. [Itho, Scheidam (Netherlands); Van der Mark, K.; Overman, P. [AGPO, Breda (Netherlands); Roemer, J.C.; Schuitema, R. [ECN Duurzame Energie in de Gebouwde Omgeving DEGO, Petten (Netherlands); Weterings, M. [GGD voor Rotterdam e.o., Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rosenmai, T.; Rasmussen, S. [Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vollebregt, R. [Bureau Kent, Utrecht (Netherlands); Smeets, L.J.M. [Nederlandse onderneming voor energie en milieu Novem, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2001-06-01

    In 10 articles attention is paid to several aspects with respect to ventilation of houses. This issue includes an overview of suppliers of high-efficiency heat recovering balanced ventilation systems.

  18. Assessing ventilation system performance in isolation rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balocco, Carla [Department of Energy Engineering ' ' Sergio Stecco' ' , via S. Marta 3, Firenze (Italy); Lio, Pietro [Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 15 JJ Thompson Avenue, CB03FD Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper numerical transient simulations were used to investigate the air flow patterns, distribution and velocity, and the particulate dispersion inside an existing typical hospitalization room equipped with an advanced Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC), with Variable Air Volume (VAV) primary air system designed for immune-suppressed patients never modelled before. The three-dimensional models of the room consider different, most typical, positions of the patients. Results indicate the best conditions for the high induction air inlet diffuser and the scheme of pressures imposed in the room to provide the effective means of controlling flows containing virus droplets. We believe that our work exemplifies the usefulness of numerical investigations of HVAC performances in real situations and provides important recommendations towards disease control and careful design and optimization of ventilation in hospital settings. (author)

  19. Ventilation System Strategy for a Prospective Korean Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin; Kwon, Sang Ki

    2005-01-01

    In the stage of conceptual design for the construction and operation of the geologic repository for radioactive wastes, it is important to consider a repository ventilation system which serves the repository working environment, hygiene and safety of the public at large, and will allow safe maintenance like moisture content elimination in repository for the duration of the repositories life, construction/operation/closure, also allowing safe waste transportation and emplacement. This paper describes the possible ventilation system design criteria and requirements for the prospective Korean radioactive waste repositories with emphasis on the underground rock cavity disposal method in the both cases of low and medium-level and high-level wastes. It was found that the most important concept is separate ventilation systems for the construction (development) and waste emplacement (storage) activities. In addition, ventilation network system modeling, natural ventilation, ventilation monitoring systems and real time ventilation simulation, and fire simulation and emergency system in the repository are briefly discussed.

  20. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  1. Considerations on nuclear reactor passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having indicated some passive safety systems present in electronuclear reactors (control bars, safety injection system accumulators, reactor cooling after stoppage, hydrogen recombination systems), this report recalls the main characteristics of passive safety systems, and discusses the main issues associated with the assessment of new passive systems (notably to face a sustained loss of electric supply systems or of cold water source) and research axis to be developed in this respect. More precisely, the report comments the classification of safety passive systems as it is proposed by the IAEA, outlines and comments specific aspects of these systems regarding their operation and performance. The next part discusses the safety approach, the control of performance of safety passive systems, issues related to their reliability, and the expected contribution of R and D (for example: understanding of physical phenomena which have an influence of these systems, capacities of simulation of these phenomena, needs of experimentations to validate simulation codes)

  2. PUREX exhaust ventilation system installation test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report validates the testing performed, the exceptions logged and resolved and certifies this portion of the SAMCONS has met all design and test criteria to perform as an operational system. The proper installation of the PUREX exhaust ventilation system components and wiring was systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of PUREX exhaust fan inlet, outlet, and vortex damper actuators and limit switches were verified, using special test equipment, to be correct and installed wiring connections were verified by operation of this equipment

  3. Hybrid Ventilation with Innovative Heat Recovery—A System Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Hellström

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors when low energy houses are built is to have good heat recovery on the ventilation system. However, standard ventilation units use a considerable amount of electricity. This article discusses the consequences on a system level of using hybrid ventilation with heat recovery. The simulation program TRNSYS was used in order to investigate a ventilation system with heat recovery. The system also includes a ground source storage and waste water heat recovery system. The result of the analysis shows that the annual energy gain from ground source storage is limited. However, this is partly a consequence of the fact that the well functioning hybrid ventilation system leaves little room for improvements. The analysis shows that the hybrid ventilation system has potential to be an attractive solution for low energy buildings with a very low need for electrical energy.

  4. Natural ventilation systems to enhance sustainability in buildings: a review towards zero energy buildings in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Baez, Maite; Barrios-Padura, Ángela; Molina-Huelva, Marta; Chacartegui, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    European regulations set the condition of Zero Energy Buildings for new buildings since 2020, with an intermediate milestone in 2018 for public buildings, in order to control greenhouse gases emissions control and climate change mitigation. Given that main fraction of energy consumption in buildings operation is due to HVAC systems, advances in its design and operation conditions are required. One key element for energy demand control is passive design of buildings. On this purpose, different recent studies and publications analyse natural ventilation systems potential to provide indoor air quality and comfort conditions minimizing electric power consumption. In these passive systems are of special relevance their capacities as passive cooling systems as well as air renovation systems, especially in high-density occupied spaces. With adequate designs, in warm/mild climates natural ventilation systems can be used along the whole year, maintaining indoor air quality and comfort conditions with small support of other heating/cooling systems. In this paper is analysed the state of the art of natural ventilation systems applied to high density occupied spaces with special focus on school buildings. The paper shows the potential and applicability of these systems for energy savings and discusses main criteria for their adequate integration in school building designs.

  5. Tracer gas evaluations of push-pull ventilation system performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2009-01-01

    A push-pull ventilation system is effective for hazardous material exhaustion. Although a push-pull ventilation system has advantages over a local exhaust hood, some laborious adjustments are required. The pertinence of the adjustments is uncertain because it is difficult to evaluate the performance of a push-pull ventilation system quantitatively. In this study, a measurement of the capture efficiency of a push-pull ventilation system was carried out by means of a tracer gas method. The capture efficiency decreased to 39.3-78.5% when blockage material, a dummy worker and a cross draft, were set in the ventilation zone, but the efficiency was 95.1-97.9% when the cross draft was stopped. The results suggest that the uniform flow of a push-pull ventilation system will detour a blockage and the performance of the system will not be reduced unless a cross draft disturbs the uniform flow.

  6. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems

  7. On the application of a new thermal diagnostic model: the passive elements equivalent in term of ventilation inside a room

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khattabi, El Mehdi; Mharzi, Mohamed; Raefat, Saad; Meghari, Zouhair

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the thermal equivalence of the passive elements of a room in a building located in Fez-Morocco has been studied. The possibility of replacing them with a semi-passive element such as ventilation has been appraised. For this aim a Software in Fortran taking into account the meteorological external conditions along with different parameters of the building envelope has been performed. A new computational approach is adapted to determinate the temperature distribution throughout the building multilayer walls. A novel equation gathering the internal temperature with the external conditions, and the building envelope has been deduced in transient state.

  8. Potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation in present and future climates in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, Heinrich; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Given the general shift in recent decades towards a lower heating and higher cooling demand for buildings in many European countries, passive cooling by night-time ventilation has come to be seen as a promising option, particularly in the moderate or cold climates of Central, Eastern and Northern...... Europe. The basic concept involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink that is available during the occupancy period. In this study, the potential for the passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation is evaluated by analysing climatic data, irrespective...... of any building-specific parameters. An approach for calculating degree-hours based on a variable building temperature - within a standardized range of thermal comfort - is presented and applied to climatic data from 259 stations throughout Europe. The results show a very high potential for night...

  9. NATURAL VENTILATION: A PASSIVE DESIGN STRATEGY IN DESIGNING HOTEL LOBBIES – CASES FROM TROPICAL MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Malik Abdul Rahman

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available When the Malaysian government increased electricity tariff by up to 12% in early 2006 and also another increase in early July 2008, most commercial buildings were affected by the move. The hardest hit would be the hotel industry as they are among the economic forefronts of the nation. Already burdened with the rigorous efforts of filling their rooms with guests, they now have to re-strategize to sustain business. Energy bills to pay for cooling have always been the biggest burden. Cooling the air is an intangible and a never-ending wasteful activity. Cold room for food is on for 24 hours for obvious reasons. To overcome this, one strategy was considered to be part and parcel of the overall building design so as to contribute to the reduction of the high dependency of energy consumption for cooling. The challenge here is to reduce electricity consumption without compromising the comfort of the guests and also reduce the overhead costs to give a more competitive edge in hotel room rates. Among other passive design elements this paper considers two natural ventilation occurrences and locations that can be relied upon for Malaysian hotel designs.

  10. Recirculating ventilation system for radioactive laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrappa, P.; Menon, V.B.; Dingankar, M.V.; Chandramoleshwar, K.; Bhargava, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive laboratories designed to handle toxic substances such as plutonium are required to have ''once through'' ventilation scheme. This is an expensive proposition particularly when conditioned air is required. A recent approach is to have recirculatory system with exhausted air passing through absolute (HEPA) filters. This scheme not only drastically reduces capital costs but also substantially cuts down maintenance and running costs. Experiments emplyoing aerosol clearance techniques were conducted to specifically establish that this new scheme meets all the health physics safety stipulations laid down for such installations. It is shown that the ''once through'' system is three times more expensive compared to the recirculation system adopted in Purnima Laboratories. Further a saving of 70% is also achieved in running and operating costs. Therefore the new approach deserves serious consideration in future planning of similar projects, particularly in view of the fact that the considerable savings achievable both in terms of money and energy are without in any way compromising on safety. (auth.)

  11. Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

  12. Optimization of control area ventilation systems for Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, T.; Nakahara, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear power plant has been required to reduce the cost for the purpose of making the low-cost energy since several years ago in Japan. The Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning system in the nuclear power plant has been also required to reduce its cost. On the other hand the ventilation system should add the improvable function according to the advanced plant design. In response to these different requirements, the ventilation criteria and the design of the ventilation system have been evaluated and optimized in Japanese PWR Plant design. This paper presents the findings of the authors' study

  13. Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection

  14. Feasibility of passive heat removal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashurko, Yu M [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a review of decay heat removal systems (DHRSs) used in liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Advantages and the disadvantages of these DHRSs, extent of their passivity and prospects for their use in advanced fast reactor projects are analyzed. Methods of extending the limitations on the employment of individual systems, allowing enhancement in their effectiveness as safety systems and assuring their total passivity are described. (author). 10 refs, 10 figs.

  15. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, Robb [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  16. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified

  17. Passive systems for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, R.; Noviello, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the most original concepts that have been considered in Italy for the back-fitting of the nuclear power plants in order to reduce the probability and the importance of the release to the environment in case of a core melt. With reference either to BWR or PWR, passive concepts have been considered for back-fitting in the following areas: pump seals damage prevention and ECCS passive operation; reactor passive depressurization; molten reactor core passive cooling; metal containment passive water cooling through a water tank located at high level; containment isolation improvement through a sealing system; containment leaks control and limitation of environmental release. In addition some considerations will be made on the protection against external events introduced from the beginning on the PUN design either on building and equipment lay-out either on structure design. (author). 5 figs

  18. Uncertainties in different level assessments of domestic ventilation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokel, R.M.J.; Yang, Z.; Cauberg, J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of ventilation systems, assessments are widely used. In this paper, 3 main assessment levels are distinguished based on the number of ventilation systems to be assessed and the assessment objective. The main assessment levels distinguished in this paper are global

  19. An Overview of National Trends Related to Innovative Ventilation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heijmans, Nicolas; Wouters, Peter; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarises the discussion related to innovative (ventilation) systems that took place at the AIVC workshop organised in Ghent, Belgium, in March 2008.......This paper summarises the discussion related to innovative (ventilation) systems that took place at the AIVC workshop organised in Ghent, Belgium, in March 2008....

  20. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Bergman, W.; Ford, H.W.; Lipska, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect HEPA filters in exit ventilation ducts from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Several methods for partially mitigating the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified through testing and analysis. These independently involve controlling the fuel, controlling the fire, and intercepting the smoke aerosol prior to its sorption on the HEPA filter. Exit duct treatment of aerosols is not unusual in industrial applications and involves the use of scrubbers, prefilters, and inertial impaction, depending on the size, distribution, and concentration of the subject aerosol. However, when these unmodified techniques were applied to smoke aerosols from fires on materials, common to experimental laboratories of LLNL, it was found they offered minimal protection to the HEPA filters. Ultimately, a continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. This technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modificaton of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has a particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, we laminated rolling filter media with the desired properties. It is not true that the use of rolling prefilters solely to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols is cost effective in every type of containment system, especially if standard fire-protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified

  1. Performance potential of mechanical ventilation systems with minimized pressure loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkildsen, Søren; Svendsen, Svend

    2013-01-01

    simulations that quantify fan power consumption, heating demand and indoor environmental conditions. The system was designed with minimal pressure loss in the duct system and heat exchanger. Also, it uses state-of-the-art components such as electrostatic precipitators, diffuse ceiling inlets and demand......In many locations mechanical ventilation has been the most widely used principle of ventilation over the last 50 years but the conventional system design must be revised to comply with future energy requirements. This paper examines the options and describes a concept for the design of mechanical...... ventilation systems with minimal pressure loss and minimal energy use. This can provide comfort ventilation and avoid overheating through increased ventilation and night cooling. Based on this concept, a test system was designed for a fictive office building and its performance was documented using building...

  2. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bergey, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  3. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, Daniel [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  4. B-Plant Canyon Ventilation Control System Description; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCDANIEL, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    Project W-059 installed a new B Plant Canyon Ventilation System. Monitoring and control of the system is implemented by the Canyon Ventilation Control System (CVCS). This document describes the CVCS system components which include a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) coupled with an Operator Interface Unit (OIU) and application software. This document also includes an Alarm Index specifying the setpoints and technical basis for system analog and digital alarms

  5. Control of ventilation system when changing of its topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koketayev, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    The complex ventilation systems of modern coal and ore mines can be described by multidimensional and highly bound graphs. Because of changes in topology, it is very difficult to control ventilation systems in the event of emergency situations such as rock bumps, roof caving, sudden gas outburst, quicksand intrusion, or mine flooding. Special mathematical tools are needed to consider such changes and to determine the corresponding conditions of a mine's ventilation needs. This paper presented a system to simulate the behaviour of mine ventilation system. The system considered changes in topology as well as timely measures for support of necessary air quantity for safe conditions for miners in underground mine workings. The paper presented the details of the study with particular reference to the calculation of ventilation conditions; graphs and sub-graphs of the ventilation system; and corresponding equations. It was concluded that the simulated system would allow users to simulate the behaviour of the mine ventilation system when changing its topology in a timely manner and to take measures to control the required volume of air to ensure safe working conditions for underground miners. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  6. On analysis of operating efficiency of autonomous ventilation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostuganov Arman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the causes and consequences of malfunctioning of natural and mechanical ventilation systems in civil buildings of Russia. Furthermore it gives their classification and analysis based on the literature review. On the basis of the analysis technical solutions for improving the efficiency of ventilation systems in civil buildings are summarized and the field of their application is specified. Among the offered technical solutions the use of autonomous ventilation systems with heat recovery is highlighted as one of the most promising and understudied. Besides it has a wide range of applications. The paper reviews and analyzes the main Russian and foreign designs of ventilation systems with heat recovery that are mostly used in practice. Three types of such systems: UVRK-50, Prana-150, ТеFо are chosen for consideration. The sequence of field tests of selected autonomous ventilation systems have been carried out in order to determine the actual air exchange and efficiency of heat recovery. The paper presents the processed results of the research on the basis of which advantages and disadvantages of the tested ventilation systems are identified and recommendations for engineering and manufacturing of new design models of autonomous ventilation systems with heat recovery are formulated.

  7. Software Verification and Validation Report for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Ventilation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YEH, T.

    2002-01-01

    This document reports on the analysis, testing and conclusions of the software verification and validation for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization ventilation system. Automation control system will use the Allen-Bradley software tools for programming and programmable logic controller (PLC) configuration. The 244-AR Interim Stabilization Ventilation System will be used to control the release of radioactive particles to the environment in the containment tent, located inside the canyon of the 244-AR facility, and to assist the waste stabilization efforts. The HVAC equipment, ducts, instruments, PLC hardware, the ladder logic executable software (documented code), and message display terminal are considered part of the temporary ventilation system. The system consists of a supply air skid, temporary ductwork (to distribute airflow), and two skid-mounted, 500-cfm exhausters connected to the east filter building and the vessel vent system. The Interim Stabilization Ventilation System is a temporary, portable ventilation system consisting of supply side and exhaust side. Air is supplied to the containment tent from an air supply skid. This skid contains a constant speed fan, a pre-filter, an electric heating coil, a cooling coil, and a constant flow device (CFD). The CFD uses a passive component that allows a constant flow of air to pass through the device. Air is drawn out of the containment tent, cells, and tanks by two 500-cfm exhauster skids running in parallel. These skids are equipped with fans, filters, stack, stack monitoring instrumentation, and a PLC for control. The 500CFM exhaust skids were fabricated and tested previously for saltwell pumping activities. The objective of the temporary ventilation system is to maintain a higher pressure to the containment tent, relative to the canyon and cell areas, to prevent contaminants from reaching the containment tent

  8. Passive containment system in high earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleimola, F.W.; Falls, O.B. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    High earthquake motion necessitates major design modifications in the complex of plant structures, systems and components in a nuclear power plant. Distinctive features imposed by seismic category, safety class and quality classification requirements for the high seismic ground acceleration loadings significantly reflect in plant costs. The design features in the Passive Containment System (PCS) responding to high earthquake ground motion are described

  9. Rehabilitation of a house with high radon level, using a ground ventilation system with double barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnefous, Y.C.; Richon, P.; Arnautou, J.C.; Sabroux, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    A ground ventilation system has been designed and implemented in a town hall in Brittany. Radon concentration in the heating unit room of this building has been reduced from 10000 Bq/m 3 to less than 200 Bq/m 3 by the means of a depressurization system using a 32 W fan, which blows air into a permeable gravel layer intercalated between two radon barrier mylar films. Results show that passive systems should be applicable; for new buildings, very low energy consumption systems with 10 W fans, are easily implemented if designed before construction

  10. Numerical analysis of passive strategies for energy retrofit of existing buildings in Mediterranean climate: thermal mass and natural ventilation combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calcerano Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the potential of coupling natural ventilation and thermal storage systems to improve hygrothermal comfort and reduce energy consumption during summer season in an existing building in the Mediterranean. It aims at bridging the knowledge gap between designers, researchers and building scientists, fostering a multidisciplinary approach and promoting numerical simulation of the energy performance of buildings within architectural professional practice. The study analyses the interaction between six natural ventilation systems (single sided ventilation through facade openings; cross ventilation through facade openings, inlet wind tower, thermal chimney, evaporative cool tower, earth pipes and with two thermal storage typology (heavy and medium-light within four strategic Italian location (Rome, Naples, Messina and Catania. For each interaction we perform a numerical dynamic simulation of indoor comfort, indoor air quality and energy consumption during the summer period, on a reference building model corresponding to the most common Italian typology. Results show that the use of the chosen systems ensures significant reductions of discomfort hours and energy consumption in all configurations. The study also highlights the high efficiency of non invasive systems (single-sided and cross ventilation with automatic control present discomfort hours reduction and energy consumption reduction above 68% for all combinations and the significant influence of the daily thermal range value on the performance of systems without air pre-treatment.

  11. Passive cooling systems in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharon, J.; Harrari, R.; Weiss, Y.; Barnea, Y.; Katz, M.; Szanto, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews several R and D activities associated with the subject of passive cooling systems, conducted by the N.R.C.Negev thermohydraulic group. A short introduction considering different types of thermosyphons and their applications is followed by a detailed description of the experimental work, its results and conclusions. An ongoing research project is focused on the evaluation of the external dry air passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in the AP-600 (Westinghouse advanced pressurized water reactor). In this context some preliminary theoretical results and planned experimental research are for the fature described

  12. NucleDyne's passive containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falls, O.B. Jr.; Kleimola, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A simple definition of the passive containment system is that it is a total safeguards system for light water reactors designed to prevent and contain any accidental release of radioactivity. Its passive features utilize the natural laws of physics and thermodynamics. The system encompasses three basic containments constructed as one integrated structure on the reactor building foundation. The primary containment encloses the reactor pressure vessel and coolant system and passive engineered safety systems and components. Auxiliary containment enclosures house auxiliary systems and components. Secondary containment (the reactor building), housing the primary and auxiliary containment structures, provides a second containment barrier as added defense-in-depth against leakage of radioactivity for all accidents assumed by the industry. The generic features of the passive containment system are applicable to both the boiling water reactors and the pressurized water reactors as standardized features for all power ranges. These features provide for a zero source term, the industry's ultimate safety goal. This paper relates to a four-loop pressurized water reactor

  13. SUBSURFACE VOLATIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration Test of Environmental Improvement Technologies’ (EIT) Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS) process. The technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) ...

  14. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

  15. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, R. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This report, developed by Building America research team CARB, addresses adding or improving mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The goal of this report is to assist decision makers and contractors in making informed decisions when selecting ventilation systems for homes. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including examination of relevant codes and standards. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors.

  16. Constant depression fan system a novel glovebox ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliner, W.V.

    1995-01-01

    In a conventional glovebox ventilation system the depression within the glovebox under normal operation is controlled by instrumentation. In the event of a breach the pressure within the box rises to atmospheric pressure, this pressure rise is detected by instrumentation which in turn operates a quick opening damper in a high depression extract to achieve a 1 metre/sec (200 fpm) inflow through the breach, which can take up to 2 seconds to establish. This system, although widely used, suffers from two distinct drawbacks: It takes a finite time to achieve the containment velocity of 1 metre/sec. It relies upon instrumentation to achieve its objectives. A new glovebox ventilation system has been developed by AWE to overcome these drawbacks. This is the Constant Depression Fan System (CDFS) which is based on an extract fan with a flat characteristic. This achieves all the requirements for the ventilation of gloveboxes and has the advantages that: It has only one moving part - the extract fan. It requires NO INSTRUMENTATION to achieve its objectives. It achieves the containment velocity of 1 metre/sec in the shortest possible time - approximately 0.2 seconds - and tests have shown that containment is maintained under breach conditions. Thus the CDFS is SAFER, SIMPLER and MORE RELIABLE

  17. Constant depression fan system a novel glovebox ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliner, W.V. [AME plc., Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    1995-02-01

    In a conventional glovebox ventilation system the depression within the glovebox under normal operation is controlled by instrumentation. In the event of a breach the pressure within the box rises to atmospheric pressure, this pressure rise is detected by instrumentation which in turn operates a quick opening damper in a high depression extract to achieve a 1 metre/sec (200 fpm) inflow through the breach, which can take up to 2 seconds to establish. This system, although widely used, suffers from two distinct drawbacks: It takes a finite time to achieve the containment velocity of 1 metre/sec. It relies upon instrumentation to achieve its objectives. A new glovebox ventilation system has been developed by AWE to overcome these drawbacks. This is the Constant Depression Fan System (CDFS) which is based on an extract fan with a flat characteristic. This achieves all the requirements for the ventilation of gloveboxes and has the advantages that: It has only one moving part - the extract fan. It requires NO INSTRUMENTATION to achieve its objectives. It achieves the containment velocity of 1 metre/sec in the shortest possible time - approximately 0.2 seconds - and tests have shown that containment is maintained under breach conditions. Thus the CDFS is SAFER, SIMPLER and MORE RELIABLE.

  18. Ventilation systems and components of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The most important radiation and nuclear safety requirements for the design and manufacture of nuclear power plant ventilation systems and components are presented in the guide. Also the regulatory activities of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) as regards the ventilation systems and components are explained. Documents and data which shall be submitted to STUK during the various phases of the regulatory procedure relating to the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the nuclear power plants are presented. (13 refs.)

  19. Rising damp in building walls: the wall base ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, A.S.; Delgado, J.M.P.Q.; Freitas, V.P. de [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Laboratorio de Fisica das Construcoes (LFC), Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Porto (Portugal)

    2012-12-15

    This work intends to validate a new system for treating rising damp in historic buildings walls. The results of laboratory experiments show that an efficient way of treating rising damp is by ventilating the wall base, using the HUMIVENT technique. The analytical model presented describes very well the observed features of rising damp in walls, verified by laboratory tests, who contributed for a simple sizing of the wall base ventilation system that will be implemented in historic buildings. (orig.)

  20. The pit ventilation features and the design principle of ventilation system in trackless mining uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Wenhui; Zhou Xinghuo; Li Xianjie

    2001-01-01

    According to the pit arrangement features of trackless mining uranium mine, based on the fundamental of radon permeation and control, and analysis of radon pollution characteristics and radon education, the design principle of ventilation system in trackless mining uranium mine has been raised

  1. Characterization of natural ventilation in wastewater collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew; Corsi, Richard; Morton, Robert; Knapp, Tom; Apgar, Dirk; Quigley, Chris; Easter, Chris; Witherspoon, Jay; Pramanik, Amit; Parker, Wayne

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to characterize natural ventilation in full-scale gravity collection system components while measuring other parameters related to ventilation. Experiments were completed at four different locations in the wastewater collection systems of Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts, Los Angeles, California, and the King County Wastewater Treatment District, Seattle, Washington. The subject components were concrete gravity pipes ranging in diameter from 0.8 to 2.4 m (33 to 96 in.). Air velocity was measured in each pipe using a carbon-monoxide pulse tracer method. Air velocity was measured entering or exiting the components at vents using a standpipe and hotwire anemometer arrangement. Ambient wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity; headspace temperature and relative humidity; and wastewater flow and temperature were measured. The field experiments resulted in a large database of measured ventilation and related parameters characterizing ventilation in full-scale gravity sewers. Measured ventilation rates ranged from 23 to 840 L/s. The experimental data was used to evaluate existing ventilation models. Three models that were based upon empirical extrapolation, computational fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics, respectively, were evaluated based on predictive accuracy compared to the measured data. Strengths and weaknesses in each model were found and these observations were used to propose a concept for an improved ventilation model.

  2. Dependence of radon level on ventilation systems in residences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokotti, H.

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of indoor radon and radon entry from soil into a house are expected to increase with increasing radon concentration in soil pores, and indoor radon concentration is expected to decrease with increasing ventilation rate. Depressurization, which can be caused by the stack effect, by wind and by unbalanced ventilation, creates different pressure conditions in a house and in the soil beneath it. To reveal the possible differences in radon removal and entry resulting from different ventilation systems, radon concentrations were determined in three similar slab-on-grade buildings provided with mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation, mechanical exhaust or natural ventilation. To limitate the effect of differences in soil parameters, the houses were constructed on the same gravel esker in Kuopio. Thus, the variation in radon entry as a result of different depressurisation of the houses (caused by unbalanced mechanical ventilation systems) could also be observed. In addition, the effect of pressurisation on living rooms could be determined in five slab-on-grade houses constructed on the same esker in Hollola. Mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation system controlled by measured indoor-outdoor pressure difference, was installed in the six houses. The seasonal variation with and without controlled pressure conditions were followed in a slab-on-grade house constructed on a gravel esker in Rekola. Long-term radon concentrations were observed to correlate negatively with air exchange rates. However, the removal effect of ventilation was found to be disturbed by negative pressure due to the stack effect and/or to unbalanced mechanical ventilation. (91 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.)

  3. Towards energy efficient operation of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning systems via advanced supervisory control design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswiecinska, A.; Hibbs, J.; Zajic, I.; Burnham, K. J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents conceptual control solution for reliable and energy efficient operation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems used in large volume building applications, e.g. warehouse facilities or exhibition centres. Advanced two-level scalable control solution, designed to extend capabilities of the existing low-level control strategies via remote internet connection, is presented. The high-level, supervisory controller is based on Model Predictive Control (MPC) architecture, which is the state-of-the-art for indoor climate control systems. The innovative approach benefits from using passive heating and cooling control strategies for reducing the HVAC system operational costs, while ensuring that required environmental conditions are met.

  4. Inherently safe passive gas monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Bellamy, John Stephen; Shuler, James M.; Shull, Davis J.; Leduc, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Generally, the present disclosure is directed to gas monitoring systems that use inductive power transfer to safely power an electrically passive device included within a nuclear material storage container. In particular, the electrically passive device can include an inductive power receiver for receiving inductive power transfer through a wall of the nuclear material storage container. The power received by the inductive power receiver can be used to power one or more sensors included in the device. Thus, the device is not required to include active power generation components such as, for example, a battery, that increase the risk of a spark igniting flammable gases within the container.

  5. Passive containment system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleimola, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A containment system is described that provides complete protection entirely by passive means for the loss of coolant accident in a nuclear power plant and wherein all stored energy released in the coolant blowdown is contained and absorbed while the nuclear fuel is continuously maintained submerged in liquid. The primary containment vessel is restored to a high subatmospheric pressure within a few minutes after accident initiation and the decay heat is safely transferred to the environment while radiolytic hydrogen is contained by passive means

  6. Development of passive radar systems at TNO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelsema, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2002, the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research – TNO, has been involved in the development of passive radar systems for research purposes. The development has been sponsored partly by the Royal Netherlands Air Force – whose main interest is threat evaluation – and partly by

  7. TEPSS - Technology Enhancement for Passive Safety Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.; Slegers, W.J.M.; Boer, S.L. de; Huggenberger, M.; Lopez Jimenez, J.; Munoz-Cabo Gonzalez, J.L.; Reventos Puigjaner, F.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the TEPSS project was to make significant additions to the technology base of the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The project focused on mixing and stratification phenomena in large water pools, passive decay heat removal from containments, and effects of aerosol deposition inside a passive heat exchanger. The PSI experimental facility LINX (Large-scale Investigation of Natural Circulation and Mixing) has been used to investigate venting of steam and steam-noncondensable gas mixtures into water pools. The test revealed that no significant steam bypass could be detected when injecting a mixture of steam or air and that mixing was very efficient. In addition to the tests, 3-D numerical computations and initial model development have been performed to study the behaviour of bubble plumes in water pools. The major part of the TEPSS project studied selective aspects of the response technology of modem pressure-suppression type containment designs and of passive-type decay heat removal systems. The work included an experimental phase using the large-scale experimental facility PANDA (Passive Nachwaermeabfuhr und Druckabbau), operated by PSI, where eight experiments successfully have been executed to test the performance of the ESBWR containment configuration. The PANDA tests have been analysed successfully using thermalhydraulic system analysis codes and 3-D CFD codes. The AIDA (Aerosol Impaction and Deposition Analysis) experimental facility of PSI has been used to investigate the degradation of passive decay heat removal due to fission product aerosols deposited on the inside surfaces of the PCC (Passive Containment Cooler) heat exchanger tubes. The one test performed revealed that the degradation of the heat transfer in the PCC tubes due to the deposition of aerosols reached about 20%. The test has been analysed using the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. (author)

  8. Backup passive reactivity shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurko, Yu.M.; Kuznetsov, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    The paper reviews self-actuated shutdown systems (SASSs) for liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Principles of operation are described, advantages and drawbacks analyzed, and prospects for application in advanced fast reactors examined. Ways to improve reactor self-protection via reactivity feedback amplification and related problems are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 12 figs

  9. Backup passive reactivity shutdown systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashurko, Yu M; Kuznetsov, L A [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    The paper reviews self-actuated shutdown systems (SASSs) for liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Principles of operation are described, advantages and drawbacks analyzed, and prospects for application in advanced fast reactors examined. Ways to improve reactor self-protection via reactivity feedback amplification and related problems are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 12 figs.

  10. Ventilation system in the RA reactor building - design specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badrljica, R.

    1984-09-01

    Protective role of the ventilation system of nuclear facilities involve construction of ventilation barriers which prevent release of radioactive particulates or gases, elimination od radioactive particulates and gases from the air which is released from contaminated zones into the reactor environment. Ventilation barriers are created by dividing the building into a number of ventilation zones with different sub pressure compared to the atmospheric pressure. The RA reactor building is divided into four ventilation zones. First zone is the zone of highest risk. It includes reactor core with horizontal experimental channels, underground rooms of the primary coolant system (D 2 O), helium system, hot cells and the space above the the reactor core. Second zone is the reactor hall and the room for irradiated fuel storage. The third zone includes corridors in the basement, ground floor and first floor where the probability of contamination is small. The fourth zone includes the annex where the contamination risk is low. There is no have natural air circulation in the reactor building. Ventilators for air input and outlet maintain the sub pressure in the building (pressure lower than the atmospheric pressure). This prevents release of radioactivity into the atmosphere [sr

  11. Active versus passive humidification for self-ventilating tracheostomy and laryngectomy patients: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C Y Y; Shakir, A A; Farboud, A; Whittet, H B

    2016-12-01

    To determine whether active or passive humidification methods are more effective in preventing pulmonary complications in self-ventilating neck breather patients. Systematic Review adhering to PRISMA guidance (checklist sourced from www.equator-network.org/). Review of current published relevant literature at a tertiary department of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. We included all separate studies and comparison studies of active and passive humidification techniques in adult and paediatric neck breather patients. The primary outcome is the reduction in pulmonary complications. Secondary outcomes include patient compliance; carer and user satisfaction. Seven studies were included in this review: two RCTs (133 patients), one randomised controlled cross-over trial (29 patients), three randomised prospective studies (171 patients), and one retrospective study (73 patients). Only one study was conducted on paediatric neck breathers. The overall quality of the studies was low. Five studies were at a high risk of bias. Of the remaining two studies, one study had a low risk of bias and the other had an unclear risk. Despite limited subject evidence, results show that passive methods of humidification (mainly HME) is the preferred choice of humidification in the spontaneously breathing neck breather patients group mainly due to the reduction in pulmonary complaints, and better patient compliance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Effect of Ventilation, Filtration and Passive Sorption on Indoor Air Quality in Museum Storage Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl-Svendsen, M.; Clausen, Geo

    2009-01-01

    in reducing nitrogen dioxide. Increased ventilation rates were expected to dilute internally generated pollutants, but ambiguous results imply that the emission rate of organic acids may also vary Recirculation/filtration was generally, the most efficient method. A cautious conclusion is that a combination...

  13. Experimental study of the heat transfers and passive cooling potential of a ventilated plenum designed for uniform air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Lessing, Julian

    2016-01-01

    suspended ceiling to uniformly distribute the supply air to the occupied zone. This, in effect, increases the thermal mass of the room because the upper slab of the room no longer is isolated from the occupied zone. In this study, the cooling potential of a diffuse ceiling ventilation system is i...

  14. Passive safety systems for integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuul, V.S.; Samoilov, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a wide range of passive safety systems intended for use on integral reactors is considered. The operation of these systems relies on natural processes and does not require external power supplies. Using these systems, there is the possibility of preventing serious consequences for all classes of accidents including reactivity, loss-of-coolant and loss of heat sink as well as severe accidents. Enhancement of safety system reliability has been achieved through the use of self-actuating devices, capable of providing passive initiation of protective and isolation systems, which respond immediately to variations in the physical parameters of the fluid in the reactor or in a guard vessel. For beyond design base accidents accompanied by complete loss of heat removal capability, autonomous self-actuated ERHR trains have been proposed. These trains are completely independent of the secondary loops and need no action to isolate them from the steam turbine plant. Passive safety principles have been consistently implemented in AST-500, ATETS-200 and VPBER 600 which are new generation NPPs developed by OKBM. Their main characteristic is enhanced stability over a wide range of internal and external emergency initiators. (author). 10 figs

  15. Sum rules and constraints on passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernland, A; Gustafsson, M; Luger, A

    2011-01-01

    A passive system is one that cannot produce energy, a property that naturally poses constraints on the system. A system in convolution form is fully described by its transfer function, and the class of Herglotz functions, holomorphic functions mapping the open upper half-plane to the closed upper half-plane, is closely related to the transfer functions of passive systems. Following a well-known representation theorem, Herglotz functions can be represented by means of positive measures on the real line. This fact is exploited in this paper in order to rigorously prove a set of integral identities for Herglotz functions that relate weighted integrals of the function to its asymptotic expansions at the origin and infinity. The integral identities are the core of a general approach introduced here to derive sum rules and physical limitations on various passive physical systems. Although similar approaches have previously been applied to a wide range of specific applications, this paper is the first to deliver a general procedure together with the necessary proofs. This procedure is described thoroughly and exemplified with examples from electromagnetic theory.

  16. Passive safety systems for integral reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuul, V S; Samoilov, O B [OKB Mechanical Engineering (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, a wide range of passive safety systems intended for use on integral reactors is considered. The operation of these systems relies on natural processes and does not require external power supplies. Using these systems, there is the possibility of preventing serious consequences for all classes of accidents including reactivity, loss-of-coolant and loss of heat sink as well as severe accidents. Enhancement of safety system reliability has been achieved through the use of self-actuating devices, capable of providing passive initiation of protective and isolation systems, which respond immediately to variations in the physical parameters of the fluid in the reactor or in a guard vessel. For beyond design base accidents accompanied by complete loss of heat removal capability, autonomous self-actuated ERHR trains have been proposed. These trains are completely independent of the secondary loops and need no action to isolate them from the steam turbine plant. Passive safety principles have been consistently implemented in AST-500, ATETS-200 and VPBER 600 which are new generation NPPs developed by OKBM. Their main characteristic is enhanced stability over a wide range of internal and external emergency initiators. (author). 10 figs.

  17. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  18. Optimized damper control of pressure and airflow in ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Hviid, Christian Anker; Terkildsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Conventional control strategies in variable air volume (VAV) ventilation systems do not take fully into advantage the potential energy savings since the system operation is based on maintaining a constant static pressure (CSP) set point in the main duct irrespective of the actual pressure demand...... by using the Simulink programming tool which is addon software to MATLAB mathematical programming language. A model of a VAV ventilation system was created in Simulink based on the International Building Physics Toolbox (IBPT); the IBPT thermal zone was remodelled in order to calculate dynamically...... the airflow demand according to the zone air temperature. The performance of the Simulink model was evaluated based on the experimental setup of the ventilation system. The SPR control method established stable system operation and was proven efficient to maintain comfortable space conditions while reducing...

  19. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-01-01

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System

  20. Anaesthesia ventilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish K Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV. PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits.

  1. Anaesthesia ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-09-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits.

  2. Anaesthesia ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits. PMID:24249886

  3. Anaesthesia ventilators

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bello...

  4. Instrumentation of air conditioning and ventilation system - R-5 project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.B.; Naik, C.D.; Narasingha Rao, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed account of instrumentation proposed for airconditioning and ventilation system in the R-5, 100 MW thermal research reactor, under construction is presented. Controls and instrumentation provided in this system are electronic, pneumatic and hydraulic in nature depending on the application. They cater to the accurate operation of the system and maintain the conditions strictly within desired tolerances. (S.K.K.)

  5. Design of energy efficient ventilation and air-conditioning systems

    CERN Document Server

    Seppänen, Olli; Bertilsson, Thore; Maripuu, Mari-Liis; Lamy, Hervé; Vanden Borre, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This guidebook covers numerous system components of ventilation and air-conditioning systems and shows how they can be improved by applying the latest technology products. Special attention is paid to details, which are often overlooked in the daily design practice, resulting in poor performance of high quality products once they are installed in the building system.

  6. A simulation-powered approach to ventilation, lighting and shading systems control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuss, Matthias; Proeglhoef, Claus; Orehounig, Kristina; Mahdavi, Ardeshir [Department of Building Physics and Building Ecology, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2010-12-15

    This paper reports on ongoing work toward implementing a predictive control approach for buildings systems for ventilation, lighting, and shading. The main objective of this method is the optimized control of multiple devices toward usage of passive cooling and natural lighting. In this way, control options (various opening positions of windows, shades, etc.) are generated and computationally assessed using a combination of option space navigation via genetic algorithms and numeric simulation. (Copyright copyright 2010 Ernst and Sohn Verlag fuer Architektur und technische Wissenschaften GmbH and Co. KG, Berlin)

  7. Basement depressurization using dwelling mechanical exhaust ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collignan, B.; O'Kelly, P.; Pilch, E.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical ventilation exhaust system is commonly used in France to generate air renewal into building and especially into dwelling. It consists of a permanent mechanical air extraction from technical rooms (kitchen, bathrooms and toilets) using a unique fan connected to exhaust ducts. Natural air inlets in living room and bed rooms ensure an air flow from living spaces towards technical rooms. To fight against radon into building, the most recognised efficient technique is the Soil Depressurization System (S.D.S.) consisting in depressurizing the house basement. The aim of this study is to test the ability of the dwelling mechanical ventilation system to depressurize the basement in conjunction with air renewal of a house. For that purpose, a S.D.S. has been installed in an experimental house at CSTB during its construction. At first, tests undertaken with a variable velocity fan connected to the S.D.S. have characterised the permeability of the basement. It is shown that basement can be depressurized adequately with a relatively low air flow rate. At a second stage, S.D.S. has been connected to the exhaust ventilation fan used for the mechanical ventilation of the house. Results obtained show the ability of such ventilation system to generate sufficient depressurization in the basement and to ensure simultaneously adequate air change rate in the dwelling. (author)

  8. Performance of a demand controlled mechanical extract ventilation system for dwellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pollet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of ventilation is to guarantee a good indoor air quality, related to the energy consumed for heating and fan(s. Active or passive heat recovery systems seem to focus on the reduction of heating consumption at the expense of fan electricity consumption and maintenance. In this study, demandcontrolled mechanical extract ventilation systems of Renson (DCV1 and DCV2, based on natural supply in the habitable rooms and mechanical extraction in the wet rooms (or even the bedrooms, was analysed for one year by means of multi-zone Contam simulations on a reference detached house and compared with standard MEV and mechanical extract ventilation systems with heat recovery (MVHR. To this end, IAQ, total energy consumption, CO2 emissions and total cost of the systems are determined. The results show that DCV systems with increased supply air flow rates or direct mechanical extract from bedrooms can significantly improve IAQ, while reducing total energy consumption compared to MEV. Applying DCV reduces primary heating energy consumption and yearly fan electricity consumption at most by 65% to 50% compared to MEV. Total operational energy costs and CO2 emissions of DCV are similar when compared to MVHR. Total costs of DCV systems over 15 years are smaller when compared to MVHR due to lower investment and maintenance costs.

  9. Active or passive systems? The EPR approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhomme, N.; Py, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    In attempting to review how EPR is contemplated to meet requirements applicable to future nuclear power plants, the authors indicate where they see the markets and the corresponding unit sizes for the EPR which is a generic key factor for competitiveness. There are no reason in industrialized countries, other than USA (where the investment and amortizing practices under control by Public Utility Commission are quite particular), not to build future plants in the 1000 to 1500 MWe range. Standardization, which has been actively applied all along the French program and for the Konvoi plants, does not prevent evolution and allows to concentrate large engineering effort in smooth realization of plants and achieve actual construction and commissioning without significant delays. In order to contribute to public trust renewal, a next generation of power reactors should be fundamentally less likely to incur serious accidents. To reach this goal the best of passive and active systems must be considered without forgetting that the most important source of knowledge is construction and operating experience. Criteria to assess passive systems investigated for possible implementation in the EPR, such as simplicity of design, impact on plant operation, safety and cost, are discussed. Examples of the principal passive systems investigated are described and reasons why they have been dropped after screening through the criteria are given. (author). 11 figs

  10. Active or passive systems? The EPR approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonhomme, N [Nuclear Power International, Cedex (France); Py, J P [FRAMATOME, Cedex (France)

    1996-12-01

    In attempting to review how EPR is contemplated to meet requirements applicable to future nuclear power plants, the authors indicate where they see the markets and the corresponding unit sizes for the EPR which is a generic key factor for competitiveness. There are no reason in industrialized countries, other than USA (where the investment and amortizing practices under control by Public Utility Commission are quite particular), not to build future plants in the 1000 to 1500 MWe range. Standardization, which has been actively applied all along the French program and for the Konvoi plants, does not prevent evolution and allows to concentrate large engineering effort in smooth realization of plants and achieve actual construction and commissioning without significant delays. In order to contribute to public trust renewal, a next generation of power reactors should be fundamentally less likely to incur serious accidents. To reach this goal the best of passive and active systems must be considered without forgetting that the most important source of knowledge is construction and operating experience. Criteria to assess passive systems investigated for possible implementation in the EPR, such as simplicity of design, impact on plant operation, safety and cost, are discussed. Examples of the principal passive systems investigated are described and reasons why they have been dropped after screening through the criteria are given. (author). 11 figs.

  11. Correlation between central venous pressure and peripheral venous pressure with passive leg raise in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Ali, Shahna; Ray, Utpal; Varshney, Ankur; Doley, Kashmiri

    2015-11-01

    Central venous pressure (CVP) assesses the volume status of patients. However, this technique is not without complications. We, therefore, measured peripheral venous pressure (PVP) to see whether it can replace CVP. To evaluate the correlation and agreement between CVP and PVP after passive leg raise (PLR) in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation. Prospective observational study in Intensive Care Unit. Fifty critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation were included in the study. CVP and PVP measurements were taken using a water column manometer. Measurements were taken in the supine position and subsequently after a PLR of 45°. Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman's analysis. This study showed a fair correlation between CVP and PVP after a PLR of 45° (correlation coefficient, r = 0.479; P = 0.0004) when the CVP was correlation was good when the CVP was >10 cmH2O. Bland-Altman analysis showed 95% limits of agreement to be -2.912-9.472. PVP can replace CVP for guiding fluid therapy in critically ill patients.

  12. Renewable building energy systems and passive human comfort solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omer, Abdeen Mustafa [17 Juniper Court, Forest Road West, Nottingham NG7 4EU (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    With environmental protection posing as the number one global problem, man has no choice but to reduce his energy consumption. One way to accomplish this is to resort to passive and low-energy systems to maintain thermal comfort in buildings. The conventional and modern designs of wind towers can successfully be used in hot arid regions to maintain thermal comfort (with or without the use of ceiling fans) during all hours of the cooling season, or a fraction of it. Climatic design is one of the best approaches to reduce the energy cost in buildings. Proper design is the first step of defence against the stress of the climate. Buildings should be designed according to the climate of the site, reducing the need for mechanical heating or cooling. Hence maximum natural energy can be used for creating a pleasant environment inside the built envelope. Technology and industry progress in the last decade diffused electronic and informatics' devices in many human activities, and also in building construction. The utilisation and operating opportunities components, increase the reduction of heat losses by varying the thermal insulation, optimise the lighting distribution with louver screens and operate mechanical ventilation for coolness in indoor spaces. In addition to these parameters the intelligent envelope can act for security control and became an important part of the building domotic revolution. Application of simple passive cooling measure is effective in reducing the cooling load of buildings in hot and humid climates. Fourty-three percent reductions can be achieved using a combination of well-established technologies such as glazing, shading, insulation, and natural ventilation. More advanced passive cooling techniques such as roof pond, dynamic insulation, and evaporative water jacket need to be considered more closely. The building sector is a major consumer of both energy and materials worldwide, and that consumption is increasing. Most industrialised

  13. Evaluation of a computerized system for mechanical ventilation of infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Fleur T; Abbasi, Soraya

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate a computerized system for mechanical ventilation of infants. FLEX is a computerized system that includes the features of a patented mode known as adaptive-support ventilation (ASV). In addition, it has many other features including adjustment of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), fraction of inspired oxygen (F(IO2)), minute ventilation, and control of weaning. It is used as an open-loop decision support system or as a closed-loop technique. Blood gas and ventilation data were collected from 12 infants in the neonatal intensive care at baseline and at the next round of evaluation. This data were input to open-loop version of FLEX. The system recommendations were compared to clinical determinations. FLEX recommended values for ventilation were on the average within 25% and 16.5% of the measured values at baseline and at the next round of evaluation, respectively. For F(IO2) and PEEP, FLEX recommended values were in general agreement with the clinical settings. FLEX recommendations for weaning were the same as the clinical determinations 50% of the time at baseline and 55% of the time at the next round of evaluation. FLEX did not recommend weaning for infants with weak spontaneous breathing effort or those who showed signs of dyspnea. A computerized system for mechanical ventilation is evaluated for treatment of infants. The results of the study show that the system has good potential for use in neonatal ventilatory care. Further refinements can be made in the system for very low-birth-weight infants.

  14. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation

  15. Passive sensor systems for nuclear material monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, M.L.; Boatner, L.A.; Holcomb, D.E.; McElhaney, S.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Muhs, J.D.; Roberts, M.R.; Hill, N.W.

    1993-01-01

    Passive fiber optic sensor systems capable of confirming the presence of special nuclear materials in storage or process facilities are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These sensors provide completely passive, remote measurement capability. No power supplies, amplifiers, or other active components that could degrade system reliability are required at the sensor location. ORNL, through its research programs in scintillator materials, has developed a variety of materials for use in alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and neutron-sensitive scintillator detectors. In addition to sensors for measuring radiation flux, new sensor materials have been developed which are capable of measuring weight, temperature, and source location. An example of a passive sensor for temperature measurement is the combination of a thermophosphor (e.g., rare-earth activated Y 2 O 3 ) with 6 LiF (95% 6 Li). This combination results in a new class of scintillators for thermal neutrons that absorb energy from the radiation particles and remit the energy as a light pulse, the decay rate of which, over a specified temperature range, is temperature dependent. Other passive sensors being developed include pressure-sensitive triboluminescent materials, weight-sensitive silicone rubber fibers, scintillating fibers, and other materials for gamma and neutron detection. The light from the scintillator materials of each sensor would be sent through optical fibers to a monitoring station, where the attribute quantity could be measured and compared with previously recorded emission levels. Confirmatory measurement applications of these technologies are being evaluated to reduce the effort, costs, and employee exposures associated with inventorying stockpiles of highly enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

  16. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  17. Control and prevention of ice formation and accretion on heat exchangers for ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral; Afshari, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    In cold climates, the application of mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery like are airto-air exchangers is used for reducing energy consumption for heating buildings by transferring heat exhausted air to supply air. However, increase efficiency of heat exchanger results in lower...... exhaust air temperatures and Ice formation on heat exchanger fins, which can cause problem and is not favourable. Therefore, prevention and control of ice formation on heat exchangers is necessary. The existing methods are divided into two different methods: active and passive ice control methods....... The active methods are e.g. bypass, recirculation, preheating. The passive methods relate to the surface characteristics of the heat exchanger fins as they have effect on ice formation in initial phase. All these methods have varying levels of success, cost, and effectiveness, which are depending on the heat...

  18. Evaluation of the nucledyne passive containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This reports contains: (1) an evaluation by Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) of the NucleDyne passive Containment System (PCS) as that conceptual design is applied to a Westinghouse, two loop, Pressurized Water Reactor; (2) an evaluation by Westinghouse of two questions about the impact of the PCS on the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS), which were posed by G/C and best answered by an NSSS vendor; and (3) replies to both the Gilbert/Commonwealth report and the Westinghoue report by NucleDyne Engineering Corporation

  19. Radioactive waste tank ventilation system incorporating tritium control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.D. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a ventilation system for radioactive waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The unique design of the system is aimed at cost-effective control of tritiated water vapor. The system includes recirculation ventilation and cooling for each tank in the facility and a central exhaust air clean-up train that includes a low-temperature vapor condenser and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME). A one-seventh scale pilot plant was built and tested to verify predicted performance of the low-temperature tritium removal system. Tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the removal of condensable vapor and soluble and insoluble aerosols and to estimate the operating life of the mist eliminator. Definitive design of the ventilation system relied heavily on the test data. The unique design features of the ventilation system will result in far less release of tritium to the atmosphere than from conventional high-volume dilution systems and will greatly reduce operating costs. NESHAPs and TAPs NOC applications have been approved, and field construction is nearly complete. Start-up is scheduled for late 1996. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Reliability of thermal-hydraulic passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Araneo, D.; Pierro, F.; Galassi, G.

    2014-01-01

    The scholar will be informed of reliability concepts applied to passive system adopted for nuclear reactors. Namely, for classical components and systems the failure concept is associated with malfunction of breaking of hardware. In the case of passive systems the failure is associated with phenomena. A method for studying the reliability of passive systems is discussed and is applied. The paper deals with the description of the REPAS (Reliability Evaluation of Passive Safety System) methodology developed by University of Pisa (UNIPI) and with results from its application. The general objective of the REPAS methodology is to characterize the performance of a passive system in order to increase the confidence toward its operation and to compare the performances of active and passive systems and the performances of different passive systems

  1. 46 CFR 105.25-7 - Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system... Requirements-When Cargo Tanks Are Installed Below Decks § 105.25-7 Ventilation systems for cargo tank or pumping system compartment. (a) Each compartment shall be provided with a mechanical exhaust system...

  2. Modelling of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building,...

  3. [Air quality control systems: heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci Sessa, R; Riccio, G

    2004-01-01

    After a brief illustration of the principal layout schemes of Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), the first part of this paper summarizes the standards, both voluntary and compulsory, regulating HVAC facilities design and installation with regard to the question of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). The paper then examines the problem of ventilation systems maintenance and the essential hygienistic requirements in whose absence HVAC facilities may become a risk factor for people working or living in the building. Lastly, the paper deals with HVAC design strategies and methods, which aim not only to satisfy comfort and air quality requirements, but also to ensure easy and effective maintenance procedures.

  4. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J

    2000-01-01

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies, and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability.

  5. Operational test report integrated system test (ventilation upgrade)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARTY, W.M.

    1999-10-05

    Operational Final Test Report for Integrated Systems, Project W-030 (Phase 2 test, RECIRC and HIGH-HEAT Modes). Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks, including upgraded vapor space cooling and filtered venting of tanks AY101, Ay102, AZ101, AZ102.

  6. Operational test report, integrated system test (ventilation upgrade)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HARTY, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Operational Final Test Report for Integrated Systems, Project W-030 (Phase 2 test, RECIRC and HIGH-HEAT Modes). Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks, including upgraded vapor space cooling and filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM - BROWN & ROOT ENVIRONMENTAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS*) is an in-situ vacuum extraction/air sparging and bioremediation technology for the treatment of subsurface organic contamination in soil and groundwater. The technology, developed by Billings and Associates, Inc., and o...

  8. Interaction of Air Flow in Complex Ventilation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhorzh G. Levitskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of interaction of air flow in complex ventilation systems. The study used Taylor and Maclaurin’s series and Lagrange formula to create the functional connections on estimation of the impact of changing aerodynamic parameters of one or several simultaneously working regulators on the air flow distribution in mines

  9. Active house concept versus passive House

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Vehler, R.; Verhoeven, M.; Fremouw, M.

    2009-01-01

    The passive house concept is the present trend in energy efficient sustainable dwellings. Within the passive house concept every effort is made to minimize the energy use. Substantial savings can be achieved by passive energy systems, especially natural ventilation, summer shading and winter solar

  10. Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems, Part of Indoor Air Quality Design Tools for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main purposes of a Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning system are to help maintain good indoor air quality through adequate ventilation with filtration and provide thermal comfort. HVAC systems are among the largest energy consumers in schools.

  11. Note on protection offered by ventilation systems in the event of a nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, J.R.; McGrath, P.E.

    1976-05-01

    A brief review of the protection offered by natural and forced ventilation systems in buildings to an atmospheric release of radioactive material is given. The protection to be gained by using the internal ventilation system is estimated

  12. Thermodynamical double-flux ventilation system in individual house; Systeme de ventilation double flux thermodynamique en maison individuelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This guidebook written by the French scientific and technical committee of the space heating, ventilation and air-conditioning industry (Costic) with the collaboration of the French association of coldness production engineering (AFF) and Electricite de France (EdF), presents the technical rules and practical advices for the installation of thermodynamical double-flux ventilation systems in residential houses. Content: heat pumps (standardization and regulation, choice and dimensioning of the auxiliary electrical supply, installation, acoustic precautions), aeraulic networks (standardization and regulation, choice and dimensioning, installation), thermal insulation, thermoregulation, control and start-up, maintenance. (J.S.)

  13. Possible scenarios for a safety upgrade of the ventilation system

    CERN Document Server

    Inigo-Golfin, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper/presentation describes the existing LHC ventilation (HVAC) system, the design principle followed for the LEP Project and the modifications implemented for the LHC Project. A discussion on possible referential standards to compare the existing system with is presented and possible axes for its improvement, based on these referentials, are discussed. Finally, some recommendations are given based on the system's present capabilities and the estimated investment necessary to achieve compliance to the referentials chosen.

  14. Ventilation in low energy housing retrofits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlecnik, E.

    2008-01-01

    According to the definition, passive houses in Europe meet a target energy demand for heating of less than 15 kWh per square meter and per year. This low level for the heating demand is based on heating by a small post-heater in the hygienic ventilation system at 52 °C maximum, while the ventilation

  15. The Importance of Individual Ventilation Cottage (IVC) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anee Suryani Sued; Fazliana Mohd Saaya; Mohd Ramli Ibrahim; Shafii Khamis

    2015-01-01

    Experimental animals such as rats and mice are used in scientific research, especially in research related to drugs, must be able to give the right decisions and authentic. The results are not accurate and authentic will harm humans, especially in pre-clinical studies of drugs (drug) trial. Therefore, the system of individual ventilated cages (IVC) has been developed in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency to ensure that animal experiments are always at the level of quality, healthy and disease free. IVC system was developed to replace conventional animal cage systems that have been used previously. The use of IVC systems in breed and maintain rats and mice to obtain disease-free animal, the animal known as SPF (Specific pathogen free animals). For this purpose, the IVC system using 'bedding' typical food and animal pests that have been purified to ensure that it meets the intended use of the system perfectly. In addition, system privileges are through the ventilation system that can isolate the one-way air enters and exits for each cage, and equipped with a HEPA filter (High -Efficiency-Particulate Air) filter which can prevent contamination of microorganisms for ventilation in the cage and the air in the vicinity , Through the use of IVC system, the quality and health of experimental animals that are bred and used in the Medical Technology Division can be improved and so can guarantee the accuracy and validity of the results of research conducted. (author)

  16. THE USE OF PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS AS PART OF THE PASSIVE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryzgalin Vladislav Viktorovich

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject: systems of passive solar heating, which can, without the use of engineering equipment, capture and accumulate the solar heat used for heating buildings. Research objectives: study of the possibility to reach the passive house standard (buildings with near zero energy consumption for heating in climatic conditions of Russia using the systems of passive solar heating in combination with other solutions for reduction of energy costs of building developed in the past. Materials and methods: search and analysis of literature, containing descriptions of various passive solar heating systems, examples of their use in different climatic conditions and the resulting effect obtained from their use; analysis of thermophysical processes occurring in these systems. Results: we revealed the potential of using the solar heating systems in the climatic conditions of parts of the territories of the Russian Federation, identified the possibility of cheaper construction by the passive house standard with the use of these systems. Conclusions: more detailed analysis of thermophysical and other processes that take place in passive solar heating systems is required for creation of their computational models, which will allow us to more accurately predict their effectiveness and seek the most cost-effective design solutions, and include them in the list of means for achieving the passive house standard.

  17. Preliminary investigation on reliability assessment of passive safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Changfan; Kuang Bo

    2012-01-01

    The reliability evaluation of passive safety system plays an important part in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of nuclear power plant applying passive safety design, which depends quantitatively on reliabilities of passive safety system. According to the object of reliability assessment of passive safety system, relevant parameters are identified. Then passive system behavior during accident scenarios are studied. A practical example of this method is given for the case of reliability assessment of AP1000 passive heat removal system in loss of normal feedwater accident. Key and design parameters of PRHRS are identified and functional failure criteria are established. Parameter combinations acquired by Latin hyper~ cube sampling (LHS) in possible parametric ranges are input and calculations of uncertainty propagation through RELAP5/MOD3 code are carried out. Based on the calculations, sensitivity assessment on PRHRS functional criteria and reliability evaluation of the system are presented, which might provide further PSA with PRHR system reliability. (authors)

  18. Method to assess the performance of domestic ventilation systems considering the influence of uncertainties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The ventilation system plays an important role in the indoor environment of a domestic building. A ventilation system is normally designed based on the national or regional regulations. Although ventilation systems are designed based on the same design rules, performance deviations between different

  19. Exhaust, Dust Collection and Ventilation Systems. Module SH-44. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on exhaust, dust collection, and ventilation systems is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module discusses the types of contaminants that can be controlled by ventilation, the types of ventilation systems, and the component parts of local exhaust systems. Following the introduction, 10 objectives…

  20. Bilevel vs ICU ventilators providing noninvasive ventilation: effect of system leaks: a COPD lung model comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana C; Chipman, Daniel W; Hill, Nicholas S; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2009-08-01

    Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) modes are currently available on bilevel and ICU ventilators. However, little data comparing the performance of the NPPV modes on these ventilators are available. In an experimental bench study, the ability of nine ICU ventilators to function in the presence of leaks was compared with a bilevel ventilator using the IngMar ASL5000 lung simulator (IngMar Medical; Pittsburgh, PA) set at a compliance of 60 mL/cm H(2)O, an inspiratory resistance of 10 cm H(2)O/L/s, an expiratory resistance of 20 cm H(2)O/ L/s, and a respiratory rate of 15 breaths/min. All of the ventilators were set at 12 cm H(2)O pressure support and 5 cm H(2)O positive end-expiratory pressure. The data were collected at baseline and at three customized leaks. At baseline, all of the ventilators were able to deliver adequate tidal volumes, to maintain airway pressure, and to synchronize with the simulator, without missed efforts or auto-triggering. As the leak was increased, all of the ventilators (except the Vision [Respironics; Murrysville, PA] and Servo I [Maquet; Solna, Sweden]) needed adjustment of sensitivity or cycling criteria to maintain adequate ventilation, and some transitioned to backup ventilation. Significant differences in triggering and cycling were observed between the Servo I and the Vision ventilators. The Vision and Servo I were the only ventilators that required no adjustments as they adapted to increasing leaks. There were differences in performance between these two ventilators, although the clinical significance of these differences is unclear. Clinicians should be aware that in the presence of leaks, most ICU ventilators require adjustments to maintain an adequate tidal volume.

  1. VWPS: A Ventilator Weaning Prediction System with Artificial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Austin H.; Chen, Guan-Ting

    How to wean patients efficiently off mechanical ventilation continues to be a challenge for medical professionals. In this paper we have described a novel approach to the study of a ventilator weaning prediction system (VWPS). Firstly, we have developed and written three Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms to predict a weaning successful rate based on the clinical data. Secondly, we have implemented two user-friendly weaning success rate prediction systems; the VWPS system and the BWAP system. Both systems could be used to help doctors objectively and effectively predict whether weaning is appropriate for patients based on the patients' clinical data. Our system utilizes the powerful processing abilities of MatLab. Thirdly, we have calculated the performance through measures such as sensitivity and accuracy for these three algorithms. The results show a very high sensitivity (around 80%) and accuracy (around 70%). To our knowledge, this is the first design approach of its kind to be used in the study of ventilator weaning success rate prediction.

  2. Ventilation-air conditioner system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Sugisaki, Toshihiko.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a ventilation-air conditioner system which enables, upon occurrence of accidents in a nuclear power plant, continuous operation for other adjacent nuclear power plants with no effect of accidents. Air supply system and exhaust system are operated during usual operaiton. If loss of coolants accidents should occur in an adjacent nuclear power plants, operation is switched from ventilation operaiton to the operation of re-cycling system based on an AND logic of three signals, that is, a pressure HIGH signal for the reactor container, a water level LOW signal for the reactor and a radioactivity signal of the ventilation-air conditioner sytem on the side of air supply in the nuclear power plant. Thus, nuclear reactor buildings of the nuclear power plant are from the external atmosphere. Therefore, the radioactivity HIGH signal for switching to the emergency air conditioner system of the nuclear power plant is not actuated due to the loss of coolant accidents in the adjacent nuclear power plant. In addition, since the atmospheric temperature in the nuclear reactor building can be maintained by a cooling device disposed to the recycling system, reactor shutdown can be prevented. (I.S.)

  3. Exposure of ventilation system cleaning workers to harmful microbiological agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołofit-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Ławniczek-Wałczyk, Anna; Górny, Rafał L

    2013-01-01

    Regular inspection of the cleanliness of the ventilation systems, as well as their periodic cleaning and disinfection, if necessary, are the main factors of the proper maintenance of each system. Performing maintenance operations on the ventilation system, workers are exposed to risk associated with the exposure to harmful biological agents. The aim of this study was to assess the employees' exposure to bioaerosols during maintenance work on ventilation systems. Bioaerosol measurements were carried out using a button sampler. The microbial particles were collected on gelatin filters. Settled-dust samples from the inner surface of the air ducts and filter-mat samples were selected for the microbiological analysis. In the collected air, dust and filter samples the concentration of bacteria and fungi were determined. Bacteria and fungi concentrations ranged between 3.6 x 10(2)-2.2 x 10(4) CFU/m3 and 4.7 x 10(2)-4.5 x 10(3) CFU/m3 at workplaces where the operations connected with mechanical ventilation cleaning were performed and 2.2 x 10(4)-1.2 x 10(5) CFU/m2 and 9.8 x 10(1)-2.5 x 10(2) CFU/m3 at workplaces where filter exchange was performed, respectively. The qualitative analysis of microorganisms isolated from the air in all studied workplaces revealed that the most prevalent bacteria belonged to Bacillus genus. The average concentrations of bacteria and fungi in filter-mat samples were 3.3 x 10(3) CFU/cm2 and 1.4 x 10(4) CFU/cm2, respectively. In settled-dust samples, average concentrations were 591 CFU/100 cm2 and 52 CFU/100 cm2, for bacteria and fungi respectively. Workers cleaning ventilation systems are exposed to harmful biological agents classified into risk groups, 1 and 2, according to their level of the risk of infection. The research conducted in the workplace can be the basis of risk assessment related to exposure to harmful biological agents during maintenance work in ventilation.

  4. Investigation of induced recirculation during planned ventilation system maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C.J.; Scott, D.F.; Noll, J.D.; Voss, B.; Leonis, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) investigated ways to increase mine airflow to underground metal/nonmetal (M/NM) mine working areas to improve miners’ health and safety. One of those areas is controlled recirculation. Because the quantity of mine air often cannot be increased, reusing part of the ventilating air can be an effective alternative, if implemented properly, until the capacity of the present system is improved. The additional airflow can be used to provide effective dilution of contaminants and higher flow velocities in the underground mine environment. Most applications of controlled recirculation involve taking a portion of the return air and passing it back into the intake to increase the air volume delivered to the desired work areas. OMSHR investigated a Nevada gold mine where shaft rehabilitation was in progress and one of the two main fans was shut down to allow reduced air velocity for safe shaft work. Underground booster fan operating pressures were kept constant to maintain airflow to work areas, inducing controlled recirculation in one work zone. Investigation into system behavior and the effects of recirculation on the working area during times of reduced primary ventilation system airflow would provide additional information on implementation of controlled recirculation into the system and how these events affect M/NM ventilation systems. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health monitored the ventilation district when both main fans were operating and another scenario with one of the units turned off for maintenance. Airflow and contaminants were measured to determine the exposure effects of induced recirculation on miner health. Surveys showed that 19% controlled recirculation created no change in the overall district airflow distribution and a small reduction in district fresh air intake. Total dust levels increased only modestly and respirable dust levels were also low. Diesel particulate matter

  5. Sampled Data Systems Passivity and Discrete Port-Hamiltonian Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Secchi, Cristian; Schaft, Arjan J. van der; Fantuzzi, Cesare

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel way to approach the interconnection of a continuous and a discrete time physical system. This is done in a way which preserves passivity of the coupled system independently of the sampling time T. This strategy can be used both in the field of telemanipulation, for

  6. 30 CFR 75.324 - Intentional changes in the ventilation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intentional changes in the ventilation system... COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.324 Intentional changes in the ventilation system. (a) A person designated by the operator shall supervise any...

  7. Comprehensive evaluation on rationality of ventilation system in uranium underground mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qinglin

    1991-01-01

    A new method is presented for evaluating rationality of uranium mine ventilation system using fuzzy mathematics. The mathematical models for fuzzy comprehensive evaluation are introduced. Based on practice of uranium mine ventilation, the evaluation factors and the evaluation procedure are given. Using the presented method, a comprehensive evaluation was carried out for ventilation systems before and after regulation in Fuzhou Uranium Mine

  8. Some important issues in evaluating the availability of passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafka, P.; Kelemen, I.; Krzykacz, B.

    1993-01-01

    In some countries new reactor concepts based on a broader use of passive safety features are under development. The term 'passive' as used here refers to systems which rely heavily on natural heat transfer process such as natural circulation to perform their function rather than on decidedly 'active' components like pumps. The paper deals with important issues in evaluating the availability of passive systems, e.g. the assessment of the active components, the assessment of passive components and structures and the probabilistic assessment of the physical function of the natural processes. Based on an outlined assessment process for the entire system and on an exercised simulation process for the assessment of passive components e.g. pipes insights and important issues are presented. A follow-up study will refine and expand the concept to a full scope assessment procedure of passive systems. (author)

  9. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Pool fires in a large scale ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Leslie, I.H.; Gregory, W.S.; White, B.

    1991-01-01

    A series of pool fire experiments was carried out in the Large Scale Flow Facility of the Mechanical Engineering Department at New Mexico State University. The various experiments burned alcohol, hydraulic cutting oil, kerosene, and a mixture of kerosene and tributylphosphate. Gas temperature and wall temperature measurements as a function of time were made throughout the 23.3m 3 burn compartment and the ducts of the ventilation system. The mass of the smoke particulate deposited upon the ventilation system 0.61m x 0.61m high efficiency particulate air filter for the hydraulic oil, kerosene, and kerosene-tributylphosphate mixture fires was measured using an in situ null balance. Significant increases in filter resistance were observed for all three fuels for burning time periods ranging from 10 to 30 minutes. This was found to be highly dependent upon initial ventilation system flow rate, fuel type, and flow configuration. The experimental results were compared to simulated results predicted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory FIRAC computer code. In general, the experimental and the computer results were in reasonable agreement, despite the fact that the fire compartment for the experiments was an insulated steel tank with 0.32 cm walls, while the compartment model FIRIN of FIRAC assumes 0.31 m thick concrete walls. This difference in configuration apparently caused FIRAC to consistently underpredict the measured temperatures in the fire compartment. The predicted deposition of soot proved to be insensitive to ventilation system flow rate, but the measured values showed flow rate dependence. However, predicted soot deposition was of the same order of magnitude as measured soot deposition

  11. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  12. Performance of the PBX-M passive plate stabilization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.

    1994-02-01

    The PBX-M passive plate stabilization system provides significant stabilization of long-wavelength external kink modes, the slowing of vertical instability growth rates, and the amelioration of disruption characteristics. The passive plate stabilization system has allowed the use of LHCD and IBW to induce current density and pressure profile modifications, and m = 1 divertor biasing for modifying edge plasma transport. Improvements in the passive plate system insulators and support structures have provided reliable operation. Impurity influxes with the close-fitting passive plates are low. Solid target boronization is applied routinely to reduce conditioning time and maintain clean conditions

  13. Stochastic Prediction of Ventilation System Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haghighat, F.; Brohus, Henrik; Frier, Christian

    The paper briefly reviews the existing techniques for predicting the airflow rate due to the random nature of forcing functions, e.g. wind speed. The effort is to establish the relationship between the statistics of the output of a system and the statistics of the random input variables and param......The paper briefly reviews the existing techniques for predicting the airflow rate due to the random nature of forcing functions, e.g. wind speed. The effort is to establish the relationship between the statistics of the output of a system and the statistics of the random input variables...

  14. Thermal-hydraulic unreliability of passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Saltos, N.T.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced light water reactor designs like AP600 and the simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) use passive safety systems for accident prevention and mitigation. Because these systems rely on natural forces for their operation, their unavailability due to hardware failures and human error is significantly smaller than that of active systems. However, the coolant flows predicted to be delivered by these systems can be subject to significant uncertainties, which in turn can lead to a significant uncertainty in the predicted thermal-hydraulic performance of the plant under accident conditions. Because of these uncertainties, there is a probability that an accident sequence for which a best estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis predicts no core damage (success sequence) may actually lead to core damage. For brevity, this probability will be called thermal-hydraulic unreliability. The assessment of this unreliability for all the success sequences requires very expensive computations. Moreover, the computational cost increases drastically as the required thermal-hydraulic reliability increases. The required computational effort can be greatly reduced if a bounding approach can be used that either eliminates the need to compute thermal-hydraulic unreliabilities, or it leads to the analysis of a few bounding sequences for which the required thermal-hydraulic reliability is relatively small. The objective of this paper is to present such an approach and determine the order of magnitude of the thermal-hydraulic unreliabilities that may have to be computed

  15. Design of integrated passive safety system (IPSS) for ultimate passive safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Kim, Sang Ho; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We newly propose the design concept of integrated passive safety system (IPSS). • It has five safety functions for decay heat removal and severe accident mitigation. • Simulations for IPSS show that core melt does not occur in accidents with SBO. • IPSS can achieve the passive in-vessel retention and ex-vessel cooling strategy. • The applicability of IPSS is high due to the installation outside the containment. -- Abstract: The design concept of integrated passive safety system (IPSS) which can perform various passive safety functions is proposed in this paper. It has the various functions of passive decay heat removal system, passive safety injection system, passive containment cooling system, passive in-vessel retention and cavity flooding system, and filtered venting system with containment pressure control. The objectives of this paper are to propose the conceptual design of an IPSS and to estimate the design characters of the IPSS with accident simulations using MARS code. Some functions of the IPSS are newly proposed and the other functions are reviewed with the integration of the functions. Consequently, all of the functions are modified and integrated for simplicity of the design in preparation for beyond design based accidents (BDBAs) focused on a station black out (SBO). The simulation results with the IPSS show that the decay heat can be sufficiently removed in accidents that occur with a SBO. Also, the molten core can be retained in a vessel via the passive in-vessel retention strategy of the IPSS. The actual application potential of the IPSS is high, as numerous strong design characters are evaluated. The installation of the IPSS into the original design of a nuclear power plant requires minimal design change using the current penetrations of the containment. The functions are integrated in one or two large tanks outside the containment. Furthermore, the operation time of the IPSS can be increased by refilling coolant from the

  16. Energetic optimization of the ventilation system in modern ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez, José Antonio; Orosa, José Antonio; Costa, Ángel Martín

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New solutions to optimize the ventilation system in modern ships are proposed. • Very important energy savings have been achieved. • Extreme indoor conditions in the engine room are modelled and analysed. • Critical places and hazardous tasks have been identified and analysed. • Important problems in the daily task schedule have been detected and corrected. - Abstract: The indoor ambience on board modern ships constitutes a perfect example of severe industrial environment, where personnel are exposed to extreme working conditions, especially in the engine room. To mitigate this problem, the classical solution is the use of powerful mechanical ventilation systems, with high energy consumption, which, in the case of the engine room, represents between 3.5% and 5.5% of the overall power installed. Consequently, its energetic optimization is critical, being an interesting example of not well solved thermal engineering problem, where work risk criteria also must be considered, as the engine room is the hottest and, therefore, one of the most hazardous places on the ship. Based on a complete 3D CFD analysis of the thermal conditions in the engine room and the requirements and duties of the crew derived from their daily work schedule, the optimal ventilation requirements and the maximum tolerable working time have been established, achieving very important energy savings, without any reduction in crew productivity or safety.

  17. Analysis of radon reduction and ventilation systems in uranium mines in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng-hua; Li, Xian-jie

    2012-09-01

    Mine ventilation is the most important way of reducing radon in uranium mines. At present, the radon and radon progeny levels in Chinese uranium mines where the cut and fill stoping method is used are 3-5 times higher than those in foreign uranium mines, as there is not much difference in the investments for ventilation protection between Chinese uranium mines and international advanced uranium mines with compaction methodology. In this paper, through the analysis of radon reduction and ventilation systems in Chinese uranium mines and the comparison of advantages and disadvantages between a variety of ventilation systems in terms of radon control, the authors try to illustrate the reasons for the higher radon and radon progeny levels in Chinese uranium mines and put forward some problems in three areas, namely the theory of radon control and ventilation systems, radon reduction ventilation measures and ventilation management. For these problems, this paper puts forward some proposals regarding some aspects, such as strengthening scrutiny, verifying and monitoring the practical situation, making clear ventilation plans, strictly following the mining sequence, promoting training of ventilation staff, enhancing ventilation system management, developing radon reduction ventilation technology, purchasing ventilation equipment as soon as possible in the future, and so on.

  18. Analysis of radon reduction and ventilation systems in uranium mines in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Penghua; Li Xianjie

    2012-01-01

    Mine ventilation is the most important way of reducing radon in uranium mines. At present, the radon and radon progeny levels in Chinese uranium mines where the cut and fill stoping method is used are 3–5 times higher than those in foreign uranium mines, as there is not much difference in the investments for ventilation protection between Chinese uranium mines and international advanced uranium mines with compaction methodology. In this paper, through the analysis of radon reduction and ventilation systems in Chinese uranium mines and the comparison of advantages and disadvantages between a variety of ventilation systems in terms of radon control, the authors try to illustrate the reasons for the higher radon and radon progeny levels in Chinese uranium mines and put forward some problems in three areas, namely the theory of radon control and ventilation systems, radon reduction ventilation measures and ventilation management. For these problems, this paper puts forward some proposals regarding some aspects, such as strengthening scrutiny, verifying and monitoring the practical situation, making clear ventilation plans, strictly following the mining sequence, promoting training of ventilation staff, enhancing ventilation system management, developing radon reduction ventilation technology, purchasing ventilation equipment as soon as possible in the future, and so on.

  19. Improving the effectiveness of boiler units with coal dust systems equipped with mill-ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsukov, V. K.

    2007-09-01

    Problems pertinent to controlling the load of steam boilers and coal dust systems equipped with mill-ventilators are analyzed. A comprehensive set of patented technical solutions for these problems is presented. A formula for determining the ventilation output of mill-ventilators as a function of the fuel charge is proposed.

  20. A new positive pressure ventilation delivery system: its impact on lung ventilation studies that are technically inadequate or non diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, C.; Leiper, C.; Lee, K.; Saunders, C.; Dixson, H.; Elison, B.; Bennett, G.; Gibian, T.; Rutland, J.; Tse, V.; Elzein, H.; Babicheva, R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an improved Positive Pressure Ventilation Delivery System (PVDS) in the investigation of Pulmonary Embolism (PE). The major component of PVDS is a commercially available, self-inflating 1.6L Hudson Resuscitator Bag, filled with either oxygen or air (if the patient has CO 2 retention), which is squeezed by the operator to push Technegas from the Technegas Generator Chamber to the patient via the Patient Administration Set synchronously with patient inspiration. 27 spontaneously breathing in-patients (12 males, 15 females, age range 64-89, 21 with chronic airflow limitation), whose conventional lung ventilation images were technically inadequate or non diagnostic, were re-scanned using PVDS within four days after the conventional ventilation study. Randomised blinded visual interpretation of conventional ventilation/perfusion scan vs. PVDS-assisted ventilation/perfusion scan was performed by consensus reading with two experienced observers. In conclusion PVDS was safe and well tolerated. PVDS improved the image quality of the lung ventilation scans in this cohort of patients. This technique has the potential to improve the accuracy of lung scanning in patients with severe lung disease. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  1. Ventilation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaret, Eimund

    Calculation procedures, used in the design of ventilating systems, which are especially suited for displacement ventilation in addition to linking it to mixing ventilation, are addressed. The two zone flow model is considered and the steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Different methods of supplying air are discussed, and different types of air flow are considered: piston flow, plane flow and radial flow. An evaluation model for ventilation systems is presented.

  2. SBO simulations for Integrated Passive Safety System (IPSS) using MARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Ho; Jeong, Sung Yeop; Chang, Soon Heung

    2012-01-01

    The current nuclear power plants have lots of active safety systems with some passive safety systems. The safety of current and future nuclear power plants can be enhanced by the application of additional passive safety systems for the ultimate safety. It is helpful to install the passive safety systems on current nuclear power plants without the design change for the licensibility. For solving the problem about the system complexity shown in the Fukushima accidents, the current nuclear power plants are needed to be enhanced by an additional integrated and simplified system. As a previous research, the integrated passive safety system (IPSS) was proposed to solve the safety issues related with the decay heat removal, containment integrity and radiation release. It could be operated by natural phenomena like gravity, natural circulation and pressure difference without AC power. The five main functions of IPSS are: (a) Passive decay heat removal, (b) Passive emergency core cooling, (c) Passive containment cooling, (d) Passive in vessel retention and ex-vessel cooling, and (e) Filtered venting and pressure control. The purpose of this research is to analyze the performances of each function by using MARS code. The simulated accident scenarios were station black out (SBO) and the additional accidents accompanied by SBO

  3. Results of a Demonstration Assessment of Passive System Reliability Utilizing the Reliability Method for Passive Systems (RMPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia; Grelle, Austin

    2015-04-26

    Advanced small modular reactor designs include many advantageous design features such as passively driven safety systems that are arguably more reliable and cost effective relative to conventional active systems. Despite their attractiveness, a reliability assessment of passive systems can be difficult using conventional reliability methods due to the nature of passive systems. Simple deviations in boundary conditions can induce functional failures in a passive system, and intermediate or unexpected operating modes can also occur. As part of an ongoing project, Argonne National Laboratory is investigating various methodologies to address passive system reliability. The Reliability Method for Passive Systems (RMPS), a systematic approach for examining reliability, is one technique chosen for this analysis. This methodology is combined with the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to assess the reliability of a passive system and the impact of its associated uncertainties. For this demonstration problem, an integrated plant model of an advanced small modular pool-type sodium fast reactor with a passive reactor cavity cooling system is subjected to a station blackout using RELAP5-3D. This paper discusses important aspects of the reliability assessment, including deployment of the methodology, the uncertainty identification and quantification process, and identification of key risk metrics.

  4. Investigation of the Indoor Environment in a Passive House Apartment Building Heated by Ventilation Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysholt Hansen, MathiasYoung Bok; Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2014-01-01

    comfort and the performance of the air heating system and solar shading. Thermal comfort category B according to ISO 7730 was obtained in the building during field measurements, indicating that the air heating system was able to maintain comfort conditions in winter, when the outdoor temperature had been...... building project finished medio 2012. The design challenge was met with a concept of air heating that is individually controlled in every room. It also applies external solar shading. This study used indoor climate measurements and dynamic simulations in one of these apartment buildings to evaluate thermal...... unusual low for a longer period. The dynamic simulations also indicated that air heating during winter can provide a comfortable thermal environment. Dynamic simulations also demonstrated that during summer, apartments with automatic external solar screens had no serious overheating, whereas in apartments...

  5. Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

  6. Incremental passivity and output regulation for switched nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hongbo; Zhao, Jun

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies incremental passivity and global output regulation for switched nonlinear systems, whose subsystems are not required to be incrementally passive. A concept of incremental passivity for switched systems is put forward. First, a switched system is rendered incrementally passive by the design of a state-dependent switching law. Second, the feedback incremental passification is achieved by the design of a state-dependent switching law and a set of state feedback controllers. Finally, we show that once the incremental passivity for switched nonlinear systems is assured, the output regulation problem is solved by the design of global nonlinear regulator controllers comprising two components: the steady-state control and the linear output feedback stabilising controllers, even though the problem for none of subsystems is solvable. Two examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. An approach for assessing ALWR passive safety system reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hake, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Many advanced light water reactor designs incorporate passive rather than active safety features for front-line accident response. A method for evaluating the reliability of these passive systems in the context of probabilistic risk assessment has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This method addresses both the component (e.g. valve) failure aspect of passive system failure, and uncertainties in system success criteria arising from uncertainties in the system's underlying physical processes. These processes provide the system's driving force; examples are natural circulation and gravity-induced injection. This paper describes the method, and provides some preliminary results of application of the approach to the Westinghouse AP600 design

  8. Ventilation System Type and the Resulting Classroom Temperature and Air Quality During Heating Season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Jie; Wargocki, Pawel; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated how different ventilation system types influence classroom temperature and air quality. Five classrooms were selected in the same school. They were ventilated by manually operable windows, manually operable windows with exhaust fan, automatically operable windows...... with and without exhaust fan and by mechanical ventilation system. Temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and opening of windows were continuously monitored for one month during heating season in 2012. Classroom with manually operable windows had the highest carbon dioxide concentration...... levels so that the estimated ventilation rate was the lowest compared with the classrooms ventilated with other systems. Temperatures were slightly lower in classroom ventilated by manually operable windows with exhaust fan. Windows were opened seldom even in the classroom ventilated by manually operable...

  9. Balancing passive and active systems for evolutionary water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fil, N.S.; Allen, P.J.; Kirmse, R.E.; Kurihara, M.; Oh, S.J.; Sinha, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced concepts of the water-cooled reactors are intended to improve safety, economics and public perception of nuclear power. The potential inclusion of new passive means in addition or instead of traditional active systems is being considered by nuclear plant designers to reach these goals. With respect to plant safety, application of the passive means is mainly intended to simplify the safety systems and to improve their reliability, to mitigate the effect of human errors and equipment malfunction. However, some clear drawbacks and the limited experience and testing of passive systems may raise additional questions that have to be addressed in the design process for each advanced reactor. Therefore the plant designer should find a reasonable balance of active and passive means to effectively use their advantages and compensate their drawbacks. Some considerations that have to be taken into account when balancing active/passive means in advanced water-cooled reactors are discussed in this paper. (author)

  10. Certification of passive houses : Lessons from real indoor climate systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlecnik, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines if and how indoor climate systems are important for passive house certification. The research subjects are passive houses in Belgium, occupied by owner-clients. These have received a quality assurance certificate from an independent organization. Through interviews with the

  11. Pressure Dynamic Characteristics of Pressure Controlled Ventilation System of a Lung Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems.

  12. Pressure Dynamic Characteristics of Pressure Controlled Ventilation System of a Lung Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems. PMID:25197318

  13. Pressure dynamic characteristics of pressure controlled ventilation system of a lung simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems.

  14. Piping systems, containment pre-stressing and steel ventilation chimney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuessi, U.

    1996-01-01

    Units 5 and 6 of NPP Kozloduy have been designed initially for seismic levels which are considered too low today. In the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Programme, a Swiss team has been commissioned by Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania, Sofia, to analyse the relevant piping system, the containment prestressing and the steel ventilation chimney and to recommend upgrade measures for adequate seismic capacity where applicable. Seismic input had been specified by and agreed upon earlier by IAEA experts. The necessary investigations have been performed in 1995 and discussed with internationally recognized experts. The main results may be summarized as follows: Upgrades are necessary at different piping sy ports (additional snubbers or viscous dampers). These fixes can be done easily at low cost. The containment prestressing tendons are adequately designed for the specified load combinations. However, unfavourable construction features endanger the reliability. It is therefore strongly recommended to replace the tendons stepwise and to upgrade the existing monitoring system. Finally, the steel ventilation chimney may not withstand a seismic event, however the containment and diesel generator building will not be destroyed at possible impact by the chimney. On the other hand the roof of the main building has to be reinforced partially. It is recommended to continue the project for 1996 and 1997 to implement the upgrade measures mentioned above, to analyse the remaining piping systems and to consolidate all results obtained by different research groups of the IAEA programme with respect to piping systems including components and tanks

  15. Co-occupant's exposure to exhaled pollutants with two types of personalized ventilation strategies under mixing and displacement ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Niu, J; Gao, N

    2013-04-01

    Personalized ventilation (PV) system in conjunction with total ventilation system can provide cleaner inhaled air for the user. Concerns still exist about whether the normally protecting PV device, on the other hand, facilitates the dispersion of infectious agents generated by its user. In this article, two types of PV systems with upward supplied fresh air, namely a chair-based PV and one kind of desk-mounted PV systems, when combined with mixing ventilation (MV) and displacement ventilation (DV) systems, are investigated using simulation method with regard to their impacts on co-occupant's exposure to the exhaled droplet nuclei generated by the infected PV user. Simulation results of tracer gas and particles with aerodynamic diameter of 1, 5, and 10 μm from exhaled air show that, when only the infected person uses a PV, the different PV air supplying directions present very different impacts on the co-occupant's intake under DV, while no apparent differences can be observed under MV. The findings demonstrate that better inhaled air quality can always be achieved under DV when the adopted PV system can deliver conditioned fresh air in the same direction with the mainly upward airflow patterns of DV. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. GOTHIC Simulation of Passive Containment Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Huiun; Kim, Hangon

    2013-01-01

    The performance of this system depends on the condensation of steam moving downward inside externally cooled vertical tubes. AES-2006: During a DBA, heat is removed by internally cooled vertical tubes, which are located in containment. We are currently developing the conceptual design of Innovative PWR, which is will be equipped with various passive safety features, including PCCS. We have plan to use internal heat exchanger (HX) type PCCS with concrete containment. In this case, the elevation of HXs is important to ensure the heat removal during accidents. In general, steam is lighter than air mixture in containment. So, steam may be collected at the upper side of containment. It means that higher elevation of HXs, larger heat removal efficiency of those. So, the aim of the present paper is to give preliminary study on variation of heat removal performance according to elevation of HXs. With reference to the design specification of the current reactors including APR+, we had determined conceptual design of PCCS. Using it, we developed a GOTHIC model of the APR1400 containment was adopted PCCS. This calculation model is described herein and representative results of calculation are presented. APR 1400 GOTHIC model was developed for PCCS performance calculation and sensitivity test according to installation elevation of PCCXs. Calculation results confirm that PCCS is working properly. It is found that the difference due to the installation elevation of PCCXs is insignificant at this preliminary analysis, however, further studies should be performed to confirm final performance of PCCS according to the installation elevation. These insights are important for developing the PCCS of Innovative PWR

  17. GOTHIC Simulation of Passive Containment Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Huiun; Kim, Hangon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The performance of this system depends on the condensation of steam moving downward inside externally cooled vertical tubes. AES-2006: During a DBA, heat is removed by internally cooled vertical tubes, which are located in containment. We are currently developing the conceptual design of Innovative PWR, which is will be equipped with various passive safety features, including PCCS. We have plan to use internal heat exchanger (HX) type PCCS with concrete containment. In this case, the elevation of HXs is important to ensure the heat removal during accidents. In general, steam is lighter than air mixture in containment. So, steam may be collected at the upper side of containment. It means that higher elevation of HXs, larger heat removal efficiency of those. So, the aim of the present paper is to give preliminary study on variation of heat removal performance according to elevation of HXs. With reference to the design specification of the current reactors including APR+, we had determined conceptual design of PCCS. Using it, we developed a GOTHIC model of the APR1400 containment was adopted PCCS. This calculation model is described herein and representative results of calculation are presented. APR 1400 GOTHIC model was developed for PCCS performance calculation and sensitivity test according to installation elevation of PCCXs. Calculation results confirm that PCCS is working properly. It is found that the difference due to the installation elevation of PCCXs is insignificant at this preliminary analysis, however, further studies should be performed to confirm final performance of PCCS according to the installation elevation. These insights are important for developing the PCCS of Innovative PWR.

  18. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YOUNG, J.

    2000-01-01

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability. Further, requiring an alarm to actuate upon CAM failure is not necessary to maintain the availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability. However, if CAM failures were only detected by the 92-day functional tests required in the Authorization Basis (AB), CAM availability would be much less than that credited in the safety analysis. Therefore it is recommended that the current surveillance practice of daily simple system checks, 30-day source checks and 92-day functional tests be continued in order to maintain CAM availability

  19. Initial computer modeling of WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] underground ventilation system, September 1985--March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, S.

    1986-11-01

    Provision of a good ventilation system has been and continues to be a major priority here of those responsible for its design, management, and operation. As an ongoing effort in this direction, development of computer simulated models for the system was initiated in September, 1985. It was decided to utilize Dravo's 'MINEVENT' computer program for this purpose. Accordingly, initial computer models of the mine's ventilation system have been developed for various modes of operation. Specifically, they include: Simulation of the current ventilation system, and Simulation of the designed ventilation system for modes: mine construction mode/shift, waste storage mode/shift, and air reversal mode. 5 figs

  20. Industrial ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, H. D.

    Industrial ventilation design methodology, using computers and using fluid dynamic models, is considered. It is noted that the design of a ventilation system must be incorporated into the plant design and layout at the earliest conceptual stage of the project. A checklist of activities concerning the methodology for the design of a ventilation system for a new facility is given. A flow diagram of the computer ventilation model shows a typical input, the initialization and iteration loop, and the output. The application of the fluid dynamic modeling techniques include external and internal flow fields, and individual sources of heat and contaminants. Major activities for a ventilation field test program are also addressed.

  1. Passive heat removal system with injector-condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soplenkov, K I [All-Russian Inst. of Nuclear Power Plant Operation, Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Centre of Nuclear Power Safety (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    The system described in this paper is a passive system for decay heat removal from WWERs. It operates off the secondary side of the steam generators (SG). Steam is taken from the SG to operate a passive injector pump which causes secondary fluid to be pumped through a heat exchanger. Variants pass either water or steam from the SG through the heat exchanger. There is a passive initiation scheme. The programme for experimental and theoretical validation of the system is described. (author). 8 figs.

  2. Overall Ventilation System Flow Network Calculation for Site Recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhoff, Jeff J.

    2001-01-01

    The scope of this calculation is to determine ventilation system resistances, pressure drops, airflows, and operating cost estimates for the Site Recommendation (SR) design as detailed in the ''Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout'' (BSC (Bechtel SAIC Company) 2001a). The statutory limit for emplacement of waste in Yucca Mountain is 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and is considered the base case for this report. The objective is to determine the overall repository system ventilation flow network for the monitoring phase during normal operations and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. Any values derived from this calculation will not be used to support construction, fabrication, or procurement. The work scope is identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY01 Work Activities'' (CRWMS M and O 2001, pp. 6 and 13). In accordance with the technical work plan this calculation was prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' and other procedures invoked by AP-3.12Q. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI1.Q, ''Software Management''

  3. Passivity Based Stabilization of Non-minimum Phase Nonlinear Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Travieso-Torres, J.C.; Duarte-Mermoud, M.A.; Zagalak, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2009), s. 417-426 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/1596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : nonlinear systems * stabilisation * passivity * state feedback Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/AS/zagalak-passivity based stabilization of non-minimum phase nonlinear systems.pdf

  4. Optimization of Passive Coherent Receiver System Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    spheroid object with a constant radar cross section (RCS). Additionally, the receiver and transmitters are assumed to be notional isotropic antennae...software- defined radio for equatorial plasma instability studies,” Radio Science, vol. 48, pp. 1–11. Aug. 2013. [2] P. C. Zhang and B. Y. Li, “Passive

  5. Effects of types of ventilation system on indoor particle concentrations in residential buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J S; Jee, N-Y; Jeong, J-W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the influence of ventilation systems on indoor particle concentrations in residential buildings. Fifteen occupied, single-family apartments were selected from three sites. The three sites have three different ventilation systems: unbalanced mechanical ventilation, balanced mechanical ventilation, and natural ventilation. Field measurements were conducted between April and June 2012, when outdoor air temperatures were comfortable. Number concentrations of particles, PM2.5 and CO2 , were continuously measured both outdoors and indoors. In the apartments with natural ventilation, I/O ratios of particle number concentrations ranged from 0.56 to 0.72 for submicron particles, and from 0.25 to 0.60 for particles larger than 1.0 μm. The daily average indoor particle concentration decreased to 50% below the outdoor level for submicron particles and 25% below the outdoor level for fine particles, when the apartments were mechanically ventilated. The two mechanical ventilation systems reduced the I/O ratios by 26% for submicron particles and 65% for fine particles compared with the natural ventilation. These results showed that mechanical ventilation can reduce exposure to outdoor particles in residential buildings. Results of this study confirm that mechanical ventilation with filtration can significantly reduce indoor particle levels compared with natural ventilation. The I/O ratios of particles substantially varied at the naturally ventilated apartments because of the influence of variable window opening conditions and unsteadiness of wind flow on the penetration of outdoor air particles. For better prediction of the exposure to outdoor particles in naturally ventilated residential buildings, it is important to understand the penetration of outdoor particles with variable window opening conditions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An approach for assessing ALWR passive safety system reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hake, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) concepts proposed for the next generation of nuclear power plants rely on passive rather than active systems to perform safety functions. Despite the reduced redundancy of the passive systems as compared to active systems in current plants, the assertion is that the overall safety of the plant is enhanced due to the much higher expected reliability of the passive systems. In order to investigate this assertion, a study is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to evaluate the reliability of ALWR passive safety features in the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the approach to this study. The quantification of passive system reliability is not as straightforward as for active systems, due to the lack of operating experience, and to the greater uncertainty in the governing physical phenomena. Thus, the adequacy of current methods for evaluating system reliability must be assessed, and alternatives proposed if necessary. For this study, the Westinghouse Advanced Passive 600 MWe reactor (AP600) was chosen as the advanced reactor for analysis, because of the availability of AP600 design information. This study compares the reliability of AP600 emergency cooling system with that of corresponding systems in a current generation reactor

  7. Evaluation of local exhaust ventilation system performance for control of Fe2O3 dust at an iron making unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Jamshidi Rastani; Farshid Ghorbani Shahna; Abdolrahman Bahrami; Somayeh Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adherence to the design values and ventilation standards (VS) after installing and also maintaining continuous work of ventilation system with maximum performance throughout its life are amongst the reasons of ventilation systems monitoring. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate performance of local exhaust ventilation system for control of dust by measuring the operating parameters and also to compare it with ventilation standards (VS) and design values. Material...

  8. Passive components of NPP safety-related systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionaytis Romuald, R.; Bubnova Tatyana, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new passive components with having drives: fast-response cutoff valves; modular actuators with opposite cocking pneumatic drives and actuation spring drives; voting electromagnetic valve units for control of pneumatic drives; passive initiators of actuation; visual diagnostics . All these devices have been developed and tested at mock-ups. This paper presents also the following direct-action passive safety components: modular pressure-relief safety valves; pilot safety valves with passive action; check valves with remote position indicator and after-tightening; modular inserts for limiting emergency coolant flow; vortex rectifier; critical weld fasteners; gas-liquid valves; fast-removable seal assembly; seal spring loaders; grooves for increasing hydraulic resistance. Replacement of active safety system components for passive ones improves the general reliability NPP by 1.5 or 2 orders of magnitudes. (authors)

  9. An air-conditioning, ventilation and automatic ventilation monitoring and recording system constructed in an unsealed radioisotope laboratory. Energy-saving measures in Nagasaki University Radioisotope Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki; Okumura, Yutaka; Ooura, Tosinobu; Kotoura, Kazuki; Yamanaka, Yasushi; Yanagita, Hiroyoshi.

    1998-01-01

    We constructed an automatic operation system of air-conditioners and ventilators in a radiation controlled area to minimize electric consumption. The system operates the air-conditioner and the ventilator of each ventilation unit when someone is staying in rooms belonging to the unit based on information from an access control system to the controlled area and lighting switches in front of individual room. For understanding of operation conditions and confirmation of radioactive concentration in air lower than the legal limit at the ventilation stack, we also constructed an automatic ventilation monitoring and recording system, which makes complete operation records of each ventilator automatically. These systems enabled to achieve sharp energy-saving compatible with radiation protection. (author)

  10. Passive safety system of a super fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutanto, E-mail: sutanto@fuji.waseda.jp [Cooperative Major in Nuclear Energy, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Polytechnic Institute of Nuclear Technology—National Nuclear Energy Agency, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Oka, Yoshiaki [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Passive safety system of a Super FR is proposed. • Total loss of feedwater flow and large LOCA are analyzed. • The criteria of MCST and core pressure are satisfied. - Abstract: Passive safety systems of a Super Fast Reactor are studied. The passive safety systems consist of isolation condenser (IC), automatic depressurization system (ADS), core make-up tank (CMT), gravity driven cooling system (GDCS), and passive containment cooling system (PCCS). Two accidents of total loss of feedwater flow and 100% cold-leg break large LOCA are analyzed by using the passive systems and the criteria of maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) and maximum core pressure are satisfied. The isolation condenser can be used for mitigation of the accident of total loss of feedwater flow at both supercritical and subcritical pressures. The ADS is used for depressurization leading to a loss of coolant during line switching to operation of the isolation condenser at subcritical pressure. Use of CMT during line switching recovers the lost coolant. In case of large LOCA, GDCS can be used for core reflooding. Coolant vaporization in the core released to containment through the break is condensed by passive containment cooling system. The condensate flows to the GDCS pool by gravity force. The maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) of the accident satisfies the criterion.

  11. Ventilation and air-conditioning system for PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmoto, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    This report outlines the ventilation and air conditioning facilities for PWR nuclear power plant as well as design re-evaluation and optimization of ventilation and air-conditioning. The primary PWR installations are generally housed in the nuclear reactor building, auxiliary buildings and control building, which are equipped with their own ventilation and air-conditioning systems to serve for their specific purposes. A ventilation/air-conditioning system should be able to work effectively not only for maintaining the ordinary reactor operation but also for controlling the environmental temperature in the event of an accident. Designing of a ventilation/air-conditioning system relied on empirical data in the past, but currently it is performed based on information obtained from various analyses to optimize the system configuration and ventilation capacity. Design re-evaluation of ventilation/air-conditioning systems are conducted widely in various areas, aiming at the integration of safety systems, optimum combination of air-cooling and water-cooling systems, and optimization of the ventilation rate for controlling the concentrations of radioactive substances in the atmosphere in the facilities. It is pointed out that performance evaluation of ventilation/air-conditioning systems, which has been conducted rather macroscopically, should be carried out more in detal in the future to determine optimum air streams and temperature distribution. (Nogami, K.)

  12. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE HANDLING BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.A. Ziegler

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste handling building ventilation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Preclosure Safety and Systems Engineering Section. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 2000). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 2000). This QA classification incorporates the current MGR design and the results of the ''Design Basis Event Frequency and Dose Calculation for Site Recommendation'' (CRWMS M andO 2000a) and ''Bounding Individual Category 1 Design Basis Event Dose Calculation to Support Quality Assurance Classification'' (Gwyn 2000)

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Obstacle in the Room on Passive Night-Time Cooling using Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Khalegi, Farzad; Domarks, Giedrius

    2011-01-01

    Night-time ventilation is a promising approach for reducing the energy needed for cooling buildings without reducing thermal comfort. The objective of this paper is to determine how an internal obstacle, such as a table, will influence the heat transfer in the room and the efficiency of night......-time ventilation which uses displacement ventilation. Experimental work was conducted on the basis of the work in a similar previous study, performed by (Artmann 2010), and this is an extension of that work. Experimental results obtained for a case with a table were compared with the results obtained by Artmann et...... al. for a room with displacement ventilation, but without table. The results obtained in the experiment with the table indicated that the mean heat flux was slightly lower but very similar compared to the case without the table. The heat flux at the ceiling was measured to be the same for both setups...

  14. An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands

  15. An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-22

    An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

  16. Ventilation and air heating systems. 5. rev. and enlarged ed. Lueftung und Luftheizung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihle, C. (Bundesfachschule fuer Sanitaer-, Heizungs- und Klimatechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany))

    1991-01-01

    Higher demands on the air quality of flats, offices and assembly rooms make ventilation and air heating the subjects of increasing interest. Taking into account the ever more urgent need for energy conservation the book deals with all aspects of ventilation on the basis of the recent DIN standards, VDI sheets and regulations. It may be used as an instruction manual, professional reference book or as a guide to practice-oriented subject selection with a minimum of theoretical fundamentals. The book deals with ventilation and air heating systems, free ventilation, design fundamentals, exercised for ventilation and air heating systems, central and decentralized ventilation systems, practical examples, ducts and calculation of ducts, air distribution, fans, noise formation, noise pollution abatement and heat recovery. (BWI) With 472 figs., 91 tabs., 1 separate map.

  17. Effect of an automatic triggering and cycling system on comfort and patient-ventilator synchrony during pressure support ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Renata dos S; Melo, Luíz Henrique de P; Sales, Raquel P; Marinho, Liégina S; Deulefeu, Flávio C; Reis, Ricardo C; Alves-de-Almeida, Mirizana; Holanda, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01

    The digital Auto-Trak™ system is a technology capable of automatically adjusting the triggering and cycling mechanisms during pressure support ventilation (PSV). To compare Auto-Trak with conventional settings in terms of patient-ventilator synchrony and discomfort. Twelve healthy volunteers underwent PSV via the mouth by breathing through an endotracheal tube. In the conventional setting, a pressure support of 8 cm H2O with flow cycling (25% peak inspiratory flow) and a sensitivity of 1 cm H2O was adjusted. In Auto-Trak the triggering and cycling were automatically set. Discomfort, effort of breathing, and the asynchrony index (AI) were assessed. In a complementary bench study, the inspiratory and expiratory time delays were quantified for both settings in three mechanical models: 'normal', obstructive (COPD), and restrictive (ARDS), using the ASL 5000 simulator. In the volunteer study the AI and the discomfort scores did not differ statistically between the two settings. In the bench investigation the use of Auto-Trak was associated with a greater triggering delay in the COPD model and earlier expiratory cycling in the ARDS model but with no asynchronic events. Use of the Auto-Trak system during PSV showed similar results in comparison to the conventional adjustments with respect to patient-ventilator synchrony and discomfort in simulated conditions of invasive mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, David [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Neri, Robin [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  19. Applied patent RFID systems for building reacting HEPA air ventilation system in hospital operation rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jesun; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2012-12-01

    RFID technology, an automatic identification and data capture technology to provide identification, tracing, security and so on, was widely applied to healthcare industry in these years. Employing HEPA ventilation system in hospital is a way to ensure healthful indoor air quality to protect patients and healthcare workers against hospital-acquired infections. However, the system consumes lots of electricity which cost a lot. This study aims to apply the RFID technology to offer a unique medical staff and patient identification, and reacting HEPA air ventilation system in order to reduce the cost, save energy and prevent the prevalence of hospital-acquired infection. The system, reacting HEPA air ventilation system, contains RFID tags (for medical staffs and patients), sensor, and reacting system which receives the information regarding the number of medical staff and the status of the surgery, and controls the air volume of the HEPA air ventilation system accordingly. A pilot program was carried out in a unit of operation rooms of a medical center with 1,500 beds located in central Taiwan from Jan to Aug 2010. The results found the air ventilation system was able to function much more efficiently with less energy consumed. Furthermore, the indoor air quality could still keep qualified and hospital-acquired infection or other occupational diseases could be prevented.

  20. Design of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...... as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low...

  1. Modelling of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...... as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low...

  2. Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-12-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  3. Reliability assessment of passive containment isolation system using APSRA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, A.K.; Jain, Vikas; Gartia, M.R.; Srivastava, A.; Prasad, Hari; Anthony, A.; Gaikwad, A.J.; Bhatia, S.; Sinha, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology known as APSRA (Assessment of Passive System ReliAbility) has been employed for evaluation of the reliability of passive systems. The methodology has been applied to the passive containment isolation system (PCIS) of the Indian advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR). In the APSRA methodology, the passive system reliability evaluation is based on the failure probability of the system to carryout the desired function. The methodology first determines the operational characteristics of the system and the failure conditions by assigning a predetermined failure criterion. The failure surface is predicted using a best estimate code considering deviations of the operating parameters from their nominal states, which affect the PCIS performance. APSRA proposes to compare the code predictions with the test data to generate the uncertainties on the failure parameter prediction, which is later considered in the code for accurate prediction of failure surface of the system. Once the failure surface of the system is predicted, the cause of failure is examined through root diagnosis, which occurs mainly due to failure of mechanical components. The failure probability of these components is evaluated through a classical PSA treatment using the generic data. The reliability of the PCIS is evaluated from the probability of availability of the components for the success of the passive containment isolation system

  4. Performance analysis of ventilation systems with desiccant wheel cooling based on exergy destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Rang; Liu, Xiao-Hua; Hwang, Yunho; Ma, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ventilation systems with desiccant wheel were analyzed from exergy destruction. • Main performances influencing factors for ventilation systems are put forward. • Improved ventilation systems with lower exergy destruction are suggested. • Performances of heat pumps driven ventilation systems are greatly increased. - Abstract: This paper investigates the performances of ventilation systems with desiccant wheel cooling from the perspective of exergy destructions. Based on the inherent influencing factors for exergy destructions of heat and mass transfer and heat sources, provide guidelines for efficient system design. First, performances of a basic ventilation system are simulated, which is operated at high regeneration temperature and low coefficient of performance (COP). Then, exergy analysis of the basic ventilation system shows that exergy destructions mainly exist in the heat and mass transfer components and the heat source. The inherent influencing factors for the heat and mass transfer exergy destruction are heat and mass transfer capacities, which are related to over dehumidification of the desiccant wheel, and unmatched coefficients, which represent the uniformity of the temperature or humidity ratio differences fields for heat and mass transfer components. Based on these findings, two improved ventilation systems are suggested. For the first system, over dehumidification is avoided and unmatched coefficients for each component are reduced. With lower heat and mass transfer exergy destructions and lower regeneration temperature, COP and exergy efficiency of the first system are increased compared with the basic ventilation system. For the second system, a heat pump, which recovers heat from the process air to heat the regeneration air, is adopted to replace the electrical heater and cooling devices. The exergy destruction of the heat pump is considerably reduced as compared with heat source exergy destruction of the basic ventilation

  5. A new prototype of an electronic jet-ventilator and its humidification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraincuk, Paul; Kepka, Anton; Ihra, Gerald; Schabernig, Christa; Aloy, Alexander

    1999-01-01

    Background: Adequate humidification in long-term jet ventilation is a critical aspect in terms of clinical safety. Aim: To assess a prototype of an electronic jet-ventilator and its humidification system. Methods: Forty patients with respiratory insufficiency were randomly allocated to one of four groups. The criterion for inclusion in this study was respiratory insufficiency exhibiting a Murray score above 2. The four groups of patients were ventilated with three different respirators and four different humidification systems. Patients in groups A and B received superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation (SHFJV) by an electronic jet-ventilator either with (group A) or without (group B) an additional humidification system. Patients in group C received high-frequency percussive ventilation (HFPV) by a pneumatic high-frequency respirator, using a hot water humidifier for warming and moistening the inspiration gas. Patients in group D received conventional mechanical ventilation using a standard intensive care unit respirator with a standard humidification system. SHFJV and HFPV were used for a period of 100 h (4days). Results: A significantly low inspiration gas temperature was noted in patients in group B, initially (27.2 ± 2.5°C) and after 2 days (28.0 ± 1.6°C) (P humidification associated with jet ventilation can be fully prevented by using this new jet-ventilator. These data were sustained by nondeteriorating MIS values at the end of the 4-day study period in groups A, C and D. PMID:11056732

  6. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  7. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  8. Active Fault Tolerant Control of Livestock Stable Ventilation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Modern stables and greenhouses are equipped with different components for providing a comfortable climate for animals and plant. A component malfunction may result in loss of production. Therefore, it is desirable to design a control system, which is stable, and is able to provide an acceptable d...... are not included, while due to the physical limitation, the input signal can not have any value. In continuing, a passive fault tolerant controller (PFTC) based on state feedback is proposed to track a reference signal while the control inputs are bounded....... of fault. Designing a fault tolerant control scheme for the climate control system. In the first step, a conceptual multi-zone model for climate control of a live-stock building is derived. The model is a nonlinear hybrid model. Hybrid systems contain both discrete and continuous components. The parameters...... affine (PWA) components such as dead-zones, saturation, etc or contain piecewise nonlinear models which is the case for the climate control systems of the stables. Fault tolerant controller (FTC) is based on a switching scheme between a set of predefined passive fault tolerant controller (PFTC...

  9. Time-to-impact estimation in passive missile warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahıngıl, Mehmet Cihan

    2017-05-01

    A missile warning system can detect the incoming missile threat(s) and automatically cue the other Electronic Attack (EA) systems in the suit, such as Directed Infrared Counter Measure (DIRCM) system and/or Counter Measure Dispensing System (CMDS). Most missile warning systems are currently based on passive sensor technology operating in either Solar Blind Ultraviolet (SBUV) or Midwave Infrared (MWIR) bands on which there is an intensive emission from the exhaust plume of the threatening missile. Although passive missile warning systems have some clear advantages over pulse-Doppler radar (PDR) based active missile warning systems, they show poorer performance in terms of time-to-impact (TTI) estimation which is critical for optimizing the countermeasures and also "passive kill assessment". In this paper, we consider this problem, namely, TTI estimation from passive measurements and present a TTI estimation scheme which can be used in passive missile warning systems. Our problem formulation is based on Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). The algorithm uses the area parameter of the threat plume which is derived from the used image frame.

  10. Experimental evaluation of the Skylab orbital workshop ventilation system concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allums, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Ralston, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive testing was conducted to evaluate the Orbital Workshop ventilation concept. Component tests were utilized to determine the relationship between operating characteristics at 1 and 0.34 atm. System tests were conducted at 1 atm within the Orbital Workshop full-scale mockup to assess delivered volumetric flow rate and compartment air velocities. Component tests with the Anemostat circular diffusers (plenum- and duct-mounted) demonstrated that the diffuser produced essentially equivalent airflow patterns and velocities in 1- and 0.34-atm environments. The tests also showed that the pressure drop across the diffuser could be scaled from 1 to 0.34 atm using the atmosphere pressure ratio. Fan tests indicated that the performance of a multiple, parallel-mounted fan cluster could be predicted by summing the single-fan flow rates at a given delta P.

  11. Effect of Room Ventilation Rates in Rodent Rooms with Direct-Exhaust IVC Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertsema, Roger S; Lindsell, Claire E

    2015-09-01

    When IVC are directly exhausted from a rodent housing room, the air quality of the room can become independent of the intracage air quality and may reduce the need for high room ventilation rates. This study assessed the effect of decreasing the ventilation rate in rodent rooms using direct-exhaust IVC systems. The study was conducted over 16 wk and compared conditions in 8 rodent rooms that had ventilation rates of 5 to 6 air changes per hour (ACH) with those in rooms at 10 to 12 ACH. At the low ventilation rate, rooms had higher CO₂ concentrations, higher dew point temperature, and lower particulate levels and spent a greater percentage of time above the temperature set point than did rooms at the high rate. The levels of allergens and endotoxins in room air were the same regardless of the ventilation rate. Differences seen in parameters within cages at the 2 ventilation rates were operationally irrelevant. We detected no total volatile organic compounds in the room that were attributable to ammonia, regardless of the ventilation rate. Clearing the air of ethanol after a spill took longer at the low compared with high rate. However, ethanol clearance was faster at the low rate when the demand-control system was activated than at the high ventilation rate alone. Air quality in the room and in the cages were acceptable with room ventilation rates of 5 to 6 ACH in rodent rooms that use direct-exhaust IVC systems.

  12. Evaluation of Mechanical Ventilator Use with Liquid Oxygen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Endotracheal tubes, high-volume, low-pressure, tracheal wall injury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF...ventilators to the LOX devices. Ventilator settings were as follows : respiratory rate 35 breaths/min, inspiratory time 0.8 seconds, tidal volume 450 mL

  13. Feasibility study on emergency passive habitability systems of SPWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, H.; Tabata, H.; Urakami, M.; Naito, T.

    2000-01-01

    The major characteristic of the Simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR) is that safety systems for the emergency core cooling and the core decay heat removal functions are achieved by passive equipment. The AP600 developed in the U.S adopts passive emergency habitability system for the main control room (MCR) and the electrical equipment rooms (EER) by using the concrete of the structures as a heat sink. For the SPWR, alternative natural circulation cooling systems have been investigated: for MCR cooling, a cold water reservoir is used as heat sink; for EER cooling, outside air is instead employed. The distribution of the air-velocity and temperature in those rooms were calculated by using a three-dimensional thermal fluid analysis code. The authors verified the conceptual feasibility of these systems as the emergency passive habitability systems in the SPWR. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the reliability of a passive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, F.; Burgazzi, L.; D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.; Ricotti, M.E.; Oriani, L.

    2001-01-01

    A passive system should be theoretically more reliable than an active one. In fact its operation is independent by any external input or energy and is relied only upon natural physical laws (e.g., gravity, natural circulation, etc.) and/or 'intelligent' use of the energy inherently available in the system (e.g., chemical reaction, decay heat, etc.). Nevertheless the passive system may fail its mission as consequences of component failures, deviation of physical phenomena, boundary and/or initial conditions from the expectation. This document describes at first the methodology developed by ENEA, in collaboration of University of Pisa and Polytechnic of Milano, allowing the evaluation of the reliability for a passive system, which operation is based on moving working fluids (type B and C, cf. IAEA). It reports the results of an exercise performed on a system, which operation is based on Natural Circulation.(author)

  15. Analysis of the systems of ventilation of residential houses of Ukraine and Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, Olena; Zhelykh, Vasyl; Voll, Hendrik

    2017-12-01

    The most common ventilation system in residential buildings in Ukraine is natural ventilation. In recent years, due to increased tightness of structures, an increase in the content of synthetic finishing materials in them, the quality of microclimate parameters deteriorated. One of the measures to improve the parameters of indoor air in residential buildings is the use of mechanical inflow and exhaust ventilation system. In this article the regulatory documents concerning the design of ventilation systems in Ukraine and Estonia and the requirements for air exchange in residential buildings are considered. It is established that the existing normative documents in Ukraine are analogous to European norms, which allow design the system of ventilation of residential buildings according to European standards. However, the basis for the design of ventilation systems in Ukraine is the national standards, in which mechanical ventilation, unfortunately, is provided only for the design of high-rise buildings. To maintain acceptable microclimate parameters in residential buildings, it is advisable for designers to apply the requirements for designing ventilation systems in accordance with European standards.

  16. Analysis of the systems of ventilation of residential houses of Ukraine and Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savchenko Olena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The most common ventilation system in residential buildings in Ukraine is natural ventilation. In recent years, due to increased tightness of structures, an increase in the content of synthetic finishing materials in them, the quality of microclimate parameters deteriorated. One of the measures to improve the parameters of indoor air in residential buildings is the use of mechanical inflow and exhaust ventilation system. In this article the regulatory documents concerning the design of ventilation systems in Ukraine and Estonia and the requirements for air exchange in residential buildings are considered. It is established that the existing normative documents in Ukraine are analogous to European norms, which allow design the system of ventilation of residential buildings according to European standards. However, the basis for the design of ventilation systems in Ukraine is the national standards, in which mechanical ventilation, unfortunately, is provided only for the design of high-rise buildings. To maintain acceptable microclimate parameters in residential buildings, it is advisable for designers to apply the requirements for designing ventilation systems in accordance with European standards.

  17. Computer-simulation study on fire behaviour in the ventilated cavity of ventilated façade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giraldo María P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fire spread through the façades is widely recognized as one of the fastest pathways of fire spreading in the buildings. Fire may spread through the façade in different ways depending on the type of façade system and on the elements and materials from which it is constructed. Ventilated façades are multilayer systems whose main feature is the creation of an air chamber of circulating air between the original building wall and the external cladding. The “chimney effect” in the air cavity is a mechanism that improves the façade's thermal behaviour and avoids the appearance of moisture from rain or condensation. However, in a event of fire, it may contribute to the quickest spreading of fire, representing a significant risk to the upper floors of a building. This study deals with some aspects of fire propagation through the ventilated cavity in ventilated façade systems. Also we review the provisions stipulated by the Spanish building code (Código Técnico de la Edificación, CTE [1] to avoid fire spread outside the building. The results highlight the importance of the use of proper fire barriers to ensure the compartmentalization of the ventilated cavity, as well as the use of non-combustible thermal insulation materials, among others. In addition, based on the results, it might be considered that the measures stipulated by the CTE are insufficient to limit the risks associated with this kind of façades systems. The study has been performed using field models of computational fluid-dynamics. In particular, the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS software has been used to numerically solve the mathematical integration models.

  18. Passivity analysis and synthesis for uncertain time-delay systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdi S. Mahmoud

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the robust passivity analysis and synthesis problems for a class of uncertain time-delay systems. This class of systems arises in the modelling effort of studying water quality constituents in fresh stream. For the analysis problem, we derive a sufficient condition for which the uncertain time-delay system is robustly stable and strictly passive for all admissible uncertainties. The condition is given in terms of a linear matrix inequality. Both the delay-independent and delay-dependent cases are considered. For the synthesis problem, we propose an observer-based design method which guarantees that the closed-loop uncertain time-delay system is stable and strictly passive for all admissible uncertainties. Several examples are worked out to illustrate the developed theory.

  19. Accurately bearing measurement in non-cooperative passive location system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhiqiang; Ma Hongguang; Yang Lifeng

    2007-01-01

    The system of non-cooperative passive location based on array is proposed. In the system, target is detected by beamforming and Doppler matched filtering; and bearing is measured by a long-base-ling interferometer which is composed of long distance sub-arrays. For the interferometer with long-base-line, the bearing is measured accurately but ambiguously. To realize unambiguous accurately bearing measurement, beam width and multiple constraint adoptive beamforming technique is used to resolve azimuth ambiguous. Theory and simulation result shows this method is effective to realize accurately bearing measurement in no-cooperate passive location system. (authors)

  20. Ventilation effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Mathisen, Hans Martin; Nielsen, Peter V; Moser, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy-to-understand descriptions of the indices used to mesure the performance of a ventilation system and which indices to use in different cases.

  1. Performance analysis of a new design of office diffuse ceiling ventilation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Hviid, Christian Anker; Yang, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to document and analyse performance of a new design of diffuse ceiling ventilation system in a typical office room. A full scale measurement is carried out in a climate chamber with an office setup at the Technical University of Denmark. Indoor air temperatures, air speeds, wall...... surface temperatures, pressure loss of the ceiling and ventilation effectiveness are measured for an air change rate of 3.5 h-1 and 5.1 h -1 respectively. A computational fluid dynamics model of the office with the diffuse ceiling ventilation system is built and validated by the full scale measurement....... The measurements of pressure loss across the ceiling show a low pressure drop between the plenum and the occupied zone. Ventilation effectiveness is measured to be close to 1 on average under the tested conditions. It is shown that the diffuse ceiling ventilation system is able to remove indoor pollutant...

  2. Multiple-Active Multiple-Passive Antenna Systems and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakalaki, Elpiniki

    2013-01-01

    -passive (MAMP) antenna topologies, as explained in Sect. 8.1. Then, Sect. 8.2 proposes MAMP antenna structures with application to reconfigurable MIMO transmission in the presence of antenna mutual coupling under poor scattering channel conditions. For this purpose, the section presents an adaptive MAMP antenna...... system capable of changing its transmission parameters via passive radiators attached to tunable loads, according to the structure of the RF propagation channel. The hybrid MAMP array structure can be tractably analyzed using the active element response vector (instead of the classical steering vector...... adaptive MAMP system can be limited to practical dimensions whereas the passive antennas require no extra RF hardware, thus meeting the cost, space, and power constrains of the users’ mobile terminals. The simulation results show that the adaptive MAMP system, thanks to its “adaptivity”, is able to achieve...

  3. Blind spot detection & passive lane change assist systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surovtcev, I.

    2015-01-01

    The project goal was design and implementation of proof-of-concept for two systems that aim to tackle the blind spot problem of for the commercial vehicles: Blind Spot Detection and Passive Lane Change Assist functions. The system implementation was done using Rapid Control Prototype (RCP) hardware.

  4. An Evaluation of a Proposed Ventilation System for Melbourne's CH2 Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Aye

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of ventilation requirements in commercial buildings has been significantly revised in the last 10-15 years. A link between health, productivity and increased fresh air use has been established by some research and this understanding underpins the ventilation philosophy adopted for the CH2 building. The ventilation system design for CH2 that has been evaluated in this paper envisages a mechanically driven system during the day, using the displacement technique to distribute filtered air. All introduced air will be drawn from outside and no recycling of air will occur. Natural ventilation will be employed at night using the stack effect, enhanced by turbine ventilators. This paper critiques the proposed ventilation system in the light of international experience and the particular conditions of the building's location. The evidence suggests that natural ventilation sometimes may be inadequate to achieve the desired objectives. Minimization of indoor pollutants, adequate filtration and high levels of ventilation should, however, ensure satisfactory air quality during occupied hours.

  5. TVENT: a computer program for analysis of tornado-induced transients in ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerre, K.H.; Andrae, R.W.; Gregory, W.S.

    1978-07-01

    The report describes TVENT, a portable FORTRAN computer program for predicting flows and pressures in a ventilation system subject to a tornado. The pressure and flow values calculated by TVENT can be used as a basis for structural analysis. TVENT is a one-dimensional, lumped-parameter model with incompressible flow augmented by fluid storage. The theoretical basis for the mathematical modeling and analysis is presented, and a description of the input for the computer code is provided. Modeling techniques specific to ventilation systems are described. Sample problems illustrate the use of TVENT in analyzing ventilation systems. Other sample problems illustrate modeling techniques used in reducing complex systems

  6. A reliability assessment methodology for the VHTR passive safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Jae, Moosung

    2014-01-01

    The passive safety system of a VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor), which has recently attracted worldwide attention, is currently being considered for the design of safety improvements for the next generation of nuclear power plants in Korea. The functionality of the passive system does not rely on an external source of an electrical support system, but on the intelligent use of natural phenomena. Its function involves an ultimate heat sink for a passive secondary auxiliary cooling system, especially during a station blackout such as the case of the Fukushima Daiichi reactor accidents. However, it is not easy to quantitatively evaluate the reliability of passive safety for the purpose of risk analysis, considering the existing active system failure since the classical reliability assessment method cannot be applied. Therefore, we present a new methodology to quantify the reliability based on reliability physics models. This evaluation framework is then applied to of the conceptually designed VHTR in Korea. The Response Surface Method (RSM) is also utilized for evaluating the uncertainty of the maximum temperature of nuclear fuel. The proposed method could contribute to evaluating accident sequence frequency and designing new innovative nuclear systems, such as the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) in VHTR to be designed and constructed in Korea.

  7. Computer modelling of an underground mine ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The ability to control workplace short-lived radon daughter concentrations to appropriate levels is crucial to the underground mining of uranium ores. Recognizing that mine ventilation models can be used to design ventilation facilities in new mines and to evaluate proposed ventilation changes in existing mines the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) initiated this study to first investigate existing mine ventilation models and then develop a suitable model for use by AECB staff. At the start of the study, available literature on mine ventilation models, in partiuclar models suitable for the unique task of predicting radon daughter levels, were reviewed. While the details of the models varied, it was found that the basic calculation procedures used by the various models were similar. Consequently, a model developed at Queen's University that not only already incorporated most of the desired features but was also readily available, was selected for implementation. Subsequently, the Queen's computer program (actually two programs, one for mine ventilation and one to calculate radon daughter levels) was extended and tested. The following report provides the relevant documentation for setting up and running the models. The mathematical basis of the calculational procedures used in the models are also described

  8. Radon mitigation in schools utilising heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.; Ligman, B.; Brennan, T.; Shaughnessy, R.; Turk, B.H.; Snead, B.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a continuing radon in schools technology development effort, EPA's School Evaluation Team has performed radon mitigation in schools by the method of ventilation/pressurisation control technology. Ventilation rates were increased, at a minimum, to meet the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standard, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (ASHRAE 62-1989). This paper presents the results and the preliminary evaluations which led to the team's decision to implement this technology. Factors considered include energy penalties, comfort, indoor air quality (IAQ), building shell tightness, and equipment costs. Cost benefit of heat recovery ventilation was also considered. Earlier results of the SEP team's efforts have indicated a severe ventilation problem within the schools of the United States. Two case studies are presented where HVAC technology was implemented for controlling radon concentrations. One involved the installation of a heat recovery ventilator to depressurise a crawl space and provide ventilation to the classrooms which previously had no mechanical ventilation. The other involved the restoration of a variable air volume system in a two-storey building. The HVAC system's controls were restored and modified to provide a constant building pressure differential to control the entry of radon. Pre-mitigation and post-mitigation indoor air pollutant measurements were taken, including radon, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), particulates, and bio-aerosols. Long-term monitoring of radon, CO 2 , building pressure differentials, and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity is presented. (author)

  9. Development and evaluation of a ceiling ventilation system enhanced by solar photovoltaic thermal collectors and phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenye; Ma, Zhenjun; Sohel, M. Imroz; Cooper, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel ceiling ventilation system enhanced by PVT and PCMs was proposed. • PCM was used to increase the local thermal mass and to serve as a storage unit. • The proposed system can enhance indoor thermal comfort in winter and summer. - Abstract: This paper presents the development and performance evaluation of a novel ceiling ventilation system integrated with solar photovoltaic thermal (PVT) collectors and phase change materials (PCMs). The PVT collectors are used to generate electricity and provide low grade heating and cooling energy for buildings by using winter daytime solar radiation and summer night-time sky radiative cooling, respectively. The PCM is integrated into the building ceiling as a part of the ceiling insulation and at the same time, as a centralized thermal energy storage to temporally store low grade energy collected from the PVT collectors. The performance of the proposed system was numerically evaluated based on a Solar Decathlon house using TRNSYS. The results showed that, in winter conditions, the proposed PVT–PCM integrated ventilation system can significantly improve the indoor thermal comfort of passive buildings without using air-conditioning systems with a maximum air temperature rise of 23.1 °C from the PVT collectors. Compared with the system using PCM but without using PVT collectors, the coefficient of thermal comfort enhancement in the kitchen, dining room and living room of the case building studied using the proposed system improved from almost zero to 0.9823 while the coefficient of thermal comfort enhancement in the study room improved from 0.0060 to 0.9921. In summer conditions, the proposed system can also enhance indoor thermal comfort through night-time sky radiative cooling

  10. Problems facing the use of passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This study will analyze the current state of the art in the reliability of passive systems for extensive use in future nuclear power plants. This case study uncovers the insights on the technological issues associated with the reliability of the systems based on thermal-hydraulics, for which, methods are still in developing phase. The paper is organized as follows: at first the current available methodologies are illustrated and compared, the open issues coming out from their analysis are identified. Five open issues have been identified: 1) the assessment of the uncertainties related to passive system performance; 2) the dependencies among parameters in thermo-hydraulics; 3) the integration of the passive systems within an accident sequence in combination with active systems; 4) the development of dynamic event tree to incorporate the evolution upon time of the physical processes; and 5) the comparison between active and passive systems, mainly on a functional viewpoint. For each open issue the state of the art and the outlook is presented; the relative importance of each of them within the evaluation process is presented as well. (authors)

  11. Computational study of smoke flow control in garage fires and optimization of the ventilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banjac Miloš J.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of evaluating capabilities of a ventilation system to control the spread of smoke in the emergency operating mode, thereby providing conditions for safe evacuation of people from a fire-struck area, computational fluid dynamics simulation of a fire in a semi-bedded garage was conducted. Using the experimental results of combustion dynamics of a passenger car on fire, optimal positions of ventilation openings were determined. According to recommendations by DIN EN 12101 standard, the operating modes of a ventilation system were verified and optimal start time of the smoke extraction system was defined.

  12. The passive safety systems of the Swr 1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, D.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, a new boiling water reactor (BWR) plant called the SWR 1000 has been developed by Siemens on behalf of Germany's electric utilities. This new plant design concept incorporates the wide range of operating experience gained with German BWRs. The main objective behind developing the SWR 1000 was to design a plant with a rated electric output of approximately 1000 MW which would not only have a lower capital cost and lower power generating costs but would also provide a much higher level of nuclear safety compared to plants currently in operation. This safety-related goal has been met through, for example, the use of passive safety equipment. Passive systems make a significant contribution towards increasing the over-all level of plant safety due to the way in which they operate. They function solely accord-ing to basic laws of nature, such as gravity, and perform their designated functions with-out any need for electric power or other sources of external energy, or signals from instrumentation and control (I and C) equipment. The passive safety systems have been designed such that design basis accidents can be controlled using just these systems alone. However, the design concept of the SWR 1000 is nevertheless still based on the provision of active safety systems in addition to passive systems. (author)

  13. Passive Decay Heat Removal System for Micro Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jangsik; Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Dry cooling system is applied as waste heat removal system therefore it is able to consider wide construction site. Schematic figure of the reactor is shown in Fig. 1. In safety features, the reactor has double containment and passive decay heat removal (PDHR) system. The double containment prevents leakage from reactor coolant system to be emitted into environment. The passive decay heat removal system copes with design basis accidents (DBAs). Micros Modular Reactor (MMR) which has been being developed in KAIST is S-CO{sub 2} gas cooled reactor and shows many advantages. The S-CO{sub 2} power cycle reduces size of compressor, and it makes small size of power plant enough to be transported by trailer.The passive residual heat removal system is designed and thermal hydraulic (TH) analysis on coolant system is accomplished. In this research, the design process and TH analysis results are presented. PDHR system is designed for MMR and coolant system with the PDHR system is analyzed by MARS-KS code. Conservative assumptions are applied and the results show that PDHR system keeps coolant system under the design limitation.

  14. AC-600 passive ECRHR system and its research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bingde; Xiao Zejun; Zhou Renmin; Liu Yiyang

    1997-01-01

    The secondary-side passive emergency core residual heat removal system (ECRHR System) is an important part of AC-600 PWR passive safety system, with which the core decay heat can be removed through nature circulation in primary and secondary system. Since 1991, the program for AC-600 passive ECRHR system has been conducted to investigate its distinct thermal-hydraulic phenomena, heat removal capability, affecting factors, and to develop computer codes. The test facility, designed according to the power/volume simulating law, is a full pressure and temperature operating loop with volume scaling factor of 1/390. It is composed of main loop system, emergence feedwater system, depression system, heat tracing, I and C system and power supply system. A total of sixteen tests is planned in first stage and fifteen of them have been done. The preliminary result analysis showed that the system has efficient heat removal capability in most conditions and some special thermal hydraulic phenomena, for example, flow fluctuation, which has negative impact on system's nature circulation, were identified

  15. Ventilating system for reprocessing of nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szulinski, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear facility such as a reprocessing plant for nuclear fuel rods, the central air cleaner discharging ventilating gas to the atmosphere must meet preselected standards not only as to the momentary concentration of radioactive components, but also as to total quantity per year. In order to comply more satisfactorily with such standards, reprocessing steps are conducted by remote control in a plurality of separate compartments. The air flow for each compartment is regulated so that the air inventory for each compartment has a slow turnover rate of more than a day but less than a year, which slow rate is conveniently designated as quasihermetic sealing. The air inventory in each such compartment is recirculated through a specialized processing unit adapted to cool and/or filter and/or otherwise process the gas. Stale air is withdrawn from such recirculating inventory and fresh air is injected (eg., By the less than perfect sealing of a compartment) into such recirculating inventory so that the air turnover rate is more than a day but less than a year. The amount of air directed through the manifold and duct system from the reprocessing units to the central air cleaner is less than in reprocessing plants of conventional design

  16. Ventilation system type, classroom environmental quality and pupils' perceptions and symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Jie; Wargocki, Pawel; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated indoor climate and window opening behaviour by pupils, as well as their perceptions and symptoms in classrooms with different types of ventilation systems. Four classrooms were selected in the same school in suburban Denmark. Classroom ventilation was achieved either......-heating and heating seasons; CO2 concentration was used to estimate average classroom ventilation rates. At the end of each measuring period, the pupils were asked to report their perceptions of the indoor environment and their acute health-related symptoms. The classroom in which ventilation was achieved by manually...... operable windows had the highest air temperatures and CO2 concentrations during both non-heating and heating season; the estimated average air-change rate was lowest in this classroom. The classroom with mechanical ventilation had the highest estimated average air-change rate. Windows were frequently...

  17. evaluation of a modified passive solar housing system for poultry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The hourly efficiency of the solar brick passive system was estimated at about 78.42% in a day of May and ... to high cost and unavailability of kerosene in most developing .... sulted in intermittent rainfall, cloud cover and sunshine. From the ...

  18. Performance of the prism reactor's passive decay heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, P.M.; Hunsbedt, A.

    1989-01-01

    The PRISM modular reactor concept has a totally passive safety-grade decay heat removal system referred to as the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that rejects heat from the reactor by radiation and natural convection of air. The system is inherently reliable and is not subject to the failure modes commonly associated with active cooling systems. The thermal performance of RVACS exceeds requirements and significant thermal margins exist. RVACS has been shown to perform its function under many postulated accident conditions. The PRISM power plant is equipped with three methods for shutdown: condenser cooling in conjunction with intermediate sodium and steam generator systems, and auxiliary cooling system (ACS) which removes heat from the steam generator by natural convection of air and transport of heat from the core by natural convection in the primary and intermediate systems, and a safety- grade reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) which removes heat passively from the reactor containment vessel by natural convection of air. The combination of one active and two passive systems provides a highly reliable and economical shutdown heat removal system. This paper provides a summary of the RVACS thermal performance for expected operating conditions and postulated accident events. The supporting experimental work, which substantiates the performance predictions, is also summarized

  19. Power system harmonics and passive filter designs

    CERN Document Server

    Das, J C

    2015-01-01

    J.C. Das is a consultant of electrical power systems at Power Systems Studies, Inc., USA. He is Life Fellow of IEEE (UK), Fellow of IET (India), and has authored approximately sixty technical papers and published 190 study reports of real-world power systems. He is the author of three books including ARC Flash Hazard Analysis and Mitigation. He is a registered P.E. in the states of Georgia and Oklahoma, C.Eng. in UK, and Eur Ing in Europe. J. C. Das is also a member of CIGRE, Federation of European Engineers, and other technical associations and organizations.

  20. Numerical Analysis of a Passive Containment Filtered Venting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taejoon; Ha, Huiun; Heo, Sun

    2014-01-01

    The passive Containment Filtered Venting system (CFVS) does not have principally any kind of isolation valves or filtering devices which need periodic maintenance. In this study, the hydro-thermal analysis is presented to investigate the existence of flow instability in the passive CFVS and its performance under the pressure change of APR+ containment building with LB-LOCA M/E data. The Passive Containment Filtered Venting System was suggested as a part in i-Power development project and the operation mechanism was investigated by numerical modeling and simulation using GOTHIC8.0 system code. There are four Phases for consideration to investigate the pressurization of the containment building, loss of hydrostatic head in the pipe line of CFVS, opening of pipe line and gas ejection to the coolant tank, and the head recovery inside the pipe as the containment gas exhausted. The simulation results show that gas generation rate determine the timing of head recovery in the CFVS pipe line and that the equipment of various devices inducing pressure loss at the pipe can give the capacity of Phase control of the passive CFVS operation

  1. Power Control for Passive QAM Multisensor Backscatter Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengbo Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve good quality of service level such as throughput, power control is of great importance to passive quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM multisensor backscatter communication systems. First, we established the RF energy harvesting model and gave the energy condition. In order to minimize the interference of subcarriers and increase the spectral efficiency, then, the colocated passive QAM backscatter communication signal model is presented and the nonlinear optimization problems of power control are solved for passive QAM backscatter communication systems. Solutions include maximum and minimum access interval, the maximum and minimum duty cycle, and the minimal RF-harvested energy under the energy condition for node operating. Using the solutions above, the maximum throughput of passive QAM backscatter communication systems is analyzed and numerical calculation is made finally. Numerical calculation shows that the maximal throughput decreases with the consumed power and the number of sensors, and the maximum throughput is decreased quickly with the increase of the number of sensors. Especially, for a given consumed power of sensor, it can be seen that the throughput decreases with the duty cycle and the number of sensors has little effect on the throughput.

  2. A simulation Model of the Reactor Hall Ventilation and air Conditioning Systems of ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Rahman, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    Although the conceptual design for any system differs from one designer to another. each of them aims to achieve the function of the system required. the ventilation and air conditioning system of reactors hall is one of those systems that really differs but always dose its function for which it is designed. thus, ventilation and air conditioning in some reactor hall constitute only one system whereas in some other ones, they are separate systems. the Egypt Research Reactor-2 (ETRR-2)represents the second type. most studies conducted on ventilation and air conditioning simulation models either in traditional building or for research rectors show that those models were not designed similarly to the model of the hall of ETRR-2 in which ventilation and air conditioning constitute two separate systems.besides, those studies experimented on ventilation and air conditioning simulation models of reactor building predict the temperature and humidity inside these buildings at certain outside condition and it is difficult to predict when the outside conditions are changed . also those studies do not discuss the influences of reactor power changes. therefore, the present work deals with a computational study backed by infield experimental measurements of the performance of the ventilation and air conditioning systems of reactor hall during normal operation at different outside conditions as well as at different levels of reactor power

  3. Design of Mine Ventilators Monitoring System Based on Wireless Sensor Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Sheng; Song Haiqiang

    2012-01-01

    A monitoring system for a mine ventilator is designed based on ZigBee wireless sensor network technology in the paper. The system consists of a sink node, sensor nodes, industrial personal computer and several sensors. Sensor nodes communicate with the sink node through the ZigBee wireless sensor network. The sink node connects with the configuration software on the pc via serial port. The system can collect or calculate vibration, temperature, negative pressure, air volume and other information of the mine ventilator. Meanwhile the system accurately monitors operating condition of the ventilator through these parameters. Especially it provides the most original information for potential faults of the ventilator. Therefore, there is no doubt that it improves the efficiency of fault diagnosis.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: NEW CONDENSATOR, INC.--THE CONDENSATOR DIESEL ENGINE RETROFIT CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program has tested New Condensator Inc.'s Condensator Diesel Engine Retrofit Crankcase Ventilation System. Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), the ratio of engine fuel consumption to the engine power output, was evaluated for engine...

  5. Design of Mine Ventilators Monitoring System Based on Wireless Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sheng; Song, Haiqiang

    2012-05-01

    A monitoring system for a mine ventilator is designed based on ZigBee wireless sensor network technology in the paper. The system consists of a sink node, sensor nodes, industrial personal computer and several sensors. Sensor nodes communicate with the sink node through the ZigBee wireless sensor network. The sink node connects with the configuration software on the pc via serial port. The system can collect or calculate vibration, temperature, negative pressure, air volume and other information of the mine ventilator. Meanwhile the system accurately monitors operating condition of the ventilator through these parameters. Especially it provides the most original information for potential faults of the ventilator. Therefore, there is no doubt that it improves the efficiency of fault diagnosis.

  6. An open-loop, physiologic model-based decision support system can provide appropriate ventilator settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karbing, Dan Stieper; Spadaro, Savino; Dey, Nilanjan

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the physiologic effects of applying advice on mechanical ventilation by an open-loop, physiologic model-based clinical decision support system. DESIGN: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: University and Regional Hospitals' ICUs. PATIENTS: Varied adult ICU population...

  7. London 2012 Paralympic swimming: passive drag and the classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yim-Taek; Burkett, Brendan; Osborough, Conor; Formosa, Danielle; Payton, Carl

    2013-09-01

    The key difference between the Olympic and Paralympic Games is the use of classification systems within Paralympic sports to provide a fair competition for athletes with a range of physical disabilities. In 2009, the International Paralympic Committee mandated the development of new, evidence-based classification systems. This study aims to assess objectively the swimming classification system by determining the relationship between passive drag and level of swimming-specific impairment, as defined by the current swimming class. Data were collected on participants at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. The passive drag force of 113 swimmers (classes 3-14) was measured using an electro-mechanical towing device and load cell. Swimmers were towed on the surface of a swimming pool at 1.5 m/s while holding their most streamlined position. Passive drag ranged from 24.9 to 82.8 N; the normalised drag (drag/mass) ranged from 0.45 to 1.86 N/kg. Significant negative associations were found between drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.41, p < 0.01) and normalised drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.60, p < 0.01). The mean difference in drag between adjacent classes was inconsistent, ranging from 0 N (6 vs 7) to 11.9 N (5 vs 6). Reciprocal Ponderal Index (a measure of slenderness) correlated moderately with normalised drag (r(P) = -0.40, p < 0.01). Although swimmers with the lowest swimming class experienced the highest passive drag and vice versa, the inconsistent difference in mean passive drag between adjacent classes indicates that the current classification system does not always differentiate clearly between swimming groups.

  8. In vitro growth and leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana (Gardner, 1839 grown in natural ventilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bortolotti da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural ventilation system facilitates gaseous exchanges in in vitro plants promoting changes in the leaf tissue, which can be evaluated through the leaf anatomy, and it allows a cultivation closer to the photoautrophic micropropagation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects on in vitro growth and on the leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana grown in natural and conventional ventilation system with different concentrations of sucrose (0; 15; 30 and 45 L-1 combined with different cultivation systems (conventional micropropagation and natural ventilation system. The culture medium was composed of MS salts, solidified with 7 g L-1 of agar and pH adjusted to 5.8. Forty milliliters of culture medium were distributed in 250 mL flasks, autoclaved at 120 ºC for 20 minutes. The greater plant growth, as well as the greater thickness of the mesophyll was observed with the use of 20 g L-1 sucrose in natural ventilation system. Plants grown in natural ventilation system showed a thicker leaf mesophyll, which is directly related to photoautotrophic crops. The natural ventilation system induced more elliptical stomata and probably more functional formats.

  9. Study on pollution control in residential kitchen based on the push-pull ventilation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Bin; Chen, Feng; Dong, Zhibo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •The push-pull ventilation system is proposed to improve IAQ inside kitchen, where air is supplied through slot air curtain and then exhausted through range hood. •CO2 reduction efficiency with application of air curtain in experiment and simulation in breathing zone was 23.7% and 23.......1%, respectively. •By orthogonal method, the influence of factors on pollution control of the push-pull ventilation system was presented....

  10. Indoor radon in three similar two-story houses with different ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokotti, H.; Savolainen, T.; Raunemaa, T.; Kalliokoski, P.

    1989-01-01

    Radon levels were monitored in three similar two-story apartment houses which were located side by side on a gravel esker in eastern Finland. The houses differed only in regard to their ventilation systems which included the following: natural ventilation, mechanical exhaust, and complete mechanical ventilation. The study started immediately when the houses were finished and was continued for two years. Radon concentrations were highest (60-430 Bq/m 3 ) in the beginning of the study period before the tenants moved in. During the following spring and fall, average radon levels of the houses decreased below 100 Bq/m 3 . Radon concentrations varied within a wide range, from 20 to 230 Bq/m 3 , in the apartments. Among the houses, the highest concentrations were found in the house equipped with mechanical exhaust ventilation and the lowest in the house with both a mechanical supply and exhaust system. One reason for the decreasing levels of radon after a one-year occupancy was that the tenants increased the ventilation of their apartments. In the house with complete mechanical ventilation, the stability of ventilation also contributed to the decrease of the indoor radon level

  11. Diffuse Ceiling Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    with conventional ventilation systems (mixing or displacement ventilation), diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk in the occupied zone. Moreover, this ventilation system presents a promising opportunity for energy saving, because of the low pressure loss, extended free...

  12. Operational experience of air washer based ventilation system for power conditioning system of Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.M.; Baghel, S.L.; Parate, J.K.; Ahlawat, Sandeep; Rawlani, B.K.; Chouksey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Indus-2 Synchrotron Accelerator requires high quality conditioned uninterrupted AC mains power for their smooth and reliable operation. Three units of 1670 kVA and one unit of 1100 kVA capacity rotary uninterruptible power conditioning systems (UPS) were installed and commissioned. These UPS units require dust free and cool ambient conditions for smooth operation. In order to meet the ventilation requirements, an evaporative cooling system of 80000 cubic meter/hour capacity with filtration units was designed, installed and commissioned in February 2011 and is operational on round-the-clock basis. Evaporative cooling scheme was chosen as has various advantages over a refrigerated system like lower initial capital costs, lower energy usage, lower running costs, less greenhouse gas and it does not contribute to ozone depletion. The ventilation system filters the environment air in stages up to 5 micron level and being conditioned with an automatic controlled soft water circulating system with cooling pads. An instrumentation and control scheme is included in the system to provide the automation requirements for operating 24 x 7 through the year. All the mechanical, hydraulic and electrical devices are maintained by providing preventive maintenance work without affecting the accelerator machine operation. Availability and reliability of the system was analysed based on the failure data. In Year 2014, the ventilation system was upgraded to accommodate standby blower unit, coupling unit and improved quality of supply air with new air conditioning devices. The control panel monitors the condition of air in the UPS hall and maintainsup to 28°C air temperature and 85% maximum relative humidity in round-the clock shift with more than 98% operational reliability. In this paper, we present design philosophy, installation, instrumentation, testing, operation experience and availability of the ventilation system for Power Conditioning System, Indus complex. (author)

  13. Electrofibrous prefilters for use in nuclear ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, W.; Kuhl, W.D.; Russell, W.L.; Taylor, R.D.; Hebard, H.D.; Biermann, A.H.; Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Lum, B.Y.

    1981-01-01

    We have established a comprehensive program for the US Department of Energy to develop electrofibrous prefilters to extend the life of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters that are used in the nuclear industry. We have selected the electrofibrous filter because, compared to the mechanical fibrous filter, it has a higher efficiency and longer lifetime. Two different electrofibrous filters have been developed for use in nuclear ventilation systems. One prototype is a stationary prefilter while the other is a rolling prefilter. Both prefilters use the same basic filtering technique in which a fibrous filter medium is sandwiched between a high voltage electrode and a ground electrode, both electrodes having a sufficient open area to offer minimum air resistance. The applied voltage on the electrodes generates an electric field that polarizes the filter fibers, which then attract suspended particles via electrostatic forces. The filter media and electrodes have been pleated to provide a sufficiently long particle residence time. The special requirement of protecting the HEPA filter from a high concentration of smoke aerosols during fire conditions led to the development of the rolling, electrofibrous prefilter. We established the feasibility of this concept in a series of tests using commercially available rolling prefilters that were modified for removing smoke aerosols. Although the rolling prefilter concept is not a cost effective measure for the sole purpose of protecting HEPA filters from smoke aerosols, it became cost effective when used primarily for protecting the HEPA filters from normal production aerosols. The same piece of equipment is then used for both normal operating conditions as well as emergency fire conditions. Several prototype electrofibrous rolling prefilters were designed, built and evaluated. The filter evaluations were conducted using NaCl and DOP aerosols as well as smoke aerosols

  14. Use of passive systems to improve plant operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, D.

    2000-01-01

    In a deregulated future, a utility's strength will depend on its ability to be cost competitive in the marketplace. However, the competitive advantage of nuclear power will depend on each owner's ability to reduce Operating and Maintenance (O and M) costs without sacrificing nuclear safety. The use of passive systems (i.e., systems without any moving parts) can reduce plant O and M costs while increasing safety in nuclear power plants. (author)

  15. Change-over natural and mechanical ventilation system energy consumption in single-family buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Maria; Szulgowska-Zgrzywa, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    The parameters of the outside air in Poland cause that in winter it is reasonable to use a mechanical ventilation equipped with a heat recovery exchanger. The time of spring, autumn, summer evenings and nights are often characterized by the parameters of the air, which allow for a natural ventilation and reduce the electricity consumption. The article presents the possibilities of energy consumption reduction for three energy standards of buildings located in Poland, ventilated by a change-over hybrid system. The analysis was prepared on the assumption that the air-to-water heat pump is the heat source for the buildings.

  16. Use of perforated acoustic panels as supply air diffusers in diffuse ceiling ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iqbal, Ahsan; Kazemi, Seyed Hossein; Ardkapan, Siamak Rahimi

    Ventilation is needed for diluting and removing the contaminants, odour and excess heat from the building interior. It is important that the inhabitants perceive the ventilated spaces as comfortable. Therefore, the supply air should reach all parts of the occupied zones. Troldtekt has been...... manufacturing perforated acoustic panels for the last 13 years. The panels can be used not only in applications related to acoustics but also as low pressure drop supply air diffusers, particularly in diffuse ceiling ventilation systems. The present study verifies on a theoretically level the performance...

  17. Ventilation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future

  18. Mixing Ventilation System in a Single-Aisle Aircraft Cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Zhang, Chen; Wojcik, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    . It is also proven possible to create an acceptable draught level in the cabin. Experiments with tracer gas indicated that the contaminant from exhalation of one manikin is fully mixed in the cabin, and the experiment with personalised ventilation did not show much improvement in this situation....

  19. Plant experience with check valves in passive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahladsingh, R R [GKN Joint Nuclear Power Plant, Dodewaard (Netherlands)

    1996-12-01

    In the design of the advanced nuclear reactors there is a tendency to introduce more passive safety systems. The 25 year old design of the GKN nuclear reactor is different from the present BWR reactors because of some special features, such as the Natural Circulation - and the Passive Isolation Condenser system. When reviewing the design, one can conclude that the plant has 25 years of experience with check valves in passive systems and as passive components in systems. The result of this experience has been modeled in a plant-specific ``living PSA`` for the plant. A data-analysis has been performed on components which are related to the safety systems in the plant. As part of this study also the check valves have been taken in consideration. At GKN, the check valves have shown to be reliable components in the systems and no catastrophic failures have been experienced during the 25 years of operation. Especially the Isolation Condenser with its operation experience can contribute substantially to the insight of check valves in stand-by position at reactor pressure and operating by gravity under different pressure conditions. With the introduction of several passive systems in the SBWR-600 design, such as the Isolation Condensers, Gravity Driven Cooling, and Suppression Pool Cooling System, the issue of reliability of check valves in these systems is actual. Some critical aspects for study in connection with check valves are: What is the reliability of a check valve in a system at reactor pressure, to open on demand; what is the reliability of a check valve in a system at low pressure (gravity), to open on demand; what is the reliability of a check valve to open/close when the stand-by check wave is at zero differential pressure. The plant experience with check valves in a few essential safety systems is described and a brief introduction will be made about the application of check valves in the design of the new generation reactors is given. (author). 6 figs, 1 tab.

  20. Reduced scale PWR passive safety system designing by genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Joao J. da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos M.; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of 'Design by Genetic Algorithms (DbyGA)', applied to a new reduced scale system problem. The design problem of a passive thermal-hydraulic safety system, considering dimensional and operational constraints, has been solved. Taking into account the passive safety characteristics of the last nuclear reactor generation, a PWR core under natural circulation is used in order to demonstrate the methodology applicability. The results revealed that some solutions (reduced scale system DbyGA) are capable of reproducing, both accurately and simultaneously, much of the physical phenomena that occur in real scale and operating conditions. However, some aspects, revealed by studies of cases, pointed important possibilities to DbyGA methodological performance improvement

  1. Passive Strategy with Integrated Passive Safety System (IPSS) for DBAs in SBO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jihee; Choi, Jae Young; Jeon, Inseop; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Beznau nuclear power plant. The third solution is to make a cooling redundancy. Integrated passive safety system (IPSS) proposed in 2011 is a representative design adding big water tanks outside containment on a top of auxiliary building as a heat sink and water supplier. Three methods are each merit and demerit. After the design concept of IPSS was proposed, main functions were analyzed to be verified. With the simulated performances of IPSS in conservative conditions, passive counter strategies to cope with design based accidents (DBAs) were proposed and described in a basic condition of a SBO.

  2. Energy Performance of a Novel System Combining Natural Ventilation with Diffuse Ceiling Inlet and Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao

    and thermally activated building systems (TABS) for cooling and ventilation in future Danish office buildings. The new solution would have the special potential of using natural ventilation all year round even in the extremely cold seasons without any draught risk. The main focuses of this study are the energy...

  3. Simulation of a passive auxiliary feedwater system with TRACE5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorduy, María; Gallardo, Sergio; Verdú, Gumersindo, E-mail: maloral@upv.es, E-mail: sergalbe@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Instituto Universitario de Seguridad Industrial, Radiofísica y Medioambiental (ISIRYM), València (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The study of the nuclear power plant accidents occurred in recent decades, as well as the probabilistic risk assessment carried out for this type of facility, present human error as one of the main contingency factors. For this reason, the design and development of generation III, III+ and IV reactors, which include inherent and passive safety systems, have been promoted. In this work, a TRACE5 model of ATLAS (Advanced Thermal- Hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) is used to reproduce an accidental scenario consisting in a prolonged Station BlackOut (SBO). In particular, the A1.2 test of the OECD-ATLAS project is analyzed, whose purpose is to study the primary system cooling by means of the water supply to one of the steam generators from a Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System (PAFS). This safety feature prevents the loss of secondary system inventory by means of the steam condensation and its recirculation. Thus, the conservation of a heat sink allows the natural circulation flow rate until restoring stable conditions. For the reproduction of the test, an ATLAS model has been adapted to the experiment conditions, and a PAFS has been incorporated. >From the simulation test results, the main thermal-hydraulic variables (pressure, flow rates, collapsed water level and temperature) are analyzed in the different circuits, contrasting them with experimental data series. As a conclusion, the work shows the TRACE5 code capability to correctly simulate the behavior of a passive feedwater system. (author)

  4. Clinical assessment of a commercial delivery system for aerosol ventilation scanning by comparison with Krypton-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.; Eriksson, L.; Andersson, A.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial aerosol delivery system for ventilation scanning was evaluated in 23 patients with lung disease involving regional disturbances of ventilation. Ventilation scans obtained after inhalation of an aerosol labeled with In-113m were compared with Kr-81m ventilation scans. An indirect comparison was also made with a settling bag technique. There was close agreement between the aerosol and the Kr-81m ventilation scans in all of the patients. The aerosol outlined the ventilated parts of the lung adequately, and central deposition of particles was minimal. The penetration of the aerosol into the lung was higher with the delivery system that with a settling bag system. The aerosol delivery system appears suitable for clinical pulmonary ventilation scintigraphy

  5. Ventilation systems as an effective tool for control of radon daughter concentration in mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-10-01

    Introduced with a brief discussion of the key role of ventilation in controlling mine atmospheres, the effects of the design of the ventilation system on the control of radon daughter concentrations are illustrated with specific reference to Alcan's Director Mine, St-Lawrence, Nfld. (This fluorspar mine was found to have high radon concentrations due to mine water bringing in dissolved radon.) After a discussion of the health physics history of the mine, the various phases of the ventilation system design and the general results are detailed. The author draws some conclusions having general application to the design of any mine with a radon or thoron daughter concentration. These include minimizing the 'age' of the air; the need for continuous ventilation in all areas; the value of remote control and monitoring; and the benefits of mine pressurization

  6. Operating theatre ventilation systems and microbial air contamination in total joint replacement surgery: results of the GISIO-ISChIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, A; Auxilia, F; Barchitta, M; Cristina, M L; D'Alessandro, D; Mura, I; Nobile, M; Pasquarella, C

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown a higher rate of surgical site infections in hip prosthesis implantation using unidirectional airflow ventilation compared with turbulent ventilation. However, these studies did not measure the air microbial quality of operating theatres (OTs), and assumed it to be compliant with the recommended standards for this ventilation technique. To evaluate airborne microbial contamination in OTs during hip and knee replacement surgery, and compare the findings with values recommended for joint replacement surgery. Air samplings were performed in 28 OTs supplied with unidirectional, turbulent and mixed airflow ventilation. Samples were collected using passive sampling to determine the index of microbial air contamination (IMA). Active sampling was also performed in some of the OTs. The average number of people in the OT and the number of door openings during the sampling period were recorded. In total, 1228 elective prosthesis procedures (60.1% hip and 39.9% knee) were included in this study. Of passive samplings performed during surgical activity in unidirectional airflow ventilation OTs (U-OTs) and mixed airflow OTs (M-OTs), 58.9% and 87.6% had IMA values >2, respectively. Of samplings performed during surgical activity in turbulent airflow OTs (T-OTs) and in turbulent airflow OTs with the surgical team wearing Steri-Shield Turbo Helmets (TH-OTs), 8.6% and 60% had IMA values ≤ 2, respectively. Positive correlation was found between IMA values and the number of people in the OT and the number of door openings (P systems always provide acceptable airborne bacterial counts. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A new system for continuous and remote monitoring of patients receiving home mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, L

    2016-09-01

    Home mechanical ventilation is the treatment of patients with respiratory failure or insufficiency by means of a mechanical ventilator at a patient's home. In order to allow remote patient monitoring, several tele-monitoring systems have been introduced in the last few years. However, most of them usually do not allow real-time services, as they have their own proprietary communication protocol implemented and some ventilation parameters are not always measured. Moreover, they monitor only some breaths during the whole day, despite the fact that a patient's respiratory state may change continuously during the day. In order to reduce the above drawbacks, this work reports the development of a novel remote monitoring system for long-term, home-based ventilation therapy; the proposed system allows for continuous monitoring of the main physical quantities involved during home-care ventilation (e.g., differential pressure, volume, and air flow rate) and is developed in order to allow observations of different remote therapy units located in different places of a city, region, or country. The developed remote patient monitoring system is able to detect various clinical events (e.g., events of tube disconnection and sleep apnea events) and has been successfully tested by means of experimental tests carried out with pulmonary ventilators typically used to support sick patients.

  8. Passive Decay Heat Removal Strategy of Integrated Passive Safety System (IPSS) for SBO-combined Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Ho; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The weak points of nuclear safety would be in outmoded nuclear power plants like the Fukushima reactors. One of the systems for the safety enhancement is integrated passive safety system (IPSS) proposed after the Fukushima accidents. It has the five functions for the prevention and mitigation of a severe accident. Passive decay heat removal (PDHR) strategy using IPSS is proposed for coping with SBO-combined accidents in this paper. The two systems for removing decay heat before core-melt were applied in the strategy. The accidents were simulated by MARS code. The reference reactor was OPR1000, specifically Ulchin-3 and 4. The accidents included loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) because the coolant losses could be occurred in the SBO condition. The examples were the stuck open of PSV, the abnormal open of SDV and the leakage of RCP seal water. Also, as LOCAs with the failure of active safety injection systems were considered, various LOCAs were simulated in SBO. Based on the thermal hydraulic analysis, the probabilistic safety analysis was carried out for the PDHR strategy to estimate the safety enhancement in terms of the variation of core damage frequency. AIMS-PSA developed by KAERI was used for calculating CDF of the plant. The IPSS was applied in the PDHR strategy which was developed in order to cope with the SBO-combined accidents. The estimation for initiating SGGI or PSIS was based on the pressure in RCS. The simulations for accidents showed that the decay heat could be removed for the safety duration time in SBO. The increase of safety duration time from the strategy provides the increase of time for the restoration of AC power.

  9. Preliminary safety evaluation for CSR1000 with passive safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pan; Gou, Junli; Shan, Jianqiang; Zhang, Bo; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The basic information of a Chinese SCWR concept CSR1000 is introduced. • An innovative passive safety system is proposed for CSR1000. • 6 Transients and 3 accidents are analysed with system code SCTRAN. • The passive safety systems greatly mitigate the consequences of these incidents. • The inherent safety of CSR1000 is enhanced. - Abstract: This paper describes the preliminary safety analysis of the Chinese Supercritical water cooled Reactor (CSR1000), which is proposed by Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC). The two-pass core design applied to CSR1000 decreases the fuel cladding temperature and flattens the power distribution of the core at normal operation condition. Each fuel assembly is made up of four sub-assemblies with downward-flow water rods, which is favorable to the core cooling during abnormal conditions due to the large water inventory of the water rods. Additionally, a passive safety system is proposed for CSR1000 to increase the safety reliability at abnormal conditions. In this paper, accidents of “pump seizure”, “loss of coolant flow accidents (LOFA)”, “core depressurization”, as well as some typical transients are analysed with code SCTRAN, which is a one-dimensional safety analysis code for SCWRs. The results indicate that the maximum cladding surface temperatures (MCST), which is the most important safety criterion, of the both passes in the mentioned incidents are all below the safety criterion by a large margin. The sensitivity analyses of the delay time of RCPs trip in “loss of offsite power” and the delay time of RMT actuation in “loss of coolant flowrate” were also included in this paper. The analyses have shown that the core design of CSR1000 is feasible and the proposed passive safety system is capable of mitigating the consequences of the selected abnormalities

  10. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options

  11. Antenna array geometry optimization for a passive coherent localisation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Peter; Kuschel, Heiner; O'Hagan, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Passive Coherent Localisation (PCL), also known as Passive Radar, making use of RF sources of opportunity such as Radio or TV Broadcasting Stations, Cellular Phone Network Base Stations, etc. is an advancing technology for covert operation because no active radar transmitter is required. It is also an attractive addition to existing active radar stations because it has the potential to discover low-flying and low-observable targets. The CORA (Covert Radar) experimental passive radar system currently developed at Fraunhofer-FHR features a multi-channel digital radar receiver and a circular antenna array with separate elements for the VHF- and the UHF-range and is used to exploit alternatively Digital Audio (DAB) or Video Broadcasting (DVB-T) signals. For an extension of the system, a wideband antenna array is being designed for which a new discone antenna element has been developed covering the full DVB-T frequency range. The present paper describes the outline of the system and the numerical modelling and optimisation methods applied to solve the complex task of antenna array design: Electromagnetic full wave analysis is required for the parametric design of the antenna elements while combinatorial optimization methods are applied to find the best array positions and excitation coefficients for a regular omni-directional antenna performance. The different steps are combined in an iterative loop until the optimum array layout is found. Simulation and experimental results for the current system will be shown.

  12. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  13. Test Protocol for Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air by Residential Ventilation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barley, C. D.; Anderson, R.; Hendron, B.; Hancock, E.

    2007-12-01

    This test and analysis protocol has been developed as a practical approach for measuring outside air distribution in homes. It has been used successfully in field tests and has led to significant insights on ventilation design issues. Performance advantages of more sophisticated ventilation systems over simpler, less-costly designs have been verified, and specific problems, such as airflow short-circuiting, have been identified.

  14. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed

  15. A new variable stiffness suspension system: passive case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Anubi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, analysis, and experimental validation of the passive case of a variable stiffness suspension system. The central concept is based on a recently designed variable stiffness mechanism. It consists of a horizontal control strut and a vertical strut. The main idea is to vary the load transfer ratio by moving the location of the point of attachment of the vertical strut to the car body. This movement is controlled passively using the horizontal strut. The system is analyzed using an L2-gain analysis based on the concept of energy dissipation. The analyses, simulation, and experimental results show that the variable stiffness suspension achieves better performance than the constant stiffness counterpart. The performance criteria used are; ride comfort, characterized by the car body acceleration, suspension deflection, and road holding, characterized by tire deflection.

  16. Passive safety systems for decay heat removal of MRX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochiai, M; Iida, H; Hoshi, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Ship System Lab.

    1996-12-01

    The MRX (marine Reactor X) is an advanced marine reactor, its design has been studied in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. It is characterized by four features, integral type PWR, in-vessel type control rod drive mechanisms, water-filled containment vessel and passive decay heat removal system. A water-filled containment vessel is of great advantage since it ensures compactness of a reactor plant by realizing compact radiation shielding. The containment vessel also yields passive safety of MRX in the event of a LOCA by passively maintaining core flooding without any emergency water injection. Natural circulation of water in the vessels (reactor and containment vessels) is one of key factors of passive decay heat removal systems of MRX, since decay heat is transferred from fuel rods to atmosphere by natural circulation of the primary water, water in the containment vessel and thermal medium in heat pipe system for the containment vessel water cooling in case of long terms cooling after a LOCA as well as after reactor scram. Thus, the ideal of water-filled containment vessel is considered to be very profitable and significant in safety and economical point of view. This idea is, however, not so familiar for a conventional nuclear system, so experimental and analytical efforts are carried out for evaluation of hydrothermal behaviours in the reactor pressure vessel and in the containment vessel in the event of a LOCA. The results show the effectiveness of the new design concept. Additional work will also be conducted to investigate the practical maintenance of instruments in the containment vessel. (author). 4 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  17. Contaminants in ventilated filling boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, D. T.; Linden, P. F.

    While energy efficiency is important, the adoption of energy-efficient ventilation systems still requires the provision of acceptable indoor air quality. Many low-energy systems, such as displacement or natural ventilation, rely on temperature stratification within the interior environment, always extracting the warmest air from the top of the room. Understanding buoyancy-driven convection in a confined ventilated space is key to understanding the flow that develops with many of these modern low-energy ventilation schemes. In this work we study the transport of an initially uniformly distributed passive contaminant in a displacement-ventilated space. Representing a heat source as an ideal sourced of buoyancy, analytical and numerical models are developed that allow us to compare the average efficiency of contaminant removal between traditional mixing and modern low-energy systems. A set of small-scale analogue laboratory experiments was also conducted to further validate our analytical and numerical solutions.We find that on average traditional and low-energy ventilation methods are similar with regard to pollutant flushing efficiency. This is because the concentration being extracted from the system at any given time is approximately the same for both systems. However, very different vertical concentration gradients exist. For the low-energy system, a peak in contaminant concentration occurs at the temperature interface that is established within the space. This interface is typically designed to sit at some intermediate height in the space. Since this peak does not coincide with the extraction point, displacement ventilation does not offer the same benefits for pollutant flushing as it does for buoyancy removal.

  18. Diffuse ceiling ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen

    Diffuse ceiling ventilation is an innovative ventilation concept where the suspended ceiling serves as air diffuser to supply fresh air into the room. Compared with conventional ventilation systems, diffuse ceiling ventilation can significantly reduce or even eliminate draught risk due to the low...

  19. Design Principles for Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system -Hybrid Ventilation. ....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and - principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples....

  20. LOCA analysis of SCWR-M with passive safety system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.J., E-mail: xiaojingliu@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Fu, S.W. [Navy University of Engineering, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Xu, Z.H. [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute, Shanghai (China); Yang, Y.H. [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dong Chuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cheng, X. [Institute of Fusion and Nuclear Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of the ATHLET-SC code to the trans-critical analysis for SCWR. • Development of a passive safety system for SCWR-M. • Analysis of hot/cold leg LOCA behaviour with different break size. • Introduction of some mitigation measures for SCWR-M -- Abstract: A new SCWR conceptual design (mixed spectrum supercritical water cooled reactor: SCWR-M) is proposed by Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). R and D activities covering core design, safety system design and code development of SCWR-M are launched at SJTU. Safety system design and analysis is one of the key tasks during the development of SCWR-M. Considering the current advanced reactor design, a new passive safety system for SCWR-M including isolation cooling system (ICS), accumulator injection system (ACC), gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) and automatic depressurization system (ADS) is proposed. Based on the modified and preliminarily assessed system code ATHLET-SC, loss of coolant accident (LOCA) analysis for hot and cold leg is performed in this paper. Three different break sizes are analyzed to clarify the hot and cold LOCA characteristics of the SCWR-M. The influence of the break location and break size on the safety performance of SCWR-M is also concluded. Several measures to induce the core coolant flow and to mitigate core heating up are also discussed. The results achieved so far demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed passive safety system to keep the SCWR-M core at safety condition during loss of coolant accident.

  1. Influence of the ventilation system on thermal comfort of the chilled panel system in heating mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Zhe; Ding, Yan; Wang, Shuo; Yin, Xinglei; Wang, Menglei [Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-12-15

    In heating mode, fresh air is still essential for a chilled panel system in order to ensure the indoor air quality. In this paper, a chilled ceiling panel system was designed and built in a typical office room. The thermal environment and thermal comfort in the room were fully measured and evaluated by using the Fanger's PMV-PPD model and the standard of ISO 7730 respectively, when room was heated in two modes, one of which is the chilled panel heating mode and the other of which is the combined heating mode of chilled panel and supply air. The research results indicate that in the combined mode, ceiling ventilation improves the general thermal comfort and reduces the risk of local discomfort. Under the condition of same general thermal comfort, the heating supply upper limit of chilled panel can be increased by 12.3% because of air mixing effect caused by introduction of air ventilation. (author)

  2. Performance evaluation of a novel personalized ventilation-personalized exhaust system for airborne infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Sekhar, S C; Cheong, K W D; Raphael, B

    2015-04-01

    In the context of airborne infection control, it is critical that the ventilation system is able to extract the contaminated exhaled air within the shortest possible time. To minimize the spread of contaminated air exhaled by occupants efficiently, a novel personalized ventilation (PV)-personalized exhaust (PE) system has been developed, which aims to exhaust the exhaled air as much as possible from around the infected person (IP). The PV-PE system was studied experimentally for a particular healthcare setting based on a typical consultation room geometry and four different medical consultation positions of an IP and a healthy person (HP). Experiments using two types of tracer gases were conducted to evaluate two types of PE: Top-PE and Shoulder-PE under two different background ventilation systems: Mixing Ventilation and Displacement Ventilation. Personalized exposure effectiveness, intake fraction (iF) and exposure reduction (ε) were used as indices to evaluate the PV-PE system. The results show that the combined PV-PE system for the HP achieves the lowest intake fraction; and the use of PE system for the IP alone shows much better performance than using PV system for the HP alone. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Waste tank ventilation rates measured with a tracer gas method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mitroshkov, A.V.

    1998-08-01

    Passive ventilation with the atmosphere is used to prevent accumulation of waste gases and vapors in the headspaces of 132 of the 177 high-level radioactive waste Tanks at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. Measurements of the passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of two key safety issues associated with the rates of flammable gas production and accumulation and the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out. Direct measurement of passive ventilation rates using mass flow meters is not feasible because ventilation occurs va multiple pathways to the atmosphere (i.e., via the filtered breather riser and unsealed tank risers and pits), as well as via underground connections to other tanks, junction boxes, and inactive ventilation systems. The tracer gas method discussed in this report provides a direct measurement of the rate at which gases are removed by ventilation and an indirect measurement of the ventilation rate. The tracer gas behaves as a surrogate of the waste-generated gases, but it is only diminished via ventilation, whereas the waste gases are continuously released by the waste and may be subject to depletion mechanisms other than ventilation. The fiscal year 1998 tracer studies provide new evidence that significant exchange of air occurs between tanks via the underground cascade pipes. Most of the single-shell waste tanks are connected via 7.6-cm diameter cascade pipes to one or two adjacent tanks. Tracer gas studies of the Tank U-102/U-103 system indicated that the ventilation occurring via the cascade line could be a significant fraction of the total ventilation. In this two-tank cascade, air evidently flowed from Tank U-103 to Tank U-102 for a time and then was observed to flow from Tank U-102 to Tank U-103

  4. Assessment of the impact of dipped guideways on urban rail transit systems: Ventilation and safety requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The ventilation and fire safety requirements for subway tunnels with dipped profiles between stations as compared to subway tunnels with level profiles were evaluated. This evaluation is based upon computer simulations of a train fire emergency condition. Each of the tunnel configurations evaluated was developed from characteristics that are representative of modern transit systems. The results of the study indicate that: (1) The level tunnel system required about 10% more station cooling than dipped tunnel systems in order to meet design requirements; and (2) The emergency ventilation requirements are greater with dipped tunnel systems than with level tunnel systems.

  5. A numerical study on the performance evaluation of ventilation systems for indoor radon reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Hoon Chae; Choi, Hang Seok; Cho, Seung Yeon; Jeong, Tae Young; Roh, Sung Cheoul [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Numerical simulations were conducted using computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the effect of ventilation conditions on radon ({sup 222}Rn) reduction performance in a residential building. The results indicate that at the same ventilation rate, a mechanical ventilation system is more effective in reducing indoor radon than a natural ventilation system. For the same ventilation type, the indoor radon concentration decreases as the ventilation rate increases. When the air change per hour (ACH) was 1, the indoor radon concentration was maintained at less than 100 Bq/m{sup 3}. However, when the ACH was lowered to 0.01, the average indoor radon concentration in several rooms exceeded 148 Bq/ m{sup 3}. The angle of the inflow air was found to affect the indoor air stream and consequently the distribution of the radon concentration. Even when the ACH was 1, the radon concentrations of some areas were higher than 100 Bq/m{sup 3} for inflow air angles of 5 .deg. and 175 .deg.

  6. COMMIX analysis of AP-600 Passive Containment Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.F.C.; Chien, T.H.; Ding, J.; Sun, J.G.; Sha, W.T.

    1992-01-01

    COMMIX modeling and basic concepts that relate components, i.e., containment, water film cooling, and natural draft air flow systems. of the AP-600 Passive Containment Cooling System are discussed. The critical safety issues during a postulated accident have been identified as (1) maintaining the liquid film outside the steel containment vessel, (2) ensuring the natural convection in the air annulus. and (3) quantifying both heat and mass transfer accurately for the system. The lack of appropriate heat and mass transfer models in the present analysis is addressed. and additional assessment and validation of the proposed models is proposed

  7. Air-conditioning and ventilation systems and components of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guide defines the requirements for the design, implementation and operation of the air-conditioning and ventilation systems of nuclear facilities belonging to safety classes 3 and 4, and for the related documents to be submitted to STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland). Furthermore, the Guide describes the inspections of air-conditioning and ventilation systems to be conducted by STUK during construction and operation of the facilities. As far as systems and components belonging to safety class 2 are concerned, STUK sets additional requirements case by case. In general, air-conditioning systems refer to systems designed to manage the indoor air cleanness, temperature, humidity and movement. In some rooms of a nuclear power plant, ventilation systems are also used to prevent radioactive materials from spreading outside the rooms. Guide YVL1.0 defines the safety principles concerning the air-conditioning and ventilation of nuclear power plants. Guide YVL2.0 gives the requirements for the design of nuclear power plant systems. In addition, YVLGuide groups 3, 4, 5 and 7 deal with the requirements for air-conditioning and ventilation systems with regard to the mechanical equipment, fire prevention, electrical systems, instrumentation and control technology, and the restriction of releases. The rules and regulations issued by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Interior (RakMK, the Finnish building code) concerning the design and operation of air-conditioning and ventilation systems and the related fire protection design bases also apply to nuclear facilities. Exhaust gas treatment systems, condenser vacuum systems of boiling water reactor plants and leak collection systems are excluded from the scope of this Guide

  8. Humidification during invasive and noninvasive mechanical ventilation: 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Ruben D; Walsh, Brian K

    2012-05-01

    We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published between January 1990 and December 2011. The update of this clinical practice guideline is based on 184 clinical trials and systematic reviews, and 10 articles investigating humidification during invasive and noninvasive mechanical ventilation. The following recommendations are made following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) scoring system: 1. Humidification is recommended on every patient receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. 2. Active humidification is suggested for noninvasive mechanical ventilation, as it may improve adherence and comfort. 3. When providing active humidification to patients who are invasively ventilated, it is suggested that the device provide a humidity level between 33 mg H(2)O/L and 44 mg H(2)O/L and gas temperature between 34°C and 41°C at the circuit Y-piece, with a relative humidity of 100%. 4. When providing passive humidification to patients undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation, it is suggested that the HME provide a minimum of 30 mg H(2)O/L. 5. Passive humidification is not recommended for noninvasive mechanical ventilation. 6. When providing humidification to patients with low tidal volumes, such as when lung-protective ventilation strategies are used, HMEs are not recommended because they contribute additional dead space, which can increase the ventilation requirement and P(aCO(2)). 7. It is suggested that HMEs are not used as a prevention strategy for ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  9. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-01-01

    A modification of a common commercial Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilatory rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration

  10. Energy efficient ventilation based on demand humidity control. Demonstration project with 49 apartments in Soenderborg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The aim of the project is to demonstrate how the overall energy consumption in apartment buildings can be reduced through a combination of: 1) Energy efficient ventilation based on demand humidity control; 2) Energy efficient design of the building shell including passive solar and seasonally flexible sunspaces; 3) Use of low temperature heating system. The 3 blocks in the project, each with 16 apartments, are furnished with 3 different ventilation systems: 1) Standard exhaust system according to building codes; 2) Ventilation system with humidity control. Each room is furnished with an air inlet valve controlled by a processor, which monitors the humidity; 3) Standard ventilation system with heat recovery. (au)

  11. Monitoring and energetic performance of two similar semi-closed greenhouse ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coomans, Mathias; Allaerts, Koen; Wittemans, Lieve; Pinxteren, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Measurements on two semi-closed greenhouses and two traditional open greenhouses. • Mechanical and natural ventilation for dehumidification and cooling. • Analyses and comparison of installation controls, indoor climate and energy flows. • Examination of air-to-air heat recuperation efficiency in ventilation unit. • Using the semi-closed systems amounted to energy savings of 13% and 28%. - Abstract: Horticulture is an energy intensive industry when dealing with cold climates such as Western Europe. High energy prices and on-going pressure from international competition are raising demand for energy efficient solutions. In search of reducing greenhouse energy consumption, this study investigates semi-closed systems combining controlled mechanical and natural ventilation with thermal screens. Ventilated greenhouse systems (semi-closed) have been implemented in the greenhouse compartments of two Belgian horticulture research facilities: the Research Station for Vegetable Production Sint-Katelijne-Waver (PSKW) and the Research Center Hoogstraten (PCH). Additionally, two reference compartments were included for comparison of the results. The greenhouses were part of a long-term monitoring campaign in which detailed measurements with a high time resolution were gathered by a central monitoring system. A large amount of data was processed and analysed, including outdoor and indoor climatic parameters, system controls and installation measurements. The ventilated greenhouses obtained energy savings of 13% and 28% for PSKW and PCH respectively, without substantial impact on crop production or indoor climate conditions when compared to the reference compartments. A considerable amount of heat was recovered by the heat recuperation stage in the ventilation unit of PCH, accounting for 12% of the total heat demand. In general, it was demonstrated that the greenhouse heat demand can be reduced significantly by controlled dehumidification with mechanical

  12. Design of the ventilation system of the nuclear facility(I). General requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. M.; Kang, I. S.; Bae, S. M.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, K. J

    1998-03-01

    To assure that the operation of the nuclear ventilation system is effective and economic, the reasonable design of system is essential. As the nuclear ventilation system has to meet the particular conditions; to keep the rooms at an below atmospheric pressure at all times and, furthermore, to maintain frequent air circulation in the rooms, the system needs the big rotating machinery. Consequently, the construction cost and the operational cost of the ventilation system is very high. For maximum function with the minimum cost, areas are to be divided into several zones depending on the level of radioactivity and the once-through air flow in the shortest route should be adopted. The pressure difference between the zones and the number of air circulations per unit time in the rooms must be reasonable, thus, the venting air volume should be of minimum. (author). 19 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs.

  13. Design of the ventilation system of the nuclear facility(I). General requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. M.; Kang, I. S.; Bae, S. M.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, K. J.

    1998-03-01

    To assure that the operation of the nuclear ventilation system is effective and economic, the reasonable design of system is essential. As the nuclear ventilation system has to meet the particular conditions; to keep the rooms at an below atmospheric pressure at all times and, furthermore, to maintain frequent air circulation in the rooms, the system needs the big rotating machinery. Consequently, the construction cost and the operational cost of the ventilation system is very high. For maximum function with the minimum cost, areas are to be divided into several zones depending on the level of radioactivity and the once-through air flow in the shortest route should be adopted. The pressure difference between the zones and the number of air circulations per unit time in the rooms must be reasonable, thus, the venting air volume should be of minimum. (author). 19 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs

  14. Personal Exposure in Displacement Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    1996-01-01

    in the lower part of the room close to the occupant. A personal exposure model for displacement ventilated rooms is proposed. The model takes the influence of gradients and the human thermal boundary layer into account. Two new quantities describing the interaction between a person and the ventilation......Personal exposure in a displacement ventilated room is examined. The stratified flow and the considerable concentration gradients necessitate an improvement of the widely used fully mixing compartmental approach. The exposure of a seated and a standing person in proportion to the stratification...... contaminant sources, this entrainment improves the indoor air quality. Measurements of exposure due to a passive contaminant source show a significant dependence on the flow field as well as on the contaminant source location. Poor system performance is found in the case of a passive contaminant released...

  15. Role of passive valves & devices in poison injection system of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapra, M.K.; Kundu, S.; Vijayan, P.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Sinha, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 300 MWe pressure tube type boiling light water (H 2 O) cooled, heavy water (D 2 O) moderated reactor. The reactor design is based on well-proven water reactor technologies and incorporates a number of passive safety features such as natural circulation core cooling; direct in-bundle injection of light water coolant during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) from Advanced Accumulators and Gravity Driven Water Pool by passive means; Passive Decay Heat Removal using Isolation Condensers, Passive Containment Cooling System and Passive Containment Isolation System. In addition to above, there is another passive safety system named as Passive Poison Injection System (PPIS) which is capable of shutting down the reactor for a prolonged time. It is an additional safety system in AHWR to fulfill the shutdown function in the event of failure of wired shutdown systems i.e. primary and secondary shut down systems of the reactor. When demanded, PPIS injects the liquid poison into the moderator by passive means using passive valves and devices. On increase of main heat transport (MHT) system pressure beyond a predetermined value, a set of rupture disks burst, which in-turn actuate the passive valve. The opening of passive valve initiates inrush of high pressure helium gas into poison tanks to push the poison into the moderator system, thereby shutting down the reactor. This paper primarily deals with design and development of Passive Poison Injection System (PPIS) and its passive valves & devices. Recently, a prototype DN 65 size Poison Injection Passive Valve (PIPV) has been developed for AHWR usage and tested rigorously under simulated conditions. The paper will highlight the role of passive valves & devices in PPIS of AHWR. The design concept and test results of passive valves along with rupture disk performance will also be covered. (author)

  16. Evaluation of a positive ventilation delivery system (PVDS) in administering technegas to the noncompliant patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, P.; Bedford, B.; Bell, A.; Lang, P.; Leiper, C.; Prouse, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Certain groups of patients have been excluded from ventilation lung scanning due to their inability to comply with instruction. Tetley Manufacturing have recently developed a Positive Ventilation Delivery System (PVDS) which assists in delivering Technegas to patients who are unable to cooperate fully. The aim of this study is to evaluate the PVDS in the clinical setting. Fifteen frail aged and psychogeriatric patients (n=l 5), mean age 78 years (range 60-93), were ventilated with Technegas using the PVDS. The decision to ventilate the patient with the PVDS was based on an initial assessment of the patients ability to comply with instructions, or failure of the conventional ventilation method, to produce an adequate count rate. Technegas was prepared in the usual manner and then delivered to the patients lungs by squeezing a black anesthetic bag synchronously with the patients breathing, until a count rate of approximately 1000 counts/second was obtained. All patients achieved a satisfactory count rate, mean 1500 counts/second (range 900 to 2300), allowing adequate ventilation images to be obtained. Time to reach this count rate varied between patients, mean 130 seconds (range 40 to 300). The number of assisted breaths also varied, mean 9 (range 3-15). In addition, four patients who required a switch from the conventional method to the PVDS, increased their initial count rate from a mean 200 ± 8% counts/second to a mean of 1300 ± 29% counts/second. This was statistically significant at p = 0.006. Our initial results demonstrate the ability of the PVDS to facilitate ventilation imaging in noncompliant patients such as the frail aged and psychogeriatric. Ventilation times and amounts of radioisotope used were acceptable, economical and practical within a busy department

  17. Experimental research progress on passive safety systems of Chinese advanced PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zejun; Zhuo Wenbin; Zheng Hua; Chen Bingde; Zong Guifang; Jia Dounan

    2003-01-01

    TMI and Chernobyl accidents, having pronounced impact on nuclear industries, triggered the governments as well as interested institutions to devote much attention to the safety of nuclear power plant and public's requirements on nuclear power plant safety were also going to be stricter and stricter. It is obvious that safety level of an ordinary light water reactor is no longer satisfactory to these requirements. Recently, the safety authorities have recommended the implementation of passive system to improve the safety of nuclear reactors. Passive safety system is one of the main differences between Chinese advanced PWR and other conventional PWR. The working principle of passive safety system is to utilize the gravity, natural convection (natural circulation) and stored energy to implement the system's safety function. Reactors with passive safety systems are not only safer, but also more economical. The passive safety system of Chinese advanced PWR is composed of three independent systems, i.e. passive containment cooling system, passive residual heat removal system and passive core makeup tank injection system. This paper is a summary of experimental research progress on passive containment cooling system, passive residual heat removal system and passive core makeup tank injection system

  18. Effectiveness of a personalized ventilation system in reducing personal exposure against directly released simulated cough droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelic, J; Tham, K W; Licina, D

    2015-12-01

    The inhalation intake fraction was used as an indicator to compare effects of desktop personalized ventilation and mixing ventilation on personal exposure to directly released simulated cough droplets. A cough machine was used to simulate cough release from the front, back, and side of a thermal manikin at distances between 1 and 4 m. Cough droplet concentration was measured with an aerosol spectrometer in the breathing zone of a thermal manikin. Particle image velocimetry was used to characterize the velocity field in the breathing zone. Desktop personalized ventilation substantially reduced the inhalation intake fraction compared to mixing ventilation for all investigated distances and orientations of the cough release. The results point out that the orientation between the cough source and the breathing zone of the exposed occupant is an important factor that substantially influences exposure. Exposure to cough droplets was reduced with increasing distance between cough source and exposed occupant. The results from this study show that an advanced air distribution system such as personalized ventilation reduces exposure to cough-released droplets better than commonly applied overhead mixing ventilation. This work can inform HVAC engineers about different aspects of air distribution systems’ performance and can serve as an aid in making critical design decisions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reduction of nanoparticle exposure to welding aerosols by modification of the ventilation system in a workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myong-Hwa; McClellan, William J.; Candela, Joe; Andrews, Dan; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer particle size distributions were measured in booths with two different ventilation patterns in an occupational environment with welding operations underway. The measurements were used to illustrate the impact of change of ventilation methods (existing - with ventilation ducts located at the top, modified - with ventilation ducts located below the weld bench) on the aerosol size distributions at different locations: close to the weld, in the vicinity of the welder's face, and in the exhaust duct. Particle number concentrations measured in the vicinity of the welder's face (mask) during a horizontal standard arc welding process in a booth with ventilation at the top was in the range of 7.78x10 5 particles cm -3 with a geometric mean size of 181 nm and geometric standard deviation of 1.8. This reduced to 1.48x10 4 particles cm -3 in the vicinity of the welder's face with the modified ventilation system. The clearance of the welding aerosol was also faster in the modified booth (6 min compared to 11 min in a conventional booth). Particles were collected in the booth for the various test conditions, and analyzed to determine their composition and morphology. The particles were composed of hazardous heavy metals such as manganese, chromium and nickel, and had varying morphologies

  20. Real-time modelling of a ventilation system for a power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, P.; Welfonder, E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes how to simulate in real-time the ventilation system of a nuclear power plant. The simulation is made under difficult computing time conditions. The ventilation system program is part of a simulator which simulates the whole nuclear power plant process in realtime. Therefore the ventilation system is split up into several smaller units. For each of these process units a real-time module has been developed, being as simple as possible but nevertheless coming close enough to the real dynamic behaviour. After that the simple real-time modules are linked together to form the total dynamic model ''ventilation system''. The continuous dynamic model developed is numerically integrated by the Euler method. The stability of this explicit method is maintained by special modelling measures such as the increasing of too low flow resistances or the limitation of too high gain factors. At the end of the paper some curves, recorded at the simulator, illustrate the behaviour of the ventilation system in the case of an accident. (author)

  1. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkai Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics.

  2. Evaluation of AY/AZ tank farm ventilation system during aging waste retrieval operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.J.; Waters, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    Waste Management is currently planning to demonstrate mobilization of radioactive waste sludges in Tank 101-AZ beginning in October 1991. The retrieval system being designed will utilize mixer pumps that generate high-velocity, high-volume submerged liquid jets to mobilize settled solids. There is concern that these jets may also generate radioactive aerosols, some of which may be carried into the tank Ventilation system. The purpose of this study is to determine if the current AY/AZ ventilation system or the proposed ventilation system upgrade (Project W-030) will provide adequate deentrainment of liquid and solid aerosols during mixer pump operations, or if the radioactive aerosols will overload the HEPA filters

  3. Ventilation systems as air cleaning devices in nuclear power plants: experience at Palisades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Murri, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    Experience at Palisades has demonstrated the importance of designing, constructing, testing and operating the ventilation system from the viewpoint of airborne radioactivity control during both normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences. An item of particular concern was the difficulty in maintaining correct non-ducted airflow patterns. Inadequate preoperational testing and system balancing led to marginal ventilation system performance. This condition was further aggravated by extensive plant maintenance and construction activities and, in some cases, by a lack of administrative control. Following completion of construction of the radwaste addition, it was possible, with minor basic design changes, to adjust and rebalance the entire ventilation system, thus assuring control of airborne radioactivity. (U.S.)

  4. System code improvements for modelling passive safety systems and their validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Sebastian; Cron, Daniel von der; Schaffrath, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    GRS has been developing the system code ATHLET over many years. Because ATHLET, among other codes, is widely used in nuclear licensing and supervisory procedures, it has to represent the current state of science and technology. New reactor concepts such as Generation III+ and IV reactors and SMR are using passive safety systems intensively. The simulation of passive safety systems with the GRS system code ATHLET is still a big challenge, because of non-defined operation points and self-setting operation conditions. Additionally, the driving forces of passive safety systems are smaller and uncertainties of parameters have a larger impact than for active systems. This paper addresses the code validation and qualification work of ATHLET on the example of slightly inclined horizontal heat exchangers, which are e. g. used as emergency condensers (e. g. in the KERENA and the CAREM) or as heat exchanger in the passive auxiliary feed water systems (PAFS) of the APR+.

  5. Nuclear safety: operational aspects. 3. Hazard Analysis of Passive Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, Luciano

    2001-01-01

    Interest has been aroused in recent years regarding the reliability assessment of passive systems being developed by suppliers, industries, utilities, and research organizations that aim at plant safety improvement and substantial simplification in its implementation. The approach to passive systems reliability assessment entails first a detailed system and safety analysis, and failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) methodology has been chosen to perform the safety analysis at the system level. The FMEA technique allows identification of all potential failure modes in a system to evaluate their effects on the system and to classify them according to their severity; this technique identifies the reliability-critical areas in the system where modifications to the design are required to reduce the probability of failure. The present study concerns passive systems designed for decay heat removal relying on natural circulation that foresee, for the most part, a condenser immersed in a cooling pool. This is to identify and rank by importance the potential hazards related to passive-system equipment and operation that may critically affect the safety or availability of the plant. More specifically, the content of the paper analyzes the isolation condenser (IC) system foreseen for advanced boiling water reactors for removal of excess sensible and core decay heat by natural circulation during isolation transients. This FMEA analysis is the initial step to be accomplished as support for the development of a methodology aimed at the reliability assessment of thermal-hydraulic passive safety systems, providing important input to more detailed quantitative studies employing, for instance, event trees and fault trees or other reliability/availability models. Main purposes of the work are to identify important accident initiators, find out the possible consequences on the plant deriving from component failures, individuate possible causes, identify mitigating features and

  6. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, J. Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wray, Craig P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Beginning with the 2008 version of Title 24, new homes in California must comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007 requirements for residential ventilation. Where installed, the limited data available indicate that mechanical ventilation systems do not always perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California Energy Commission about a decade ago at Berkeley Lab documented procedures for residential commissioning, but did not focus on ventilation systems. Since then, standards and approaches for commissioning ventilation systems have been an active area of work in Europe. This report describes our efforts to collect new literature on commissioning procedures and to identify information that can be used to support the future development of residential-ventilation-specific procedures and standards. We recommend that a standardized commissioning process and a commissioning guide for practitioners be developed, along with a combined energy and IAQ benefit assessment standard and tool, and a diagnostic guide for estimating continuous pollutant emission rates of concern in residences (including a database that lists emission test data for commercially-available labeled products).

  7. A passive automated personnel accountability system for reactor emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.O.; DeLisle, G.V.; Hickey, E.E.

    1988-04-01

    In 1985 a project was undertaken at the N Reactor on the Hanford Site to develop an automated personnel accountability system to ensure accountability of all personnel within 30 minutes of a site evacuation. The decision to develop such a system was made after a full-scale evacuation drill showed that the manual accountability system in use at the time was inadequate to meet the 30-minute requirement. Accountability systems at commercial nuclear power plants were evaluated, but found to be unsuitable because they were not passive, that is, they required action on part of the user for the system to work. Approximately 2500 people could be required to evacuate the 100-N Area. Therefore, a card key system or badge exchange system was judged not to be feasible. A passive accountability system was desired for N Reactor to allow personnel to enter and leave the site in a more timely manner. To meet the need for an automated accountability system at N Reactor, a special Evacuation Accountability System (EVACS) was designed and developed. The EVACS system has three basic components: the transponder, a credit card-sized device worn with the security badge; portal monitors, which are electronically activated by the transponder; and a computer information system that contains the personnel data base. Each person wearing a transponder is accounted for automatically by walking through a portal. In this paper, a description of the hardware and software will be presented, together with problems encountered and lessons learned while adapting an existing technology to this particular use. The system is currently installed and requires acceptance testing before becoming operational

  8. The influence of an estimated energy saving due to natural ventilation on the Mexican energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the impacts of the extensive use of NV (natural ventilation) in the Mexican residential sector on the Mexican energy system. By integrating a thermal-airflow simulation programme with an energy systems analysis model, the impact on the Mexican energy system of replacing air...... conditioning, in particular, with natural ventilation to cool residential buildings is determined. It is shown that when, as in Mexico, there is a relatively simple connection between supply and electricity demand, NV creates savings which could be used to reduce either the fossil-fuel-based generation...

  9. A completely passive continuous flow solar water purification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, William S.; Hodgson, David A. [Dept. of Mechanical Enginnering, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Water-borne pathogens in developing countries cause several billion cases of disease and up to 10 million deaths each year, at least half of which are children. Solar water pasteurization is a potentially cost-effective, robust and reliable solution to these problems. A completely passively controlled solar water pasteurization system with a total collector area of 0.45 m{sup 2} has been constructed. The system most recently tested produced 337 litres per m{sup 2} of collector area of treated water on a sunny day. We developed our completely passive density-driven solar water pasteurization system over a five year span so that it now achieves reliable control for all possible variations in solar conditions. We have also substantially increased its daily pure water production efficiency over the same period. We will discuss the performance of our water purification system and provide an analyses that demonstrates that the system insures safe purified water production at all times. (orig.)

  10. : ventilators for noninvasive ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauroux , Brigitte; Leroux , Karl; Desmarais , Gilbert; Isabey , Daniel; Clément , Annick; Lofaso , Frédéric; Louis , Bruno

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of all the ventilators proposed for home noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in children in France. The ventilators (one volume-targeted, 12 pressure-targeted and four dual) were evaluated on a bench which simulated six different paediatric ventilatory patterns. For each ventilator, the quality of the inspiratory and expiratory trigger and the ability to reach and maintain the preset pre...

  11. Inter comparison of REPAS and APSRA methodologies for passive system reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanki, R.B.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.; Singh, Suneet; Varde, P.V.; Verma, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of passive systems in the innovative nuclear reactors puts demand on the estimation of the reliability assessment of these passive systems. The passive systems operate on the driving forces such as natural circulation, gravity, internal stored energy etc. which are moderately weaker than that of active components. Hence, phenomenological failures (virtual components) are equally important as that of equipment failures (real components) in the evaluation of passive systems reliability. The contribution of the mechanical components to the passive system reliability can be evaluated in a classical way using the available component reliability database and well known methods. On the other hand, different methods are required to evaluate the reliability of processes like thermohydraulics due to lack of adequate failure data. The research is ongoing worldwide on the reliability assessment of the passive systems and their integration into PSA, however consensus is not reached. Two of the most widely used methods are Reliability Evaluation of Passive Systems (REPAS) and Assessment of Passive System Reliability (APSRA). Both these methods characterize the uncertainties involved in the design and process parameters governing the function of the passive system. However, these methods differ in the quantification of passive system reliability. Inter comparison among different available methods provides useful insights into the strength and weakness of different methods. This paper highlights the results of the thermal hydraulic analysis of a typical passive isolation condenser system carried out using RELAP mode 3.2 computer code applying REPAS and APSRA methodologies. The failure surface is established for the passive system under consideration and system reliability has also been evaluated using these methods. Challenges involved in passive system reliabilities are identified, which require further attention in order to overcome the shortcomings of these

  12. Minimum ventilation systems and their effects on the initial stage of turkey production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Mendes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the live performance of turkeys during the initial stage of production (1-26 days of age and to map the environmental variables inside turkey houses, such as temperature, relative humidity, CO2 concentration, at two distinct minimum ventilation systems. House 1 (H1 was equipped with a negative-pressure ventilation system and House 2 (H2 was equipped with a positive-pressure ventilation system. This study was performed in commercial poultry houses, located in Francisco Beltrão, Paraná, Brazil, in June, 2008. A number of 14,000 turkeys toms at the same age, provided by the same local hatchery and were housed at a stocking density of 23 birds m-2. Three 13 m² boxes with 300 turkeys each were placed inside the poultry houses. All treatments were assigned for the birds inside each of the three boxes. The poultry barns were virtually divided in eight equally distributed in areas where the environmental variables were recorded. The performance parameters measured were weight gain, feed conversion and mortality rate, recorded weekly. Analysis of variance and F-tests were performed to compare results within different environmental conditions, using MINITAB 14 statistical software. The ventilation systems did not significantly influence CO2 concentrations (p = 0.489, whereas temperature (p = 0.016 and relative humidity (p = 0.0001 and feed conversion (p = 0.001 were significantly affected by ventilation system. Temperature and relative humidity in H2 (positive pressure ventilation system was found to be less aversive than those in H1 (negative pressure system. Also, bids in H2 presented lower feed conversions than those in H1.

  13. Technical feasibility and reliability of passive safety systems for nuclear power plants. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The meeting provided an overview of the key issues on passive safety. Technical problems which may affect future deployment, and the operating experience of passive systems and components, as well as, definitions of passive safety terms, were discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of passive systems were also highlighted. The philosophy behind different passive safety systems was presented and the range of possibility between fully passive and fully active systems was discussed. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Technical feasibility and reliability of passive safety systems for nuclear power plants. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The meeting provided an overview of the key issues on passive safety. Technical problems which may affect future deployment, and the operating experience of passive systems and components, as well as, definitions of passive safety terms, were discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of passive systems were also highlighted. The philosophy behind different passive safety systems was presented and the range of possibility between fully passive and fully active systems was discussed. Refs, figs, tabs.

  15. Ventilation Transport Trade Study for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Paul, Heather L.

    2008-01-01

    A new and advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for space suit surface exploration will require a durable, compact, and energy efficient system to transport the ventilation stream through the space suit. Current space suits used by NASA circulate the ventilation stream via a ball-bearing supported centrifugal fan. As NASA enters the design phase for the next generation PLSS, it is necessary to evaluate available technologies to determine what improvements can be made in mass, volume, power, and reliability for a ventilation transport system. Several air movement devices already designed for commercial, military, and space applications are optimized in these areas and could be adapted for EVA use. This paper summarizes the efforts to identify and compare the latest fan and bearing technologies to determine candidates for the next generation PLSS.

  16. Electrostatic stabilizer for a passive magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2015-11-24

    Electrostatic stabilizers are provided for passive bearing systems composed of annular magnets having a net positive stiffness against radial displacements and that have a negative stiffness for vertical displacements, resulting in a vertical instability. Further embodiments are shown of a radial electrostatic stabilizer geometry (using circuitry similar to that employed in the vertical stabilizer). This version is suitable for stabilizing radial (lateral) displacements of a rotor that is levitated by annular permanent magnets that are stable against vertical displacements but are unstable against radial displacements.

  17. Experimental study including subjective evaluations of mixing and displacement ventilation combined with radiant floor heating/cooling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajcik, Michal; Tomasi, Roberta; Simone, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Sixteen subjects evaluated the indoor environment in four experiments with different combinations of ventilation systems and radiant heating/cooling systems. In the first two tests, the simulated residential room was equipped either by a mixing ventilation system supplying warm air for space heat...

  18. Investigation of analytical and experimental behavior of nuclear facility ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.R.; Ricketts, C.I.; Andrae, R.W.; Bolstad, J.W.; Horak, H.L.; Martin, R.A.; Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of nuclear facility ventilation systems subjected to both natural and man-caused accidents is being investigated. The purpose of the paper is to present a program overview and highlight recent results of the investigations. The program includes both analytical and experimental investigations. Computer codes for predicting accident-induced gas dynamics and test facilities to obtain supportive experimental data to define structural integrity and confinement effectiveness of ventilation system components are described. A unique test facility and recently obtained structural limits for high efficiency particulate air filters are reported

  19. Cleanup and Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Ventilation Systems Using Robotic Tools - 13162

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambon, Frederic; CIZEL, Jean-Pierre; Blanchard, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The UP1 plant reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. Following operating incidents in the eighties, the ventilation system of the continuous dissolution line facility was shut down and replaced. Two types of remote controlled tool carriers were developed to perform the decontamination and dismantling operations of the highly contaminated ventilation duct network. The first one, a dedicated small robot, was designed from scratch to retrieve a thick powder deposit within a duct. The robot, managed and confined by two dedicated glove boxes, was equipped for intervention inside the ventilation duct and used for carrying various cleanup and inspection tools. The second type, consisting of robotic tools developed on the base of an industrial platform, was used for the clean-up and dismantling of the ventilation duct system. Depending on the type of work to be performed, on the shape constraints of the rooms and any equipment to be dismantled, different kinds of robotic tools were developed and installed on a Brokk 40 carrier. After more than ten years of ventilation duct D and D operations at the UP1 plant, a lot of experience was acquired about remote operations. The three main important lessons learned in terms of remote controlled operation are: characterizing the initial conditions as much as reasonably possible, performing non-radioactive full scale testing and making it as simple and modular as possible. (authors)

  20. Cleanup and Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Ventilation Systems Using Robotic Tools - 13162

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia MD (United States); CIZEL, Jean-Pierre [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France); Blanchard, Samuel [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France)

    2013-07-01

    The UP1 plant reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. Following operating incidents in the eighties, the ventilation system of the continuous dissolution line facility was shut down and replaced. Two types of remote controlled tool carriers were developed to perform the decontamination and dismantling operations of the highly contaminated ventilation duct network. The first one, a dedicated small robot, was designed from scratch to retrieve a thick powder deposit within a duct. The robot, managed and confined by two dedicated glove boxes, was equipped for intervention inside the ventilation duct and used for carrying various cleanup and inspection tools. The second type, consisting of robotic tools developed on the base of an industrial platform, was used for the clean-up and dismantling of the ventilation duct system. Depending on the type of work to be performed, on the shape constraints of the rooms and any equipment to be dismantled, different kinds of robotic tools were developed and installed on a Brokk 40 carrier. After more than ten years of ventilation duct D and D operations at the UP1 plant, a lot of experience was acquired about remote operations. The three main important lessons learned in terms of remote controlled operation are: characterizing the initial conditions as much as reasonably possible, performing non-radioactive full scale testing and making it as simple and modular as possible. (authors)

  1. The Design and Simulation of Natural Personalised Ventilation (NPV System for Multi-Bed Hospital Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adequate ventilation is necessary for thermal comfort and reducing risks from infectious bio-aerosols in hospital wards, but achieving this with mechanical ventilation has carbon and energy implications. Natural ventilation is often limited to window-based designs whose dilution/mixing effectiveness are subject to constraints of wind speed, cross ventilation, and in the case of hospital wards, proximity of patients to external walls. A buoyancy-driven natural ventilation system capable of achieving dilution/mixing was shown to be feasible in a preceding study of novel system called natural personalised ventilation (NPV. This system combined both architecture and airflow engineering principles of space design and buoyancy and was tested and validated (salt-bath experiment for a single bed ward. This research extends the previous work and is proof-of-concept on the feasibility of NPV system for multi-bed wards. Two different four-bed ward types were investigated of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations under wind-neutral conditions. Results predict that NPV system could deliver fresh air to multiple patients, including those located 10 m away from external wall, with absolute flow rates of between 32 L·s−1 and 54 L·s−1 for each patient/bed. Compared to same wards simulated using window design, ingress of airborne contaminants into patients’ breathing zone and summer overheating potential were minimised, while overall ward dilution was maximised. Findings suggest the NPV has potentials for enabling architects and building service engineers to decouple airflow delivery from the visualisation and illumination responsibilities placed upon windows.

  2. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  3. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Sciocchetti, A.; Giovannoli, P.; DeFelice, P.; Cardellini, F.; Cotellessa, G.; Pagliari, M.

    2010-01-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered. (authors)

  4. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciocchetti, G; Sciocchetti, A; Giovannoli, P; DeFelice, P; Cardellini, F; Cotellessa, G; Pagliari, M

    2010-10-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered.

  5. Modification of the ventilation system at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    The WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) Project near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a research and development project sponsored by the US Department of Energy, designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive waste. A mine (repository) is being developed 2,150 feet below the surface in a thick salt bed, which will serve as the disposal medium. The underground ventilation system for the WIPP project was originally designed based on a fixed project scope. The design criteria and ventilation requirements were developed for the performance of various activities as then envisioned towards the achievement of this goal. However, in light of new information and actual site-specific experience at WIPP leading to a clearer definition of the scope-related programs and activities, it was realized that the existing ventilation system may need to be modified

  6. TNKVNT: A model of the Tank 48 purge/ventilation exhaust system. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    The waste tank purge ventilation system for Tank 48 is designed to prevent dangerous concentrations of hydrogen or benzene from accumulating in the gas space of the tank. Fans pull the gas/water vapor mixture from the tank gas space and pass it sequentially through a demister, a condenser, a reheater, and HEPA filters before discharging to the environment. Proper operation of the HEPA filters requires that the gas mixture passing through them has a low relative humidity. The ventilation system has been modified by increasing the capacity of the fans and changing the condenser from a two-pass heat exchanger to a single-pass heat exchanger. It is important to understand the impact of these modifications on the operation of the system. A hydraulic model of the ventilation exhaust system has been developed. This model predicts the properties of the air throughout the system and the flowrate through the system, as functions of the tank gas space and environmental conditions. This document serves as a Software Design Report, a Software Coding report, and a User's Manual. All of the information required for understanding and using this code is herein contained: the governing equations are fully developed, the numerical algorithms are described in detail, and an extensively commented code listing is included. This updated version of the code models the entire purge ventilation system, and is therefore more general in its potential applications

  7. Energy and exergy performance of residential heating systems with separate mechanical ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmeureanu, Radu; Yu Wu, Xin

    2007-01-01

    The paper brings new evidence on the impact of separate mechanical ventilation system on the annual energy and exergy performance of several design alternatives of residential heating systems, when they are designed for a house in Montreal. Mathematical models of residential heating, ventilation and domestic hot water (HVAC-DHW) systems, which are needed for this purpose, are developed and furthermore implemented in the Engineering Equation Solver (EES) environment. The Coefficient of Performance and the exergy efficiency are estimated as well as the entropy generation and exergy destruction of the overall system. The equivalent greenhouse gas emissions due to the on-site and off-site use of primary energy sources are also estimated. The addition of a mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery to any HVAC-DHW system discussed in the paper increases the energy efficiency; however, it decreases the exergy efficiency, which indicates a potential long-term damaging impact on the natural environment. Therefore, the use of a separate mechanical ventilation system in a house should be considered with caution, and recommended only when other means for controlling the indoor air quality cannot be applied

  8. Symptoms and perceived indoor air quality among occupants of houses and apartments with different ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruotsalainen, R.; Roennberg, R.; Majanen, A.; Seppaenen, O. (Laboratory of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland)); Jaakkola, J.J.K. (Laboratory of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland) Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki (Finland))

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of symptoms and the perception of poor indoor air quality among the occupants of houses and apartments with different ventilation systems. The study population consisted of the 473 occupants of 242 dwellings in the Helsinki metropolitan area who responded to a self-administered questionnaire (response rate 93.1%) after a two-week period of indoor air quality measurements. The symptoms of interest were those often related to poor indoor air quality including dryness or itching of the skin; dryness, irritation or itching of the eyes; nasal congestion (''blocked nose''); nasal dryness; nasal discharge (''runny nose''); sneezing; cough; breathlessness; headache or migraine; and lethargy, weakness or nausea. Perception of coldness; warmness; draught; dryness; stuffiness; and sufficiency of air exchange was also requested. The age-standardized period prevalences of the symptoms and complaints were systematically more common among the occupants of the apartments than those of the houses. The occupants of the houses with natural ventilation seemed to have more symptoms and complaints than those with balanced ventilation. However, in the apartments with blanced ventilation the occupants reported, in general, more symptoms and complaints than those with natural ventilation. (au) (9 refs.).

  9. Probable variations of a passive safety containment for a 1700 MWe class PWR with passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Fujiki, Yasunobu; Oikawa, Hirohide; Ofstun, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents probable variations of a passive safety containment for a PWR. The passive safety containment is named Mark P containment tentatively. It is a pressure suppression type containment for a large scale PWR with a BWR type passive containment cooling system (PCCS). More than 3-day grace period can be achieved even for a 1700 MWe class large scale PWR owing to the PCCS. The containment is a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV). The design pressure of the RCCV can be low owing to the suppression pool (S/P) and no prestressed tendon is necessary. It is a single barrier CV that can withstand a large airplane crash by itself. This simple configuration results in good economy and short construction term. The BWR type passive safety systems also include the Passive Cooling and Depressurization System (PCDS). The PCDS has 3-day grace period for the SBO induced by a giant earthquake and can practically eliminate the residual risk of a giant earthquake beyond the design basis earthquake of Ss. It also has a safety function to automatically depressurize the primary system at accidents such as SGTR and eliminate the need for operator actions. It is a large 1700 MWe passive safety PWR that has more than 3-day grace period for extremely severe natural disasters including a giant earthquake, a mega hurricane, tsunami and so on; no containment failure at a SA establishing a no evacuation plant; protection for a large airplane crash with the RCCV single barrier; good economy and short construction term. (author)

  10. Parametric instabilities of rotor-support systems with application to industrial ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parszewski, Z.; Krodkiemski, T.; Marynowski, K.

    1980-01-01

    Rotor support systems interaction with parametric excitation is considered for both unequal principal shaft stiffness (generators) and offset disc rotors (ventilators). Instability regions and types of instability are computed in the first case, and parametric resonances in the second case. Computed and experimental results are compared for laboratory machine models. A field case study of parametric vibrations in industrial ventilators is reported. Computed parametric resonances are confirmed in field measurements, and some industrial failures are explained. Also the dynamic influence and gyroscopic effect of supporting structures are shown and computed.

  11. Mechanical Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventilation is a life support treatment. A mechanical ventilator is a machine that helps people breathe when ... to breathe enough on their own. The mechanical ventilator is also called a ventilator , respirator, or breathing ...

  12. Optimal design of passive containment cooling system for innovative PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Huiun; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Hangon [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Using the Generation of Thermal-Hydraulic Information for Containments (GOTHIC) code, thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur inside the containment have been investigated, along with the preliminary design of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) of an innovative pressurized water reactor (PWR). A GOTHIC containment model was constructed with reference to the design data of the Advanced Power Reactor 1400, and report related PCCS. The effects of the design parameters were evaluated for passive containment cooling tank (PCCT) geometry, PCCS heat exchanger (PCCX) location, and surface area. The analyzed results, obtained using the single PCCT, showed that repressurization and reheating phenomena had occurred. To resolve these problems, a coupled PCCT concept was suggested and was found to continually decrease the containment pressure and temperature without repressurization and reheating. If the installation level of the PCCX is higher than that of the PCCT, it may affect the PCCS performance. Additionally, it was confirmed that various means of increasing the external surface area of the PCCX, such as fins, could help improve the energy removal performance of the PCCS. To improve the PCCS design and investigate its performance, further studies are needed.

  13. Optimal design of passive containment cooling system for innovative PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiun Ha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using the Generation of Thermal-Hydraulic Information for Containments (GOTHIC code, thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur inside the containment have been investigated, along with the preliminary design of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS of an innovative pressurized water reactor (PWR. A GOTHIC containment model was constructed with reference to the design data of the Advanced Power Reactor 1400, and report related PCCS. The effects of the design parameters were evaluated for passive containment cooling tank (PCCT geometry, PCCS heat exchanger (PCCX location, and surface area. The analyzed results, obtained using the single PCCT, showed that repressurization and reheating phenomena had occurred. To resolve these problems, a coupled PCCT concept was suggested and was found to continually decrease the containment pressure and temperature without repressurization and reheating. If the installation level of the PCCX is higher than that of the PCCT, it may affect the PCCS performance. Additionally, it was confirmed that various means of increasing the external surface area of the PCCX, such as fins, could help improve the energy removal performance of the PCCS. To improve the PCCS design and investigate its performance, further studies are needed.

  14. Optimal design of passive containment cooling system for innovative PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Huiun; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Hangon

    2017-01-01

    Using the Generation of Thermal-Hydraulic Information for Containments (GOTHIC) code, thermal-hydraulic phenomena that occur inside the containment have been investigated, along with the preliminary design of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) of an innovative pressurized water reactor (PWR). A GOTHIC containment model was constructed with reference to the design data of the Advanced Power Reactor 1400, and report related PCCS. The effects of the design parameters were evaluated for passive containment cooling tank (PCCT) geometry, PCCS heat exchanger (PCCX) location, and surface area. The analyzed results, obtained using the single PCCT, showed that repressurization and reheating phenomena had occurred. To resolve these problems, a coupled PCCT concept was suggested and was found to continually decrease the containment pressure and temperature without repressurization and reheating. If the installation level of the PCCX is higher than that of the PCCT, it may affect the PCCS performance. Additionally, it was confirmed that various means of increasing the external surface area of the PCCX, such as fins, could help improve the energy removal performance of the PCCS. To improve the PCCS design and investigate its performance, further studies are needed

  15. Passive versus active hazard detection and avoidance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, D.; Mercier, G.; Hamel, J.-F.; Simard Bilodeau, V.; Woicke, S.; Alger, M.; Beaudette, D.

    2015-06-01

    Upcoming planetary exploration missions will require advanced guidance, navigation and control technologies to reach landing sites with high precision and safety. Various technologies are currently in development to meet that goal. Some technologies rely on passive sensors and benefit from the low mass and power of such solutions while others rely on active sensors and benefit from an improved robustness and accuracy. This paper presents two different hazard detection and avoidance (HDA) system design approaches. The first architecture relies only on a camera as the passive HDA sensor while the second relies, in addition, on a Lidar as the active HDA sensor. Both options use in common an innovative hazard map fusion algorithm aiming at identifying the safest landing locations. This paper presents the simulation tools and reports the closed-loop software simulation results obtained using each design option. The paper also reports the Monte Carlo simulation campaign that was used to assess the robustness of each design option. The performance of each design option is compared against each other in terms of performance criteria such as percentage of success, mean distance to nearest hazard, etc. The applicability of each design option to planetary exploration missions is also discussed.

  16. Design, Implementation & Assessment of Local Exhaust Ventilation System and dust collectors for crushing unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Ghorbani shahna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objective: Industrial ventilation systems and dust collectors are effective solutions to reduce particulate emissions in the workplace and environmental in mineral processes. In this study, Local Exhaust Ventilation System and dust collectors for control of emitted silica, coke, silicon carbide dusts from crushing unit was designed and evaluated. Methods: : Local Exhaust ventilation system based on standards and guides was designed and implemented after field study of the processes and sources of air pollutants. A set comprised of the four parallel cyclones (Stairmand model and a new design of the scrubber had been used for dust control. After set-up of systems, its effectiveness in reducing the exposure of workers in the workshops and dust collecting were assessed. Results: Test results were significant differences between the concentration of particles in both on and off the ventilation system revealed (P <0.05. The system has been implemented as means of personal exposure to pollutants and environmental emissions were reduced 93.01% and 64.64%, respectively. Also, alone and integrated collection efficiency of cyclone and scrubber, were 94.2%, 59.05% and 97.4%, respectively. The results show good agreement with the values of the parameters ventilation system was designed. Conclusion: Implementation of integrated dust collectors is a good option in industries that have the financial and technical constraints to improve change processes and devices. This method with attainment to health and environmental standards not only can be resolve of the pollution problems, but also will be economically justified of such projects with reduction of depreciation expense and dust recycling.

  17. Micro and nano devices in passive millimetre wave imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, R.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of micro and nano technology on millimetre wave imaging from the post war years to the present day is reviewed. In the 1950s whisker contacted diodes in mixers and vacuum tubes were used to realise both radiometers and radars but required considerable skill to realise the performance needed. Development of planar semiconductor devices such as Gunn and Schottky diodes revolutionised mixer performance and provided considerable improvement. The next major breakthrough was high frequency transistors based on gallium arsenide which were initially used at intermediate frequencies but later after further development at millimeter wave frequencies. More recently Monolithic Microwave Integrated circuits(MMICs) offer exceptional performance and the opportunity for innovative design in passive imaging systems. In the future the use of micro and nano technology will continue to drive system performance and we can expect to see integration of antennae, millimetre wave and sub millimetre wave circuits and signal processing.

  18. Some Passive Damping Sources on Flooring Systems besides the TMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Impulsive loads and walking loads can generate problematic structural vibrations in flooring-systems. Measures that may be taken to mitigate the problem would often be to consider the implementation of a tuned mass damper or even more advanced vibration control technologies; this in order to add...... damping to the structure. Basically also passive humans on a floor act as a damping source, but it also turns out from doing system identification tests with a floor strip that a quite simple set-up installed on the floor (cheap and readily at hand) might do a good job in terms of reducing vertical floor...... vibrations for some floors. The paper describes the tests with the floor strip, and the results, in terms of dynamic floor behaviour, are compared with what would be expected had the floor instead been equipped with a tuned mass damper....

  19. Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

  20. Optimum radars and filters for the passive sphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luers, J. K.; Soltes, A.

    1971-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the tracking radar and data reduction technique on the accuracy of the meteorological measurements made in the 30 to 100 kilometer altitude region by the ROBIN passive falling sphere. A survey of accuracy requirements was made of agencies interested in data from this region of the atmosphere. In light of these requirements, various types of radars were evaluated to determine the tracking system most applicable to the ROBIN, and methods were developed to compute the errors in wind and density that arise from noise errors in the radar supplied data. The effects of launch conditions on the measurements were also examined. Conclusions and recommendations have been made concerning the optimum tracking and data reduction techniques for the ROBIN falling sphere system.

  1. Ventilator-Related Adverse Events: A Taxonomy and Findings From 3 Incident Reporting Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Williams, Tamara L; Sparnon, Erin M; Cillie, Tam K; Scharen, Hilda F; Marella, William M

    2016-05-01

    In 2009, researchers from Johns Hopkins University's Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; public agencies, including the FDA; and private partners, including the Emergency Care Research Institute and the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization, sought to form a public-private partnership for the promotion of patient safety (P5S) to advance patient safety through voluntary partnerships. The study objective was to test the concept of the P5S to advance our understanding of safety issues related to ventilator events, to develop a common classification system for categorizing adverse events related to mechanical ventilators, and to perform a comparison of adverse events across different adverse event reporting systems. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of ventilator-related adverse events reported in 2012 from the following incident reporting systems: the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System, UHC's Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization database, and the FDA's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database. Once each organization had its dataset of ventilator-related adverse events, reviewers read the narrative descriptions of each event and classified it according to the developed common taxonomy. A Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, FDA, and UHC search provided 252, 274, and 700 relevant reports, respectively. The 3 event types most commonly reported to the UHC and the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System databases were airway/breathing circuit issue, human factor issues, and ventilator malfunction events. The top 3 event types reported to the FDA were ventilator malfunction, power source issue, and alarm failure. Overall, we found that (1) through the development of a common taxonomy, adverse events from 3 reporting systems can be evaluated, (2) the types of events reported in each database were related

  2. Ventilator-Related Adverse Events: A Taxonomy and Findings From 3 Incident Reporting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Williams, Tamara L; Sparnon, Erin M; Cillie, Tam K; Scharen, Hilda F; Marella, William M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2009, researchers from Johns Hopkins University's Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality; public agencies, including the FDA; and private partners, including the Emergency Care Research Institute and the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization, sought to form a public-private partnership for the promotion of patient safety (P5S) to advance patient safety through voluntary partnerships. The study objective was to test the concept of the P5S to advance our understanding of safety issues related to ventilator events, to develop a common classification system for categorizing adverse events related to mechanical ventilators, and to perform a comparison of adverse events across different adverse event reporting systems. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of ventilator-related adverse events reported in 2012 from the following incident reporting systems: the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System, UHC's Safety Intelligence Patient Safety Organization database, and the FDA's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database. Once each organization had its dataset of ventilator-related adverse events, reviewers read the narrative descriptions of each event and classified it according to the developed common taxonomy. RESULTS: A Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, FDA, and UHC search provided 252, 274, and 700 relevant reports, respectively. The 3 event types most commonly reported to the UHC and the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority's Patient Safety Reporting System databases were airway/breathing circuit issue, human factor issues, and ventilator malfunction events. The top 3 event types reported to the FDA were ventilator malfunction, power source issue, and alarm failure. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found that (1) through the development of a common taxonomy, adverse events from 3 reporting systems can be evaluated, (2) the types of

  3. A method for evaluating the problem complex of choosing the ventilation system for a new building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2007-01-01

    The application of a ventilation system in a new building is a multidimensional complex problem that involves quantifiable and non-quantifiable data like energy consump¬tion, indoor environment, building integration and architectural expression. This paper presents a structured method for evaluat...

  4. Ventilation system consequence calculations to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, G.W.

    1997-05-07

    This document presents the radiological dose and toxicological exposure calculations for an accident scenario involved with the ventilation system used to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101. This tank has been listed on the Hydrogen Watch List.

  5. Ventilation system consequence calculations to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the radiological dose and toxicological exposure calculations for an accident scenario involved with the ventilation system used to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101. This tank has been listed on the Hydrogen Watch List

  6. New regulatory requirements of HVAC ventilation systems in nuclear installations Spanish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation systems serve a number of functions vital to the safe operation of nuclear facilities: the renewal of air, cooling components, prevent the release of contaminated air into the environment under both normal operating and accident, or ensure habitability of the control rooms in all situations.

  7. IMPACT UPON ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION DUE TO DEFECTIVELY PRODUCED AND OPERATED VENTILATION SYSTEMS IN FOOD INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Małecka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical (air-conditioning ventilation systems and equipment in the food industry may transfer various pathogenic bacteria causing, for instance, pneumonia (Legionellosis. Microclimate parameters in manufacturing shops felt by people are affected by: human factors (health, individual temperature perception etc, and non-human factors (air physical parameters, air freshness and cleanliness etc.. Microbiological contamination of process equipment, machines and systems such as ventilation and air-conditioning equipment causes growth of pathogenic bacteria. The amount of air supplied and removed from a room depends on its use and load of odours and hazardous material. As a result of dew point formation in ventilation systems may appear the so-called air-borne condensation nuclei on which steam settles when the air gets oversaturated. The air flow rate has a material influence upon comfortable conditions in human inhabited zones. In manufacturing shops where the highest air quality is a priority, radial disinfection by means of catalytic ionization is applied. In food industry manufacturing shops of higher microbiological standard, ventilation systems based on air re-circulation should not be used.

  8. Performance of Counter Flow Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems in Dwellings Considering the Influence of Uncertainties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Cauberg, J.J.M.; Tenpierik, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Both critical and optimistic claims have been made regarding the performance of heat recovery ventilation systems (HRVS) in dwellings. Such arguments are raised partly because two key aspects are not fully clarified, i.e. the performance criteria and the influence of uncertainties. In the current

  9. Measuring Airflow in Local Exhaust Ventilation Systems. Module 23. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on measuring airflow in local exhaust ventilation systems. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming each…

  10. Ventilation systems as an effective tool for control of radon daughter concentration in mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-10-01

    Experience in mines shows that a very high concentration of radon daughters builds up in an unventilated dead end heading. Even minimal air movement results in a drastic reduction in radon daughter concentration. Designing the ventilation system to provide an optimized flow of fresh air into the workplace results in acceptable climatic conditions and radon daughter levels. The example of the Director fluorospar mine in Newfoundland is used to illustrate the actual design and operation of a ventilation system that provided effective radon daughter control. It was found at this mine that the age of the air underground should be kept as low as possible; that no areas of the mine should be left unventilated unless they could be kept at negative pressure; that a comparatively simple remote control and monitoring system helped stabilize ventilation and detected upsets; that the ventilation system should operate continuously, even when the mine is shut down for short periods; and that pressurization of the mine seemed to inhibit radon influx

  11. Calculation notes in support of ammonia releases from waste tank ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojdac, L.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ammonia is generated in waste tanks via the degradation of nitrogen compounds. The ammonia is released from the liquids by a mechanism which is dependent on temperature, pH, ionic strength and ammonia concentration. The release of ammonia to the environment occurs via diffusion of ammonia through a stagnant air mass and into the ventilation system

  12. Evaluation of Flammable Gas Monitoring and Ventilation System Alternatives for Double-Contained Receiver Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    This study identifies possible flammable gas monitoring and ventilation system alternatives to ensure adequate removal of flammable gases from the Double-Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) primary tanks during temporary storage of small amounts of waste. The study evaluates and compares these alternatives to support closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ TF-96-04330)

  13. A novel system solution for cooling and ventilation in office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Lei, Bo

    2015-01-01

    solution has the special function of using natural ventilation all the year around without draught risk, even in very cold seasons. A case study of a typical office room using this solution and other traditional HVAC systems is carried out by energy simulation. The results show that there is a large energy...

  14. Positioning of sensors for control of ventilation systems in broiler houses: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayla Morandi Ridolfi de Carvalho Curi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ventilation systems are incorporated at intensive poultry farms to control environment conditions and thermal comfort of broilers. The ventilation system operates based on environmental data, particularly measured by sensors of temperature and relative humidity. Sensors are placed at different positions of the facility. Quality, number and positioning of the sensors are critical factors to achieve an efficient performance of the system. For this reason, a strategic positioning of the sensors associated to controllers could support the maintenance and management of the microclimate inside the facility. This research aims to identify the three most representative points for the positioning of sensors in order to support the ventilation system during the critical period from 12h00 to 15h00 on summer days. Temperature, relative humidity and wind speed were measured in four different tunnel ventilated barns at the final stage of the production cycle. The descriptive analysis was performed on these data. The Temperature and Humidity Index (THI was also calculated. Then, the geostatistical analysis of THI was performed by GS+ and the position of sensors was determined by ordinary kriging. The methodology was able to detect the most representative points for the positioning of sensors in a case study (southeastern Brazil. The results suggested that this strategic positioning would help controllers to obtain a better inference of the microclimate during the studied period (the hottest microclimate, considered critical in Brazil. In addition, these results allow developing a future road map for a decision support system based on 24 h monitoring of the ventilation systems in broiler houses.

  15. A literature review on the improvement strategies of passive design for the roofing system of the modern house in a hot and humid climate region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qairuniza Roslan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increase of indoor temperature compared with outdoor temperature is a major concern in modern house design. Occupants suffer from this uncomfortable condition because of overheating indoor temperature. Poor passive design causes heat to be trapped, which influences the rise in indoor temperature. The upper part, which covers the area of the roof, is the most critical part of the house that is exposed to heat caused by high solar radiation and high emissivity levels. During daytime, the roof accumulates heat, which increases the indoor temperature and affects the comfort level of the occupants. To maintain the indoor temperature within the comfort level, most house designs usually depend on mechanical means by using fans or air conditioning systems. The dependence on a mechanical ventilation system could lead to additional costs for its installation, operation, and maintenance. Thus, this study concentrates on reviews on passive design and suggests recommendations for future developments. New proposals or strategies are proposed to improve the current passive design through ventilated and cool roof systems. It is possible to achieve the comfort level inside a house throughout the day by reducing the transmitted heat into the indoor environment and eliminating the internal hot air. These recommendations could become attractive strategies in providing a comfortable indoor temperature to the occupants as well as in minimizing energy consumption.

  16. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) application to investigate potential use of natural ventilation in new building designs in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayata, Tahir; Cam, Ertugrul; Yildiz, Osman [Kirikkale University, Faculty of Engineering, 71451, Campus, Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2007-05-15

    Natural ventilation in living and working places provides both circulation of clear air and a decrease of indoor temperature, especially during hot summer days. In addition to openings, the dimension ratio and position of buildings play a significant role to obtain a uniform indoor air velocity distribution. In this study, the potential use of natural ventilation as a passive cooling system in new building designs in Kayseri, a midsize city in Turkey, was investigated. First, indoor air velocity distributions with respect to changing wind direction and magnitude were simulated by the FLUENT package program, which employs finite element methods. Then, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) model was employed to predict indoor average and maximum air velocities using the simulated data by FLUENT. The simulation results suggest that natural ventilation can be used to provide a thermally comfortable indoor environment during the summer season in the study area. Also, the ANFIS model can be proposed for estimation of indoor air velocity values in such studies. (author)

  17. Comparison of indoor air distribution and thermal environment for different combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2018-01-01

    A hybrid system with a radiant heating system and a mechanical ventilation system, which is regarded as an advanced heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, has been applied in many modern buildings worldwide. To date, almost no studies focused on comparative analysis of the indoor...... air distribution and the thermal environment for all combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems. Therefore, in this article, the indoor air distribution and the thermal environment were comparatively analyzed in a room with floor heating (FH) or ceiling heating (CH......) and mixing ventilation (MV) or displacement ventilation (DV) when the supply air temperature ranged from 15.0°C to 19.0°C. The results showed that the temperature effectiveness values were 1.05–1.16 and 0.95–1.02 for MV+ FH and MV+ CH, respectively, and they were 0.78–0.91 and 0.51–0.67 for DV + FH and DV...

  18. A novel fiber-optic measurement system for the evaluation of performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battista, L; Scorza, A; Botta, F; Sciuto, S A

    2016-01-01

    Published standards for the performance evaluation of pulmonary ventilators are mainly directed to manufacturers rather than to end-users and often considered inadequate or not comprehensive. In order to contribute to overcome the problems above, a novel measurement system was proposed and tested with waveforms of mechanical ventilation by means of experimental trials carried out with infant ventilators typically used in neonatal intensive care units: the main quantities of mechanical ventilation in newborns are monitored, i.e. air flow rate, differential pressure and volume from infant ventilator are measured by means of two novel fiber-optic sensors (OFSs) developed and characterized by the authors, while temperature and relative humidity of air mass are obtained by two commercial transducers. The proposed fiber-optic sensors (flow sensor Q-OFS, pressure sensor P-OFS) showed measurement ranges of air flow and pressure typically encountered in neonatal mechanical ventilation, i.e. the air flow rate Q ranged from 3 l min −1 to 18 l min −1 (inspiratory) and from  −3 l min −1 to  −18 l min −1 (expiratory), the differential pressure ΔP ranged from  −15 cmH 2 O to 15 cmH2O. In each experimental trial carried out with different settings of the ventilator, outputs of the OFSs are compared with data from two reference sensors (reference flow sensor RF, reference pressure sensor RP) and results are found consistent: flow rate Q showed a maximum error between Q-OFS and RF up to 13 percent, with an output ratio Q RF /Q OFS of not more than 1.06  ±  0.09 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9822 and 0.9931). On the other hand the maximum error between P-OFS and RP on differential pressure ΔP was lower than 10 percent, with an output ratio ΔP RP /ΔP OFS between 0.977  ±  0.022 and 1.0  ±  0.8 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9864 and 0.9876). Despite the

  19. A novel fiber-optic measurement system for the evaluation of performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, L.; Scorza, A.; Botta, F.; Sciuto, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Published standards for the performance evaluation of pulmonary ventilators are mainly directed to manufacturers rather than to end-users and often considered inadequate or not comprehensive. In order to contribute to overcome the problems above, a novel measurement system was proposed and tested with waveforms of mechanical ventilation by means of experimental trials carried out with infant ventilators typically used in neonatal intensive care units: the main quantities of mechanical ventilation in newborns are monitored, i.e. air flow rate, differential pressure and volume from infant ventilator are measured by means of two novel fiber-optic sensors (OFSs) developed and characterized by the authors, while temperature and relative humidity of air mass are obtained by two commercial transducers. The proposed fiber-optic sensors (flow sensor Q-OFS, pressure sensor P-OFS) showed measurement ranges of air flow and pressure typically encountered in neonatal mechanical ventilation, i.e. the air flow rate Q ranged from 3 l min-1 to 18 l min-1 (inspiratory) and from  -3 l min-1 to  -18 l min-1 (expiratory), the differential pressure ΔP ranged from  -15 cmH2O to 15 cmH2O. In each experimental trial carried out with different settings of the ventilator, outputs of the OFSs are compared with data from two reference sensors (reference flow sensor RF, reference pressure sensor RP) and results are found consistent: flow rate Q showed a maximum error between Q-OFS and RF up to 13 percent, with an output ratio Q RF/Q OFS of not more than 1.06  ±  0.09 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9822 and 0.9931). On the other hand the maximum error between P-OFS and RP on differential pressure ΔP was lower than 10 percent, with an output ratio ΔP RP/ΔP OFS between 0.977  ±  0.022 and 1.0  ±  0.8 (least square estimation, 95 percent confidence level, R 2 between 0.9864 and 0.9876). Despite the possible improvements

  20. Passive and active vibration isolation systems using inerter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alujević, N.; Čakmak, D.; Wolf, H.; Jokić, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on passive and active vibration isolation schemes using inerter elements in a two degree of freedom (DOF) mechanical system. The aim of the work is to discuss basic capabilities and limitations of the vibration control systems at hand using simple and physically transparent models. Broad frequency band dynamic excitation of the source DOF is assumed. The purpose of the isolator system is to prevent vibration transmission to the receiving DOF. The frequency averaged kinetic energy of the receiving mass is used as the metric for vibration isolation quality. It is shown that the use of inerter element in the passive vibration isolation scheme can enhance the isolation effect. In the active case, a feedback disturbance rejection scheme is considered. Here, the error signal is the receiving body absolute velocity which is directly fed to a reactive force actuator between the source and the receiving bodies. In such a scheme, the so-called subcritical vibration isolation problems exist. These problems are characterised by the uncoupled natural frequency of the receiving body larger than the uncoupled natural frequency of the source body. In subcritical vibration isolation problems, the performance of the active control is limited by poor stability margins. This is because the stable feedback gain is restricted in a narrow range between a minimum and a maximum. However, with the inclusion of an inerter in the isolator, one of the two stability margins can be opened. This enables large, theoretically unlimited negative feedback gains and large active damping of the receiving body vibration. A simple expression for the required inertance is derived.

  1. Convective heat exposure from large fires to the final filters of ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Fire Science Group of the Hazards Control Department, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has been asked to design a probable fire scenario for a fuel-pellet fabrication facility. This model was used to estimate the potential for thermal damage to the final HEPA filters. These filters would not experience direct fire exposure because they are the last component of the ventilation system before the exhaust air pumps. However, they would be exposed to hot air and fire gases that are drawn into the ventilation system. Because fire is one of the few occurrences that can defeat the containment integrity of facilities where radioactive materials are stored and processed, the fire scenarios must be defined to ensure that containment systems are adequate to meet the threat of such events. Fire-growth calculations are based on the measured fuel load of materials within the fabrication enclosure and on semi-empirical fire-spread models. It is assumed that the fire never becomes ventilation controlled. The temperature rise of ceiling gases and heat transfer from ventilation ducting are calculated using accepted empirical relationships, and the analysis shows that even under the most severe exposure conditions, heat transfer from the duct reduces the fire gas temperatures to levels that would not hamper filter function

  2. Determination of respiratory system compliance during pressure support ventilation by small variations of pressure support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Tobias; Schädler, Dirk; Rostalski, Philipp; Zick, Günther; Frerichs, Inéz; Weiler, Norbert

    2017-09-22

    In mechanically ventilated patients, measurement of respiratory system compliance (C rs ) is of high clinical interest. Spontaneous breathing activity during pressure support ventilation (PSV) can impede the correct assessment of C rs and also alter the true C rs by inducing lung recruitment. We describe a method for determination of C rs during PSV and assess its accuracy in a study on 20 mechanically ventilated patients. To assess C rs during pressure support ventilation (C rs,PSV ), we performed repeated changes in pressure support level by ± 2 cmH 2 O. C rs,PSV was calculated from the volume change induced by these changes in pressure support level, taking into account the inspiration time and the expiratory time constant. As reference methods, we used C rs , measured during volume controlled ventilation (C rs,VCV ). In a post-hoc analysis, we assessed C rs during the last 20% of the volume-controlled inflation (C rs,VCV20 ). Values were compared by linear regression and Bland-Altman methods comparison. Comparing C rs,PSV to the reference value C rs,VCV , we found a coefficient of determination (r 2 ) of 0.90, but a relatively high bias of - 7 ml/cm H 2 O (95% limits of agreement - 16.7 to + 2.7 ml/cmH 2 O). Comparison with C rs,VCV20 resulted in a negligible bias (- 1.3 ml/cmH 2 O, 95% limits of agreement - 13.9 to + 11.3) and r 2 of 0.81. We conclude that the novel method provides an estimate of end-inspiratory C rs during PSV. Despite its limited accuracy, it might be useful for non-invasive monitoring of C rs in patients undergoing pressure support ventilation.

  3. Availability analysis of the AP600 passive core cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip, M [National Atomic Energy Research Agency, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Subki, I R [BATAN Head Office, Jakarta (Indonesia); Canton, M H [Westinghouse Electric Corp. (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The reliability analysis of the AP600 Passive Core Cooling System (PXS) has been done. The fault tree analysis method was used for the quantitative analysis. The PXS can be grouped to several sub-systems i.e.: Reactor Coolant System (RCS) Injection Subsystem, Emergency Core Decay Heat Removal Subsystem, and Containment Sump pH Control Subsystem. The quantitative analysis results indicates that the system unavailability is highly dependent on the valves configuration of the Automatic Depressurization System (ADS). If the ADS valves is arranged in Option-1, the system unavailability is 2.347E-03, this means that the yearly contribution to plant down time can be estimated to be about 20.56 hours per year. Whereas, by using Option-2 of fourth stage ADS valves, the system unavailability is reduced to be 9.877E-04 or 8.65 hours per year and this value is consistent with the allocated goal value (8.0 hours per year). The ADS contributes 66.89% to the system unavailability if it is arranged in Option-1, and will reduced to be about 21.21% if its fourth stages are arranged in Option-2. If the ADS is not included as a subsystem of the PXS (relocate to RCS as a subsystem of RCS), then the PXS unavailability will be reduced to about 7.784E-04 or 6.82 hours per year; this is less then the allocated goal value. The major contributors to the system unavailability are mostly dominated by Stage-4 ADS valves (air piston operated valves and squib valves), inservice testing valves of ADS (solenoid operated valves), solenoid valves of Nitrogen Supply to Accumulator, and Passive Residual Heat Removal actuation valves (air operated valves). It is recommended that those valves be analyzed more detail to gain the improvement in its reliability. It is also recommended that the fourth stage of ADS valves should be arranged according to Option-2, i.e. one 10-inch normally open motor operated gate valve in series with one 10-inch normally closed squib valve. (author). 13 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  4. Numerical analysis of diffuse ceiling ventilation and its integration with a radiant ceiling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Chen, Qingyan

    2017-01-01

    A novel system combining diffuse ceiling ventilation and radiant ceiling was proposed recently, with the aim of providing energy efficient and comfort environment to office buildings. Designing of such a system is challenging because of complex interactions between the two subsystems and a large ......-uniformity air distribution and further led to the draught problem in the occupied zone. This system was recommended to apply in the small offices instead of large, open spaces....

  5. Assessment of dynamic mechanical properties of the respiratory system during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacà, Raffaele L; Zannin, Emanuela; Ventura, Maria L; Sancini, Giulio; Pedotti, Antonio; Tagliabue, Paolo; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    1) To investigate the possibility of estimating respiratory system impedance (Zrs, forced oscillation technique) by using high-amplitude pressure oscillations delivered during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation; 2) to characterize the relationship between Zrs and continuous distending pressure during an increasing/decreasing continuous distending pressure trial; 3) to evaluate how the optimal continuous distending pressure identified by Zrs relates to the point of maximal curvature of the deflation limb of the quasi-static pressure-volume curve. Prospective laboratory animal investigation. Experimental medicine laboratory. Eight New Zealand rabbits. The rabbits were ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Zrs was measured while continuous distending pressure was increased and decreased between 2 and 26 cm H2O in 1-minute steps of 4 cm H2O. At each step, a low-amplitude (6 cm H2O) sinusoidal signal was alternated with a high-amplitude (18 cm H2O) asymmetric high-frequency oscillatory ventilation square pressure waveform. Pressure-volume curves were determined at the end of the continuous distending pressure trial. All measurements were repeated after bronchoalveolar lavage. Zrs was estimated from flow and pressure measured at the inlet of the tracheal tube and expressed as resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs). Linear correlation between the values, measured by applying the small-amplitude sinusoidal signal and the ventilator waveform, was good for Xrs (r = 0.95 ± 0.04) but not for Rrs (r = 0.60 ± 0.34). Following lavage, the Xrs-continuous distending pressure curves presented a maximum on the deflation limb, identifying an optimal continuous distending pressure that was, on average, 1.1 ± 1.7 cm H2O below the point of maximal curvature of the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curves. Xrs can be accurately measured during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation without interrupting ventilation and/or connecting additional devices. An optimal

  6. Study on collaborative optimization control of ventilation and radon reduction system based on multi-agent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Jianyong; Meng Lingcong; Zou Shuliang

    2015-01-01

    According to the radioactive safety features such as radon and its progeny, combined with the theory of ventilation system, structure of multi-agent system for ventilation and radon reduction system is constructed with the application of multi agent technology. The function attribute of the key agent and the connection between the nodes in the multi-agent system are analyzed to establish the distributed autonomous logic structure and negotiation mechanism of multi agent system of ventilation and radon reduction system, and thus to implement the coordination optimization control of the multi-agent system. The example analysis shows that the system structure of the multi-agent system of ventilation and reducing radon system and its collaborative mechanism can improve and optimize the radioactive pollutants control, which provides a theoretical basis and important application prospect. (authors)

  7. Personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    microenvironment. Furthermore, HVAC systems should be designed to protect occupants from airborne transmission of infectious agents that may be present in exhaled air. Personalized ventilation is a new development in the field of HVAC and has the potential to fulfill the above requirements. This paper reviews...... existing knowledge on performance of personalized ventilation (PV) and on human response to it. The airflow interaction in the vicinity of the human body is analyzed and its impact on thermal comfort and inhaled air quality is discussed together with control strategies and the application of PV in practice...

  8. Two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR with active and passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Akinaga, Makoto; Kojima, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR. They are named Mark S and Mark X containment. One of their common merits is very low peak pressure at severe accidents without venting the containment atmosphere to the environment. The PCV pressure can be moderated within the design pressure. Another merit is the capability to submerge the PCV and the RPV above the core level. The third merit is robustness against external events such as a large commercial airplane crash. Both the containments have a passive cooling core catcher that has radial cooling channels. The Mark S containment is made of reinforced concrete and applicable to a large power BWR up to 1830 MWe. The Mark X containment has the steel secondary containment and can be cooled by natural circulation of outside air. It can accommodate a medium power BWR up to 1380 MWe. In both cases the plants have active and passive safety systems constituting in-depth hybrid safety (IDHS). The IDHS provides not only hardware diversity between active and passive safety systems but also more importantly diversity of the ultimate heat sinks between the atmosphere and the sea water. Although the plant concept discussed in the paper uses well-established technology, plant performance including economy is innovatively and evolutionally improved. Nothing is new in the hardware but everything is new in the performance.

  9. Two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR with active and passive safety systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takashi [Toshiba Corporation, IEC, Gen-SS, 8, Shinsugita-ho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama (Japan)], E-mail: takashi44.sato@glb.toshiba.co.jp; Akinaga, Makoto; Kojima, Yoshihiro [Toshiba Corporation, IEC, Gen-SS, 8, Shinsugita-ho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents two types of a passive safety containment for a near future BWR. They are named Mark S and Mark X containment. One of their common merits is very low peak pressure at severe accidents without venting the containment atmosphere to the environment. The PCV pressure can be moderated within the design pressure. Another merit is the capability to submerge the PCV and the RPV above the core level. The third merit is robustness against external events such as a large commercial airplane crash. Both the containments have a passive cooling core catcher that has radial cooling channels. The Mark S containment is made of reinforced concrete and applicable to a large power BWR up to 1830 MWe. The Mark X containment has the steel secondary containment and can be cooled by natural circulation of outside air. It can accommodate a medium power BWR up to 1380 MWe. In both cases the plants have active and passive safety systems constituting in-depth hybrid safety (IDHS). The IDHS provides not only hardware diversity between active and passive safety systems but also more importantly diversity of the ultimate heat sinks between the atmosphere and the sea water. Although the plant concept discussed in the paper uses well-established technology, plant performance including economy is innovatively and evolutionally improved. Nothing is new in the hardware but everything is new in the performance.

  10. Special features of nuclear waste repository ventilation system VIS-A-VIS experiences at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis and discussion of the underground ventilation system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Particular emphasis is placed on specific repository-related requirements and the gradual evolution of engineering designs relative to the WIPP Project scope. The ventilation system for a nuclear waste facility similar to WIPP is designed to provide a suitable environment for personnel and equipment during normal activities. It is also designed to provide confinement and channeling of potential airborne radioactive material in the event of an accidental release. It is desirable to identify and design all parallel activities and the required process equipment prior to completion of the repository mine final design. Such factors as ventilation requirements, drift sizes, bulkhead sizes, and placement are dependent on these items. Mine creep closure properties must be factored into the mine and ventilation equipment design considerations. Effects of natural ventilation pressures deserve due consideration in the design. Mine ventilation requirements are dominated by the diesel equipment to be operated in the underground horizon. WIPP engineers have also found it extremely desirable to have automated real-time monitoring and control for the underground ventilation air. Final testing and balancing of the ventilation system is an extremely important startup requirement. 3 refs., 2 figs

  11. Project W-420 Ventilation Stack Monitoring System Year 2000 Compliance Assessment Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUSSELL, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This assessment describes the potential Year 2000 (Y2K) problems and describes the methods for achieving Y2K Compliance for Project W-420, Ventilation Stack Monitoring Systems Upgrades. The purpose of this assessment is to give an overview of the project. This document will not be updated and any dates contained in this document are estimates and may change. The project work scope includes upgrades to ventilation stacks and generic effluent monitoring systems (GEMS) at the 244-A Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT), the 244-BX DCRT, the 244-CR Vault, tanks 241-C-105 and 241-C-106, the 244-S DCRT, and the 244-TX DCRT. A detailed description of system dates, functions, interfaces, potential Y2K problems, and date resolutions can not be described since the project is in the definitive design phase, This assessment will describe the methods, protocols, and practices to ensure that equipment and systems do not have Y2K problems

  12. Alternative ventilation system for operating theaters: parameter study and full-scale assessment of the performance of a local ventilation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.H. Loogman; Dr. H.S.M. Kort; M.G.L.C. Loomans; I.M. de Visser

    2016-01-01

    A local operating theater ventilation device to specifically ventilate the wound area has been developed and investigated. The ventilation device is combined with a blanket which lies over the patient during the operation. Two configurations were studied: Configuration 1 where HEPA-filtered air was

  13. Synchronous Design and Test of Distributed Passive Radar Systems Based on Digital Broadcasting and Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Xianrong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Digital broadcasting and television are important classes of illuminators of opportunity for passive radars. Distributed and multistatic structure are the development trends for passive radars. Most modern digital broadcasting and television systems work on a network, which not only provides a natural condition to distributed passive radar but also puts forward higher requirements on the design of passive radar systems. Among those requirements, precise synchronization among the receivers and transmitters as well as among multiple receiving stations, which mainly involves frequency and time synchronization, is the first to be solved. To satisfy the synchronization requirements of distributed passive radars, a synchronization scheme based on GPS is presented in this paper. Moreover, an effective scheme based on the China Mobile Multimedia Broadcasting signal is proposed to test the system synchronization performance. Finally, the reliability of the synchronization design is verified via the distributed multistatic passive radar experiments.

  14. Design and operating technique for ventilating system of irradiated materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Hwa; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Eom, Sung Ho

    1999-08-01

    Ventilation and air filtering system is installed at IMEF to maintain optimized operating condition of the facility by keeping different negative pressure condition depending on contamination level in the IMEF due to its treatment of radioactive materials. Inspection on each system, air flow measurement, filter leak test and other related test are periodically performed as the performance test for increasing operational efficiency and safety. (Author). 16 refs., 21 tabs., 9 figs

  15. Definition and means of maintaining the ventilation system confinement portion of the PFP safety envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, J.D.; Grover, G.A.; O`Brien, P.M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-05

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant Heating Ventilation and Cooling system provides for the confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and provides for the confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. This document identifies the components and procedures necessary to ensure the HVAC system provides these functions. Appendices E through J provide a snapshot of non-safety class HVAC equipment and need not be updated when the remainder of the document and Appendices A through D are updated.

  16. Advanced Hybrid Spacesuit Concept Featuring Integrated Open Loop and Closed Loop Ventilation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Brian A.; Fitzpatrick, Garret R.; Gohmert, Dustin M.; Ybarra, Rick M.; Dub, Mark O.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the design and prototype of an advanced spacesuit concept that integrates the capability to function seamlessly with multiple ventilation system approaches. Traditionally, spacesuits are designed to operate both dependently and independently of a host vehicle environment control and life support system (ECLSS). Spacesuits that operate independent of vehicle-provided ECLSS services must do so with equipment selfcontained within or on the spacesuit. Suits that are dependent on vehicle-provided consumables must remain physically connected to and integrated with the vehicle to operate properly. This innovation is the design and prototype of a hybrid spacesuit approach that configures the spacesuit to seamlessly interface and integrate with either type of vehicular systems, while still maintaining the ability to function completely independent of the vehicle. An existing Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) was utilized as the platform from which to develop the innovation. The ACES was retrofitted with selected components and one-off items to achieve the objective. The ventilation system concept was developed and prototyped/retrofitted to an existing ACES. Components were selected to provide suit connectors, hoses/umbilicals, internal breathing system ducting/ conduits, etc. The concept utilizes a lowpressure- drop, high-flow ventilation system that serves as a conduit from the vehicle supply into the suit, up through a neck seal, into the breathing helmet cavity, back down through the neck seal, out of the suit, and returned to the vehicle. The concept also utilizes a modified demand-based breathing system configured to function seamlessly with the low-pressure-drop closed-loop ventilation system.

  17. Building envelope design for renewal of air by natural ventilation in moderate climates. Proposition of a designing methodology; Conception des enveloppes de batiments pour le renouvellement d'air par ventilation naturelle en climats temperes. Proposition d'une methodologie de conception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansouri, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The subject of this research is to produce methods and methodological tools for the architects to support the integration of natural ventilation systems in the building envelope design. Our research is situated to the interface between the architectural practice and the physical research on natural ventilation. We are interested in phenomena that can influence or force the strategy of ventilation. A morphological analysis of naturally ventilated buildings concerning the integration modes of natural ventilation systems is done permitting US to propose a typology and a topology of ventilation systems. We define criteria in relation to the thermal comfort, to the quality of air and the economy of energy to assess air renewal techniques. In complement of the sizing tool, we elaborate a methodology of conception for the integration of passives ventilation systems. Design guidelines permit US to conclude on an effective natural ventilation system which is well adapted to collective habitat. (author)

  18. Passive safety systems reliability and integration of these systems in nuclear power plant PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Lumia, V.; Mercier, S.; Marques, M.; Pignatel, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Innovative nuclear reactor concepts could lead to use passive safety features in combination with active safety systems. A passive system does not need active component, external energy, signal or human interaction to operate. These are attractive advantages for safety nuclear plant improvements and economic competitiveness. But specific reliability problems, linked to physical phenomena, can conduct to stop the physical process. In this context, the European Commission (EC) starts the RMPS (Reliability Methods for Passive Safety functions) program. In this RMPS program, a quantitative reliability evaluation of the RP2 system (Residual Passive heat Removal system on the Primary circuit) has been realised, and the results introduced in a simplified PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment). The scope is to get out experience of definition of characteristic parameters for reliability evaluation and PSA including passive systems. The simplified PSA, using event tree method, is carried out for the total loss of power supplies initiating event leading to a severe core damage. Are taken into account: failures of components but also failures of the physical process involved (e.g. natural convection) by a specific method. The physical process failure probabilities are assessed through uncertainty analyses based on supposed probability density functions for the characteristic parameters of the RP2 system. The probabilities are calculated by MONTE CARLO simulation coupled to the CATHARE thermalhydraulic code. The yearly frequency of the severe core damage is evaluated for each accident sequence. This analysis has identified the influence of the passive system RP2 and propose a re-dimensioning of the RP2 system in order to satisfy the safety probabilistic objectives for reactor core severe damage. (authors)

  19. Designing, Constructing and Installing a Local Exhaust Ventilation System to Minimize Welders\\' Exposure to Welding Fumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Zare

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Welder’s exposure to welding fumes can cause occupational diseases. The current study sought to examine exposure to welding fumes among welders who work in the repair shop of Sarcheshmeh Copper Complex and design a local exhaust ventilation system to control exposure to welding fumes. Materials & Methods: This applied analytical study was conducted in the summer of 2016 among welders working in the repair shop of Sarcheshmeh Copper Complex. The study comprised three phases; in the first one, welders’ exposure to welding fumes was assessed at the beginning of the study. After that, a local exhaust ventilation system was designed and installed in the aforementioned repair shop. In the final stage, welders’ exposure to welding fumes was assessed again after installation of the ventilation system. The procedure recommended by NIOSH (method number 7300 was used for individual sampling of welders. Results: Based on the obtained findings, before installing the ventilation system, welding technicians were exposed to 0.3 mg/m3 of copper fumes and 0.04 mg/m3 of chromium fumes. Journeyman welders were also exposed to 2.16 mg/m3 of manganese fumes, while stellar welders were exposed to 6.9 mg/m3 of iron fumes. In the light of these measurements, a local exhaust ventilation system was designed and installed. Subsequently, measurement of exposure to welding fumes showed a significant reduction. That is, welding technicians were exposed to 0.17 mg/m3 and 0.015 mg/m3 of copper and chromium fumes respectively. Additionally, journeyman welders were exposed to 0.86 mg/m3 of manganese fumes, whereas stellar welders were exposed to 4.3 mg/m3 of iron fumes. Conclusions: A comparison of standard limits of exposure to welding fumes and the results obtained from measurements in sampling stations before and after the installation of the local exhaust ventilation system reveals that this controlling measure was very effective in the

  20. Energy saving effect of desiccant ventilation system using Wakkanai siliceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Yuki; Togawa, Jun-ya; Nagano, Katsunori; Kazuyo, Tsuzuki

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear power station accident resulting from the Great East Japan Earthquake disaster has resulted in a constrained electricity supply. However, in this Asian region there is high temperature and high humidity and consequently dehumidification process requires a huge amount of energy. This is the reason for the increasing energy consumption in the residential and commercial sectors. Accordingly, a high efficiency air-conditioning system is needed to be developed. The desiccant ventilation system is effective to reduce energy consumption for the dehumidification process. This system is capable of dehumidifying without dew condensing unlike a conventional air-conditioning system. Then we focused on Wakkanai Siliceous Shale (WSS) as a desiccant material to develop a new desiccant ventilation system. This is low priced, high performance, new type of thing. The aim of this study is to develop a desiccant ventilation unit using the WSS rotor which can be regenerated with low-temperature by numerical calculation. The results of performance prediction of the desiccant unit, indicate that it is possible to regenerate the WSS rotor at low-temperature of between 35 - 45 °C. In addition, we produced an actual measurement for the desiccant unit and air-conditioning unit. This air-conditioning system was capable to reduce roughly 40 % of input energy consumption.

  1. [Reducing the levels of formaldehyde exposure during a gross anatomy dissection course with a local ventilation system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Akio; Yamato, Hiroshi; Kunugita, Naoki; Nakashima, Tamiji; Hayashi, Haruki

    2010-03-01

    Reducing the levels of formaldehyde (FA) exposure in gross anatomy laboratories has been urgently required. We improved the environment of our gross anatomy laboratory by changing the existing general ventilation to local ventilation. We developed a local ventilation apparatus (grid-type of hood with downward suction) that can be attached to an ordinary dissection table. Furthermore, in order to make this local ventilation apparatus an enclosure hood, the upper plate of the dissection table was surrounded by flexible vertical flanges. The apparatus works as an effective enclosure hood without interfering with students' practice of dissection. We installed 26 local ventilation apparatuses and connected them to the ventilation duct. The ventilation ducts were installed above the ceiling or along the pillars not to interfere with students' vision and movements in the room. Adopting the local ventilation system reduced dramatically the students' and lecturers' exposure to formaldehyde. The geometric mean formaldehyde concentration was 0.066 ppm in the anatomy laboratory in 2005. Since 2005, the new system has enabled us to comply with safety and health regulations and providing a smell- and irritant-free dissection room with an excellent environment for anatomy study.

  2. Modeling illumination performance of plastic optical fiber passive daylighting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, F; Ahmad, A [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering; Ahmed, A Z [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia). Bureau of Reseaarch and Consultancy

    2006-12-15

    of the most direct methods of utilizing solar energy for energy conservation is to bring natural light indoors to light up an area. This paper reports on the investigation of the feasibility to utilize large core optical fibers to convey and distribute solar light passively throughout residential or commercial structures. The focus of this study is on the mathematical modeling of the illumination performance and the light transmission efficiency of solid core end light fiber for optical day lighting systems. The Meatball simulations features the optical fiber transmittance for glass and plastic fibers, illumination performance over lengths of plastic end-lit fiber, spectral transmission, light intensity loss through the large diameter solid core optical fibers as well as the transmission efficiency of the optical fiber itself. It was found that plastic optical fiber has less transmission loss over the distance of the fiber run which clearly shows that the Plastic Optical Fiber should be optimized for emitting visible light. The findings from the analysis on the performance of large diameter optical fibers for day lighting systems seems feasible for energy efficient lighting system in commercial or residential buildings.

  3. Modeling illumination performance of plastic optical fiber passive daylighting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaiman, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, A.Z.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most direct methods of utilizing solar energy for energy conservation is to bring natural light indoors to light up an area. This paper reports on the investigation of the feasibility to utilize large core optical fibers to convey and distribute solar light passively throughout residential or commercial structures. The focus of this study is on the mathematical modeling of the illumination performance and the light transmission efficiency of solid core end light fiber for optical day lighting systems. The Meatball simulations features the optical fiber transmittance for glass and plastic fibers, illumination performance over lengths of plastic end-lit fiber, spectral transmission, light intensity loss through the large diameter solid core optical fibers as well as the transmission efficiency of the optical fiber itself. It was found that plastic optical fiber has less transmission loss over the distance of the fiber run which clearly shows that the Plastic Optical Fiber should be optimized for emitting visible light. The findings from the analysis on the performance of large diameter optical fibers for day lighting systems seems feasible for energy efficient lighting system in commercial or residential buildings

  4. Performance of ALMR passive decay heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, C.E.; Hunsbedt, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) concept has a totally passive safety-grade decay heat removal system referred to as the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that rejects heat from the small (471 MWt) modular reactor to the environmental air by natural convection heat transfer. The system has no active components, requires no operator action to initiate, and is inherently reliable. The RVACS can perform its function under off-normal or degraded operating conditions without significant loss in performance. Several such events are described and the RVACS thermal performance for each is given and compared to the normal operation performance. The basic RVACS performance as well as the performance during several off-normal events have been updated to reflect design changes for recycled fuel with minor actinides for end of equilibrium cycle conditions. The performance results for several other off-normal events involving various degrees of RVACS air flow passage blockages are presented. The results demonstrated that the RVACS is unusually tolerant to a wide range of postulated faults. (author)

  5. Numerical model describing the heat transfer between combustion products and ventilation-system duct walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolstad, J.W.; Foster, R.D.; Gregory, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    A package of physical models simulating the heat transfer processes occurring between combustion gases and ducts in ventilation systems is described. The purpose of the numerical model is to predict how the combustion gas in a system heats up or cools down as it flows through the ducts in a ventilation system under fire conditions. The model treats a duct with (forced convection) combustion gases flowing on the inside and stagnant ambient air on the outside. The model is composed of five submodels of heat transfer processes along with a numerical solution procedure to evaluate them. Each of these quantities is evaluated independently using standard correlations based on experimental data. The details of the physical assumptions, simplifications, and ranges of applicability of the correlations are described. A typical application of this model to a full-scale fire test is discussed, and model predictions are compared with selected experimental data

  6. Preliminary assessment of a combined passive safety system for typical 3-loop PWR CPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zijiang; Shan, Jianqiang, E-mail: jqshan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Gou, Junli

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • A combined passive safety system was placed on a typical 3-loop PWR CPR1000. • Three accident analyses show the three different accident mitigation methods of the passive safety system. • The three mitigation methods were proved to be useful. - Abstract: As the development of the nuclear industry, passive technology turns out to be a remarkable characteristic of advanced nuclear power plants. Since the 20th century, much effort has been given to the passive technology, and a number of evolutionary passive systems have developed. Thoughts have been given to upgrade the existing reactors with passive systems to meet stricter safety demands. In this paper, the CPR1000 plant, which is one kind of mature pressurized water reactor plants in China, is improved with some passive systems to enhance safety. The passive systems selected are as follows: (1) the reactor makeup tank (RMT); (2) the advanced accumulator (A-ACC); (3) the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST); (4) the passive emergency feed water system (PEFS), which is installed on the secondary side of SGs; (5) the passive depressurization system (PDS). Although these passive components is based on the passive technology of some advanced reactors, their structural and trip designs are adjusted specifically so that it could be able to mitigate accidents of the CPR1000. Utilizing the RELAP5/MOD3.3 code, accident analyses (small break loss of coolant accident, large break loss of coolant accident, main feed water line break accident) of this improved CPR1000 plant were presented to demonstrate three different accident mitigation methods of the safety system and to test whether the passive safety system preformed its function well. In the SBLOCA, all components of the passive safety system were put into work sequentially, which prevented the core uncover. The LBLOCA analysis illustrates the contribution of the A-ACCs whose small-flow-rate injection can control the maximum cladding

  7. Modelling of Condensation in Vertical Tubes for Passive Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papini, D.; Ricotti, M.; Santini, L.; Grgic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Condensation in vertical tubes plays an important role in the performance of heat exchangers in passive safety systems, widely adopted in next generation reactors. Vertical pipe condensers are implemented in the GE-SBWR1000 Isolation Condenser as well as in the Emergency Heat Removal System (EHRS) of the IRIS reactor. The transient and safety analysis is usually carried out by means of best-estimate, thermalhydraulic codes, as RELAP. Suitable heat transfer correlations are required to duly model the two-phase processes. As far as the condensation process is concerned, RELAP5/MOD3.3 adopts the Nusselt correlation to calculate the heat transfer coefficient in laminar conditions and the Shah correlation for turbulent conditions; the maximum of the predictions from laminar and turbulent regimes is used to calculate the condensation heat transfer coefficient. Shah correlation is generally considered as the best empirical correlation for turbulent annular film condensation, but suitable in proper ranges of the various parameters. Nevertheless, recent investigations have pointed out that its validity is highly questionable for high pressure and large diameter tube applications with water, as should be for the utilization for vertical tube condensers in passive safety systems. Thus, a best-estimate model, based on the theory of film condensation on a plain wall, is proposed. Condensate velocity, expressed in terms of Reynolds number, governs the development of three different regime zones: laminar, laminar wavy and turbulent. The best correlation for each regime (Nusselt's for laminar, Kutateladze's for laminar wavy and Chen's for turbulent) is considered and then implemented in RELAP code. Comparison between the Nusselt-Shah and the proposed model shows substantial differences in heat transfer coefficient prediction. Especially, a trend of increasing value of the heat transfer coefficient with tube abscissa (and quality decreasing) is predicted, when turbulence

  8. Ventilation systems analysis during tornado conditions. Progress report, July--December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, W.S.; Duerre, K.H.; Bennett, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    A review of some existing digital simulations of fluid systems, a brief description of the proposed generalized computer code, a description of, and results from, two solution techniques, and a sample test case ventilation system are presented. The review of some fluid system simulations covers methods and techniques for development of a more general digital solution technique than the successive substitution method used in previous analyses. The structure and organization of the computer code under development is discussed. A section dealing with the development of a user-oriented input to the code is also presented. Two solution techniques suitable for solving the simultaneous nonlinear algebraic and differential equations are presented. One of the techniques is based upon a loop method and employs Newton's method for obtaining simultaneous iterative corrections for the solution. The second approach is based upon a node orientation and employs Cross' method to arrive at successive iterative corrections for the solution. Graphical results using both methods are presented. The results are essentially identical. A ''test-case'' ventilation system is introduced. The test-case ventilation system model was developed primarily for ''debugging'' the proposed generalized code. The test case is a simple yet realistic representation of the types of subsystems which could be encountered in nuclear facilities

  9. A Review: Passive System Reliability Analysis – Accomplishments and Unresolved Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Arun Kumar, E-mail: arunths@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Chandrakar, Amit [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai (India); Vinod, Gopika [Reactor Safety Division, Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-10-10

    Reliability assessment of passive safety systems is one of the important issues, since safety of advanced nuclear reactors rely on several passive features. In this context, a few methodologies such as reliability evaluation of passive safety system (REPAS), reliability methods for passive safety functions (RMPS), and analysis of passive systems reliability (APSRA) have been developed in the past. These methodologies have been used to assess reliability of various passive safety systems. While these methodologies have certain features in common, but they differ in considering certain issues; for example, treatment of model uncertainties, deviation of geometric, and process parameters from their nominal values. This paper presents the state of the art on passive system reliability assessment methodologies, the accomplishments, and remaining issues. In this review, three critical issues pertaining to passive systems performance and reliability have been identified. The first issue is applicability of best estimate codes and model uncertainty. The best estimate codes based phenomenological simulations of natural convection passive systems could have significant amount of uncertainties, these uncertainties must be incorporated in appropriate manner in the performance and reliability analysis of such systems. The second issue is the treatment of dynamic failure characteristics of components of passive systems. REPAS, RMPS, and APSRA methodologies do not consider dynamic failures of components or process, which may have strong influence on the failure of passive systems. The influence of dynamic failure characteristics of components on system failure probability is presented with the help of a dynamic reliability methodology based on Monte Carlo simulation. The analysis of a benchmark problem of Hold-up tank shows the error in failure probability estimation by not considering the dynamism of components. It is thus suggested that dynamic reliability methodologies must be

  10. A Novel Control Algorithm for Integration of Active and Passive Vehicle Safety Systems in Frontal Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wallner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates an approach to integrate active and passive safety systems of passenger cars. Worldwide, the introduction of Integrated Safety Systems and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS is considered to continue the today

  11. A passive wireless ultrasound pitch–catch system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, F; Yao, J; Huang, H

    2015-01-01

    This paper exploits amplitude modulation and demodulation to achieve a passive wireless ultrasound pitch–catch system consisting of a wireless interrogator and a combination of a wireless actuator and a sensor mounted on a structure. The wireless interrogator operates in two modes, i.e. the generation and sensing modes. At the generation mode, the interrogator transmits two microwave signals; one is amplitude modulated with the ultrasound excitation signal while the other is a continuous-wave carrier signal. Once received by the wireless actuator, the amplitude modulated signal is demodulated using the carrier signal to recover the ultrasound excitation signal, which is then supplied to a piezoelectric wafer actuator for ultrasound generation. Subsequently, the interrogator is switched to the sensing mode by transmitting a carrier signal with a different frequency. Once received by the wireless sensor, this carrier signal is modulated with the ultrasound sensing signal acquired by the piezoelectric wafer sensor to produce an amplitude modulated microwave signal, which can then be wirelessly transmitted and demodulated by the interrogator to recover the original ultrasound sensing signal. The principle and implementation of the wireless ultrasound pitch–catch system as well as the data processing of the wirelessly received sensing signal are described. Experiment results validating wireless ultrasound generation and sensing from a distance of 0.5 m are presented. (paper)

  12. Foundations for Improvements to Passive Detection Systems - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labov, S E; Pleasance, L; Sokkappa, P; Craig, W; Chapline, G; Frank, M; Gronberg, J; Jernigan, J G; Johnson, S; Kammeraad, J; Lange, D; Meyer, A; Nelson, K; Pohl, B; Wright, D; Wurtz, R

    2004-01-01

    This project explores the scientific foundation and approach for improving passive detection systems for plutonium and highly enriched uranium in real applications. Sources of gamma-ray radiation of interest were chosen to represent a range of national security threats, naturally occurring radioactive materials, industrial and medical radiation sources, and natural background radiation. The gamma-ray flux emerging from these sources, which include unclassified criticality experiment configurations as surrogates for nuclear weapons, were modeled in detail. The performance of several types of gamma-ray imaging systems using Compton scattering were modeled and compared. A mechanism was created to model the combine sources and background emissions and have the simulated radiation ''scene'' impinge on a model of a detector. These modeling tools are now being used in various projects to optimize detector performance and model detector sensitivity in complex measuring environments. This study also developed several automated algorithms for isotope identification from gamma-ray spectra and compared these to each other and to algorithms already in use. Verification testing indicates that these alternative isotope identification algorithms produced less false positive and false negative results than the ''GADRAS'' algorithms currently in use. In addition to these algorithms that used binned spectra, a new approach to isotope identification using ''event mode'' analysis was developed. Finally, a technique using muons to detect nuclear material was explored

  13. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory`s High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects.

  14. TRAC analysis of passive containment cooling system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Kataoka, Kazuyoshi; Nagasaka, Hideo

    1993-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system (PCCS) is a promising concept to improve the reliability of decay heat removal during an accident. Toshiba has carried out analytical studies for PCCS development in addition to experimental studies, using a best estimate thermal hydraulic computer code TRAC. In order to establish an analytical model for the PCCS performance analysis, it is necessary for the analytical model to be qualified against experimental results and thoroughly address the phenomena important for PCCS performance analysis. In this paper, the TRAC qualification for PCCS application is reported. A TRAC model has been verified against a drain line break simulation test conducted at the PCCS integral test facility, GIRAFFE. The result shows that the TRAC model can accurately predict the major system response and the PCCS performance in the drain line break test. In addition, the results of several sensitivity analyses, showing various points concerning the modeling in the PCCS performance analysis, have been reported. The analyses have been carried out for the SBWR and the analytical points are closely related to important phenomena which can affect PCCS performance

  15. HTS thin films: Passive microwave components and systems integration issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, F.A.; Chorey, C.M.; Bhasin, K.B.

    1994-01-01

    The excellent microwave properties of the High-Temperature-Superconductors (HTS) have been amply demonstrated in the laboratory by techniques such as resonant cavity, power transmission and microstrip resonator measurements. The low loss and high Q passive structures made possible with HTS, present attractive options for applications in commercial, military and space-based systems. However, to readily insert HTS into these systems improvement is needed in such areas as repeatability in the deposition and processing of the HTS films, metal-contact formation, wire bonding, and overall film endurance to fabrication and assembly procedures. In this paper we present data compiled in our lab which illustrate many of the problems associated with these issues. Much of this data were obtained in the production of a space qualified hybrid receiver-downconverter module for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Temperature Superconductivity Space Experiment II (HTSSE-II). Examples of variations observed in starting films and finished circuits will be presented. It is shown that under identical processing the properties of the HTS films can degrade to varying extents. Finally, we present data on ohmic contacts and factors affecting their adhesion to HTS films, strength of wire bonds made to such contacts, and aging effects

  16. On-Chip Correlator for Passive Wireless SAW Multisensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For decoding the asynchronous superposition of response signals from different sensors, it is a challenge to achieve correlation in a code division multiplexing (CDM based passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW multisensor system. Therefore, an on-chip correlator scheme is developed in this paper. In contrast to conventional CDM-based systems, this novel scheme enables the correlations to be operated at the SAW sensors, instead of the reader. Thus, the response signals arriving at the reader are the result of cross-correlation on the chips. It is then easy for the reader to distinguish the sensor that is matched with the interrogating signal. The operation principle, signal analysis, and simulation of the novel scheme are described in the paper. The simulation results show the response signals from the correlations of the sensors. A clear spike pulse is presented in the response signals, when a sensor code is matched with the interrogating code. Simulations verify the feasibility of the on-chip correlator concept.

  17. AC-600 passive containment cooling system performance research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Baoshan; Yu Jiyang; Shi Junying

    1997-01-01

    a code named PCCSAC which is able to predict both the evaporating film on the outside surface of the vessel and the condensed film on its inside is developed successfully. It is a special software tool to analyze the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) performance in the design of AC-600. The author includes the establishment of physical models, selection of numerical methods, debugging and verification of the code and application of the code in the AC-600 PCCS. In physical models, the fundamental conservation equations about various areas and heat conduction equations are established. In order to make the equations to meet the closed form of solution, a lot of structure formulae are complemented. After repeated selection and demonstration of the numerical methods, the backward difference method Gear which is generally used for stiff problem is chosen for the solution of ordinary differential equations derived from the physical models. The results of standard example calculated by the PCCSAC code and the COMMIX code which is used to analyze westinghouse AP-600 are same in the main. The reliability and validity are verified from the calculations. The PCCSAC code is applied in the calculations of two important LOCA used in the containment safety analyses. The sensitivity of main parameters in the system based on LOCA are studied. All the results are reasonable and in agreement with the theoretical analyses. It can be concluded that the PCCSAC code is able to be used for the analyses of AC-600 PCCS performance

  18. An experimental investigation of natural circulated air flow in the passive containment cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.H.; Oh, S.M.; Park, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of air inlet position and external conditions on the natural circulated air flow rate in a passive containment cooling system of the advanced passive reactor. Experiments have been performed with 1/36 scaled segment type passive containment test facility. The air velocities and temperatures are measured through the air flow path. Also, the experimental results are compared with numerical calculations and show good agreement. (author)

  19. Design Principles for Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation. ....... The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples.......For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation...

  20. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  1. Ventilation and air conditioning system in waste treatment and storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hirotsugu; Sugawara, Kazushige.

    1987-01-01

    So far, the measures concerning the facilities for treating and storing radioactive wastes in nuclear fuel cycle in Japan were in the state which cannot be said to be sufficient. In order to cope with this situation, electric power companies constructed and operated radioactive waste concentration and volume reduction facilities, solid waste storing facilities for drums, high level solid waste storing facilities, spent fuel cask preserving facilities and so on successively in the premises of nuclear power stations, and for the wastes expected in future, the research and the construction plan of the facilities for treating and storing low, medium and high level wastes have been advanced. The ventilation and air conditioning system for these facilities is the important auxiliary system which has the mission of maintaining safe and pleasant environment in the facilities and lowering as far as possible the release of radioactive substances to outside. The outline of waste treatment and storage facilities is explained. The design condition, ventilation and air conditioning method, the features of respective waste treatment and storage facilities, and the problems for the future are described. Hereafter, mechanical ventilation system continues to be the main system, and filters become waste, while the exchange of filters is accompanied by the radiation exposure of workers. (Kako, I.)

  2. Analysis of ventilation systems subjected to tornado conditions, May 1--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrae, R.W.; Duerre, K.H.; Dove, R.C.; Smith, M.H.; Gregory, W.S.

    1978-12-01

    A computer code called TVENT was developed to predict variations of pressure and flow induced in nuclear facility ventilation systems by a tornado. The final revisions made to TVENT that resulted from the suggestions of several users and the application of TVENT by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to real ventilation systems, such as those in the new LASL plutonium facility are described. TVENT was also used in an investigation of scale-modeling laws for ventilation systems. Application of TVENT to the LASL plutonium facility demonstrated that the code will handle large, complex systems. The results showed that tornado-induced transients would produce pressure reversals between zones and high flow through the filters in some plenums. The investigation of any serious implications of these conditions will require a separate effort that is beyond the scope of this report. Scale models based on several different assumptions were analyzed using TVENT to determine the best approach in building a scale model. One model distorted viscosity, and another distorted compressibility. Comparison of the distorted model results with results obtained using full-scale dimensions showed conclusively that compressibility should not be distorted, but that viscosity can be distorted without significant effects

  3. A versatile hydraulically operated respiratory servo system for ventilation and lung function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M; Slama, H

    1983-09-01

    A description is given of the design and performance of a microcomputer-controlled respiratory servo system that incorporates the characteristics of a mechanical ventilator and also allows the performance of a multitude of test procedures required for assessment of pulmonary function in paralyzed animals. The device consists of a hydraulically operated cylinder-piston assembly and solenoid valves that direct inspiratory and expiratory gas flow and also enable switching to different test gas sources. The system operates as a volume-flow-preset ventilator but may be switched to other operational cycling modes. Gas flow rates may be constant or variable. The system operates as an assister-controller and, combined with a gas analyzer, can function as a "demand" ventilator allowing for set-point control of end-tidal PCO2 and PO2. Complex breathing maneuvers for a variety of single- and multiple-breath lung function tests are automatically performed. Because of the flexibility in selection and timing of respiratory parameters, the system is particularly suitable for respiratory gas studies.

  4. Design and simulation of a hybrid ventilation system with earth-air heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athienitis, A.K.; Zhao, M. [Concordia Univ., Centre for Building Studies, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Roy, M. [Martin Roy and Associes Group Conseil Inc., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    A simulation study was conducted during the design phase of a new circus building in Montreal which includes a hybrid ventilation system through which fresh air is supplied from an earth-air heat exchanger (EAHE). The EAHE has the potential to satisfy the cooling needs of the building and can also be used to preheat fresh air, thereby satisfying one-third or more of the building's heating needs. Another feature of the building is that it uses displacement ventilation by which the air is supplied at low velocities through large diffusers behind the top level seats or under the seats. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out to help size the supply and return units of the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system, as well as the exhaust chimney. The primary objective of the CFD simulation was to determine the maximum velocity and temperature in the seated area to ensure thermal comfort. CFD simulation predictions were found to be in good agreement with preliminary measurements taken in the building. In order to monitor the operation of the system over the next year, the underground ducts were equipped with temperature sensors at several depths into the soil. The energy efficiency of the hybrid HVAC system will be assessed and the velocity and temperature distribution in the theatre will be examined under various operating and energy load conditions. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Use of geostatistics on broiler production for evaluation of different minimum ventilation systems during brooding phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayla Morandi Ridolfi de Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate different minimum ventilation systems, in relation to air quality and thermal comfort using geostatistics in brooding phase. The minimum ventilation systems were: Blue House I: exhaust fans + curtain management (end of the building; Blue House II: exhaust fans + side curtain management; and Dark House: exhaust fans + flag. The climate variables evaluated were: dry bulb temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, carbon dioxide and ammonia concentration, during winter time, at 9 a.m., in 80 equidistant points in brooding area. Data were evaluated by geostatistic technique. The results indicate that Wider broiler houses (above 15.0 m width present the greatest ammonia and humidity concentration. Blue House II present the best results in relation to air quality. However, none of the studied broiler houses present an ideal thermal comfort.

  6. Laboratory study of subjective perceptions to low temperature heating systems with exhaust ventilation in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Quan; Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2017-01-01

    Given the global trends of rising energy demand and the increasing utilization of low-grade renewable energy, low-temperature heating systems can play key roles in improving building energy efficiency while providing a comfortable indoor environment. To meet the need to retrofit existing buildings...... in Nordic countries for greater energy efficiency, this study focused on human subjects’ thermal sensation, thermal comfort, thermal acceptability, draft acceptability, and perceived air quality when three low-temperature heating systems were used: conventional radiator, ventilation radiator, or floor...... heating with exhaust ventilation. Human subject tests were carried out in the climate chamber at the Technical University of Denmark. In total, 24 human subjects, 12 females and 12 males, participated in the tests during the winter season. The results show that no significant differences in thermal...

  7. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, S.E.; Haass, C.C.; Kovach, J.L.; Turner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through out the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  8. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, C.C.; Kovach, J.L.; Kelly, S.E.; Turner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  9. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  10. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  11. Cost optimization for buildings with hybrid ventilation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kun; Lu, Yan

    2018-02-13

    A method including: computing a total cost for a first zone in a building, wherein the total cost is equal to an actual energy cost of the first zone plus a thermal discomfort cost of the first zone; and heuristically optimizing the total cost to identify temperature setpoints for a mechanical heating/cooling system and a start time and an end time of the mechanical heating/cooling system, based on external weather data and occupancy data of the first zone.

  12. SIMULATION OF FREE CURRENT FLOWS IN BUOYANCY-DRIVEN VENTILATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Abramkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to analyse the effect of the design and methods for heating the ventilation duct of a buoyancy- driven system on the formation of free convective air currents in it.Methods. The study of free convection under the conditions of interior problem was carried out using the CFD software, based on  the finite volume method with unstructured grid. Ansys Fluent software was used as a calculation tool in the study, due to its having a high convergence of numerical solutions offering full-scale  measurements of convective currents.To evaluate the reliability of  the results obtained, a validation procedure was carried out, allowing us to determine how accurately the selected conceptual model describes the investigated flow through a comparison of experimental and numerical data.Results. The results of numerical modelling of free convective currents occurring in the heated channel of the ventilation system of  the top floor of a multi-storey residential building are presented in  the article. In the course of the study, the air velocity at the entrance to the ventilation duct was found to depend on the calculated  temperature difference θ ˚C for various heating methods. A gradual  increase in the discrepancy between the numerical simulation and  experimental results is observed if the calculated temperature  difference > 20 ° C. This phenomenon is due to the fact that with  increased duct temperature, it is quite difficult to achieve even  heating under actual conditions; this is especially noticeable when  considering the variant when the vertical part of the vent duct and the take-off are both heated. The maximum deviation of the  results is 4.4%. The obtained velocity profiles in the calculated  sections indicate the impact of the ventilation take-off on the nature  of the air flow motion.Conclusion. One of the drawbacks of the existing systems of natural ventilation of residential

  13. Ventilation system in the RA reactor building - design specifications; Sistem ventilacije u objektu 'RA' - Tehnicki opis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badrljica, R [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1984-09-15

    Protective role of the ventilation system of nuclear facilities involve construction of ventilation barriers which prevent release of radioactive particulates or gases, elimination od radioactive particulates and gases from the air which is released from contaminated zones into the reactor environment. Ventilation barriers are created by dividing the building into a number of ventilation zones with different sub pressure compared to the atmospheric pressure. The RA reactor building is divided into four ventilation zones. First zone is the zone of highest risk. It includes reactor core with horizontal experimental channels, underground rooms of the primary coolant system (D{sub 2}O), helium system, hot cells and the space above the the reactor core. Second zone is the reactor hall and the room for irradiated fuel storage. The third zone includes corridors in the basement, ground floor and first floor where the probability of contamination is small. The fourth zone includes the annex where the contamination risk is low. There is no have natural air circulation in the reactor building. Ventilators for air input and outlet maintain the sub pressure in the building (pressure lower than the atmospheric pressure). This prevents release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. Zastitne uloge ventilacionog sistema kod nuklearnih postrojenja obuhvataju formiranje ventilacionih barijera koje onemugucavaju sirenje radioaktivnih cestica ili gasova putem cirkulacije vazduha; eliminaciju radioaktivnih cestica i gasova iz vazduha koji se evakuise iz kontaminiranih prostora u okolinu reaktorskog postrojenja. Formiranje zastitnih ventilacionih barijera ostvaruje se obicno podelom unutrasnjosti objekta na vise ventilacionih zona razlicitih podpritisaka u odnosu na spoljni atmosferski pritisak. Celi prostor zgrade reaktora RA podeljen je u cetiri ventilacione zone. Prva zona je zona najveceg rizika, u koju spadaju reaktorsko jezgro sa horizontalnim eksperimentalnim kanalima, tehnoloske

  14. Plan of action for quality improvement of ventilation systems; Actieplan Kwaliteitsverbetering Ventilatievoorzieningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsma, J. [Ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu IenM, Den Haag (Netherlands); Calon, M. [Aedes vereniging van woningcorporaties, Den Haag (Netherlands); Schoorl, F.J. [Bond Nederlandse Architecten BNA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Tuinen, J.L. [Bouwend Nederland, Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Bodewes, W.J. [Vereniging van Nederlandse projectontwikkeling Maatschappijen Neprom, Voorburg (Netherlands); Goossens, J.H. [Vereniging voor ontwikkelaars en bouwondernemers NVB, Voorburg (Netherlands); Polman, E.J.M. [Stichting Waarborgfonds Koopwoningen SWK, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Engels, M. [Uneto-VNI, Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Werner-van Beek, H. J. [VACpunt Wonen, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mulder, R.J. [Vereniging Eigen Huis VEH, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Rook, G. [Vereniging Leveranciers van Luchttechnische Apparaten VLA, Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Van Noord, P. [Woningborg, Gouda (Netherlands); Paping, R.H.M. [De Nederlandse Woonbond, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    The action plan comprises the agreements made by the Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment and the Ministry of Internal Affairs in the Netherlands with representatives of building organizations to improve the quality of ventilation systems in newly built houses [Dutch] Het actieplan bevat de afspraken die het ministerie van Infrastructuur en Milieu en het ministerie van Binnenlandse Zaken met de bouwpartijen hebben gemaakt om de kwaliteit van de ventilatievoorzieningen van nieuwbouwwoningen te verbeteren.

  15. Reliability centered maintenance pilot system implementation 241-AP-tank farm primary ventilation system final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOORE TL

    2001-01-01

    When the Hanford Site Tank Farms' mission was safe storage of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks, maintenance activities focused on time-based preventive maintenance. Tank Farms' new mission to deliver waste to a vitrification plant where the waste will be processed into a form suitable for permanent storage requires a more efficient and proactive approach to maintenance. Systems must be maintained to ensure that they are operational and available to support waste feed delivery on schedule with a minimum of unplanned outages. This report describes the Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) pilot system that was implemented in the 241-AP Tank Farm Primary Ventilation System under PI-ORP-009 of the contract between the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection and CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CHG). The RCM analytical techniques focus on monitoring the condition of operating systems to predict equipment failures so that maintenance activities can be completed in time to prevent or mitigate unplanned equipment outages. This approach allows maintenance activities to be managed with minimal impact on plant operations. The pilot demonstration provided an opportunity for CHG staff-training in RCM principles and tailoring of the RCM approach to the Hanford Tank Farms' unique needs. This report details the implementation of RCM on a pilot system in Tank Farms

  16. Characterization of Passive Spectral Regrowth in Radio Frequency Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    as using RF absorber and Faraday cages around sensi- tive spots. To ensure maximum radiated isolation, each cable or component should be shielded...nonlinear effects of spectral-regrowth-generating phenomena on an RF signal. Detection of low-level passive spectral regrowth close in frequency to a...experimentally and analytically characterize the nonlinear effects of spectral- regrowth-generating phenomena on an RF signal. Detection of low-level passive

  17. A knowledge- and model-based system for automated weaning from mechanical ventilation: technical description and first clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Dirk; Mersmann, Stefan; Frerichs, Inéz; Elke, Gunnar; Semmel-Griebeler, Thomas; Noll, Oliver; Pulletz, Sven; Zick, Günther; David, Matthias; Heinrichs, Wolfgang; Scholz, Jens; Weiler, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    To describe the principles and the first clinical application of a novel prototype automated weaning system called Evita Weaning System (EWS). EWS allows an automated control of all ventilator settings in pressure controlled and pressure support mode with the aim of decreasing the respiratory load of mechanical ventilation. Respiratory load takes inspired fraction of oxygen, positive end-expiratory pressure, pressure amplitude and spontaneous breathing activity into account. Spontaneous breathing activity is assessed by the number of controlled breaths needed to maintain a predefined respiratory rate. EWS was implemented as a knowledge- and model-based system that autonomously and remotely controlled a mechanical ventilator (Evita 4, Dräger Medical, Lübeck, Germany). In a selected case study (n = 19 patients), ventilator settings chosen by the responsible physician were compared with the settings 10 min after the start of EWS and at the end of the study session. Neither unsafe ventilator settings nor failure of the system occurred. All patients were successfully transferred from controlled ventilation to assisted spontaneous breathing in a mean time of 37 ± 17 min (± SD). Early settings applied by the EWS did not significantly differ from the initial settings, except for the fraction of oxygen in inspired gas. During the later course, EWS significantly modified most of the ventilator settings and reduced the imposed respiratory load. A novel prototype automated weaning system was successfully developed. The first clinical application of EWS revealed that its operation was stable, safe ventilator settings were defined and the respiratory load of mechanical ventilation was decreased.

  18. Design Principles for Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per

    2000-01-01

    For many years mechanical and natural ventilation systems have developed separately. Naturally, the next step in this development is the development of ventilation concepts that utilize and combine the best features from each system to create a new type of ventilation system- Hybrid Ventilation. The hybrid ventilation concepts, design challenges and principles are discussed and illustrated by four building examples.

  19. Passive magnetic shielding in MRI-Linac systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Brendan; Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Brad M.; Keall, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Passive magnetic shielding refers to the use of ferromagnetic materials to redirect magnetic field lines away from vulnerable regions. An application of particular interest to the medical physics community is shielding in MRI systems, especially integrated MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) systems. In these systems, the goal is not only to minimize the magnetic field in some volume, but also to minimize the impact of the shield on the magnetic fields within the imaging volume of the MRI scanner. In this work, finite element modelling was used to assess the shielding of a side coupled 6 MV linac and resultant heterogeneity induced within the 30 cm diameter of spherical volume (DSV) of a novel 1 Tesla split bore MRI magnet. A number of different shield parameters were investigated; distance between shield and magnet, shield shape, shield thickness, shield length, openings in the shield, number of concentric layers, spacing between each layer, and shield material. Both the in-line and perpendicular MRI-Linac configurations were studied. By modifying the shield shape around the linac from the starting design of an open ended cylinder, the shielding effect was boosted by approximately 70% whilst the impact on the magnet was simultaneously reduced by approximately 10%. Openings in the shield for the RF port and beam exit were substantial sources of field leakage; however it was demonstrated that shielding could be added around these openings to compensate for this leakage. Layering multiple concentric shield shells was highly effective in the perpendicular configuration, but less so for the in-line configuration. Cautious use of high permeability materials such as Mu-metal can greatly increase the shielding performance in some scenarios. In the perpendicular configuration, magnetic shielding was more effective and the impact on the magnet lower compared with the in-line configuration.

  20. Intelligent solar-powered automobile-ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, K. David; Tzeng, S.-C.; Ma Weiping; Wu Mingfung

    2005-01-01

    This study adopts airflow management technology to improve the local temperature distributions in an automobile to counteract the greenhouse effect. The automobile's temperature can be reduced to almost the outside temperature before the driver or passenger gets into the vehicle. When the engine is idling, the greenhouse-control system can be activated to remove the hot air from the car. An appropriate negative pressure is maintained to prevent stuffiness and save energy. The greenhouse-control system requires electrical power when the engine is idle, and a battery cannot supply sufficient power. An auxiliary solar-power supply can save energy and reduce the greenhouse effect of sunlight, while creating a comfortable traveling environment. It ensures that the engine is not overburdened and increases its service life, conserving energy, protecting the environment and improving comfort

  1. Development on design methodology of PWR passive containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong Wook

    1998-02-01

    The containment is the most important barrier against the release of radioactive materials into the environment during accident conditions of nuclear power plants. Therefore the development of a reliable containment cooling system is one of key areas in advanced reactor development. To enhance the safety of the containment system, many new containment system designs have been proposed and developed in the world. Several passive containment cooling system (PCCS) concepts for both steel and concrete containment systems are overviewed and assessed comparatively. Major concepts considered are: (a) the spray of water on the outer surface of a steel containment from an elevated tank, (b) an external moat for a steel containment, (c) a suppression pool for a concrete containment, and (d) combination of the internal spray and internal or external condensers for a concrete containment. Emphasis is given to the heat removal principles, the required heat transfer area, system complexity and operational reliability. As one of conceptual design steps of containment, a methodology based on scaling principles is proposed to determine the containment size according to the power level. The AP600 containment system is selected as the reference containment to which the scaling laws are applied. Governing equations of containment pressure are set up in consideration of containment behavior in accident conditions. Then, the dimensionless numbers, which characterize the containment phenomena, are derived for the blowdown dominant and decay heat dominant stage, respectively. The important phenomena in blowdown stage are mass and energy sources and their absorption in containment atmosphere or containment structure, while heat transfer to the outer environment becomes important in decay heat stage. Based on their similarity between the prototype and the model, the containment sizes are determined for higher power levels and are compared with the SPWR containment design values available

  2. Correlation between germ and particle measurements for the qualification of ventilation systems in the OR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulitta Clemens

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare associated infections in surgical procedures have long been the focus of scientific research. In Germany, more than 225,000 patients suffer from such infections each year [1]. However, the reduction of the microbiological contamination is not only limited by cleaning and disinfecting measures. The choice of the ventilation system in the operating room or the type of the clothing of the personnel during the operation is also an important factor contributing to patient safety and infection control. Currently there are different approaches for assessing the hygienic situation in an operating room. In Germany, the air quality and cleanliness is evaluated by the DIN 1946-4: 2008-12 [2] and is based on the measurement of particles in the operating theatre. Other countries i.eSweden. focus on the biological contamination and use microbiological methods for the assessment and surveillance of the operating room ventilation (SIS-TS 39: 2015 [3].

  3. The effect of a personalized ventilation system on perceived air quality and SBS symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Zeng, Q.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2002-01-01

    Perceived air quality, SBS symptoms and performance were studied with 30 human subjects. Experiments were performed in an office set-up with six workplaces, each equipped with a Personalized Ventilation System (PVS). Each PVS allowed the amount of supply air and its direction to be controlled...... condition in regard to perceived air quality, perception of freshness and intensity of SBS symptoms was when PVS supplied outdoor air at 20 deg.C. Perceived air quality in this case was significantly better (p....... Subjects participated in four experiments: (1) PVS supplying outdoor air at 20 deg.C; (2) PVS supplying outdoor air at 23 deg.C; (3) PVS supplying recirculated room air; and (4) mixing ventilation. Room temperature was kept constant at 23 deg.C and relative humidity at 30%. Results showed that the best...

  4. Dispersion of Exhalation Pollutants in a Two-bed Hospital Ward with a Downward Ventilation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Nielsen, Peter V.; Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended the use of downward ventilation systems in isolation rooms to reduce the risk of cross-infection from airborne transmissible diseases. The expected airflow pattern of a downward ventilation design would supply cooler and slightly...... to investigate the airflow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the test ward. Based on both experimental and numerical results, the laminar airflow pattern was shown to be impossible to achieve due to turbulent flow mixing and flow entrainment into the supply air stream. The thermal plumes produced above people...... were found to induce flow mixing. We also studied the effects of the locations of the supply and extraction openings on both the flow pattern and pollutant exposure level in the occupied zone. A number of practical recommendations are suggested....

  5. Numerical analysis of natural ventilation system in a studio apartment in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Hasan, Md. Rakibul; Khan, Md. Abdul Hakim

    2017-07-01

    The study of temperature and air flow for natural ventilation system has been investigated numerically. A finite element model for studio apartment was developed with the aim of achieving detail energy allocation in the real buildings during the transient process in the walls and internal air. A tool of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is employed to assist the process. In the tropical regions most of the energy is consumed by the heating, cooling and ventilation appliances. Therefore, the optimize ventilation system will be a suitable and valid option for the saving of energy from the household sector to increase cooling performance and ensuring thermal comfort as well. A mathematical exploration is carried out on full scale dwelling and small scale model and indication is given on the relevance of such a comparison. Calculations are carried out with household heat sources for calm and windy period, but without any human. As expected, for windy periods, the wind is the main driving force behind the internal air flow. However, in calm periods for unsteady flow the internal airflow looks like more complexes through observation.

  6. Development of a research-oriented system for collecting mechanical ventilator waveform data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Gregory B; Kuhn, Brooks T; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Guo, Edward C; Lieng, Monica K; Nguyen, Jimmy; Anderson, Nicholas R; Adams, Jason Y

    2017-10-28

    Lack of access to high-frequency, high-volume patient-derived data, such as mechanical ventilator waveform data, has limited the secondary use of these data for research, quality improvement, and decision support. Existing methods for collecting these data are obtrusive, require high levels of technical expertise, and are often cost-prohibitive, limiting their use and scalability for research applications. We describe here the development of an unobtrusive, open-source, scalable, and user-friendly architecture for collecting, transmitting, and storing mechanical ventilator waveform data that is generalizable to other patient care devices. The system implements a software framework that automates and enforces end-to-end data collection and transmission. A web-based data management application facilitates nontechnical end users' abilities to manage data acquisition devices, mitigates data loss and misattribution, and automates data storage. Using this integrated system, we have been able to collect ventilator waveform data from >450 patients as part of an ongoing clinical study. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Experimental research of heat recuperators in ventilation systems on the basis of heat pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matveev Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental studies of heat pipes and their thermo-technical characteristics (heat power, conductivity, heat transfer resistance, heat-transfer coefficient, temperature level and differential, etc.. The theoretical foundations and the experimental methods of the research of ammonia heat pipes made of aluminum section АS – КRА 7.5 – R1 (made of the alloy AD - 31 are explained. The paper includes the analysis of the thermo-technical characteristics of heat pipes as promising highly efficient heat transfer devices, which may be used as the basic elements of heat exchangers - heat recuperators for exhaust ventilation air, capable of providing energy-saving technologies in ventilation systems for housing and public utilities and for various branches of industry. The thermo-technical characteristics of heat pipes (HP as the basic elements of a decentralized supply-extract ventilation system (DSEVS and energy-saving technologies are analyzed. As shown in the test report of the ammonia horizontal HP made of the section АS-КRА 7,5-R1-120, this pipe ensures safe operation under various loads.

  8. A passive decay heat removal strategy of the integrated passive safety system (IPSS) for SBO combined with LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Ho; Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Yu Jung; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new PDHR strategy is proposed to cope with SBO-combined accidents. • The concept of integrated passive safety system (IPSS) is used in this strategy. • This strategy performs the functions of passive safety injection and SG gravity injection. • LOCAs in SBO are classified by the pressures in reactor coolant system for passive functions. • The strategy can be integrated with EOP and SAMG as a complementary strategy for ensuring safety. - Abstract: An integrated passive safety system (IPSS), to be achieved by the use of a large water tank placed at high elevation outside the containment, was proposed to achieve various passive functions. These include decay heat removal, safety injection, containment cooling, in-vessel retention through external reactor vessel cooling, and containment filtered venting. The purpose of the passive decay heat removal (PDHR) strategy using the IPSS is to cope with SBO and SBO-combined accidents under the assumption that existing engineered safety features have failed. In this paper, a PDHR strategy was developed based on the design and accident management strategy of Korean representative PWR, the OPR1000. The functions of a steam generator gravity injection and a passive safety injection system in the IPSS with safety depressurization systems were included in the PDHR strategy. Because the inadvertent opening of pressurizer valves and seal water leakage from RCPs could cause a loss of coolant in an SBO, LOCAs during a SBO were simulated to verify the performance of the strategy. The failure of active safety injection in LOCAs could also be covered by this strategy. Although LOCAs have generally been categorized according to their equivalent break diameters, the RCS pressure is used to classify the LOCAs during SBOs. The criteria values for categorization were determined from the proposed systems, which could maintain a reactor in a safe state by removing the decay heat for the SBO coping time of 8 h. The

  9. A passive decay heat removal strategy of the integrated passive safety system (IPSS) for SBO combined with LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Ho [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291, Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Soon Heung [Handong Global University, 558, Handong-ro, Buk-gu, Pohang Gyeongbuk 37554 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jung [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.—Central Research Institute, 70, 1312-gil, Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34101 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong Hoon, E-mail: jeongyh@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291, Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A new PDHR strategy is proposed to cope with SBO-combined accidents. • The concept of integrated passive safety system (IPSS) is used in this strategy. • This strategy performs the functions of passive safety injection and SG gravity injection. • LOCAs in SBO are classified by the pressures in reactor coolant system for passive functions. • The strategy can be integrated with EOP and SAMG as a complementary strategy for ensuring safety. - Abstract: An integrated passive safety system (IPSS), to be achieved by the use of a large water tank placed at high elevation outside the containment, was proposed to achieve various passive functions. These include decay heat removal, safety injection, containment cooling, in-vessel retention through external reactor vessel cooling, and containment filtered venting. The purpose of the passive decay heat removal (PDHR) strategy using the IPSS is to cope with SBO and SBO-combined accidents under the assumption that existing engineered safety features have failed. In this paper, a PDHR strategy was developed based on the design and accident management strategy of Korean representative PWR, the OPR1000. The functions of a steam generator gravity injection and a passive safety injection system in the IPSS with safety depressurization systems were included in the PDHR strategy. Because the inadvertent opening of pressurizer valves and seal water leakage from RCPs could cause a loss of coolant in an SBO, LOCAs during a SBO were simulated to verify the performance of the strategy. The failure of active safety injection in LOCAs could also be covered by this strategy. Although LOCAs have generally been categorized according to their equivalent break diameters, the RCS pressure is used to classify the LOCAs during SBOs. The criteria values for categorization were determined from the proposed systems, which could maintain a reactor in a safe state by removing the decay heat for the SBO coping time of 8 h. The

  10. Applied reliability assessment for the passive safety systems of nuclear power plants (NPPs) using system dynamics (SD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Il; Woo, Tae Ho

    2018-01-01

    The passive system by the free-fall is investigated in the accident of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The complex algorithm of the system dynamics (SD) modeling is done in the passive cooling system. The nuclear passive system by free-fall is successfully modeled for the loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Conventional passive system of gravity or natural circulation is working only when the piping systems is in the good condition. The external coolant supply system is introduced in the case of the piping system failure. The water is poured into the reactor through the guiding piping or tube. If the explosion happens, the coolants could be showering into the reactor core and its building. New kind of passive system is expected successfully in the on-site black out where the drone could be operated by battery or engine.

  11. Effects of vehicle ventilation system, fuel type, and in-cabin smoking on the concentration of toluene and ethylbenzene in Pride cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rismanchian

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The ventilation condition, fuel type, and in-cabin smoking were not significantly impressive on the toluene and ethylbenzene concentrations inside the cars. However, simultaneous usage of the vehicle ventilation system and natural ventilation (windows could lead to little decrease in toluene concentration levels inside the car, while smoking consumption by passengers can increase them.

  12. [A design of simple ventilator control system based on LabVIEW].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Baoqing; Xu, Shengwei; Li, Hui; Li, Deyu; Pei, Yidong; He, Haixing

    2011-01-01

    This paper designed a ventilator control system to control proportional valves and motors. It used LabVIEW to control the object mentioned above and design ,validate, evaluate arithmetic, and establish hardware in loop platform. There are two system' s hierarchies. The high layer was used to run non-real time program and the low layer was used to run real time program. The two layers communicated through TCP/IP net. The program can be divided into several modules, which can be expanded and maintained easily. And the harvest in the prototype designing can be seamlessly used to embedded products. From all above, this system was useful in employing OEM products.

  13. Physicochemical Characterization of Nanoparticles from Indoor Ventilation Systems and Their Potential Health Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, G.; Revkin, A. C.; Gruenspecht, H.; Ramanathan, V.; Brown, M. A.; Nagel, D. C.; Revkin, A. C.; Umo, N. S.; Oseghe, E. O.

    2016-12-01

    Indoor air pollution remains a major concern to humans considering that we spend about 90% of our daily lives indoors [1,2]. Air pollutants, which ranges from gases to aerosol particles, vary considerably from our homes, public/work places and confined environments such as cars. They can impact on our health depending on the nature and concentration of the pollutants as well as the duration of exposure [3,4]. Particulate matter (PM), which is one of the major air pollutant markers, is present indoors and can be circulated for days to months within a confined space by the ventilation systems. In this study, both physical and chemical compositional evaluation of PM2.5 - 10 was carried out and the recirculation model of these particulates is presented based on the study of some ventilation systems such as air conditioners, cooling vents, and fans. For the first time, it is shown that the compositional variability of PM does not just depend on the source or the ongoing activities in the confined space but also on the recirculation time. Mineral dust particles were found to be dominant, some mixed with organics and soot or BC particles; heavy metals such as lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe) and others were also analysed from the collected PM. Ventilation systems trap these particulates and do recirculate them over time and this can increase their toxicities and influences their composition. From this study, it can be suggested that regular cleaning of ventilation systems and flushing closed spaces with fresh air may become the most effective ways of controlling the concentration of PM in closed spaces with ventilation units such as indoors and cars. [1] H. K. Lai, et al., Atmospheric Environment 38 (37)(2004). [2] N.E. Klepeis, et al., J. of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology 11(2001). [3] N. Bruce, et al., Bul. of the World Health Organization, 78 (9)(2000). [4] K.A. Miller, et al, The New England Journal of Medicine 356 (2007).

  14. Evaluation of comfort level in desks equipped with two personalized ventilation systems in slightly warm environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, Eusebio Z.E. [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia - Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Lucio, Manuela J.R. [Agrupamento Vertical Professor Paula Nogueira, R. Comunidade Lusiada, 8700-000 Olhao (Portugal); Rosa, Silvia P.; Custodio, Ana L.V.; Andrade, Renata L.; Meira, Maria J.P.A. [Faculdade de Ciencias do Mar e do Ambiente - Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-03-15

    In this work the comfort level, namely the thermal comfort, local thermal discomfort and air quality levels, in a classroom with desks equipped with two personalized ventilation systems, in slightly warm environments, is evaluated. A manikin, a ventilated classroom desk, two indoor climate analyzers, a multi-nodal human thermal comfort numerical model and a computational fluid dynamic numerical model, are used. The classroom desk, with double occupation capacity, is used by a student, located in the right side seat. Each personalized ventilation system is equipped with one air terminal device located above the desk writing area, in front to the trunk area, and an other located below the desk writing area, in front to the legs area. The thermal comfort level is evaluated by the developed multi-nodal human thermal comfort numerical model, using a PMV value, the local thermal discomfort level, namely the draught risk and the air velocity fluctuation equivalent frequencies, is evaluated by empirical models, while the air quality level and the detailed airflow around the manikin are evaluated by the computational fluid dynamic numerical model. In the experimental tests the mean air velocity and the turbulence intensity in the upper air terminal device are 3.5 m/s and 9.7%, while in the lower air terminal device are 2.6 m/s and 15.2%. The mean air temperature in the air terminal devices is around 28 C, while the mean radiant temperature in the occupation area, the mean air temperature far from the occupation area and the internal mean air relative humidity were, respectively, 28 C, 28 C and 50%. The air velocity and temperature around the occupant are measured around 15 human body sections. The actual personalized ventilation system, which promotes an ascendant airflow around the occupant with highest air renovation rate in the respiration area, promotes acceptable thermal comfort conditions and air quality in the respiration area in accord to the present standards. The

  15. Dispersion of exhaled droplet nuclei in a two-bed hospital ward with three different ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    hospital ward with three ventilation systems, i.e. mixing, downward and displacement ventilation. Two life-size breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate a source patient and a receiving patient. The exhalation jet from a bed-lying manikin was visualized using smoke. N2O was used as tracer gas...... are well mixed in the ward. Bed distance does not affect the personal exposure of the receiving patient. For displacement ventilation, the exhaled jet can penetrate a long distance. A high concentration layer of exhaled droplet nuclei because of thermal stratification locking has also been observed...

  16. Parametric study on the advantages of weather-predicted control algorithm of free cooling ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medved, Sašo; Babnik, Miha; Vidrih, Boris; Arkar, Ciril

    2014-01-01

    Predicted climate changes and the increased intensity of urban heat islands, as well as population aging, will increase the energy demand for the cooling of buildings in the future. However, the energy demand for cooling can be efficiently reduced by low-exergy free-cooling systems, which use natural processes, like evaporative cooling or the environmental cold of ambient air during night-time ventilation for the cooling of buildings. Unlike mechanical cooling systems, the energy for the operation of free-cooling system is needed only for the transport of the cold from the environment into the building. Because the natural cold potential is time dependent, the efficiency of free-cooling systems could be improved by introducing a weather forecast into the algorithm for the controlling. In the article, a numerical algorithm for the optimization of the operation of free-cooling systems with night-time ventilation is presented and validated on a test cell with different thermal storage capacities and during different ambient conditions. As a case study, the advantage of weather-predicted controlling is presented for a summer week for typical office room. The results show the necessity of the weather-predicted controlling of free-cooling ventilation systems for achieving the highest overall energy efficiency of such systems in comparison to mechanical cooling, better indoor comfort conditions and a decrease in the primary energy needed for cooling of the buildings. - Highlights: • Energy demand for cooling will increase due to climate changes and urban heat island • Free cooling could significantly reduce energy demand for cooling of the buildings. • Free cooling is more effective if weather prediction is included in operation control. • Weather predicted free cooling operation algorithm was validated on test cell. • Advantages of free-cooling on mechanical cooling is shown with different indicators

  17. Numerical Study on Different Series Modes of Jet Fan in a Longitudinal Tunnel Ventilation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Pei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient ventilation systems will contribute to maintaining air quality in the tunnel. In order to improve ventilation performance in normal traffic condition, the 3D tunnel models were established according to the original design for the tunnel located in central plains of China. Based on the commercial CFD software Fluent 6.3 and k-ε turbulence model, numerical simulations were carried out to study the patterns of jet flow and the optimization of fan combinations. It is found that the axial velocity profile obtained from numerical simulation agrees quite well with turbulent free jet theory although there is a little difference on the magnitude. The comparison of four combination modes under the condition of operating four fans indicates that the ventilation effectiveness is affected mainly by both the interval of adjacent groups of fans and the combination modes of operational fans. According to the simulation results, a novel combination mode which consists of a group double paralleled fans and two groups single fan is designed. The novel combination mode is regarded as the optimum combination mode with respect to maximizing air velocity in the tunnel. Compared to the traditional combination modes, it will increase the air velocity by 5.7%.

  18. FLOW-i ventilator performance in the presence of a circle system leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucangelo, Umberto; Ajčević, Miloš; Accardo, Agostino; Borelli, Massimo; Peratoner, Alberto; Comuzzi, Lucia; Zin, Walter A

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the FLOW-i anaesthesia ventilator was developed based on the SERVO-i intensive care ventilator. The aim of this study was to test the FLOW-i's tidal volume delivery in the presence of a leak in the breathing circuit. We ventilated a test lung model in volume-, pressure-, and pressure-regulated volume-controlled modes (VC, PC, and PRVC, respectively) with a FLOW-i. First, the circuit remained airtight and the ventilator was tested with fresh gas flows of 6, 1, and 0.3 L/min in VC, PC, and PRVC modes and facing 4 combinations of different resistive and elastic loads. Second, a fixed leak in the breathing circuit was introduced and the measurements repeated. In the airtight system, FLOW-i maintained tidal volume (VT) and circuit pressure at approximately the set values, independently of respiratory mode, load, or fresh gas flow. In the leaking circuit, set VT = 500 mL, FLOW-i delivered higher VTs in PC (about 460 mL) than in VC and PRVC, where VTs were substantially less than 500 mL. Interestingly, VT did not differ appreciably from 6 to 0.3 L/min of fresh air flow among the 3 ventilatory modes. In the absence of leakage, peak inspiratory pressures were similar, while they were 35-45 % smaller in PRVC and VC than in PC mode in the presence of leaks. In conclusion, FLOW-i maintained VT (down to fresh gas flows of 0.3 L/min) to 90 % of its preset value in PC mode, which was 4-5 times greater than in VC or PRVC modes.

  19. Advanced reactor passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grelle, Austin

    2017-01-01

    Many advanced reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended because of deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize within a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper provides an overview of a passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event. Considering an earthquake with the possibility of site flooding, the analysis focuses on the behavior of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System following potential physical damage and system flooding. The assessment approach seeks to combine mechanistic and simulation-based methods to leverage the benefits of the simulation-based approach without the need to substantially deviate from conventional probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Although this study is presented as only an example analysis, the results appear to demonstrate a high level of reliability of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (and the reactor system in general) for the postulated transient event

  20. Advanced Reactor Passive System Reliability Demonstration Analysis for an External Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Bucknor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Many advanced reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended because of deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize within a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper provides an overview of a passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event. Considering an earthquake with the possibility of site flooding, the analysis focuses on the behavior of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System following potential physical damage and system flooding. The assessment approach seeks to combine mechanistic and simulation-based methods to leverage the benefits of the simulation-based approach without the need to substantially deviate from conventional probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Although this study is presented as only an example analysis, the results appear to demonstrate a high level of reliability of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (and the reactor system in general for the postulated transient event.

  1. Advanced reactor passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Grabaskas, David; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grelle, Austin [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Many advanced reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended because of deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize within a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper provides an overview of a passive system reliability demonstration analysis for an external event. Considering an earthquake with the possibility of site flooding, the analysis focuses on the behavior of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System following potential physical damage and system flooding. The assessment approach seeks to combine mechanistic and simulation-based methods to leverage the benefits of the simulation-based approach without the need to substantially deviate from conventional probabilistic risk assessment techniques. Although this study is presented as only an example analysis, the results appear to demonstrate a high level of reliability of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (and the reactor system in general) for the postulated transient event.

  2. Contribution to the study of hybrid ventilation system effectiveness in office and educational buildings; Contribution a l'etude de l'efficacite des systemes de ventilation hybride dans les batiments du secteur tertiaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cron, F.

    2004-06-15

    This study is part of the International Energy Agency Annex 35, 'Hybrid Ventilation in New and Retro-fitted Office Buildings', also called the HybVent Project. It presents the numerical analyses of a number of hybrid ventilation systems and their potential for several buildings in relation to local climate characteristics. The first part of this work reviews the state-of-the-art of existing ventilation systems and details the principles, expectations and features of hybrid ventilation systems. This first section also examines some examples of hybrid systems extracted from the collection of Annex 35 case studies. A comprehensive bibliography of numerical tools available for this type of analysis is given in the second section. The numerical models for building simulation and the object-oriented environment used to develop our simulation tool are presented in this section as well. Two single-zone studies undertaken in this project are reported in the third section. The first study concerns an experimental cell simulation. Numerical results are compared to experimental data to validate the use of the simulation tool developed. The second single-zone study predicts the potential of a specific hybrid ventilation system in a typical classroom, given climatic conditions. Finally, the last section presents a more complete study - a multi-zone study of the Tonga school, an Annex 35 case study located in Sweden. Three rooms were modelled initially to compare numerical results to experimental data and then to analyse the performance of the existing hybrid ventilation system and two other systems. This final study was completed for three European cities with very different climates. The overall analysis of the potential of the hybrid ventilation systems considered and the perspective for future work are outlined in the conclusion. (author)

  3. Performance of personalized ventilation in a room with an underfloor air distribution system: transport of contaminants between occupants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cermak, Radim; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2003-01-01

    the workplaces has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a study on the performance of a personalized ventilation system installed in a full-scale test room with an underfloor air distribution system. Transport of human-produced airborne pollutants (in real life they can be infectious agents) between......Studies have documented that personalized ventilation, which provides clean air at each office workplace, is able to improve substantially the quality of air inhaled by occupants. However, the interaction between the airflow generated by personalized ventilation and the airflow pattern outside...... two occupants was examined using a tracer-gas. Two breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate occupants. The results show that the tested combination of personalized and underfloor ventilation was not able to decrease concentration of the human-produced airborne pollutants in air inhaled...

  4. Effect of enhanced ultraviolet germicidal irradiation in the heating ventilation and air conditioning system on ventilator-associated pneumonia in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R M; Wilding, G E; Wynn, R J; Welliver, R C; Holm, B A; Leach, C L

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that enhanced ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (eUVGI) installed in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) heating ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC) would decrease HVAC and NICU environment microbes, tracheal colonization and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The study was designed as a prospective interventional pre- and post-single-center study. University-affiliated Regional Perinatal Center NICU. Intubated patients in the NICU were evaluated for colonization, and a high-risk sub-population of infants <30 weeks gestation ventilated for ≥ 14 days was studied for VAP. eUVGI was installed in the NICU's remote HVACs. The HVACs, NICU environment and intubated patients' tracheas were cultured pre- and post-eUVGI for 12 months. The high-risk patients were studied for VAP (positive bacterial tracheal culture, increased ventilator support, worsening chest radiograph and ≥ 7 days of antibiotics). Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Serratia, Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were cultured from all sites. eUVGI significantly decreased HVAC organisms (baseline 500,000 CFU cm(-2); P=0.015) and NICU environmental microbes (P<0.0001). Tracheal microbial loads decreased 45% (P=0.004), and fewer patients became colonized. VAP in the high-risk cohort fell from 74% (n=31) to 39% (n=18), P=0.04. VAP episodes per patient decreased (Control: 1.2 to eUVGI: 0.4; P=0.004), and antibiotic usage was 62% less (P=0.013). eUVGI decreased HVAC microbial colonization and was associated with reduced NICU environment and tracheal microbial colonization. Significant reductions in VAP and antibiotic use were also associated with eUVGI in this single-center study. Large randomized multicenter trials are needed.

  5. Experimental research on the indoor temperature and humidity fields in radiant ceiling air-conditioning system under natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Xiang, Yutong; Wang, Yonghong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the indoor temperature and humidity fields of the air in a metal ceiling radiant panel air conditioning system with fresh air under natural ventilation were researched. The temperature and humidity distributions at different height and different position were compared. Through the computation analysis of partial pressure of water vapor, the self-recovery characteristics of humidity after the natural ventilation was discussed.

  6. Evaluation of a Mapleson D CPAP system for weaning of mechanical ventilation in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomero-Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; de Arteaga, Héctor Chozas; Báez, Yolanda Laporta; de Vicente Sánchez, Jesús; Carretero, Pascual Sanabria; Conde, Pilar Sánchez; Pérez Ferrer, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years, we have used a flow-inflating bag circuit with a nasotracheal or nasopharyngeal tube as an interface to deliver effective CPAP support in infants ("Mapleson D CPAP system"). The primary goal of this study was to assess the usefulness of the "Mapleson D CPAP system" for weaning of mechanical ventilation (MV) in infants who received MV over 24 h. All infants who received MV for more than 24 h in the last year were enrolled in the study. Demographic data included age, gender, weight, and admission diagnosis. Heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were measured during MV, 2 h after the nasotracheal Mapleson D CPAP system and 2 h after extubation. Patients were classified into two groups: patients MV more than 48 h, and patients with MV fewer than 48 h. P CPAP system and 2 h after extubation and spontaneous ventilation with the nasopharyngeal Mapleson D CPAP system or with nasal prongs. The overall extubation failure rate was 26% (n = 13). Weight and age were significantly associated with extubation failure (P CPAP system, in our opinion, is a useful and safe alternative to more complex and expensive noninvasive CPAP and BiPAP weaning from MV in infants.

  7. Compositional properties of passivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerber, Florian; van der Schaft, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    The classical passivity theorem states that the negative feedback interconnection of passive systems is again passive. The converse statement, - passivity of the interconnected system implies passivity of the subsystems -, turns out to be equally valid. This result implies that among all feasible

  8. Displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Mundt, Elisabeth

    The aim of this Guidebook is to give the state-of-the art knowledge of the displacement ventilation technology, and to simplify and improve the practical design procedure. The Guidebook discusses methods of total volume ventilation by mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation and it gives...... insights of the performance of the displacement ventilation. It also shows practical case studies in some typical applications and the latest research findings to create good local micro-climatic conditions....

  9. Evaluation of local exhaust ventilation system performance for control of Fe2O3 dust at an iron making unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jamshidi Rastani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to the design values and ventilation standards (VS after installing and also maintaining continuous work of ventilation system with maximum performance throughout its life are amongst the reasons of ventilation systems monitoring. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate performance of local exhaust ventilation system for control of dust by measuring the operating parameters and also to compare it with ventilation standards (VS and design values. Material and Method: The present research is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted in three sections of measuring, monitoring and evaluating the operating parameters on hoods, channels and fan of ventilation system based on the current status of the system, documentation (design, and recommended standards (VS. Static pressure, velocity pressure, surface area, and flow rate were measured based on the recommendations of various sources and ACGIH industrial ventilation manual, and the data were compared with the design and recommended values, using the SPSS software version 16.   Result: The results of paired sample t-test between flow rate and velocities of design and current status, showed significant differences in various parts. Accordingly, the results revealed a reduction of more than 50% in the design duct velocity compared to the current duct velocity, while design duct velocity is 1.3 more than the standard duct velocity of current status, and current duct velocity is about 65% of standard duct velocity. Conclusion: The reduction and nonconformity of the results of measurements of operating parameters (after a minimum of two decades with design and standard values are corroborant and sufficient reason for obstructions, abrasions, leaks, imbalance of system ducts and their inefficiency in some branches. Since there is no base line measurements for system (supposing that the system worked with maximum amounts of setup time, one of the reasons for these

  10. Evaluation of the Ventilation and Air Cleaning System Design Concepts for Safety Requirements during Fire Conditions in Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashad, S.; El-Fawal, M.; Kandil, M.

    2013-01-01

    The ventilation and air cleaning system in the nuclear or radiological installations is one of the essential nuclear safety concerns. It is responsible for confining the radioactive materials involved behind suitable barriers during normal and abnormal conditions. It must be designed to prevent the release of harmful products (radioactive gases, or airborne radioactive materials) from the system or facility, impacting the public or workers, and doing environmental damage. There are two important safety functions common to all ventilation and air cleaning system in nuclear facilities. They are: a) the requirements to maintain the pressure of the ventilated volume below that of surrounding, relatively non-active areas, in order to inhibit the spread of contamination during normal and abnormal conditions, and b) the need to treat the ventilated gas so as to minimize the release of any radioactive or toxic materials. Keeping the two important safety functions is achieved by applying the fire protection for the ventilation system to achieve safety and adequate protection in nuclear applications facilities during fire and accidental criticality conditions.The main purpose of this research is to assist ventilation engineers and experts in nuclear installations for safe operation and maintaining ventilation and air cleaning system during fire accident in nuclear facilities. The research focuses on fire prevention and protection of the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. High-Efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are extremely susceptible to damage when exposed to the effects of fire, smoke, and water; it is the intent of this research to provide the designer with the experience gained over the years from hard lessons learned in protecting HEPA filters from fire. It describes briefly and evaluates the design safety features, constituents and working conditions of ventilation and air cleaning system in nuclear and radioactive industry.This paper provides and

  11. Performance improvement of the finned passive PVT system using reflectors like removable insulation covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziapour, Behrooz M.; Palideh, Vahid; Mokhtari, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A passive PVT system means the combination of a PV panel and a compact solar water heater. • Comparative study was done on performance characteristics in passive and hybrid PVT systems. • Reflectors effects on performance of a finned passive PVT system were numerically studied. • Results show that the finned passive PVT system has higher performance than the hybrid type. • Reflectors reduce the night heat losses and increase the solar radiation rate on PVT system. - Abstract: A passive photovoltaic–thermal system (PVT) is the combination of a photovoltaic (PV) panel and a compact solar water heater for co-generation of heat and electricity. This system bears considerable heat losses to ambient, particularly at noncollection times. One simple way to overcome this problem is to use a removable insulation cover on the collector's outer glazing. In this paper, the effects of the reflectors on day and night performance of a finned passive PVT system were numerically studied. At nonenergy collection time, the reflectors can turn and cover the collector cover glass as a nonconductor material. Simulation results showed that the reflectors reduce the night heat losses and increase the solar radiation rate on the absorber plate. The use of removable insulation reflectors resulted to saving extra sensibly thermal energy. Also, the solar cells power generation (P_s_c), in the case of reflectors installed, was reinforced.

  12. Mathematics of an automatic control system for ventilation of gassy coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puchkov, L.A.; Bakhvalov, L.A.; Kravchenko, A.G.

    1987-09-01

    Describes and presents a circuit diagram of an automatic control system introduced to control ventilation in the Kommunist mine belonging to the Oktyabr'ugol' coal mining association. The system comprises: sensors to register the parameters of the mine atmosphere (e.g. methane and air flow rate); communications channels and remote control devices to convert and transmit the data; a CM-4 computer with a high-speed processor, an 128-256 kByte operating memory, external memory devices, polydiaphragm air flow controllers, devices for controlling the electric drive of the main ventilation system, devices for collecting, processing and displaying the data. This system uses two groups of algorithms: algorithms for a data subsystem responsible for centralized control of the mine atmosphere parameters and a control subsystem which forms and implements the necessary control commands. The main software is the DISMAIN program. Introducing this system increased the productivity of the mine by 2%, reduced energy consumption by 5-7% and increased safety levels. 2 refs

  13. Emergency automatic commutation of the ventilation system of the RP-10 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Walter; Corimanya, Mario; Ovalle, Edgar; Anaya, Olgger; Veramendi, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the achievements in the design and implementation of a system for monitoring and automatic control of radioactive effluents from the chimney of the RP-10 reactor, using as hardware an Arduino UNO platform containing an ATMEGA 328 programmable micro controller to which has been added LCD screen to display the values, a keyboard and an EEPROM memory data, where the limit of the level of radiation is fixed. The radiation level in the air of the reactor hall, going up the chimney is counted by a radiation monitor called MAB1000, and data are supplied to the new system. When the radiation level is above the national and international standards, the new design makes work a relay, so that the ventilation system is automatically switched to operate in emergency condition, preventing the release of radioactive contaminants into the environment. After installing the new design, it was verified that removed by the radiation monitor MAB1000, value is identical to that shown in the new system. Additionally, the operation of the relay was tested successfully with radioactive sources to switch the ventilation system to the emergency condition. (authors).

  14. European BWR R and D cluster for innovative passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicken, E.F.; Lensa, W. von

    1996-01-01

    The main technological innovation trends for future nuclear power plants tend towards a broader use of passive safety systems for the prevention, mitigation and managing of severe accident scenarios. Several approaches have been undertaken in a number of European countries to study and demonstrate the feasibility and charateristics of innovative passive safety systems. The European BWR R and D Cluster combines those experimental and analytical efforts that are mainly directed to the introduction of passive safety systems into boiling water reactor technology. The Cluster is grouped around thermohydraulic test facilities in Europe for the qualification of innovative BWR safety systems, also taking into account especially the operating experience of the nuclear power plant Dodewaard and other BWRs, which already incorporated some passive safety features. The background, the objectives, the structure of the project and the work programme are presented in this paper as well as an outline of the significance of the expected results. (orig.) [de

  15. Analysis of passive moderator cooling system of Candu-6A reactor at emergency condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Efrizon; Subki, M. Hadid; Vecchiarelli, Jack

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of passive moderator cooling system subject to in-core LOCA with no emergency core cooling injection has been done. In this study, the new model of passive moderator system has been tested for emergency conditions and CATHENA code Mod-3.5b/Rev1 is used to calculate some parameters of this passive moderator cooling system. This result of simulation show that the proposed moderator cooling system have given satisfactory result, especially for the case with 0.7 m riser diameter and the number of heat exchanger tubes 8100. For PEWS tank containing 3000 m3 of light water initially at 30 0C and a 3641 m2 moderator heat exchanger, the average long-term heat removed rate balances the moderator heat load and the flow through the passive moderator loop remains stable for over 72 hours with no saturated boiling in the calandria and flow instabilities do not develop during long-term period

  16. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  17. Passive Wireless Sensor System for Space and Structural Health Monitoring, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aviana Molecular (Aviana) and the University of Central Florida (UCF) propose to develop a Passive Wireless Sensor System (PWSS) for Structural Health Monitoring...

  18. Feasibility study of applying the passive safety system concept to fusion–fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhang-cheng; Xie, Heng

    2014-01-01

    The fusion–fission hybrid reactor can produce energy, breed nuclear fuel, and handle the nuclear waste, etc., with the fusion neutron source striking the subcritical blanket. The passive safety system consists of passive residual heat removal system, passive safety injection system and automatic depressurization system was adopted into the fusion–fission hybrid reactor in this paper. Modeling and nodalization of primary loop, partial secondary loop and passive core cooling system for the fusion–fission hybrid reactor using relap5 were conducted and small break LOCA on cold leg was analyzed. The results of key transient parameters indicated that the actuation of passive safety system could mitigate the accidental consequence of the 4-inch cold leg small break LOCA on cold leg in the early time effectively. It is feasible to apply the passive safety system concept to fusion–fission hybrid reactor. The minimum collapsed liquid level had great increase if doubling the volume of CMTs to increase its coolant injection and had no increase if doubling the volume of ACCs

  19. Ventilation of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Y.; Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Dumas, M.

    1975-01-01

    In the first part of the paper the authors describe the ventilation of French mines in terms of the primary ventilation system, which brings the outside air close to the working places using the overall structure of the mine to form the airways, and the secondary ventilation system, which is for the distribution of the primary air or for the ventilation of the development drifts and blind tunnels. Brief mention is made of the French regulations on the ventilation of mines in general and uranium mines in particular. The authors describe the equipment used and discuss the installed capacities and air flow per man and per working place. The difficulties encountered in properly ventilating various types of working places are mentioned, such as sub-level development drifts, reinforced stopes, and storage chambers with an artificial crown. The second part of the paper is devoted to computer calculations of the primary ventilation system. It is explained why the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has found it necessary to make these calculations. Without restating the mathematical theories underlying the methods employed, the authors demonstrate how simple measuring instruments and a small-size computer can be used to solve the ventilation problems arising in French mines. Emphasis is given to the layout of the ventilation system and to air flow and negative pressure measurements at the base of the mine. The authors show how calculations can be applied to new heading operations, a change in resistance, the replacement or addition of a ventilator, and a new air inlet or outlet. The authors come to the conclusion that since ventilation is at present the most reliable way of avoiding the pollution of mines, a thorough knowledge of the capabilities in this respect can often help improve working conditions. Despite the progress made, however, constant surveillance of the ventilation systems in uranium mines by a separate team with no responsibility for production problems is

  20. Ventilation of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Y.; Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Dumas, M.

    1975-01-01

    In the first part of the paper the authors describe the ventilation of French mines in terms of the primary ventilation system, which brings the outside air close to the working places using the overall structure of the mine to form the airways, and the secondary ventilation system, which is for the distribution of the primary air or for the ventilation of the development drifts and blind tunnels. Brief mention is made of the French regulations on the ventilation of mines in general and uranium mines in particular. The authors describe the equipment used and discuss the installed capacities and air flow per man and per working place. The difficulties encountered in properly ventilating various types of working places are mentioned, such as sublevel development drifts, reinforced stopes, and storage chambers with an artificial crown. The second part of the paper is devoted to computer calculations of the primary ventilation system. It is explained why the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has found it necessary to make these calculations. Without restating the mathematical theories underlying the methods employed, the authors demonstrate how simple measuring instruments and a small-size computer can be used to solve the ventilation problems arising in French mines. Emphasis is given to the layout of the ventilation system and to air flow and negative pressure measurements at the base of the mine. The authors show how calculations can be applied to new heading operations, a change in resistance, the replacement or addition of a ventilator, and a new air inlet or outlet. The authors come to the conclusion that since ventilation is at present the most reliable way of avoiding the pollution of mines, a thorough knowledge of the capabilities in this respect can often help improve working conditions. Despite the progress made, however, constant surveillance of the ventilation systems in uranium mines by a separate team with no responsibility for production problems is