WorldWideScience

Sample records for passive sampling devices

  1. Accumulation of brevetoxins by passive sampling devices | Shea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report on initial investigations into the use of polymer-based passive sampling devices for the chronic time-integrated measure of brevetoxins in natural waters. Polyethylene membranes readily accumulated brevetoxins, but reached steady state within a few days, likely owing to surface saturation on the polyethylene ...

  2. Use of passive sampling devices to determine soil contaminant concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K.A. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States)]|[Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Hooper, M.J. [Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC (United States); Weisskopf, C.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The effective remediation of contaminated sites requires accurate identification of chemical distributions. A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDs) can provide a thorough site assessment. We have been pursuing their application in terrestrial systems and have found that they increase the ease and speed of analysis, decrease solvent usage and overall cost, and minimize the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a higher sampling frequency than is generally the case using traditional methods. PSDs have been used in the field in soils of varying physical properties and have been successful in estimating soil concentrations ranging from 1 {mu}g/kg (parts per billion) to greater than 200 mg/kg (parts per million). They were also helpful in identifying hot spots within the sites. Passive sampling devices show extreme promise as an analytical tool to rapidly characterize contaminant distributions in soil. There are substantial time and cost savings in laboratory personnel and supplies. By selectively excluding common interferences that require sample cleanup, PSDs can be retrieved from the field and processed rapidly (one technician can process approximately 90 PSDs in an 8-h work day). The results of our studies indicate that PSDs can be used to accurately estimate soil contaminant concentrations and provide lower detection limits. Further, time and cost savings will allow a more thorough and detailed characterization of contaminant distributions. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. In planta passive sampling devices for assessing subsurface chlorinated solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Mikhil K; Limmer, Matt A; Waltermire, Kendra; Morrison, Glenn C; Burken, Joel G

    2014-06-01

    Contaminant concentrations in trees have been used to delineate groundwater contaminant plumes (i.e., phytoscreening); however, variability in tree composition hinders accurate measurement of contaminant concentrations in planta, particularly for long-term monitoring. This study investigated in planta passive sampling devices (PSDs), termed solid phase samplers (SPSs) to be used as a surrogate tree core. Characteristics studied for five materials included material-air partitioning coefficients (Kma) for chlorinated solvents, sampler equilibration time and field suitability. The materials investigated were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM) and plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Both PDMS and LLDPE samplers demonstrated high partitioning coefficients and diffusivities and were further tested in greenhouse experiments and field trials. While most of the materials could be used for passive sampling, the PDMS SPSs performed best as an in planta sampler. Such a sampler was able to accurately measure trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) concentrations while simultaneously incorporating simple operation and minimal impact to the surrounding property and environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of passive sampling devices for monitoring and compliance checking of POP concentrations in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, R.; Booij, K.; Smedes, F.; Vrana, B.

    2012-01-01

    The state of the art of passive water sampling of (nonpolar) organic contaminants is presented. Its suitability for regulatory monitoring is discussed, with an emphasis on the information yielded by passive sampling devices (PSDs), their relevance and associated uncertainties. Almost all persistent

  5. Device for electrochemical detection of metal sample surface resistance and passivation against corrosion in electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbancik, L.; Bar, J.; Nemec, J.; Sima, A.

    1986-01-01

    The device consists of a teflon vessel with sealing and an opening below the electrolyte level. Into it is submerged an electrode connected to a dc voltage supply whose other pole is connected to a sample of the metal which is pressed to the opening in the sealing with a flexible strap. The teflon vessel and the sealing are integral. The device is simpler and less costly than those manufactured so far. The operating capability of damaged sealing may be renewed by simple mechanical working. The device may be used for detecting the resistance and passivation of steam generator metal tubes. (J.B.). 1 fig

  6. Trends in monitoring pharmaceuticals and personal-care products in the aquatic environment by use of passive sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, G.A.; Vrana, B.; Allan, I.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Greenwood, R.

    2007-01-01

    The use of passive sampling in monitoring pharmaceuticals and personal-care products (PPCPs) in the aquatic environment is discussed. The utility of passive sampling methods for monitoring the fraction of heavy metals and the biologically available fraction of non-polar organic priority pollutants is recognized and these technologies are being used in surveys of water quality. These devices are used to measure the dissolved fraction and they can yield information that can be used in the development of risk assessments models. These devices can also be used to locate illegal dumping and to monitor specific sources of input of PPCPs into the environment, or to monitor the effectiveness of water treatment processes in the removal of these compounds from wastewater. These devices can provide representative information at low cost which necessitate a combination of laboratory calibration and field studies for emerging pollutants.

  7. An unattended device for high-voltage sampling and passive measurement of thoron decay products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierl, Stefanie; Meisenberg, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.meisenberg@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Wielunski, Marek; Tschiersch, Jochen [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Haninger, Thomas [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Auswertungsstelle für Strahlendosimeter, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 München (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    An integrating measurement device for the concentration of airborne thoron decay products was designed and calibrated. It is suitable for unattended use over up to several months also in inhabited dwellings. The device consists of a hemispheric capacitor with a wire mesh as the outer electrode on ground potential and the sampling substrates as the inner electrode on +7.0 kV. Negatively charged and neutral thoron decay products are accelerated to and deposited on the sampling substrates. As sampling substrates, CR39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are used in order to record the alpha decay of the sampled decay products. Nuclide discrimination is achieved by covering the detectors with aluminum foil of different thickness, which are penetrated only by alpha particles with sufficient energy. Devices of this type were calibrated against working level monitors in a thoron experimental house. The sensitivity was measured as 9.2 tracks per Bq/m{sup 3} × d of thoron decay products. The devices were used over 8 weeks in several houses built of earthen material in southern Germany, where equilibrium equivalent concentrations of 1.4–9.9 Bq/m{sup 3} of thoron decay products were measured.

  8. The effect of DNA degradation bias in passive sampling devices on metabarcoding studies of arthropod communities and their associated microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehenwinkel, Henrik; Fong, Marisa; Kennedy, Susan; Huang, Edward Greg; Noriyuki, Suzuki; Cayetano, Luis; Gillespie, Rosemary

    2018-01-01

    PCR amplification bias is a well-known problem in metagenomic analysis of arthropod communities. In contrast, variation of DNA degradation rates is a largely neglected source of bias. Differential degradation of DNA molecules could cause underrepresentation of taxa in a community sequencing sample. Arthropods are often collected by passive sampling devices, like malaise traps. Specimens in such a trap are exposed to varying periods of suboptimal storage and possibly different rates of DNA degradation. Degradation bias could thus be a significant issue, skewing diversity estimates. Here, we estimate the effect of differential DNA degradation on the recovery of community diversity of Hawaiian arthropods and their associated microbiota. We use a simple DNA size selection protocol to test for degradation bias in mock communities, as well as passively collected samples from actual Malaise traps. We compare the effect of DNA degradation to that of varying PCR conditions, including primer choice, annealing temperature and cycle number. Our results show that DNA degradation does indeed bias community analyses. However, the effect of this bias is of minor importance compared to that induced by changes in PCR conditions. Analyses of the macro and microbiome from passively collected arthropod samples are thus well worth pursuing.

  9. Occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern along the California coast (2009-10) using passive sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, David A.; Maruya, Keith A.; Dodder, Nathan G.; Lao, Wenjian; Furlong, Edward T.; Smalling, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Three passive sampling devices (PSDs), polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS), polyethylene devices (PEDs), and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) samplers were used to sample a diverse set of chemicals in the coastal waters of San Francisco Bay and the Southern California Bight. Seventy one chemicals (including fragrances, phosphate flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, PAHs, PCBs, PBDEs, and pesticides) were measured in at least 50% of the sites. The chemical profile from the San Francisco Bay sites was distinct from profiles from the sites in the Southern California Bight. This distinction was not due to a single compound or class, but by the relative abundances/concentrations of the chemicals. Comparing the PSDs to mussel (Mytilus spp.) tissues, a positive correlation exists for the 25 and 26 chemicals in common for the PEDs and SPME, respectively. Diphenhydramine was the only common chemical out of 40 analyzed in both POCIS and tissues detected at a common site.

  10. Improving toxicity assessment of pesticide mixtures: the use of polar passive sampling devices extracts in microalgae toxicity tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra KIM TIAM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Complexity of contaminants exposure needs to be taking in account for an appropriate evaluation of risks related to mixtures of pesticides released in the ecosystems. Toxicity assessment of such mixtures can be made through a variety of toxicity tests reflecting different level of biological complexity. This paper reviews the recent developments of passive sampling techniques for polar compounds, especially Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS and Chemcatcher® and the principal assessment techniques using microalgae in laboratory experiments. The progresses permitted by the coupled use of such passive samplers and ecotoxicology testing as well as their limitations are presented. Case studies combining passive sampling devices (PSD extracts and toxicity assessment toward microorganisms at different biological scales from single organisms to communities level are presented. These case studies, respectively aimed i at characterizing the toxic potential of waters using dose-response curves, and ii at performing microcosm experiments with increased environmental realism in the toxicant exposure in term of cocktail composition and concentration. Finally perspectives and limitations of such approaches for future applications in the area of environmental risk assessment are discussed.

  11. Passive sampling devices enable capacity building and characterization of bioavailable pesticide along the Niger, Senegal and Bani Rivers of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kim A; Seck, Dogo; Hobbie, Kevin A; Traore, Anna Ndiaye; McCartney, Melissa A; Ndaye, Adama; Forsberg, Norman D; Haigh, Theodore A; Sower, Gregory J

    2014-04-05

    It is difficult to assess pollution in remote areas of less-developed regions owing to the limited availability of energy, equipment, technology, trained personnel and other key resources. Passive sampling devices (PSDs) are technologically simple analytical tools that sequester and concentrate bioavailable organic contaminants from the environment. Scientists from Oregon State University and the Centre Régional de Recherches en Ecotoxicologie et de Sécurité Environnementale (CERES) in Senegal developed a partnership to build capacity at CERES and to develop a pesticide-monitoring project using PSDs. This engagement resulted in the development of a dynamic training process applicable to capacity-building programmes. The project culminated in a field and laboratory study where paired PSD samples were simultaneously analysed in African and US laboratories with quality control evaluation and traceability. The joint study included sampling from 63 sites across six western African countries, generating a 9000 data point pesticide database with virtual access to all study participants.

  12. Use of bioindicators and passive sampling devices to evaluate ambient ozone concentrations in north central Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuska, D.E.; Skelly, J.M.; Ferdinand, J.A.; Stevenson, R.E.; Savage, J.E.; Mulik, J.D.; Hines, A

    2003-09-01

    Passive samplers and bioindicator plants detect ozone air pollution in north central Pennsylvania. - Ambient concentrations of tropospheric ozone and ozone-induced injury to black cherry (Prunus serotina) and common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) were determined in north central Pennsylvania from 29 May to 5 September 2000 and from 28 May to 18 September 2001. Ogawa passive ozone samplers were utilized within openings at 15 forested sites of which six were co-located with TECO model 49 continuous ozone monitors. A significant positive correlation was observed between the Ogawa passive samplers and the TECO model 49 continuous ozone monitors for the 2000 (r=0.959) and 2001 (r=0.979) seasons. In addition, a significant positive correlation existed in 2000 and 2001 between ozone concentration and elevation (r=0.720) and (r=0.802), respectively. Classic ozone-induced symptoms were observed on black cherry and common milkweed. In 2000, initial injury was observed in early June, whereas for the 2001 season, initial injury was initially observed in late June. During both seasons, injury was noted at most sites by mid- to late-July. Soil moisture potential was measured for the 2001 season and a significant positive relationship (P<0.001) showed that injury to black cherry was a function of cumulative ozone concentrations and available soil moisture.

  13. Use of bioindicators and passive sampling devices to evaluate ambient ozone concentrations in north central Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuska, D.E.; Skelly, J.M.; Ferdinand, J.A.; Stevenson, R.E.; Savage, J.E.; Mulik, J.D.; Hines, A.

    2003-01-01

    Passive samplers and bioindicator plants detect ozone air pollution in north central Pennsylvania. - Ambient concentrations of tropospheric ozone and ozone-induced injury to black cherry (Prunus serotina) and common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) were determined in north central Pennsylvania from 29 May to 5 September 2000 and from 28 May to 18 September 2001. Ogawa passive ozone samplers were utilized within openings at 15 forested sites of which six were co-located with TECO model 49 continuous ozone monitors. A significant positive correlation was observed between the Ogawa passive samplers and the TECO model 49 continuous ozone monitors for the 2000 (r=0.959) and 2001 (r=0.979) seasons. In addition, a significant positive correlation existed in 2000 and 2001 between ozone concentration and elevation (r=0.720) and (r=0.802), respectively. Classic ozone-induced symptoms were observed on black cherry and common milkweed. In 2000, initial injury was observed in early June, whereas for the 2001 season, initial injury was initially observed in late June. During both seasons, injury was noted at most sites by mid- to late-July. Soil moisture potential was measured for the 2001 season and a significant positive relationship (P<0.001) showed that injury to black cherry was a function of cumulative ozone concentrations and available soil moisture

  14. Validation of Passive Sampling Devices for Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    and sampling handling was met. All calibration criteria and instrument maintenance was met for all final reported data. 23 3.2 QUALITATIVE ...the relatively large size of each sampling box within the grid, there were no issues associated with locating appropriate anchoring locations, based...quantiative, as only estimated sampling rates were available, or spiked recoveries were lower suggesting the results are qualitative . TNT RDX ADNTs

  15. Demonstration/Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    purging and sampling protocol. Analytes that were measured at the Pease site included total and dissolved concentrations of arsenic (As), calcium ...samples remain in the original bottle in which they were collected, presumably losses of volatiles and changes in concentrations of dissolved gases or...because of excavation and removal. This has resulted in hydraulically interconnected bedrock and overburden water- bearing zones in much of this area

  16. Passive fault current limiting device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  17. Passive Sampling and Analysis of Naphthalene in Internal Combustion Engine Exhaust with Retracted SPME Device and GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassiba Baimatova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust gases from internal combustion engines are the main source of urban air pollution. Quantification of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in the exhaust gases is needed for emissions monitoring, enforcement, development, and testing of control technologies. The objective was to develop quantification of gaseous naphthalene in diesel engine exhaust based on diffusion-controlled extraction onto a retracted solid-phase microextraction (SPME fiber coating and analysis on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Extraction of naphthalene with retracted fibers followed Fick’s law of diffusion. Extracted mass of naphthalene was proportional to Cg, t, Dg, T and inversely proportional to Z. Method detection limit (p = 0.95 was 11.5 ppb (0.06 mg·m−3 at t = 9 h, Z = 10 mm and T = 40 °C, respectively. It was found that the % mass extracted of naphthalene by SPME needle assembly depended on the type of fiber. Storage time at different temperatures did not affect analyte losses extracted by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS 100 µm fiber. The developed method was tested on exhaust gases from idling pickup truck and tractor, and compared side-by-side with a direct injection of sampled exhaust gas method. Time-weighted average (TWA concentrations of naphthalene in exhaust gases from idling pickup truck and a tractor ranged from 0.08 to 0.3 mg·m−3 (15.3–53.7 ppb.

  18. Device for sampling HTGR recycle fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Lackey, W.J.

    1977-03-01

    Devices for sampling High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel microspheres were evaluated. Analysis of samples obtained with each of two specially designed passive samplers were compared with data generated by more common techniques. A ten-stage two-way sampler was found to produce a representative sample with a constant batch-to-sample ratio

  19. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  20. Surface passivation for CdTe devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Matthew O.; Perkins, Craig L.; Burst, James M.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2017-08-01

    In one embodiment, a method for surface passivation for CdTe devices is provided. The method includes adjusting a stoichiometry of a surface of a CdTe material layer such that the surface becomes at least one of stoichiometric or Cd-rich; and reconstructing a crystalline lattice at the surface of the CdTe material layer by annealing the adjusted surface.

  1. Decision Support on Small size Passive Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Popukaylo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A construction technique of adequate mathematical models for small size passive samples, in conditions when classical probabilistic-statis\\-tical methods do not allow obtaining valid conclusions was developed.

  2. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peijnenburg, Willie J.G.M.; Teasdale, Peter R.; Reible, Danny

    2014-01-01

    “Dissolved” concentrations of contaminants in sediment porewater (Cfree) provide a more relevant exposure metric for risk assessment than do total concentrations. Passive sampling methods (PSMs) for estimating Cfree offer the potential for cost-efficient and accurate in situ characterization...

  3. Highly air stable passivation of graphene based field effect devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagade, Abhay A; Neumaier, Daniel; Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Elorza, Amaia Zurutuza; Kurz, Heinrich

    2015-02-28

    The sensitivity of graphene based devices to surface adsorbates and charge traps at the graphene/dielectric interface requires proper device passivation in order to operate them reproducibly under ambient conditions. Here we report on the use of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as passivation layer on graphene field effect devices (GFETs). We show that successful passivation produce hysteresis free DC characteristics, low doping level GFETs stable over weeks though operated and stored in ambient atmosphere. This is achieved by selecting proper seed layer prior to deposition of encapsulation layer. The passivated devices are also demonstrated to be robust towards the exposure to chemicals and heat treatments, typically used during device fabrication. Additionally, the passivation of high stability and reproducible characteristics is also shown for functional devices like integrated graphene based inverters.

  4. Use of passive sampling for atmospheric tritium monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira Ideias, P.; Pierrard, O.; Tournieux, D. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN (France); Tenailleau, L. [Marine nationale (France)

    2014-07-01

    Tritium is one of the most important radionuclide in environmental radiological monitoring. In French civil and military nuclear facilities, the releases levels are between 100 to 100 000 higher than any other radionuclide (rare gas excluded). Moreover these levels will probably increase in the next decades. With an average energy of 6 keV, the beta particle from tritium radioactive decay is difficult to detect and quantify within the environmental levels. To monitor the tritium in the air, French actors (authorities, operator, and experts) commonly use atmospheric bubblers and water vapour condensers. This type of sampling approach is time-consuming and very costly. To simplify and complete these methods, the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), had developed an atmospheric tritium monitoring device based on passive sampling. The passive sampler developed consists in a small container designed with a patented specific geometry and filled with 13X molecular sieve. This system is based on free diffusion flow principle (Fick's law). The driving force is the partial pressure gradient existing between the environmental atmosphere and the passive sampler. The constancy of the sampling rate for different moisture conditions assures the representativeness of the proposed device. The desorption bench developed specifically allows the recovery of 99% of the water vapour sampled in the molecular sieve. More than 99% of the sampled tritium (HTO) activity is recovered in the range between 0 and 100 Bq.L{sup -1}. Above 100 Bq.L{sup -1} to 25 k Bq.L{sup -1} (max tested activity), it was verified that no more than 3% of the tritium remains in the molecular sieve.. Thus, the use of passive sampler provides: - a representative sampling method, - a good detection limit (0,01 Bq.m{sup -3}), - no electric power supply needs, - a wide range of sampling duration (1 day to 1 month), - a low-cost method for monitoring. Different performance tests were

  5. Liquid waste sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosuge, Tadashi

    1998-01-01

    A liquid pumping pressure regulator is disposed on the midway of a pressure control tube which connects the upper portion of a sampling pot and the upper portion of a liquid waste storage vessel. With such a constitution, when the pressure in the sampling pot is made negative, and liquid wastes are sucked to the liquid pumping tube passing through the sampling pot, the difference between the pressure on the entrance of the liquid pumping pressure regulator of the pressure regulating tube and the pressure at the bottom of the liquid waste storage vessel is made constant. An opening degree controlling meter is disposed to control the degree of opening of a pressure regulating valve for sending actuation pressurized air to the liquid pumping pressure regulator. Accordingly, even if the liquid level of liquid wastes in the liquid waste storage vessel is changed, the height for the suction of the liquid wastes in the liquid pumping tube can be kept constant. With such procedures, sampling can be conducted correctly, and the discharge of the liquid wastes to the outside can be prevented. (T.M.)

  6. Sampling inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Keiichi.

    1996-01-01

    A holder is inserted to a holder guide, and is stopped at a position where one end of a hook disposed to the holder is not in contact with the holder guide (a position where hooks do not work). A cap incorporated with wiping paper is pushed up into a holder by a device rod with the wiping paper situated downwardly. The hooks of the holder are engaged to the grooves of the cap to secure the cap. The holder is moved to a predetermined place to wipe off the deposited materials on the surface of a vessel which contains radioactive wastes. Then, the holder is inserted to the holder guide, and is stopped at a position where the one end of the holder is raised. The securement of the gap is released, the cap is forced into a recovering cover by a discharging rod. The hooks of the recovering cover are caught by the grooves of the cap to secure the cap. Then, the cap is transported to a radioactivity measuring chamber. (I.N.)

  7. Device-free object tracking using passive tags

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jinsong; Zhao, Kun; Jiang, Zhiping

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief examines the use of cheap commercial passive RFID tags to achieve accurate device-free object-tracking. It presents a sensitive detector, named Twins, which uses a pair of adjacent passive tags to detect uncooperative targets (such as intruders). Twins leverages a newly observed phenomenon called critical state that is caused by interference among passive tags.The author expands on the previous object tracking methods, which are mostly device-based, and reveals a new interference model and their extensive experiments for validation. A prototype implementation of the Twins-ba

  8. Using bioavailability to assess contaminated sediment risk: Passive sampling and Pore Water Remedial Guidelines (PWRGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosted by the Contaminated Sediment Forum, this half-day course will introduce the RPM to the use of passive samplers to assess bioavailability and in ecological risk assessment. Passive sampling devices (PSD) are a technology with growing acceptance for measuring porewater conce...

  9. Second Law based definition of passivity/activity of devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Kyle M.; Ferry, David K.; Kish, Laszlo B.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, our efforts to clarify the old question, if a memristor is a passive or active device [1], triggered debates between engineers, who have had advanced definitions of passivity/activity of devices, and physicists with significantly different views about this seemingly simple question. This debate triggered our efforts to test the well-known engineering concepts about passivity/activity in a deeper way, challenging them by statistical physics. It is shown that the advanced engineering definition of passivity/activity of devices is self-contradictory when a thermodynamical system executing Johnson-Nyquist noise is present. A new, statistical physical, self-consistent definition based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics is introduced. It is also shown that, in a system with uniform temperature distribution, any rectifier circuitry that can rectify thermal noise must contain an active circuit element, according to both the engineering and statistical physical definitions.

  10. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Fanto, Susan V.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  11. Sample processing device and method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A sample processing device is disclosed, which sample processing device comprises a first substrate and a second substrate, where the first substrate has a first surface comprising two area types, a first area type with a first contact angle with water and a second area type with a second contact...... angle with water, the first contact angle being smaller than the second contact angle. The first substrate defines an inlet system and a preparation system in areas of the first type which two areas are separated by a barrier system in an area of the second type. The inlet system is adapted to receive...

  12. Design issues for semi-passive optical communication devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, I.

    2007-09-01

    Optical smart cards are devices containing a retro-reflector, light modulator, and some computing and data storage capabilities to affect semi-passive communication. They do not produce light; instead they modulate and send back light received from a stationary unit. These devices can replace contact-based smart cards as well as RF based ones for applications ranging from identification to transmitting and validating data. Since their transmission is essentially focused on the receiving unit, they are harder to eavesdrop than RF devices, yet need no physical contact or alignment. In this paper we explore optical design issues of these devices and estimate their optical behavior. Specifically, we analyze how these compact devices can be optimized for selected application profiles. Some of the key parameters addressed are effective light efficiency (how much modulated signal can be received by the stationary unit given the amount of light it transmits), range of tilt angles (angle between device surface normal to the line connecting the optical smart card with the stationary unit) through which the device would be effective, and power requirements of the semi-passive unit. In addition, issues concerning compact packaging of this device are discussed. Finally, results of the analysis are employed to produce a comparison of achievable capabilities of these optical smart cards, as opposed to alternative devices, and discuss potential applications were they can be best utilized.

  13. High-temperature superconducting passive microwave devices, filters and antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, S.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) passive microwave devices, such as filters and antennas, are promising devices. In particular, HTS filters may be successfully marketed in the near future. Cross-coupled filters, ring filters, and coplanar waveguide filters are good options to reduce filter size. On the other hand, HTS patch antennas which can be cooled by a cryo-cooler are also promising devices as well, since they show higher efficiency than normal antennas. This paper examines the design process and filter properties of HTS filters as well as the gains, directivity, and cooling system of HTS patch antennas. (author)

  14. Mobile dynamic passive sampling of trace organic compounds: Evaluation of sampler performance in the Danube River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, Branislav; Smedes, Foppe; Allan, Ian; Rusina, Tatsiana; Okonski, Krzysztof; Hilscherová, Klára; Novák, Jiří; Tarábek, Peter; Slobodník, Jaroslav

    2018-03-29

    A "dynamic" passive sampling (DPS) device, consisting of an electrically driven large volume water pumping device coupled to a passive sampler exposure cell, was designed to enhance the sampling rate of trace organic compounds. The purpose of enhancing the sampling rate was to achieve sufficient method sensitivity, when the period available for sampling is limited to a few days. Because the uptake principle in the DPS remains the same as for conventionally-deployed passive samplers, free dissolved concentrations can be derived from the compound uptake using available passive sampler calibration parameters. This was confirmed by good agreement between aqueous concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) derived from DPS and conventional caged passive sampler. The DPS device enhanced sampling rates of compounds that are accumulated in samplers under water boundary layer control (WBL) more than five times compared with the conventionally deployed samplers. The DPS device was deployed from a ship cruising downstream the Danube River to provide temporally and spatially integrated concentrations. A DPS-deployed sampler with surface area of 400cm 2 can reach sampling rates up to 83Ld -1 . The comparison of three passive samplers made of different sorbents and co-deployed in the DPS device, namely silicone rubber (SR), low density polyethylene (LDPE) and SDB-RPS Empore™ disks showed a good correlation of surface specific uptake for compounds that were sampled integratively during the entire exposure period. This provided a good basis for a cross-calibration between the samplers. The good correlation of free dissolved PAHs, PCBs and HCB concentration estimates obtained using SR and LDPE confirmed that both samplers are suitable for the identification of concentration gradients and trends in the water column. We showed that the differences in calculated aqueous concentrations between sampler types

  15. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  16. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Robert B.

    2018-04-17

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  17. Review of passive accumulation devices for monitoring organic micropollutants in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Frank

    2005-08-01

    Over the past 15 years passive sampling devices have been developed that accumulate organic micropollutants and allow detection at ambient sub ng/l concentrations. Most passive accumulation devices (PADs) are designed for 1-4 weeks field deployment, where uptake is governed by linear first order kinetics providing a time weighted average of the exposure concentration. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are the most comprehensively studied PADs, but other samplers may also be considered for aquatic monitoring purposes. The applicability of the PADs is reviewed with respect to commonly monitored aqueous matrices and compounds, the detection limits, and for use in quantitative monitoring related to requirements embedded in the EU Water Framework Directive, the US and EU Water Quality Criteria, and the Danish monitoring aquatic programme. The PADs may monitor >75% of the organic micropollutants of the programmes. Research is warranted regarding the uptake in PADs in low flow environments and for the development of samplers for polar organic compounds.

  18. Tube closure device, especially for sample irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klahn, F.C.; Nolan, J.H.; Wills, C.

    1979-01-01

    Device for closing the outlet of a bore and temporarily locking components in this bore. Specifically, it concerns a device for closing a tube containing a set of samples for monitoring irradiation in a nuclear reactor [fr

  19. Advancing the Use of Passive Sampling in Risk Assessment and Management of Sediments Contaminated with Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals: Results of an International Ex Situ Passive Sampling Interlaboratory Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work presents the results of an international interlaboratory comparison on ex situ passive sampling in sediments. The main objectives were to map the state of the science in passively sampling sediments, identify sources of variability, provide recommendations and practica...

  20. Sampled Data Systems Passivity and Discrete Port-Hamiltonian Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Secchi, Cristian; Schaft, Arjan J. van der; Fantuzzi, Cesare

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel way to approach the interconnection of a continuous and a discrete time physical system. This is done in a way which preserves passivity of the coupled system independently of the sampling time T. This strategy can be used both in the field of telemanipulation, for

  1. Calibrating passive sampling and passive dosing techniques to lipid based concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Annika, A.

    2011-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling into various formats of the silicone polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasingly used to measure the exposure of hydrophobic organic chemicals in environmental matrices, and passive dosing from silicone is increasingly used to control and maintain their exposure in laboratory...... coated vials and with Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) yielded lipid based concentrations that were in good agreement with each other, but about a factor of two higher than measured lipid-normalized concentrations in the organisms. Passive dosing was applied to bioconcentration...

  2. Passive sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Mayer, Philipp

    PCBs were widely used in construction materials in the 1906s and 1970s, a period of high building activity in Denmark. The objective of this study was therefore to use passive sampling techniques to develop a simple and cost-effective screening tool for PCBs in indoor air. The study proceeded...... in three phases combining a literature review, laboratory experiments and measurements in buildings potentially containing PCBs in indoor air. The laboratory experiments showed a strong influence of air velocity on the PCB partitioning between air and the passive sampler. Based on the results of the first...

  3. Review of passive accumulation devices for monitoring organic micropollutants in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 15 years passive sampling devices have been developed that accumulate organic micropollutants and allow detection at ambient sub ng/l concentrations. Most passive accumulation devices (PADs) are designed for 1-4 weeks field deployment, where uptake is governed by linear first order kinetics providing a time weighted average of the exposure concentration. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are the most comprehensively studied PADs, but other samplers may also be considered for aquatic monitoring purposes. The applicability of the PADs is reviewed with respect to commonly monitored aqueous matrices and compounds, the detection limits, and for use in quantitative monitoring related to requirements embedded in the EU Water Framework Directive, the US and EU Water Quality Criteria, and the Danish monitoring aquatic programme. The PADs may monitor >75% of the organic micropollutants of the programmes. Research is warranted regarding the uptake in PADs in low flow environments and for the development of samplers for polar organic compounds. - Major developments in the passive sampling of organic contaminants in aquatic environments will support future monitoring, compliance and research

  4. Micro and nano devices in passive millimetre wave imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, R.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of micro and nano technology on millimetre wave imaging from the post war years to the present day is reviewed. In the 1950s whisker contacted diodes in mixers and vacuum tubes were used to realise both radiometers and radars but required considerable skill to realise the performance needed. Development of planar semiconductor devices such as Gunn and Schottky diodes revolutionised mixer performance and provided considerable improvement. The next major breakthrough was high frequency transistors based on gallium arsenide which were initially used at intermediate frequencies but later after further development at millimeter wave frequencies. More recently Monolithic Microwave Integrated circuits(MMICs) offer exceptional performance and the opportunity for innovative design in passive imaging systems. In the future the use of micro and nano technology will continue to drive system performance and we can expect to see integration of antennae, millimetre wave and sub millimetre wave circuits and signal processing.

  5. A Improved Seabed Surface Sand Sampling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X.

    2017-12-01

    In marine geology research it is necessary to obtain a suf fcient quantity of seabed surface samples, while also en- suring that the samples are in their original state. Currently,there are a number of seabed surface sampling devices available, but we fnd it is very diffcult to obtain sand samples using these devices, particularly when dealing with fne sand. Machine-controlled seabed surface sampling devices are also available, but generally unable to dive into deeper regions of water. To obtain larger quantities of seabed surface sand samples in their original states, many researchers have tried to improve upon sampling devices,but these efforts have generally produced ambiguous results, in our opinion.To resolve this issue, we have designed an improved andhighly effective seabed surface sand sampling device that incorporates the strengths of a variety of sampling devices. It is capable of diving into deepwater to obtain fne sand samples and is also suited for use in streams, rivers, lakes and seas with varying levels of depth (up to 100 m). This device can be used for geological mapping, underwater prospecting, geological engineering and ecological, environmental studies in both marine and terrestrial waters.

  6. Bipolar Electrode Sample Preparation Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi (Inventor); Song, Hongjun (Inventor); Pant, Kapil (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An analyte selection device can include: a body defining a fluid channel having a channel inlet and channel outlet; a bipolar electrode (BPE) between the inlet and outlet; one of an anode or cathode electrically coupled with the BPE on a channel inlet side of the BPE and the other of the anode or cathode electrically coupled with the BPE on a channel outlet side of the BPE; and an electronic system operably coupled with the anode and cathode so as to polarize the BPE. The fluid channel can have any shape or dimension. The channel inlet and channel outlet can be longitudinal or lateral with respect to the longitudinal axis of the channel. The BPE can be any metallic member, such as a flat plate on a wall or mesh as a barrier BPE. The anode and cathode can be located at a position that polarizes the BPE.

  7. Passive direct methanol fuel cells for portable electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad, F.; Kamarudin, S.K.; Daud, W.R.W.; Majlan, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing demand for electricity, clean, renewable energy resources must be developed. Thus, the objective of the present study was to develop a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) for portable electronic devices. The power output of six dual DMFCs connected in series with an active area of 4 cm 2 was approximately 600 mW, and the power density of the DMFCs was 25 mW cm -2 . The DMFCs were evaluated as a power source for mobile phone chargers and media players. The results indicated that the open circuit voltage of the DMFC was between 6.0 V and 6.5 V, and the voltage under operating conditions was 4.0 V. The fuel cell was tested on a variety of cell phone chargers, media players and PDAs. The cost of energy consumption by the proposed DMFC was estimated to be USD 20 W -1 , and the cost of methanol is USD 4 kW h. Alternatively, the local conventional electricity tariff is USD 2 kW h. However, for the large-scale production of electronic devices, the cost of methanol will be significantly lower. Moreover, the electricity tariff is expected to increase due to the constraints of fossil fuel resources and pollution. As a result, DMFCs will become competitive with conventional power sources.

  8. A Passively-Suspended Tesla Pump Left Ventricular Assist Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izraelev, Valentin; Weiss, William J.; Fritz, Bryan; Newswanger, Raymond K.; Paterson, Eric G.; Snyder, Alan; Medvitz, Richard B.; Cysyk, Joshua; Pae, Walter E.; Hicks, Dennis; Lukic, Branka; Rosenberg, Gerson

    2009-01-01

    The design and initial test results of a new passively suspended Tesla type LAVD blood pump are described. CFD analysis was used in the design of the pump. Overall size of the prototype device is 50 mm in diameter and 75 mm in length. The pump rotor has a density lower than that of blood and when spinning inside the stator in blood it creates a buoyant centering force that suspends the rotor in the radial direction. The axial magnetic force between the rotor and stator restrain the rotor in the axial direction. The pump is capable of pumping up to 10 liters/min at a 70 mmHg head rise at 8000 RPM. The pump has demonstrated a normalized index of hemolysis level below .02 mg/dL for flows between 2 and 9.7 L/min. An inlet pressure sensor has also been incorporated into the inlet cannula wall and will be used for control purposes. One initial in vivo study showed an encouraging result. Further CFD modeling refinements are planned as well as endurance testing of the device. PMID:19770799

  9. Device physics underlying silicon heterojunction and passivating-contact solar cells: A topical review

    KAUST Repository

    Chavali, Raghu V. K.; De Wolf, Stefaan; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2018-01-01

    The device physics of commercially dominant diffused-junction silicon solar cells is well understood, allowing sophisticated optimization of this class of devices. Recently, so-called passivating-contact solar cell technologies have become prominent

  10. Passive sampling of ambient ozone by solid phase microextraction with on-fiber derivatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I-S.; Tsai, S.-W.

    2008-01-01

    The solid phase microextraction (SPME) device with the polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fiber was used as a passive sampler for ambient ozone. Both O-2,3,4,5,6-(pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) and 1,2-di-(4-pyridyl)ethylene (DPE) were loaded onto the fiber before sampling. The SPME fiber assembly was then inserted into a PTFE tubing as a passive sampler. Known concentrations of ozone around the ambient ground level were generated by a calibrated ozone generator. Laboratory validations of the SPME passive sampler with the direct-reading ozone monitor were performed side-by-side in an exposure chamber at 25 deg. C. After exposures, pyriden-4-aldehyde was formed due to the reaction between DPE and ozone. Further on-fiber derivatizations between pyriden-4-aldehyde and PFBHA were followed and the derivatives, oximes, were then determined by portable gas chromatography with electron capture detector. The experimental sampling rate of the SPME ozone passive sampler was found to be 1.10 x 10 -4 cm 3 s -1 with detection limit of 58.8 μg m -3 h -1 . Field validations with both SPME device and the direct-reading ozone monitor were also performed. The correlations between the results from both methods were found to be consistent with r = 0.9837. Compared with other methods, the current designed sampler provides a convenient and sensitive tool for the exposure assessments of ozone

  11. Passive sampling for the isotopic fingerprinting of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, B. A.; MacLagan, D.; Spoznar, N.; Kaplan, R.; Chandan, P.; Stupple, G.; Zimmerman, L.; Wania, F.; Mitchell, C. P. J.; Steffen, A.; Monaci, F.; Derry, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies show that there are variations in the mercury (Hg) isotopic signature of atmospheric Hg, which demonstrates the potential for source tracing and improved understanding of atmospheric cycling of Hg. However, current methods for both measuring atmospheric Hg and collecting enough atmospheric Hg for isotopic analyses require expensive instruments that need power and expertise. Additionally, methods for collecting enough atmospheric Hg for isotopic analysis require pumping air through traps for long periods (weeks and longer). Combining a new passive atmospheric sampler for mercury (Hg) with novel Hg isotopic analyses will allow for the application of stable Hg isotopes to atmospheric studies of Hg. Our group has been testing a new passive sampler for gaseous Hg that relies on the diffusion of Hg through a diffusive barrier and adsorption onto a sulphur-impregnated activated carbon sorbent. The benefit of this passive sampler is that it is low cost, requires no power, and collects gaseous Hg for up to one year with linear, well-defined uptake, which allows for reproducible and accurate measurements of atmospheric gaseous Hg concentrations ( 8% uncertainty). As little as one month of sampling is often adequate to collect sufficient Hg for isotopic analysis at typical background concentrations. Experiments comparing the isotopic Hg signature in activated carbon samples using different approaches (i.e. by passive diffusion, by passive diffusion through diffusive barriers of different thickness, by active pumping) and at different temperatures confirm that the sampling process itself does not impose mass-independent fractionation (MIF). However, sampling does result in a consistent and thus correctable mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) effect. Therefore, the sampler preserves Hg MIF with very high accuracy and precision, which is necessary for atmospheric source tracing, and reasonable MDF can be estimated with some increase in error. In addition to

  12. Role of passive valves & devices in poison injection system of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapra, M.K.; Kundu, S.; Vijayan, P.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Sinha, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 300 MWe pressure tube type boiling light water (H 2 O) cooled, heavy water (D 2 O) moderated reactor. The reactor design is based on well-proven water reactor technologies and incorporates a number of passive safety features such as natural circulation core cooling; direct in-bundle injection of light water coolant during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) from Advanced Accumulators and Gravity Driven Water Pool by passive means; Passive Decay Heat Removal using Isolation Condensers, Passive Containment Cooling System and Passive Containment Isolation System. In addition to above, there is another passive safety system named as Passive Poison Injection System (PPIS) which is capable of shutting down the reactor for a prolonged time. It is an additional safety system in AHWR to fulfill the shutdown function in the event of failure of wired shutdown systems i.e. primary and secondary shut down systems of the reactor. When demanded, PPIS injects the liquid poison into the moderator by passive means using passive valves and devices. On increase of main heat transport (MHT) system pressure beyond a predetermined value, a set of rupture disks burst, which in-turn actuate the passive valve. The opening of passive valve initiates inrush of high pressure helium gas into poison tanks to push the poison into the moderator system, thereby shutting down the reactor. This paper primarily deals with design and development of Passive Poison Injection System (PPIS) and its passive valves & devices. Recently, a prototype DN 65 size Poison Injection Passive Valve (PIPV) has been developed for AHWR usage and tested rigorously under simulated conditions. The paper will highlight the role of passive valves & devices in PPIS of AHWR. The design concept and test results of passive valves along with rupture disk performance will also be covered. (author)

  13. Device for passive flow control around vertical axis marine turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coşoiu, C. I.; Georgescu, A. M.; Degeratu, M.; Haşegan, L.; Hlevca, D.

    2012-11-01

    The power supplied by a turbine with the rotor placed in a free stream flow may be increased by augmenting the velocity in the rotor area. The energy of the free flow is dispersed and it may be concentrated by placing a profiled structure around the bare turbine in order to concentrate more energy in the rotor zone. At the Aerodynamic and Wind Engineering Laboratory (LAIV) of the Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest (UTCB) it was developed a concentrating housing to be used for hydro or aeolian horizontal axis wind turbines, in order to increase the available energy in the active section of turbine rotor. The shape of the concentrating housing results by superposing several aero/hydro dynamic effects, the most important being the one generated by the passive flow control devices that were included in the housing structure. Those concentrating housings may be also adapted for hydro or aeolian turbines with vertical axis. The present paper details the numerical research effectuated at the LAIV to determine the performances of a vertical axis marine turbine equipped with such a concentrating device, in order to increase the energy quantity extracted from the main flow. The turbine is a Darrieus type one with three vertical straight blades, symmetric with respect to the axis of rotation, generated using a NACA4518 airfoil. The global performances of the turbine equipped with the concentrating housing were compared to the same characteristics of the bare turbine. In order to validate the numerical approach used in this paper, test cases from the literature resulting from experimental and numerical simulations for similar situations, were used.

  14. Device for passive flow control around vertical axis marine turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coşoiu, C I; Georgescu, A M; Degeratu, M; Haşegan, L; Hlevca, D

    2012-01-01

    The power supplied by a turbine with the rotor placed in a free stream flow may be increased by augmenting the velocity in the rotor area. The energy of the free flow is dispersed and it may be concentrated by placing a profiled structure around the bare turbine in order to concentrate more energy in the rotor zone. At the Aerodynamic and Wind Engineering Laboratory (LAIV) of the Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest (UTCB) it was developed a concentrating housing to be used for hydro or aeolian horizontal axis wind turbines, in order to increase the available energy in the active section of turbine rotor. The shape of the concentrating housing results by superposing several aero/hydro dynamic effects, the most important being the one generated by the passive flow control devices that were included in the housing structure. Those concentrating housings may be also adapted for hydro or aeolian turbines with vertical axis. The present paper details the numerical research effectuated at the LAIV to determine the performances of a vertical axis marine turbine equipped with such a concentrating device, in order to increase the energy quantity extracted from the main flow. The turbine is a Darrieus type one with three vertical straight blades, symmetric with respect to the axis of rotation, generated using a NACA4518 airfoil. The global performances of the turbine equipped with the concentrating housing were compared to the same characteristics of the bare turbine. In order to validate the numerical approach used in this paper, test cases from the literature resulting from experimental and numerical simulations for similar situations, were used.

  15. passive and active measurements for some ceramic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.F.; Said, S.A.; Ali, M.A.; Szegedi, S.

    2004-01-01

    passive measurements for an imported natural ore (zirconium silicate) used in ceramic industries were carried out to identify its radioactivity . this work was done for ceramic quality control purposes. accurate gamma spectrometers with 30% and 70% detector efficiencies were used in the measurements. the 235 U, 238 U and 232 Th radioactivity were determined . for the sake of comparison already manufactured different ceramic samples were investigated applying fast neutrons activation analysis (FNAA) and X-Ray florescence (XRF) techniques. the obtained results were discussed with the tabulated international radioactivity levels for building materials

  16. Device for radioactivity measurement of liquid samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamaziere, J.

    1983-01-01

    The device for low activity gamma measurements comprises an automatic changer for sample transfer from a conveyor to a measuring chamber. The conveyor includes a horizontal table were are regularly distributed sample holders. A lift allows a vertical motion of a plate for the exposition in front of a detector [fr

  17. Sampling device for radioactive molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Masato

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for accurately sampling molten salts to which various kinds of metals in a molten salt storage tank are mixed for analyzing them during a spent fuel dry type reprocessing. Namely, the device comprises a sampling tube having an opened lower end to be inserted into the radioactive molten salts stored in a tank and keeps reduced pressure from the upper end, and a pressure reducing pipeline having one end connected to the sampling tube and other end connected to an evacuating pump. In this device, the top end of the sampling tube is inserted to a position for sampling the radioactive molten salts (molten salts). The pressure inside the evacuating pipeline connected to the upper portion of the sampling tube is reduced for a while. In this case, the inside of the pressure reducing pipeline is previously evacuated by the evacuating pump so as to keep a predetermined pressure. Since the pressure in the sampling tube is lowered, molten salts are inserted into the sampling tube, the sampling tube is withdrawn, and the molten salts flown in the sampling tube are analyzed. (I.S.)

  18. Passive sampling as a tool for identifying micro-organic compounds in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, N; Cerar, S; Koroša, A; Auersperger, P

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the use of a simple and cost efficient passive sampling device with integrated active carbon with which to test the possibility of determining the presence of micro-organic compounds (MOs) in groundwater and identifying the potential source of pollution as well as the seasonal variability of contamination. Advantage of the passive sampler is to cover a long sampling period by integrating the pollutant concentration over time, and the consequently analytical costs over the monitoring period can be reduced substantially. Passive samplers were installed in 15 boreholes in the Maribor City area in Slovenia, with two sampling campaigns covered a period about one year. At all sampling sites in the first series a total of 103 compounds were detected, and 144 in the second series. Of all detected compounds the 53 most frequently detected were selected for further analysis. These were classified into eight groups based on the type of their source: Pesticides, Halogenated solvents, Non-halogenated solvents, Domestic and personal, Plasticizers and additives, Other industrial, Sterols and Natural compounds. The most frequently detected MO compounds in groundwater were tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene from the Halogenated solvents group. The most frequently detected among the compound's groups were pesticides. Analysis of frequency also showed significant differences between the two sampling series, with less frequent detections in the summer series. For the analysis to determine the origin of contamination three groups of compounds were determined according to type of use: agriculture, urban and industry. Frequency of detection indicates mixed land use in the recharge areas of sampling sites, which makes it difficult to specify the dominant origin of the compound. Passive sampling has proved to be useful tool with which to identify MOs in groundwater and for assessing groundwater quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Device for sampling liquid radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasak, L.

    1987-01-01

    Remote sampling of radioactive materials in the process of radioactive waste treatment is claimed by the Czechoslovak Patent Document 238599. The existing difficulties are eliminated consisting in a complex remote control of sampling featuring the control of sliding and rotary movements of the sampling device. The new device consists of a vertical pipe with an opening provided with a cover. A bend is provided above the opening level housing flow distributors. A sampling tray is pivoted in the cover. In sampling, the tray is tilted in the vertical pipe space while it tilts back when filled. The sample flows into a vessel below the tray. Only rotary movement is thus sufficient for controlling the tray. (Z.M.)

  20. Application of Passive Sampling to Characterise the Fish Exometabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Viant

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The endogenous metabolites excreted by organisms into their surrounding environment, termed the exometabolome, are important for many processes including chemical communication. In fish biology, such metabolites are also known to be informative markers of physiological status. While metabolomics is increasingly used to investigate the endogenous biochemistry of organisms, no non-targeted studies of the metabolic complexity of fish exometabolomes have been reported to date. In environmental chemistry, Chemcatcher® (Portsmouth, UK passive samplers have been developed to sample for micro-pollutants in water. Given the importance of the fish exometabolome, we sought to evaluate the capability of Chemcatcher® samplers to capture a broad spectrum of endogenous metabolites excreted by fish and to measure these using non-targeted direct infusion mass spectrometry metabolomics. The capabilities of C18 and styrene divinylbenzene reversed-phase sulfonated (SDB-RPS Empore™ disks for capturing non-polar and polar metabolites, respectively, were compared. Furthermore, we investigated real, complex metabolite mixtures excreted from two model fish species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus. In total, 344 biological samples and 28 QC samples were analysed, revealing 646 and 215 m/z peaks from trout and stickleback, respectively. The measured exometabolomes were principally affected by the type of Empore™ (Hemel Hempstead, UK disk and also by the sampling time. Many peaks were putatively annotated, including several bile acids (e.g., chenodeoxycholate, taurocholate, glycocholate, glycolithocholate, glycochenodeoxycholate, glycodeoxycholate. Collectively these observations show the ability of Chemcatcher® passive samplers to capture endogenous metabolites excreted from fish.

  1. Monitoring of BTX by passive sampling in Hat Yai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proespichaya Kanatharana

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-built passive samplers were used for monitoring of trace benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX in Hat Yai from 28 July to 12 August, 2003. Sampler bottles contained activated Tenax TA 60/80 meshand a lab-built thermal well were developed and evaluated for the sampling and analysis of BTX. The sampling was carried out for two weeks before the passive samplers were thermally desorbed, trapped ina sampling loop by a laboratory built purge and trap system and analysed by gas chromatography (GC equipped with a flame ionization detector. After optimization and calibration, the developed method showed high selectivity, a good sensitivity with detection limits for BTX of 0.8, 1.1 and 13.0 µg/m3 respectively and an acceptable precision. Ambient BTX measurements were conducted at many monitoring site i.e. hot spots (high exposure, residential areas/work places (common exposure and park (low exposure. The concentration at hot spots range from 3.2 to 5.4 µg/m3 for benzene, 38.0 to 80.3 µg/m3 for toluene and 29.7 to 66.7 µg/m3 for xylene.The low BTX were found at the city periphery (Tesco-Lotus billboard sampling stations, roof level and in Hat Yai Municipal Park but no absolute background concentration could be defined. The monitoring results showed that at higher level from the street surface, the level of BTX tended to decrease and the BTX pollution built up along a street canyon (Sanehanuson Road according to the wind direction. The highest BTX were found at the underground parking, 23.5 725.1 and 267.9 µg/m3 respectively where both WHO guideline for Benzene (16.3 µg/m3 and Toluene (260 µg/m3 were exceeded.

  2. A passive cold storage device economic model to evaluate selected immunization location scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Bryan A; Nourollahi, Sevnaz; Chen, Sheng-I; Brown, Shawn T; Claypool, Erin G; Connor, Diana L; Schmitz, Michelle M; Rajgopal, Jayant; Wateska, Angela R; Lee, Bruce Y

    2013-10-25

    The challenge of keeping vaccines cold at health posts given the unreliability of power sources in many low- and middle-income countries and the expense and maintenance requirements of solar refrigerators has motivated the development of passive cold storage devices (PCDs), containers that keep vaccines cold without using an active energy source. With different PCDs under development, manufacturers, policymakers and funders need guidance on how varying different PCD characteristics may affect the devices' cost and utility. We developed an economic spreadsheet model representing the lowest two levels of a typical Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccine supply chain: a district store, the immunization locations that the district store serves, and the transport vehicles that operate between the district store and the immunization locations. The model compares the use of three vaccine storage device options [(1) portable PCDs, (2) stationary PCDs, or (3) solar refrigerators] and allows the user to vary different device (e.g., size and cost) and scenario characteristics (e.g., catchment area population size and vaccine schedule). For a sample set of select scenarios and equipment specification, we found the portable PCD to generally be better suited to populations of 5,000 or less. The stationary PCD replenished once per month can be a robust design especially with a 35L capacity and a cost of $2,500 or less. The solar device was generally a reasonable alternative for most of the scenarios explored if the cost was $2,100 or less (including installation). No one device type dominated over all explored circumstances. Therefore, the best device may vary from country-to-country and location-to-location within a country. This study introduces a quantitative model to help guide PCD development. Although our selected set of explored scenarios and device designs was not exhaustive, future explorations can further alter model input values to represent additional scenarios

  3. Comparison of active and passive sampling strategies for the monitoring of pesticide contamination in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoumani, Azziz; Margoum, Christelle; Guillemain, Céline; Coquery, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The monitoring of water bodies regarding organic contaminants, and the determination of reliable estimates of concentrations are challenging issues, in particular for the implementation of the Water Framework Directive. Several strategies can be applied to collect water samples for the determination of their contamination level. Grab sampling is fast, easy, and requires little logistical and analytical needs in case of low frequency sampling campaigns. However, this technique lacks of representativeness for streams with high variations of contaminant concentrations, such as pesticides in rivers located in small agricultural watersheds. Increasing the representativeness of this sampling strategy implies greater logistical needs and higher analytical costs. Average automated sampling is therefore a solution as it allows, in a single analysis, the determination of more accurate and more relevant estimates of concentrations. Two types of automatic samplings can be performed: time-related sampling allows the assessment of average concentrations, whereas flow-dependent sampling leads to average flux concentrations. However, the purchase and the maintenance of automatic samplers are quite expensive. Passive sampling has recently been developed as an alternative to grab or average automated sampling, to obtain at lower cost, more realistic estimates of the average concentrations of contaminants in streams. These devices allow the passive accumulation of contaminants from large volumes of water, resulting in ultratrace level detection and smoothed integrative sampling over periods ranging from days to weeks. They allow the determination of time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of the dissolved fraction of target contaminants, but they need to be calibrated in controlled conditions prior to field applications. In other words, the kinetics of the uptake of the target contaminants into the sampler must be studied in order to determine the corresponding sampling rate

  4. Molecular monolayers for electrical passivation and functionalization of silicon-based solar energy devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerbeek, Janneke; Firet, Nienke J.; Vijselaar, Wouter; Elbersen, R.; Gardeniers, Han; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2017-01-01

    Silicon-based solar fuel devices require passivation for optimal performance yet at the same time need functionalization with (photo)catalysts for efficient solar fuel production. Here, we use molecular monolayers to enable electrical passivation and simultaneous functionalization of silicon-based

  5. Experimental study of glass sampling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, A.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Meyere, A.

    1992-01-01

    Two high-level liquid waste containment glass sampling systems have been designed and built. The first device fits entirely inside a standard glass storage canister, and may thus be used in facilities not initially designed for this function. It has been tested successfully in the nonradioactive prototype unit at Marcoule. The work primarily covered the design and construction of an articulated arm supporting the sampling vessel, and the mechanisms necessary for filling the vessel and recovering the sample. System actuation and operation are fully automatic, and the resulting sample is representative of the glass melt. Implementation of the device is delicate however, and its reliability is estimated at about 75%. A second device was designed specifically for new vitrification facilities. It is installed directly on the glass melting furnace, and meets process operating and quality control requirements. Tests conducted at the Marcoule prototype vitrification facility demonstrated the feasibility of the system. Special attention was given to the sampling vessel transfer mechanisms, with two filling and controlled sample cooling options

  6. A holistic passive integrative sampling approach for assessing the presence and potential impacts of waterborne environmental contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Alvarez, D.A.; Brumbaugh, W. G.; Cranor, W.L.; Gale, R.W.; Rastall, A.C.; Jones-Lepp, T. L.; Leiker, T.J.; Rostad, C. E.; Furlong, E.T.

    2004-01-01

    As an integral part of our continuing research in environmental quality assessment approaches, we have developed a variety of passive integrative sampling devices widely applicable for use in defining the presence and potential impacts of a broad array of contaminants. The semipermeable membrane device has gained widespread use for sampling hydrophobic chemicals from water and air, the polar organic chemical integrative sampler is applicable for sequestering waterborne hydrophilic organic chemicals, the stabilized liquid membrane device is used to integratively sample waterborne ionic metals, and the passive integrative mercury sampler is applicable for sampling vapor phase or dissolved neutral mercury species. This suite of integrative samplers forms the basis for a new passive sampling approach for assessing the presence and potential toxicological significance of a broad spectrum of environmental contaminants. In a proof-of-concept study, three of our four passive integrative samplers were used to assess the presence of a wide variety of contaminants in the waters of a constructed wetland, and to determine the effectiveness of the constructed wetland in removing contaminants. The wetland is used for final polishing of secondary-treatment municipal wastewater and the effluent is used as a source of water for a state wildlife area. Numerous contaminants, including organochlorine pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphate pesticides, and pharmaceutical chemicals (e.g., ibuprofen, oxindole, etc.) were detected in the wastewater. Herein we summarize the results of the analysis of the field-deployed samplers and demonstrate the utility of this holistic approach.

  7. Comparative performance of passive devices for piping system under seismic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen, E-mail: pra_veen74@rediffmail.com [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Jangid, R.S. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai, 400076 (India); Reddy, G.R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, 400085 (India)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Correlated the analytical results obtained from the proposed analytical procedures with experimental results in the case of XPD. • Substantial reduction of the seismic response of piping system with passive devices is observed. • Significant increase in the modal damping of the piping system is noted. • There exist an optimum parameters of the passive devices. • Good amount of energy dissipation is observed by using passive devices. - Abstract: Among several passive control devices, X-plate damper, viscous damper, visco-elastic damper, tuned mass damper and multiple tuned mass dampers are popular and used to mitigate the seismic response in the 3-D piping system. In the present paper detailed studies are made to see the effectiveness of the dampers when used in 3-D piping system subjected to artificial earthquake with increasing amplitudes. The analytical results obtained using Wen's model are compared with the corresponding experimental results available which indicated a good match with the proposed analytical procedure for the X-plate dampers. It is observed that there is significant reduction in the seismic response of interest like relative displacement, acceleration and the support reaction of the piping system with passive devices. In general, the passive devices under particular optimum parameters such as stiffness and damping are very effective and practically implementable for the seismic response mitigation, vibration control and seismic requalification of piping system.

  8. Advancing the Use of Passive Sampling in Risk Assessment and Management of Sediments Contaminated with Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals: Results of an International Ex Situ Passive Sampling Interlaboratory Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Michiel T O; van der Heijden, Stephan A; Adelman, Dave; Apell, Jennifer N; Burgess, Robert M; Choi, Yongju; Fernandez, Loretta A; Flavetta, Geanna M; Ghosh, Upal; Gschwend, Philip M; Hale, Sarah E; Jalalizadeh, Mehregan; Khairy, Mohammed; Lampi, Mark A; Lao, Wenjian; Lohmann, Rainer; Lydy, Michael J; Maruya, Keith A; Nutile, Samuel A; Oen, Amy M P; Rakowska, Magdalena I; Reible, Danny; Rusina, Tatsiana P; Smedes, Foppe; Wu, Yanwen

    2018-03-20

    This work presents the results of an international interlaboratory comparison on ex situ passive sampling in sediments. The main objectives were to map the state of the science in passively sampling sediments, identify sources of variability, provide recommendations and practical guidance for standardized passive sampling, and advance the use of passive sampling in regulatory decision making by increasing confidence in the use of the technique. The study was performed by a consortium of 11 laboratories and included experiments with 14 passive sampling formats on 3 sediments for 25 target chemicals (PAHs and PCBs). The resulting overall interlaboratory variability was large (a factor of ∼10), but standardization of methods halved this variability. The remaining variability was primarily due to factors not related to passive sampling itself, i.e., sediment heterogeneity and analytical chemistry. Excluding the latter source of variability, by performing all analyses in one laboratory, showed that passive sampling results can have a high precision and a very low intermethod variability (sampling, irrespective of the specific method used, is fit for implementation in risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments, provided that method setup and performance, as well as chemical analyses are quality-controlled.

  9. Re-Active Passive devices for control of noise transmission through a panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive devices have been developed to control low-frequency (transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The Re-Active Passive device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover relatively high-frequency range (>150 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber to cover the medium-frequency range (50-200 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (transmission through a panel mounted in the Transmission Loss Test Facility at Virginia Tech. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three Re-Active Passive devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 g to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  10. High aspect-ratio MEMS devices for the next generation of THz/MHz passive components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorentino, G.

    2015-01-01

    The realization of efficient passive devices directly on chip represents one of the most intriguing challenges in IC fabrication processes. The performance of such devices are intrinsically determined by physical parameters that cannot be easily scaled, making the on-chip integration of such

  11. Italy: Analysis of Solutions for Passively Actuated Safety Shutdown Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, L.

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at different special shutdown systems specifically engineered for prevention of severe accidents, to be implemented on Fast Reactors, with main focus on the investigation of the performance of the self-actuated shutdown systems in Sodium Fast Reactors. The passive shut-down systems are designed to shut-down system only by inherent passive reactivity feedback mechanism, under unprotected accident conditions, implying failure of reactor protection system. They are conceived to be self-actuated without any signal elaboration, since the actuation of the system is triggered by the effects induced by the transient like material dilatation, in case of overheating of the coolant for instance, according to Fast Reactor design to meet the safety requirements

  12. Molecular Monolayers for Electrical Passivation and Functionalization of Silicon-Based Solar Energy Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerbeek, Janneke; Firet, Nienke J; Vijselaar, Wouter; Elbersen, Rick; Gardeniers, Han; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2017-01-11

    Silicon-based solar fuel devices require passivation for optimal performance yet at the same time need functionalization with (photo)catalysts for efficient solar fuel production. Here, we use molecular monolayers to enable electrical passivation and simultaneous functionalization of silicon-based solar cells. Organic monolayers were coupled to silicon surfaces by hydrosilylation in order to avoid an insulating silicon oxide layer at the surface. Monolayers of 1-tetradecyne were shown to passivate silicon micropillar-based solar cells with radial junctions, by which the efficiency increased from 8.7% to 9.9% for n + /p junctions and from 7.8% to 8.8% for p + /n junctions. This electrical passivation of the surface, most likely by removal of dangling bonds, is reflected in a higher shunt resistance in the J-V measurements. Monolayers of 1,8-nonadiyne were still reactive for click chemistry with a model catalyst, thus enabling simultaneous passivation and future catalyst coupling.

  13. Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Ptasinski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we explore the negative thermo-optic properties of liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic integrated circuits. Photonic circuits are playing an increasing role in communications and computing, but they suffer from temperature dependent performance variation. Most existing techniques aimed at compensation of thermal effects rely on power hungry Joule heating. We show that integrating a liquid crystal cladding helps to minimize the effects of a temperature dependent drift. The advantage of liquid crystals lies in their high negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the infrared wavelengths.

  14. An experimental study of the flow characteristics of fluidic device in a passive safety injection tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seok; Song, Chul Hwa; Won, Suon Yeon; Min, Kyong Ho; Chung, Moon Ki

    1998-01-01

    It is considered to adopt passive safety injection tank (SIT) as a enhanced safety feature in KNGR. Passive SIT employs a vortex chamber as a fluidic device, which control injection flow rate passively by the variation of flow resistance produced by vortex intensity within the vortex chamber. To investigate the flow characteristics of the vortex chamber many tests have been carried out by using small-scale test facility. In this report the effects of geometric parameters of vortex chamber on discharge flow characteristics and the velocity measurement result of flow field, measured by PIV, are presented and discussed. (author). 25 refs., 11 tabs., 31 figs

  15. bility of passive implants and devices in an MR environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    al risk to the patient or other individ- ... magnetic field strength MR systems ... alloy, or commercially pure titanium) .... The Lea shield is a silicon rubber ... Copper is the metal most used in an IUCD without side-effect. • The Mirena device is safe ...

  16. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  17. Ambient NO2 concentration profiles in Flanders using passive sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Potgieter-Vermaak

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In most parts of Europe NO2 emissions from excessive road traffic, concentrated by confined spaces and limited dispersion, are often higher than the ambient guideline values. As a pollutant,NO2 has a number of adverse effects on human health and the environment. The European Union sets guideline and threshold values for various pollutants, to protect humans and the environment, of which NO2 is one. Flanders adopted these values as most countries did, and the monitoring and evaluation of the levels against these guideline values are mostly done by VMM (the Flemish Environmental Company. The air quality Framework Directive (96/62/EG was drafted on the27th of September 1996 and instituted on the 21st of November 1996. New guideline values forNO2 will come into effect in 2010 (1999/30/EG. The future hourly guideline value is 200 µg m-3which may not be exceeded more than 18 times in a calendar year. The average annual guideline value must not exceed 40 µg m-3.Currently various pollutants are continuously monitored by means of fixed monster monitors and analysers, where after data is extrapolated to give an overview of the dispersion. In the 2003annual report the future guideline value has been exceeded in 7 locations in Flanders. Moreover, in a separate study it was reported that in various locations with high traffic density and low dispersion, this value was exceeded, even though the dispersion model did not indicate it. Hence, to test these and other locations against the future guideline value a total of 19points, in 6 different cities and towns in Flanders, were chosen to monitor the NO2 profile over a1 year period. Passive sampling, averaged over periods of 2 weeks, was used and comparisons with the fixed monitors in some of these locations were possible. The future annual guideline value of 40 µg m-3 (2010 was exceeded in 11 of the 19 measured locations. When high traffic density was accompanied by low dispersion the value was at its

  18. Continuous Passive Sampling of Solutes from Agricultural Subsurface Drainage Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad Vendelboe, Anders; de Jonge, Hubert; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Wollesen de Jonge, Lis

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural subsurface tube drain systems play an important role in water and solute transport. One study, focusing on lowland agricultural catchments, showed that subsurface tube drainage contributed up to 80% of the annual discharge and 90% of the annual NO3 load from agricultural fields to the receiving water bodies. Knowledge of e.g. nutrient loads and drainage volumes, based on measurements and modelling, are important for adequate water quality management. Despite the importance of tube drain transport of solutes, monitoring data are scarce. This scarcity is a result of the existing monitoring techniques for flow and contaminant load from tube drains being expensive and labor-extensive. The study presented here aimed at developing a cheap, simple, and robust method to monitor solute loads from tube drains. The method is based on the newly developed Flowcap, which can be attached to existing tube drain outlets and can measure total flow, contaminant load and flow-averaged concentrations of solutes in the drainage. The Flowcap builds on the existing Sorbicell principle, a passive sampling system that measures average concentrations over longer periods of time (days to months) for various compounds. The Sorbicell consists of two compartments permeable to water. One compartment contains an adsorbent and one contains a tracer. When water passes through the Sorbicell the compound of interest is absorbed while a tracer is released. Using the tracer loss to calculate the volume of water that has passed the Sorbicell it is possible to calculate the average concentration of the compound. When mounting Sorbicells in the Flowcap, a flow-proportional part of the drainage is sampled from the main stream. To accommodate the wide range of drainage flow rates two Flowcaps with different capacities were tested in the laboratory: one with a capacity of 25 L min-1 (Q25) and one with a capacity of 256 L min-1 (Q256). In addition, Sorbicells with two different hydraulic

  19. Passivation layer breakdown during laser-fired contact formation for photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, A.; DebRoy, T.; Palmer, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Low resistance laser-fired ohmic contacts (LFCs) can be formed on the backside of Si-based solar cells using microsecond pulses. However, the impact of these longer pulse durations on the dielectric passivation layer is not clear. Retention of the passivation layer during processing is critical to ensure low recombination rates of electron-hole pairs at the rear surface of the device. In this work, advanced characterization tools are used to demonstrate that although the SiO 2 passivation layer melts directly below the laser, it is well preserved outside the immediate LFC region over a wide range of processing parameters. As a result, low recombination rates at the passivation layer/wafer interface can be expected despite higher energy densities associated with these pulse durations.

  20. Review of 3D Printed Millimeter-Wave and Terahertz Passive Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D printing technology is catching attention nowadays. It has certain advantages over the traditional fabrication processes. We give a chronical review of the 3D printing technology from the time it was invented. This technology has also been used to fabricate millimeter-wave (mmWave and terahertz (THz passive devices. Though promising results have been demonstrated, the challenge lies in the fabrication tolerance improvement such as dimensional tolerance and surface roughness. We propose the design methodology of high order device to circumvent the dimensional tolerance and suggest specific modelling of the surface roughness of 3D printed devices. It is believed that, with the improvement of the 3D printing technology and related subjects in material science and mechanical engineering, the 3D printing technology will become mainstream for mmWave and THz passive device fabrication.

  1. Calibration and field performance of membrane-enclosed sorptive coating for integrative passive sampling of persistent organic pollutants in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrana, Branislav; Paschke, Albrecht; Popp, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Membrane-enclosed sorptive coating (MESCO) is a miniaturised monitoring device that enables integrative passive sampling of persistent, hydrophobic organic pollutants in water. The system combines the passive sampling with solventless preconcentration of organic pollutants from water and subsequent desorption of analytes on-line into a chromatographic system. Exchange kinetics of chemicals between water and MESCO was studied at different flow rates of water, in order to characterize the effect of variable environmental conditions on the sampler performance, and to identify a method for in situ correction of the laboratory-derived calibration data. It was found that the desorption of chemicals from MESCO into water is isotropic to the absorption of the analytes onto the sampler under the same exposure conditions. This allows for the in situ calibration of the uptake of pollutants using elimination kinetics of performance reference compounds and more accurate estimates of target analyte concentrations. A field study was conducted to test the sampler performance alongside spot sampling. A good agreement of contaminant patterns and water concentrations was obtained by the two sampling techniques. - A robust calibration method of a passive sampling device for monitoring of persistent organic pollutants in water is described

  2. Review on Upper Limb Continuous Passive Motion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragazzo Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to a survey on the state of the art of elements and parts for the upper limb rehabilitation. As a matter of fact, the use of technological, and specifically of robotic, devices is entering in the habits of clinical approaches, due to their ability to work efficiently and to be able to obtain, at least, the same rehabilitation results of manual therapy. At the same time, the therapists can change his/her role in rehabilitation activity from a physical contribution to an intellectual/motivational one.

  3. Device physics underlying silicon heterojunction and passivating-contact solar cells: A topical review

    KAUST Repository

    Chavali, Raghu V. K.

    2018-01-15

    The device physics of commercially dominant diffused-junction silicon solar cells is well understood, allowing sophisticated optimization of this class of devices. Recently, so-called passivating-contact solar cell technologies have become prominent, with Kaneka setting the world\\'s silicon solar cell efficiency record of 26.63% using silicon heterojunction contacts in an interdigitated configuration. Although passivating-contact solar cells are remarkably efficient, their underlying device physics is not yet completely understood, not in the least because they are constructed from diverse materials that may introduce electronic barriers in the current flow. To bridge this gap in understanding, we explore the device physics of passivating contact silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. Here, we identify the key properties of heterojunctions that affect cell efficiency, analyze the dependence of key heterojunction properties on carrier transport under light and dark conditions, provide a self-consistent multiprobe approach to extract heterojunction parameters using several characterization techniques (including dark J-V, light J-V, C-V, admittance spectroscopy, and Suns-Voc), propose design guidelines to address bottlenecks in energy production in SHJ cells, and develop a process-to-module modeling framework to establish the module\\'s performance limits. We expect that our proposed guidelines resulting from this multiscale and self-consistent framework will improve the performance of future SHJ cells as well as other passivating contact-based solar cells.

  4. Passive sampling of bioavailable organic chemicals in Perry County, Missouri cave streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J Tyler; Adams, Ginny; Sharum, Martin; Steelman, Karen L

    2010-12-01

    Two types of passive samplers--semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS)--were deployed in spring 2008 to assess bioavailable concentrations of aquatic contaminants in five cave streams and resurgences in Perry County, Missouri. Study sites represent areas of high cave biodiversity and the only known habitat for grotto sculpin (Cottus carolinae). Time-weighted average (TWA) water concentrations were calculated for 20 compounds (n = 9 SPMDs; n = 11 POCIS) originating primarily from agricultural sources, including two organochlorine insecticides, dieldrin and heptachlor epoxide, which were found at levels exceeding U.S. EPA criteria for the protection of aquatic life. GIS data were used to quantify and map sinkhole distribution and density within the study area. Infiltration of storm runoff and its influence on contaminant transport were also evaluated using land cover and hydrological data. This work provides evidence of cave stream contamination by a mix of organic chemicals and demonstrates the applicability of passive samplers for monitoring water quality in dynamic karst environments where rapid transmission of storm runoff makes instantaneous water sampling difficult.

  5. Hybrid finite element/waveguide mode analysis of passive RF devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Daniel T.

    1993-07-01

    A numerical solution for time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in two-port passive radio frequency (RF) devices has been developed, implemented in a computer code, and validated. Vector finite elements are used to represent the fields in the device interior, and field continuity across waveguide apertures is enforced by matching the interior solution to a sum of waveguide modes. Consequently, the mesh may end at the aperture instead of extending into the waveguide. The report discusses the variational formulation and its reduction to a linear system using Galerkin's method. It describes the computer code, including its interface to commercial CAD software used for geometry generation. It presents validation results for waveguide discontinuities, coaxial transitions, and microstrip circuits. They demonstrate that the method is an effective and versatile tool for predicting the performance of passive RF devices.

  6. Material properties of CorCap passive cardiac support device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsaz, Sam; Wenk, Jonathan F; Ge, Liang; Wisneski, Andrew; Mookhoek, Aart; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M; Tseng, Elaine E

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial function deteriorates during ventricular remodeling in patients with congestive heart failure (HF). Ventricular restraint therapy using a cardiac support device (CSD) is designed to reduce the amount of stress inside the dilated ventricles, which in turn halts remodeling. However, as an open mesh surrounding the heart, it is unknown what the mechanical properties of the CSD are in different fiber orientations. Composite specimens of CorCap (Acorn Cardiovascular, Inc, St. Paul, MN) CSD fabric and silicone were constructed in different fiber orientations and tested on a custom-built biaxial stretcher. Silicone controls were made and stretched to detect the parameters of the matrix. CSD coefficients were calculated using the composite and silicone matrix stress-strain data. Stiffness in different fiber orientations was determined. Silicone specimens exerted a linear behavior, with stiffness of 2.57 MPa. For the composites with 1 fiber set aligned with respect to the stretch axes, stiffness in the direction of the aligned fiber set was higher than that in the cross-fiber direction (14.39 MPa versus 5.66 MPa), indicating greater compliance in the cross-fiber direction. When the orientation of the fiber sets in the composite were matched to the expected clinical orientation of the implanted CorCap, the stiffness in the circumferential axis (with respect to the heart) was greater than in the longitudinal axis (10.55 MPa versus 9.70 MPa). The mechanical properties of the CorCap demonstrate directionality with greater stiffness circumferentially than longitudinally. Implantation of the CorCap clinically should take into account the directionality of the biomechanics to optimize ventricular restraint. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of Passive Acoustic Wave Shaping Devices and Their Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, Ole; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    We discuss a topology optimization based approach for designing passive acoustic wave shaping devices and demonstrate its application to; directional sound emission [1], sound focusing and wave splitting. Optimized devices, numerical and experimental results are presented and benchmarked against...... other designs proposed in the literature. We focus on design problems where the size of the device is on the order of the wavelength, a problematic region for traditional design methods, such as ray tracing.The acoustic optimization problem is formulated in the frequency domain and modeled...

  8. Ball assisted device for analytical surface sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElNaggar, Mariam S; Van Berkel, Gary J; Covey, Thomas R

    2015-11-03

    A system for sampling a surface includes a sampling probe having a housing and a socket, and a rolling sampling sphere within the socket. The housing has a sampling fluid supply conduit and a sampling fluid exhaust conduit. The sampling fluid supply conduit supplies sampling fluid to the sampling sphere. The sampling fluid exhaust conduit has an inlet opening for receiving sampling fluid carried from the surface by the sampling sphere. A surface sampling probe and a method for sampling a surface are also disclosed.

  9. Passive high-frequency devices based on superlattice ferromagnetic nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, B.; Li, F.; Cimpoesu, D.; Wiley, J.B.; Jung, J.-S.; Stancu, A.; Spinu, L.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose to tailor the bandwidth of a microwave filter by exploitation of shape anisotropy of nanowires. In order to achieve this control of shape anisotropy, we considered superlattice wires containing varying-sized ferromagnetic regions separated by nonferromagnetic regions. Superlattice wires of Ni and Au with a nominal diameter of 200 nm were grown using standard electrodeposition techniques. The microwave properties were probed using X-band (9.8 GHz) ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) experiments performed at room temperature. In order to investigate the effectiveness of the shape anisotropy on the superlattice nanowire based filter the FMR spectrum of superlattice structure is compared to the FMR spectra of nanowires samples with constant length

  10. Passive sampling of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in aquatic environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křesinová, Zdena; Petrů, Klára; Lhotský, O.; Rodsand, T.; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 43-46 ISSN 1805-0174 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : passive sampling * polar organic chemical integrative samplers * aquatic matrices Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  11. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F.; Adams, Rachel G.

    2014-01-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive upta...

  12. Effects of emitter junction and passive base region on low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershenkov, V.S.; Cherepko, S.V.; Maslov, V.B.; Belyakov, V.V.; Sogoyan, A.V.; Ulimov, N.; Emelianov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Low dose rate effect in bipolar devices consists in the increase of peripheral surface recombination current with dose rate decrease. This is due to the more rapid positive oxide charge and interface trap density build-up as the dose rate becomes lower. High dose rate elevated temperature irradiation is proposed for simulation if the low dose rate effect. In the present we tried to separate the effect of radiation-induced charge in the thick passivation oxide over the emitter junction and passive base regions of npn bipolar transistor. Its goal is to improve bipolar device design for use in space environments and nuclear installations. Three experiments were made during this work. 1. Experiment on radiation-induced charge neutralization (RICN) effect under elevated temperature was performed to show transistor degradation dependence on emitter-base bias. 2. High dose rate elevated and room temperature irradiation of bipolar transistors were performed to separate effects of emitter-junction and passive base regions. 3. Pre- and post- irradiation hydrogen ambient storage was used to investigate its effect on radiation-induced charge build-up over the passive base region. All experiments were performed with npn and pnp transistors. (authors)

  13. Possible way for increasing the quality of imaging from THz passive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin; Zhang, Xin

    2011-11-01

    Using the passive THz imaging system developed by the CNU-THz laboratory, we capture the passive THz image of human body with forbidden objects hidden under opaque clothes. We demonstrate the possibility of significant improving the quality of the image. Our approach bases on the application of spatial filters, developed by us for computer treatment of passive THz imaging. The THz imaging system is constructed with accordance to well known passive THz imaging principles and to the THz quasi-optical theory. It contains a scanning mechanism, which has a detector approximately with 1200μm central wavelength, a data acquisition card and a microcomputer. To get a clear imaging of object we apply a sequence of the spatial filters to the image and spectral transforms of the image. The treatment of imaging from the passive THz device is made by computer code. The performance time of treatment of the image, containing about 5000 pixels, is less than 0.1 second. To illustrate the efficiency of developed approach we detect the liquid explosive, knife, pistol and metal plate hidden under opaque clothes. The results obtained demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection and recognition of the hidden objects and are very promising for the real security application.

  14. Evaporation and condensation devices for passive heat removal systems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershuni, A.N.; Pis'mennyj, E.N.; Nishchik, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The paper justifies advantages of evaporation and condensation heat transfer devices as means of passive heat removal and thermal shielding in nuclear power engineering. The main thermophysical factors that limit heat transfer capacity of evaporation and condensation systems have been examined in the research. The results of experimental studies of heat engineering properties of elongated (8-m) vertically oriented evaporation and condensation devices (two-phase thermosyphons), which showed a high enough heat transfer capacity, as well as stability and reliability both in steady state and in start-up modes, are provided. The paper presents the examples of schematic designs of evaporation and condensation systems for passive heat removal and thermal shielding in application to nuclear power equipment

  15. Evaluating the precision of passive sampling methods using ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess these models, four different thicknesses of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers were co-deployed for 28 days in the water column at three sites in New Bedford Harbor, MA, USA. Each sampler was pre-loaded with six PCB performance reference compounds (PRCs) to assess equilibrium status, such that the percent of PRC lost would range depending on PRC and LDPE thickness. These data allow subsequent Cfree comparisons to be made in two ways: (1) comparing Cfree derived from one thickness using different models and (2) comparing Cfree derived from the same model using different thicknesses of LDPE. Following the deployments, the percent of PRC lost ranged from 0-100%. As expected, fractional equilibrium decreased with increasing PRC molecular weight as well as sampler thickness. Overall, a total of 27 PCBs (log KOW ranging from 5.07 – 8.09) were measured at Cfree concentrations varying from 0.05 pg/L (PCB 206) to about 200 ng/L (PCB 28) on a single LDPE sampler. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for total PCB measurements using the same thickness and varying model types range from 0.04-12% and increased with sampler thickness. Total PCB RSD for measurements using the same model and varying thickness ranged from: 6 – 30%. No RSD trends between models were observed but RSD did increase as Cfree decreased. These findings indicate that existing models yield precise and reproducible results when using LDPE and PRCs to measure Cfree. This work in

  16. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  17. A passive-active neutron device for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estep, R.J.; Coop, K.L.; Deane, T.M.; Lujan, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A combined passive-active neutron assay device was constructed for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste. A study of matrix and source position effects in active assays showed that a knowledge of the source position alone is not sufficient to correct for position-related errors in highly moderating or absorbing matrices. An alternate function for the active assay of solid fuel pellets was derived, although the efficacy of this approach remains to be established

  18. FAST and SAFE Passive Safety Devices for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Chihyung; Kim, In-Hyung; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The major factor is the impact of the neutron spectral hardening. The second factor that affects the CVR is reduced capture by the coolant when the coolant voiding occurs. To improve the CVR, many ideas and concepts have been proposed, which include introduction of an internal blanket, spectrum softening, or increasing the neutron leakage. These ideas may reduce the CVR, but they deteriorate the neutron economy. Another potential solution is to adopt a passive safety injection device such as the ARC (autonomous reactivity control) system, which is still under development. In this paper, two new concepts of passive safety devices are proposed. The devices are called FAST (Floating Absorber for Safety at Transient) and SAFE (Static Absorber Feedback Equipment). Their purpose is to enhance the negative reactivity feedback originating from the coolant in fast reactors. SAFE is derived to balance the positive reactivity feedback due to sodium coolant temperature increases. It has been demonstrated that SAFE allows a low-leakage SFR to achieve a self-shutdown and self-controllability even though the generic coolant temperature coefficient is quite positive and the coolant void reactivity can be largely managed by the new FAST device. It is concluded that both FAST and SAFE devices will improve substantially the fast reactor safety and they deserve more detailed investigations.

  19. Estimation of functional failure probability of passive systems based on adaptive importance sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baosheng; Wang Dongqing; Zhang Jianmin; Jiang Jing

    2012-01-01

    In order to estimate the functional failure probability of passive systems, an innovative adaptive importance sampling methodology is presented. In the proposed methodology, information of variables is extracted with some pre-sampling of points in the failure region. An important sampling density is then constructed from the sample distribution in the failure region. Taking the AP1000 passive residual heat removal system as an example, the uncertainties related to the model of a passive system and the numerical values of its input parameters are considered in this paper. And then the probability of functional failure is estimated with the combination of the response surface method and adaptive importance sampling method. The numerical results demonstrate the high computed efficiency and excellent computed accuracy of the methodology compared with traditional probability analysis methods. (authors)

  20. 30 CFR 90.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved sampling devices; equivalent... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent...

  1. 14CO2 analysis of soil gas: Evaluation of sample size limits and sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotte, Anja; Wischhöfer, Philipp; Wacker, Lukas; Rethemeyer, Janet

    2017-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) analysis of CO2 respired from soils or sediments is a valuable tool to identify different carbon sources. The collection and processing of the CO2, however, is challenging and prone to contamination. We thus continuously improve our handling procedures and present a refined method for the collection of even small amounts of CO2 in molecular sieve cartridges (MSCs) for accelerator mass spectrometry 14C analysis. Using a modified vacuum rig and an improved desorption procedure, we were able to increase the CO2 recovery from the MSC (95%) as well as the sample throughput compared to our previous study. By processing series of different sample size, we show that our MSCs can be used for CO2 samples of as small as 50 μg C. The contamination by exogenous carbon determined in these laboratory tests, was less than 2.0 μg C from fossil and less than 3.0 μg C from modern sources. Additionally, we tested two sampling devices for the collection of CO2 samples released from soils or sediments, including a respiration chamber and a depth sampler, which are connected to the MSC. We obtained a very promising, low process blank for the entire CO2 sampling and purification procedure of ∼0.004 F14C (equal to 44,000 yrs BP) and ∼0.003 F14C (equal to 47,000 yrs BP). In contrast to previous studies, we observed no isotopic fractionation towards lighter δ13C values during the passive sampling with the depth samplers.

  2. A Wireless Fully Passive Neural Recording Device for Unobtrusive Neuropotential Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiourti, Asimina; Lee, Cedric W L; Chae, Junseok; Volakis, John L

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel wireless fully passive neural recording device for unobtrusive neuropotential monitoring. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring emulated brain signals in a wireless fully passive manner. In this paper, we propose a novel realistic recorder that is significantly smaller and much more sensitive. The proposed recorder utilizes a highly efficient microwave backscattering method and operates without any formal power supply or regulating elements. Also, no intracranial wires or cables are required. In-vitro testing is performed inside a four-layer head phantom (skin, bone, gray matter, and white matter). Compared to our former implementation, the neural recorder proposed in this study has the following improved features: 1) 59% smaller footprint, 2) up to 20-dB improvement in neuropotential detection sensitivity, and 3) encapsulation in biocompatible polymer. For the first time, temporal emulated neuropotentials as low as 63 μVpp can be detected in a wireless fully passive manner. Remarkably, the high-sensitivity achieved in this study implies reading of most neural signals generated by the human brain. The proposed recorder brings forward transformational possibilities in wireless fully passive neural detection for a very wide range of applications (e.g., epilepsy, Alzheimer's, mental disorders, etc.).

  3. Device-Free Passive Identity Identification via WiFi Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jiguang; Yang, Wu; Man, Dapeng

    2017-11-02

    Device-free passive identity identification attracts much attention in recent years, and it is a representative application in sensorless sensing. It can be used in many applications such as intrusion detection and smart building. Previous studies show the sensing potential of WiFi signals in a device-free passive manner. It is confirmed that human's gait is unique from each other similar to fingerprint and iris. However, the identification accuracy of existing approaches is not satisfactory in practice. In this paper, we present Wii, a device-free WiFi-based Identity Identification approach utilizing human's gait based on Channel State Information (CSI) of WiFi signals. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and low pass filter are applied to remove the noises in the signals. We then extract several entities' gait features from both time and frequency domain, and select the most effective features according to information gain. Based on these features, Wii realizes stranger recognition through Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and identity identification through a Support Vector Machine (SVM) with Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel. It is implemented using commercial WiFi devices and evaluated on a dataset with more than 1500 gait instances collected from eight subjects walking in a room. The results indicate that Wii can effectively recognize strangers and can achieves high identification accuracy with low computational cost. As a result, Wii has the potential to work in typical home security systems.

  4. Device-Free Passive Identity Identification via WiFi Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Lv

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Device-free passive identity identification attracts much attention in recent years, and it is a representative application in sensorless sensing. It can be used in many applications such as intrusion detection and smart building. Previous studies show the sensing potential of WiFi signals in a device-free passive manner. It is confirmed that human’s gait is unique from each other similar to fingerprint and iris. However, the identification accuracy of existing approaches is not satisfactory in practice. In this paper, we present Wii, a device-free WiFi-based Identity Identification approach utilizing human’s gait based on Channel State Information (CSI of WiFi signals. Principle Component Analysis (PCA and low pass filter are applied to remove the noises in the signals. We then extract several entities’ gait features from both time and frequency domain, and select the most effective features according to information gain. Based on these features, Wii realizes stranger recognition through Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM and identity identification through a Support Vector Machine (SVM with Radial Basis Function (RBF kernel. It is implemented using commercial WiFi devices and evaluated on a dataset with more than 1500 gait instances collected from eight subjects walking in a room. The results indicate that Wii can effectively recognize strangers and can achieves high identification accuracy with low computational cost. As a result, Wii has the potential to work in typical home security systems.

  5. Sample preparation and detection device for infectious agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy W.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Yu, June

    2003-06-10

    A sample preparation and analysis device which incorporates both immunoassays and PCR assays in one compact, field-portable microchip. The device provides new capabilities in fluid and particle control which allows the building of a fluidic chip with no moving parts, thus decreasing fabrication cost and increasing the robustness of the device. The device can operate in a true continuous (not batch) mode. The device incorporates magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumps to move the fluid through the system, acoustic mixing and fractionation, dielectropheretic (DEP) sample concentration and purification, and on-chip optical detection capabilities.

  6. Comparative study of passive and semi-active energy dissipation devices intended for overhead cranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guihot, P.; Revaud, D.

    1996-04-01

    This paper deals with the results of a bibliographic survey of energy dissipation devices which could be adapted for overhead cranes. The principle of passive devices using friction, yielding steel systems of viscous and viscoelastic systems are remembered. An active control system, which needs a minimum of external control energy is also presented. The application to overhead cranes which have a strong non linear behaviour under strong seismic motion (sliding between rails and wheels, local yielding and damage) is further discussed. The first results of a numerical study in progress are likewise purposed. The criterion of selection of the devices turn on the performance, the robustness and the reliability. The behaviour in the presence of non linearities, the sensitivity to the variations of the vibratory characteristics, and lastly the sensitivity to the response delay of the active controller are taken into account. (authors). 14 refs., 4 figs

  7. Mobile Device Passive Localization Based on IEEE 802.11 Probe Request Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel passive mobile device localization mode based on IEEE 802.11 Probe Request frames. In this approach, the listener can discover mobile devices by receiving the Probe Request frames and localize them on his walking path. The unique location of the mobile device is estimated on a geometric diagram and right-angled walking path. In model equations, site-related parameter, that is, path loss exponent, is eliminated to make the approach site-independent. To implement unique localization, the right-angled walking path is designed and the optimal location is estimated from the optional points. The performance of our method has been evaluated inside the room, outside the room, and in outdoor scenarios. Three kinds of walking paths, for example, horizontal, vertical, and slanted, are also tested.

  8. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booij, Kees; Robinson, Craig D; Burgess, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths...... is the best available technology for chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds. Key issues to be addressed by scientists and environmental managers are outlined....... and shortcomings of passive sampling are assessed for water, sediments, and biota. Passive water sampling is a suitable technique for measuring concentrations of freely dissolved compounds. This method yields results that are incompatible with the EU's quality standard definition in terms of total concentrations...

  9. Passive devices of a reactor stop: classification of the characteristics and estimation of perfection degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portyanoj, A.G.; Serdun', E.N.; Sorokin, A.P.; Egorov, V.S.; Shkarovskij, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    The perspective direction in NPP safety improvement connected with development of passive devices for nuclear reactor emergency shutdown (PDRS) is discussed. More than hundred devices which can fulfil the PDRS functions are suggested nowadays. The analysis of PDRS designing status as applicable for the fast reactors in the main which are based on the physical effect used in an element sensitive to temperature is made. The complex consisting of nine general characteristics including passive character, thresholdness, forces generation, inertia, multichannel design, stability towards operational factors, safety at failures, simplicity and visualisation, development conditions, is suggested for estimation of the quality of PDRS of different types. Basing on expert assessments realized using the complex of general characteristics it is shown that the types of PDRS may be separated into following three groups: linear expansion of solid bodies and thermoelectric ones (K ≅ 0.45); magnet ones with shape memory effect, liquid volume expansion (K ≅ 0.6); fusing ones (K ≅ 0.7). The conclusion is made that PDRS on the basis of fusing devices of the sulphon type with liofobic capillary-porous working body most completely satisfy the complex of general characteristics considered

  10. Water sampling device for detecting fuel failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Yukio.

    1997-01-01

    A notched portion is formed at the lower end of an outer cap, and an extensible air bag is disposed being in contact with the inner side of the notched portion. A compressed air is sent into the outer gap through an air supply pipe to urge coolants thereby lowering the water level. A portion of the compressed air gets out of the outer gap from the notched portion, and if air bubbles are observed on the surface of coolants in a pressure vessel of a reactor, the outer cap is confirmed to be attached to the upper lattice plate. Compressed air is supplied to the air bag to close the notched portion. Then, coolants are sucked from a water level confirmation pipe. The level of coolants is further lowered, and the compressed air is sucked from the water level confirmation pipe instead of the coolants. Then, the level of the coolants at the inner side of the inner cap is confirmed to be made lower than the upper end of the channel box of a reactor fuel assembly. Then, coolants in the channel box are sampled, as a specimen water, through a water sampling pipe. (I.N.)

  11. Passive safety device and internal short tested method for energy storage cells and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Matthew; Darcy, Eric; Long, Dirk; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-09-22

    A passive safety device for an energy storage cell for positioning between two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage cell. The safety device also comprising a separator and a non-conductive layer. A first electrically conductive material is provided on the non-conductive layer. A first opening is formed through the separator between the first electrically conductive material and one of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. A second electrically conductive material is provided adjacent the first electrically conductive material on the non-conductive layer, wherein a space is formed on the non-conductive layer between the first and second electrically conductive materials. A second opening is formed through the non-conductive layer between the second electrically conductive material and another of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. The first and second electrically conductive materials combine and exit at least partially through the first and second openings to connect the two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device at a predetermined temperature.

  12. Velocity dependent passive sampling for monitoring of micropollutants in dynamic stormwater discharges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Sharma, Anitha Kumari; Vezzaro, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Micropollutant monitoring in stormwater discharges is challenging because of the diversity of sources and thus large number of pollutants found in stormwater. This is further complicated by the dynamics in runoff flows and the large number of discharge points. Most passive samplers are non......-ideal for sampling such systems because they sample in a time-integrative manner. This paper reports test of a flow-through passive sampler, deployed in stormwater runoff at the outlet of a residential-industrial catchment. Momentum from the water velocity during runoff events created flow through the sampler...... resulting in velocity dependent sampling. This approach enables the integrative sampling of stormwater runoff during periods of weeks to months while weighting actual runoff events higher than no flow periods. Results were comparable to results from volume-proportional samples and results obtained from...

  13. Optical absorption and oxygen passivation of surface states in III-nitride photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Ian; Callsen, Gordon; Jacopin, Gwénolé; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    III-nitride surface states are expected to impact high surface-to-volume ratio devices, such as nano- and micro-wire light-emitting diodes, transistors, and photonic integrated circuits. In this work, reversible photoinduced oxygen desorption from III-nitride microdisk resonator surfaces is shown to increase optical attenuation of whispering gallery modes by 100 cm-1 at λ = 450 nm. Comparison of photoinduced oxygen desorption in unintentionally and n+-doped microdisks suggests that the spectral changes originate from the unpinning of the surface Fermi level, likely taking place at etched nonpolar III-nitride sidewalls. An oxygen-rich surface prepared by thermal annealing results in a broadband Q improvement to state-of-the-art values exceeding 1 × 104 at 2.6 eV. Such findings emphasize the importance of optically active surface states and their passivation for future nanoscale III-nitride optoelectronic and photonic devices.

  14. Aloe vera in active and passive regions of electronic devices towards a sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Zhe Xi; Sreenivasan, Sasidharan; Wong, Yew Hoong; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2017-07-01

    The increasing awareness towards sustainable development of electronics has driven the search for natural bio-organic materials in place of conventional electronic materials. The concept of using natural bio-organic materials in electronics provides not only an effective solution to address global electronic waste crisis, but also a compelling template for sustainable electronics manufacturing. This paper attempts to provide an overview of using Aloe vera gel as a natural bio-organic material for various electronic applications. Important concepts such as responses of living Aloe vera plant towards electrical stimuli and demonstrations of Aloe vera films as passive and active regions of electronic devices are highlighted in chronological order. The biodegradability and biocompatibility of Aloe vera can bring the world a step closer towards the ultimate goal of sustainable development of electronic devices from "all-natural" materials.

  15. Water sampling at the Berge Helene FPSO at Chinguetti field in Mauritania using passive samplers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korytar, P.; Galien, van der W.

    2007-01-01

    Three rounds of water sampling were performed at the Berge Helene FPSO at the Chinguetti field in Mauritania using passive samplers attached to the FPSO to determine the levels of contamination that could potentially accumulate in organisms. Two rounds were carried out prior to the commencement of

  16. Surface Passivation for Reliable Measurement of Bulk Electronic Properties of Heterojunction Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Benjamin; Guerra-Nunez, Carlos; Carron, Romain; Nishiwaki, Shiro; La Mattina, Fabio; Pianezzi, Fabian; Losio, Paolo A; Avancini, Enrico; Reinhard, Patrick; Haass, Stefan G; Lingg, Martina; Feurer, Thomas; Utke, Ivo; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2016-10-01

    Quantum efficiency measurements of state of the art Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells reveal current losses in the near infrared spectral region. These losses can be ascribed to inadequate optical absorption or poor collection of photogenerated charge carriers. Insight on the limiting mechanism is crucial for the development of more efficient devices. The electron beam induced current measurement technique applied on device cross-sections promises an experimental access to depth resolved information about the charge carrier collection probability. Here, this technique is used to show that charge carrier collection in CIGS deposited by multistage co-evaporation at low temperature is efficient over the optically active region and collection losses are minor as compared to the optical ones. Implications on the favorable absorber design are discussed. Furthermore, it is observed that the measurement is strongly affected by cross-section surface recombination and an accurate determination of the collection efficiency is not possible. Therefore it is proposed and shown that the use of an Al 2 O 3 layer deposited onto the cleaved cross-section significantly improves the accuracy of the measurement by reducing the surface recombination. A model for the passivation mechanism is presented and the passivation concept is extended to other solar cell technologies such as CdTe and Cu 2 (Zn,Sn)(S,Se) 4 . © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Passive air sampling for persistent organic pollutants: Introductory remarks to the special issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harner, Tom; Bartkow, Michael; Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana; Wania, Frank; Gioia, Rosalinda; Moeckel, Claudia; Sweetman, Andrew J.; Jones, Kevin C.

    2006-01-01

    There have been a number of developments in the need, design and use of passive air samplers (PAS) for persistent organic pollutants (POPs). This article is the first in a Special Issue of the journal to review these developments and some of the data arising from them. We explain the need and benefit of developing PAS for POPs, the different approaches that can be used, and highlight future developments and needs. - The context, needs and state-of-the-art of passive air sampling techniques for atmospheric persistent organic pollutants are discussed

  18. Passive sampling of selected pesticides in aquatic environment using polar organic chemical integrative samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomatou, Alphanna-Akrivi; Zacharias, Ierotheos; Hela, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2011-08-01

    Polar chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were examined for their sampling efficiency of 12 pesticides and one metabolite commonly detected in surface waters. Laboratory-based calibration experiments of POCISs were conducted. The determined passive sampling rates were applied for the monitoring of pesticides levels in Lake Amvrakia, Western Greece. Spot sampling was also performed for comparison purposes. Calibration experiments were performed on the basis of static renewal exposure of POCIS under stirred conditions for different time periods of up to 28 days. The analytical procedures were based on the coupling of POCIS and solid phase extraction by Oasis HLB cartridges with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The recovery of the target pesticides from the POCIS was generally >79% with relative standard deviation (RSD) monitoring campaign using both passive and spot sampling whereas higher concentrations were measured by spot sampling in most cases. Passive sampling by POCIS provides a useful tool for the monitoring of pesticides in aquatic systems since integrative sampling at rates sufficient for analytical quantitation of ambient levels was observed. Calibration data are in demand for a greater number of compounds in order to extend the use in environmental monitoring.

  19. Improvement of fuel sampling device for STACY and TRACY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Hideyuki; Sakuraba, Koichi; Onodera, Seiji

    1998-05-01

    STACY and TRACY, static and transient experiment facilities in NUCEF, use solution fuel. It is important to analyze accurately fuel composition (uranium enrichment, uranium concentration, nitric acid morality, amount of impurities, radioactivity of FP) for their safety operation and improvement of experimental accuracy. Both STACY and TRACY have the sampling devices to sample fuel solution for that purpose. The previous sampling devices of STACY and TRACY had been designed to dilute fuel sample with nitric acid. Its sampling mechanism could pour fuel sample into sampling vessel by a piston drive of nitric acid in the burette. It was, however, sometimes found that sample fuel solution was diluted by mixing with nitric acid in the burette. Therefore, the sampling mechanism was change into a fixed quantity pump drive which didn't use nitric acid. The authors confirmed that the performance of the new sampling device was improved by changing sampling mechanism. It was confirmed through the function test that the uncertainty in uranium concentration measurement using the improved sampling device was 0.14%, and less than the designed value of 0.2% (coefficient of variation). (author)

  20. An economic passive sampling method to detect particulate pollutants using magnetic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liwan; Appel, Erwin; Hu, Shouyun; Ma, Mingming

    2015-10-01

    Identifying particulate matter (PM) emitted from industrial processes into the atmosphere is an important issue in environmental research. This paper presents a passive sampling method using simple artificial samplers that maintains the advantage of bio-monitoring, but overcomes some of its disadvantages. The samplers were tested in a heavily polluted area (Linfen, China) and compared to results from leaf samples. Spatial variations of magnetic susceptibility from artificial passive samplers and leaf samples show very similar patterns. Scanning electron microscopy suggests that the collected PM are mostly in the range of 2-25 μm; frequent occurrence of spherical shape indicates industrial combustion dominates PM emission. Magnetic properties around power plants show different features than other plants. This sampling method provides a suitable and economic tool for semi-quantifying temporal and spatial distribution of air quality; they can be installed in a regular grid and calibrate the weight of PM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Device for taking gaseous samples from irradiated fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengacker, B.

    1983-01-01

    The described device allows to take gaseous samples from irradiated fuel elements. It is connected with a gas analyzer and a pressure gage, so that in opening the fuel can the internal pressure can be determined

  2. Passive PE Sampling in Support of In Situ Remediation of Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    biodegradation . As discussed in Fernandez et al. (2009b), target compounds like PCBs and PAHs diffuse through the surrounding environmental media... biodegradation . The PE passive sampling technique may also offer significant cost savings per site for sample collection and analysis cost. When compared with...water, detergent), Nitrile gloves, aluminum foil, plastic sheeting, rope, paper towels, garbage bags , bubble wrap, Ziplock bags , and ice. • Non

  3. Hydrogen Passivation of Interstitial Zn Defects in Heteroepitaxial InP Cell Structures and Influence on Device Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, S. A.; Chatterjee, B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen passivation of heteroepitaxial InP solar cells is of recent interest for deactivation of dislocations and other defects caused by the cell/substrate lattice mismatch that currently limit the photovoltaic performance of these devices. In this paper we present strong evidence that, in addition to direct hydrogen-dislocation interactions, hydrogen forms complexes with the high concentration of interstitial Zn defects present within the p(+) Zn-doped emitter of MOCVD-grown heteroepitaxial InP devices, resulting in a dramatic increase of the forward bias turn-on voltage by as much as 280 mV, from 680 mV to 960 mV. This shift is reproducible and thermally reversible and no such effect is observed for either n(+)p structures or homoepitaxial p(+)n structures grown under identical conditions. A combination of photoluminescence (PL), electrochemical C-V dopant profiling, SIMS and I-V measurements were performed on a set of samples having undergone a matrix of hydrogenation and post-hydrogenation annealing conditions to investigate the source of this voltage enhancement and confirm the expected role of interstitial Zn and hydrogen. A precise correlation between all measurements is demonstrated which indicates that Zn interstitials within the p(+) emitter and their interaction with hydrogen are indeed responsible for this device behavior.

  4. A device for fresh water sampling before radioactive measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maubert, Henri; Picat, Philippe.

    1982-06-01

    On account of the many field operations carried out by the laboratory, a water sampling device has been developed. This portable autonomous device performs in situ water filtration and concentration on ion exchange resins and activated carbon columns. The device is described and the trapping performance for 8 radionuclides is given. A comparison is made with the so-called evaporation method. The effects of the treatment of the filtrating elements on the radioactive results are studied. This sampling method is very sensitive [fr

  5. Development of a magnetic measurement device for thin ribbon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yuta; Todaka, Takashi; Enokizono, Masato

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic measurement device for thin ribbon samples, which are produced by rapid cooling technique. This device enables us to measure magnetic properties easily by only inserting a ribbon sample into a sample holder. The sample holder was made by bakelite to fix any width sample. A long solenoid coil was used to generate a uniform magnetic field and the sample holder was placed at the mid part of the solenoid. The magnetic field strength was measured using a shunt resistor and the magnetic flux density and magnetization in sample ribbons were evaluated by using search coils. The accuracy of measurement was verified with an amorphous metal ribbon sample. Next, we have measured magnetic properties of some magnetic shape memory alloys, which have different compositions. The measured results are compared and we clarified the effect of Sm contents on the magnetic properties

  6. Passive Dosing to Determine the Speciation of Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals in Aqueous Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Gouliarmou, V.; Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten

    2010-01-01

    A new analytical approach to determine the speciation of hydrophobic organic analytes is presented. The freely dissolved concentration in a sample is controlled by passive dosing from silicone (poly(dimethylsiloxane)), and the total sample concentration at equilibrium is measured. The free fraction...... is determined as the ratio between measured concentrations in pure water and sample. C-14-labeled fluoranthene served as model analyte, and total sample concentrations were easily measured by liquid scintillation counting. The method was applied to surface water, stormwater runoff, and wastewater...... (SPME). This analytical approach combines simplicity with high precision, and it does not require any phase separation steps....

  7. [Influence of Natural Dissolved Organic Matter on the Passive Sampling Technique and its Application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shang-yun; Zhou, Yan-mei

    2015-08-01

    This paper studied the effects of different concentrations of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the passive sampling technique. The results showed that the presence of DOM affected the organic pollutant adsorption ability of the membrane. For lgK(OW), 3-5, DOM had less impact on the adsorption of organic matter by the membrane; for lgK(OW), > 5.5, DOM significantly increased the adsorption capacity of the membrane. Meanwhile, LDPE passive sampling technique was applied to monitor PAHs and PAEs in pore water of three surface sediments in Taizi River. All of the target pollutants were detected in varying degrees at each sampling point. Finally, the quotient method was used to assess the ecological risks of PAHs and PAEs. The results showed that fluoranthene exceeded the reference value of the aquatic ecosystem, meaning there was a big ecological risk.

  8. Combining Passive Sampling with Toxicological Characterization of Complex Mixtures of Pollutants from the Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Annika; Witt, Gesine; Schäfer, Sabine; Haase, Nora; Escher, Beate I

    The combination of polymer-based passive sampling to collect complex environmental mixtures of pollutants, the transfer of these mixtures into bioassays, and their related toxicological characterization is still in its infancy. However, this approach has considerable potential to improve environmental hazard and risk assessment for two reasons. First, the passive sampler collects a broad range of chemicals representing the fraction of compounds available for diffusion and (bio)uptake, excluding a large part of the matrix; thus, extensive sample cleanup which could discriminate certain compounds can be avoided. Second, the toxicological characterization of samples using bioassays is complementary to chemical (target) analysis within environmental monitoring because it captures all chemicals exerting the same mode of toxic action and acting jointly in mixtures, thus providing a comprehensive picture of their overall combined effects. The scientific literature describes a range of examples from the water phase where passive sampling is usually carried out in the kinetic uptake regime for most chemicals although some may already have reached equilibrium. The composition of the chemical mixture changes from the water phase to the passive sampling material because of kinetic effects and polymer/water partition coefficients which depend on the chemicals' hydrophobicity. In contrast, only a few applications in sediment and biota have been described, but amongst these some pioneering studies have demonstrated the feasibility and potential of this combined approach. This chapter gives an overview of what has been carried out in this research area, focusing on opportunities and challenges, and points out desirable future developments with a focus on the importance of choosing a suitable combination of sampling and dosing to transfer (or re-establish) the environmental mixture into the bioassay.

  9. Hybrid heat pipe based passive cooling device for spent nuclear fuel dry storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Hybrid heat pipe was presented as a passive cooling device for dry storage cask of SNF. • A method to utilize waste heat from spent fuel was suggested using hybrid heat pipe. • CFD analysis was performed to evaluate the thermal performance of hybrid heat pipe. • Hybrid heat pipe can increase safety margin and storage capacity of the dry storage cask. - Abstract: Conventional dry storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) were designed to remove decay heat through the natural convection of air, but this method has limited cooling capacity and a possible re-criticality accident in case of flooding. To enhance the safety and capacity of dry storage cask of SNF, hybrid heat pipe-based passive cooling device was suggested. Heat pipe is an excellent passive heat transfer device using the principles of both conduction and phase change of the working fluid. The heat pipe containing neutron absorber material, the so-called hybrid heat pipe, is expected to prevent the re-criticality accidents of SNF and to increase the safety margin during interim and long term storage period. Moreover, a hybrid heat pipe with thermoelectric module, a Stirling engine and a phase change material tank can be used for utilization of the waste heat as heat-transfer medium. Located at the guide tube or instrumentation tube, hybrid heat pipe can remove decay heat from inside the sealed metal cask to outside, decreasing fuel rod temperature. In this paper, a 2-step analysis was performed using computational fluid dynamics code to evaluate the heat and fluid flow inside a cask, which consisted of a single spent fuel assembly simulation and a full-scope dry cask simulation. For a normal dry storage cask, the maximum fuel temperature is 290.0 °C. With hybrid heat pipe cooling, the temperature decreased to 261.6 °C with application of one hybrid heat pipe per assembly, and to 195.1 °C with the application of five hybrid heat pipes per assembly. Therefore, a dry

  10. The development of differential inductors using double air-bridge structure based on integrated passive device technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Yao, Zhao; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Li, Zhi-Ming; Shan, Fu-Kai; Wang, Cong

    2017-05-01

    Recently, integrated passive devices have become increasingly popular; inductor realization, in particular, offers interesting high performance for RF modules and systems. In this paper, a development of differential inductor fabricated by integrated passive devices technology using a double air-bridge structure is presented. A study of the model development of the differential inductor is first demonstrated. In this model section, a segment box analysis method is applied to provide a clear presentation of the differential inductor. Compared with other work that only shows a brief description of the process, the integrated passive devices process used to fabricate the inductor in this study is elaborated on. Finally, a characterization of differential inductors with different physical layout parameters is illustrated based on inductance and quality factors, which provides a valuable reference for realizing high performance. The proposed work provides a good solution for the design, fabrication and practical application of RF modules and systems.

  11. Evaluation of passive sampling of gaseous mercury using different sorbing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiming; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Chunyan; Tong, Yingdong; Zhang, Qianggong; Wang, Xuejun

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric mercury monitoring is essential because of its potential human health and ecological impacts. Current automated monitoring systems include limitations such as high cost, complicated configuration, and electricity requirements. Passive samplers require no electric power and are more appropriate for screening applications and long-term monitoring. Sampling rate is a major factor to evaluate the performance of a passive sampler. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out using an exposure chamber to search for high efficiency sorbents for gaseous mercury. Four types of sorbents, including sulfur-impregnated carbon (SIC), chlorine-impregnated carbon (CIC), bromine-impregnated carbon (BIC), and gold-coated sand (GCS) were evaluated under a wide range of meteorological parameters, including temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. The results showed that the four sorbents all have a high sampling rate above 0.01 m 3 g -1  day -1 , and wind speed has a positive correlation with the sampling rate. Under different temperature and relative humidity, the sampling rate of SIC keeps stable. The sampling rate of CIC and BIC shows a negative correlation with temperature, and GCS is influenced by all the three meteorological factors. Furthermore, long-term experiments were carried out to investigate the uptake capacity of GCS and SIC. Uptake curves show that the mass amount of sorbent in a passive sampler can influence uptake capacity. In the passive sampler, 0.9 g SIC or 0.9 g GCS can achieve stable uptake efficiency for at least 110 days with gaseous mercury concentration at or below 2 ng/m 3 . For mercury concentration at or below 21 ng/m 3 , 0.9 g SIC can maintain stable uptake efficiency for 70 days, and 0.9 g GCS can maintain stability for 45 days.

  12. Comparison of marine sampling methods for organic contaminants: Passive samplers, water extractions, and live oyster deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, Kristin B; Vlahos, Penny; Whitney, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory and field trials evaluated the efficacy of three methods of detecting aquatic pesticide concentrations. Currently used pesticides: atrazine, metolachlor, and diazinon and legacy pesticide dieldrin were targeted. Pesticides were extracted using solid-phase extraction (SPE) of water samples, titanium plate passive samplers coated in ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea viginica) as biosamplers. A laboratory study assessed the extraction efficiencies and precision of each method. Passive samplers yielded the highest precision of the three methods (RSD: 3-14% EVA plates; 19-60% oysters; and 25-56% water samples). Equilibrium partition coefficients were derived. A significant relationship was found between the concentration in oyster tissue and the ambient aquatic concentration. In the field (Housatonic River, CT (U.S.)) water sampling (n = 5) detected atrazine at 1.61-7.31 μg L(-1), oyster sampling (n = 2×15) detected dieldrin at n.d.-0.096 μg L(-1) SW and the passive samplers (n = 5×3) detected atrazine at 0.97-3.78 μg L(-1) SW and dieldrin at n.d.-0.68 μg L(-1) SW. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Chen, Xiao

    2018-03-01

    Based on the orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation, we present a novel passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) scheme with the two-mode source. Combining with the tight bounds of the yield and error rate of single-photon pairs given in our paper, we conduct performance analysis on the scheme with heralded single-photon source. The numerical simulations show that the performance of our scheme is significantly superior to the traditional MDI-QKD in the error rate, key generation rate and secure transmission distance, since the application of orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation can exclude the basis-dependent flaw and increase the information content for each single photon. Moreover, the performance is improved with the rise of the frame length. Therefore, our scheme, without intensity modulation, avoids the source side channels and enhances the key generation rate. It has greatly utility value in the MDI-QKD setups.

  14. Conceptualization of an exoskeleton Continuous Passive Motion(CPM) device using a link structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Jung; Kang, Min-Sung; Choi, Youn-Sung; Han, Jungsoo; Han, Changsoo

    2011-01-01

    This study is about developing an exoskeleton Continuous Passive Motion (CPM) with the same Range of Motion (ROM) and instant center of rotation as the human knee. The key feature in constructing a CPM is an accurate alignment with the human knee joint enabling it to deliver the same movements as the actual body on the CPM. In this research, we proposed an exoskeleton knee joint through kinematic interpretation, measured the knee joint torque generated while using a CPM and applied it to the device. Thus, this new exoskeleton type CPM will allow precise alignment with the human knee joint, and follow the same ROM as the human knee in any position. © 2011 IEEE

  15. Develop of omni-tritium sample preparation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Junhua; Zheng Min; Zhang Dong

    2008-06-01

    The content of total tritium analysis is required in order to know the tritium contaminated degree of biological samples accurately. But the conversion and collection of organic tritium are difficult. A device to treat total tritium samples was developed. Plant samples were treated by combustion and catalysis. After expelling the free HTO in the samples when heated in abundant oxygen, the samples were ignited. Combustion gas passed the catalysts at 800 degree C and its oxidation was catalyzed, and then the combined tritium in tissues was converted into HTO. HTO was collected by water-cooling tube and condenser. For other samples, HTO was treated and collected by high temperature (The highest temperature is 1000 degree C)-catalysis-double condensation method. This device had solved the problem that organic tritium is difficult to gather. (authors)

  16. Device for sampling radioactive and aggressive liquid and vaporous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przibram, E.; Halm, G.

    1974-01-01

    The equipment enables the taking of samples even of radioactive media from a main pipeline in the through-flow in a closed system. A tap device is attached to the main pipeline which branches into two parts. The one branch contains the actual tap which is closed to both sides with snap closure coupling. It is only used for taking samples. The other branch bridges the tap position as a bypass so that a representative sample is always available. Both branches join up again and lead back to the main pipeline. The sampling can be used in a nuclear power plant for the determination of O 2 , CI, SiO 2 , and Cu. A millilitre collecting cylinder and a millipore filtration device can be connected to the tap for liquid sampling and solid analysis, respectively. The system can be extended to several tap positions. Permanent measuring equipment is attached to the bypass pipe to control the sample liquid. (DG) [de

  17. Calibration and Application of Passive Sampling in Drinking Water for Perfluoroalkyl Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are global environmental contaminants and a need for monitoring levels has arisen due to their persistency and their ability to bioaccumulate. One relatively novel method of monitoring for both long and short time intervals and generating time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations is passive sampling for which no power, maintenance and supervision is required. The polar organic compound integrative sampler (POCIS) with a weak anion exchange (WAX) sorbent and ...

  18. High-resolution passive sampling of dissolved methane in the water column of lakes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A. E.; Cadieux, S. B.; White, J. R.; Pratt, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lakes are important participants in the global carbon cycle, releasing methane in a warming climate and contributing to a positive feedback to climate change. In order to yield detailed methane budgets and understand the implications of warming on methane dynamics, high-resolution profiles revealing methane behavior within the water column need to be obtained. Single day sampling using disruptive techniques has the potential to result in biases. In order to obtain high-resolution, undisturbed profiles of methane concentration and isotopic composition, this study evaluates a passive sampling method over a multi-day equilibration period. Selected for this study were two small lakes (Gatos Research Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer. PDB sampling and pump sampling resulted in statistically similar concentrations (R2=0.89), ranging from 0.85 to 135 uM from PDB and 0.74 to 143 uM from pump sampling. In anoxic waters of the lake, where concentrations were high enough to yield robust isotopic results on the LGR MCIA, δ13C were also similar between the two methods, yielding -73‰ from PDB and -74‰ from pump sampling. Further investigation will produce results for a second lake and methane carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition for both lakes. Preliminary results for this passive sampling method are promising. We envision the use of this technique in future studies of dissolved methane and expect that it will provide a more finely resolved vertical profile, allowing for a more complete understanding of lacustrine methane dynamics.

  19. FISHprep: A Novel Integrated Device for Metaphase FISH Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel integrated device for preparing metaphase chromosomes spread slides (FISHprep). The quality of cytogenetic analysis from patient samples greatly relies on the efficiency of sample pre-treatment and/or slide preparation. In cytogenetic slide preparation, cell cultures...... are routinely used to process samples (for culture, arrest and fixation of cells) and/or to expand limited amount of samples (in case of prenatal diagnostics). Arguably, this expansion and other sample pretreatments form the longest part of the entire diagnostic protocols spanning over 3–4 days. We present here...... with minimal handling for metaphase FISH slide preparation....

  20. Specific characteristics of radon passive/open model detectors compared to passive/close and charcoal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andru, J.

    1990-01-01

    All passive/open detectors, also called Unfiltered alpha Track Detectors (UTDs), are built around KODAK LR115 film, only material sensitive to all ambient alpha particles and capable to work in open mode. The principle of open detectors is not new. They are largely used worldwide, often by scientists (in France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Sweden etc.). However, their particular functioning needs some explanation and some reminders. This paper is more aimed to discuss generalities than details of calculation. The estimation of the Potential Alpha Energy (PAE) concentration is about 4 times better than that from other passive detectors and it includes thoron progeny. The film is more sensitive to ambient decay products than it is to Radon as track count is higher for alpha's of greater initial energy

  1. Microfabricated Devices for Sample Extraction, Concentrations, and Related Sample Processing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-12-01

    This is an invited book chapter. As with other analytical techniques, sample pretreatments, sample extraction, sample introduction, and related techniques are of extreme importance for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Bio-MEMS devices and systems start with a sampling step. The biological sample then usually undergoes some kinds of sample preparation steps before the actual analysis. These steps may involve extracting the target sample from its matrix, removing interferences from the sample, derivatizing the sample to detectable species, or performing a sample preconcentration step. The integration of the components for sample pretreatment into microfluidic devices represents one of the remaining the bottle-neck towards achieving true miniaturized total analysis systems (?TAS). This chapter provides a thorough state-of-art of the developments in this field to date.

  2. The use of segregated heat sink structures to achieve enhanced passive cooling for outdoor wireless devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Flaherty, K; Punch, J

    2014-01-01

    Environmental standards which govern outdoor wireless equipment can stipulate stringent conditions: high solar loads (up to 1 kW/m 2 ), ambient temperatures as high as 55°C and negligible wind speeds (0 m/s). These challenges result in restrictions on power dissipation within a given envelope, due to the limited heat transfer rates achievable with passive cooling. This paper addresses an outdoor wireless device which features two segregated heat sink structures arranged vertically within a shielded chimney structure: a primary sink to cool temperature-sensitive components; and a secondary sink for high power devices. Enhanced convective cooling of the primary sink is achieved due to the increased mass flow within the chimney generated by the secondary sink. An unshielded heat sink was examined numerically, theoretically and experimentally, to verify the applicability of the methods employed. Nusselt numbers were compared for three cases: an unshielded heat sink; a sink located at the inlet of a shield; and a primary heat sink in a segregated structure. The heat sink, when placed at the inlet of a shield three times the length of the sink, augmented the Nusselt number by an average of 64% compared to the unshielded case. The Nusselt number of the primary was found to increase proportionally with the temperature of the secondary sink, and the optimum vertical spacing between the primary and secondary sinks was found to be close to zero, provided that conductive transfer between the sinks was suppressed.

  3. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coes, Alissa L; Paretti, Nicholas V; Foreman, William T; Iverson, Jana L; Alvarez, David A

    2014-03-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19-23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coes, Alissa L.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Foreman, William T.; Iverson, Jana L.; Alvarez, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19–23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  5. Passive sampling and analyses of common dissolved fixed gases in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, Brian Patrick; Watson, David B.

    2008-01-01

    An in situ passive sampler and gas chromatographic protocol for analysis of the major and several minor fixed gases in groundwater was developed. A gas-tight syringe, mated to a short length of silicone tubing, was equilibrated with dissolved gases in groundwater by immersing in monitoring wells and was used to transport and to inject a 0.5 mL gas sample into a gas chromatograph. Using Ar carrier gas, a HaySep DB porous polymer phase, and sequential thermal conductivity and reductive gas detectors allowed good sensitivity for He, Ne, H2, N2, O2, CO, CH4, CO2, and N2O. Within 4 days of immersion in groundwater, samplers initially filled with either He or air attained the same and constant gas composition at an Oak Ridge, Tennessee, site heavily impacted by uranium, acidity, and nitrate. Between June 2006 and July 2007, 12 permanent groundwater wells were used to test the passive samplers in groundwater contaminated by a group of four closed radioactive wastewater seepage ponds; over a thousand passive gas samples from these wells averaged 56% CO2, 32.4% N2, 2.5% O2, 2.5% N2O, 0.20% CH4, 0.096% H2, and 0.023% CO with an average recovery of 95 14% of the injected gas volume

  6. Water sampling device for fuel rod failure monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oogami, Hideaki; Echigoya, Hironori; Matsuoka, Tesshi.

    1991-01-01

    The device of the present invention accurately samples coolants in a channel box as sampling water even if the upper end of the channel box of a fuel assembly is positioned at the same height or lower than the upper end of an upper lattice plate. An existent device comprises an outer cap, an inner cap, an air supply pipe and a water sampling tube. In addition, the device of the present invention comprises a sealing material disposed at the end of the outer cap for keeping liquid sealing with the upper lattice plate and a water level monitoring pipe extended to lower than the inner cap passing through the liquid sealing of the outer cap for sucking the atmosphere in the outer cap. Pressurized air is sent through the air supply pipe, to lower the water level of the coolants in the outer cap and the water level monitoring pipe sucks the pressurized air, by which the inside and the outside of the channel box are partitioned. Subsequently, if the sample water is sampled by a sampling tube, sampling water which enables accurate evaluation for radioactivity concentration in the fuel assembly can be obtained. (I.S.)

  7. Paper Capillary Enables Effective Sampling for Microfluidic Paper Analytical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Jin-Wen; Liu, Yu; Wang, Sha; Hou, Yun-Xuan; Xu, Bi-Yi; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2018-06-06

    Paper capillary is introduced to enable effective sampling on microfluidic paper analytical devices. By coupling mac-roscale capillary force of paper capillary and microscale capillary forces of native paper, fluid transport can be flexibly tailored with proper design. Subsequently, a hybrid-fluid-mode paper capillary device was proposed, which enables fast and reliable sampling in an arrayed form, with less surface adsorption and bias for different components. The resulting device thus well supports high throughput, quantitative, and repeatable assays all by hands operation. With all these merits, multiplex analysis of ions, proteins, and microbe have all been realized on this platform, which has paved the way to level-up analysis on μPADs.

  8. Efficacy of passive hair-traps for the genetic sampling of a low-density badger population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Balestrieri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available

    A hair-trapping survey was carried out in the western River Po plain (NW Italy. We aimed to test whether barbed wire hair snares in combination with DNA profiling might represent an effective tool to study a low-density badger population. Traps were placed above the entrances of twelve badger setts between 15 February and 30 April 2010. Trapping effort was expressed as the number of trap-nights required to pluck a hair sample and the trend in the number of genotyped individual over time was analysed by regression analysis. Forty-three hair samples were collected, with an overall trapping effort of 54.8 trap-nights per one hair sample. Twenty-eight samples yielded reliable genotypes, allowing the identification of nine individual badgers. The length of storage period (1-3 months before DNA extraction did not seem to affect genotyping success. According to the regression model, trapping effort allowed to sample 75% of the overall population. Our results suggest that the efficacy of passive devices is affected by population density.

  9. 78 FR 27442 - Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices; Correction AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: On April 30, 2013, Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published a notice in the Federal Register...

  10. Perfluoroalkyl substances in aquatic environment-comparison of fish and passive sampling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveny, Daniel; Grabic, Roman; Fedorova, Ganna; Grabicova, Katerina; Turek, Jan; Kodes, Vit; Golovko, Oksana; Zlabek, Vladimir; Randak, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of seven perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were investigated in 36 European chub (Squalius cephalus) individuals from six localities in the Czech Republic. Chub muscle and liver tissue were analysed at all sampling sites. In addition, analyses of 16 target PFASs were performed in Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCISs) deployed in the water at the same sampling sites. We evaluated the possibility of using passive samplers as a standardized method for monitoring PFAS contamination in aquatic environments and the mutual relationships between determined concentrations. Only perfluorooctane sulphonate was above the LOQ in fish muscle samples and 52% of the analysed fish individuals exceeded the Environmental Quality Standard for water biota. Fish muscle concentration is also particularly important for risk assessment of fish consumers. The comparison of fish tissue results with published data showed the similarity of the Czech results with those found in Germany and France. However, fish liver analysis and the passive sampling approach resulted in different fish exposure scenarios. The total concentration of PFASs in fish liver tissue was strongly correlated with POCIS data, but pollutant patterns differed between these two matrices. The differences could be attributed to the metabolic activity of the living organism. In addition to providing a different view regarding the real PFAS cocktail to which the fish are exposed, POCISs fulfil the Three Rs strategy (replacement, reduction, and refinement) in animal testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential Use of Passive Sampling for Environmental Monitoring of Petroleum E&P Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional environmental monitoring relies on water or soil samples being taken at various time increments and sent to offsite laboratories for analysis. Reliance on grab samples generally captures limited “snapshots” of environmental contaminant concentrations, is time intensive, costly, and generates residual waste from excess sample and/or reagents used in the analysis procedures. As an alternative, we are evaluating swellable organosilica sorbents to create passive sampling systems for monitoring applications. Previous work has focused on absorption and detection of fuels, chlorinated solvents, endocrine disruptors, explosives, pesticides, fluorinated chemicals, and metals including Ba, Sr, Hg, Pb, Fe, Cu, and Zn. The advantages of swellable organosilica are that the material cancapture target compounds for an extended periods of time, does not absorb natural organic matter, and resists biofilm formation since the sorbent possesses an animated surface morphology.

  12. Computer processing of image captured by the passive THz imaging device as an effective tool for its de-noising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Kuchik, Igor E.; Zhang, Cun-lin; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    As it is well-known, passive THz imaging devices have big potential for solution of the security problem. Nevertheless, one of the main problems, which take place on the way of using these devices, consists in the low image quality of developed passive THz camera. To change this situation, it is necessary to improve the engineering characteristics (resolution, sensitivity and so on) of the THz camera or to use computer processing of the image. In our opinion, the last issue is more preferable because it is more inexpensive. Below we illustrate possibility of suppression of the noise of the image captured by three THz passive camera developed in CNU (Beijing. China). After applying the computer processing of the image, its quality enhances many times. Achieved quality in many cases becomes enough for the detection of the object hidden under opaque clothes. We stress that the performance of developed computer code is enough high and does not restrict the performance of passive THz imaging device. The obtained results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem. Nevertheless, developing the new spatial filter for treatment of the THz image remains a modern problem at present time.

  13. Comparison of POCIS passive samplers vs. composite water sampling: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Dumoulin, David; Howsam, Michael; Mondamert, Leslie; Goossens, Jean-François; Prygiel, Jean; Billon, Gabriel

    2017-12-31

    The relevance of Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) was evaluated for the assessment of concentrations of 46 pesticides and 19 pharmaceuticals in a small, peri-urban river with multi-origin inputs. Throughout the period of POCIS deployment, 24h-average water samples were collected automatically, and showed the rapid temporal evolution of concentrations of several micropollutants, as well as permitting the calculation of average concentrations in the water phase for comparison with those estimated from POCIS passive samplers. In the daily water samples, cyproconazol, epoxyconazol and imidacloprid showed high temporal variations with concentrations ranging from under the limit of detection up to several hundreds of ngL -1 . Erythromycin, cyprofloxacin and iopromide also increased rapidly up to tens of ngL -1 within a few days. Conversely, atrazine, caffeine, diclofenac, and to a lesser extent carbamazepine and sucralose, were systematically present in the water samples and showed limited variation in concentrations. For most of the substances studied here, the passive samplers gave reliable average concentrations between the minimal and maximal daily concentrations during the time of deployment. For pesticides, a relatively good correlation was clearly established (R 2 =0.89) between the concentrations obtained by POCIS and those gained from average water samples. A slight underestimation of the concentration by POCIS can be attributed to inappropriate sampling rates extracted from the literature and for our system, and new values are proposed. Considering the all data set, 75% of the results indicate a relatively good agreement between the POCIS and the average water samples concentration (values of the ratio ranging between 0,33 and 3). Note further that this agreement between these concentrations remains valid considering different sampling rates extracted from the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of dissolved organic matter on pre-equilibrium passive sampling: A predictive QSAR modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Jiang, Ruifen; Shen, Yong; Xiong, Yaxin; Hu, Sizi; Xu, Jianqiao; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2018-04-13

    Pre-equilibrium passive sampling is a simple and promising technique for studying sampling kinetics, which is crucial to determine the distribution, transfer and fate of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in environmental water and organisms. Environmental water samples contain complex matrices that complicate the traditional calibration process for obtaining the accurate rate constants. This study proposed a QSAR model to predict the sampling rate constants of HOCs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides) in aqueous systems containing complex matrices. A homemade flow-through system was established to simulate an actual aqueous environment containing dissolved organic matter (DOM) i.e. humic acid (HA) and (2-Hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin (β-HPCD)), and to obtain the experimental rate constants. Then, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model using Genetic Algorithm-Multiple Linear Regression (GA-MLR) was found to correlate the experimental rate constants to the system state including physicochemical parameters of the HOCs and DOM which were calculated and selected as descriptors by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Chem 3D. The experimental results showed that the rate constants significantly increased as the concentration of DOM increased, and the enhancement factors of 70-fold and 34-fold were observed for the HOCs in HA and β-HPCD, respectively. The established QSAR model was validated as credible (R Adj. 2 =0.862) and predictable (Q 2 =0.835) in estimating the rate constants of HOCs for complex aqueous sampling, and a probable mechanism was developed by comparison to the reported theoretical study. The present study established a QSAR model of passive sampling rate constants and calibrated the effect of DOM on the sampling kinetics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Does equilibrium passive sampling reflect actual in situ bioaccumulation of PAHs and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures in aquatic worms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijs, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194995526; Jonker, M.T.O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/175518793

    2012-01-01

    Over the past couple of years, several analytical methods have been developed for assessing the bioavailability of environmental contaminants in sediments and soils. Comparison studies suggest that equilibrium passive sampling methods generally provide the better estimates of internal concentrations

  16. Sampling of BTX in Hat Yai city using cost effective laboratory-built PCB passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba, Jas Raj; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2016-08-23

    A laboratory-built printed circuit board (PCB) passive sampler used for the monitoring of xylene and styrene in copy print shops was re-validated for detecting benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) and applied for the sampling of ambient air from Hat Yai city, Songkhla, Thailand, in the month of November 2014. For monitoring, the PCB passive samplers were exposed to target analytes in 16 locations covering high to low exposure areas. After sampling, the samplers were thermally desorbed and the analytes were trapped by multi-walled carbon nanotubes packed into a micro-preconcentrator coupled to a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a flame ionization detector. At the optimum GC operating conditions, the linear dynamic ranges for BTX were 0.06-5.6 µg for benzene, 0.07-2.2 µg for toluene and 0.23-2.5 µg for xylene with R(2) > 0.99 with the limits of detection being 6.6, 6.8 and 19 ng for benzene, toluene and xylene, respectively. The concentrations of BTX in the 16 sampling sites were in the range of N.D.-1.3 ± 1.6, 4.50 ± 0.76-49.6 ± 3.7 and 1.00 ± 0.21-39.6 ± 3.1 µg m(-3), respectively. When compared to past studies, there had been an increase in the benzene concentration.

  17. Rapid, Sensitive, and Reusable Detection of Glucose by a Robust Radiofrequency Integrated Passive Device Biosensor Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Young; Adhikari, Kishor Kumar; Dhakal, Rajendra; Chuluunbaatar, Zorigt; Wang, Cong; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous demands for sensitive and reliable label-free biosensors have stimulated intensive research into developing miniaturized radiofrequency resonators for a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a robust, reusable radiofrequency resonator based integrated passive device biosensor chip fabricated on a gallium arsenide substrate for the detection of glucose in water-glucose solutions and sera. As a result of the highly concentrated electromagnetic energy between the two divisions of an intertwined spiral inductor coupled with an interdigital capacitor, the proposed glucose biosensor chip exhibits linear detection ranges with high sensitivity at center frequency. This biosensor, which has a sensitivity of up to 199 MHz/mgmL−1 and a short response time of less than 2 sec, exhibited an ultralow detection limit of 0.033 μM and a reproducibility of 0.61% relative standard deviation. In addition, the quantities derived from the measured S-parameters, such as the propagation constant (γ), impedance (Z), resistance (R), inductance (L), conductance (G) and capacitance (C), enabled the effective multi-dimensional detection of glucose. PMID:25588958

  18. Thin film-based optically variable security devices: From passive to active

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloukas, Bill

    Counterfeiting costs the world economy billions of dollars every year. Aside from financial losses, counterfeiting also poses a great threat to the public's safety, for example through the existence of counterfeit passports (terrorism), pharmaceutical products (health hazards) and even airplane parts (safety issues). Optical security devices (OSDs) have therefore played a critical role in the fight against counterfeiting. It is the aim of the present thesis to show that through the use of metamerism and electrochromic materials, new types of active security devices with interesting features can be created; indeed, most present-day devices are passive in nature. I first demonstrate that the addition of metamerism in the design of interference filters can result in innovative features. Different structures which can be used in transmission and/or in reflection are designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The first structures which are presented here are based on a combination of two different metameric interference filters. Possessing widely different transmission spectra, these filters also offer different angular color shifts and, as a result, offer an opportunity of creating hidden image effects. Despite their interesting properties, such metameric devices are shown to be highly illuminant and observer sensitive; that is the color match is lost under most observation conditions. These issues are solved by a simpler structure based on the juxtaposition of an interference filter and a non-iridescent colored material. Throughout this study, I present the design approach, analyze the filters' sensitivity to deposition errors, and evaluate the performance of prototype devices prepared by dual ion beam sputtering. Following my work on passive metameric systems, I then propose to go one step further by implementing an active component using an electrochromic material. This novel concept, which is based on the joint use of a metameric filter and electrochromic device, offers

  19. Introduction to Maxxam All-Season Passive Sampling System and Principles of Proper Use of Passive Samplers in the Field Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmao Tang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxxam all-season passive sampling system (PASS is introduced in this paper. The PASS can be used to quantitatively and accurately monitor SO2 , NO2, O 3, and H2 S in air in all weather conditions with flexible exposure times from several hours to several months. The air pollution detection limits of PASS are very low. They can be from sub ppb to ppt levels. The principles of proper use of passive samplers in the field study are discussed by using the PASS as an example.

  20. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless hydrogen leak...

  1. Comparison of passive sampling and biota for monitoring of tonalide in aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumova, Jitka; Grabicova, Katerina; Golovko, Oksana; Koba, Olga; Kodes, Vit; Fedorova, Ganna; Grabic, Roman; Kroupova, Hana Kocour

    2017-10-01

    Synthetic musk compounds are extensively used in personal care and cosmetic products all over the world. Afterwards, they are discharged into the environment mainly because they are not completely removed in wastewater treatment plants. The aim of this study was to investigate if a passive sampler is applicable for the monitoring of tonalide, a polycyclic musk compound, in the aquatic environment and to compare the levels of tonalide in pesticide-polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and biota. For this purpose, four sampling localities on the three biggest rivers in the Czech Republic were selected. Tonalide was determined in POCIS at all sampling sites in the concentration ranging from 9 ng/POCIS (Labe River, Hradec Králové) to 25 ng/POCIS (Morava River, Blatec). The locality with the most frequent occurrence of tonalide in biota samples was the Morava River which well corresponded with the highest tonalide concentration in POCIS among sampling sites. The highest number of positive tonalide detections among all studied biota samples was found in fish plasma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence that tonalide bioaccumulates in fish blood. Tonalide levels were below the limit of quantification in benthos samples at all sampling sites.

  2. A core handling device for the Mars Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Owen

    1989-01-01

    A core handling device for use on Mars is being designed. To provide a context for the design study, it was assumed that a Mars Rover/Sample Return (MRSR) Mission would have the following characteristics: a year or more in length; visits by the rover to 50 or more sites; 100 or more meter-long cores being drilled by the rover; and the capability of returning about 5 kg of Mars regolith to Earth. These characteristics lead to the belief that in order to bring back a variegated set of samples that can address the range of scientific objetives for a MRSR mission to Mars there needs to be considerable analysis done on board the rover. Furthermore, the discrepancy between the amount of sample gathered and the amount to be returned suggests that there needs to be some method of choosing the optimal set of samples. This type of analysis will require pristine material-unaltered by the drilling process. Since the core drill thermally and mechanically alters the outer diameter (about 10 pct) of the core sample, this outer area cannot be used. The primary function of the core handling device is to extract subsamples from the core and to position these subsamples, and the core itself if needed, with respect to the various analytical instruments that can be used to perform these analyses.

  3. Improving the UNC Passive Aerosol Sampler Model Based on Comparison with Commonly Used Aerosol Sampling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirdel, Mariam; Andersson, Britt M; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Sommar, Johan N; Wingfors, Håkan; Liljelind, Ingrid E

    2018-03-12

    In an occupational environment, passive sampling could be an alternative to active sampling with pumps for sampling of dust. One passive sampler is the University of North Carolina passive aerosol sampler (UNC sampler). It is often analysed by microscopic imaging. Promising results have been shown for particles above 2.5 µm, but indicate large underestimations for PM2.5. The aim of this study was to evaluate, and possibly improve, the UNC sampler for stationary sampling in a working environment. Sampling was carried out at 8-h intervals during 24 h in four locations in an open pit mine with UNC samplers, respirable cyclones, PM10 and PM2.5 impactors, and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). The wind was minimal. For quantification, two modifications of the UNC sampler analysis model, UNC sampler with hybrid model and UNC sampler with area factor, were compared with the original one, UNC sampler with mesh factor derived from wind tunnel experiments. The effect of increased resolution for the microscopic imaging was examined. Use of the area factor and a higher resolution eliminated the underestimation for PM10 and PM2.5. The model with area factor had the overall lowest deviation versus the impactor and the cyclone. The intraclass correlation (ICC) showed that the UNC sampler had a higher precision and better ability to distinguish between different exposure levels compared to the cyclone (ICC: 0.51 versus 0.24), but lower precision compared to the impactor (PM10: 0.79 versus 0.99; PM2.5: 0.30 versus 0.45). The particle size distributions as calculated from the different UNC sampler analysis models were visually compared with the distributions determined by APS. The distributions were obviously different when the UNC sampler with mesh factor was used but came to a reasonable agreement when the area factor was used. High resolution combined with a factor based on area only, results in no underestimation of small particles compared to impactors and cyclones and a

  4. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apley, Walter J.; Cliff, William C.; Creer, James M.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  5. Strategies for monitoring the emerging polar organic contaminants in water with emphasis on integrative passive sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Hanna; Lindberg, Richard H; Fick, Jerker

    2009-01-16

    Although polar organic contaminants (POCs) such as pharmaceuticals are considered as some of today's most emerging contaminants few of them are regulated or included in on-going monitoring programs. However, the growing concern among the public and researchers together with the new legislature within the European Union, the registration, evaluation and authorisation of chemicals (REACH) system will increase the future need of simple, low cost strategies for monitoring and risk assessment of POCs in aquatic environments. In this article, we overview the advantages and shortcomings of traditional and novel sampling techniques available for monitoring the emerging POCs in water. The benefits and drawbacks of using active and biological sampling were discussed and the principles of organic passive samplers (PS) presented. A detailed overview of type of polar organic PS available, and their classes of target compounds and field of applications were given, and the considerations involved in using them such as environmental effects and quality control were discussed. The usefulness of biological sampling of POCs in water was found to be limited. Polar organic PS was considered to be the only available, but nevertheless, an efficient alternative to active water sampling due to its simplicity, low cost, no need of power supply or maintenance, and the ability of collecting time-integrative samples with one sample collection. However, the polar organic PS need to be further developed before they can be used as standard in water quality monitoring programs.

  6. Assessment of PDMS-water partition coefficients: implications for passive environmental sampling of hydrophobic organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFilippo, Erica L.; Eganhouse, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive-sampling technique in aquatic environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partition coefficient between the fiber coating and water (Kf). For some hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), Kf values spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and water. However, 24% of the published data examined in this review did not pass the criterion for negligible depletion, resulting in questionable Kf values. The range in reported Kf is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these questionable values are removed. Other factors that could account for the range in reported Kf, such as fiber-coating thickness and fiber manufacturer, were evaluated and found to be insignificant. In addition to accurate measurement of Kf, an understanding of the impact of environmental variables, such as temperature and ionic strength, on partitioning is essential for application of laboratory-measured Kf values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured Kf for HOCs at conditions other than at 20 degrees or 25 degrees C in distilled water. The available data indicate measurable variations in Kf at different temperatures and different ionic strengths. Therefore, if the appropriate environmental variables are not taken into account, significant error will be introduced into calculated aqueous concentrations using this passive sampling technique. A multiparameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate log Kf in distilled water at 25 degrees C based on published physicochemical parameters. This method provided a good correlation (R2 = 0.94) between measured and predicted log Kf values for several compound classes. Thus, an LSER approach may offer a reliable means of predicting log Kf for HOCs whose experimental log Kf values are presently unavailable. Future

  7. Sample taking device for toxic and/or radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterwalder, L.; Zeh, H.; Schaarschmidt, U.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for taking samples of toxic and/or radioactive liquid substances by introducing such substances into sample vessels includes a holder for holding such a vessel, at least one needle head filling system composed of upwardly pointing hollow needles for introducing a sample of one such substance into such a vessel at a filling position, and inlet and outlet conduits for pneumatically conveying vessels to or from the holder at a transfer position. The holder is composed of a turntable having a sleeve for accommodating such vessel and is mounted to undergo rotary movement to convey a sample vessel held in the sleeve between the filling and transfer positions. The apparatus further includes a stand supporting the filling system below the holder and a lifting device connected for imparting a translational movement to the holder to bring a vessel in the holder to operative association with the filling system. The lifting device is arranged so that the translational movement which it produces is independent of the rotary movement of the turntable

  8. Evaluation of a Low-Cost Volatile Organic Compound Passive Sampling Method and Laboratory Intercomparison

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This project “fenceline Passive Sampler and Sensor Studies” contains information on several related field efforts that examine use of passive sorbent tubes and...

  9. Uncertainties in monitoring of SVOCs in air caused by within-sampler degradation during active and passive air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Prokeš, Roman; Kukučka, Petr; Přibylová, Petra; Vojta, Šimon; Kohoutek, Jiří; Lammel, Gerhard; Klánová, Jana

    2017-10-01

    Degradation of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) occurs naturally in ambient air due to reactions with reactive trace gases (e.g., ozone, NOx). During air sampling there is also the possibility for degradation of SVOCs within the air sampler, leading to underestimates of ambient air concentrations. We investigated the possibility of this sampling artifact in commonly used active and passive air samplers for seven classes of SVOCs, including persistent organic pollutants (POPs) typically covered by air monitoring programs, as well as SVOCs of emerging concern. Two active air samplers were used, one equipped with an ozone denuder and one without, to compare relative differences in mass of collected compounds. Two sets of passive samplers were also deployed to determine the influence of degradation during longer deployment times in passive sampling. In active air samplers, comparison of the two sampling configurations suggested degradation of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with concentrations up to 2× higher in the denuder-equipped sampler, while halogenated POPs did not have clear evidence of degradation. In contrast, more polar, reactive compounds (e.g., organophosphate esters and current use pesticides) had evidence of losses in the sampler with denuder. This may be caused by the denuder itself, suggesting sampling bias for these compounds can be created when typical air sampling apparatuses are adapted to limit degradation. Passive air samplers recorded up to 4× higher concentrations when deployed for shorter consecutive sampling periods, suggesting that within-sampler degradation may also be relevant in passive air monitoring programs.

  10. An optimized Line Sampling method for the estimation of the failure probability of nuclear passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, E.; Pedroni, N.

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative reliability assessment of a thermal-hydraulic (T-H) passive safety system of a nuclear power plant can be obtained by (i) Monte Carlo (MC) sampling the uncertainties of the system model and parameters, (ii) computing, for each sample, the system response by a mechanistic T-H code and (iii) comparing the system response with pre-established safety thresholds, which define the success or failure of the safety function. The computational effort involved can be prohibitive because of the large number of (typically long) T-H code simulations that must be performed (one for each sample) for the statistical estimation of the probability of success or failure. In this work, Line Sampling (LS) is adopted for efficient MC sampling. In the LS method, an 'important direction' pointing towards the failure domain of interest is determined and a number of conditional one-dimensional problems are solved along such direction; this allows for a significant reduction of the variance of the failure probability estimator, with respect, for example, to standard random sampling. Two issues are still open with respect to LS: first, the method relies on the determination of the 'important direction', which requires additional runs of the T-H code; second, although the method has been shown to improve the computational efficiency by reducing the variance of the failure probability estimator, no evidence has been given yet that accurate and precise failure probability estimates can be obtained with a number of samples reduced to below a few hundreds, which may be required in case of long-running models. The work presented in this paper addresses the first issue by (i) quantitatively comparing the efficiency of the methods proposed in the literature to determine the LS important direction; (ii) employing artificial neural network (ANN) regression models as fast-running surrogates of the original, long-running T-H code to reduce the computational cost associated to the

  11. Tracking human footprints in Antarctica through passive sampling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in inland lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wang, Feng; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-06-01

    Freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in seven inland lakes of Antarctica by a polyethylene (PE)-based passive sampling technique, with the objective of tracking human footprints. The measured concentrations of PAHs were in the range of 14-360 ng L(-1) with the highest values concentrated around the Russian Progress II Station, indicating the significance of human activities to the loading of PAHs in Antarctica. The concentrations of PAHs in the inland lakes were in the upper part of the PAHs levels in aquatic environments from remote and background regions across the globe. The composition profiles of PAHs indicated that PAHs in the inland lakes were derived mainly from local oil spills, which was corroborated by a large number of fuel spillage reports from ship and plane crash incidents in Antarctica during recent years. Clearly, local human activities, rather than long-range transport, are the dominant sources of PAH contamination to the inland lakes. Finally, the present study demonstrates the efficacy of PE-based passive samplers for investigating PAHs in the aquatic environment of Antarctica under complex field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experience-Sampling Methodology with a Mobile Device in Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilla Diana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the usability studies conducted in the development of an experience-sampling methodology (ESM system running in a mobile device. The goal of the system is to improve the accuracy and ecology in gathering daily self-report data in individuals suffering a chronic pain condition, fibromyalgia. The usability studies showed that the developed software to conduct ESM with mobile devices (smartphones, cell phones can be successfully used by individuals with fibromyalgia of different ages and with low level of expertise in the use of information and communication technologies. 100% of users completed the tasks successfully, although some have completely illiterate. Also there seems to be a clear difference in the way of interaction obtained in the two studies carried out.

  13. A comparison of passive and active acoustic sampling for a bat community impacted by White-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    In the summers of 2011 and 2012, we compared passive and active acoustic sampling for bats at 31 sites at Fort Drum Military Installation, New York. We defined active sampling as acoustic sampling that occurred in 30-min intervals between the hours of sunset and 0200 with a user present to manipulate the directionality of the microphone. We defined passive sampling as acoustic sampling that occurred over a 12-h period (1900–0700 hours) without a user present and with the microphone set in a predetermined direction. We detected seven of the nine possible species at Fort Drum, including the federally endangered Indiana bat Myotis sodalis, the proposed-for-listing northern bat M. septentrionalis, the little brown bat M. lucifugus, and the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus, which are impacted by white-nose syndrome (WNS); and the eastern red bat Lasiurus borealis, the hoary bat L. cinereus, and the silver-haired bat Lasionycteris noctivagans, which are not known to be impacted by WNS. We did not detect two additional WNS-impacted species known to historically occur in the area: the eastern small-footed bat Myotis leibii and the tri-colored bat Perimyotis subflavus. Single-season occupancy models revealed lower detection probabilities of all detected species using active sampling versus passive sampling. Additionally, overall detection probabilities declined in detected WNS-impacted species between years. A paired t-test of simultaneous sampling on 21 occasions revealed that overall recorded foraging activity per hour was greater using active than passive sampling for big brown bats and greater using passive than active sampling for little brown bats. There was no significant difference in recorded activity between methods for other WNS-impacted species, presumably because these species have been so reduced in number that their “apparency” on the landscape is lower. Finally, a cost analysis of standard passive and active sampling protocols revealed that passive

  14. Effect of passive acoustic sampling methodology on detecting bats after declines from white nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant with the emergence and spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS) and precipitous decline of many bat species in North America, natural resource managers need modified and/or new techniques for bat inventory and monitoring that provide robust occupancy estimates. We used Anabat acoustic detectors to determine the most efficient passive acoustic sampling design for optimizing detection probabilities of multiple bat species in a WNS-impacted environment in New York, USA. Our sampling protocol included: six acoustic stations deployed for the entire duration of monitoring as well as a 4 x 4 grid and five transects of 5-10 acoustic units that were deployed for 6-8 night sample durations surveyed during the summers of 2011-2012. We used Program PRESENCE to determine detection probability and site occupancy estimates. Overall, the grid produced the highest detection probabilities for most species because it contained the most detectors and intercepted the greatest spatial area. However, big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and species not impacted by WNS were detected easily regardless of sampling array. Endangered Indiana (Myotis sodalis) and little brown (Myotis lucifugus) and tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) showed declines in detection probabilities over our study, potentially indicative of continued WNS-associated declines. Identification of species presence through efficient methodologies is vital for future conservation efforts as bat populations decline further due to WNS and other factors.   

  15. Passive sampling - a tool for targeted screening of emerging pollutants in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodes, Vit; Grabic, Roman

    2016-04-01

    A screening of more than 300 pollutants such as pharmaceuticals (analgesics, psycholeptics, antidepressants, antibiotics, beta blockers), PCPs (UV blockers, musk's, repellents), illicit drugs, pesticides, perfluorinated compounds and their metabolites at 22 monitoring sites throughout the Czech Republic was conducted in 2013. POCIS samplers were used in this study. Two types of passive samplers (pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS) were deployed for 14 days in May and in October, 88 samples were collected in total. In total 265 and 310 target compounds were analyzed in pharmaceutical and pesticide samplers respectively. The chemicals of interest were extracted from the passive samplers according to standardized procedures. LC -MS/MS and LC-MS/HRMS methods were applied for analyses of extracts. 150 of 310 (48%) and 127 of 265 (48%) analyzed substances had been found in pesticide and pharmaceutical samplers respectively. 27 substances (pharmaceuticals, PCPs, pesticides, caffeine, nicotine metabolite cotinine) occurred at all sampled sites, additional 39 substances (pharmaceuticals, PCPs, pesticides) occurred at more than 17 (75%) sites. One of perfluorinated compounds (PFOA) occurred at 68% of sites, whilst one of illicit drugs (Methamphetamine) was found at 61% of sites. The highest number of contaminants found in one POCIS at a single monitoring site was 111. The concentrations varied from nanograms to thousands of nanograms per sampler. Emerging contaminants occurring in highest concentrations (> 1000 ng/sampler) were BP-4 and PBSA (UV blockers), caffeine, DEET (insect repellent), imidacloprid (insecticide), telmisartan (hypertension drug) and tramadol (analgesic). Monitoring in the Czech Republic has demonstrated that many target compounds enter river waters and a number of these compounds reach high concentrations.

  16. Developing a passive trap for diffusive atmospheric {sup 14}CO{sub 2} sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Jennifer C.; Xu, Xiaomei [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Fahrni, Simon M. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Institute of Particle Physics, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Lupascu, Massimo [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Department of Geography, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Czimczik, Claudia I. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} measurement is an unique tool to quantify source-based emissions of CO{sub 2} for both the urban and natural environments. Acquiring a sample that temporally integrates the atmospheric {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} signature that allows for precise {sup 14}C analysis is often necessary, but can require complex sampling devices, which can be difficult to deploy and maintain, especially for multiple locations. Here we describe our progress in developing a diffusive atmospheric CO{sub 2} molecular sieve trap, which requires no power to operate. We present results from various cleaning procedures, and rigorously tested for blank and memory effects. Traps were tested in the environment along-side conventional sampling flasks for accuracy. Results show that blank and memory effects can be minimized with thorough cleaning and by avoiding overheating, and that diffusively collected air samples agree well with traditionally canister-sampled air.

  17. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  18. Comparison of Passive and Active Air Sampling (PAAS) Methods for PCBs – A Pilot Study in New York City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    PCBs were used extensively in school building materials (caulk and lighting fixture ballasts) during the approximate period of 1950-1978. Most of the schools built nationwide during this period have not had indoor air sampling conducted for PCBs. Passive air sampling holds promi...

  19. Passive air sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine compounds, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers across Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaward, Foday M; Zhang, Gan; Nam, Jae Jak; Sweetman, Andrew J; Obbard, Jeffrey P; Kobara, Yuso; Jones, Kevin C

    2005-11-15

    Asia is of global importance economically, yet data on ambient persistent organic pollutant levels are still sparse for the region, despite international efforts under the Stockholm Convention to identify and reduce emissions. A large-scale passive air sampling survey was therefore conducted in Asia, specifically in China, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. Polyurethane foam disks were deployed simultaneously at 77 sites, between Sept 21 and Nov 16, 2004, and analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine compounds (hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), chlordane), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The meteorological conditions prevailing in the region at this time facilitated the assessment of local/regional differences in atmospheric emissions, because large-scale advection effects due to monsoons or dust storms did not occur. Air concentrations estimated assuming an average sampler uptake rate of 3.5 m3/day ranged as follows (pg m(-3)): PCBs, 5-340; HCB, 10-460; DDTs, 0.4-1800; chlordanes, 1-660; PBDEs, < 0.13-340. South Korea and Singapore generally had regionally low concentrations. Elevated concentrations of PCBs, DDTs, and HCB occurred at sites in China, higher than reported in a similar recent sampling campaign in Europe. Chlordane was highest in samples from Japan (which also had elevated levels of PCBs and DDTs) and was also elevated in some Chinese locations. PBDE levels were generally low in the region.

  20. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: State of the science for organic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydy, Michael J; Landrum, Peter F; Oen, Amy MP; Allinson, Mayumi; Smedes, Foppe; Harwood, Amanda D; Li, Huizhen; Maruya, Keith A; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript surveys the literature on passive sampler methods (PSMs) used in contaminated sediments to assess the chemical activity of organic contaminants. The chemical activity in turn dictates the reactivity and bioavailability of contaminants in sediment. Approaches to measure specific binding of compounds to sediment components, for example, amorphous carbon or specific types of reduced carbon, and the associated partition coefficients are difficult to determine, particularly for native sediment. Thus, the development of PSMs that represent the chemical activity of complex compound–sediment interactions, expressed as the freely dissolved contaminant concentration in porewater (Cfree), offer a better proxy for endpoints of concern, such as reactivity, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. Passive sampling methods have estimated Cfree using both kinetic and equilibrium operating modes and used various polymers as the sorbing phase, for example, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene in various configurations, such as sheets, coated fibers, or vials containing thin films. These PSMs have been applied in laboratory exposures and field deployments covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales. A wide range of calibration conditions exist in the literature to estimate Cfree, but consensus values have not been established. The most critical criteria are the partition coefficient between water and the polymer phase and the equilibrium status of the sampler. In addition, the PSM must not appreciably deplete Cfree in the porewater. Some of the future challenges include establishing a standard approach for PSM measurements, correcting for nonequilibrium conditions, establishing guidance for selection and implementation of PSMs, and translating and applying data collected by PSMs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:167–178. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  1. POLYP: an automatic device for drawing sequential samples of gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaglione, P; Koechler, C; Stanchi, L

    1974-12-01

    Polyp is an automatic device consisting of electronic equipment which drives sequentially 8 small pumps for drawing samples of gas. The electronic circuit is driven by a quartz oscillator and allows for the preselection of a waiting time in such a manner that a set of similar instruments placed in suitable position in the open country will start simultaneously. At the same time the first pump of each instrument will inflate a plastic bag for a preset time. The other seven pumps will inflate sequentially the other bags. The instrument is powered by rechargeable batteries and realized with C-MUS integrated circuits for a nearly negligible consumption. As it is foreseen for field operation it is waterproof.

  2. POLYP: an automatic device for drawing sequential samples of gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaglione, P.; Koechler, C.; Stanchi, L.

    1974-12-01

    POLYP is an automatic device consisting of an electronic equipment which drives sequentially 8 small pumps for drawing samples of gas. The electronic circuit is driven by a quartz oscillator and allows for the preselection of a waiting time in such a manner that a set of similar instruments placed in suitable position in the open country will start simultaneously. At the same time the first pump of each instrument will inflate a plastic bag for a preset time. Thereafter the other seven pumps will inflate sequentially the other bag. The instrument is powered by rechargeable batteries and realized with C-MOS integrated circuits for a nearly negligible consumption. As it is foreseen for field operation it is waterproof

  3. A linear 180 nm SOI CMOS antenna switch module using integrated passive device filters for cellular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Cui; Lei, Chen; Peng, Zhao; Xu, Niu; Yi, Liu

    2014-06-01

    A broadband monolithic linear single pole, eight throw (SP8T) switch has been fabricated in 180 nm thin film silicon-on-insulator (SOI) CMOS technology with a quad-band GSM harmonic filter in integrated passive devices (IPD) technology, which is developed for cellular applications. The antenna switch module (ASM) features 1.2 dB insertion loss with filter on 2G bands and 0.4 dB insertion loss in 3G bands, less than -45 dB isolation and maximum -103 dB intermodulation distortion for mobile front ends by applying distributed architecture and adaptive supply voltage generator.

  4. A linear 180 nm SOI CMOS antenna switch module using integrated passive device filters for cellular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jie; Chen Lei; Liu Yi; Zhao Peng; Niu Xu

    2014-01-01

    A broadband monolithic linear single pole, eight throw (SP8T) switch has been fabricated in 180 nm thin film silicon-on-insulator (SOI) CMOS technology with a quad-band GSM harmonic filter in integrated passive devices (IPD) technology, which is developed for cellular applications. The antenna switch module (ASM) features 1.2 dB insertion loss with filter on 2G bands and 0.4 dB insertion loss in 3G bands, less than −45 dB isolation and maximum −103 dB intermodulation distortion for mobile front ends by applying distributed architecture and adaptive supply voltage generator. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  5. Installation and sampling of vadose zone monitoring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, S.M.; Strickland, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    1987-10-01

    A vadose zone monitoring system was installed in a sanitary landfill near the Y-12 facility on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge, Tennessee Reservation. The work was completed as part of the LLWDDD program to develop, design, and demonstrate new low level radioactive waste disposal monitoring methods. The objective of the project was to evaluate the performance of three types of vadose zone samplers within a similar hydrogeologic environment for use as early detection monitoring devices. The three different types of samplers included the Soil Moisture Equipment Corporation Pressure-Vacuum samplers (Models 1920 and 1940), and the BAT Piezometer (Model MK II) manufactured by BAT Envitech, Inc. All three samplers are designed to remove soil moisture from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Five clusters of three holes each were drilled to maximum depths of 45 ft around part of the periphery of the landfill. Three samplers, one of each type, were installed at each cluster location. Water samples were obtained from 13 of the 15 samplers and submitted to Martin Marietta for analysis. All three samplers performed satisfactorily when considering ease of installation, required in-hole development, and ability to collect water samples from the vadose zone. Advantages and disadvantages of each sampler type are discussed in the main report

  6. Passive sampling: A cost-effective method for understanding antibiotic fate, behaviour and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Er; Zhang, Hao; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhou, Li-Jun; Jones, Kevin C

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of antibiotics in the environment has raised much concern in recent years. Understanding their release, fate and behaviour in the environment is vital to assess potential risks. In this study, a novel passive water sampler - diffusion gradients in thin-films for organics (o-DGT) - was employed to assess the occurrence and removal of antibiotics in two waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) - one in China and the other in the United Kingdom (UK). Of the targeted compounds, 11 of 19 were detected in the Chinese WWTP (ND-200ng/L) and 10 of 40 were found in the UK plant (ND-1380ng/L). Florfenicol, lincomycin, ofloxacin and roxithromycin were most abundant in the Chinese WWTP (influent), while anhydrous erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim, ofloxacin and sulfapyridine were the most abundant in the UK influent samples. Estimated Chinese and UK consumption data are used to interpret the results. Neither of the WWTPs was very effective at removing antibiotics: ~40-50% (overall) was removed by the two plants, with the rest being discharged into the receiving rivers. This is the first study using o-DGT to assess the occurrence and removal of antibiotics in WWTPs. o-DGT is a useful, cost-effective tool to assess WWTP performance and can highlight the effectiveness of treatment steps, which can be applied to wastewater based epidemiology studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dispersion modeling of selected PAHs in urban air: A new approach combining dispersion model with GIS and passive air sampling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sáňka, O.; Melymuk, L.; Čupr, P.; Dvorská, Alice; Klánová, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, oct (2014), s. 88-95 ISSN 1352-2310 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : passive air sampling * air dispersion modeling * GIS * polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * emission inventories Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 3.281, year: 2014

  8. Latex Rubber Gloves as a Sampling Dosimeter Using a Novel Surrogate Sampling Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Gayatri; Lopez, Terry; Ries, Steve; Ross, John; Vega, Helen; Eastmond, David A; Krieger, Robert I

    2015-01-01

    Pesticide exposure during harvesting of crops occurs primarily to the workers' hands. When harvesters wear latex rubber gloves for personal safety and hygiene harvesting reasons, gloves accumulate pesticide residues. Hence, characterization of the gloves' properties may be useful for pesticide exposure assessments. Controlled field studies were conducted using latex rubber gloves to define the factors that influence the transfer of pesticides to the glove and that would affect their use as a residue monitoring device. A novel sampling device called the Brinkman Contact Transfer Unit (BCTU) was constructed to study the glove characteristics and residue transfer and accumulation under controlled conditions on turf. The effectiveness of latex rubber gloves as sampling dosimeters was evaluated by measuring the transferable pesticide residues as a function of time. The validation of latex rubber gloves as a residue sampling dosimeter was performed by comparing pesticide transfer and dissipation from the gloves, with the turf transferable residues sampled using the validated California (CA) Roller, a standard measure of residue transfer. The observed correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient R(2)) between the two methods was .84 for malathion and .96 for fenpropathrin, indicating that the BCTU is a useful, reliable surrogate tool for studying available residue transfer to latex rubber gloves under experimental conditions. Perhaps more importantly, these data demonstrate that latex gloves worn by workers may be useful quantifiable matrices for measuring pesticide exposure.

  9. Analysis of solutions for passively activated safety shutdown devices for SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Innovative systems for emergency shut down of fast reactors are proposed. • The concepts of inherent and passive safety are put forward. • The relative analysis in terms of safety and reliability is presented. • A comparative assessment among the concepts is performed. • Path forward is tracked. -- Abstract: In order to enhance the inherent safety of fast reactors, innovative reactivity control systems have been proposed for intrinsic ultimate shut-down instead of conventional scram rods, to cope with the potential consequences of severe unprotected transient accidents, such as an energetic core disruptive accident, as in case of sodium fast reactors. The passive shut-down systems are designed to shut-down system only by inherent passive reactivity feedback mechanism, under unprotected accident conditions, implying failure of reactor protection system. They are conceived to be self-actuated without any signal elaboration, since the actuation of the system is triggered by the effects induced by the transient like material dilatation, in case of overheating of the coolant for instance, according to fast reactor design to meet the safety requirements. This article looks at different special shutdown systems specifically engineered for prevention of severe accidents, to be implemented on fast reactors, with main focus on the investigation of the performance of the self-actuated shutdown systems in sodium fast reactors

  10. Carbon Nanotube Integrative Sampler (CNIS) for passive sampling of nanosilver in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Fischer, Jillian; Martin, Jonathan; Hoque, Md Ehsanul; Telgmann, Lena; Hintelmann, Holger; Metcalfe, Chris D; Yargeau, Viviane

    2016-11-01

    Nanomaterials such as nanosilver (AgNP) can be released into the aquatic environment through production, usage, and disposal. Sensitive and cost-effective methods are needed to monitor AgNPs in the environment. This work is hampered by a lack of sensitive methods to detect nanomaterials in environmental matrixes. The present study focused on the development, calibration and application of a passive sampling technique for detecting AgNPs in aquatic matrixes. A Carbon Nanotube Integrative Sampler (CNIS) was developed using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the sorbent for accumulating AgNPs and other Ag species from water. Sampling rates were determined in the laboratory for different sampler configurations and in different aquatic matrixes. The sampler was field tested at the Experimental Lakes Area, Canada, in lake water dosed with AgNPs. For a configuration of the CNIS consisting of CNTs bound to carbon fiber (i.e. CNT veil) placed in Chemcatcher® housing, the time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of silver estimated from deployments of the sampler in lake mesocosms dosed with AgNPs were similar to the measured concentrations of "colloidal silver" (i.e. <0.22μm in size) in the water column. For a configuration of CNIS consisting of CNTs in loose powder form placed in a custom made housing that were deployed in a whole lake dosed with AgNPs, the estimated TWA concentrations of "CNIS-labile Ag" were similar to the concentrations of total silver measured in the epilimnion of the lake. However, sampling rates for the CNIS in various matrixes are relatively low (i.e. 1-20mL/day), so deployment periods of several weeks are required to detect AgNPs at environmentally relevant concentrations, which can allow biofilms to develop on the sampler and could affect the sampling rates. With further development, this novel sampler may provide a simple and sensitive method for screening for the presence of AgNPs in surface waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  11. Application of an immobilized ionic liquid for the passive sampling of perfluorinated substances in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gong, Xinying; Wang, Ruonan; Gan, Zhiwei; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Hongwen

    2017-09-15

    Ionic liquids have been used to efficiently extract a wide range of polar and nonpolar organic contaminants from water. In this study, imidazole ionic liquids immobilized on silica gel were synthesized through a chemical bonding method, and the immobilized dodecylimidazolium ionic liquid was selected as the receiving phase material in a POCIS (polar organic chemical integrative sampler) like passive sampler to monitor five perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in water. Twenty-one days of integrative accumulation was conducted in laboratory scale experiments, and the accumulated PFASs in the samplers were eluted and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The partitioning coefficients of most PFASs between sampler sorbents and water in the immobilized ionic liquid (IIL)-sampler were higher than those in the HLB-sampler, especially for compounds with shorter alkyl chains. The effects of flow velocity, temperature, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and pH on the uptake of these analytes were also evaluated. Under the experimental conditions, the uptake of PFASs in the IIL-sampler slightly increased with the flow velocity and temperature, while different influences of DOM and pH on the uptake of PFAS homologues with short or long chains were observed. The designed IIL-samplers were applied in the influent and effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. All five PFASs could be accumulated in the samplers, with concentrations ranging from 6.5×10 -3 -3.6×10 -1 nmol/L in the influent and from 1.3×10 -2 -2.2×10 -1 nmol/L in the effluent. The calculated time-weighted average concentrations of most PFASs fit well with the detected concentrations of the active sampling, indicating the applicability of the IIL-sampler in monitoring these compounds in water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sampling strategies to improve passive optical remote sensing of river bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl; Overstreet, Brandon; Kinzel, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Passive optical remote sensing of river bathymetry involves establishing a relation between depth and reflectance that can be applied throughout an image to produce a depth map. Building upon the Optimal Band Ratio Analysis (OBRA) framework, we introduce sampling strategies for constructing calibration data sets that lead to strong relationships between an image-derived quantity and depth across a range of depths. Progressively excluding observations that exceed a series of cutoff depths from the calibration process improved the accuracy of depth estimates and allowed the maximum detectable depth ($d_{max}$) to be inferred directly from an image. Depth retrieval in two distinct rivers also was enhanced by a stratified version of OBRA that partitions field measurements into a series of depth bins to avoid biases associated with under-representation of shallow areas in typical field data sets. In the shallower, clearer of the two rivers, including the deepest field observations in the calibration data set did not compromise depth retrieval accuracy, suggesting that $d_{max}$ was not exceeded and the reach could be mapped without gaps. Conversely, in the deeper and more turbid stream, progressive truncation of input depths yielded a plausible estimate of $d_{max}$ consistent with theoretical calculations based on field measurements of light attenuation by the water column. This result implied that the entire channel, including pools, could not be mapped remotely. However, truncation improved the accuracy of depth estimates in areas shallower than $d_{max}$, which comprise the majority of the channel and are of primary interest for many habitat-oriented applications.

  13. A novel passive water sampler for in situ sampling of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Er; Zhang, Hao; Jones, Kevin C

    2012-05-01

    Passive water sampling has several advantages over active methods; it provides time-integrated data, can save on time and cost compared to active methods, and yield high spatial resolution data through co-deployment of simple, cheap units. However, one problem with many sampler designs in current use is that their uptake rates for trace substances of interest are flow-rate dependent, thereby requiring calibration data and other information to enable water concentrations to be derived from the mass per sampler. However, the 'family' of samplers employing the principle of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) provides an in situ means of quantitatively measuring labile species in aquatic systems without field calibration. So far, this technique has only been tested and applied in inorganic substances: metals, radionuclides, nutrients, etc. Design and applications of DGT to trace organic contaminants ('o-DGT') would be of widespread interest. This study describes the laboratory testing and performance characteristics of o-DGT, with the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SMX) as a model compound and XAD18 as the novel binding agent. o-DGT uptake of SMX increased with time and decreased with diffusion layer thickness, confirming the principle for SMX. XAD18 showed sufficiently high capacity for SMX for routine field applications. o-DGT measurement of SMX was independent of pH (6-9) and ionic strength (0.001-0.1 M) and not affected by flow rate once above static conditions. The diffusion coefficient of SMX in the sampler was measured using an independent diffusion cell and information is presented to allow temperature correction and derivation of aqueous concentrations from deployed samplers. The potential use of o-DGT for in situ measurement of pharmaceutical antibiotics is confirmed by this study and applications are briefly discussed.

  14. Efficient approximate eigensolution for structures equipped with a passive damping device

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hračov, Stanislav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 144, č. 5 (2018), č. článku 06018002. ISSN 0733-9445 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01035S; GA ČR(CZ) GC17-26353J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : nonclassical damping * eigensolution * perturbation method * passive damper Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering OBOR OECD: Construction engineering, Municipal and structural engineering Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2016 https://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29ST.1943-541X.0002017

  15. Equilibrium Passive Sampling of POP in Lipid-Rich and Lean Fish Tissue: Quality Control Using Performance Reference Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Tatsiana P; Carlsson, Pernilla; Vrana, Branislav; Smedes, Foppe

    2017-10-03

    Passive sampling is widely used to measure levels of contaminants in various environmental matrices, including fish tissue. Equilibrium passive sampling (EPS) of persistent organic pollutants (POP) in fish tissue has been hitherto limited to application in lipid-rich tissue. We tested several exposure methods to extend EPS applicability to lean tissue. Thin-film polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) passive samplers were exposed statically to intact fillet and fish homogenate and dynamically by rolling with cut fillet cubes. The release of performance reference compounds (PRC) dosed to passive samplers prior to exposure was used to monitor the exchange process. The sampler-tissue exchange was isotropic, and PRC were shown to be good indicators of sampler-tissue equilibration status. The dynamic exposures demonstrated equilibrium attainment in less than 2 days for all three tested fish species, including lean fish containing 1% lipid. Lipid-based concentrations derived from EPS were in good agreement with lipid-normalized concentrations obtained using conventional solvent extraction. The developed in-tissue EPS method is robust and has potential for application in chemical monitoring of biota and bioaccumulation studies.

  16. Air sampling procedures to evaluate microbial contamination: a comparison between active and passive methods in operating theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Christian; Marcotrigiano, Vincenzo; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2012-08-02

    Since air can play a central role as a reservoir for microorganisms, in controlled environments such as operating theatres regular microbial monitoring is useful to measure air quality and identify critical situations. The aim of this study is to assess microbial contamination levels in operating theatres using both an active and a passive sampling method and then to assess if there is a correlation between the results of the two different sampling methods. The study was performed in 32 turbulent air flow operating theatres of a University Hospital in Southern Italy. Active sampling was carried out using the Surface Air System and passive sampling with settle plates, in accordance with ISO 14698. The Total Viable Count (TVC) was evaluated at rest (in the morning before the beginning of surgical activity) and in operational (during surgery). The mean TVC at rest was 12.4 CFU/m3 and 722.5 CFU/m2/h for active and passive samplings respectively. The mean in operational TVC was 93.8 CFU/m3 (SD = 52.69; range = 22-256) and 10496.5 CFU/m2/h (SD = 7460.5; range = 1415.5-25479.7) for active and passive samplings respectively. Statistical analysis confirmed that the two methods correlate in a comparable way with the quality of air. It is possible to conclude that both methods can be used for general monitoring of air contamination, such as routine surveillance programs. However, the choice must be made between one or the other to obtain specific information.

  17. Air sampling procedures to evaluate microbial contamination: a comparison between active and passive methods in operating theatres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoli Christian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since air can play a central role as a reservoir for microorganisms, in controlled environments such as operating theatres regular microbial monitoring is useful to measure air quality and identify critical situations. The aim of this study is to assess microbial contamination levels in operating theatres using both an active and a passive sampling method and then to assess if there is a correlation between the results of the two different sampling methods. Methods The study was performed in 32 turbulent air flow operating theatres of a University Hospital in Southern Italy. Active sampling was carried out using the Surface Air System and passive sampling with settle plates, in accordance with ISO 14698. The Total Viable Count (TVC was evaluated at rest (in the morning before the beginning of surgical activity and in operational (during surgery. Results The mean TVC at rest was 12.4 CFU/m3 and 722.5 CFU/m2/h for active and passive samplings respectively. The mean in operational TVC was 93.8 CFU/m3 (SD = 52.69; range = 22-256 and 10496.5 CFU/m2/h (SD = 7460.5; range = 1415.5-25479.7 for active and passive samplings respectively. Statistical analysis confirmed that the two methods correlate in a comparable way with the quality of air. Conclusion It is possible to conclude that both methods can be used for general monitoring of air contamination, such as routine surveillance programs. However, the choice must be made between one or the other to obtain specific information.

  18. Chemical and physical passivation of type II strained-layer superlattice devices by means of thiolated self-assembled monolayers and polymer encapsulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Nathan C.; Knorr, Daniel B.; Williams, Kristen S.; Baril, Neil; Nallon, Eric; Lenhart, Joseph L.; Andzelm, Jan W.; Pellegrino, Joseph; Tidrow, Meimei; Cleveland, Erin; Bandara, Sumith

    2015-05-01

    The efficacy of solution deposition of thiolated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been explored for the purpose of passivating III-V type II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors, more specifically a p-type heterojunction device. Sulfur passivation has previously been achieved on T2SL devices. However, degradation over time, temperature sensitivity and inconsistent reproducibility necessitate a physical encapsulate that can chemically bond to the chemical passivant. Thus, this research investigates two passivation methods, surface passivation with a thiol monolayer and passivation with a polymer encapsulant with a view toward future combination of these techniques. Analysis of the physical and chemical condition of the surface prior to deposition assisted in the development of ideal processes for optimized film quality. Successful deposition was facilitated by in situ oxide removal. Various commercially available functional (cysteamine) and non-functional (alkane) thiolated monolayers were investigated. Dark current was reduced by 3 orders of magnitude and achieved negligible surface leakage at low bias levels. The lowest dark current result, 7.69 × 10-6 A/cm2 at 50 mV, was achieved through passivation with cysteamine.

  19. [Efficiency of a postoperative treatment after rotator cuff repair with a continuous passive motion device (CPM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, J W-P; König, D P; Imhoff, A B; Martinek, V; Braun, S; Hübscher, M; Koch, C; Dreithaler, B; Bernholt, J; Preis, S; Loew, M; Rickert, M; Speck, M; Bös, L; Bidner, A; Eysel, P

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to prove that a postoperative combined continuous passive motion (CPM) and physiotherapy treatment protocol (CPM group) can achieve 90 degrees active abduction in the shoulder joint earlier than physiotherapy alone (PT group). The indication was a complete tear of the rotator cuff. The study was conducted under in-patient and out-patient conditions. 55 patients were included in this study. The prospective, randomized multicenter study design complies with DIN EN 540. The primary endpoint was the time span until 90 degrees active abduction was achieved by the patients. Patients in the CPM group reached the primary endpoint on average 12 days earlier than the control group. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0292). Analyzing the secondary endpoints, e. g., pain and disablement, the results in the CPM group showed again advantages of the combined treatment protocol (CPM + physiotherapy). The postoperative treatment of a total tear of the rotator cuff with a combined continuous passive motion and physiotherapy protocol provided a significantly earlier range of motion in the shoulder joint than physiotherapy alone. There was no report of CPM-related adverse effects.

  20. Evaluating the precision of passive sampling methods using PRCs in the water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess these models, four different thicknesses of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers were co-deployed for 28 days in the water column at three sites in New Bedford Harbor, MA, USA. Each sampler was pre-loaded with six PCB performance reference compounds (PRCs) t...

  1. Passive Sampling to Capture the Spatial Variability of Coarse Particles by Composition in Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive samplers deployed at 25 sites for three week-long intervals were used to characterize spatial variability in the mass and composition of coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) in Cleveland, OH in summer 2008. The size and composition of individual particles deter...

  2. The Consistency of Isotopologues of Ambient Atmospheric Nitric Acid in Passively Collected Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Padgett, P.; Allen, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen oxides have previously been shown to have distinctive isotopic signatures of oxygen and nitrogen. Nylon filters are currently used in passive sampling arrays to measure ambient atmospheric nitric acid concentrations and estimate deposition rates. This experiment measured the ability of nylon filters to consistently collect isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in the same ratios as they are present in the atmosphere. Samplers were deployed in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and at field sites across a nitrogen deposition gradient in Southern California. Filters were exposed over a four week period with individual filters being subjected to 1-4 week exposure times. Extracted nitric acid were measured for δ18O and δ15N ratios and compared for consistency based on length of exposure and amount of HNO3 collected. Filters within the CSTRs collected HNO3 at a consistent rate in both high and low concentration chambers. After two weeks of exposure, the mean δ18O values were within 0.5‰ of the δ18O of the source HNO3 solution. The mean of all weekly exposures were within 0.5‰ of the δ15N of the source solution, but after three weeks, the mean δ15N of adsorbed HNO3 was within 0.2‰. As the length of the exposure increased, the variability of measured delta values decreased for both elements. The field samplers collected HNO3 consistent with previously measured values along a deposition gradient. The mean δ18O at high deposition sites was 52.2‰ compared to 35.7‰ at the low deposition sites. Mean δ15N values were similar at all sites across the deposition gradient. Due to precipitation events occurring during the exposure period, the δ15N and δ18O of nitric acid were highly variable at all field sites. At single sites, changes in δ15N and δ18O were negatively correlated, consistent with two-sourcing mixing dynamics, but the slope of the regressions differed between high and low deposition sites. Anthropogenic

  3. CHOMIK -Sampling Device of Penetrating Type for Russian Phobos Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seweryn, Karol; Grygorczuk, Jerzy; Rickmann, Hans; Morawski, Marek; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Drogosz, Michal; Gurgurewicz, Joanna; Kozlov, Oleg E.; Krolikowska-Soltan, Malgorzata; Sutugin, Sergiej E.; Wawrzaszek, Roman; Wisniewski, Lukasz; Zakharov, Alexander

    Measurements of physical properties of planetary bodies allow to determine many important parameters for scientists working in different fields of research. For example effective heat conductivity of the regolith can help with better understanding of processes occurring in the body interior. Chemical and mineralogical composition gives us a chance to better understand the origin and evolution of the moons. In principle such parameters of the planetary bodies can be determined based on three different measurement techniques: (i) in situ measurements (ii) measurements of the samples in laboratory conditions at the Earth and (iii) remote sensing measurements. Scientific missions which allow us to perform all type of measurements, give us a chance for not only parameters determination but also cross calibration of the instruments. Russian Phobos Sample Return (PhSR) mission is one of few which allows for all type of such measurements. The spacecraft will be equipped with remote sensing instruments like: spectrometers, long wave radar and dust counter, instruments for in-situ measurements -gas-chromatograph, seismometer, thermodetector and others and also robotic arm and sampling device. PhSR mission will be launched in November 2011 on board of a launch vehicle Zenit. About a year later (11 months) the vehicle will reach the Martian orbit. It is anticipated that it will land on Phobos in the beginning of 2013. A take off back will take place a month later and the re-entry module containing a capsule that will hold the soil sample enclosed in a container will be on its way back to Earth. The 11 kg re-entry capsule with the container will land in Kazakhstan in mid-2014. A unique geological penetrator CHOMIK dedicated for the Phobos Sample Return space mis-sion will be designed and manufactured at the Space Mechatronics and Robotics Laboratory, Space Research Centre Polish Academy of Sciences (SRC PAS) in Warsaw. Functionally CHOMIK is based on the well known MUPUS

  4. A versatile passive and active non-destructive device for spent fuel assemblies monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berne, R.; Bignan, G.; Andrieu, G.; Dethan, B.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring of spent fuel assemblies in reactor pools or in reprocessing plants with NDA methods is interesting (non-destructivity, non-intrusivity) for process control, safety-criticality and/or nuclear material management. In this context, the authors present the results of the development and design of a prototype device (physical methods used, qualification...) called PYTHON. The aim of PYTHON is to check the declared characteristic values of an irradiated assembly before taking it into a transport cask for safety criticality control. The PYTHON device consists of a detector head in two sections and a 252 Cf source if active neutron counting is to be used. Each section of the detection head consists of two detectors: one fission chamber and one ionization chamber

  5. Evaluation on thermal-hydraulic characteristics for passive safety device of APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seong Yeon; Lee, S. H.; Son, M. K. [Korea Association for Nuclear Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jee, M. S.; Chung, M. H. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-15

    To establish evaluation and verification guideline for the APR1400, thermal-hydraulic characteristics for fuel rod bundle, reactor vessel and fluidic device is analyzed using FLUENT. Scope and major results of research are as follows : Thermal-hydraulic characteristics for nuclear fuel rod bundle: design data for nuclear fuel rod bundle and structure are surveyed, and 3 x 3 sub-channel model is adopted to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics in fuel rod bundle. Computational results are compared with the heat transfer data measured by naphthalene sublimation method, and numerical analysis and evaluation are performed at various design conditions and flow conditions. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics for reactor vessel: reactor vessel design data are surveyed to develop numerical model. Porous media model is applied for fuel rod bundle, and full-scale, three dimensional simulation is performed at actual operating conditions. Distributions of velocity, pressure and temperature are discussed. Flow characteristics for fluidic device: three dimensional numerical model for fluidic device is developed, and numerical results are compared with experimental data obtained at KAERI in order to verify numerical simulation. In addition, variation of flow rate is investigated at various elapsed times after valve operating, and flow characteristics is analyzed at low and high flow rate conditions, respectively.

  6. [Intelligent operating room suite : From passive medical devices to the self-thinking cognitive surgical assistant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenngott, H G; Wagner, M; Preukschas, A A; Müller-Stich, B P

    2016-12-01

    Modern operating room (OR) suites are mostly digitally connected but until now the primary focus was on the presentation, transfer and distribution of images. Device information and processes within the operating theaters are barely considered. Cognitive assistance systems have triggered a fundamental rethinking in the automotive industry as well as in logistics. In principle, tasks in the OR, some of which are highly repetitive, also have great potential to be supported by automated cognitive assistance via a self-thinking system. This includes the coordination of the entire workflow in the perioperative process in both the operating theater and the whole hospital. With corresponding data from hospital information systems, medical devices and appropriate models of the surgical process, intelligent systems could optimize the workflow in the operating theater in the near future and support the surgeon. Preliminary results on the use of device information and automatically controlled OR suites are already available. Such systems include, for example the guidance of laparoscopic camera systems. Nevertheless, cognitive assistance systems that make use of knowledge about patients, processes and other pieces of information to improve surgical treatment are not yet available in the clinical routine but are urgently needed in order to automatically assist the surgeon in situation-related activities and thus substantially improve patient care.

  7. Using Mobile Device Samples to Estimate Traffic Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    In this project, TTI worked with StreetLight Data to evaluate a beta version of its traffic volume estimates derived from global positioning system (GPS)-based mobile devices. TTI evaluated the accuracy of average annual daily traffic (AADT) volume :...

  8. 30 CFR 90.205 - Approved sampling devices; operation; air flowrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved sampling devices; operation; air... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.205 Approved sampling devices; operation; air flowrate...

  9. 30 CFR 90.204 - Approved sampling devices; maintenance and calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved sampling devices; maintenance and... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.204 Approved sampling devices; maintenance and...

  10. Evaluation of a passive sampling system of CPVC for nitrogen dioxide in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Bolanos, Omar; Jimenez-Barrantes, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Passive diffusion tubes have been built to determine the concentration of NO 2 in the air with poly tubes (vinyl chloride) chloride (CPVC). The performance has been evaluated during the 2008, through comparisons of their results with the results obtained, using the method modified Griess-Saltzman, recommended by the World Health Organization. The comparison results have shown good agreement between the two methodologies with respect to NO 2 concentrations of 45-85 μg/m''3. Linear regression when used by minimum simple square and ranges test and Wilcoxon signs, no significant differences found between the results provided by both methods. Relative bias calculated in 7 comparisons has varied from -19,05% to 24,44% with an average of 5,76%. The results have indicated that the passive tubes overestimated the concentration of NO 2 ; without however, this bias has not been higher than those reported by other authors. The precision the passive system has been in the field of 5,2% to 10,6%, measured in four tubes through the coefficient of variation, similar to reported by other researchers. (author) [es

  11. Development of a comprehensive analytical method for the determination of chlorinated paraffins in spruce needles applied in passive air sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iozza, Saverio; Schmid, Peter; Oehme, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Conifer needles are used for the monitoring of atmospheric persistent organic pollutants. The objective of the present study was to develop a method for the detection of airborne chlorinated paraffins (CPs) using spruce needles as a passive sampler. The method is based on liquid extraction of the cuticular wax layer followed by chromatographic fractionation and detection of CPs using two different GCMS techniques. Total CP concentrations (sum of short (SCCP), medium (MCCP) and long chain CPs (LCCP)) were determined by EI-MS/MS. SCCP and MCCP levels as well as congener group patterns (n-alkane chain length, chlorine content) could be evaluated using ECNI-LRMS. For the first time, data on environmental airborne CPs on spruce needles taken within the Monitoring Network in the Alpine Region for Persistent and other Organic Pollutants (MONARPOP) are presented providing evidence that spruce needles are a suitable passive sampling system for the monitoring of atmospheric CPs. - A developed method for chlorinated paraffins (CPs) provided evidence that spruce needles are a suitable passive sampling system for the monitoring of atmospheric CPs.

  12. On the development of automatic sample preparation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesselmann, J.

    1987-01-01

    Modern mass spectrometers for stable isotope analysis offer accurate isotope ratio results from gaseous samples (CO 2 , N 2 , H 2 , SO 2 ) in a completely automated fashion. However, most samples of interest either are associated with contaminant gases or the gas has to be liberated by a chemical procedure prior to measurement. In most laboratories this sample preparation step is performed manually. As a consequence, sample throughput is rather low and - despite skilful operation - the preparation procedure varies slightly from one sample to the next affecting mainly the reproducibility of the data. (author)

  13. Main principles of passive devices based on graphene and carbon films in microwave-THz frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhir, Polina P.; Paddubskaya, Alesia G.; Volynets, Nadezhda I.; Batrakov, Konstantin G.; Kaplas, Tommi; Lamberti, Patrizia; Kotsilkova, Rumiana; Lambin, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    The ability of thin conductive films, including graphene, pyrolytic carbon (PyC), graphitic PyC (GrPyC), graphene with graphitic islands (GrI), glassy carbon (GC), and sandwich structures made of all these materials separated by polymer slabs to absorb electromagnetic radiation in microwave-THz frequency range, is discussed. The main physical principles making a basis for high absorption ability of these heterostructures are explained both in the language of electromagnetic theory and using representation of equivalent electrical circuits. The idea of using carbonaceous thin films as the main working elements of passive radiofrequency (RF) devices, such as shields, filters, polarizers, collimators, is proposed theoretically and proved experimentally. The important advantage of PyC, GrI, GrPyC, and GC is that, in contrast to graphene, they either can be easily deposited onto a dielectric substrate or are strong enough to allow their transfer from the catalytic substrate without a shuttle polymer layer. This opens a new avenue toward the development of a scalable protocol for cost-efficient production of ultralight electromagnetic shields that can be transferred to commercial applications. A robust design via finite-element method and design of experiment for RF devices based on carbon/graphene films and sandwiches is also discussed in the context of virtual prototyping.

  14. Settlement substantiation of the passive devices shutdown fast reactors by trip the absorbing rod in case of anticipated accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portianoy, A.G.; Serdun, E.N.; Sorokin, A.P.; Uhov, V.A.; Egorov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    Results of improvement of the passive device shutdown fast reactors BN-600 (PDSR) are considered. The device works (lets off a neutron absorber) at increase of coolant temperature above 660 deg. C (650 deg. C). The PDSR working element represents a design of a sylphon-container type, filled with aluminium (magnesium) and operates (extended) under melting it at the expense of energy of a compressed high-temperature spring, and/or increases of a volume (6% of aluminium) at melting, and/or increases of a volume at further growth of a temperature. Account of the characteristics of PDSR working elements is carried out. Mathematical models, describing dependence of the basic of the characteristics (sluggishness, size of lengthening) from the constructive factors and modes of anticipated accident, are received. Is shown, that the PDSR characteristics provide an emergency stop of the reactor BN-600 in a case of a heaviest anticipated accident prior to the beginning sodium boiling in a core. The developed PDSR have a number of advantages before known, for example, magnetic with a Curie point, first of all, at the expense of significant efforts generation, multichannels of operation and weak dependence on the operational factors, first of all, neutron fluence. (author)

  15. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Brown

    Full Text Available Hearing protection devices (HPDs such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1 sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2 speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3 tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive, including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions.

  16. An active radon sampling device for high humidity places

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alegria, N.; Herranz, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Fluid Mechanics, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Alameda Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    An active radon measurement device has been developed to be used in workplaces with a relative humidity of 100% for spot measurements of radon concentration. A mathematical model based on the convective-diffusive transport equation is used in the design of this system, which has been used to measure the radon concentration in the Pozalagua cave (Biscay, at Northern of Spain). From the obtained radon values the public and workers doses have been obtained.

  17. Computationally efficient design of optimal output feedback strategies for controllable passive damping devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalzare, Mahmoud; Johnson, Erik A; Wojtkiewicz, Steven F

    2014-01-01

    Designing control strategies for smart structures, such as those with semiactive devices, is complicated by the nonlinear nature of the feedback control, secondary clipping control and other additional requirements such as device saturation. The usual design approach resorts to large-scale simulation parameter studies that are computationally expensive. The authors have previously developed an approach for state-feedback semiactive clipped-optimal control design, based on a nonlinear Volterra integral equation that provides for the computationally efficient simulation of such systems. This paper expands the applicability of the approach by demonstrating that it can also be adapted to accommodate more realistic cases when, instead of full state feedback, only a limited set of noisy response measurements is available to the controller. This extension requires incorporating a Kalman filter (KF) estimator, which is linear, into the nominal model of the uncontrolled system. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated by a numerical study of a 100-degree-of-freedom frame model, excited by a filtered Gaussian random excitation, with noisy acceleration sensor measurements to determine the semiactive control commands. The results show that the proposed method can improve computational efficiency by more than two orders of magnitude relative to a conventional solver, while retaining a comparable level of accuracy. Further, the proposed approach is shown to be similarly efficient for an extensive Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the effects of sensor noise levels and KF tuning on the accuracy of the response. (paper)

  18. Validation of Passive Sampling Devices for Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    TNT TOC TSS Low Order Detonation Munitions constituents Munitions Debris Method Detection Limit Munitions and explosives of concern Mean low...Total organic carbon ( TOC ) and grain size distribution from stations A1, T10, T11, and T12 at BSS...16 syringes/stn) TNT, ADNTs, DNTs, RDX 4 locations in BSS based on positive POCIS results Sediment 5 TOC , grain size 4, co-located with sediment

  19. Validation of Passive Sampling Devices for Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Research and Development Program [SERDP] project #ER-2542) into the canister would provide enhancement of the quantitative estimation of the TWA...Department of Defense EOD Explosive Ordnance Disposal EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency EQL Environmental Quantitation Limit EST...Laboratory Quantitation Limit MC Munitions Constituents mL Milliliter MR Munitions Response NESDI Navy’s Environmental Security Development to

  20. Validation of Passive Sampling Devices for Monitoring of Munitions Constituents in Underwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    and explosives of concern (MEC) corroding, breaching, and leaking MC into the water column (Darrach, Chutjian, and Plett, 1998; GMI, 2007; Lewis et...underwater UWMM have the potential to corrode, breach, and leak munitions constituents (MCs) such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5...Wang et al., 2013), a number of challenges prevent accurate assessment of environmental exposure using traditional water , sediment, and tissue

  1. Passive sampling of DDT, DDE and DDD in sediments: accounting for degradation processes with reaction-diffusion modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcaciuc, A Patricia; Borrelli, Raffaella; Zaninetta, Luciano M; Gschwend, Philip M

    2018-01-24

    Passive sampling is becoming a widely used tool for assessing freely dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants in environmental media. For certain media and target analytes, the time to reach equilibrium exceeds the deployment time, and in such cases, the loss of performance reference compounds (PRCs), loaded in the sampler before deployment, is one of the common ways used to assess the fractional equilibration of target analytes. The key assumption behind the use of PRCs is that their release is solely diffusion driven. But in this work, we show that PRC transformations in the sediment can have a measurable impact on the PRC releases and even allow estimation of that compound's transformation rate in the environment of interest. We found that in both field and lab incubations, the loss of the 13 C 2,4'-DDT PRC from a polyethylene (PE) passive sampler deployed at the sediment-water interface was accelerated compared to the loss of other PRCs ( 13 C-labeled PCBs, 13 C-labeled DDE and DDD). The DDT PRC loss was also accompanied by accumulation in the PE of its degradation product, 13 C 2,4'-DDD. Using a 1D reaction-diffusion model, we deduced the in situ degradation rates of DDT from the measured PRC loss. The in situ degradation rates increased with depth into the sediment bed (0.14 d -1 at 0-10 cm and 1.4 d -1 at 30-40 cm) and although they could not be independently validated, these rates compared favorably with literature values. This work shows that passive sampling users should be cautious when choosing PRCs, as degradation processes can affect some PRC's releases from the passive sampler. More importantly, this work opens up the opportunity for novel applications of passive samplers, particularly with regard to investigating in situ degradation rates, pathways, and products for both legacy and emerging contaminants. However, further work is needed to confirm that the rates deduced from model fitting of PRC loss are a true reflection of DDT

  2. Comparative study of the characteristics of some suction devices for gas sampling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donguy, R.; Drouet, J.

    1959-06-01

    Gas sampling (used to determine the characteristics of dusts or aerosols contained in a gas) needs a suction device. In order to select the right device and the right conditions of use, the characteristics and performances of various suction devices (helicoidal and centrifugal aspirators, air pumps, volumetric pumps) have been experimentally measured: flow rate, head loss, sampling volume and duration, aerosol and dust concentration, gas density, nature of the gas, suction circuit configuration, etc

  3. Test plan for K Basin Sludge Canister and Floor Sampling Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the test plan and procedure forms for conducting the functional and operational acceptance testing of the K Basin Sludge Canister and Floor Sampling Device(s). These samplers samples sludge off the floor of the 100K Basins and out of 100K fuel storage canisters

  4. 78 FR 25308 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ...; Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: 60-Day... mines. CPDMs must be designed and constructed for coal miners to wear and operate without impeding their... related to Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices. MSHA is particularly interested in comments that: Evaluate...

  5. The theoretical study of passive and active optical devices via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method and other approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo, Ye [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically study the electromagnetic wave propagation in several passive and active optical components and devices including 2-D photonic crystals, straight and curved waveguides, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and etc. Several optical designs are also presented like organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells and solar concentrators. The first part of the thesis focuses on theoretical investigation. First, the plane-wave-based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is briefly described with a short review of photonic crystals and other numerical methods to study them (Chapter 1 and 2). Next TMM, the numerical method itself is investigated in details and developed in advance to deal with more complex optical systems. In chapter 3, TMM is extended in curvilinear coordinates to study curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. In chapter 4, a new set of localized basis orbitals are introduced to locally represent electromagnetic field in photonic crystals as alternative to planewave basis. The second part of the thesis focuses on the design of optical devices. First, two examples of TMM applications are given. The first example is the design of metal grating structures as replacements of ITO to enhance the optical absorption in OPV cells (chapter 6). The second one is the design of the same structure as above to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 7). Next, two design examples by ray tracing method are given, including applying a microlens array to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 5) and an all-angle wide-wavelength design of solar concentrator (chapter 8). In summary, this dissertation has extended TMM which makes it capable of treating complex optical systems. Several optical designs by TMM and ray tracing method are also given as a full complement of this

  6. Evaluation of spot and passive sampling for monitoring, flux estimation and risk assessment of pesticides within the constraints of a typical regulatory monitoring scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zulin; Troldborg, Mads; Yates, Kyari; Osprey, Mark; Kerr, Christine; Hallett, Paul D; Baggaley, Nikki; Rhind, Stewart M; Dawson, Julian J C; Hough, Rupert L

    2016-11-01

    In many agricultural catchments of Europe and North America, pesticides occur at generally low concentrations with significant temporal variation. This poses several challenges for both monitoring and understanding ecological risks/impacts of these chemicals. This study aimed to compare the performance of passive and spot sampling strategies given the constraints of typical regulatory monitoring. Nine pesticides were investigated in a river currently undergoing regulatory monitoring (River Ugie, Scotland). Within this regulatory framework, spot and passive sampling were undertaken to understand spatiotemporal occurrence, mass loads and ecological risks. All the target pesticides were detected in water by both sampling strategies. Chlorotoluron was observed to be the dominant pesticide by both spot (maximum: 111.8ng/l, mean: 9.35ng/l) and passive sampling (maximum: 39.24ng/l, mean: 4.76ng/l). The annual pesticide loads were estimated to be 2735g and 1837g based on the spot and passive sampling data, respectively. The spatiotemporal trend suggested that agricultural activities were the primary source of the compounds with variability in loads explained in large by timing of pesticide applications and rainfall. The risk assessment showed chlorotoluron and chlorpyrifos posed the highest ecological risks with 23% of the chlorotoluron spot samples and 36% of the chlorpyrifos passive samples resulting in a Risk Quotient greater than 0.1. This suggests that mitigation measures might need to be taken to reduce the input of pesticides into the river. The overall comparison of the two sampling strategies supported the hypothesis that passive sampling tends to integrate the contaminants over a period of exposure and allows quantification of contamination at low concentration. The results suggested that within a regulatory monitoring context passive sampling was more suitable for flux estimation and risk assessment of trace contaminants which cannot be diagnosed by spot

  7. Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parra, Amanda [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Russell, Marion [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, Wen-Yee [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick’s Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

  8. Comparison of dioxin-like PCBs in passive air and vegetation samples surrounding a metal reclamation incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucaciu, C.M.; Fayez, L.; Reiner, E.J.; Kolic, T.M.; MacPherson, K.A.; Crozier, P.W.; Emerson, R. [Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wania, F. [Toronto Univ., Scarborough, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physical and Environmental Sciences

    2004-09-15

    In 1998 the WHO identified 12 PCBs to be dioxin-like (DLPCB). This list includes 4 coplanar: 77, 81, 126, 169 and 8 mono-ortho: 105, 114, 118, 123, 156, 157, 167 and 189 congeners. Determination of DLPCBs allows results to be converted into TEQ (toxic equivalent quantity of 2,3,7,8-TCDD) values and enables data comparison at very low (sub ppt (pg/g)) levels. Vegetation and air samples were collected from an area surrounding a metal recovery incinerator in order to assess spatial and temporal trends for DLPCBs stemming from the long term operation of the incinerator. Foliage samples were harvested in September (1999 - 2 sets, 2000 to 2003) from maple and ash trees surrounding the incinerator at varying distances. Mature tree leaves are exposed to atmospheric deposition of PCBs for about 4 months (June to September) and the levels determined in foliage are representative of DLPCBs in the atmosphere surrounding each tree. Additionally, a passive air sampling technique based on the sorption of gaseous pollutants on XAD-2 (a styrene-divinylbenzene co-polymer) resin was used for measuring long-term average gas-phase concentrations in the area surrounding the incinerator. Ten passive samplers were placed adjacent to trees previously sampled for DLPCBs at locations presented in Figure 1. The deployment period, lasting approximately 4 month (June to September 2003), corresponds to the time that mature leaves were present on the adjacent trees. Four other air samplers were placed close to a main highway in Toronto in order to compare the concentration of DLPCB in the urban area with the concentration in the rural area surrounding the incineration facility. Passive air samplers allow the characterization of the gaseous distribution of DLPCBs in the atmosphere. The advantages of using this technique are that it is independent of the atmospheric conditions (winds, precipitation, UV exposure) and can be used for sampling year round. Atmospheric deposition is expected to control

  9. Feasibility Study of Commercial Markets for New Sample Acquisition Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Collin; Coyne, Jim; Bilen, Sven G.; Kisenwether, Liz; Miller, Garry; Mueller, Robert P.; Zacny, Kris

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and Penn State technology commercialization project was designed to assist in the maturation of a NASA SBIR Phase III technology. The project was funded by NASA's ESMD Education group with oversight from the Surface Systems Office at NASA Kennedy Space Center in the Engineering Directorate. Two Penn State engineering student interns managed the project with support from Honeybee Robotics and NASA Kennedy Space Center. The objective was to find an opportunity to integrate SBIR-developed Regolith Extractor and Sampling Technology as the payload for the future Lunar Lander or Rover missions. The team was able to identify two potential Google Lunar X Prize organizations with considerable interest in utilizing regolith acquisition and transfer technology.

  10. Measures of ozone concentrations using passive sampling in forests of South Western Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, M.J. [Fundacion CEAM, Charles R. Darwin 14, Parc Tecnologic, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: mjose@ceam.es; Calatayud, V. [Fundacion CEAM, Charles R. Darwin 14, Parc Tecnologic, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Sanchez-Pena, G. [Servicio de Proteccion de los Montes contra Agentes Nocivos, Direccion General para la Biodiversidad, Ministerio de Medio Ambiente, Gran Via de San Francisco, 4, E-28005, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    Ambient ozone concentrations were measured with passive samplers in the framework of the EU and UN/ECE Level II forest monitoring programme. Data from France, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain and Switzerland are reported for 2000-2002, covering the period from April to September. The number of plots increased from 67 in 2000 to 83 in 2002. The year 2001 experienced the highest ozone concentrations, reflecting more stable summer meteorological conditions. Average 6-month ozone concentrations above 45 ppb were measured this year in 40.3% of the plots, in contrast with the less than 21% measured in the other 2 years. Gradients of increasing ozone levels were observed from North to South and with altitude. Comments are made on the regional trends and on the time frame of the higher ozone episodes. Also, some recommendations enabling a better comparison between plots are provided. - Ozone concentrations in forested areas of SW Europe during the period 2000-2002 showed highest values in 2001, as well as a tendency to increase towards the South and with altitude.

  11. Measures of ozone concentrations using passive sampling in forests of South Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, M.J.; Calatayud, V.; Sanchez-Pena, G.

    2007-01-01

    Ambient ozone concentrations were measured with passive samplers in the framework of the EU and UN/ECE Level II forest monitoring programme. Data from France, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain and Switzerland are reported for 2000-2002, covering the period from April to September. The number of plots increased from 67 in 2000 to 83 in 2002. The year 2001 experienced the highest ozone concentrations, reflecting more stable summer meteorological conditions. Average 6-month ozone concentrations above 45 ppb were measured this year in 40.3% of the plots, in contrast with the less than 21% measured in the other 2 years. Gradients of increasing ozone levels were observed from North to South and with altitude. Comments are made on the regional trends and on the time frame of the higher ozone episodes. Also, some recommendations enabling a better comparison between plots are provided. - Ozone concentrations in forested areas of SW Europe during the period 2000-2002 showed highest values in 2001, as well as a tendency to increase towards the South and with altitude

  12. Passive Acoustic Source Localization at a Low Sampling Rate Based on a Five-Element Cross Microphone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Kan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate acoustic source localization at a low sampling rate (less than 10 kHz is still a challenging problem for small portable systems, especially for a multitasking micro-embedded system. A modification of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC method with the up-sampling (US theory is proposed and defined as the US-GCC method, which can improve the accuracy of the time delay of arrival (TDOA and source location at a low sampling rate. In this work, through the US operation, an input signal with a certain sampling rate can be converted into another signal with a higher frequency. Furthermore, the optimal interpolation factor for the US operation is derived according to localization computation time and the standard deviation (SD of target location estimations. On the one hand, simulation results show that absolute errors of the source locations based on the US-GCC method with an interpolation factor of 15 are approximately from 1/15- to 1/12-times those based on the GCC method, when the initial same sampling rates of both methods are 8 kHz. On the other hand, a simple and small portable passive acoustic source localization platform composed of a five-element cross microphone array has been designed and set up in this paper. The experiments on the established platform, which accurately locates a three-dimensional (3D near-field target at a low sampling rate demonstrate that the proposed method is workable.

  13. PASSIVE SAMPLING OF GROUND WATER MONITORING WELLS WITHOUT PURGING MULTILEVEL WELL CHEMISTRY AND TRACER DISAPPEARANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is essential that the sampling techniques utilized in groundwater monitoring provide data that accurately depicts the water quality of the sampled aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Due to the large amount of monitoring activity currently underway in the U.S.A. it is also im...

  14. Passive air sampling of organochlorine pesticides in a northeastern state of India, Manipur

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ningombam Linthoingambi Devi; Shihua Qi; Paromita Chakraborty; Gan Zhang; Ishwar Chandra Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-six polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers (PUF-PAS) were deployed over a year during January to December, 2009 at three locations, i.e., Imphal (urban site), Thoubal (rural site) and Waithou (alpine site) of Manipur, to assess the seasonal local atrnospheric emission of selected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs).The average concentration of HCHs monitored at mountain site during hot season (Mar, Apr, and May) and rainy seasons (Jun, Jul, Aug, and Sep) were 403 and 349 pg/m3, respectively.DDTs had a high concentration with 384 pg/m3 at rural site and 379 pg/m3 at urban site during hot seasons.Endosulfans and chlordane were found high in concentration during hot seasons (260 pg/m3) and low during retreating monsoon seasons (44 pg/m3) at rural site.Most of the OCPs concentrations were high during cultivation period.The OCP concentrations of rainy season were highly correlated (p < 0.01) with OCPs of hot seasons.Further, positive correlation (p < 0.05) was also obtained between cold seasons and retreating monsoon.Principal component analysis showed a significant correlation among the four seasons and distribution pattern of OCPs in air.Back trajectory analysis by using HYPSLIT model showed a long range air transport of OCPs to the present study area.Present OCP levels at Manipur is an outcome of both local emission and also movement of air mass by long range atmospheric transport.

  15. Does Passive Sampling Accurately Reflect the Bee (Apoidea: Anthophila) Communities Pollinating Apple and Sour Cherry Orchards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Jason; Joshi, Neelendra K; Wilson, Julianna K; Rothwell, Nikki L; Powers, Karen; Haas, Mike; Gut, Larry; Biddinger, David J; Isaacs, Rufus

    2017-06-01

    During bloom of spring orchard crops, bees are the primary providers of pollination service. Monitoring these insects for research projects is often done by timed observations or by direct aerial netting, but there has been increasing interest in blue vane traps as an efficient passive approach to collecting bees. Over multiple spring seasons in Michigan and Pennsylvania, orchards were monitored for wild bees using timed netting from crop flowers and blue vane traps. This revealed a distinctly different community of wild bees captured using the two methods, suggesting that blue vane traps can complement but cannot replace direct aerial netting. The bee community in blue vane traps was generally composed of nonpollinating species, which can be of interest for broader biodiversity studies. In particular, blue vane traps caught Eucera atriventris (Smith), Eucera hamata (Bradley), Bombus fervidus (F.), and Agapostemon virescens (F.) that were never collected from the orchard crop flowers during the study period. Captures of bee species in nets was generally stable across the 3 yr, whereas we observed significant declines in the abundance of Lasioglossum pilosum (Smith) and Eucera spp. trapped using blue vane traps during the project, suggesting local overtrapping of reproductive individuals. We conclude that blue vane traps are a useful tool for expanding insights into bee communities within orchard crop systems, but they should be used with great caution to avoid local extirpation of these important insects. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A passive guard for low thermal conductivity measurement of small samples by the hot plate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannot, Yves; Godefroy, Justine; Degiovanni, Alain; Grigorova-Moutiers, Veneta

    2017-01-01

    Hot plate methods under steady state conditions are based on a 1D model to estimate the thermal conductivity, using measurements of the temperatures T 0 and T 1 of the two sides of the sample and of the heat flux crossing it. To be consistent with the hypothesis of the 1D heat flux, either a hot plate guarded apparatus is used, or the temperature is measured at the centre of the sample. On one hand the latter method can be used only if the ratio thickness/width of the sample is sufficiently low and on the other hand the guarded hot plate method requires large width samples (typical cross section of 0.6  ×  0.6 m 2 ). That is why both methods cannot be used for low width samples. The method presented in this paper is based on an optimal choice of the temperatures T 0 and T 1 compared to the ambient temperature T a , enabling the estimation of the thermal conductivity with a centered hot plate method, by applying the 1D heat flux model. It will be shown that these optimal values do not depend on the size or on the thermal conductivity of samples (in the range 0.015–0.2 W m −1 K −1 ), but only on T a . The experimental results obtained validate the method for several reference samples for values of the ratio thickness/width up to 0.3, thus enabling the measurement of the thermal conductivity of samples having a small cross-section, down to 0.045  ×  0.045 m 2 . (paper)

  17. [Characterizing spatial patterns of NO(x), SO2 and O3 in Pearl River Delta by passive sampling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Shao, Min; Wang, Chen; Wang, Bo-Guang; Lu, Si-Hua; Zhong, Liu-Ju

    2011-02-01

    Concentrations of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were measured by passive sampling within 200km x 200km grid in Pearl River Delta (PRD). Sampling period was two weeks in November, 2009. Spatial distributions of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were obtained by Kriging interpolation method. The results were compared with emission inventories and modeling results. The transportations of O3 were evaluated by using backward trajectories of air parcels. During the sampling period, the mean concentrations of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were 75.9 microg/m3, 37.3 microg/m3 and 36.2 microg/m3, respectively. And the highest concentrations of NO(x), SO2 and O3 were 195.7 microg/m3, 95.9 microg/m3 and 81.8 microg/m3. Comparing with routine measurements from the regional monitoring network in PRD, the results by passive method were 18.6%, 33.5% and 37.5% lower for NO(x), SO2 and O3, respectively. The spatial patterns demonstrated that higher NO(x) concentrations often appeared in cities such as Guangzhou, Foshan and Shenzhen. SO2 concentrations were higher in west and lower in east. High SO2 concentrations are mainly from emission of power plants and industrial sources. Concentrations of O3 showed the highest levels in the south of PRD. Backward trajectory analysis for higher ozone areas indicated that 53% of the air masses were from the region with high concentration of NO(x). The horizontal transportation caused higher ozone in the south while lower in north in PRD.

  18. Methods and devices for hyperpolarising and melting NMR samples in a cryostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Axelsson, Oskar H. E.; Golman, Klaes Koppel

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to devices and method for melting solid polarised sample while retaining a high level of polarisation. In an embodiment of the present invention a sample is polarised in a sample-retaining cup 9 in a strong magnetic field in a polarising means 3a, 3b, 3c in a cryosta...

  19. Comparison of lichen, conifer needles, passive air sampling devices, and snowpack as passive sampling media to measure semi-volatile organic compounds in remote atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of extensively used arsenic-containing herbicides on groundwater beneath golf courses has become a topic of interest. Although currently used organoarsenicals are less toxic, their application into the environment may produce the more toxic inorganic arsenicals. The ob...

  20. Metal insulator semiconductor solar cell devices based on a Cu2O substrate utilizing h-BN as an insulating and passivating layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergen, Onur; Gibb, Ashley; Vazquez-Mena, Oscar; Zettl, Alex; Regan, William Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) based metal insulator semiconductor Schottky (MIS-Schottky) solar cells with efficiency exceeding 3%. A unique direct growth technique is employed in the fabrication, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) serves simultaneously as a passivation and insulation layer on the active Cu 2 O layer. The devices are the most efficient of any Cu 2 O based MIS-Schottky solar cells reported to date

  1. Metal insulator semiconductor solar cell devices based on a Cu{sub 2}O substrate utilizing h-BN as an insulating and passivating layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergen, Onur; Gibb, Ashley; Vazquez-Mena, Oscar; Zettl, Alex, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Regan, William Raymond [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-03-09

    We demonstrate cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) based metal insulator semiconductor Schottky (MIS-Schottky) solar cells with efficiency exceeding 3%. A unique direct growth technique is employed in the fabrication, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) serves simultaneously as a passivation and insulation layer on the active Cu{sub 2}O layer. The devices are the most efficient of any Cu{sub 2}O based MIS-Schottky solar cells reported to date.

  2. Preparation and thermal performance of paraffin/Nano-SiO2 nanocomposite for passive thermal protection of electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yaqin; Gao, Xuenong; Chen, Peng; Huang, Zhaowen; Xu, Tao; Fang, Yutang; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three types of paraffin/nano-SiO 2 nanocomposites were prepared and characterized. • Thermo-physical properties of these composites were determined and compared. • One composite with lower thermal conductivity showed better thermal insulation properties. • This composite was identified as thermal insulation material for electronic components. - Abstract: In this paper, three grades of nano silicon dioxide (nano-SiO 2 ), NS1, NS2 and NS3, were mixed into paraffin to prepare nanocomposites as novel insulation materials for electronic passive thermal protection applications. The optimal mass percentages of paraffin for the three composites, NS1P, NS2P and NS3P, were determined to be 75%, 70% and 65%, respectively. Investigations by means of scanning electron micrographs (SEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), hot disk analyzer and thermal protection performance tests were devoted to the morphology, thermal properties and thermal protection performance analysis of composites. Experimental results showed that paraffin uniformly distributed into the pores and on the surface of nano-SiO 2 . Melting points of composites declined and experimental latent heat became lower than the calculated values with the decrease of nano-SiO 2 pore size. The NS1P composite had larger thermal storage capacity, better reliability and stability compared with NS2P and NS3P. In addition, compared with 90% wt.% paraffin/EG composite, the incorporation of NS1 (25 wt.%) into paraffin caused not only 63.2% reduction in thermal conductivity, but also 21.8% increase in thermal protection time affected by the ambient temperature. Thus those good properties confirmed that NS1P (75 wt.%) composite was a viable candidate for protecting electronic devices under high temperature environment.

  3. Monitoring of atmospheric pollutants passive sampling for the protection of historic buildings and monuments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Santis, F.; Fino, A.; Vazzana, C.; Allegrini, I. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Inquinamento Atmosferico, Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    When considering the various possibilities to assess the effects of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} on historic buildings and monuments, a distinction can be made according to the completeness of the scope of the assessment itself. A first approach can be limited to gathering data as they become available through the official bodies established under air quality legislation. This approach is based on a single point measurement where a general purpose monitoring station is located, often quite far from the monument to protect and often without investigating local and temporal variations. A more comprehensive assessment should include a generalisation that covers the territory. This can be made on the basis of the knowledge of the spatial distribution of concentrations and the knowledge of the causes of air pollution. Passive samplers allow the measurement of air quality in numerous sites and to assess the pollutant spatial distribution over a large area with a high resolution. As an application of the method, the spatial distribution of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} in the city of Siracusa, Sicily, Italy, has been studied to identify areas of high deposition fluxes in relation to the protection of buildings and monuments of the historic centre. [Italian] E' noto che gli inquinanti presenti in aria, tra questi in particolare l'SO{sub 2} e l'NO{sub 2}, sono causa di danno sui monumenti e sulle opere d'arte. La valutazione dell'impatto di questi due inquinanti viene solitamente effettuata sulla base del monitoraggio eseguito secondo la legislazione vigente ma spesso lontano dal monumento da proteggere. Cio', evidentemente, non consente di valutare correttamente il grado di rischio al quale un monumento e' esposto poiche' non fornisce informazioni sulle variazioni spaziali e temporali dei due inquinanti in prossimita' del monumento stesso. Allo scopo di raccogliere quindi informazioni complete sulla distribuzione degli inquinanti, e

  4. Evaluating organochlorine pesticide residues in the aquatic environment of the Lake Naivasha River basin using passive sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Yasser; Mannaerts, Chris M

    2018-05-18

    Passive sampling techniques can improve the discovery of low concentrations by continuous collecting the contaminants, which usually go undetected with classic and once-off time-point grab sampling. The aim of this study was to evaluate organochlorine pesticide (OCP) residues in the aquatic environment of the Lake Naivasha river basin (Kenya) using passive sampling techniques. Silicone rubber sheet and Speedisk samplers were used to detect residues of α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH, δ-HCH, heptachlor, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, pp-DDE, endrin, dieldrin, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, pp-DDD, endrin aldehyde, pp-DDT, endosulfan sulfate, and methoxychlor in the Malewa River and Lake Naivasha. After solvent extraction from the sampling media, the residues were analyzed using gas chromatography electron capture detection (GC-ECD) for the OCPs and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the PCB reference compounds. Measuring the OCP residues using the silicone rubber samplers revealed the highest concentration of residues (∑OCPs of 81 (± 18.9 SD) μg/L) to be at the Lake site, being the ultimate accumulation environment for surficial hydrological, chemical, and sediment transport through the river basin. The total OCP residue sums changed to 71.5 (± 11.3 SD) μg/L for the Middle Malewa and 59 (± 12.5 SD) μg/L for the Upper Malewa River sampling sites. The concentration sums of OCPs detected using the Speedisk samplers at the Upper Malewa, Middle Malewa, and the Lake Naivasha sites were 28.2 (± 4.2 SD), 31.3 (± 1.8 SD), and 34.2 (± 6.4 SD) μg/L, respectively. An evaluation of the different pesticide compound variations identified at the three sites revealed that endosulfan sulfate, α-HCH, methoxychlor, and endrin aldehyde residues were still found at all sampling sites. However, the statistical analysis of one-way ANOVA for testing the differences of ∑OCPs between the sampling sites for both the silicone rubber sheet and Speedisk samplers

  5. Effective Passivation and Tunneling Hybrid a-SiOx(In) Layer in ITO/n-Si Heterojunction Photovoltaic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Wan, Yazhou; Li, Yong; Han, Baichao; Song, Wenlei; Xu, Fei; Zhao, Lei; Ma, Zhongquan

    2017-05-24

    In this article, using controllable magnetron sputtering of indium tin oxide (ITO) materials on single crystal silicon at 100 °C, the optoelectronic heterojunction frame of ITO/a-SiO x (In)/n-Si is simply fabricated for the purpose of realizing passivation contact and hole tunneling. It is found that the gradation profile of indium (In) element together with silicon oxide (SiO x /In) within the ultrathin boundary zone between ITO and n-Si occurs and is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the ion milling technique. The atomistic morphology and physical phase of the interfacial layer has been observed with a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. X-ray diffraction, Hall effect measurement, and optical transmittance with Tauc plot have been applied to the microstructure and property analyses of ITO thin films, respectively. The polycrystalline and amorphous phases have been verified for ITO films and SiO x (In) hybrid layer, respectively. For the quantum transport, both direct and defect-assisted tunneling of photogenerated holes through the a-SiO x (In) layer is confirmed. Besides, there is a gap state correlative to the indium composition and located at E v + 4.60 eV in the ternary hybrid a-SiO x (In) layer that is predicted by density functional theory of first-principles calculation, which acts as an "extended delocalized state" for direct tunneling of the photogenerated holes. The reasonable built-in potential (V bi = 0.66 V) and optimally controlled ternary hybrid a-SiO x (In) layer (about 1.4 nm) result in that the device exhibits excellent PV performance, with an open-circuit voltage of 0.540 V, a short-circuit current density of 30.5 mA/cm 2 , a high fill factor of 74.2%, and a conversion efficiency of 12.2%, under the AM 1.5 illumination. The work function difference between ITO (5.06 eV) and n-Si (4.31 eV) is determined by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and ascribed to the essence of the built-in-field of the PV device

  6. Evaluation of a new simple collection device for sampling of microparticles in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferaj, Sabina; Ullah, Shahid; Tinglev, Åsa; Carlsson, Sten; Winberg, Jesper; Stambeck, Peter; Beck, Olof

    2018-03-12

    The microparticle fraction of exhaled breath is of interest for developing clinical biomarkers. Exhaled particles may contain non-volatile components from all parts of the airway system, formed during normal breathing. This study aimed to evaluate a new, simple sampling device, based on impaction, for collecting microparticles from exhaled breath. Performance of the new device was compared with that of the existing SensAbues membrane filter device. The analytical work used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods. The new device collected three subsamples and these were separately analysed from eight individuals. No difference was observed between the centre position (0.91 ng/sample) and the side positions (1.01 ng/sample) using major phosphatidylcholine (PC) 16:0/16:0 as the analyte. Exhaled breath was collected from eight patients on methadone maintenance treatment. The intra-individual variability in measured methadone concentration between the three collectors was 8.7%. In another experiment using patients on methadone maintenance treatment, the sampling efficiency was compared with an established filter device. Compared to the existing device, the efficiency of the new device was 121% greater for methadone and 1450% greater for DPPC. The data from lipid analysis also indicated that a larger fraction of the collected material was from the distal parts. Finally, a study using an optical particle counter indicated that the device preferentially collects the larger particle fraction. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the usefulness of the new device for collecting non-volatile components from exhaled breath. The performance of the device was superior to the filter device in several aspects.

  7. A Biopolymer Heparin Sodium Interlayer Anchoring TiO2 and MAPbI3 Enhances Trap Passivation and Device Stability in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shuai; Wang, Hui; Bi, Shiqing; Zhou, Jiyu; Qin, Liang; Qiu, Xiaohui; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Xu, Yun; Zhang, Yuan; Shi, Xinghua; Zhou, Huiqiong; Tang, Zhiyong

    2018-04-18

    Traps in the photoactive layer or interface can critically influence photovoltaic device characteristics and stabilities. Here, traps passivation and retardation on device degradation for methylammonium lead trihalide (MAPbI 3 ) perovskite solar cells enabled by a biopolymer heparin sodium (HS) interfacial layer is investigated. The incorporated HS boosts the power conversion efficiency from 17.2 to 20.1% with suppressed hysteresis and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination, which originates primarily from the passivation of traps near the interface between the perovskites and the TiO 2 cathode. The incorporation of an HS interfacial layer also leads to a considerable retardation of device degradation, by which 85% of the initial performance is maintained after 70 d storage in ambient environment. Aided by density functional theory calculations, it is found that the passivation of MAPbI 3 and TiO 2 surfaces by HS occurs through the interactions of the functional groups (COO - , SO 3 - , or Na + ) in HS with undersaturated Pb and I ions in MAPbI 3 and Ti 4+ in TiO 2 . This work demonstrates a highly viable and facile interface strategy using biomaterials to afford high-performance and stable perovskite solar cells. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Passive sampling of selected endocrine disrupting compounds using polar organic chemical integrative samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Voutsa, Dimitra

    2008-01-01

    Two types of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (pharmaceutical POCIS and pesticide POCIS) were examined for their sampling efficiency of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Laboratory-based calibration of POCISs was conducted by exposing them at high and low concentrations of 14 EDCs (4-alkyl-phenols, their ethoxylate oligomers, bisphenol A, selected estrogens and synthetic steroids) for different time periods. The kinetic studies showed an integrative uptake up to 28 days. The sampling rates for the individual compounds were obtained. The use of POCISs could result in an integrative approach to the quality status of the aquatic systems especially in the case of high variation of water concentrations of EDCs. The sampling efficiency of POCISs under various field conditions was assessed after their deployment in different aquatic environments. - Calibration and field performance of polar organic integrative samplers for monitoring EDCs in aquatic environments

  9. Passive sampling in regulatory chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, K.; Robinson, C.D.; Burgess, R.M.; Mayer, P.; Roberts, C.A.; Ahrens, L.; Allan, I.J.; Brant, J.; Jones, L.; Kraus, U.R.; Larsen, M.M.; Lepom, P.; Petersen, J.; Pröfrock, D.; Roose, P.; Schäfer, S.; Smedes, F.; Tixier, C.; Vorkamp, K.; Whitehouse, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the EuropeanUnion, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of themarine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met bypassive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths

  10. Device to investigate samples by means of flameless atomic absorption measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, K.R.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement on a device to investigate samples by means of flameless atomic absorption measurement is suggested in which one aims to produce a most complete possible atomic clond from the sample to be investigated within the sample space defined by the beam bundle, through which the measuring beam bundle is passed. According to the invention, the tubular sample space should be closed by an optically penetrable window on one side. (RW) [de

  11. PCDD/PCDF and dl-PCB in the ambient air of a tropical Andean city: passive and active sampling measurements near industrial and vehicular pollution sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, J; González, C M; Morales, L; Abalos, M; Abad, E; Aristizábal, B H

    2014-09-01

    Concentration gradients were observed in gas and particulate phases of PCDD/F originating from industrial and vehicular sources in the densely populated tropical Andean city of Manizales, using passive and active air samplers. Preliminary results suggest greater concentrations of dl-PCB in the mostly gaseous fraction (using quarterly passive samplers) and greater concentrations of PCDD/F in the mostly particle fraction (using daily active samplers). Dioxin-like PCB predominance was associated with the semi-volatility property, which depends on ambient temperature. Slight variations of ambient temperature in Manizales during the sampling period (15°C-27°C) may have triggered higher concentrations in all passive samples. This was the first passive air sampling monitoring of PCDD/F conducted in an urban area of Colombia. Passive sampling revealed that PCDD/F in combination with dioxin-like PCB ranged from 16 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) near industrial sources to 7 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) in an intermediate zone-a reduction of 56% over 2.8 km. Active sampling of particulate phase PCDD/F and dl-PCB were analyzed in PM10 samples. PCDD/F combined with dl-PCB ranged from 46 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) near vehicular sources to 8 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) in the same intermediate zone, a reduction of 83% over 2.6 km. Toxic equivalent quantities in both PCDD/F and dl-PCB decreased toward an intermediate zone of the city. Variations in congener profiles were consistent with variations expected from nearby sources, such as a secondary metallurgy plant, areas of concentrated vehicular emissions and a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI). These variations in congener profile measurements of dioxins and dl-PCBs in passive and active samples can be partly explained by congener variations expected from the various sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DGT Passive Sampling for Quantitative in Situ Measurements of Compounds from Household and Personal Care Products in Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Yanying; Chen, Chang-Er; Sweetman, Andrew J; Zhang, Hao; Jones, Kevin C

    2017-11-21

    Widespread use of organic chemicals in household and personal care products (HPCPs) and their discharge into aquatic systems means reliable, robust techniques to monitor environmental concentrations are needed. The passive sampling approach of diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) is developed here and demonstrated to provide in situ quantitative and time-weighted average (TWA) measurement of these chemicals in waters. The novel technique is developed for HPCPs, including preservatives, antioxidants and disinfectants, by evaluating the performance of different binding agents. Ultrasonic extraction of binding gels in acetonitrile gave good and consistent recoveries for all test chemicals. Uptake by DGT with HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic-balanced) as the binding agent was relatively independent of pH (3.5-9.5), ionic strength (0.001-0.1 M) and dissolved organic matter (0-20 mg L -1 ), making it suitable for applications across a wide range of environments. Deployment time and diffusion layer thickness dependence experiments confirmed DGT accumulated chemicals masses are consistent with theoretical predictions. The technique was further tested and applied in the influent and effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. Results were compared with conventional grab-sampling and 24-h-composited samples from autosamplers. DGT provided TWA concentrations over up to 18 days deployment, with minimal effects from biofouling or the diffusive boundary layer. The field application demonstrated advantages of the DGT technique: it gives in situ analyte preconcentration in a simple matrix, with more quantitative measurement of the HPCP analytes.

  13. Passive sampling in the study of dynamic and environmental impact of pesticides in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon F. Narvaez V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Los plaguicidas son las sustancias con mayor aplicación en la agricultura las cuales pueden contaminar los cuerpos de agua por descarga directa o indirecta, pero los grandes volúmenes y los procesos transformación pueden disminuir la concentración de estas sustancias y sus productos de degradación en las cuencas. Actualmente, los métodos convencionales de extracción tales como: la extracción en fase sólida (SPE y la micro extracción en fase sólida (SPME entre otras, no permiten bajos límites de detección, sin embargo bajos niveles de pesticidas y productos de degradación podrían producir toxicidad crónica en diferentes especies. Actualmente el muestreo pasivo es ampliamente usado en el monitoreo de plaguicidas y para el aseguramiento de la calidad del agua debido a que esta metodología es aplicada in estudios de bioacumulación y deteccion a partes por cuatrillón (ppq. Las membranas con mayor uso en el muestreo pasivo son las membranas tipo SPMD (Semi-permeable membrane devices, las cuales permiten la concentración de sustancias lipofílicas y las membranas tipo POCIS (Polar organic chemistry integrative sampler, las cuales permiten concentrar sustancias hidrofílicas. Esta revisión cubre la aplicación de los muestreadores pasivos en el análisis de plaguicidas, en los estudios de biacumulación y en la evaluación de los riesgos ecotoxicológicos. Finalmente los muestreadores pasivos permiten reducir costos, el tiempo de concentración y la cantidad de solventes orgánicos empleados en el tratamiento de muestra, lo que conduce a su clasificación dentro de las tendencias de la “química analítica verde”.

  14. Polymeric ionic liquid-based portable tip microextraction device for on-site sample preparation of water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Pei, Junxian; Huang, Xiaojia; Lu, Min

    2018-06-05

    On-site sample preparation is highly desired because it avoids the transportation of large-volume samples and ensures the accuracy of the analytical results. In this work, a portable prototype of tip microextraction device (TMD) was designed and developed for on-site sample pretreatment. The assembly procedure of TMD is quite simple. Firstly, polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based adsorbent was in-situ prepared in a pipette tip. After that, the tip was connected with a syringe which was driven by a bidirectional motor. The flow rates in adsorption and desorption steps were controlled accurately by the motor. To evaluate the practicability of the developed device, the TMD was used to on-site sample preparation of waters and combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection to measure trace estrogens in water samples. Under the most favorable conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) for the target analytes were in the range of 4.9-22 ng/L, with good coefficients of determination. Confirmatory study well evidences that the extraction performance of TMD is comparable to that of the traditional laboratory solid-phase extraction process, but the proposed TMD is more simple and convenient. At the same time, the TMD avoids complicated sampling and transferring steps of large-volume water samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biological samples positioning device for irradiations on a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Gual, Maritza; Mas Milian, Felix; Deppman, Airton; Pinto Coelho, Paulo Rogerio

    2010-01-01

    For the demand of an experimental device for biological samples positioning system for irradiations on a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor in operation was constructed and started up a device for the place and remove of the biological samples from the irradiation channels without interrupting the operation of the reactor. The economical valuations are effected comparing with another type of device with the same functions. This work formed part of an international project between Cuba and Brazil that undertook the study of the induced damages by various types of ionizing radiation in DNA molecules. Was experimentally tested the proposed solution, which demonstrates the practical validity of the device. As a result of the work, the experimental device for biological samples irradiations are installed and operating in the radial beam hole No3(BH3) for more than five years at the IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor according to the solicited requirements the device. The designed device increases considerably the type of studies can be conducted in this reactor. Its practical application in research taking place in that facility, in the field of radiobiology and dosimetry, and so on is immediate

  16. Air-deployable oil spill sampling devices review phase 2 testing. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, L.; Dumouchel, A.; Fingas, M.; Brown, C.E.

    2007-01-01

    SAIC Canada tested air deployable oil sampling devices for the Emergencies Science and Technology Division of Environment Canada in order to determine the applicability and status of these devices. The 3 devices tested were: Canada's SABER (sampling autonomous buoy for evidence recovery), the United States' POPEIE (probe for oil pollution evidence in the environment); and, Sweden's SAR Floatation 2000. They were tested for buoyancy properties, drift behaviour and sampler sorbent pickup ratios. The SAR and SABER both had lesser draft and greater freeboard, while the POPEIE had much greater draft than freeboard. All 3 devices could be used for oil sample collection in that their drift characteristics would allow for the SABER and SAR devices to be placed upwind of the slick while the POPEIE device could be placed downwind of an oil spill. The sorbent testing revealed that Sefar sorbent and Spectra sorbent used in the 3 devices had negative pickup ratios for diesel but performance improved as oil viscosity increased. Both sorbents are inert and capable of collecting oil in sufficient volumes for consistent fingerprinting analysis. 10 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs

  17. A low-temperature sample orienting device for single crystal spectroscopy at the SNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherline, T E; Solomon, L; Roberts, C K II; Bruce, D; Gaulin, B; Granroth, G E, E-mail: sherlinete@ornl.gov

    2010-11-01

    A low temperature sample orientation device providing three axes of rotation has been successfully built and is in testing for use on several spectrometers at the spallation neutron source (SNS). Sample rotation about the vertical ({omega}) axis of nearly 360 deg. and out of plane tilts ({phi} and v) of from -3.4 deg. to 4.4 deg. and from -2.8 deg. to 3.5 deg., respectively, are possible. An off-the-shelf closed cycle refrigerator (CCR) is mounted on a room temperature sealed rotary flange providing {omega} rotations of the sample. Out-of-plane tilts are made possible by piezoelectric actuated angular positioning devices mounted on the low temperature head of the CCR. Novel encoding devices based on magnetoresistive sensors have been developed to measure the tilt stage angles. This combination facilitates single crystal investigations from room temperature to 3.1 K. Commissioning experiments of the rotating CCR for both powder and single crystal samples have been performed on the ARCS spectrometer at the SNS. For the powder sample this device was used to continuously rotate the sample and thus average out any partial orientation of the powder. The powder rings observed in S(Q) are presented. For the single crystal sample, the rotation was used to probe different regions of momentum transfer (Q-space). Laue patterns obtained from a single crystal sample at two rotation angles are presented.

  18. Microfluidic devices for sample clean-up and screening of biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical chemistry plays an important role in the separation and identification of analytes from raw samples (e.g. plant extracts, blood), but the whole analytical process is tedious, difficult to automate and time consuming. To overcome these drawbacks, the concept of μTAS (miniaturized total

  19. Predicting bioavailability of PAHs in field-contaminated soils by passive sampling with triolein embedded cellulose acetate membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Yuqiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Shuzhen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: szzhang@rcees.ac.cn; Wang Zijian [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Christie, Peter [Queen' s University Belfast, Agricultural and Environmental Science Department, Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Triolein embedded cellulose acetate membrane (TECAM) was used for passive sampling of the fraction of naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in 18 field-contaminated soils. The sampling process of PAHs by TECAM fitted well with a first-order kinetics model and PAHs reached 95% of equilibrium in TECAM within 20 h. Concentrations of PAHs in TECAM (C{sub TECAM}) correlated well with the concentrations in soils (r{sup 2} = 0.693-0.962, p < 0.001). Furthermore, concentrations of PAHs determined in the soil solution were very close to the values estimated by C{sub TECAM} and the partition coefficient between TECAM and water (K{sub TECAM-w}). After lipid normalization nearly 1:1 relationships were observed between PAH concentrations in TECAMs and earthworms exposed to the soils (r{sup 2} = 0.591-0.824, n = 18, p < 0.01). These results suggest that TECAM can be a useful tool to predict bioavailability of PAHs in field-contaminated soils. - Triolein embedded cellulose acetate membranes can be a useful tool to predict bioavailability of PAHs in field-contaminated soils.

  20. Development of gas-sampling device for 13N monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lihong; Gong Xueyu

    2003-01-01

    The 13 N monitoring system is used in the monitoring of the rate of leakage of the primary coolant circuit in nuclear power stations. The author introduces a gas-sampling device of the 13 Nmonitoring system. It is with a close-loop flow control system with intelligent control of Single Chip Micyoco (SCM), and has the ability to monitor and replace the filter paper automatically, to increase the automation of the device and stable operation in long time

  1. Design of sample analysis device for iodine adsorption efficiency test in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Jinnan

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, iodine adsorption efficiency test is used to check the iodine adsorption efficiency of the iodine adsorber. The iodine adsorption efficiency can be calculated through the analysis of the test sample, and thus to determine if the performance of the adsorber meets the requirement on the equipment operation and emission. Considering the process of test and actual demand, in this paper, a special device for the analysis of this kind of test sample is designed. The application shows that the device is with convenient operation and high reliability and accurate calculation, and improves the experiment efficiency and reduces the experiment risk. (author)

  2. Bio-sample detection on paper-based devices with inkjet printer-sprayed reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wun-Hong; Chu, Chien-Hung; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2015-12-01

    The reagent required for bio-sample detection on paper-based analytical devices is generally introduced manually using a pipette. Such an approach is time-consuming; particularly if a large number of devices are required. Automated methods provide a far more convenient solution for large-scale production, but incur a substantial cost. Accordingly, the present study proposes a low-cost method for the paper-based analytical devices in which the biochemical reagents are sprayed onto the device directly using a modified commercial inkjet printer. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by performing aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) tests using simple two-dimensional (2D) paper-based devices. In both cases, the reaction process is analyzed using an image-processing-based colorimetric method. The experimental results show that for AST detection within the 0-105 U/l concentration range, the optimal observation time is around four minutes, while for ALT detection in the 0-125 U/l concentration range, the optimal observation time is approximately one minute. Finally, for both samples, the detection performance of the sprayed-reagent analytical devices is insensitive to the glucose concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Solid Ceramic Dosimeters for the Time-Integrative Passive Sampling of Volatile Organic Compounds in Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Riza Gabriela; Nam, Go-Un; Eom, In-Yong; Hong, Yong-Seok

    2017-11-07

    Time-integrative passive sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water can now be accomplished using a solid ceramic dosimeter. A nonporous ceramic, which excludes the permeation of water, allowing only gas-phase diffusion of VOCs into the resin inside the dosimeter, effectively captured the VOCs. The mass accumulation of 11 VOCs linearly increased with time over a wide range of aqueous-phase concentrations (16.9 to 1100 μg L -1 ), and the linearity was dependent upon the Henry's constant (H). The average diffusivity of the VOCs in the solid ceramic was 1.46 × 10 -10 m 2 s -1 at 25 °C, which was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that in air (8.09 × 10 -6 m 2 s -1 ). This value was 60% greater than that in the water-permeable porous ceramic (0.92 × 10 -10 m 2 s -1 ), suggesting that its mass accumulation could be more effective than that of porous ceramic dosimeters. The mass accumulation of the VOCs in the solid ceramic dosimeter increased in the presence of salt (≥0.1 M) and with increasing temperature (4 to 40 °C) but varied only slightly with dissolved organic matter concentration. The solid ceramic dosimeter was suitable for the field testing and measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of VOC-contaminated waters.

  4. Ethylene vinyl acetate polymer as a tool for passive sampling monitoring of hydrophobic chemicals in the salmon farm industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucca, Felipe; Moya, Heriberto; Barra, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The samplers allow the detection of hydrophobic chemicals in the marine environment. • The samplers reach equilibrium quickly, with days of deployment in the field. • The samplers have low costs and easy manipulation for monitoring programs. • A way to collect chemicals in the aquatic environment without human effort. - Abstract: Current monitoring programs are focused on hydrophobic chemicals detection in aquatic systems, which require the collection of high volumes of water samples at a given time. The present study documents the preliminary use of the polymer ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) as a passive sampler for the detection of a hydrophobic chemical used by salmon industries such as cypermethrin. Initially, an experimental calibration in laboratory was performed to determine the cypermethrin equilibrium between sampler and aquatic medium, which was reached after seven days of exposure. A logarithm of partitioning coefficient EVA–water (log K EVA–W ) of 5.6 was reported. Field deployment of EVA samplers demonstrated average concentrations of cypermethrin in water to be 2.07 ± 0.7 ng L −1 close to salmon cages, while near-shore was 4.39 ± 0.8 ng L −1 . This was a first approach for assessing EVA samplers design as a tool of monitoring in water for areas with salmon farming activity

  5. Atmospheric concentrations and trends of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) over 7 years of sampling in the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauert, Cassandra; Shoieb, Mahiba; Schuster, Jasmin K; Eng, Anita; Harner, Tom

    2018-07-01

    Poly- and per-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) were monitored at 21 sites in the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) Network. Atmospheric concentrations previously reported from 2009 were compared to concentrations measured at these sites in 2013 and 2015, to assess trends over 7 years of monitoring. Concentrations of the fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) and fluorinated sulfonamides and sulfonamidoethanols (FOSAs and FOSEs) were stable at these sites from 2009 to 2015 with no significant difference (p > 0.05) in concentrations. Elevated concentrations of all the neutral PFAS were detected at the urban sites as compared to the polar/background sites. The perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs), meanwhile, saw a significant increase (p  0.05). Concentrations of the PFSAs and the PFCAs were similar at all location types, showing the global reach of these persistent compounds. Concentrations of the cyclic VMS (cVMS) were at least an order of magnitude higher than the linear VMS (lVMS) and the PFAS. Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) saw a weak significant increase in concentrations from 2009 to 2013 (p < 0.05), however, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3) had a strong significant decrease in concentrations from 2009 to 2015 (p < 0.01). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Microfluidic devices for sample preparation and rapid detection of foodborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant, Krishna; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Dave, Vivek Priy

    2018-01-01

    and improve the limit of detections. Integration of pathogen capturing bio-receptors on microfluidic devices is a crucial step, which can facilitate recognition abilities in harsh chemical and physical conditions, offering a great commercial benefit to the food-manufacturing sector. This article reviews...... diagnosis competences. This has prompted researchers to call the current status of detection approaches into question and leverage new technologies for superior pathogen sensing outcomes. Novel strategies mainly rely on incorporating all the steps from sample preparation to detection in miniaturized devices...... recent advances in current state-of-the-art of sample preparation and concentration from food matrices with focus on bacterial capturing methods and sensing technologies, along with their advantages and limitations when integrated into microfluidic devices for online rapid detection of pathogens in foods...

  7. Time integrated Pesticide analysis in the tropical Rio Tapezco in Costa Rica by using passive sampling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Frederik; Stamm, Christian; Ruepert, Clemens; Zurbrügg, Christian; Eggen, Rik

    2016-04-01

    Tropical areas are pesticide "hot spots". Global data indicate that in these regions the annual average pesticide application rates and surface runoff potentials can be very high. However in tropical regions, information about the pesticide entry routes, their environmental behavior, and the degree of water pollution is often lacking. Catchment-scale monitoring data are required to fill these knowledge gaps and to gain a better systematic understanding of the environmental fate, behavior and impacts of pesticides in tropical aquatic environments. Accordingly, our study was conducted in the tropical Rio Tapezco catchment in the Zarcero canton, Costa Rica. The area covers 5112 ha, ranges between an altitude of 1580 and 2010 m above sea level and receives a total annual precipitation between 1500 and 3500 mm. The catchment is intensively used for the horticultural production of vegetables and herbs. It is a hot spots of pesticide use with an average application rate of about 22 kg/ha of arable land and cropping cycle. In conjunction with the poor pesticide application practices, the tropical climate, strong precipitations and the continuous pesticide application during the whole year, the risks for water pollution and environmental health are high. Indeed, previous spot sampling showed that in streams of the study area, several pesticides were found in concentrations up to 6.8 μg/L. While this data indicate the risk for the aquatic environment, the seasonal grab sampling reflects only poorly the highly dynamic concentration time-series. Additionally, the assessment of the actual pollution level was restricted by a limited analytical window. To close these research gaps, we sampled the rivers of the study area continuously between end of July and beginning of October 2015 by using three passive sampling systems (Camcather® with styrene-divinylbenzene reverse phase sulfonated discs, polydimethylsiloxane sheets, and a water level proportional water sampler). Samples

  8. Device for the analysis of feedwater and condensation samples from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostofin, A.A.; Sorokina, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    An improved version of a device for automatic measurement of the salt and NH 3 contents of feedwater and condensate samples from nuclear power plants is described. Only one sample is required for determining both values. The invention proposes on the one hand to change the dimensions of a throttle opening and on the other to install a second measuring instrument (conductivity measuring instrument). (UWI) [de

  9. VAPOR SAMPLING DEVICE FOR INTERFACE WITH MICROTOX ASSAY FOR SCREENING TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A time-integrated sampling system interfaced with a toxicity-based assay is reported for monitoring volatile toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the fill solvent accumulated each of 17 TICs from the vapor...

  10. Short communication: Influence of the sampling device on somatic cell count variation in cow milk samples (by official recording)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouz, R.; Vilar, M.J.; Yus, E.; Sanjuán, M.L.; Diéguez, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the variability in cow´s milk somatic cell counts (SCC) depending on the type of milk meter used by dairy farms for official milk recording. The study was performed in 2011 and 2012 in the major cattle area of Spain. In total, 137,846 lactations of Holstein-Friesian cows were analysed at 1,912 farms. A generalised least squares regression model was used for data analysis. The model showed that the milk meter had a substantial effect on the SCC for individual milk samples obtained for official milk recording. The results suggested an overestimation of the SCC in milk samples from farms that had electronic devices in comparison with farms that used portable devices and underestimation when volumetric meters are used. A weak positive correlation was observed between the SCC and the percentage of fat in individual milk samples. The results underline the importance of considering this variable when using SCC data from milk recording in the dairy herd improvement program or in quality milk programs. (Author)

  11. Short communication: Influence of the sampling device on somatic cell count variation in cow milk samples (by official recording)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouz, R.; Vilar, M.J.; Yus, E.; Sanjuán, M.L.; Diéguez, F.J.

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the variability in cow´s milk somatic cell counts (SCC) depending on the type of milk meter used by dairy farms for official milk recording. The study was performed in 2011 and 2012 in the major cattle area of Spain. In total, 137,846 lactations of Holstein-Friesian cows were analysed at 1,912 farms. A generalised least squares regression model was used for data analysis. The model showed that the milk meter had a substantial effect on the SCC for individual milk samples obtained for official milk recording. The results suggested an overestimation of the SCC in milk samples from farms that had electronic devices in comparison with farms that used portable devices and underestimation when volumetric meters are used. A weak positive correlation was observed between the SCC and the percentage of fat in individual milk samples. The results underline the importance of considering this variable when using SCC data from milk recording in the dairy herd improvement program or in quality milk programs. (Author)

  12. Optical and electrical characterizations of a single step ion beam milling mesa devices of chloride passivated PbS colloidal quantum dots based film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hechster, Elad, E-mail: elad.hechster@gmail.com; Sarusi, Gabby [Electro-Optics Engineering Unit and Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 84100 Israel (Israel); Shapiro, Arthur; Lifshitz, Efrat [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Solid State Institute, Russel Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

    2016-07-15

    Colloidal Quantum Dots (CQDs) are of increasing interest, thanks to their quantum size effect that gives rise to their usage in various applications, such as biological tagging, solar cells and as the sensitizing layer of night vision devices. Here, we analyze the optical absorbance of chloride passivated PbS CQDs as well as revealing a correlation between their photoluminescence and sizes distribution, using theoretical models and experimental results from the literature. Next, we calculate the CQDs resistivity as a film. Although resistivity can be calculated from sheet resistance measurement using four point probes, such measurement is usually carried-out on the layer’s surface that in most cases has dangling bonds and surface states, which might affect the charges flow and modify the resistivity. Therefore; our approach, which was applied in this work, is to extract the actual resistivity from measurements that are performed along the film’s thickness (z-direction). For this intent, we fabricated gold capped PbS mesas devices using a single step Ion Beam Milling (IBM) process where we milled the gold and the PbS film continually, and then measured the vertical resistance. Knowing the mesas’ dimensions, we calculate the resistivity. To the best of our knowledge, no previous work has extracted, vertically, the resistivity of chloride passivated PbS CQDs using the above method.

  13. Optical and electrical characterizations of a single step ion beam milling mesa devices of chloride passivated PbS colloidal quantum dots based film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechster, Elad; Sarusi, Gabby; Shapiro, Arthur; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal Quantum Dots (CQDs) are of increasing interest, thanks to their quantum size effect that gives rise to their usage in various applications, such as biological tagging, solar cells and as the sensitizing layer of night vision devices. Here, we analyze the optical absorbance of chloride passivated PbS CQDs as well as revealing a correlation between their photoluminescence and sizes distribution, using theoretical models and experimental results from the literature. Next, we calculate the CQDs resistivity as a film. Although resistivity can be calculated from sheet resistance measurement using four point probes, such measurement is usually carried-out on the layer’s surface that in most cases has dangling bonds and surface states, which might affect the charges flow and modify the resistivity. Therefore; our approach, which was applied in this work, is to extract the actual resistivity from measurements that are performed along the film’s thickness (z-direction). For this intent, we fabricated gold capped PbS mesas devices using a single step Ion Beam Milling (IBM) process where we milled the gold and the PbS film continually, and then measured the vertical resistance. Knowing the mesas’ dimensions, we calculate the resistivity. To the best of our knowledge, no previous work has extracted, vertically, the resistivity of chloride passivated PbS CQDs using the above method.

  14. Spot the difference. Impact of different selection criteria on observed properties of passive galaxies in zCOSMOS-20k sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresco, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Cimatti, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bolzonella, M.; Lamareille, F.; Mignoli, M.; Zucca, E.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovač, K.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pelló, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Presotto, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Barnes, L.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Diener, C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Le Floc'h, E.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Nair, P.; Oesch, P.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.; Welikala, N.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: We present the analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and morphological properties for differently selected samples of passive galaxies up to z = 1 extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k spectroscopic survey. This analysis intends toexplore the dependence of galaxy properties on the selection criterion adopted, study the degree of contamination due to star-forming outliers, and provide a comparison between different commonly used selection criteria. This work is a first step to fully investigating the selection effects of passive galaxies for future massive surveys such as Euclid. Methods: We extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k catalog six different samples of passive galaxies, based on morphology (3336 "morphological" early-type galaxies), optical colors (4889 "red-sequence" galaxies and 4882 "red UVJ" galaxies), specific star-formation rate (2937 "quiescent" galaxies), a best fit to the observed spectral energy distribution (2603 "red SED" galaxies), and a criterion that combines morphological, spectroscopic, and photometric information (1530 "red & passive early-type galaxies"). For all the samples, we studied optical and infrared colors, morphological properties, specific star-formation rates (SFRs), and the equivalent widths of the residual emission lines; this analysis was performed as a function of redshift and stellar mass to inspect further possible dependencies. Results: We find that each passive galaxy sample displays a certain level of contamination due to blue/star-forming/nonpassive outliers. The morphological sample is the one that presents the higher percentage of contamination, with ~12-65% (depending on the mass range) of galaxies not located in the red sequence, ~25-80% of galaxies with a specific SFR up to ~25 times higher than the adopted definition of passive, and significant emission lines found in the median stacked spectra, at least for log (M/M⊙) contamination in color 10.25, very limited tails in sSFR, a median value ~20% higher than the

  15. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2015-01-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameter...

  16. A novel needle-type sampling device for flexible ultrathin bronchoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Yuji; Hayashi, Katsutoshi; Shindoh, Yuriko; Iijima, Hideya; Tanaka, Akiko

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of suspected cancer in the periphery of the lung is difficult. A flexible ultrathin bronchoscope has been developed for the diagnosis of peripherally located pulmonary lesions that cannot be reached with the sampling devices for standard flexible bronchoscopes. The diagnostic yield with forceps and a brush for ultrathin bronchoscopes, however, is not adequate, especially when a lesion is not exposed to the bronchial lumen. We have thus developed a novel needle-type sampling device and tested its yield in transbronchial cytology. The device consists of an elongated dental H-file (0.4 mm in diameter and 110 cm in length), a housing sheath (1.0 mm in outer diameter), and a novel handle, which enables rapid out-and-in motion of the needle. Ten consecutive patients with a peripheral pulmonary lesion who had an indication for diagnostic procedure with a flexible ultrathin bronchoscope were enrolled. The optimal bronchial route to the lesion was analyzed with virtual bronchoscopy in a data set obtained with high-resolution computed tomography, and a novel bronchial route labeling system (prior-ridge-based relative orientation nomenclature) was employed to guide insertion of the bronchoscope. Sampling with the novel needle was performed prior to use of the forceps and brush under conventional fluoroscopy. In all the cases, sampling with the needle was successful and the amount of the specimen was sufficient for cytology. Our novel sampling system with flexible ultrathin bronchoscopes may contribute to accurate and minimally invasive diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions. (author)

  17. Development and application of a micro-digestion device for biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlen, A. von; Klockenkaemper, R.; Messerschmidt, J.; Alt, F.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical characterization of small amounts of a sample is of increasing importance for various research projects in biology, biochemistry and medicine. Reliable determinations of minor and trace elements in microsamples can be performed by total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF). This microanalytical method is suitable for direct multielement analyses of a tiny amount of a liquid or solid sample. Instead of a direct analysis, however, a complete digestion or mineralisation of the sample material prior to analysis can be recommendable. It can be advantageous for a favorable presentation, for a preconcentration and/or homogenization of the material and particularly for an accurate quantification. Unfortunately, commercially available digestion devices are optimized for amounts of 50 to 400 mg of a sample. For smaller amounts, a microdigestion device was constructed and adapted to an equipment of high pressure ashing, which is commercially available. Digestions of very different microsamples between some μg and some mg were carried out, followed by quantitative determinations of a lot of elements. Besides, different Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were analyzed. The homogeneity of these materials could be investigated by comparing the results found for microsamples with those obtained for samples of 200 mg, the latter after digestion in a conventional device. (author)

  18. Passive air sampling of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in New Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai and Chennai: Levels, homologous profiling and source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Paromita; Zhang, Gan; Cheng, Hairong; Balasubramanian, Prithiviraj; Li, Jun; Jones, Kevin C

    2017-12-01

    Several studies in the recent past reported new sources for industrial persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from metropolitan cities of India. To fill the data gap for atmospheric polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polyurethane foam disk passive air sampling (PUF-PAS) was conducted along urban-suburban-rural transects in four quadrilateral cities viz., New Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai and Chennai from northern, eastern, western and southern India respectively. Average concentration of Σ 8 PBDEs in pg/m 3 for New Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai and Chennai were 198, 135, 264 and 144 respectively. We observed a distinct urban > suburban > rural trend for atmospheric PBDEs in Mumbai. Principal component analysis (PCA) attributed three different source types. BDE-47, -99, -100, -153 and -154 loaded in the first component were relatively high in the sites where industrial and informal electronic waste (e-waste) recycling activities were prevalent. Penta congener, BDE-99 and tetra congener, BDE-47 contributed 50%-75% of total PBDEs. Ratio of BDE-47 and -99 in Indian cities reflected the usage of penta formulations like Bromkal -70DE and DE-71 in the commercial and electrical products. PC-2 was loaded with BDE-28 and -35. Percentage of BDE-28 and BDE-35 (>10%) were comparatively much higher than commercial penta products. Abundance of BDE-28 in majority sites can be primarily due to re-emission from surface soil. PC-3 was loaded with BDE-183 and elevated levels were observed mostly in the industrial corridor of Indian cities. BDE-183 was notably high in the urban industrial sites of New Delhi. We suspect this octa-BDE congener resulted from recycling process of plastic products containing octa-BDE formulation used as flame retardants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of (NH4)2Sx passivation on the (311)A GaAs surface and its use in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrad, D J; Burke, A M; Reece, P J; Lyttleton, R W; Waddington, D E J; Rai, A; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D; Micolich, A P

    2013-08-14

    We have studied the efficacy of (NH4)2Sx surface passivation on the (311)A GaAs surface. We report XPS studies of simultaneously-grown (311)A and (100) heterostructures showing that the (NH4)2Sx solution removes surface oxide and sulfidizes both surfaces. Passivation is often characterized using photoluminescence measurements; we show that while (NH4)2Sx treatment gives a 40-60 ×  increase in photoluminescence intensity for the (100) surface, an increase of only 2-3 ×  is obtained for the (311)A surface. A corresponding lack of reproducible improvement in the gate hysteresis of (311)A heterostructure transistor devices made with the passivation treatment performed immediately prior to gate deposition is also found. We discuss possible reasons why sulfur passivation is ineffective for (311)A GaAs, and propose alternative strategies for passivation of this surface.

  20. The effect of (NH4)2Sx passivation on the (311)A GaAs surface and its use in AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrad, D J; Burke, A M; Reece, P J; Lyttleton, R W; Waddington, D E J; Micolich, A P; Rai, A; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the efficacy of (NH 4 ) 2 S x surface passivation on the (311)A GaAs surface. We report XPS studies of simultaneously-grown (311)A and (100) heterostructures showing that the (NH 4 ) 2 S x solution removes surface oxide and sulfidizes both surfaces. Passivation is often characterized using photoluminescence measurements; we show that while (NH 4 ) 2 S x treatment gives a 40–60 × increase in photoluminescence intensity for the (100) surface, an increase of only 2–3 × is obtained for the (311)A surface. A corresponding lack of reproducible improvement in the gate hysteresis of (311)A heterostructure transistor devices made with the passivation treatment performed immediately prior to gate deposition is also found. We discuss possible reasons why sulfur passivation is ineffective for (311)A GaAs, and propose alternative strategies for passivation of this surface. (paper)

  1. Passive radon daughter dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, R.G.C.; Johnson, J.R.

    1986-03-01

    On the basis of an extensive review of the recent literature concerning passive radon daughter dosimeters, we have reached the following conclusions: 1) Passive dosimeters for measuring radon are available and reliable. 2) There does not presently exist an acceptable passive dosimeter for radon daughters. There is little if any hope for the development of such a device in the foreseeable future. 3) We are pessimistic about the potential of 'semi-passive dosimeters' but are less firm about stating categorically that these devices cannot be developed into a useful radon daughter dosimeter. This report documents and justifies these conclusions. It does not address the question of the worker's acceptance of these devices because at the present time, no device is sufficiently advanced for this question to be meaningful. 118 refs

  2. Microfluidic devices for sample preparation and rapid detection of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Dave, Vivek Priy; Ngo, Tien Anh; Chidambara, Vinayaka Aaydha; Than, Linh Quyen; Bang, Dang Duong; Wolff, Anders

    2018-03-10

    Rapid detection of foodborne pathogens at an early stage is imperative for preventing the outbreak of foodborne diseases, known as serious threats to human health. Conventional bacterial culturing methods for foodborne pathogen detection are time consuming, laborious, and with poor pathogen diagnosis competences. This has prompted researchers to call the current status of detection approaches into question and leverage new technologies for superior pathogen sensing outcomes. Novel strategies mainly rely on incorporating all the steps from sample preparation to detection in miniaturized devices for online monitoring of pathogens with high accuracy and sensitivity in a time-saving and cost effective manner. Lab on chip is a blooming area in diagnosis, which exploits different mechanical and biological techniques to detect very low concentrations of pathogens in food samples. This is achieved through streamlining the sample handling and concentrating procedures, which will subsequently reduce human errors and enhance the accuracy of the sensing methods. Integration of sample preparation techniques into these devices can effectively minimize the impact of complex food matrix on pathogen diagnosis and improve the limit of detections. Integration of pathogen capturing bio-receptors on microfluidic devices is a crucial step, which can facilitate recognition abilities in harsh chemical and physical conditions, offering a great commercial benefit to the food-manufacturing sector. This article reviews recent advances in current state-of-the-art of sample preparation and concentration from food matrices with focus on bacterial capturing methods and sensing technologies, along with their advantages and limitations when integrated into microfluidic devices for online rapid detection of pathogens in foods and food production line. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A dual-mode hemispherical sparse array for 3D passive acoustic mapping and skull localization within a clinical MRI guided focused ultrasound device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Brinker, Spencer T.; Coviello, Christian M.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2018-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that passive acoustic imaging may be used alongside MRI for monitoring of focused ultrasound therapy. However, past implementations have generally made use of either linear arrays originally designed for diagnostic imaging or custom narrowband arrays specific to in-house therapeutic transducer designs, neither of which is fully compatible with clinical MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) devices. Here we have designed an array which is suitable for use within an FDA-approved MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound device, within the bore of a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The array is constructed from 5  ×  0.4 mm piezoceramic disc elements arranged in pseudorandom fashion on a low-profile laser-cut acrylic frame designed to fit between the therapeutic elements of a 230 kHz InSightec ExAblate 4000 transducer. By exploiting thickness and radial resonance modes of the piezo discs the array is capable of both B-mode imaging at 5 MHz for skull localization, as well as passive reception at the second harmonic of the therapy array for detection of cavitation and 3D passive acoustic imaging. In active mode, the array was able to perform B-mode imaging of a human skull, showing the outer skull surface with good qualitative agreement with MR imaging. Extension to 3D showed the array was able to locate the skull within  ±2 mm/2° of reference points derived from MRI, which could potentially allow registration of a patient to the therapy system without the expense of real-time MRI. In passive mode, the array was able to resolve a point source in 3D within a  ±10 mm region about each axis from the focus, detect cavitation (SNR ~ 12 dB) at burst lengths from 10 cycles to continuous wave, and produce 3D acoustic maps in a flow phantom. Finally, the array was used to detect and map cavitation associated with microbubble activity in the brain in nonhuman primates.

  4. An automatic device for sample insertion and extraction to/from reactor irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloni, L.; Venturelli, A.; Meloni, S.

    1990-01-01

    At the previous European Triga Users Conference in Vienna,a paper was given describing a new handling tool for irradiated samples at the L.E.N.A plant. This tool was the first part of an automatic device for the management of samples to be irradiated in the TRIGA MARK ii reactor and successively extracted and stored. So far sample insertion and extraction to/from irradiation facilities available on reactor top (central thimble,rotatory specimen rack and channel f),has been carried out manually by reactor and health-physics operators using the ''traditional'' fishing pole provided by General Atomic, thus exposing reactor personnel to ''unjustified'' radiation doses. The present paper describes the design and the operation of a new device, a ''robot''type machine,which, remotely operated, takes care of sample insertion into the different irradiation facilities,sample extraction after irradiation and connection to the storage pits already described. The extraction of irradiated sample does not require the presence of reactor personnel on the reactor top and,therefore,radiation doses are strongly reduced. All work from design to construction has been carried out by the personnel of the electronic group of the L.E.N.A plant. (orig.)

  5. Sampling technologies and air pollution control devices for gaseous and particulate arsenic: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helsen, Lieve

    2005-01-01

    Direct measurement of arsenic release requires a good sampling and analysis procedure in order to capture and detect the total amount of metals emitted. The literature is extensively reviewed in order to evaluate the efficiency of full field-scale and laboratory scale techniques for capturing particulate and gaseous emissions of arsenic from the thermo-chemical treatment of different sources of arsenic. Furthermore, trace arsenic concentrations in ambient air, national standard sampling methods and arsenic analysis methods are considered. Besides sampling techniques, the use of sorbents is also reviewed with respect to both approaches (1) to prevent the metals from exiting with the flue gas and (2) to react or combine with the metals in order to be collected in air pollution control systems. The most important conclusion is that submicron arsenic fumes are difficult to control in conventional air pollution control devices. Complete capture of the arsenic species requires a combination of particle control and vapour control devices. - Submicron arsenic fumes are difficult to control in conventional air pollution control devices

  6. An efficient, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for herbal samples like Cinchona bark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Honoré; Holmfred, Else Skovgaard; Cornett, Claus

    2015-01-01

    An effective, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for the grinding of herb samples like bark and roots was developed by rebuilding a commercially available coffee grinder. The grinder was constructed to be able to provide various particle sizes, to be easy to clean, and to have a minimum...... of dead volume. The recovery of the sample when grinding as little as 50 mg of crude Cinchona bark was about 60%. Grinding is performed in seconds with no rise in temperature, and the grinder is easily disassembled to be cleaned. The influence of the particle size of the obtained powders on the recovery...

  7. An Efficient, Robust, and Inexpensive Grinding Device for Herbal Samples like Cinchona Bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Steen Honoré; Holmfred, Else; Cornett, Claus; Maldonado, Carla; Rønsted, Nina

    2015-01-01

    An effective, robust, and inexpensive grinding device for the grinding of herb samples like bark and roots was developed by rebuilding a commercially available coffee grinder. The grinder was constructed to be able to provide various particle sizes, to be easy to clean, and to have a minimum of dead volume. The recovery of the sample when grinding as little as 50 mg of crude Cinchona bark was about 60%. Grinding is performed in seconds with no rise in temperature, and the grinder is easily disassembled to be cleaned. The influence of the particle size of the obtained powders on the recovery of analytes in extracts of Cinchona bark was investigated using HPLC.

  8. Variation in isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in passively collected samples along an air pollution gradient in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Bell; James O. Sickman; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Pamela E. Padgett; Edith B. Allen

    2014-01-01

    The sources and oxidation pathways of atmospheric nitric acid (HNO3) can be evaluated using the isotopic signatures of oxygen (O) and nitrogen (N). This study evaluated the ability of Nylasorb nylon filters to passively collect unbiased isotopologues of atmospheric HNO3 under controlled and field conditions. Filters...

  9. Development of an automatic sampling device for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perraud, V.

    2007-12-01

    Two sampling strategies were studied to develop an automatic instrument for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyl compounds. Because of its specificity towards carbonyls compounds, sampling by using a transfer of gaseous phase in a liquid phase associated with a simultaneous chemical derivatization of the trapped compounds was first studied. However, this method do not allow a quantitative sampling of all studied carbonyl compounds, nor a continuous measurement in the field. To overcome the difficulties, a second strategy was investigated: the cryogenic adsorption onto solid adsorbent followed by thermodesorption and a direct analysis by GC/MS. Collection efficiency using different solid adsorbents was found greater than 95% for carbonyl compounds consisting of 1 to 7 carbons. This work is a successful first step towards the realization of the automatic sampling device for a continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds. (author)

  10. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  11. Enhanced Optoelectronic Performance of a Passivated Nanowire-Based Device: Key Information from Real-Space Imaging Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2016-03-03

    Managing trap states and understanding their role in ultrafast charge-carrier dynamics, particularly at surface and interfaces, remains a major bottleneck preventing further advancements and commercial exploitation of nanowire (NW)-based devices. A key challenge is to selectively map such ultrafast dynamical processes on the surfaces of NWs, a capability so far out of reach of time-resolved laser techniques. Selective mapping of surface dynamics in real space and time can only be achieved by applying four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM). Charge carrier dynamics are spatially and temporally visualized on the surface of InGaN NW arrays before and after surface passivation with octadecylthiol (ODT). The time-resolved secondary electron images clearly demonstrate that carrier recombination on the NW surface is significantly slowed down after ODT treatment. This observation is fully supported by enhancement of the performance of the light emitting device. Direct observation of surface dynamics provides a profound understanding of the photophysical mechanisms on materials\\' surfaces and enables the formulation of effective surface trap state management strategies for the next generation of high-performance NW-based optoelectronic devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Benchmark and parametric study of a passive flow controller (fluidic device) for the development of optimal designs using a CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang-Gyu; Lee, Seok-Ho; Kim, Han-Gon

    2010-01-01

    A passive flow controller or a fluidic device (FD) is used for a safety injection system (SIS) for efficient use of nuclear reactor emergency cooling water since it can control the injection flow rate in a passive and optimal way. The performance of the FD is represented by pressure loss coefficient (K-factor) which is further affected by the configuration of the components such as a control port direction and a nozzle angle. The flow control mechanism that is varied according to the water level inside a vortex chamber determines the duration of the safety injection. This paper deals with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis for simulating the flow characteristics of the FD using the ANSYS CFX 11.0. The CFD analysis is benchmarked against existing experimental data to obtain applicability to the prediction of the FD performance in terms of K-factor. The CFD calculation is implemented with Shear Stress Transport (SST) model for a swirling flow and a strong streamline curvature in the vortex chamber of the FD, considering a numerical efficiency. Based on the benchmark results, parametric analyses are performed for an optimal design of the FD by varying the control port direction and the nozzle angle. Consequently, the FD performance is enhanced according to the angle of the control port nozzle.

  13. The use of gamma ray computed tomography to investigate soil compaction due to core sampling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Correchel, Vladia; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus; Brasil, Rene P. Camponez do

    2004-01-01

    Compaction processes can influence soil physical properties such as soil density, porosity, pore size distribution, and processes like soil water and nutrient movements, root system distribution, and others. Soil porosity modification has important consequences like alterations in results of soil water retention curves. These alterations may cause differences in soil water storage calculations and matrix potential values, which are utilized in irrigation management systems. Because of this, soil-sampling techniques should avoid alterations of sample structure. In this work soil sample compaction caused by core sampling devices was investigated using the gamma ray computed tomography technique. A first generation tomograph with fixed source-detector arrangement and translation/rotational movements of the sample was utilized to obtain the images. The radioactive source is 241 Am, with an activity of 3.7 GBq, and the detector consists of a 3 in. x 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Soil samples were taken from an experimental field utilizing cylinders 4.0 cm high and 2.6 cm in diameter. Based on image analyses it was possible to detect compacted regions in all samples next to the cylinder wall due to the sampling system. Tomographic unit profiles of the sample permitted to identify higher values of soil density for deeper regions of the sample, and it was possible to determine the average densities and thickness of these layers. Tomographic analyses showed to be a very useful tool for soil compaction characterization and presented many advantages in relation to traditional methods. (author)

  14. Passive device for emergency core cooling of pressurized water reactors. Pasivno ustrojstvo za bezopasnost na vodo-voden atomen reaktor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, D

    1984-02-28

    The device proposed ensures additional margin of reactor subcriticality in case of post-accident emergency core cooling (ECC), using concentrated solution of chemical absorber and hot water from the secondary circuit. It consists of: a) a differential cylinder with a differential piston in it, with a lid and a seal, connected to a pipeline for secondary coolant; b) a pipeline for the secondary coolant; c) a volume between the lid and the piston for the secondary coolant from the steam generator; d) a discharge pipeline with a check valve of seal type connecting the inner volume of the differential cylinder to the discharge line; and e) a pipeline from the high-pressure volume of the differential cylinder filled with concentrated chemical absorber solution, to one of the main circulation loops. The device permits ECC innovation of the operating non-standard nuclear power plants with PWR type reactors.

  15. Radio frequency energy harvesting from a feeding source in a passive deep brain stimulation device for murine preclinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Samad, Mst Fateha; Kale, Rajas P; Bennet, Kevin E; Manciu, Felicia S; Berk, Michael

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the development of an energy harvesting circuit for use with a head-mountable deep brain stimulation (DBS) device. It consists of a circular planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) and a Schottky diode-based Cockcroft-Walton 4-voltage rectifier. The PIFA has the volume of π × 10(2) × 1.5 mm(3), resonance frequency of 915 MHz, and bandwidth of 16 MHz (909-925 MHz) at a return loss of -10 dB. The rectifier offers maximum efficiency of 78% for the input power of -5 dBm at a 5 kΩ load resistance. The developed rectenna operates efficiently at 915 MHz for the input power within -15 dBm to +5 dBm. For operating a DBS device, the DC voltage of 2 V is recorded from the rectenna terminal at a distance of 55 cm away from a 26.77 dBm transmitter in free space. An in-vitro test of the DBS device is presented. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sequencing of real-world samples using a microfabricated hybrid device having unconstrained straight separation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaorong; Elkin, Christopher; Kapur, Hitesh

    2003-11-01

    We describe a microfabricated hybrid device that consists of a microfabricated chip containing multiple twin-T injectors attached to an array of capillaries that serve as the separation channels. A new fabrication process was employed to create two differently sized round channels in a chip. Twin-T injectors were formed by the smaller round channels that match the bore of the separation capillaries and separation capillaries were incorporated to the injectors through the larger round channels that match the outer diameter of the capillaries. This allows for a minimum dead volume and provides a robust chip/capillary interface. This hybrid design takes full advantage, such as sample stacking and purification and uniform signal intensity profile, of the unique chip injection scheme for DNA sequencing while employing long straight capillaries for the separations. In essence, the separation channel length is optimized for both speed and resolution since it is unconstrained by chip size. To demonstrate the reliability and practicality of this hybrid device, we sequenced over 1000 real-world samples from Human Chromosome 5 and Ciona intestinalis, prepared at Joint Genome Institute. We achieved average Phred20 read of 675 bases in about 70 min with a success rate of 91%. For the similar type of samples on MegaBACE 1000, the average Phred20 read is about 550-600 bases in 120 min separation time with a success rate of about 80-90%.

  17. Passive safety; Passive Sicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueckert, J. [Skoda Auto a.s., Mlada Boleslav (Czech Republic). Interieurentwicklung und Versuche; Hau, M. [Skoda Auto a.s., Mlada Boleslav (Czech Republic). Koordination der Fahrzeugsicherung

    2004-05-01

    The specifications for passive safety are partly based on the legal requirements for all export markets combined with the strict internal standards of Volkswagen Group. The Euro NCAP tests and their precisely defined testing methods using the new point assessment are very important. (orig.)

  18. Geometric design of a passive mechanical knee for lower extremity wearable devices based on anthropomorphic foot task geometry scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, S; Robson, N; McCarthy, JM

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 by ASME. The standard recovery treatment for ankle and lower leg injuries consists of using underarm crutches. Hands-free crutches have recently emerged as a more comfortable, natural and energy efficient alternative. However in the currently available devices such as the iWalk-Free (iWALKFree, Inc., USA) the lack of a knee joint results in abnormal motion pattern at the hip and pelvic joints to ensure foot clearance during the swing phase of the gait. To address this shortco...

  19. RF-Care: Device-Free Posture Recognition for Elderly People Using A Passive RFID Tag Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Yao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity recognition is a fundamental research topic for a wide range of important applications such as fall detection for elderly people. Existing techniques mainly rely on wearable sensors, which may not be reliable and practical in real-world situations since people often forget to wear these sensors. For this reason, device-free activity recognition has gained the popularity in recent years. In this paper, we propose an RFID (radio frequency identification based, device-free posture recognition system. More specifically, we analyze Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI signal patterns from an RFID tag array, and systematically examine the impact of tag configuration on system performance. On top of selected optimal subset of tags, we study the challenges on posture recognition. Apart from exploring posture classification, we specially propose to infer posture transitions via Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model (DPGMM based Hidden Markov Model (HMM, which effectively captures the nature of uncertainty caused by signal strength varieties during posture transitions. We run a pilot study to evaluate our system with 12 orientation-sensitive postures and a series of posture change sequences. We conduct extensive experiments in both lab and real-life home environments. The results demonstrate that our system achieves high accuracy in both environments, which holds the potential to support assisted living of elderly people.

  20. Evaluation of the Semipermeable Membrane Device (SPMD) as a Passive In Situ Concentrator of Military Chemicals in Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petty, Jim

    1995-01-01

    .... This fact, that of membrane permeation as the rate controlling step in the uptake of contaminants, provides SPMD sampling rates, independent of water velocity and is extremely important in developing...

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of a Microfluidic Device to Ultrapurify Blood Samples

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Marco

    2015-05-04

    The improvement of blood cell sorting techniques in recent years have attracted the attention of many researchers due to the possible benefits that these methods can lead in biology, regenerative medicine, materials science and therapeutic area. In this work a cell sorting technique based on filtration is described. The separation occurs by means of a microfluidic device, suitably designed, manufactured and tested, that is connected to an external experimental set-up. The fabrication process can be divided in two parts: at first it is described the manufacturing process of a filtering membrane, with holes of specific size that allow the passage of only certain cell types. Following the microfluidic device is fabricated through the mechanical micromilling. The membrane and the microdevice are suitably bonded and tested by means of an external connection with syringe pumps that inject blood samples at specific flow rates. The device is designed to separate blood cells and tumor cells only by using differences in size and shape. In particular during the first experiments red blood cells and platelets are sorted from white blood cells; in the other experiments red blood cells and platelets are separated from white blood cells and tumor cells. The microdevice has proven to be very efficient, in fact a capture efficiency of 99% is achieved. For this reason it could be used in identification and isolation of circulating tumor cells, a very rare cancer cell type whose presence in the bloodstream could be symptom of future solid tumor formation. The various experiments have also demonstrated that tumor cells survive even after the separation treatment, and then the suffered stress during the sorting process does not harm the biological sample.

  2. Active and passive measurements of radon/thoron exhalation from coal and flyash samples collected from various thermal power plants of Delhi, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Rajesh; Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K.; Rajendra Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of radon ( 222 Rn) exhalation from coal, flyash and soil samples was carried out using active (Scintillation based Smart Radon Monitor) as well as passive technique (SSNTD based Can technique). In addition, thoron ( 220 Rn) exhalation measurements were also made for the above samples using Scintillation based Smart Thoron Monitor. To the best of our knowledge, thoron exhalation measurement is first of its kind in India. In this study, a total of 26 samples collected from Badarpur Thermal Power Station, Badarpur and Rajghat Power Station, Rajghat, Delhi were analysed. Thoron surface exhalation rate measured by Scintillation based Thoron Monitor for Badarpur Thermal Power Station varied from 327.8 Bq/m 2 /h to 874.2 Bq/m 2 /h and for Rajghat Thermal Power Station it varied from 176.0 Bq/m 2 /h to 781.1 Bq/m 2 /h. Similarly, the radon mass exhalation rate measured by active technique varied from 12.13 mBq/Kg/h to 118.08 mBq/Kg/h for the samples collected from Badarpur Thermal Power Station; while it varied from 15.00 Bq/Kg/h to 168.07 mBq/Kg/h for the samples collected from Rajghat Thermal Power station. On the other hand, result of measurements made by the conventional Can technique were significantly lower varying from 0.44 mBq/Kg/h to 2.34 mBq/Kg/h for Rajghat Thermal Power Station and from 0.78 mBq/Kg/h to 2.88 mBq/Kg/h for Badarpur Thermal Power Station. This vast variation in the results obtained by active and passive techniques is due to the fact that the active technique accounts for the effect of back-diffusion and possible leakage from the chamber in the process of least square fitting of exponential model while it is not so in the case of SSNTD based Can technique. In view of this, results of active technique are more reliable as compared to the passive technique. More importantly, there was no thoron interference in the radon measurement by the active technique. Further experiments are being carried out using controlled radon and thoron

  3. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A Fillon

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest™. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST. We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15 and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome.

  4. Controlled power delivery for super-resolution imaging of biological samples using digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiya Peedikakkal, Liyana; Cadby, Ashley

    2017-02-01

    Localization based super resolution images of a biological sample is generally achieved by using high power laser illumination with long exposure time which unfortunately increases photo-toxicity of a sample, making super resolution microscopy, in general, incompatible with live cell imaging. Furthermore, the limitation of photobleaching reduces the ability to acquire time lapse images of live biological cells using fluorescence microscopy. Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology can deliver light at grey scale levels by flickering digital micromirrors at around 290 Hz enabling highly controlled power delivery to samples. In this work, Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is implemented in an inverse Schiefspiegler telescope setup to control the power and pattern of illumination for super resolution microscopy. We can achieve spatial and temporal patterning of illumination by controlling the DMD pixel by pixel. The DMD allows us to control the power and spatial extent of the laser illumination. We have used this to show that we can reduce the power delivered to the sample to allow for longer time imaging in one area while achieving sub-diffraction STORM imaging in another using higher power densities.

  5. Demonstration/Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Groundwater Sampling Device at the Former McClellan Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    calibrated the Hach field colorimeter for analyses of Iron (2). Upon our return to the site, we purchased other needed supplies, calibrated the purge... Colorimeter II test kit following the manufacturer’s guidelines. 5.7.3.2 Laboratory Analyses To obtain a better understanding of the mechanism for...manufacturer’s guidelines were used to calibrate the Hach Colorimeter II for field analyses for Iron (2). B.3.2 Calibration of Laboratory Instruments

  6. Nanofiber Enabled, Multi - Target Passive Sampling Device for Determination of the Freely Dissolved Sediment Pore Water Concentrations of Organic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    foil. Nanofiber diameters were adjusted between ~100-200 nm by controlling the electrospinning solution (e.g., viscosity , dielectric constant...acetate)/ Clay Nanocomposite Fibers. J Polym Sci Pol Phys 2009, 47, (24), 2501-2508. 36. Piperno, S.; Lozzi, L.; Rastelli, R.; Passacantando, M.; Santucci

  7. Evaluation of the Semipermeable Membrane Device (SPMD) as a Passive In Situ Concentrator of Military Organic Chemicals in Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petty, J

    1997-01-01

    ...., 1 ng/L, 10 ng/L, and 100 ng/L) at water temperatures ranging from I 00C to 260C. The data are indicative of concentration independent sampling rates for the 23 OC pesticides employed in this research...

  8. Overview of the U.S. EPA/SERDP/ESTCP: Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using Passive Sampling in the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediments: User’s Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive sampling is used for applications at contaminated sediment sites including performing assessments of contaminant bioavailability (i.e., freely dissolved concentration (Cfree)), conducting remedial investigations and feasibility studies, and assessing the potential for con...

  9. Sampling device for in vivo sampling of liquids from the gastrointestinal tract, process for the production thereof and mould or mask for use in the production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprenkels, A.J.; Jenneboer, Antonius J.S.M.; Venema, Konraad; van den Berg, Albert; de Vos, Willem M.

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to a sampling device suitable for in vivo sampling of liquid(s) from the gastro-intestinal tract, comprising a body, the body comprising a channel and an opening for entrance of the liquid(s) at one end of the channel, and a cover bonded to at least part of the body and

  10. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated lake ecosystem: Combining equilibrium passive sampling of sediment and water with total concentration measurements of biota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T.; Figueiredo, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling devices can be applied to study and monitor the exposure and fate of hydrophobic organic chemicals on a thermodynamic basis. They can be used to determine freely dissolved concentrations and chemical activity ratios and to predict equilibrium partitioning concentrations...... of hydrophobic organic chemicals in biota lipids. The authors' aim was to assess the equilibrium status of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated lake ecosystem and along its discharge course using equilibrium sampling devices for measurements in sediment and water and by also analyzing biota....... The authors used equilibrium sampling devices (silicone rubber and polyethylene [PE]) to determine freely dissolved concentrations and chemical activities of PCBs in the water column and sediment porewater and calculated for both phases the corresponding equilibrium concentrations and chemical activities...

  11. Plasma diagnostics and device properties of AlGaN/GaN HEMT passivated with SiN deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, M F; Sanz, M M; Munoz, E [ISOM-Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM). ETSIT, Madrid (Spain); Tanarro, I [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, A, E-mail: itanarro@iem.cfmac.csic.e [Departamento Electronica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Alcala, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    In this work, silicon nitride thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition on both silicon samples and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) grown on sapphire substrates. Commercial parallel-plate RF plasma equipment has been used. During depositions, the dissociation rates of SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} precursors and the formation of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} have been analysed by mass spectrometry as a function of the NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} flow ratio and the RF power applied to the plasma reactor. Afterwards, the properties of the films and the HEMT electrical characteristics have been studied. Plasma composition has been correlated with the SiN deposition rate, refractive index, H content and the final electric characteristics of the passivated transistors.

  12. Calibration of silicone rubber rods as passive samplers for pesticides at two different flow velocities: Modeling of sampling rates under water boundary layer and polymer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexis; Margoum, Christelle; Jolivet, Antoine; Assoumani, Azziz; El Moujahid, Bachir; Randon, Jérôme; Coquery, Marina

    2018-04-01

    There is a need to determine time-weighted average concentrations of polar contaminants such as pesticides by passive sampling in environmental waters. Calibration data for silicone rubber-based passive samplers are lacking for this class of compounds. The calibration data, sampling rate (R s ), and partition coefficient between silicone rubber and water (K sw ) were precisely determined for 23 pesticides and 13 candidate performance reference compounds (PRCs) in a laboratory calibration system over 14 d for 2 water flow velocities, 5 and 20 cm s -1 . The results showed that an in situ exposure duration of 7 d left a silicone rubber rod passive sampler configuration in the linear or curvilinear uptake period for 19 of the pesticides studied. A change in the transport mechanism from polymer control to water boundary layer control was observed for pesticides with a log K sw of approximately 3.3. The PRC candidates were not fully relevant to correct the impact of water flow velocity on R s . We therefore propose an alternative method based on an overall resistance to mass transfer model to adjust R s from laboratory experiments to in situ hydrodynamic conditions. We estimated diffusion coefficients (D s ) and thickness of water boundary layer (δ w ) as adjustable model parameters. Log D s values ranged from -12.13 to -10.07 m 2  s -1 . The estimated δ w value showed a power function correlation with water flow velocity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:1208-1218. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  13. Wireless Technology Recognition Based on RSSI Distribution at Sub-Nyquist Sampling Rate for Constrained Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Kulin, Merima; Kazaz, Tarik; Shahid, Adnan; Moerman, Ingrid; De Poorter, Eli

    2017-09-12

    Driven by the fast growth of wireless communication, the trend of sharing spectrum among heterogeneous technologies becomes increasingly dominant. Identifying concurrent technologies is an important step towards efficient spectrum sharing. However, due to the complexity of recognition algorithms and the strict condition of sampling speed, communication systems capable of recognizing signals other than their own type are extremely rare. This work proves that multi-model distribution of the received signal strength indicator (RSSI) is related to the signals' modulation schemes and medium access mechanisms, and RSSI from different technologies may exhibit highly distinctive features. A distinction is made between technologies with a streaming or a non-streaming property, and appropriate feature spaces can be established either by deriving parameters such as packet duration from RSSI or directly using RSSI's probability distribution. An experimental study shows that even RSSI acquired at a sub-Nyquist sampling rate is able to provide sufficient features to differentiate technologies such as Wi-Fi, Long Term Evolution (LTE), Digital Video Broadcasting-Terrestrial (DVB-T) and Bluetooth. The usage of the RSSI distribution-based feature space is illustrated via a sample algorithm. Experimental evaluation indicates that more than 92% accuracy is achieved with the appropriate configuration. As the analysis of RSSI distribution is straightforward and less demanding in terms of system requirements, we believe it is highly valuable for recognition of wideband technologies on constrained devices in the context of dynamic spectrum access.

  14. Electronic module for control of sample feeding device of spectrometers of X-ray fluorescent analysis of CRV type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.A.; Fursov, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    The scheme of electronic module for sample feeding device control for the CRV type X-ray fluorescence analysis spectrometers is considered. This module provides realization of next functions: sample change operations and installation in starting position; signaling and defense at emergency cases; indication of any sample amount in the spectrometer chamber; testing function at tuning and testing of modules. All these principal functions are entrusted with microcontroller. Programming of the microcontroller is putting into effect by algorithm of the whole sample feeding device. In the capacity of microcontroller the single crystalline processor PICI16C54 and stepping motor of NV-306-V2202 model have been used

  15. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the

  16. Characteristics of a new fully programmable blood sampling device for monitoring blood radioactivity during PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, R.; Lingen, A. van; Balen, S.C.M. van; Hoving, B.G.; Lammertsma, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The first performance tests of a new fully programmable blood sampling device for monitoring blood radioactivity during positron emission tomography (PET) are described. Blood is withdrawn through 1-mm internal diameter tubing using an infusion pump which can be operated at rates varying from 0 to 600 ml/h. Activity in blood is measured by a 6-cm-thick bismuth germanate crystal connected to a photomultiplier tube and multichannel analyser (MCA) which are positioned within 6 cm lead shielding. Positioning of the tubing is an exact and simple procedure. The minimal readout time of the MCA is 1 s. Two independent energy windows can be set. Operation of the pump and MCA is fully controlled by a PC, i.e. sampling time, interval time and pump rate can be varied at any time during the PET scan by user-defined scripts. A number of characteristics of the new system were studied, such as sensitivity, dead time, linearity, effect of background radiation and pump rate as a function of input pressure. In addition, dispersion was measured as a function of pump rate. Finally, first clinical results were compared with manual samples. The sensitivity equalled 0.7 and 0.2 cps/Bq for 511- and 1022-keV 30% energy windows, respectively, and the system dead time was 500 ns. The system remained linear within 2% with activity concentrations up to 2.5 MBq/cc. Short-term reproducibility was better than 3% for a 1-h period. Long-term reproducibility was about 5% (1SD), which was mainly caused by variation in the diameter of the tubing. If the device was positioned in such a way that maximum shielding was directed towards the patient, the effects of background radiation from the patient on the measured activity concentration for clinically relevant conditions was minimal ( -1 were observed for pump rates higher than 300 ml/h, indicating that the system dispersion is small. Clinical data showed an excellent agreement to within 3% (1SD) between the results obtained with the new system and

  17. Multiple double cross-section transmission electron microscope sample preparation of specific sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Lynne M; Mittal, Surbhi; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Cohen, Guy M; Sleight, Jeffrey W

    2011-12-01

    The ability to prepare multiple cross-section transmission electron microscope (XTEM) samples from one XTEM sample of specific sub-10 nm features was demonstrated. Sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire (NW) devices were initially cross-sectioned using a dual-beam focused ion beam system in a direction running parallel to the device channel. From this XTEM sample, both low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were obtained from six separate, specific site Si NW devices. The XTEM sample was then re-sectioned in four separate locations in a direction perpendicular to the device channel: 90° from the original XTEM sample direction. Three of the four XTEM samples were successfully sectioned in the gate region of the device. From these three samples, low- and high-resolution TEM images of the Si NW were taken and measurements of the NW diameters were obtained. This technique demonstrated the ability to obtain high-resolution TEM images in directions 90° from one another of multiple, specific sub-10 nm features that were spaced 1.1 μm apart.

  18. Sieve-based device for MALDI sample preparation. III. Its power for quantitative measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Laura; Cristoni, Simone; Seraglia, Roberta; Traldi, Pietro

    2011-02-01

    The solid sample inhomogeneity is a weak point of traditional MALDI deposition techniques that reflects negatively on quantitative analysis. The recently developed sieve-based device (SBD) sample deposition method, based on the electrospraying of matrix/analyte solutions through a grounded sieve, allows the homogeneous deposition of microcrystals with dimensions smaller than that of the laser spot. In each microcrystal the matrix/analyte molar ratio can be considered constant. Then, by irradiating different portions of the microcrystal distribution an identical response is obtained. This result suggests the employment of SBD in the development of quantitative procedures. For this aim, mixtures of different proteins of known molarity were analyzed, showing a good relationship between molarity and intensity ratios. This behaviour was also observed in the case of proteins with quite different ionic yields. The power of the developed method for quantitative evaluation was also tested by the measurement of the abundance of IGPP[Oxi]GPP[Oxi]GLMGPP (m/z 1219) present in the collagen-α-5(IV) chain precursor, differently expressed in urines from healthy subjects and diabetic-nephropathic patients, confirming its overexpression in the presence of nephropathy. The data obtained indicate that SBD is a particularly effective method for quantitative analysis also in biological fluids of interest. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The potential effect of differential ambient and deployment chamber temperatures on PRC derived sampling rates with polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Karen, E-mail: k.kennedy@uq.edu.a [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Hawker, Darryl W. [Griffith University, School of Environment, Nathan QLD 4111 (Australia); Bartkow, Michael E. [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Carter, Steve [Queensland Health Forensic and Scientific Services, Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Ishikawa, Yukari; Mueller, Jochen F. [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    Performance reference compound (PRC) derived sampling rates were determined for polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers in both sub-tropical and temperate locations across Australia. These estimates were on average a factor of 2.7 times higher in summer than winter. The known effects of wind speed and temperature on mass transfer coefficients could not account for this observation. Sampling rates are often derived using ambient temperatures, not the actual temperatures within deployment chambers. If deployment chamber temperatures are in fact higher than ambient temperatures, estimated sampler-air partition coefficients would be greater than actual partition coefficients resulting in an overestimation of PRC derived sampling rates. Sampling rates determined under measured ambient temperatures and estimated deployment chamber temperatures in summer ranged from 7.1 to 10 m{sup 3} day{sup -1} and 2.2-6.8 m{sup 3} day{sup -1} respectively. These results suggest that potential differences between ambient and deployment chamber temperatures should be considered when deriving PRC-based sampling rates. - Internal deployment chamber temperatures rather than ambient temperatures may be required to accurately estimate PRC-based sampling rates.

  20. Innovative soft magnetic multilayers with enhanced in-plane anisotropy and ferromagnetic resonance frequency for integrated RF passive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falub, Claudiu V.; Bless, Martin; Hida, Rachid; MeduÅa, Mojmír; Ammann, Arnold

    2018-04-01

    We present an innovative, economical method for manufacturing soft magnetic materials that may pave the way for integrated thin film magnetic cores with dramatically improved properties. Soft magnetic multilayered thin films based on the Fe-28%Co20%B (at.%) and Co-4.5%Ta4%Zr (at.%) amorphous alloys are deposited on 8" bare Si and Si/200nm-thermal-SiO2 wafers in an industrial, high-throughput Evatec LLS EVO II magnetron sputtering system. The multilayers consist of stacks of alternating 80-nm-thick ferromagnetic layers and 4-nm-thick Al2O3 dielectric interlayers. Since in our dynamic sputter system the substrate cage rotates continuously, such that the substrates face different targets alternatively, each ferromagnetic sublayer in the multilayer consists of a fine structure comprising alternating CoTaZr and FeCoB nanolayers with very sharp interfaces. We adjust the thickness of these individual nanolayers between 0.5 and 1.5 nm by changing the cage rotation speed and the power of each gun, which is an excellent mode to engineer new, composite ferromagnetic materials. Using X-ray reflectometry (XRR) we reveal that the interfaces between the FeCoB and CoTaZr nanolayers are perfectly smooth with roughness of 0.2-0.3 nm. Kerr magnetometry and B-H looper measurements for the as-deposited samples show that the coercivity of these thin films is very low, 0.2-0.3 Oe, and gradually scales up with the thickness of FeCoB nanolayers, i.e. with the increase of the overall Fe content from 0 % (e.g. CoTaZr-based multilayers) to 52 % (e.g. FeCoB-based multilayers). We explain this trend in the random anisotropy model, based on considerations of grain size growth, as revealed by glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), but also because of the increase of magnetostriction with the increase of Fe content as shown by B-H looper measurements performed on strained wafers. The unexpected enhancement of the in-plane anisotropy field from 18.3 Oe and 25.8 Oe for the conventional Co

  1. Development of a Novel Self-Enclosed Sample Preparation Device for DNA/RNA Isolation in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish K.; Pensinger, Stuart J.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    Modern biology techniques present potentials for a wide range of molecular, cellular, and biochemistry applications in space, including detection of infectious pathogens and environmental contaminations, monitoring of drug-resistant microbial and dangerous mutations, identification of new phenotypes of microbial and new life species. However, one of the major technological blockades in enabling these technologies in space is a lack of devices for sample preparation in the space environment. To overcome such an obstacle, we constructed a prototype of a DNA/RNA isolation device based on our novel designs documented in the NASA New Technology Reporting System (MSC-24811-1/3-1). This device is self-enclosed and pipette free, purposely designed for use in the absence of gravity. Our design can also be modified easily for preparing samples in space for other applications, such as flowcytometry, immunostaining, cell separation, sample purification and separation according to its size and charges, sample chemical labeling, and sample purification. The prototype of our DNA/RNA isolation device was tested for efficiencies of DNA and RNA isolation from various cell types for PCR analysis. The purity and integrity of purified DNA and RNA were determined as well. Results showed that our developed DNA/RNA isolation device offers similar efficiency and quality in comparison to the samples prepared using the standard protocol in the laboratory.

  2. Innovative soft magnetic multilayers with enhanced in-plane anisotropy and ferromagnetic resonance frequency for integrated RF passive devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu V. Falub

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an innovative, economical method for manufacturing soft magnetic materials that may pave the way for integrated thin film magnetic cores with dramatically improved properties. Soft magnetic multilayered thin films based on the Fe-28%Co20%B (at.% and Co-4.5%Ta4%Zr (at.% amorphous alloys are deposited on 8” bare Si and Si/200nm-thermal-SiO2 wafers in an industrial, high-throughput Evatec LLS EVO II magnetron sputtering system. The multilayers consist of stacks of alternating 80-nm-thick ferromagnetic layers and 4-nm-thick Al2O3 dielectric interlayers. Since in our dynamic sputter system the substrate cage rotates continuously, such that the substrates face different targets alternatively, each ferromagnetic sublayer in the multilayer consists of a fine structure comprising alternating CoTaZr and FeCoB nanolayers with very sharp interfaces. We adjust the thickness of these individual nanolayers between 0.5 and 1.5 nm by changing the cage rotation speed and the power of each gun, which is an excellent mode to engineer new, composite ferromagnetic materials. Using X-ray reflectometry (XRR we reveal that the interfaces between the FeCoB and CoTaZr nanolayers are perfectly smooth with roughness of 0.2-0.3 nm. Kerr magnetometry and B-H looper measurements for the as-deposited samples show that the coercivity of these thin films is very low, 0.2-0.3 Oe, and gradually scales up with the thickness of FeCoB nanolayers, i.e. with the increase of the overall Fe content from 0 % (e.g. CoTaZr-based multilayers to 52 % (e.g. FeCoB-based multilayers. We explain this trend in the random anisotropy model, based on considerations of grain size growth, as revealed by glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD, but also because of the increase of magnetostriction with the increase of Fe content as shown by B-H looper measurements performed on strained wafers. The unexpected enhancement of the in-plane anisotropy field from 18.3 Oe and 25.8 Oe for the

  3. A Simple Device for Lens-to-Sample Distance Adjustment in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Juliana; Farias Filho, Benedito B; Fontes, Laiane M; Pasquini, Celio; Raimundo, Ivo M; Pimentel, Maria Fernanda; de Souza Lins Borba, Flávia

    2017-04-01

    A simple device based on two commercial laser pointers is described to assist in the analysis of samples that present uneven surfaces and/or irregular shapes using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The device allows for easy positioning of the sample surface at a reproducible distance from the focusing lens that conveys the laser pulse to generate the micro-plasma in a LIBS system, with reproducibility better than ±0.2 mm. In this way, fluctuations in the fluence (J cm -2 ) are minimized and the LIBS analytical signals can be obtained with a better precision even when samples with irregular surfaces are probed.

  4. Passive air sampling of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in the Yangtze River Delta, China: Concentrations, distributions, and cancer risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lifei; Dong, Liang; Yang, Wenlong; Zhou, Li; Shi, Shuangxin; Zhang, Xiulan; Niu, Shan; Li, Lingling; Wu, Zhongxiang; Huang, Yeru

    2013-01-01

    The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) has been quickly industrialized and urbanized. Passive air sampling of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was carried out in the YRD in 2010–2011 to investigate their spatiotemporal distributions and estimate the risk of cancer from their inhalation. Annual concentrations were 151, 168, 18.8, 110, 17.9, and 35.0 pg m −3 for HCB, ∑DDTs, ∑HCHs, ∑chlordane, mirex, and PCBs, respectively. The highest OCP and PCB concentrations were generally detected in the autumn and winter. The average concentrations of OCPs and PCBs for the different site groups followed the order urban ≈ urban–rural transition > rural. The lifetime excess cancer risks from the inhalation of OCPs and PCBs were −6 . The predicted cancer cases per lifetime associated with the inhalation of OCPs and PCBs are 12, 7, and 4 per ten thousand people for urban, urban–rural transition, and rural areas, respectively. Highlights: •Organochlorine pollutants were measured in the air in the Yangtze River Delta area. •Air PCB concentration declined in recent years comparing with previous results. •HCB and DDEs predominated, with the highest values in winter and autumn, respectively. •OCPs and PCBs followed the order: urban ≈ urban–rural transition > rural. -- A detailed study of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in air across the Yangtze River Delta area using passive air samplers

  5. Novel Electrosorption-Enhanced Solid-Phase Microextraction Device for Ultrafast In Vivo Sampling of Ionized Pharmaceuticals in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Junlang; Wang, Fuxin; Zhang, Tianlang; Chen, Le; Liu, Yuan; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2018-01-02

    Decreasing the tedious sample preparation duration is one of the most important concerns for the environmental analytical chemistry especially for in vivo experiments. However, due to the slow mass diffusion paths for most of the conventional methods, ultrafast in vivo sampling remains challenging. Herein, for the first time, we report an ultrafast in vivo solid-phase microextraction (SPME) device based on electrosorption enhancement and a novel custom-made CNT@PPY@pNE fiber for in vivo sampling of ionized acidic pharmaceuticals in fish. This sampling device exhibited an excellent robustness, reproducibility, matrix effect-resistant capacity, and quantitative ability. Importantly, the extraction kinetics of the targeted ionized pharmaceuticals were significantly accelerated using the device, which significantly improved the sensitivity of the SPME in vivo sampling method (limits of detection ranged from 0.12 ng·g -1 to 0.25 ng·g -1 ) and shorten the sampling time (only 1 min). The proposed approach was successfully applied to monitor the concentrations of ionized pharmaceuticals in living fish, which demonstrated that the device and fiber were suitable for ultrafast in vivo sampling and continuous monitoring. In addition, the bioconcentration factor (BCF) values of the pharmaceuticals were derived in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) for the first time, based on the data of ultrafast in vivo sampling. Therefore, we developed and validated an effective and ultrafast SPME sampling device for in vivo sampling of ionized analytes in living organisms and this state-of-the-art method provides an alternative technique for future in vivo studies.

  6. Passive Mixing inside Microdroplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengmin Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based micromixers are essential units in many microfluidic devices for widespread applications, such as diagnostics and synthesis. The mixers can be either passive or active. When compared to active methods, the passive mixer is widely used because it does not require extra energy input apart from the pump drive. In recent years, several passive droplet-based mixers were developed, where mixing was characterized by both experiments and simulation. A unified physical understanding of both experimental processes and simulation models is beneficial for effectively developing new and efficient mixing techniques. This review covers the state-of-the-art passive droplet-based micromixers in microfluidics, which mainly focuses on three aspects: (1 Mixing parameters and analysis method; (2 Typical mixing element designs and the mixing characters in experiments; and, (3 Comprehensive introduction of numerical models used in microfluidic flow and diffusion.

  7. Evaluation of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards as sampling devices for detection of rotavirus in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Ka Ian; Esona, Mathew D; Williams, Alice; Ndze, Valantine N; Boula, Angeline; Bowen, Michael D

    2015-09-15

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are available and rotavirus surveillance is carried out to assess vaccination impact. In surveillance studies, stool samples are stored typically at 4°C or frozen to maintain sample quality. Uninterrupted cold storage is a problem in developing countries because of power interruptions. Cold-chain transportation of samples from collection sites to testing laboratories is costly. In this study, we evaluated the use of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards for storage and transportation of samples for virus isolation, EIA, and RT-PCR testing. Infectious rotavirus was recovered after 30 days of storage on Sensi-Discs™ at room temperature. We were able to genotype 98-99% of samples stored on Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards at temperatures ranging from -80°C to 37°C up to 180 days. A field sampling test using samples prepared and shipped from Cameroon, showed that both matrices yielded 100% genotyping success compared with whole stool and Sensi-Discs™ demonstrated 95% concordance with whole stool in EIA testing. The utilization of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA(®) cards for stool sample storage and shipment has the potential to have great impact on global public health by facilitating surveillance and epidemiological investigations of rotavirus strains worldwide at a reduced cost. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Evaluation of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards as sampling devices for detection of rotavirus in stool samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Ka Ian; Esona, Mathew D.; Williams, Alice; Ndze, Valentine N.; Boula, Angeline; Bowen, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotavirus vaccines are available and rotavirus surveillance is carried out to assess vaccination impact. In surveillance studies, stool samples are stored typically at 4°C or frozen to maintain sample quality. Uninterrupted cold storage is a problem in developing countries because of power interruptions. Cold-chain transportation of samples from collection sites to testing laboratories is costly. In this study, we evaluated the use of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards for storage and transportation of samples for virus isolation, EIA, and RT-PCR testing. Infectious rotavirus was recovered after 30 days of storage on Sensi-Discs™ at room temperature. We were able to genotype 98–99% of samples stored on Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards at temperatures ranging from −80°C to 37°C up to 180 days. A field sampling test using samples prepared and shipped from Cameroon, showed that both matrices yielded 100% genotyping success compared with whole stool and Sensi-Discs™ demonstrated 95% concordance with whole stool in EIA testing. The utilization of BBL™ Sensi-Discs™ and FTA® cards for stool sample storage and shipment has the potential to have great impact on global public health by facilitating surveillance and epidemiological investigations of rotavirus strains worldwide at a reduced cost. PMID:26022083

  9. Equilibrium passive sampling as a tool to study polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Baltic Sea sediment pore-water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lang, Susann-Cathrin; Hursthouse, Andrew; Mayer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) was applied to provide the first large scale dataset of freely dissolved concentrations for 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Baltic Sea sediment cores. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated glass fibers were used for ex-situ equilibrium sampling followed...

  10. Application of passive sampling in assessing the occurrence and risk of antibiotics and endocrine disrupting chemicals in the Yangtze Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X; Zhou, J L; Zhao, H; Hou, L; Yang, Y

    2014-09-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was used in assessing the occurrence and risk of 12 widely used antibiotics and 5 most potent endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in the Yangtze Estuary, China. During laboratory validation, the kinetics of pollutant uptake by POCIS were linear, and the sampling rates of most compounds were raised by flow rate and salinity, reaching the highest values at salinity 14‰. The sampling rates varied with the target compounds with the EDCs showing the highest values (overall average=0.123Ld(-1)), followed by chloramphenicols (0.100Ld(-1)), macrolides (0.089Ld(-1)), and finally sulfonamides (0.056Ld(-1)). Validation in the Yangtze Estuary in 2013 showed that the field sampling rates were significantly greater for all compounds except bisphenol A, in comparison to laboratory results, and high-frequency spot sampling is critical for fully validating the passive sampler. The field studies show that antibiotics were widely detected in the Yangtze Estuary, with concentrations varying from below quantification to 1613ngL(-1), suggesting their widespread use and persistence in estuarine waters. The dominating pollutants in July were sulfonamides with a total concentration of 258ngL(-1) and in October were macrolides with a total concentration of 350ngL(-1). The calculation of risk quotient suggested that sulfapyridine, sulfaquinoxaline and erythromycin-H2O may have caused medium damage to sensitive organisms such as fish. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Demonstration of the AGI Universal Samplers (F.K.A. the GORE Modules) for Passive Sampling of Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    and lower Hen- ry’s Law constants are biased low (Anderson 2013). In this instance, me- thyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is lost entirely and 1,2...coolers full of ice or blue ice to transport samples to the laboratory. One limitation associated with using the GORE Module is that, like all no- purge...was taken from Dunbar et al. (2001). A regional geologic and geomorphic model was developed for the Aberdeen Prov- ing Ground (APG). Regional

  12. Demonstration of the AGI Universal Samplers (F.K.A. the GORE (registered trademark) Modules) for Passive Sampling of Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    and lower Hen- ry’s Law constants are biased low (Anderson 2013). In this instance, me- thyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is lost entirely and 1,2...coolers full of ice or blue ice to transport samples to the laboratory. One limitation associated with using the GORE Module is that, like all no- purge...was taken from Dunbar et al. (2001). A regional geologic and geomorphic model was developed for the Aberdeen Prov- ing Ground (APG). Regional

  13. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated lake ecosystem: combining equilibrium passive sampling of sediment and water with total concentration measurements of biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T; Figueiredo, Kaisa; Mayer, Philipp; Gilbert, Dorothea; Jahnke, Annika; Gil-Allué, Carmen; Akkanen, Jarkko; Nybom, Inna; Herve, Sirpa

    2015-11-01

    Equilibrium sampling devices can be applied to study and monitor the exposure and fate of hydrophobic organic chemicals on a thermodynamic basis. They can be used to determine freely dissolved concentrations and chemical activity ratios and to predict equilibrium partitioning concentrations of hydrophobic organic chemicals in biota lipids. The authors' aim was to assess the equilibrium status of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated lake ecosystem and along its discharge course using equilibrium sampling devices for measurements in sediment and water and by also analyzing biota. The authors used equilibrium sampling devices (silicone rubber and polyethylene [PE]) to determine freely dissolved concentrations and chemical activities of PCBs in the water column and sediment porewater and calculated for both phases the corresponding equilibrium concentrations and chemical activities in model lipids. Overall, the studied ecosystem appeared to be in disequilibrium for the studied phases: sediment, water, and biota. Chemical activities of PCBs were higher in sediment than in water, which implies that the sediment functioned as a partitioning source of PCBs and that net diffusion occurred from the sediment to the water column. Measured lipid-normalized PCB concentrations in biota were generally below equilibrium lipid concentrations relative to the sediment (CLip ⇌Sed ) or water (CLip ⇌W ), indicating that PCB levels in the organisms were below the maximum partitioning levels. The present study shows the application versatility of equilibrium sampling devices in the field and facilitates a thermodynamic understanding of exposure and fate of PCBs in a contaminated lake and its discharge course. © 2015 SETAC.

  14. The organic pollutant status of rivers in Bosnia and Herzegovina as determined by a combination of active and passive sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Christopher; Grung, Merete; Djedjibegovic, Jasmina; Marjanovic, Aleksandra; Fjeld, Eirik; Braaten, Hans Fredrik Veiteberg; Sober, Miroslav; Larssen, Thorjørn; Ranneklev, Sissel Brit

    2018-04-15

    There is an overall lack of data concerning the pollution status of Bosnia Herzegovina, which is confounded by fragmented national environmental management. The present study aimed to provide some initial data for concentrations of priority substances in two major Bosnian Rivers, using two types of passive sampler (PS) as well as by using high volume water sampling (HVWS). Overall, concentrations of most persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and legacy pesticides, were shown to be low. However, around the town of Doboj on the Bosna River, concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) breached European standards for several compounds and reached 67 ng L -1 for freely dissolved concentrations and 250 ng L -1 for total concentrations. In general, contamination was lower in the Neretva River compared to the Bosna, although for brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), results suggested an active source of PBDEs at one location based on the ratio of congeners 47 and 99. Direct comparisons between the different sampling techniques used are not straightforward, but similar patterns of PAH contamination were shown by HVWS and PS in the Bosna River. There are both scientific and practical considerations when choosing which type of sampling technique to apply, and this should be decided based on the goals of each individual study.

  15. High sensitivity high-resolution full range relaxometry using a fast mechanical sample shuttling device and a cryo-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Ching-Yu [Université Paris-Saclay, NIMBE, CEA, CNRS (France); Chu, Minglee [Academia Sinica, Institute of Physics (China); Chang, Chi-Fon [Academia Sinica, Genomics Research Center (China); Yu, Tsunai; Huang, Tai-huang, E-mail: bmthh@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica, Institute of Biomedical Science (China); Sakellariou, Dimitris, E-mail: dimitrios.sakellariou@cea.fr [Université Paris-Saclay, NIMBE, CEA, CNRS (France)

    2016-11-15

    Field-dependent NMR studies of bio-molecular systems using a sample shuttling hardware operating on a high-field NMR apparatus have provided valuable structural and dynamic information. We have recently published a design of a compact sample transportation device, called “field-cycler”, which was installed in a commercial spectrometer and which provided highly precise positioning and stability during high speed shuttling. In this communication, we demonstrate the first use of a sample shuttling device on a commercial high field standard bore NMR spectrometer, equipped with a commercial triple resonance cryogenically cooled NMR probe. The performance and robustness of the hardware operating in 1D and 2D field cycling experiments, as well as the impact of the sample shuttling time on the signal intensity are discussed.

  16. Integration of continuous-flow sampling with microchip electrophoresis using poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based valves in a reversibly sealed device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michelle W; Martin, R Scott

    2007-07-01

    Here we describe a reversibly sealed microchip device that incorporates poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based valves for the rapid injection of analytes from a continuously flowing stream into a channel network for analysis with microchip electrophoresis. The microchip was reversibly sealed to a PDMS-coated glass substrate and microbore tubing was used for the introduction of gas and fluids to the microchip device. Two pneumatic valves were incorporated into the design and actuated on the order of hundreds of milliseconds, allowing analyte from a continuously flowing sampling stream to be injected into an electrophoresis separation channel. The device was characterized in terms of the valve actuation time and pushback voltage. It was also found that the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the buffer system greatly increased the reproducibility of the injection scheme and enabled the analysis of amino acids derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde/cyanide. Results from continuous injections of a 0.39 nL fluorescein plug into the optimized system showed that the injection process was reproducible (RSD of 0.7%, n = 10). Studies also showed that the device was capable of monitoring off-chip changes in concentration with a device lag time of 90 s. Finally, the ability of the device to rapidly monitor on-chip concentration changes was demonstrated by continually sampling from an analyte plug that was derivatized upstream from the electrophoresis/continuous flow interface. A reversibly sealed device of this type will be useful for the continuous monitoring and analysis of processes that occur either off-chip (such as microdialysis sampling) or on-chip from other integrated functions.

  17. Passive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojesen, Emile

    2018-01-01

    This paper does not present an advocacy of a passive education as opposed to an active education nor does it propose that passive education is in any way 'better' or more important than active education. Through readings of Maurice Blanchot, Jacques Derrida and B.S. Johnson, and gentle critiques of Jacques Rancière and John Dewey, passive…

  18. Microbial profiling of cpn60 universal target sequences in artificial mixtures of vaginal bacteria sampled by nylon swabs or self-sampling devices under different storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, John J; Oh, Angela Yena; Hill, Janet E

    2017-05-01

    The vaginal microbiome is increasingly characterized by deep sequencing of universal genes. However, there are relatively few studies of how different specimen collection and sample storage and processing influence these molecular profiles. Here, we evaluate molecular microbial community profiles of samples collected using the HerSwab™ self-sampling device, compared to nylon swabs and under different storage conditions. In order to minimize technical variation, mixtures of 11 common vaginal bacteria in simulated vaginal fluid medium were sampled and DNA extracts prepared for massively parallel sequencing of the cpn60 universal target (UT). Three artificial mixtures imitating commonly observed vaginal microbiome profiles were easily distinguished and proportion of sequence reads correlated with the estimated proportion of the organism added to the artificial mixtures. Our results indicate that cpn60 UT amplicon sequencing quantifies the proportional abundance of member organisms in these artificial communities regardless of swab type or storage conditions, although some significant differences were observed between samples that were stored frozen and thawed prior to DNA extraction, compared to extractions from samples stored at room temperature for up to 7days. Our results indicate that an on-the-market device developed for infectious disease diagnostics may be appropriate for vaginal microbiome profiling, an approach that is increasingly facilitated by rapidly dropping deep sequencing costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel device for batch-wise isolation of α-cellulose from small-amount wholewood samples

    OpenAIRE

    T. Wieloch; Gerhard Helle; Ingo Heinrich; Michael Voigt; P. Schyma

    2011-01-01

    A novel device for the chemical isolation of α-cellulose from wholewood material of tree rings was designed by the Potsdam Dendro Laboratory. It allows the simultaneous treatment of up to several hundred micro samples. Key features are the batch-wise exchange of the chemical solutions, the reusability of all major parts and the easy and unambiguous labelling of each individual sample. Compared to classical methods labour intensity and running costs are significantly reduced.

  20. On the use of ultracentrifugal devices for routine sample preparation in biomolecular magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhishek; Boatz, Jennifer C; Wheeler, Travis B; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2017-03-01

    A number of recent advances in the field of magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR have enabled its application to a range of biological systems of ever increasing complexity. To retain biological relevance, these samples are increasingly studied in a hydrated state. At the same time, experimental feasibility requires the sample preparation process to attain a high sample concentration within the final MAS rotor. We discuss these considerations, and how they have led to a number of different approaches to MAS NMR sample preparation. We describe our experience of how custom-made (or commercially available) ultracentrifugal devices can facilitate a simple, fast and reliable sample preparation process. A number of groups have since adopted such tools, in some cases to prepare samples for sedimentation-style MAS NMR experiments. Here we argue for a more widespread adoption of their use for routine MAS NMR sample preparation.

  1. On the use of ultracentrifugal devices for routine sample preparation in biomolecular magic-angle-spinning NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Abhishek; Boatz, Jennifer C. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Wheeler, Travis B. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology (United States); Wel, Patrick C. A. van der, E-mail: vanderwel@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology (United States)

    2017-03-15

    A number of recent advances in the field of magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR have enabled its application to a range of biological systems of ever increasing complexity. To retain biological relevance, these samples are increasingly studied in a hydrated state. At the same time, experimental feasibility requires the sample preparation process to attain a high sample concentration within the final MAS rotor. We discuss these considerations, and how they have led to a number of different approaches to MAS NMR sample preparation. We describe our experience of how custom-made (or commercially available) ultracentrifugal devices can facilitate a simple, fast and reliable sample preparation process. A number of groups have since adopted such tools, in some cases to prepare samples for sedimentation-style MAS NMR experiments. Here we argue for a more widespread adoption of their use for routine MAS NMR sample preparation.

  2. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  3. Thiol passivation of MWIR type II superlattice photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, O.; Muti, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Poor passivation on photodetectors can result in catastrophic failure of the device. Abrupt termination of mesa side walls during pixel definition generates dangling bonds that lead to inversion layers and surface traps leading to surface leakage currents that short circuit diode action. Good passivation, therefore, is critical in the fabrication of high performance devices. Silicondioxide has been the main stay of passivation for commercial photodetectors, deposited at high temperatures and high RF powers using plasma deposition techniques. In photodetectors based on III-V compounds, sulphur passivation has been shown to replace oxygen and saturate the dangling bonds. Despite its effectiveness, it degrades over time. More effort is required to create passivation layers which eliminate surface leakage current. In this work, we propose the use of sulphur based octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, as a passivation layer for the InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors that acts as a self assembled monolayer (SAM). ODT SAMs consist of a chain of 18 carbon atoms with a sulphur atom at its head. ODT Thiol coating is a simple process that consist of dipping the sample into the solution for a prescribed time. Excellent electrical performance of diodes tested confirm the effectiveness of the sulphur head stabilized by the intermolecular interaction due to van der Walls forces between the long chains of ODT SAM which results in highly stable ultrathin hydrocarbon layers without long term degradation.

  4. 3D site specific sample preparation and analysis of 3D devices (FinFETs) by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambham, Ajay Kumar; Kumar, Arul; Gilbert, Matthieu; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2013-09-01

    With the transition from planar to three-dimensional device architectures such as Fin field-effect-transistors (FinFETs), new metrology approaches are required to meet the needs of semiconductor technology. It is important to characterize the 3D-dopant distributions precisely as their extent, positioning relative to gate edges and absolute concentration determine the device performance in great detail. At present the atom probe has shown its ability to analyze dopant distributions in semiconductor and thin insulating materials with sub-nm 3D-resolution and good dopant sensitivity. However, so far most reports have dealt with planar devices or restricted the measurements to 2D test structures which represent only limited challenges in terms of localization and site specific sample preparation. In this paper we will discuss the methodology to extract the dopant distribution from real 3D-devices such as a 3D-FinFET device, requiring the sample preparation to be carried out at a site specific location with a positioning accuracy ∼50 nm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Automatic gamma radiation scanning device and feed mechanism for plural sample holders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus is disclosed for measuring the level of gamma radiation contained in a plurality of biological samples which are located on the fibrous sheet member carried by a sample holder. The apparatus is adapted to count the radiation level of the number of closely spaced samples located in rows and columns on the sheet by automatically sequencing through the individual samples within the rows and to advance the holder to bring successive rows into proximity with the detector. The detector is moved from sample to sample within the rows, although a number of detectors can be employed. A plurality of sample holders are automatically advanced to the detector. 25 claims, 5 drawing figures

  6. Practical microwave electron devices

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  7. Techniques for active passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  8. Evaluation of Titanium Dioxide as a Binding Phase for the Passive Sampling of Glyphosate and Aminomethyl Phosphonic Acid in an Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvelle, Vincent; Nhu-Trang, Tran-Thi; Feret, Thibaut; Madarassou, Karine; Randon, Jérôme; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2015-06-16

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide on a world scale for the last 40 years, for both urban and agricultural uses. Here we describe the first passive sampling method for estimating the concentration of glyphosate and AMPA (aminomethyl phosphonic acid, one of its major degradation products) in surface water. The sampling method is based on a newly developed configuration of the diffusive gradient in thin-film (DGT) technique, which includes a TiO2 binding phase, already in use for a wide range of anions. Glyphosate and AMPA were retained well on a TiO2 binding phase, and elution in a 1 mL of 1 M NaOH led to recoveries greater than 65%. We found no influence of pH or flow velocity on the diffusion coefficients through 0.8 mm polyacrylamide gels, although they did increase with temperature. TiO2 binding gels were able to accumulate up to 1167 ng of P for both glyphosate and AMPA, and linear accumulation was expected over several weeks, depending on environmental conditions. DGT sampling rates were close to 10 mL day(-1) in ultrapure water, while they were less than 1 mL day(-1) in the presence of naturally occurring ions (e.g., copper, iron, calcium, magnesium). These last results highlighted (i) the ability of DGT to measure only the freely dissolved fraction of glyphosate and AMPA in water and (ii) the needs to determine which fraction (total, particulate, dissolved, freely dissolved) is indeed bioactive.

  9. Paper-Based Analytical Device for Zinc Ion Quantification in Water Samples with Power-Free Analyte Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Kudo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient sensitivity is a general issue of colorimetric paper-based analytical devices (PADs for trace analyte detection, such as metal ions, in environmental water. This paper demonstrates the colorimetric detection of zinc ions (Zn2+ on a paper-based analytical device with an integrated analyte concentration system. Concentration of Zn2+ ions from an enlarged sample volume (1 mL has been achieved with the aid of a colorimetric Zn2+ indicator (Zincon electrostatically immobilized onto a filter paper substrate in combination with highly water-absorbent materials. Analyte concentration as well as sample pretreatment, including pH adjustment and interferent masking, has been elaborated. The resulting device enables colorimetric quantification of Zn2+ in environmental water samples (tap water, river water from a single sample application. The achieved detection limit of 0.53 μM is a significant improvement over that of a commercial colorimetric Zn2+ test paper (9.7 μM, demonstrating the efficiency of the developed analyte concentration system not requiring any equipment.

  10. Evaluation of sediment sampling devices and methods used in the NKS/EKO-1 project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilus, E. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Finland)

    1996-10-01

    The radioactive fallout caused by nuclear weapons tests in the 1960s and the accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986 has created useful markers in the sediments of many Nordic waters. These have been successfully used not only in radioecological studies but also in limnological and marine research dealing with sedimentation processes and rates. To be able to study sedimentation and processes in sediments, it is essential to obtain reliable samples from sediments. False conclusions are an obvious risk if the studies are based on biased field samples. More strictly,, it is unreasonable to perform exacting and expensive analyses if the samples themselves are unreliable or of poor quality. The instruments best suited for quantitative sampling of soft-bottom sediments appear to be those based on the coring principle. Box corers can be reliably used for bulk sampling of coherent sediments and some silty and sandy sediments. Many factors speak in favour of large diameters/areas of the corer orifices. It is not possible, however, to increase the tube diameter without negative impact to the corer`s handiness and increasing difficulty in handling and slicing of the cores. Despite the large variety of sampling instruments and many sources of error involved in the use of different instruments, it is most important to know and account for the disadvantages and to work as carefully as possible towards minimizing errors and obtaining undisturbed, reliable samples. (EG).

  11. Evaluation of sediment sampling devices and methods used in the NKS/EKO-1 project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilus, E.

    1996-01-01

    The radioactive fallout caused by nuclear weapons tests in the 1960s and the accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986 has created useful markers in the sediments of many Nordic waters. These have been successfully used not only in radioecological studies but also in limnological and marine research dealing with sedimentation processes and rates. To be able to study sedimentation and processes in sediments, it is essential to obtain reliable samples from sediments. False conclusions are an obvious risk if the studies are based on biased field samples. More strictly,, it is unreasonable to perform exacting and expensive analyses if the samples themselves are unreliable or of poor quality. The instruments best suited for quantitative sampling of soft-bottom sediments appear to be those based on the coring principle. Box corers can be reliably used mainly for bulk sampling of coherent sediments and some silty and sandy sediments. Many factors speak in favour of relatively large diameters/areas of the corer orifices. It is not possible, however, to increase the tube diameter endlessly without negative impact to the corer's handiness and increasing difficulty in handling and slicing of the cores. Despite the large variety of sampling instruments and many sources of error involved in the use of different instruments, it is most important to know and account for the disadvantages and to work as carefully as possible towards minimizing errors and obtaining undisturbed, reliable samples. (EG)

  12. Validation of a new HPV self-sampling device for cervical cancer screening: The Cervical and Self-Sample In Screening (CASSIS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zein, Mariam; Bouten, Sheila; Louvanto, Karolina; Gilbert, Lucy; Gotlieb, Walter; Hemmings, Robert; Behr, Marcel A; Franco, Eduardo L; Liang, Victoria; Martins, Claudia; Duarte, Silvy; Sarban, Natalia; Geddes, Patricia; Massa, Ana; Samios, Kathrin; Aboufadl, Siham; Verdon, Sophie; Pereria, Cynthia; Lacroix, Isabelle

    2018-04-17

    We compared the self-sampling performance of the newly designed HerSwab™ device with a physician-collected cervical sample and another self-sample using the cobas® PCR Female swab for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. Women referred for colposcopy at McGill University affiliated hospital clinics collected two consecutive self-samples, one with HerSwab™ and one with cobas® swab, after receiving instructions. The order of sampling was randomized. The colposcopist then collected a cervical sample and conducted a colposcopic examination. Samples were tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. Sensitivity and specificity to detect CIN2+ and respective 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to compare sampling approaches. The HPV testing agreement between samples was measured using the Kappa statistic. Of 1217 women enrolled, 1076 had complete results for HPV and cytology; 148 (13.8%) had CIN1, 147 (13.7%) had CIN2/3, and 5 (0.5%) had cancer. There was very good agreement between methods for HPV detection (HerSwab™ versus physician: kappa=0.84; cobas® swabs versus physician: kappa=0.81; HerSwab™ versus cobas® swabs: kappa=0.87). The sensitivity of HPV detection for CIN2+ was 87.6% (95%CI: 79.8-93.2) with self-sampling using HerSwab™, 88.6% (95%CI: 80.9-94.0) with self-sampling using the cobas® swab, and 92.4% (95%CI: 85.5-96.7) with physician sampling. Corresponding estimates of specificity were 58.1% (95%CI: 54.1-62.1), 55.0% (95%CI: 50.9-59.0) and 58.7% (95%CI: 54.6-62.6). Cytology (ASC-US or more severe) done on the physician-collected specimen was 80.2% (95%CI: 70.8-87.6) sensitive and 61.4% (95%CI: 57.2-65.5) specific for CIN2+. The HerSwab™ had good agreement with physician sampling in detecting HPV, and adequate performance in detecting high-grade lesions among women referred to colposcopy for abnormal cytology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Method and system having ultrasonic sensor movable by translation device for ultrasonic profiling of weld samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyard, James; Potter, Timothy; Charron, William; Hopkins, Deborah; Reverdy, Frederic

    2010-04-06

    A system for ultrasonic profiling of a weld sample includes a carriage movable in opposite first and second directions. An ultrasonic sensor is coupled to the carriage to move over the sample as the carriage moves. An encoder determines the position of the carriage to determine the position of the sensor. A spring is connected at one end of the carriage. Upon the carriage being moved in the first direction toward the spring such that the carriage and the sensor are at a beginning position and the spring is compressed the spring decompresses to push the carriage back along the second direction to move the carriage and the sensor from the beginning position to an ending position. The encoder triggers the sensor to take the ultrasonic measurements of the sample when the sensor is at predetermined positions while the sensor moves over the sample between the beginning and positions.

  14. Fabrication Techniques of Stretchable and Cloth Electroadhesion Samples for Implementation on Devices with Space Application

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this study is to determine materials and fabrication techniques for efficient space-rated electroadhesion (EA) samples. Liquid metals, including...

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Heavy Metals in Water Based on LIBS with an Automatic Device for Sample Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Li; Zhao Nanjing; Liu Wenqing; Meng Deshuo; Fang Li; Wang Yin; Yu Yang; Ma Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals in water can be deposited on graphite flakes, which can be used as an enrichment method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and is studied in this paper. The graphite samples were prepared with an automatic device, which was composed of a loading and unloading module, a quantitatively adding solution module, a rapid heating and drying module and a precise rotating module. The experimental results showed that the sample preparation methods had no significant effect on sample distribution and the LIBS signal accumulated in 20 pulses was stable and repeatable. With an increasing amount of the sample solution on the graphite flake, the peak intensity at Cu I 324.75 nm accorded with the exponential function with a correlation coefficient of 0.9963 and the background intensity remained unchanged. The limit of detection (LOD) was calculated through linear fitting of the peak intensity versus the concentration. The LOD decreased rapidly with an increasing amount of sample solution until the amount exceeded 20 mL and the correlation coefficient of exponential function fitting was 0.991. The LOD of Pb, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn after evaporating different amounts of sample solution on the graphite flakes was measured and the variation tendency of their LOD with sample solution amounts was similar to the tendency for Cu. The experimental data and conclusions could provide a reference for automatic sample preparation and heavy metal in situ detection. (paper)

  16. Theoretical basis, application, reliability, and sample size estimates of a Meridian Energy Analysis Device for Traditional Chinese Medicine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yen Tsai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The Meridian Energy Analysis Device is currently a popular tool in the scientific research of meridian electrophysiology. In this field, it is generally believed that measuring the electrical conductivity of meridians provides information about the balance of bioenergy or Qi-blood in the body. METHODS AND RESULTS: PubMed database based on some original articles from 1956 to 2014 and the authoŕs clinical experience. In this short communication, we provide clinical examples of Meridian Energy Analysis Device application, especially in the field of traditional Chinese medicine, discuss the reliability of the measurements, and put the values obtained into context by considering items of considerable variability and by estimating sample size. CONCLUSION: The Meridian Energy Analysis Device is making a valuable contribution to the diagnosis of Qi-blood dysfunction. It can be assessed from short-term and long-term meridian bioenergy recordings. It is one of the few methods that allow outpatient traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis, monitoring the progress, therapeutic effect and evaluation of patient prognosis. The holistic approaches underlying the practice of traditional Chinese medicine and new trends in modern medicine toward the use of objective instruments require in-depth knowledge of the mechanisms of meridian energy, and the Meridian Energy Analysis Device can feasibly be used for understanding and interpreting traditional Chinese medicine theory, especially in view of its expansion in Western countries.

  17. Gaseous and Freely-Dissolved PCBs in the Lower Great Lakes Based on Passive Sampling: Spatial Trends and Air-Water Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Siyao; McDonough, Carrie A; Khairy, Mohammed; Muir, Derek C G; Helm, Paul A; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-05-17

    Polyethylene passive sampling was performed to quantify gaseous and freely dissolved polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the air and water of Lakes Erie and Ontario during 2011-2012. In view of differing physical characteristics and the impacts of historical contamination by PCBs within these lakes, spatial variation of PCB concentrations and air-water exchange across these lakes may be expected. Both lakes displayed statistically similar aqueous and atmospheric PCB concentrations. Total aqueous concentrations of 29 PCBs ranged from 1.5 pg L(-1) in the open lake of Lake Erie (site E02) in 2011 spring to 105 pg L(-1) in Niagara (site On05) in 2012 summer, while total atmospheric concentrations were 7.7-634 pg m(-3) across both lakes. A west-to-east gradient was observed for aqueous PCBs in Lake Erie. River discharge and localized influences (e.g., sediment resuspension and regional alongshore transport) likely dominated spatial trends of aqueous PCBs in both lakes. Air-water exchange fluxes of Σ7PCBs ranged from -2.4 (±1.9) ng m(-2) day(-1) (deposition) in Sheffield (site E03) to 9.0 (±3.1) ng m(-2) day(-1) (volatilization) in Niagara (site On05). Net volatilization of PCBs was the primary trend across most sites and periods. Almost half of variation in air-water exchange fluxes was attributed to the difference in aqueous concentrations of PCBs. Uncertainty analysis in fugacity ratios and mass fluxes in air-water exchange of PCBs indicated that PCBs have reached or approached equilibrium only at the eastern Lake Erie and along the Canadian shore of Lake Ontario sites, where air-water exchange fluxes dominated atmospheric concentrations.

  18. Device for mechanoluminescence excitation by applying gradually varying pressure on the sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, R.K.; Kher, R.S.; Upadhyay, A.K.; Dhoble, S.J.; Khan, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanoluminescence (ML) is an interesting phenomenon, which is a light emission caused by mechanical stimuli such as grinding, cutting, collision, striking, friction etc. The nature of the ML emitted from a particular material depends upon how the materials are deformed. The compression technique and piston impact or impulsive techniques are the most popular for ML measurement. In these techniques, ML is excited by applying certain fixed load on to the sample and, it is not possible to study ML by continuously varying load on to the sample. Therefore in order to study ML by applying continuously increasing/decreasing pressure on the sample, a low cost set up has been designed and developed. We have compared the ML of sugar (non-irradiated), γ-irradiated LiF:Ba and BaAl 2 O 4 :Eu phosphor, when ML is excited impulsively and by applying continuously varying pressure on the sample. When BaAl 2 O 4 :Eu phosphor is deformed impulsively, a single peak with shoulder is observed in the time versus ML intensity curve, while number of peak is observed, when continuously increasing pressure applied on the sample. When pressure is continuously decreased less number of peaks is observed as compared to that of increasing pressure. Similar result is observed for LiF:Ba crystal. The enhancement in ML intensity with γ-irradiation suggest that the BaAl 2 O 4 :Eu is a suitable candidate for ML dosimetry. (author)

  19. Advantages and disadvantages of sulfur passivation of InAs/GaSb superlattice waveguide photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J; Lehnert, T; Hoffmann, D; Fouckhardt, H

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the influence of ammonium sulfide (NH 4 ) 2 S passivation on waveguide based mid-infrared InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetectors (2–5 µm wavelength) has been studied. The current–voltage characteristics for reverse as well as for forward bias of passivated samples have been examined. The advantages of this have been the reduction of the reverse leakage current and the increase of zero bias resistance. As a disadvantage the decrease of the photoresponsivity after sulfur passivation has been found. Furthermore, it has been observed that the passivation solution does not only passivate the surface of GaSb, but it also reacts with entire GaSb layers and can destroy the devices

  20. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2016-03-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameters. This method is applied to a Si quantum well and a Si ultra-thin body transistor oxidized with SiO2 in several oxidation configurations. Comparison with ab-initio results and experiments verifies the presented method. Oxidation configurations that severely hamper the transistor performance are identified. It is also shown that the commonly used implicit H atom passivation overestimates the transistor performance.

  1. Development of a One-Handed, Environmental Surface-Sampling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    individual packaging, an operator can generate a large amount of waste that needs to be managed during a sampling mission. The U.S. Army Edgewood...prepared and spore spotting was performed in a biological safety cabinet. For the spore- spotting procedures, the surfaces were spotted with 1 mL of...260 nm (A260) and 280 nm (A280). To determine the DNA concentration for each sample, the NanoDrop software used a modified Beer –Lambert equation and

  2. Device for flame combustion of liquid or solid samples in radioactive isotope trace indication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaartinen, N.H.

    1979-01-01

    The plant or animal tissue containing T and/or 14 C isotope indicator is in a small ignition cage within the combustion chamber. The ignition cage consists of Nichrome which supports the ignition procedure. The combustion chamber is maintained at a temperature above the condensation temperature of the vapours escaping from the tissue (e.g. H 2 O). The thimble type ignition cage burns uniformly together with the sample. It is no longer necessary to make pellets of the sample. (DG) [de

  3. An all-glass solid sampling device for open tubular columns in gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, T.P.H.; vd Berg, P.M.J.

    1972-01-01

    An all-glass system for direct sample-introduction of high-boiling compounds onto open tubular columns is described. The standard deviation for quantitative measurements is less than 2.7%. The loss in resolving power of capillary columns, due to this injection system is negligible. The system is

  4. A sampling device for counting insect egg clusters and measuring vertical distribution of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Talerico; Robert W., Jr. Wilson

    1978-01-01

    The use of a vertical sampling pole that delineates known volumes and position is illustrated and demonstrated for counting egg clusters of N. sertifer. The pole can also be used to estimate vertical and horizontal coverage, distribution or damage of vegetation or foliage.

  5. Ram-air sample collection device for a chemical warfare agent sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megerle, Clifford A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    In a surface acoustic wave sensor mounted within a body, the sensor having a surface acoustic wave array detector and a micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator exposed on a surface of the body, an apparatus for collecting air for the sensor, comprising a housing operatively arranged to mount atop the body, the housing including a multi-stage channel having an inlet and an outlet, the channel having a first stage having a first height and width proximate the inlet, a second stage having a second lower height and width proximate the micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator, a third stage having a still lower third height and width proximate the surface acoustic wave array detector, and a fourth stage having a fourth height and width proximate the outlet, where the fourth height and width are substantially the same as the first height and width.

  6. Determining the sample size required to establish whether a medical device is non-inferior to an external benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Adrian; Crowther, Michael J; Judge, Andrew; Whitehouse, Michael R; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-08-28

    The use of benchmarks to assess the performance of implants such as those used in arthroplasty surgery is a widespread practice. It provides surgeons, patients and regulatory authorities with the reassurance that implants used are safe and effective. However, it is not currently clear how or how many implants should be statistically compared with a benchmark to assess whether or not that implant is superior, equivalent, non-inferior or inferior to the performance benchmark of interest.We aim to describe the methods and sample size required to conduct a one-sample non-inferiority study of a medical device for the purposes of benchmarking. Simulation study. Simulation study of a national register of medical devices. We simulated data, with and without a non-informative competing risk, to represent an arthroplasty population and describe three methods of analysis (z-test, 1-Kaplan-Meier and competing risks) commonly used in surgical research. We evaluate the performance of each method using power, bias, root-mean-square error, coverage and CI width. 1-Kaplan-Meier provides an unbiased estimate of implant net failure, which can be used to assess if a surgical device is non-inferior to an external benchmark. Small non-inferiority margins require significantly more individuals to be at risk compared with current benchmarking standards. A non-inferiority testing paradigm provides a useful framework for determining if an implant meets the required performance defined by an external benchmark. Current contemporary benchmarking standards have limited power to detect non-inferiority, and substantially larger samples sizes, in excess of 3200 procedures, are required to achieve a power greater than 60%. It is clear when benchmarking implant performance, net failure estimated using 1-KM is preferential to crude failure estimated by competing risk models. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  7. What sampling device is the most appropriate for vaginal vault cytology in gynaecological cancer follow up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lino, Del Pup; Vincenzo, Canzonieri; Diego, Serraino; Elio, Campagnutta

    2012-01-01

    In women with cancer-related hysterectomy, the vaginal vault cytology has a low efficacy - when performed by conventional methods – for the early detection of vaginal recurrence. The amount of exfoliated cells collected is generally low because of atrophy, and the vaginal vault corners can be so narrow that the commonly used Ayres spatula cannot often penetrate deeply into them. This prospective study aimed at identifying the advantages obtained in specimens collection using the cytobrush, as compared to the Ayres’s spatula. 141 gynaecologic cancer patients were studied to compare samplings collected with Ayre’s spatula or with cytobrush. In a pilot setting of 15 patients, vaginal cytology samples obtained by both Ayre’s spatula and cytobrush were placed at the opposite sites of a single slide for quali-quantitative evaluation. Thereafter, the remaining 126 consecutive women were assigned to either group A (spatula) or B (cytobrush) according to the order of entry. The same gynaecologist performed all the procedures. In all 15 pilot cases, the cytobrush seemed to collect a higher quantity of material. The comparative analysis of the two complete groups indicated that the cytobrush technique was more effective than the spatula one. The odds ratio (OR) for an optimal cytology using the cytobrush was 2.8 (95% confidence interval -C.I. 1.3–6.2; chi-square test, p=0.008). Vaginal vault cytology with cytobrush turned out to better perform than the traditional Ayre’s spatula to obtain an adequate sampling in gynecological cancer patients

  8. Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex III: Neutron Devices and Computational and Sample Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sakasai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neutron devices such as neutron detectors, optical devices including supermirror devices and 3He neutron spin filters, and choppers are successfully developed and installed at the Materials Life Science Facility (MLF of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC, Tokai, Japan. Four software components of MLF computational environment, instrument control, data acquisition, data analysis, and a database, have been developed and equipped at MLF. MLF also provides a wide variety of sample environment options including high and low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and high pressures. This paper describes the current status of neutron devices, computational and sample environments at MLF.

  9. Enhanced Optoelectronic Performance of a Passivated Nanowire-Based Device: Key Information from Real-Space Imaging Using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Sun, Jingya; Priante, Davide; Bose, Riya; Shaheen, Basamat; Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Chao; Bakr, Osman; Ooi, Boon S.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Managing trap states and understanding their role in ultrafast charge-carrier dynamics, particularly at surface and interfaces, remains a major bottleneck preventing further advancements and commercial exploitation of nanowire (NW)-based devices. A

  10. 3D Numerical Study of Velocity Profiles and Thermal Mixing in Passive, Infrared Suppression Devices for Gas Turbine Engine Driven Generators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blackwell, Neal E

    2002-01-01

    ...) suppression device for exhaust ducting. The results, for a gas turbine driven generator, yield a novel design that is more compact and allows for shorter duct lengths, hence enabling associated camouflage netting to be lower in height...

  11. A device for the application of uniaxial strain to single crystal samples for use in synchrotron radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gannon, L. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford Physics Department, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 ODE (United Kingdom); Bosak, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Burkovsky, R. G. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University, 29 Politekhnicheskaya, 195251, St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Nisbet, G.; Hoesch, M., E-mail: Moritz.Hoesch@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 ODE (United Kingdom); Petrović, A. P. [DPMC-MaNEP, Université de Genève, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24, 1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    We present the design, construction, and testing of a straining device compatible with many different synchrotron radiation techniques, in a wide range of experimental environments (including low temperature, high field and ultra-high vacuum). The device has been tested by X-ray diffraction on single crystal samples of quasi-one-dimensional Cs{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 6} and K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 6}, in which microscopic strains up to a Δc/c = 0.12% ± 0.01% change in the c lattice parameters have been achieved. We have also used the device in an inelastic X-ray scattering experiment, to probe the strain-dependent speed of sound ν along the c axis. A reduction Δν/ν of up to −3.8% was obtained at a strain of Δc/c = 0.25% in K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 6}.

  12. Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    ASTM ASTM International ASU Arizona State University ATD automated thermal desorption BENZ Benzene C/Co passive sampler concentration...Protection Agency [USEPA], 1998a, b; California Department of Toxic Substance Control, 2011; ASTM International [ASTM] D7758, 2011). This demonstration... microporous sintered polyethylene, through which the vapors diffuse. Figure 1b. Radiello sampler with regular (white) and low-uptake rate

  13. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Sciocchetti, A.; Giovannoli, P.; DeFelice, P.; Cardellini, F.; Cotellessa, G.; Pagliari, M.

    2010-01-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered. (authors)

  14. A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciocchetti, G; Sciocchetti, A; Giovannoli, P; DeFelice, P; Cardellini, F; Cotellessa, G; Pagliari, M

    2010-10-01

    A new passive radon-thoron discriminative measurement system has been developed for monitoring radon and thoron individually. It consists of a 'couple' of passive integrating devices with a CR39 nuclear track detector (NTD). The experimental prototype is based on the application of a new concept of NTD instrument developed at ENEA, named Alpha-PREM, acronym of piston radon exposure meter, which allows controlling the detector exposure with a patented sampling technique (Int. Eu. Pat. and US Pat.). The 'twin diffusion chambers system' was based on two A-PREM devices consisting of the standard device, named NTD-Rn, and a modified version, named NTD-Rn/Tn, which was set up to improve thoron sampling efficiency of the diffusion chamber, without changing the geometry and the start/stop function of the NTD-Rn device. Coupling devices fitted on each device allowed getting a system, which works as a double-chamber structure when deployed at the monitoring position. In this paper both technical and physical aspects are considered.

  15. Passive air sampling of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and emerging compounds in Kolkata megacity and rural mangrove wetland Sundarban in India: An approach to regional monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Karla; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Estellano, Victor H; Mitra, Soumita; Audi, Ondrej; Kukucka, Petr; Přibylová, Petra; Klánová, Jana; Corsolini, Simonetta

    2017-02-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers were deployed concurrently at five sites across Kolkata megacity and the rural mangrove wetland of Sundarban (UNESCO World Heritage Site) between January-March in 2014. Samples were analyzed for hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltricholoroethanes (DDTs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Derived air concentrations (pg/m 3 ) for Kolkata ranged: for ∑α- and γ-HCH between 70 and 207 (114 ± 62), ∑ 6 DDTs: 127-216 (161 ± 36), ∑ 7 PCBs: 53-213 (141 ± 64), and ∑ 10 PBDEs: 0.30-23 (11 ± 9). Low values for all the studied POPs were recorded in the remote area of the Sundarban site (with the exception of DDTs: o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDT), where ∑ 4 DDTs was 161 ± 36. In particular, the site of Ballygunge, located in the southern part of Kolkata, showed the highest level of all the metabolites/congeners of POPs, suggesting a potential hot spot of usage and emissions. From HCHs, α-/γ-HCH isomers ratio was low (0.67-1.96) indicating a possible sporadic source of lindane. γ-HCH dominated the HCH signal (at 3 sites) reflecting wide spread use of lindane both in Kolkata and the Sundarban region; however, isomeric composition in Kolkata also suggests potential technical HCHs use. Among DDT metabolites, both o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDT shared the dominant percentages accounting for ∼26-46% of total DDTs followed by p,p'-DDE (∼12-19%). The PCB congener profile was dominated by tri- and tetra-Cl at the southern and eastern part of Kolkata. These results are one of the few contributions that reports air concentrations of POPs, concurrently, at urban and remote villages in India. These data are useful to assess atmospheric pollution levels and to motivate local and regional authorities to better understand the potential human exposure risk associated to urban areas in India. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  16. Use of criteria pollutants, active and passive mercury sampling, and receptor modeling to understand the chemical forms of gaseous oxidized mercury in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Edgerton, E.; Gustin, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    The highest mercury (Hg) wet deposition in the United States (US) occurs along the Gulf of Mexico, and in the southern and central Mississippi River Valley. Gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) is thought to be a major contributor due to its high water solubility and reactivity. Therefore, it is critical to understand the concentrations, potential for wet and dry deposition, and GOM compounds present in the air. Concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of GOM were measured at Outlying Landing Field (OLF), Florida, using a Tekran® 2537/1130/1135, and active and passive samplers using cation-exchange and nylon membranes. Relationships with Tekran® derived data must be interpreted with caution, since GOM concentrations can be biased low depending on the chemical compounds in air, and interferences with water vapor and ozone. Only gaseous elemental Hg and GOM are discussed here since the PBM measurement uncertainties are higher. Criteria air pollutants were concurrently measured and Tekran® data were assessed along with these using Principal Component Analysis to identify associations among air pollutants. Based on the diel pattern, high GOM concentrations at this site were associated with fossil fuel combustion and gas phase oxidation during the day, and gas phase oxidation and transport in the free troposphere. The ratio of GEM/CO at OLF (0.008 ng m-3 ppbv-1) was much higher than the numbers reported for the Western United States and central New York for domestic emissions or biomass burning (0.001 ng m-3 ppbv-1), which we suggest is indicative of a marine boundary layer source. Results from nylon membranes with thermal desorption analyses suggest five potential GOM compounds exist in this area, including HgBr2, HgO, Hg(NO3)2, HgSO4, and an unknown compound. This indicates that the site is influenced by different gaseous phase reactions and sources. A~high GOM event related to high CO but average SO2 suggests the air parcels moved from the free troposphere and across

  17. Evaluation of a New Technique for iFOBT Utilising a New Sample Collection Device with Increased Buffer Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns-Toepler, Markus; Hardt, Philip

    2017-07-01

    The aims of the present study were: (i) Evaluate specificity and sensitivity of Hb Smart enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (ScheBo Biotech) compared to colonoscopy results and (ii) assess stability of a new sample collection device containing a newly formulated buffer to extract haemoglobin using buffer and stool samples spiked with defined concentrations of haemoglobin. Stool samples were quantified with the ELISA method. The stability of haemoglobin in the extraction buffer and in native stool samples, respectively, was determined daily by ELISA during storage for 5 days at 4°C and at room temperature after addition of haemoglobin. Haemoglobin ELISA had a sensitivity of 78.4% for detection of CRC with a specificity of 98%. Haemoglobin extracted in corresponding extraction buffer demonstrated stability throughout storage for 5 days at 4°C and at room temperature. Hb Smart represents a very promising tool for large-scale screening of CRC with regard to sample handling, stability and analysis of haemoglobin in faeces. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Devices used by automated milking systems are similarly accurate in estimating milk yield and in collecting a representative milk sample compared with devices used by farms with conventional milk recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Claudia; Dela Rue, B.; Turner, S.A.; Petch, S.

    2015-01-01

    Information on accuracy of milk-sampling devices used on farms with automated milking systems (AMS) is essential for development of milk recording protocols. The hypotheses of this study were (1) devices used by AMS units are similarly accurate in estimating milk yield and in collecting

  19. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    , which aimed to investigate: 1) The development of a clinical method to evaluate and distinguish neural (reflex mediated stiffness) and non-neural (passive muscle stiffness) components of muscle stiffness in adults with CP by objective and reliable measurements. 2) The association between increased...... and reliability of the method, and argue for the use of the method in the clinical practice. The device is able to distinguish between passive muscle stiffness and reflex-mediated stiffness in subjects with CP. It shows good high intrarater and interrater reliability in evaluation of passive muscle stiffness...... to measure muscle stiffness, and distinguish between passive muscle stiffness and reflex-mediated stiffness. Furthermore, it is a reliable device to measure changes in passive ROM. Treatment of passive muscle stiffness should be directed towards intense training, comprising many repetitions with a functional...

  20. Sampling gaseous compounds from essential oils evaporation by solid phase microextraction devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Lai, Chin-Hsing

    2014-12-01

    Needle trap samplers (NTS) are packed with 80-100 mesh divinylbenzene (DVB) particles to extract indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study compared extraction efficiency between an NTS and a commercially available 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane-solid phase microextration (PDMS-SPME) fiber sampler used to sample gaseous products in heated tea tree essential oil in different evaporation modes, which were evaporated respectively by free convection inside a glass evaporation dish at 27 °C, by evaporation diffuser at 60 °C, and by thermal ceramic wicks at 100 °C. The experimental results indicated that the NTS performed better than the SPME fiber samplers and that the NTS primarily adsorbed 5.7 ng ethylbenzene, 5.8 ng m/p-xylenes, 11.1 ng 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 12.4 ng 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 9.99 ng 1,4-diethylbenzene when thermal ceramic wicks were used to evaporate the tea tree essential oil during a 1-hr evaporation period. The experiment also indicated that the temperature used to heat the essential oils should be as low as possible to minimize irritant VOC by-products. If the evaporation temperature does not exceed 100 °C, the concentrations of main by-products trimethylbenzene and diethylbenzene are much lower than the threshold limit values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

  1. Miniaturized bead-beating device to automate full DNA sample preparation processes for gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu-Youn; Kwon, Sung Hong; Jung, Sun-Ok; Lim, Hee-Kyun; Jung, Won-Jong; Park, Chin-Sung; Kim, Joon-Ho; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Huh, Nam

    2011-11-07

    We have developed a miniaturized bead-beating device to automate nucleic acids extraction from Gram-positive bacteria for molecular diagnostics. The microfluidic device was fabricated by sandwiching a monolithic flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane between two glass wafers (i.e., glass-PDMS-glass), which acted as an actuator for bead collision via its pneumatic vibration without additional lysis equipment. The Gram-positive bacteria, S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, were captured on surface-modified glass beads from 1 mL of initial sample solution and in situ lyzed by bead-beating operation. Then, 10 μL or 20 μL of bacterial DNA solution was eluted and amplified successfully by real-time PCR. It was found that liquid volume fraction played a crucial role in determining the cell lysis efficiency in a confined chamber by facilitating membrane deflection and bead motion. The miniaturized bead-beating operation disrupted most of S. aureus within 3 min, which turned out to be as efficient as the conventional benchtop vortexing machine or the enzyme-based lysis technique. The effective cell concentration was significantly enhanced with the reduction of initial sample volume by 50 or 100 times. Combination of such analyte enrichment and in situ bead-beating lysis provided an excellent PCR detection sensitivity amounting to ca. 46 CFU even for the Gram-positive bacteria. The proposed bead-beating microdevice is potentially useful as a nucleic acid extraction method toward a PCR-based sample-to-answer system. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  2. Combination of a Sample Pretreatment Microfluidic Device with a Photoluminescent Graphene Oxide Quantum Dot Sensor for Trace Lead Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minsu; Ha, Hyun Dong; Kim, Yong Tae; Jung, Jae Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2015-11-03

    A novel trace lead ion (Pb(2+)) detection platform by combining a microfluidic sample pretreatment device with a DNA aptamer linked photoluminescent graphene oxide quantum dot (GOQD) sensor was proposed. The multilayered microdevice included a microchamber which was packed with cation exchange resins for preconcentrating metal ions. The sample loading and recovery were automatically actuated by a peristaltic polydimethylsiloxane micropump with a flow rate of 84 μL/min. Effects of the micropump actuation time, metal ion concentration, pH, and the volumes of the sample and eluent on the metal ion capture and preconcentration efficiency were investigated on a chip. The Pb(2+) samples whose concentrations ranged from 0.48 nM to 1.2 μM were successfully recovered with a preconcentration factor value between 4 and 5. Then, the preconcentrated metal ions were quantitatively analyzed with a DNA aptamer modified GOQD. The DNA aptamer on the GOQD specifically captured the target Pb(2+) which can induce electron transfer from GOQD to Pb(2+) upon UV irradiation, thereby resulting in the fluorescence quenching of the GOQD. The disturbing effect of foreign anions on the Pb(2+) detection and the spiked Pb(2+) real samples were also analyzed. The proposed GOQD metal ion sensor exhibited highly sensitive Pb(2+) detection with a detection limit of 0.64 nM and a dynamic range from 1 to 1000 nM. The on-chip preconcentration of the trace metal ions from a large-volume sample followed by the metal ion detection by the fluorescent GOQD sensor can provide an advanced platform for on-site water pollution screening.

  3. Passive, Collapsible Contingency Urinal for Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Fluid transport systems for spacecraft face acute challenges because of the persistently unfamiliar and unforgiving low-gravity environment. IRPI, LLC, has developed a contingency wastewater collection and processing device that provides passive liquid collation, containment, bubble separation, and droplet coalescence functions. The lightweight, low-volume, low-cost, and potentially disposable device may be used for subsequent sampling, metering, storage, disposal, and/or reuse. The approach includes a fractal wetting design that incorporates smart capillary fluidics. This work could have a broad impact on capillary-based fluid management on spacecraft and on Earth.

  4. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  5. A Lab on a chip device for rapid identification of Avian Influenza virus by on-chip sample preparation and solid phase PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sun; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bang, Dang Duong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel lab-on-a-chip device for fast AIV screening by integrating DNA microarray-based solid phase PCR on microchip. The device can handle viral samples in an automatic way. Moreover, multiplex PCR and sequence detection are done in one-step, which greatly simplifies...

  6. Fluid-flow pressure measurements and thermo-fluid characterization of a single loop two-phase passive heat transfer device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinca, A.; Mangini, D.; Mameli, M.; Fioriti, D.; Filippeschi, S.; Araneo, L.; Roth, N.; Marengo, M.

    2017-11-01

    A Novel Single Loop Pulsating Heat Pipe (SLPHP), with an inner diameter of 2 mm, filled up with two working fluids (Ethanol and FC-72, Filling Ratio of 60%), is tested in Bottom Heated mode varying the heating power and the orientation. The static confinement diameter for Ethanol and FC-72, respectively 3.4 mm and 1.7mm, is above and slightly under the inner diameter of the tube. This is important for a better understanding of the working principle of the device very close to the limit between the Loop Thermosyphon and Pulsating Heat Pipe working modes. With respect to previous SLPHP experiments found in the literature, such device is designed with two transparent inserts mounted between the evaporator and the condenser allowing direct fluid flow visualization. Two highly accurate pressure transducers permit local pressure measurements just at the edges of one of the transparent inserts. Additionally, three heating elements are controlled independently, so as to vary the heating distribution at the evaporator. It is found that peculiar heating distributions promote the slug/plug flow motion in a preferential direction, increasing the device overall performance. Pressure measurements point out that the pressure drop between the evaporator and the condenser are related to the flow pattern. Furthermore, at high heat inputs, the flow regimes recorded for the two fluids are very similar, stressing that, when the dynamic effects start to play a major role in the system, the device classification between Loop Thermosyphon and Pulsating Heat Pipe is not that sharp anymore.

  7. Portable and low-cost colorimetric office paper-based device for phenacetin detection in seized cocaine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gabriela O; de Araujo, William R; Paixão, Thiago R L C

    2018-01-01

    An office paper-based colorimetric device is proposed as a portable, rapid, and low-cost sensor for forensic applications aiming to detect phenacetin used as adulterant in illicit seized materials such as cocaine. The proposed method uses white office paper as the substrate and wax printing technology to fabricate the detection zones. Based on the optimum conditions, a linear analytical curve was obtained for phenacetin concentrations ranging from 0 to 64.52µgmL ‒1 , and the straight line was in accordance with the following equation: (Magenta percentage color) = 1.19 + 0.458 (C Phe /µgmL ‒1 ), R 2 = 0.990. The limit of detection was calculated as 3.5µgmL ‒1 (3σ/slope). The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated using real seized cocaine samples and the spike-recovery procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Field trials of an electret based passive dust sampler in coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemingway, M.A.; Brown, R.C.; Arthur, J. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    An electret-based passive dust sampler has been developed by the Health and Safety Laboratory, UK. The device consists of a small disc of electret (polymer holding a permanent electric charge) held between earthen plates, and it acts by attaching charged dust particles to itself. The device does not require a pump and its rate of sampling is independent of external air velocity, provided that the velocity exceeds a low limiting value. Experiments have been carried out in two coal mines. In each experiment two passive sampler were mounted alongside an MRE sampler at the statutory sampling point in the return roadway. Both passive samplers were mounted vertically but in one the plane of the electret was parallel to the air flow and in the other it was perpendicular. The result obtained from the first mine showed a good correlation between gravimetric estimates of dust concentration obtained with the passive samplers and respirable dust concentrations obtained with MRE. The correlation between the two sets of results at the second mine was not quite as good as those of the first, but was reasonable. In no instance was any significant difference observed between samples obtained from pairs of passive samples in different orientations. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. High-resolution room-temperature sample scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscope configurable for geological and biomagnetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, L. E.; Holzer, J. R.; McBride, K. K.; Lima, E. A.; Baudenbacher, F.; Radparvar, M.

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope system with interchangeable sensor configurations for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature (RT) samples with submillimeter resolution. The low-critical-temperature (Tc) niobium-based monolithic SQUID sensors are mounted on the tip of a sapphire and thermally anchored to the helium reservoir. A 25μm sapphire window separates the vacuum space from the RT sample. A positioning mechanism allows us to adjust the sample-to-sensor spacing from the top of the Dewar. We achieved a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100μm, which could be maintained for periods of up to four weeks. Different SQUID sensor designs are necessary to achieve the best combination of spatial resolution and field sensitivity for a given source configuration. For imaging thin sections of geological samples, we used a custom-designed monolithic low-Tc niobium bare SQUID sensor, with an effective diameter of 80μm, and achieved a field sensitivity of 1.5pT/Hz1/2 and a magnetic moment sensitivity of 5.4×10-18Am2/Hz1/2 at a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100μm in the white noise region for frequencies above 100Hz. Imaging action currents in cardiac tissue requires a higher field sensitivity, which can only be achieved by compromising spatial resolution. We developed a monolithic low-Tc niobium multiloop SQUID sensor, with sensor sizes ranging from 250μm to 1mm, and achieved sensitivities of 480-180fT /Hz1/2 in the white noise region for frequencies above 100Hz, respectively. For all sensor configurations, the spatial resolution was comparable to the effective diameter and limited by the sensor-to-sample spacing. Spatial registration allowed us to compare high-resolution images of magnetic fields associated with action currents and optical recordings of transmembrane potentials to study the bidomain nature of cardiac tissue or to match petrography to magnetic field maps in thin sections of geological samples.

  10. Toward compression of small cell population: harnessing stress in passive regions of dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert

    2014-03-01

    We present a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) for in vitro analysis of mm2 biological samples under periodic compressive stress. Understanding how mechanical stimuli affect cell functions could lead to significant advances in diseases diagnosis and drugs development. We previously reported an array of 72 micro-DEAs on a chip to apply a periodic stretch to cells. To diversify our cell mechanotransduction toolkit we have developed an actuator for periodic compression of small cell populations. The device is based on a novel design which exploits the effects of non-equibiaxial pre-stretch and takes advantage of the stress induced in passive regions of DEAs. The device consists of two active regions separated by a 2mm x 2mm passive area. When connected to an AC high-voltage source, the two active regions periodically compress the passive region. Due to the non-equibiaxial pre-stretch it induces uniaxial compressive strain greater than 10%. Cells adsorbed on top of this passive gap would experience the same uniaxial compressive stain. The electrodes configuration confines the electric field and prevents it from reaching the biological sample. A thin layer of silicone is casted on top of the device to ensure a biocompatible environment. This design provides several advantages over alternative technologies such as high optical transparency of the area of interest (passive region under compression) and its potential for miniaturization and parallelization.

  11. Development and Validation of a SPME-GC-MS Method for In situ Passive Sampling of Root Volatiles from Glasshouse-Grown Broccoli Plants Undergoing Below-Ground Herbivory by Larvae of Cabbage Root Fly, Delia radicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, William; Shepherd, Tom; Alexander, Colin J; Birch, A Nicholas E; Evans, K Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Research on plant root chemical ecology has benefited greatly from recent developments in analytical chemistry. Numerous reports document techniques for sampling root volatiles, although only a limited number describe in situ collection. To demonstrate a new method for non-invasive in situ passive sampling using solid phase micro extraction (SPME), from the immediate vicinity of growing roots. SPME fibres inserted into polyfluorotetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sampling tubes located in situ which were either perforated, covered with stainless steel mesh or with microporous PTFE tubing, were used for non-invasive sub-surface sampling of root volatiles from glasshouse-grown broccoli. Sampling methods were compared with above surface headspace collection using Tenax TA. The roots were either mechanically damaged or infested with Delia radicum larvae. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate the effect of damage on the composition of volatiles released by broccoli roots. Analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with SPME and automated thermal desorption (ATD) confirmed that sulphur compounds, showing characteristic temporal emission patterns, were the principal volatiles released by roots following insect larval damage. Use of SPME with in situ perforated PTFE sampling tubes was the most robust method for out-of-lab sampling. This study describes a new method for non-invasive passive sampling of volatiles in situ from intact and insect damaged roots using SPME. The method is highly suitable for remote sampling and has potential for wide application in chemical ecology/root/soil research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Inherently safe passive gas monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Bellamy, John Stephen; Shuler, James M.; Shull, Davis J.; Leduc, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Generally, the present disclosure is directed to gas monitoring systems that use inductive power transfer to safely power an electrically passive device included within a nuclear material storage container. In particular, the electrically passive device can include an inductive power receiver for receiving inductive power transfer through a wall of the nuclear material storage container. The power received by the inductive power receiver can be used to power one or more sensors included in the device. Thus, the device is not required to include active power generation components such as, for example, a battery, that increase the risk of a spark igniting flammable gases within the container.

  13. Compositional properties of passivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerber, Florian; van der Schaft, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    The classical passivity theorem states that the negative feedback interconnection of passive systems is again passive. The converse statement, - passivity of the interconnected system implies passivity of the subsystems -, turns out to be equally valid. This result implies that among all feasible

  14. A paper-polymer centrifugal device for low-cost sample pre-concentration and colorimetric lateral flow assay enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wiederoder, MS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a novel hybrid paper-polymer centrifugal microfluidic device for pre-concentration of E.coli and lateral flow immunoassay enhancement for water quality verification. The device balances rotational centrifugal force...

  15. Low volume sampling device for mass spectrometry analysis of gas formation in nickel-metalhydride (NiMH) batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruesemann, P.V.E.; Mank, A.J.G.; Belfadhel-Ayeb, A.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2006-01-01

    Rechargeable nickel-metalhydride (NiMH) batteries have major advantages with respect to environmental friendliness and energy density compared to other battery systems. Research on thermodynamics and reaction kinetics is required to study the behaviour of these batteries, especially under severe operating conditions such as overcharging and (over)discharging. During these processes several reactions take place resulting in the formation of oxygen and hydrogen gas. Hence, the recombination processes should be well controlled to guarantee that the partial oxygen and hydrogen pressure inside the battery are kept low. Mass spectrometry is one of the analytical techniques capable of measuring the composition of gases released inside the battery during the charge and discharge processes. However, the sample gas needs to be withdrawn from the battery during the experiment. The gas consumption must be kept to a minimum otherwise the equilibrium inside the battery will be disturbed. A bench-top quadrupole mass spectrometer with a standard capillary by-pass inlet cannot be used for this purpose as its gas consumption is in the 1-10 ml/min range. In this paper, a new gas inlet device is presented that reduces gas consumption to a value <50 μl/h. The use of a capillary by-pass splitter and a discontinuous sampling procedure allow mass spectrometry to be used as a gas analysis tool in many applications in which small amounts of sample gas are involved. Experiments with standard AA-size NiMH batteries show that hydrogen release dominates during (over)charging at increased charging rates. Beside mass spectrometry, evolved gases are also analysed using Raman spectroscopy. Although some differences are observed, the results of similar experiments show a good agreement

  16. Sample pre-concentration with high enrichment factors at a fixed location in paper-based microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shih-Hao; Chou, Kuang-Hua; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2016-03-07

    The lack of sensitivity is a major problem among microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for early disease detection and diagnosis. Accordingly, the present study presents a method for improving the enrichment factor of low-concentration biomarkers by using shallow paper-based channels realized through a double-sided wax-printing process. In addition, the enrichment factor is further enhanced by exploiting the ion concentration polarization (ICP) effect on the cathodic side of the nanoporous membrane, in which a stationary sample plug is obtained. The occurrence of ICP on the shallow-channel μPAD is confirmed by measuring the current-voltage response as the external voltage is increased from 0 to 210 V (or the field strength from 0 to 1.05 × 10(4) V m(-1)) over 600 s. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, the electroosmotic flow (EOF) speed on the μPAD fabricated with a wax-channel is measured for the first time using a current monitoring method. The experimental results show that for a fluorescein sample, the concentration factor is increased from 130-fold in a conventional full-thickness paper channel to 944-fold in the proposed shallow channel. Furthermore, for a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) sample, the proposed shallow-channel μPAD achieves an 835-fold improvement in the concentration factor. The concentration technique presented here provides a novel strategy for enhancing the detection sensitivity of μPAD applications.

  17. Comparison of the sampling rates and partitioning behaviour of polar and non-polar contaminants in the polar organic chemical integrative sampler and a monophasic mixed polymer sampler for application as an equilibrium passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoonah; Schäffer, Andreas; Smith, Kilian

    2018-06-15

    In this work, Oasis HLB® beads were embedded in a silicone matrix to make a single phase passive sampler with a higher affinity for polar and ionisable compounds than silicone alone. The applicability of this mixed polymer sampler (MPS) was investigated for 34 aquatic contaminants (log K OW -0.03 to 6.26) in batch experiments. The influence of flow was investigated by comparing uptake under static and stirred conditions. The sampler characteristics of the MPS was assessed in terms of sampling rates (R S ) and sampler-water partition coefficients (K SW ), and these were compared to those of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) as a reference kinetic passive sampler. The MPS was characterized as an equilibrium sampler for both polar and non-polar compounds, with faster uptake rates and a shorter time to reach equilibrium than the POCIS. Water flow rate impacted sampling rates by up to a factor of 12 when comparing static and stirred conditions. In addition, the relative accumulation of compounds in the polyethersulfone (PES) membranes versus the inner Oasis HLB sorbent was compared for the POCIS, and ranged from <1% to 83% depending on the analyte properties. This is indicative of a potentially significant lag-phase for less polar compounds within POCIS. The findings of this study can be used to quantitatively describe the partitioning and kinetic behaviour of MPS and POCIS for a range of aquatic organic contaminants for application in field sampling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt versus three-party pseudo-telepathy: on the optimal number of samples in device-independent quantum private query

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jyotirmoy; Maitra, Subhamoy

    2018-04-01

    In device-independent (DI) paradigm, the trustful assumptions over the devices are removed and CHSH test is performed to check the functionality of the devices toward certifying the security of the protocol. The existing DI protocols consider infinite number of samples from theoretical point of view, though this is not practically implementable. For finite sample analysis of the existing DI protocols, we may also consider strategies for checking device independence other than the CHSH test. In this direction, here we present a comparative analysis between CHSH and three-party Pseudo-telepathy game for the quantum private query protocol in DI paradigm that appeared in Maitra et al. (Phys Rev A 95:042344, 2017) very recently.

  19. Use of a dry-plasma collection device to overcome problems with storage and transportation of blood samples for epidemiology studies in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgalieva, Z Z; Almuchambetova, R; Machmudova, A; Kapsultanova, D; Osato, M S; Peacock, J; Zoltek, R P; Marchildon, P A; Graham, D Y; Zhangabylov, A

    2000-11-01

    Studies are difficult in areas lacking modern facilities due to the inability to reliably collect, store, and ship samples. Thus, we sought to evaluate the use of a dry plasma collection device for seroepidemiology studies. Plasma was obtained by fingerstick using a commercial dry plasma collection device (Chemcard Plasma Collection Device) and serum (venipuncture) from individuals in Kazakhstan. Plasma samples were air dried for 15 min and then stored desiccated in foil zip-lock pouches at 4 to 6 degrees C and subsequently shipped to the United States by air at ambient temperature. Serum samples remained frozen at -20 degrees C until assayed. Helicobacter pylori status was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HM-CAP EIA) for the dry plasma and the serum samples. The results were concordant in 250 of the 289 cases (86.5%). In 25 cases (8.6%), the dry plasma samples gave indeterminate results and could not be retested because only one sample was collected. Five serum samples were positive, and the corresponding dry plasma samples were negative; one serum sample was negative, and the corresponding plasma sample was positive. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the Chemcard samples to serum were 97.6 and 97.9%, respectively, excluding those with indeterminate results. Repeated freeze-thawing had no adverse effect on the accuracy of the test. We found the dry plasma collection device to provide an accurate and practical alternative to serum when venipuncture may be difficult or inconvenient and sample storage and handling present difficulties, especially for seroepidemiologic studies in rural areas or developing countries and where freeze-thawing may be unavoidable.

  20. Mechanism of phosphorus passivation of near-interface oxide traps in 4H–SiC MOS devices investigated by CCDLTS and DFT calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Asanka; Shen, X.; Mooney, P. M.; Dhar, Sarit

    2018-06-01

    Interfacial charge trapping in 4H–SiC MOS capacitors with P doped SiO2 or phospho-silicate glass (PSG) as a gate dielectric has been investigated with temperature dependent capacitance–voltage measurements and constant capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (CCDLTS) measurements. The measurements indicate that P doping in the dielectric results in significant reduction of near-interface electron traps that have energy levels within 0.5 eV of the 4H–SiC conduction band edge. Extracted trap densities confirm that the phosphorus induced near-interface trap reduction is significantly more effective than interfacial nitridation, which is typically used for 4H–SiC MOSFET processing. The CCDLTS measurements reveal that the two broad near-interface trap peaks, named ‘O1’ and ‘O2’, with activation energies around 0.15 eV and 0.4 eV below the 4H–SiC conduction band that are typically observed in thermal oxides on 4H–SiC, are also present in PSG devices. Previous atomic scale ab initio calculations suggested these O1 and O2 traps to be carbon dimers substituted for oxygen dimers (CO=CO) and interstitial Si (Sii) in SiO2, respectively. Theoretical considerations in this work suggest that the presence of P in the near-interfacial region reduces the stability of the CO=CO defects and reduces the density of Sii defects through the network restructuring. Qualitative comparison of results in this work and reported work suggest that the O1 and O2 traps in SiO2/4H–SiC MOS system negatively impact channel mobility in 4H–SiC MOSFETs.

  1. Passive inhalation of cannabis smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B; Mason, P A; Moffat, A C; King, L J; Marks, V

    1984-09-01

    Six volunteers each smoked simultaneously, in a small unventilated room (volume 27 950 liter), a cannabis cigarette containing 17.1 mg delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). A further four subjects - passive inhalers - remained in the room during smoking and afterwards for a total of 3 h. Blood and urine samples were taken from all ten subjects and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for THC metabolites. The blood samples from the passive subjects taken up to 3 h after the start of exposure to cannabis smoke showed a complete absence of cannabinoids. In contrast, their urine samples taken up to 6 h after exposure showed significant concentrations of cannabinoid metabolites (less than or equal to 6.8 ng ml-1). These data, taken with the results of other workers, show passive inhalation of cannabis smoke to be possible. These results have important implications for forensic toxicologists who are frequently called upon to interpret cannabinoid levels in body fluids.

  2. Multiple mechanisms quench passive spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser-McKelvie, Amelia; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin; Dolley, Tim; Bonne, Nicolas J.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the properties of a sample of 35 nearby passive spiral galaxies in order to determine their dominant quenching mechanism(s). All five low-mass (M⋆ environments. We postulate that cluster-scale gas stripping and heating mechanisms operating only in rich clusters are required to quench low-mass passive spirals, and ram-pressure stripping and strangulation are obvious candidates. For higher mass passive spirals, while trends are present, the story is less clear. The passive spiral bar fraction is high: 74 ± 15 per cent, compared with 36 ± 5 per cent for a mass, redshift and T-type matched comparison sample of star-forming spiral galaxies. The high mass passive spirals occur mostly, but not exclusively, in groups, and can be central or satellite galaxies. The passive spiral group fraction of 74 ± 15 per cent is similar to that of the comparison sample of star-forming galaxies at 61 ± 7 per cent. We find evidence for both quenching via internal structure and environment in our passive spiral sample, though some galaxies have evidence of neither. From this, we conclude no one mechanism is responsible for quenching star formation in passive spiral galaxies - rather, a mixture of mechanisms is required to produce the passive spiral distribution we see today.

  3. An Assessment of Aquifer/Well Flow Dynamics: Identification of Parameters Key to Passive Sampling and Application of Downhole Sensor Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Traditional groundwater sampling methods: Groundwater sampling methods that involve pumping or bailing before the sample is collected ER-1704 Final...illustrates the construction detail. Wells were installed by standard methods, and developed thoroughly by surging, bailing and pumping to achieve...pour method at all three fill rates (Table 7). For these comparisons, a number followed by two letters were used to differentiate among the methods

  4. Micromachined filter-chamber array with passive valves for biochemical assays on beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, H; van der Wijngaart, W; Stemme, G

    2001-01-01

    The filter-chamber array presented here enables a real-time parallel analysis of three different samples on beads in a volume of 3 nL, on a 1 cm2 chip. The filter-chamber array is a system containing three filter-chambers, three passive valves at the inlet channels and a common outlet. The design enables parallel sample handling and time-controlled analysis. The device is microfabricated in silicon and sealed with a Pyrex lid to enable real-time analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis by using pyrosequencing has successfully been performed in single filter-chamber devices. The passive valves consist of plasma-deposited octafluorocyclobutane and show a much higher resistance towards water and surface-active solutions than previous hydrophobic patches. The device is not sensitive to gas bubbles, clogging is rare and reversible, and the filter-chamber array is reusable. More complex (bio)chemical reactions on beads can be performed in the devices with passive valves than in the devices without valves.

  5. Passive solar technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  6. Performance of passive samplers for monitoring estuarine water column concentrations: 2. Emerging contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Monique M; Burgess, Robert M; Suuberg, Eric M; Cantwell, Mark G; Pennell, Kelly G

    2013-10-01

    Measuring dissolved concentrations of emerging contaminants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and triclosan, can be challenging due to their physicochemical properties resulting in low aqueous solubilities and association with particles. Passive sampling methods have been applied to assess dissolved concentrations in water and sediments primarily for legacy contaminants. Although the technology is applicable to some emerging contaminants, the use of passive samplers with emerging contaminants is limited. In the present study, the performance of 3 common passive samplers was evaluated for sampling PBDEs and triclosan. Passive sampling polymers included low-density polyethylene (PE) and polyoxymethylene (POM) sheets, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. Dissolved concentrations were calculated using measured sampler concentrations and laboratory-derived partition coefficients. Dissolved tri-, tetra-, and pentabrominated PBDE congeners were detected at several of the study sites at very low pg/L concentrations using PE and POM. Calculated dissolved water concentrations of triclosan ranged from 1.7 ng/L to 18 ng/L for POM and 8.8 ng/L to 13 ng/L for PE using performance reference compound equilibrium adjustments. Concentrations in SPME were not reported due to lack of detectable chemical in the PDMS polymer deployed. Although both PE and POM were found to effectively accumulate emerging contaminants from the water column, further research is needed to determine their utility as passive sampling devices for emerging contaminants. © 2013 SETAC.

  7. Emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds in the Canadian Athabasca oil sands region - development using current knowledge and evaluation with passive sampling and air dispersion modelling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xin; Cheng, Irene; Yang, Fuquan; Horb, Erin; Zhang, Leiming; Harner, Tom

    2018-03-01

    Two speciated and spatially resolved emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR) were developed. The first database was derived from volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions data provided by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA) and the second database was derived from additional data collected within the Joint Canada-Alberta Oil Sands Monitoring (JOSM) program. CALPUFF modelling results for atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), obtained using each of the emissions databases, are presented and compared with measurements from a passive air monitoring network. The JOSM-derived emissions resulted in better model-measurement agreement in the total PAH concentrations and for most PAH species concentrations compared to results using CEMA-derived emissions. At local sites near oil sands mines, the percent error of the model compared to observations decreased from 30 % using the CEMA-derived emissions to 17 % using the JOSM-derived emissions. The improvement at local sites was likely attributed to the inclusion of updated tailings pond emissions estimated from JOSM activities. In either the CEMA-derived or JOSM-derived emissions scenario, the model underestimated PAH concentrations by a factor of 3 at remote locations. Potential reasons for the disagreement include forest fire emissions, re-emissions of previously deposited PAHs, and long-range transport not considered in the model. Alkylated PAH and DBT concentrations were also significantly underestimated. The CALPUFF model is expected to predict higher concentrations because of the limited chemistry and deposition modelling. Thus the model underestimation of PACs is likely due to gaps in the emissions database for these compounds and uncertainties in the methodology for estimating the emissions. Future work is required that focuses on improving the PAC emissions estimation and

  8. Emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds in the Canadian Athabasca oil sands region – development using current knowledge and evaluation with passive sampling and air dispersion modelling data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Two speciated and spatially resolved emissions databases for polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR were developed. The first database was derived from volatile organic compound (VOC emissions data provided by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA and the second database was derived from additional data collected within the Joint Canada–Alberta Oil Sands Monitoring (JOSM program. CALPUFF modelling results for atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, alkylated PAHs, and dibenzothiophenes (DBTs, obtained using each of the emissions databases, are presented and compared with measurements from a passive air monitoring network. The JOSM-derived emissions resulted in better model–measurement agreement in the total PAH concentrations and for most PAH species concentrations compared to results using CEMA-derived emissions. At local sites near oil sands mines, the percent error of the model compared to observations decreased from 30 % using the CEMA-derived emissions to 17 % using the JOSM-derived emissions. The improvement at local sites was likely attributed to the inclusion of updated tailings pond emissions estimated from JOSM activities. In either the CEMA-derived or JOSM-derived emissions scenario, the model underestimated PAH concentrations by a factor of 3 at remote locations. Potential reasons for the disagreement include forest fire emissions, re-emissions of previously deposited PAHs, and long-range transport not considered in the model. Alkylated PAH and DBT concentrations were also significantly underestimated. The CALPUFF model is expected to predict higher concentrations because of the limited chemistry and deposition modelling. Thus the model underestimation of PACs is likely due to gaps in the emissions database for these compounds and uncertainties in the methodology for estimating the emissions. Future work is required that focuses on improving the PAC

  9. Traffic classification with passive measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Hoang Phong

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This is a master thesis from a collaboration between Oslo University College and Uninett Research. Uninett have a passive monitoring device on a 2.5 Gbps backbone link between Trondheim and Narvik. They uses measurement with optical splitters and specialized measuring interfaces to trace traffic with Gigabit speed. We would like to investigate the structure and patterns in these data. It is of special interest to classify the traffic belonging to different services and protocols. ...

  10. Use of a holder-vacuum tube device to save on-site hands in preparing urine samples for head-space gas-chromatography, and its application to determine the time allowance for sample sealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Toshio; Sumino, Kimiaki; Ohashi, Fumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    To facilitate urine sample preparation prior to head-space gas-chromatographic (HS-GC) analysis. Urine samples containing one of the five solvents (acetone, methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and toluene) at the levels of biological exposure limits were aspirated into a vacuum tube via holder, a device commercially available for venous blood collection (the vacuum tube method). The urine sample, 5 ml, was quantitatively transferred to a 20-ml head-space vial prior to HS-GC analysis. The loaded tubes were stored at +4 ℃ in dark for up to 3 d. The vacuum tube method facilitated on-site procedures of urine sample preparation for HS-GC with no significant loss of solvents in the sample and no need of skilled hands, whereas on-site sample preparation time was significantly reduced. Furthermore, no loss of solvents was detected during the 3-d storage, irrespective of hydrophilic (acetone) or lipophilic solvent (toluene). In a pilot application, high performance of the vacuum tube method in sealing a sample in an air-tight space succeeded to confirm that no solvent will be lost when sealing is completed within 5 min after urine voiding, and that the allowance time is as long as 30 min in case of toluene in urine. The use of the holder-vacuum tube device not only saves hands for transfer of the sample to air-tight space, but facilitates sample storage prior to HS-GC analysis.

  11. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ''point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies

  12. An All-Silicon Passive Optical Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Varghese, Leo T.; Shen, Hao; Niu, Ben; Xuan, Yi; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2011-01-01

    A passive optical diode effect would be useful for on-chip optical information processing but has been difficult to achieve. Using a method based on optical nonlinearity, we demonstrate a forward-backward transmission ratio of up to 28 decibels within telecommunication wavelengths. Our device, which uses two silicon rings 5 micrometers in radius, is passive yet maintains optical nonreciprocity for a broad range of input power levels, and it performs equally well even if the backward input pow...

  13. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  14. XPS and electrochemical studies of the dissolution and passivation of molybdenum-implanted austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vito, E.; Marcus, P.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the chemical composition and the chemical states of the passive film formed on austenitic stainless steels (Fe-19Cr-10Ni (at.%)) which have been implanted with molybdenum (Mo + , 100 keV, 2.5 x 10 16 at./cm 2 ). Prior to passivation the implanted alloy was characterized by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy) and XPS. Alloys with well-defined surface concentrations of molybdenum were prepared by ion sputtering the implanted alloy in the preparation chamber of the spectrometer, to a fixed point in the implantation profile. The samples were then transferred without air exposure to a glove box with inert gas in which the electrochemical measurements were performed. After passivation, return transfer of the passivated samples was done with the same transfer device to avoid exposure to air. In 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 , the anodic dissolution current density decreases with increasing Mo content on the alloy surface. Surface analysis by XPS showed that the surface is enriched with molybdenum in the Mo 4+ chemical state. The current density in the passive state is similar for both the non-implanted and the implanted alloys. Surface analysis by XPS showed that the passive film has a bilayer structure (inner oxide and outer hydroxide) and that the hydroxide layer present on the surface of the passive film is markedly enriched with molybdenum in the Mo 6+ chemical state. The XPS measurements indicate that the presence of molybdenum favors the formation of chromium hydroxide at the expense of chromium oxide. A significant enrichment of the alloyed (Cr, Ni) and implanted (Mo) elements was also observed in the metallic phase under the passive film. The possible mechanisms of the effect of molybdenum on the corrosion resistance of stainless steels are discussed in light of the obtained surface analytical results

  15. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and passive sampling: powerful tools for the determination of emerging pollutants in water for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirasole, Cristiana; Di Carro, Marina; Tanwar, Shivani; Magi, Emanuele

    2016-09-01

    Among the wide range of emerging pollutants, perfluorinated compounds and various pharmaceuticals, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are showing growing concern. These contaminants can be found in freshwater ecosystems because of their incomplete removal during wastewater treatments so, their water solubility and poor degradability result in their continuous discharge and pseudo-persistent contamination. Usually, expected levels of these analytes are particularly low; therefore, sensitive and selective analytical techniques are required for their determination. Moreover, sampling and preconcentration are fundamental steps to reach the low detection limits required. The polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) represents a modern sampling approach that allows the in-situ preconcentration of ultra-trace pollutants. In this work, a fast liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of diclofenac, ketoprofen, mefenamic acid, naproxen, ibuprofen, perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctanesulfonate and caffeine in water for human consumption. The chromatographic separation of analytes was achieved in less than 6 min. Quantitative analysis was performed in multiple reaction monitoring mode using ketoprofen-d3 as internal standard. Two different sites of Northern Italy were studied deploying POCIS for four weeks in both inlet and outlet of two drinking water treatment plants. The evaluation of time-weighted average concentration of contaminants was accomplished after the calibration of POCIS; to this aim, the sampling rate values for each compound were obtained by means of a simple calibration system developed in our laboratory. Ketoprofen, perfluorooctane sulfonate, perfluorooctanoate and caffeine were measured in both sites at the ng l(-1) level. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Intercomparison and intercalibration of passive/active radon and active radon progeny instruments and methods in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Tu, Keng W.

    1993-06-01

    An intercomparison and intercalibration exercise for radon and radon progeny measurements made with active and passive instruments was held at EML from October 22--30,1992. Twenty-five participants submitted 96 passive integrating devices, eight active devices for radon, and seven integrating devices for potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC). In addition, 40 grab samples for radon progeny analysis were taken by five groups that participated in person during the intercomparison. The results reported to EML indicate that the majority of the participants (70%) obtained mean results within 10% of the EML reference value. Although the instruments used in this exercise are based on different principles of collection and detection, they all appear reliable. However, in some instances there seemed to be some minor problems with quality control and calibration bias. Also, the large counting errors for the PAEC experienced by some of the participants can be minimized by using higher sampling air flow rates without sacrificing instrument portability

  17. Developed a needle trap device with PDMS sorbent for microextraction of toluene and methyl ethyl ketone from aquatic samples using dynamic headspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Karimi Zeverdegani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to the widespread use of toxic chemicals in most workplaces that can lead to toxic effects on human, various chemical extraction technique have been defined for analysis these toxic substances in air, water and biological samples. The purpose of this research is extraction of  toluene and methyl ethyl ketone from aquatic samples with needle trap device and  one commercial sorbent. Methods: In this research, needle trap device was used to extraction of  toluene and methyl ethyl ketone in aquatic samples, so needles(size 20 were packed with PDMS and extraction was done with dynamic headspace needle trap device. Gas chromatography with - flame ionization detector was used to analysis and optimized extraction of two substances were obtained. Results: Results show that the optimum temperature and time extraction was similar for toluene and methyl ethyl ketone (30 ° C, 30 min, but the reproducibility of results and calibration curve that obtained for toluene was better than methyl ethyl ketone. Conclusion: Needle trap technique is inexpensive, sensitive and portable also this method has good recovery to extract small amounts of  toluene and methyl ethyketon from aquatic samples with polydimethylsiloxane.

  18. Sieve-based device for MALDI sample preparation. I. Influence of sample deposition conditions in oligonucleotide analysis to achieve significant increases in both sensitivity and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Laura; Cristoni, Simone; Crotti, Sara; Bernardi, Luigi Rossi; Seraglia, Roberta; Traldi, Pietro

    2008-11-01

    Spraying of oligonucleotide-matrix solutions through a stainless steel (ss) sieve (38 microm, 450 mesh) leads to the formation, on the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) sample holder, of uniformly distributed microcrystals, well separated from each other. When the resulting sample holder surface is irradiated by laser, abundant molecular species form, with a clear increase in both intensity and resolution with respect to values obtained by 'Dried Droplet', 'Double Layer', and 'Sandwich' deposition methods. In addition, unlike the usual situation, the sample is perfectly homogeneous, and identical spectra are obtained by irradiating different areas. On one hand, the data indicate that this method is highly effective for oligonucleotide MALDI analysis, and on the other, that it can be validly employed for fully automated MALDI procedures.

  19. Evaluation of a novel dried blood spot collection device (HemaSpot™) to test blood samples collected from dogs for antibodies to Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Pick, Leanne D; Hernandez, Jaime O Esquivel; Lindsay, David S

    2014-09-15

    Collection of blood samples from veterinary and wildlife patients is often challenging because the samples have to be collected on farm or in the wild under various environmental conditions. This poses many technical problems associated with venipuncture materials, their safe use and disposal, transportation and processing of collected samples. Dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection techniques offer a simple and practical alternative to traditional blood collection methods to obtain blood samples from animals for parasite antibody evaluation. The DBS collection devices are compact, simple to use, and are particularly useful for large number of samples. Additionally, DBS samples take up less space and they are easier to transport than traditional venipuncture-collected blood samples. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a potentially fatal parasitic disease of dogs and humans and it is frequently diagnosed by antibody tests. Immunochromatographic tests (ICT) for antibodies to Leishmania infantum are commercially available for dogs and they produce qualitative results in minutes. Measurement of canine antibodies to L. infantum with the ICT using traditional venipuncture has been validated previously, but the use of DBS samples has not been evaluated using this method. The purpose of the present study was to determine the ability of DBS samples to detect antibodies to L. infantum in dogs using a commercial ICT assay. One hundred plasma samples from dogs experimentally infected with the LIVT-1 strain of L. infantum were collected by venipuncture and frozen. Individual samples were thawed, and then 80 μl plasma (2 drops) was aliquotted onto the 8-spoked disk pad on individual DBS sample collection devices (HemaSpot™, Spot-On Sciences, Austin, TX), dried, and stored in the dark at room temperature. After one month and six months, respectively, 2 spokes of the 8 spokes of the disk pad of each DBS sample were removed and eluted in 200 μl PBS. The eluate was used to test

  20. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & ...

  1. An investigation of a passively controlled haptic interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Book, W.J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-03-01

    Haptic interfaces enhance cooperation between humans and robotic manipulators by providing force and tactile feedback to the human user during the execution of arbitrary tasks. The use of active actuators in haptic displays presents a certain amount of risk since they are capable of providing unacceptable levels of energy to the systems upon which they operate. An alternative to providing numerous safeguards is to remove the sources of risk altogether. This research investigates the feasibility of trajectory control using passive devices, that is, devices that cannot add energy to the system. Passive actuators are capable only of removing energy from the system or transferring energy within the system. It is proposed that the utility of passive devices is greatly enhanced by the use of redundant actuators. In a passive system, once motion is provided to the system, presumably by a human user, passive devices may be able to modify this motion to achieve a desired resultant trajectory. A mechanically passive, 2-Degree-of-Freedom (D.O.F.) manipulator has been designed and built. It is equipped with four passive actuators: two electromagnetic brakes and two electromagnetic clutches. This paper gives a review of the literature on passive and robotics and describes the experimental test bed used in this research. Several control algorithms are investigated, resulting in the formulation of a passive control law.

  2. An investigation of a passively controlled haptic interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.T.; Book, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Haptic interfaces enhance cooperation between humans and robotic manipulators by providing force and tactile feedback to the human user during the execution of arbitrary tasks. The use of active actuators in haptic displays presents a certain amount of risk since they are capable of providing unacceptable levels of energy to the systems upon which they operate. An alternative to providing numerous safeguards is to remove the sources of risk altogether. This research investigates the feasibility of trajectory control using passive devices, that is, devices that cannot add energy to the system. Passive actuators are capable only of removing energy from the system or transferring energy within the system. It is proposed that the utility of passive devices is greatly enhanced by the use of redundant actuators. In a passive system, once motion is provided to the system, presumably by a human user, passive devices may be able to modify this motion to achieve a desired resultant trajectory. A mechanically passive, 2-Degree-of-Freedom (D.O.F.) manipulator has been designed and built. It is equipped with four passive actuators: two electromagnetic brakes and two electromagnetic clutches. This paper gives a review of the literature on passive and robotics and describes the experimental test bed used in this research. Several control algorithms are investigated, resulting in the formulation of a passive control law

  3. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  4. Development of targeted STORM for super resolution imaging of biological samples using digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiya Peedikakkal, Liyana; Steventon, Victoria; Furley, Andrew; Cadby, Ashley J.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple illumination system based on a digital mirror device which allows for fine control over the power and pattern of illumination. We apply this to localization microscopy (LM), specifically stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM). Using this targeted STORM, we were able to image a selected area of a labelled cell without causing photo-damage to the surrounding areas of the cell.

  5. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  6. Monitoring of urban particulate using an electret-based passive sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorpe, A.; Hemingway, M.A.; Brown, R.C.

    1999-11-01

    Site sampling trials have been carried out in the urban environment in order to assess the usefulness of a passive sampling device, originally developed for personal monitoring of airborne dust levels in industry. The sampling element is a small disc of elect material (polymer carrying a permanent electric charge) within a metal frame weighing approximately 15 g. The sampler is designed to capture particles by electrostatic attraction, in which case the capture rate depends on their electrical mobility but is independent of the rate at which air flows past the device. Passive samplers, along with miniaturized cascade impactors, have been exposed to urban particulate for periods of up to 28 days in locations with significant different levels of airborne pollution. The cascade impactor data enabled good estimates to be made of PM{sub 10} and PMN{sub 2.5} levels, and data from the passive sampler correlated with the total dust sampled by the impactor and with both the size fractions, that with the PM{sub 10} being better. Too few data have yet been obtained for its accuracy to be established, but it is unlikely that it will approach that of pumped samplers. It has been shown to be potentially useful for multiple, simultaneous site sampling and for monitoring personal environmental exposure situations in which dispensing with a power source is particularly useful. Being small, the sampler is easy to hide or camouflage, and because it is cheap, its loss or damage is not a serious matter.

  7. Predicting bioavailability and accumulation of organochlorine pesticides by Japanese medaka in the presence of humic acid and natural organic matter using passive sampling membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Runhui; Luo, Jianping; Sun, Liwei; Wang, Zijian; Spear, Philip A

    2007-10-01

    Adsorption to dissolved organic matter (DOM) may significantly decrease the freely dissolved concentration of many hydrophobic organic compounds and, hence, result in reduced bioavailability to aquatic organisms. Here, the suitability of using triolein-embedded cellulose acetate membrane (TECAM) as a biomimetic surrogate to assess the bioavailability of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in water in the presence of DOM was explored. The accumulation of OCPs was measured in TECAM and pelagic Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) in the laboratory after 12 h exposure to water containing different levels of Aldrich humic acid. Further, OCP uptake by TECAM and medaka in real aqueous environments was evaluated after 30 d exposures in two sites. Laboratory results showed that OCP uptake by medaka consistently decreased with increasing levels of humic acid in the range of 0-15 mg C/L in sample solutions. This tendency was closely mimicked by OCP accumulation in TECAM under the same conditions. Field results showed that TECAM accumulated similar OCP patterns as medaka (r2 = 0.92 for site 1 and r2 = 0.94 for site 2), although comparison of the in-field eight OCP concentrations in TECAM to those in medaka yielded approximately a factor of 3 (on a wet weight basis). These results suggest that the TECAM method can be used as a simple and useful tool to predict the bioavailability and bioaccumulation potential of poorly biotransformed organic compounds in pelagic fish in aqueous environment.

  8. Seismic Passive Control of Cable-Stayed Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam-Eddin M. Ali

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional modeling procedure is proposed for cable-stayed bridges with rubber, steel, and lead energy dissipation devices. The passive control technique is investigated by considering the response of bridge models with and without energy dissipation devices. The impact of various design parameters on the seismic response of current and future bridge designs is studied. Appropriate locations and properties of the passive devices can achieve better performance for cable-stayed bridges by balancing the significant reduction in earthquake-induced forces against tolerable displacements. Proper design of passive systems can help provide solutions for retro-fitting some existing bridges.

  9. All-integrated and highly sensitive paper based device with sample treatment platform for Cd2+ immunodetection in drinking/tap waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Marzo, Adaris M; Pons, Josefina; Blake, Diane A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2013-04-02

    Nowadays, the development of systems, devices, or methods that integrate several process steps into one multifunctional step for clinical, environmental, or industrial purposes constitutes a challenge for many ongoing research projects. Here, we present a new integrated paper based cadmium (Cd(2+)) immunosensing system in lateral flow format, which integrates the sample treatment process with the analyte detection process. The principle of Cd(2+) detection is based on competitive reaction between the cadmium-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-bovine serum albumin-gold nanoparticles (Cd-EDTA-BSA-AuNP) conjugate deposited on the conjugation pad strip and the Cd-EDTA complex formed in the analysis sample for the same binding sites of the 2A81G5 monoclonal antibody (mAb), specific to Cd-EDTA but not Cd(2+) free, which is immobilized onto the test line. This platform operates without any sample pretreatment step for Cd(2+) detection thanks to an extra conjugation pad that ensures Cd(2+) complexation with EDTA and interference masking through ovalbumin (OVA). The detection and quantification limits found for the device were 0.1 and 0.4 ppb, respectively, these being the lowest limits reported up to now for metal sensors based on paper. The accuracy of the device was evaluated by addition of known quantities of Cd(2+) to different drinking water samples and subsequent Cd(2+) content analysis. Sample recoveries ranged from 95 to 105% and the coefficient of variation for the intermediate precision assay was less than 10%. In addition, the results obtained here were compared with those obtained with the well-established inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES) and the analysis of certificate standard samples.

  10. Effects of fusion relevant transient energetic radiation, plasma and thermal load on PLANSEE double forged tungsten samples in a low-energy plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Ouyang, B.; Zhang, Z.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salar Elahi, A.; Rawat, R. S.

    2018-06-01

    Tungsten is the leading candidate for plasma facing component (PFC) material for thermonuclear fusion reactors and various efforts are ongoing to evaluate its performance or response to intense fusion relevant radiation, plasma and thermal loads. This paper investigates the effects of hot dense decaying pinch plasma, highly energetic deuterium ions and fusion neutrons generated in a low-energy (3.0 kJ) plasma focus device on the structure, morphology and hardness of the PLANSEE double forged tungsten (W) samples surfaces. The tungsten samples were provided by Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), Germany via International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria. Tungsten samples were irradiated using different number of plasma focus (PF) shots (1, 5 and 10) at a fixed axial distance of 5 cm from the anode top and also at various distances from the top of the anode (5, 7, 9 and 11 cm) using fixed number (5) of plasma focus shots. The virgin tungsten sample had bcc structure (α-W phase). After PF irradiation, the XRD analysis showed (i) the presence of low intensity new diffraction peak corresponding to β-W phase at (211) crystalline plane indicating the partial structural phase transition in some of the samples, (ii) partial amorphization, and (iii) vacancy defects formation and compressive stress in irradiated tungsten samples. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed the distinctive changes to non-uniform surface with nanometer sized particles and particle agglomerates along with large surface cracks at higher number of irradiation shots. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated the reduction in relative tungsten oxide content and the increase in metallic tungsten after irradiation. Hardness of irradiated samples initially increased for one shot exposure due to reduction in tungsten oxide phase, but then decreased with increasing number of shots due to increasing concentration of defects. It is demonstrated that the plasma focus device provides

  11. Study of measurement of the alcohol biomarker phosphatidylethanol (PEth) in dried blood spot (DBS) samples and application of a volumetric DBS device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Kenan Modén, Naama; Seferaj, Sabina; Lenk, Gabriel; Helander, Anders

    2018-04-01

    Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is a group of phospholipids formed in cell membranes following alcohol consumption. PEth measurement in whole blood samples is established as a specific alcohol biomarker with clinical and medico-legal applications. This study further evaluated the usefulness of dried blood spot (DBS) samples collected on filter paper for PEth measurement. Specimens used were surplus volumes of venous whole blood sent for routine LC-MS/MS quantification of PEth 16:0/18:1, the major PEth homolog. DBS samples were prepared by pipetting blood on Whatman 903 Protein Saver Cards and onto a volumetric DBS device (Capitainer). The imprecision (CV) of the DBS sample amount based on area and weight measurements of spot punches were 23-28%. Investigation of the relationship between blood hematocrit and PEth concentration yielded a linear, positive correlation, and at around 1.0-1.5μmol/L PEth 16:0/18:1, the PEth concentration increased by ~0.1μmol/L for every 5% increase in hematocrit. There was a close agreement between the PEth concentrations obtained with whole blood samples and the corresponding results using Whatman 903 (PEth DBS =1.026 PEth WB +0.013) and volumetric device (PEth DBS =1.045 PEth WB +0.016) DBS samples. The CV of PEth quantification in DBS samples at concentrations≥0.05μmol/L were ≤15%. The present results further confirmed the usefulness of DBS samples for PEth measurement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Portable Passive Physiotherapeutic Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasheek Naidu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The public healthcare system in South Africa is in need of urgent attention in no small part because there has been an escalation in the number of stroke victims which could be due to the increase in hypertension in this urbanizing society. There is a growing need for physiotherapists and occupational therapists in the country, which is further hindered by the division between urban and rural areas. A possible solution is a portable passive physiotherapeutic exoskeleton device. The exoskeleton device has been formulated to encapsulate methodologies that enable the anthropomorphic integration between a biological and mechatronic limb. A physiotherapeutic mechanism was designed to be portable and adjustable, without limiting the spherical motion and workspace of the human arm. The exoskeleton was designed to be portable in the sense that it could be transported geographically. It is a complete device allowing for motion in the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand joints. The inverse kinematics was solved iteratively via the Damped Least Squares (DLS method. The electronic and computer system allowed for professional personnel to either change an individual joint or a combination of joints angles via the kinematic models. A ramp PI controller was established to provide a smooth response to simulate the passive therapy motion.

  13. Lipid-Based Passivation in Nanofluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Stretching DNA in nanochannels is a useful tool for direct, visual studies of genomic DNA at the single molecule level. To facilitate the study of the interaction of linear DNA with proteins in nanochannels, we have implemented a highly effective passivation scheme based on lipid bilayers. We demonstrate virtually complete long-term passivation of nanochannel surfaces to a range of relevant reagents, including streptavidin-coated quantum dots, RecA proteins, and RecA–DNA complexes. We show that the performance of the lipid bilayer is significantly better than that of standard bovine serum albumin-based passivation. Finally, we show how the passivated devices allow us to monitor single DNA cleavage events during enzymatic degradation by DNase I. We expect that our approach will open up for detailed, systematic studies of a wide range of protein–DNA interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:22432814

  14. Process and device of elementary and chemical analysis of a sample through a spectral analysis of the secondary electron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gressus, Claude; Massignon, Daniel; Sopizet, Rene.

    1975-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of chemical and elementary analysis of samples through a spectral analysis of secondary electrons (Auger electrons) emitted from said sample under a primary monokinetic electron beam concentrated on its surface. Said method is characterized in that the intensity of the primary monokinetic electron beam emitted from an electron gun is modulated at a frequency ω; and in that the secondary electrons of energy E emitted from the sample are then collected. A reference voltage corresponding to the modulation in intensity of the primary electron beam is applied at the input of a phase sensitive detector together with a voltage proportional to the intensity of the flux of said collected secondary electrons to obtain at the output of said detector a voltage proportional to the number of the secondary electrons of energy E. The secondary emission energy spectrum of the sample is then plotted [fr

  15. Evaluation of the performance of a passive sampler in the monitoring of benzene and other volatile aromatic compounds in urban and indoor sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoni, G.; Tappa, R.; Allegrini, I.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests have been performed on a new passive device, properly designed for the collection of volatile organic compounds from ambient air on an active charcoal layer. Tests performed in order to determine accuracy and precision, response linearity and employment limits show that this device may be helpful in long and medium-time determinations of BTX (benzene, toluene and xylenes) in the atmosphere. The sampler is optimised for a four weeks sampling in open air [it

  16. Intercomparison study of sampling methods for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Bull, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of organic pollutants in seawater is a serious problem, as their concentrations in the water column are typical in the fg - ng/L range. Available methods therefore includes extensive sampling and laboratory work. The development of simple sampling techniques for organochlorines (e.g. passive sampling with semipermeable membrane device (SPMD), mussel watch) is required. Three methods for the measurement of trace organochlorines in seawater were investigated: (1) the filtration (GF/F) and extraction (XAD-2 resin) of seawater with an in-situ pumping system, (2) biological-accumulation by mussels (mytilus edulis) and (3) passive sampling with SPMD

  17. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  18. Comparative study of the characteristics of some suction devices for gas sampling applications; Etude comparative des caracteristiques de quelques dispositifs d'aspiration a l'usage des prelevements de gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donguy, R.; Drouet, J.

    1959-06-15

    Gas sampling (used to determine the characteristics of dusts or aerosols contained in a gas) needs a suction device. In order to select the right device and the right conditions of use, the characteristics and performances of various suction devices (helicoidal and centrifugal aspirators, air pumps, volumetric pumps) have been experimentally measured: flow rate, head loss, sampling volume and duration, aerosol and dust concentration, gas density, nature of the gas, suction circuit configuration, etc.

  19. High-order passive photonic temporal integrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Mohammad H; Wang, Chao; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José

    2010-04-15

    We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, an ultrafast photonic high-order (second-order) complex-field temporal integrator. The demonstrated device uses a single apodized uniform-period fiber Bragg grating (FBG), and it is based on a general FBG design approach for implementing optimized arbitrary-order photonic passive temporal integrators. Using this same design approach, we also fabricate and test a first-order passive temporal integrator offering an energetic-efficiency improvement of more than 1 order of magnitude as compared with previously reported passive first-order temporal integrators. Accurate and efficient first- and second-order temporal integrations of ultrafast complex-field optical signals (with temporal features as fast as approximately 2.5ps) are successfully demonstrated using the fabricated FBG devices.

  20. Radio requestable passive SAW water content sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reindl, L.; Ruppel, C.C.W.; Kirmayr, A.; Stockhausen, N.; Hilhorst, M.A.; Balendonk, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new passive sensor for remote measurement of water content in sandy soil was designed, using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line. Information from this sensor can be obtained by an interrogation device via a radio link operating in the European 434-MHz industrial-scientific-medical

  1. Analytical Method for Carbon and Oxygen Isotope of Small Carbonate Samples with the GasBench Ⅱ-IRMS Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Cui-cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method for measuring carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of trace amount carbonate (>15 μg was established by Delta V Advantage isotope Ratio MS coupled with GasBench Ⅱ. Different trace amount (5-50 μg carbonate standard samples (IAEA-CO-1 were measured by GasBench Ⅱ with 12 mL and 3.7 mL vials. When the weight of samples was less than 40 μg and it was acidified in 12 mL vials, most standard deviations of the δ13C and δ18O were more than 0.1‰, which couldn’t satisfied high-precision measurements. When the weight of samples was greater than 15 μg and it was acidified in 3.7 mL vials, standard deviations for the δ13C and δ18O were 0.01‰-0.07‰ and 0.01‰-0.08‰ respectively, which satisfied high-precision measurements. Therefore, small 3.7 mL vials were used to increase the concentration of carbon dioxide in headspace, carbonate samples even less as 15 μg can be analyzed routinely by a GasBench Ⅱ continuous-flow IRMS. Meanwhile, the linear relationship between sample’s weight and peak’s area was strong (R2>0.993 2 and it can be used to determine the carbon content of carbonate samples.

  2. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives. This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Approach/Activities. Fifty-five studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation were measured and 19 of these investigations provided direct comparisons relating passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulation. Polymers compared included low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and organisms ranged from polychaetes and oligochaetes to bivalves, aquatic insects, and gastropods. Regression equations correlating bioaccumulation (CL) and passive sampler uptake (CPS) were used to assess the strength of observed relationships. Results/Lessons Learned. Passive sampling based concentrations resulted in strong logarithmic regression relationships, most of which were within one to two orders of magnitude of measured bioaccumulation. Mean coefficients of determination (r2) for LDPE, PDMS and POM were 0.68, 0.76 and 0.58, respectively. For the available raw data, the mean ratio of CL and CPS was 10.8 ± 18.4 (n = 609). Passive sampler uptake and bioaccumulation were not found to be identical (i.e., CPS ≠ CL) but the logarithmic-based relationships between these values were consistently linear and predictive. This review concludes that in many applications passive sampling may serve as a

  3. Chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in surface water using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Perkins, S.D.; Clark, R.C.; Smith, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    Passive sampling methodologies were used to conduct a chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in the surface waters of three geographically distinct agricultural watersheds. A selection of current-use agrochemicals and persistent organic pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides, were targeted using the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and the semipermeable membrane device passive samplers. In addition to the chemical analysis, the Microtox assay for acute toxicity and the yeast estrogen screen (YES) were conducted as potential assessment tools in combination with the passive samplers. During the spring of 2004, the passive samplers were deployed for 29 to 65 d at Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Morgan Creek, MD; and DR2 Drain, WA. Chemical analysis of the sampler extracts identified the agrochemicals predominantly used in those areas, including atrazine, simazine, acetochlor, and metolachlor. Other chemicals identified included deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, trifluralin, fluoranthene, pyrene, cis- and trans-nonachlor, and pentachloroanisole. Screening using Microtox resulted in no acutely toxic samples. POCIS samples screened by the YES assay failed to elicit a positive estrogenic response. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and evaluation of a device for simultaneous uniaxial compression and optical imaging of cartilage samples in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinert, Marian; Kratz, Marita; Jones, David B. [Department of Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Philipps University Marburg, Baldingerstr., 35043 Marburg (Germany); Jaedicke, Volker; Hofmann, Martin R. [Photonics and Terahertz Technology, Ruhr University Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we present a system that allows imaging of cartilage tissue via optical coherence tomography (OCT) during controlled uniaxial unconfined compression of cylindrical osteochondral cores in vitro. We describe the system design and conduct a static and dynamic performance analysis. While reference measurements yield a full scale maximum deviation of 0.14% in displacement, force can be measured with a full scale standard deviation of 1.4%. The dynamic performance evaluation indicates a high accuracy in force controlled mode up to 25 Hz, but it also reveals a strong effect of variance of sample mechanical properties on the tracking performance under displacement control. In order to counterbalance these disturbances, an adaptive feed forward approach was applied which finally resulted in an improved displacement tracking accuracy up to 3 Hz. A built-in imaging probe allows on-line monitoring of the sample via OCT while being loaded in the cultivation chamber. We show that cartilage topology and defects in the tissue can be observed and demonstrate the visualization of the compression process during static mechanical loading.

  5. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  6. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David; Ross, Shane; Lin, Binbin

    2014-05-01

    Spores of fungi in the genus Fusarium may be transported through the atmosphere over long distances. Members of this genus are important pathogens and mycotoxin producers. New information is needed to characterize seasonal trends in atmospheric loads of Fusarium and to pinpoint the source(s) of inoculum at both local (farm) and regional (state or country) scales. Spores of Fusarium were collected from the atmosphere in an agricultural ecosystem in Blacksburg, VA, USA using a Burkard volumetric sampler (BVS) 1 m above ground level and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) 100 m above ground level. More than 2,200 colony forming units (CFUs) of Fusarium were collected during 104 BVS sampling periods and 180 UAV sampling periods over four calendar years (2009-2012). Spore concentrations ranged from 0 to 13 and 0 to 23 spores m-3 for the BVS and the UAVs, respectively. Spore concentrations were generally higher in the fall, spring, and summer, and lower in the winter. Spore concentrations from the BVS were generally higher than those from the UAVs for both seasonal and hourly collections. Some of the species of Fusarium identified from our collections have not been previously reported in the state of Virginia. A Gaussian plume transport model was used to estimate distances to the potential inoculum source(s) by season. This work extends previous studies showing an association between atmospheric transport barriers (Lagrangian coherent structures or LCSs) and the movement of Fusarium in the lower atmosphere. An increased understanding of the aerobiology of Fusarium may contribute to new and improved control strategies for diseases causes by fusaria in the future.

  7. Passive solar construction handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  8. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  9. An all-silicon passive optical diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Varghese, Leo T; Shen, Hao; Niu, Ben; Xuan, Yi; Weiner, Andrew M; Qi, Minghao

    2012-01-27

    A passive optical diode effect would be useful for on-chip optical information processing but has been difficult to achieve. Using a method based on optical nonlinearity, we demonstrate a forward-backward transmission ratio of up to 28 decibels within telecommunication wavelengths. Our device, which uses two silicon rings 5 micrometers in radius, is passive yet maintains optical nonreciprocity for a broad range of input power levels, and it performs equally well even if the backward input power is higher than the forward input. The silicon optical diode is ultracompact and is compatible with current complementary metal-oxide semiconductor processing.

  10. Passivity-based control and estimation in networked robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Hatanaka, Takeshi; Fujita, Masayuki; Spong, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    Highlighting the control of networked robotic systems, this book synthesizes a unified passivity-based approach to an emerging cross-disciplinary subject. Thanks to this unified approach, readers can access various state-of-the-art research fields by studying only the background foundations associated with passivity. In addition to the theoretical results and techniques,  the authors provide experimental case studies on testbeds of robotic systems  including networked haptic devices, visual robotic systems,  robotic network systems and visual sensor network systems. The text begins with an introduction to passivity and passivity-based control together with the other foundations needed in this book. The main body of the book consists of three parts. The first examines how passivity can be utilized for bilateral teleoperation and demonstrates the inherent robustness of the passivity-based controller against communication delays. The second part emphasizes passivity’s usefulness for visual feedback control ...

  11. Passivity and Evolutionary Game Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Shinkyu; Shamma, Jeff S.; Martins, Nuno C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates an energy conservation and dissipation -- passivity -- aspect of dynamic models in evolutionary game theory. We define a notion of passivity using the state-space representation of the models, and we devise systematic methods to examine passivity and to identify properties of passive dynamic models. Based on the methods, we describe how passivity is connected to stability in population games and illustrate stability of passive dynamic models using numerical simulations.

  12. Passivity and Evolutionary Game Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Shinkyu

    2018-03-21

    This paper investigates an energy conservation and dissipation -- passivity -- aspect of dynamic models in evolutionary game theory. We define a notion of passivity using the state-space representation of the models, and we devise systematic methods to examine passivity and to identify properties of passive dynamic models. Based on the methods, we describe how passivity is connected to stability in population games and illustrate stability of passive dynamic models using numerical simulations.

  13. Vehicle Classification and Speed Estimation Using Combined Passive Infrared/Ultrasonic Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Odat, Enas M.; Shamma, Jeff S.; Claudel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new sensing device that can simultaneously monitor traffic congestion and urban flash floods is presented. This sensing device is based on the combination of passive infrared sensors (PIRs) and ultrasonic rangefinder, and is used

  14. An introduction to electrooptic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminow, Ivan P

    1974-01-01

    An Introduction to Electrooptic Devices aims to present an introduction to the electrooptic effect and to summarize work on devices employing the electrooptic effect. The book provides the necessary background in classical crystal optics. The text then discusses topics including crystal symmetry, the tensor description of linear dielectric properties, propagation in anisotropic media, and passive crystal optic devices. The book also describes the phenomenological description of tensor nonlinear dielectric properties of crystals, with emphasis on the electrooptic effect; device design and appli

  15. Aktiv kontra passiv forvaltning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    2017-01-01

    Fordele og ulemper ved aktiv og passiv forvaltning har fået fornyet opmærksomhed blandt andet i forbindelse med den forestående implementering af MiFID II. Som bidrag til denne diskussion indeholder dette nummer af Finans/Invest tre artikler, der behandler aktiv og passiv forvaltning fra...... forskellige vinkler. Denne leder forklarer, hvorfor valget mellem aktiv og passiv forvaltning er mere kompliceret, end hvad man kunne tro ved første øjekast, og konkluderer, at der vil være plads til - og behov for - begge typer forvaltning....

  16. Most energetic passive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Huber, Marcus; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Tura, Jordi; Acín, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Passive states are defined as those states that do not allow for work extraction in a cyclic (unitary) process. Within the set of passive states, thermal states are the most stable ones: they maximize the entropy for a given energy, and similarly they minimize the energy for a given entropy. Here we find the passive states lying in the other extreme, i.e., those that maximize the energy for a given entropy, which we show also minimize the entropy when the energy is fixed. These extremal properties make these states useful to obtain fundamental bounds for the thermodynamics of finite-dimensional quantum systems, which we show in several scenarios.

  17. Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based on Multimode Selectivity simultaneously Achievable in a Single Device. 11. Design and Evaluation of a Small Portable Sensor for the Determination of Ferrocyanide in Hanford Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegemiller, Michael L.; Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Ridgway, Thomas H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Sell, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    Spectroelectrochemical sensing based on multimode selectivity simultaneously achievable in a single device. 11. Design and evaluation of a small portable sensor for the determination of ferrocyanide in Hanford waste samples

  18. Development of a silicone-membrane passive sampler for monitoring cylindrospermopsin and microcystin LR-YR-RR in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyoni, Hlengilizwe; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Silicone membrane tubes were functionalised by filling them with synthesised γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and used as a passive sampling device for monitoring microcystins and cylindrospermopsin in aquatic environments. This novel device was calibrated for the measurement of microcystin and cylindrospermopsin concentrations in water. The effect of temperature and hydrodynamics on the sampler performance was studied in a flow-through system under controlled conditions. The chemical uptake of microcystins (MCs) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN) into the passive sampler remained linear and integrative throughout the exposure period. The rate of accumulation of most of the MC compounds tested was dependent on temperature and flow velocity. The use of 13C labelled polychlorinated biphenyls as performance reference compounds (PRCs) in silicone membrane/γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle passive sampler, Chemcatcher and polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was evaluated. The majority of PRCs improved the semi quantitative nature of water concentration estimated by the three samplers. The corrected sampling rate values of model biotoxin compounds were used to estimate the time-weighted average concentrations in natural cyanobacterial water blooms of the Hartbeespoort dam. The corrected sampling rates RScorr values varied from 0.1140 to 0.5628 Ld-1 between samplers with silicone membrane having the least RScorr values compared to the Chemcatcher and POCIS. The three passive sampling devises provided a more relevant picture of the biotoxin concentration in the Hartbeespoort dam. The results suggested that the three sampling devices are suitable for use in monitoring microcystins and cylindrospermopsin concentrations in aquatic environments.

  19. Laser-cut paper-based device for the detection of dengue non-structural NS1 protein and specific IgM in human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theillet, G; Rubens, A; Foucault, F; Dalbon, P; Rozand, C; Leparc-Goffart, I; Bedin, F

    2018-03-10

    The incidence of flavivirus infections has increased dramatically in recent decades in tropical and sub-tropical areas worldwide, affecting hundreds of millions of people each year. Dengue viruses are typically transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause a wide range of symptoms from flu-like fever to organ impairment and death. Although conventional diagnostic tests can provide early diagnosis of acute dengue infections, access to these tests is often limited in developing countries. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop affordable, simple, rapid, and robust diagnostic tools that can be used at 'Point of Care' settings. Early diagnosis is crucial to improve patient management and reduce the risk of complications. In the present study, a novel laser-cut device made of glass-fiber paper was designed and tested for the detection of the dengue Non Structural 1 (NS1) viral protein and specific IgM in blood and plasma. The device, called PAD, was able to detect around 25 ng/mL of NS1 protein in various sample types in 8 minutes, following a few simple steps. The PAD was also able to detect specific IgM in human plasmas in less than 10 minutes. The PAD appears to have all the potential to assist health workers in early diagnosis of dengue fever or other tropical fevers caused by flaviviruses.

  20. Comparison of fatal motor vehicle accidents at passive and active railway level crossings in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirkku Laapotti

    2016-07-01

    Active warning devices are effective in preventing accidents due to road user errors. Equipping the most dangerous passive level crossings with warning devices – low cost or conventional – would increase safety. Alternatively, some level crossings could be removed altogether. A minimum requirement is that the environmental factors at passive level crossings support safe crossing.

  1. CANDU passive shutdown systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, R S; Olmstead, R A [AECL CANDU, Sheridan Park Research Community, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-01

    CANDU incorporates two diverse, passive shutdown systems, independent of each other and from the reactor regulating system. Both shutdown systems function in the low pressure, low temperature, moderator which surrounds the fuel channels. The shutdown systems are functionally different, physically separate, and passive since the driving force for SDS1 is gravity and the driving force for SDS2 is stored energy. The physics of the reactor core itself ensures a degree of passive safety in that the relatively long prompt neutron generation time inherent in the design of CANDU reactors tend to retard power excursions and reduces the speed required for shutdown action, even for large postulated reactivity increases. All passive systems include a number of active components or initiators. Hence, an important aspect of passive systems is the inclusion of fail safe (activated by active component failure) operation. The mechanisms that achieve the fail safe action should be passive. Consequently the passive performance of the CANDU shutdown systems extends beyond their basic modes of operation to include fail safe operation based on natural phenomenon or stored energy. For example, loss of power to the SDS1 clutches results in the drop of the shutdown rods by gravity, loss of power or instrument air to the injection valves of SDS2 results in valve opening via spring action, and rigorous self checking of logic, data and timing by the shutdown systems computers assures a fail safe reactor trip through the collapse of a fluctuating magnetic field or the discharge of a capacitor. Event statistics from operating CANDU stations indicate a significant decrease in protection system faults that could lead to loss of production and elimination of protection system faults that could lead to loss of protection. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the passive shutdown systems employed by CANDU. (author). 4 figs, 3 tabs.

  2. Optimisation of the membrane-assisted passive sampler and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-20

    Jul 20, 2010 ... to collect a sample of the water, which is then analysed for potential pollutants in the ... advantages of the passive sampling approach with solvent- ... Chlorinated phenols can also form during wastewater treat- ment, since ...

  3. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alex

    2012-07-29

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alex; Thon, Susanna; Hoogland, Sjoerd H.; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan K.; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R.; Carey, Graham H.; Fischer, Armin H.; Kemp, Kyle W.; Kramer, Illan J.; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J.; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, E. H.

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Portable devices for monitoring radon and its progeny in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huaiqin; Yao Wanyuan; Su Jingling; Liu Jinhua

    1990-01-01

    We have developed two kinds of portable monitoring devices to measure the concentration and potential energy concentration of radon and its progeny in air. The thermoluminescence material CaSO4 (Tm) is used as the detection element. One of the devices is called passive radon monitor. The lowest detectable limit for radon in air is about 1.5 Bq/m 3 , as a sampling time being one week. Good reliability and ease to operate are its main advantages. The second kind of device is called a working level monitor which consists of a miniature remembrane pump and an integrating sampling probe. The lowest detectable limit is about 0.00043 WL (9x10 -9 J/m 3 ) for a sampling time of 6 hours. It weighs only 0.35 kg, but maintenance is necessary sometimes. (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Determination of uptake kinetics (sampling rates) by lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Orazio, C.E.; Lebo, J.A.; Clark, R.C.; Gibson, V.L.; Gala, W.R.; Echols, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    The use of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) is becoming commonplace, but very little sampling rate data are available for the estimation of ambient contaminant concentrations from analyte levels in exposed SPMDs. We determined the aqueous sampling rates (R(s)s; expressed as effective volumes of water extracted daily) of the standard (commercially available design) 1-g triolein SPMD for 15 of the priority pollutant (PP) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at multiple temperatures and concentrations. Under the experimental conditions of this study, recovery- corrected R(s) values for PP PAHs ranged from ???1.0 to 8.0 L/d. These values would be expected to be influenced by significant changes (relative to this study) in water temperature, degree of biofouling, and current velocity- turbulence. Included in this paper is a discussion of the effects of temperature and octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)); the impacts of biofouling and hydrodynamics are reported separately. Overall, SPMDs responded proportionally to aqueous PAH concentrations; i.e., SPMD R(s) values and SPMD-water concentration factors were independent of aqueous concentrations. Temperature effects (10, 18, and 26 ??C) on Rs values appeared to be complex but were relatively small.The use of lipid-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) is becoming commonplace, but very little sampling rate data are available for the estimation of ambient contaminant concentrations from analyte levels in exposed SPMDs. We determined the aqueous sampling rates (Rss; expressed as effective volumes of water extracted daily) of the standard (commercially available design) 1-g triolein SPMD for 15 of the priority pollutant (PP) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at multiple temperatures and concentrations. Under the experimental conditions of this study, recovery-corrected Rs values for PP PAHs ranged from ???1.0 to 8.0 L/d. These values would be expected to be influenced by

  7. Passive propulsion in vortex wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, D. N.; Hover, F. S.; Triantafyllou, M. S.; Liao, J. C.; Lauder, G. V.

    A dead fish is propelled upstream when its flexible body resonates with oncoming vortices formed in the wake of a bluff cylinder, despite being well outside the suction region of the cylinder. Within this passive propulsion mode, the body of the fish extracts sufficient energy from the oncoming vortices to develop thrust to overcome its own drag. In a similar turbulent wake and at roughly the same distance behind a bluff cylinder, a passively mounted high-aspect-ratio foil is also shown to propel itself upstream employing a similar flow energy extraction mechanism. In this case, mechanical energy is extracted from the flow at the same time that thrust is produced. These results prove experimentally that, under proper conditions, a body can follow at a distance or even catch up to another upstream body without expending any energy of its own. This observation is also significant in the development of low-drag energy harvesting devices, and in the energetics of fish dwelling in flowing water and swimming behind wake-forming obstacles.

  8. Mixing in a Microfluid Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Deryabin, Mikhail

    Mixing of fluids in microchannels cannot rely on turbulence since the flow takes place at extremly low Reynolds numbers. Various active and passive devices have been developed to induce mixing in microfluid flow devices. We describe here a model of an active mixer where a transverse periodic flow...

  9. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  10. Use of passive alpha detectors to screen for uranium contamination in a field at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudney, C.S.; Meyer, K.E.; Gammage, R.B.; Wheeler, R.V.; Salasky, M.; Kotrappa, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the results from a field test of newly developed techniques for inexpensive, in situ screening of soil for alpha contamination. Passive alpha detectors that are commercially available for the detection indoor airborne alpha activity (i.e., 222 Rn) have been modified so they can be applied to the detection of alpha contamination on surfaces or in soils. Results reported here are from an intercomparison involving several different techniques with all measurements being made at the same sites in a field near the formerly used uranium processing facility at Fernald, Ohio, during the summer of 1994. The results for two types of passive alpha detector show that the quality of calibration is improved if soils samples are milled to increase homogeneity within the soil matrices. The correlation between laboratory based radiochemical analyses and quick, field-based screening measurements is acceptable and can be improved if the passive devices are left for longer exposure times in the field. The total cost per measurement for either type of passive alpha detector is probably less than $25 and should provide a cost-effective means for site managers to develop the information needed to find areas with remaining alpha contamination so resources can be allocated efficiently

  11. Newnes passive and discrete circuits pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    MARSTON, R M

    2000-01-01

    Newnes Passive and Discrete Circuits Pocket Book is aimed at all engineers, technicians, students and experimenters who can build a design directly from a circuit diagram. In a highly concise form Ray Marston presents a huge compendium of circuits that can be built as they appear, adapted or used as building blocks. The devices used have been carefully chosen for their ease of availability and reasonable price. The selection of devices has been thoroughly updated for the second edition, which has also been expanded to cover the latest ICs.The three sections of the book cover: Moder

  12. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, David [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Neri, Robin [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  13. Fluid phase passivation and polymer encapsulation of InP/InGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxland, R K; Rahman, F

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of effective passivation techniques for improving and stabilizing the characteristics of InP/InGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Two different methods for carrying out sulfur-based surface passivations are compared. These include exposure to gaseous hydrogen sulfide and immersion treatment in an ammonium sulfide solution. The temporal behaviour of effects resulting from such passivation treatments is reported. It is shown that liquid phase passivation has a larger beneficial effect on device performance than gas phase passivation. This is explained in terms of the polarity of passivating species and the exposed semiconductor surface. Finally, device encapsulation in a novel chalcogenide polymer is shown to be effective in preserving the benefits of surface passivation treatments. The relevant properties of this encapsulation material are also discussed

  14. Passive components of NPP safety-related systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionaytis Romuald, R.; Bubnova Tatyana, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new passive components with having drives: fast-response cutoff valves; modular actuators with opposite cocking pneumatic drives and actuation spring drives; voting electromagnetic valve units for control of pneumatic drives; passive initiators of actuation; visual diagnostics . All these devices have been developed and tested at mock-ups. This paper presents also the following direct-action passive safety components: modular pressure-relief safety valves; pilot safety valves with passive action; check valves with remote position indicator and after-tightening; modular inserts for limiting emergency coolant flow; vortex rectifier; critical weld fasteners; gas-liquid valves; fast-removable seal assembly; seal spring loaders; grooves for increasing hydraulic resistance. Replacement of active safety system components for passive ones improves the general reliability NPP by 1.5 or 2 orders of magnitudes. (authors)

  15. Adaptive suppression of passive intermodulation in digital satellite transceivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu TIAN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the performance issues of satellite transceivers suffering passive intermodulation interference, a novel and effective digital suppression algorithm is presented in this paper. In contrast to analog approaches, digital passive intermodulation (PIM suppression approaches can be easily reconfigured and therefore are highly attractive for future satellite communication systems. A simplified model of nonlinear distortion from passive microwave devices is established in consideration of the memory effect. The multiple high-order PIM products falling into the receiving band can be described as a bilinear predictor function. A suppression algorithm based on a bilinear polynomial decorrelated adaptive filter is proposed for baseband digital signal processing. In consideration of the time-varying characteristics of passive intermodulation, this algorithm can achieve the rapidness of online interference estimation and low complexity with less consumption of resources. Numerical simulation results show that the algorithm can effectively compensate the passive intermodulation interference, and achieve a high signal-to-interference ratio gain.

  16. Modeling the transport of organic chemicals between polyethylene passive samplers and water in finite and infinite bath conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcaciuc, A Patricia; Apell, Jennifer N; Gschwend, Philip M

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transfer of chemicals between passive samplers and water is essential for their use as monitoring devices of organic contaminants in surface waters. By applying Fick's second law to diffusion through the polymer and an aqueous boundary layer, the authors derived a mathematical model for the uptake of chemicals into a passive sampler from water, in finite and infinite bath conditions. The finite bath model performed well when applied to laboratory observations of sorption into polyethylene (PE) sheets for various chemicals (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane [DDT]) and at varying turbulence levels. The authors used the infinite bath model to infer fractional equilibration of PCB and DDT analytes in field-deployed PE, and the results were nearly identical to those obtained using the sampling rate model. However, further comparison of the model and the sampling rate model revealed that the exchange of chemicals was inconsistent with the sampling rate model for partially or fully membrane-controlled transfer, which would be expected in turbulent conditions or when targeting compounds with small polymer diffusivities and small partition coefficients (e.g., phenols, some pesticides, and others). The model can be applied to other polymers besides PE as well as other chemicals and in any transfer regime (membrane, mixed, or water boundary layer-controlled). Lastly, the authors illustrate practical applications of this model such as improving passive sampler design and understanding the kinetics of passive dosing experiments. © 2015 SETAC.

  17. Constructing passive houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehler, S. [Oehler Faigle Archkom Solar Architektur, Bretten (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Everybody can learn to build energy-efficient. It needs theoretical and practical experience. 1997 we built the first freestanding Passive House in Europe, the Passive House Oehler. There had been a lot of questions, starting with the insecurity, whether the calculation program of the Passive House Institute, the PHPP, is working properly in our case. Nobody knew at that time because nobody tried it out before. It took us a lot of time to find out and every detail of the construction hat to be invented to meet the very high demand of thermal quality. All the following houses needed less time and had fewer open questions, adding one piece of experience with every building. 2002 we realised the biggest Passive House, the office building Energon Ulm with 420 working spaces. In the meantime we have learned a lot like how to produce prefabricated timber elements for the facades, providing good insulation, air tightness and avoiding serious thermal bridges. We have proofed, that any kind of building type can be a Passive House. And with increasing experience the freedom of design and construction is growing. Even the economical efficiency increased. The Energon Ulm is providing a much better indoor climate than any other office building and was build 10 % cheaper than an average German office building. At present the Passive House Standard is the most efficient solution for the user to live in the desired comfort zone between 20 C and 25 C. This zone of individual feeling-well can be described with the term ''operative temperature''. This term is defined by factors like air temperature, radiation temperature of warm and cold surfaces, air speed and humidity. The result of all these factors has to be within 18 C to 25 C without accepting one of the factors getting extreme.

  18. Enabling optical metrology on small 5×5μm2 in-cell targets to support flexible sampling and higher order overlay and CD control for advanced logic devices nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Antonio; de la Fuente, Isabel; Hsu, Zack; Tai, Alan; Chang, Hammer; McNamara, Elliott; Cramer, Hugo; Li, Daoping

    2018-03-01

    In next generation Logic devices, overlay control requirements shrink to sub 2.5nm level on-product overlay. Historically on-product overlay has been defined by the overlay capability of after-develop in-scribe targets. However, due to design and dimension, the after development metrology targets are not completely representative for the final overlay of the device. In addition, they are confined to the scribe-lane area, which limits the sampling possibilities. To address these two issues, metrology on structures matching the device structure and which can be sampled with high density across the device is required. Conventional after-etch CDSEM techniques on logic devices present difficulties in discerning the layers of interest, potential destructive charging effects and finally, they are limited by the long measurement times[1] [2] [3] . All together, limit the sampling densities and making CDSEM less attractive for control applications. Optical metrology can overcome most of these limitations. Such measurement, however, does require repetitive structures. This requirement is not fulfilled by logic devices, as the features vary in pitch and CD over the exposure field. The solution is to use small targets, with a maximum pad size of 5x5um2 , which can easily be placed in the logic cell area. These targets share the process and architecture of the device features of interest, but with a modified design that replicates as close as possible the device layout, allowing for in-device metrology for both CD and Overlay. This solution enables measuring closer to the actual product feature location and, not being limited to scribe-lanes, it opens the possibility of higher-density sampling schemes across the field. In summary, these targets become the facilitator of in-device metrology (IDM), that is, enabling the measurements both in-device Overlay and the CD parameters of interest and can deliver accurate, high-throughput, dense and after-etch measurements for Logic

  19. Passive containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleimola, F.W.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a containment system that provides complete protection entirely by passive means for the loss of coolant accident in a nuclear power plant and wherein all stored energy released in the coolant blowdown is contained and absorbed while the nuclear fuel is prevented from over-heating by a high containment back-pressure and a reactor vessel refill system. The primary containment vessel is restored to a high sub-atmospheric pressure within a few minutes after accident initiation and the decay heat is safely transferred to the environment while radiolytic hydrogen is contained by passive means. 20 claims, 14 figures

  20. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  1. GRADIENCE IN ANALYSIS: A CASE OF PRESENTATIVE PASSIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Toyota

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a concept of overlapping grammatical categories in alinguistic analysis is discussed. This overlap has gained recognition in research and is often termed as gradience. A specific instance of gradience concerning various types of the passive voice, especially the one involving less-typical information status, is used asan example to illustrate how gradience exists in different languages. The passive is known to function as a topic marker in a clause, but there are some cases where it is used as a focus device. By studying these features both synchronically and diachronically, one can find gradience of the passive both structurally and functionally.

  2. Passive Badge Assessment for Long-Term, Low-level Air Monitoring on Submarines: Acrolein Badge Validation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Kimberly P; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L; Kidwell, David A

    2006-01-01

    .... Passive badge monitors for acrolein detection were tested. Long-term sampling efficiency was evaluated for a 28-day period by comparing the response of the passive badge to an active tube sampling method...

  3. Preliminary investigation on reliability assessment of passive safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Changfan; Kuang Bo

    2012-01-01

    The reliability evaluation of passive safety system plays an important part in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of nuclear power plant applying passive safety design, which depends quantitatively on reliabilities of passive safety system. According to the object of reliability assessment of passive safety system, relevant parameters are identified. Then passive system behavior during accident scenarios are studied. A practical example of this method is given for the case of reliability assessment of AP1000 passive heat removal system in loss of normal feedwater accident. Key and design parameters of PRHRS are identified and functional failure criteria are established. Parameter combinations acquired by Latin hyper~ cube sampling (LHS) in possible parametric ranges are input and calculations of uncertainty propagation through RELAP5/MOD3 code are carried out. Based on the calculations, sensitivity assessment on PRHRS functional criteria and reliability evaluation of the system are presented, which might provide further PSA with PRHR system reliability. (authors)

  4. Passive remediation strategies for petroleum contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everett, L.G.; Cullen, S.J.; Eccles, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The US EPA is becoming increasingly aware of costs and the limited success of existing remediation strategies. Research teams within the US EPA believe that if passive remediation can be successfully demonstrated, it is a candidate for best available technology. Passive remediation, however, must be demonstrated through the use of monitoring techniques, which demonstrate: contaminants are not moving in the dissolved, adsorbed or free product phase; and contamination is biodegrading in-place. This paper presents a concise monitoring and analysis strategy for passive remediation. Specifically, the paper presents the accuracy, precision and operating range of neutron moderation techniques as a low cost, real-time screening tool to measure the migration of the dissolved phase in soil moisture, the stabilized adsorbed phase and free product movement. In addition, the paper identifies the capillary pressure range through which the dissolved phase will move and identifies techniques for satisfying the risk analysis that movement is not taking place. The rationale for passive remediation taking place is confirmed through a discussion of gas ratios associated with bacterial assimilation of hydrocarbons. Gas ratios which are relatively constant above ground are highly inverted in the subsurface at contamination sites. The use of frequent screening of a vertical geologic profile using least cost techniques and the infrequent analysis of soil gas ratios provides the required data upon which the public will accept passive remediation as best available technology at a particular site. The paper points out that neutron moderation is a high candidate vadose zone monitoring device and identifies alternative techniques using resistivity and dielectric constants, which are in the developmental stage. The economic implications for passive remediation are enormous relative to the excavation and remediation strategies which are currently in use

  5. Flow injection microfluidic device with on-line fluorescent derivatization for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in water samples after solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment of Three Gorges Region of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400045 (China); Department of Chemistry, Beijing Key Laboratory of Microanalytical Methods and Instrumentation, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); He, Qiang, E-mail: heqiang0980@163.com [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment of Three Gorges Region of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400045 (China); Lu, Ying [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Armed Police College, Chengdu, 610213 (China); Huang, Jing [Research Center for Advanced Computation, College of Science, Xihua University, Chengdu, 610039 (China); Lin, Jin-Ming, E-mail: jmlin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Beijing Key Laboratory of Microanalytical Methods and Instrumentation, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2017-02-22

    In this paper, a rapid and simple method using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS), as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent, was successfully developed for extraction and preconcentration trace amounts of Cr(III) in water samples. The synthesized magnetic-MWCNTs nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A rhodamine derivative (R1) was synthesized and characterized as a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent derivatizing agent for Cr(III). After SPE procedure, Cr(III) analysis was performed by flow injection microfluidic chip with on-line fluorescent derivatization and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy detection. The parameters, which affected the efficiency of the developed method were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0–10.0 nM, with a detection limit of 0.094 nM and an enrichment factor of 38. Furthermore, real water samples were analyzed and good recoveries were obtained from 91.0 to 101.6%. - Graphical abstract: Flow injection microfluidic device with on-line fluorescent derivatization and detection coupled to LIF. - Highlights: • A highly selective and sensitive derivatizing reagent for Cr(III) was synthesized and characterized. • The magnetic-MWCNTs nanocomposite as a SPE sorbent was successfully synthesized and characterized. • A new portable detection system was developed for microfluidic chip FIA platform.

  6. A new nebulization device with exchangeable aerosol generation mode as a useful tool to investigate sample introduction processes in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotti, Marco; Lagomarsino, Cristina; Frache, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    A new sample introduction device has been designed in order to differentiate between the effects of the aerosol production and its following desolvation on analytical performances of an inductively coupled plasma optical spectrometer. This research tool allows to easily switch between the pneumatic and ultrasonic aerosol generation mode and to use a joint desolvation chamber. In this way, a real comparison between aerosol production systems may be attained and the influence of aerosol generation process on analytical figures clearly distinguished from that of the desolvation process. In this work, the separate effects of the aerosol generation and desolvation processes on analytical sensitivity and tolerance towards matrix effects have been investigated. Concerning sensitivity, it was found that both the processes play an important role in determining emission intensities, being the increase in sensitivity due to desolvation higher than that due to the improved aerosol generation efficiency. Concerning the matrix effects, a predominant role of the desolvation system was found, while the influence of the aerosol generation mode was much less important. For nitric acid, the decreasing effect was mitigated by the presence of a desolvation system, due to partial removal of the acid. On the contrary, the depressive effect of sulfuric acid was enhanced by the presence of a desolvation system, due to degradation of the solvent removal efficiency and to further decrease in the analyte transport rate caused by clustering phenomena. Concerning the interferences due to sodium and calcium, a depressive effect was observed, which is enhanced by desolvation

  7. Electrochemical characterization of anode passivation mechanisms in copper electrorefining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moats, Michael Scott

    Anode passivation can decrease productivity and quality while increasing costs in modern copper electrorefineries. This investigation utilized electrochemical techniques to characterize the passivation behavior of anode samples from ten different operating companies. It is believed that this collection of anodes is the most diverse set ever to be assembled to study the effect of anode composition on passivation. Chronopotentiometry was the main electrochemical technique, employing a current density of 3820 A m-2. From statistical analysis of the passivation characteristics, increasing selenium, tellurium, silver, lead and nickel were shown to accelerate passivation. Arsenic was the only anode impurity that inhibited passivation. Oxygen was shown to accelerate passivation when increased from 500 to 1500 ppm, but further increases did not adversely affect passivation. Nine electrolyte variables were also examined. Increasing the copper, sulfuric acid or sulfate concentration of the electrolyte accelerated passivation. Arsenic in the electrolyte had no effect on passivation. Chloride and optimal concentrations of thiourea and glue delayed passivation. Linear sweep voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy provided complementary information. Analysis of the electrochemical results led to the development of a unified passivation mechanism. Anode passivation results from the formation of inhibiting films. Careful examination of the potential details, especially those found in the oscillations just prior to passivation, demonstrated the importance of slimes, copper sulfate and copper oxide. Slimes confine dissolution to their pores and inhibit diffusion. This can lead to copper sulfate precipitation, which blocks more of the surface area. Copper oxide forms because of the resulting increase in potential at the interface between the copper sulfate and anode. Ultimate passivation occurs when the anode potential is high enough to stabilize the oxide film in

  8. Passiv-Sammler

    OpenAIRE

    Fritsche, U.

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a passive collector for air pollution for the determination of emission rates for dry and wet deposits on construction materials such as natural stone, whereby the collector has a surrogate surface of the stone under investigation, the surrogate surface being linked to a collecting vessel such that any dry or wet contamination occurring can be collected.

  9. Passive houses in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halse, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    The paper analyzes the introduction of passive houses in the Norwegian house market. Passive houses are houses with extremely low levels of energy consumption for heating, and have not yet been built in Norway, but have started to enter the market in Germany and some other countries. The construction sector is analyzed as a sectoral innovation system. The different elements of the innovation system are studied. This includes government agencies, producers, consumers, finance and education. The analysis shows that passive and low-energy houses are on the verge of market breakthrough. This can partly be explained by economic calculations, and partly by processes of learning and change in the institutional set-up of the sector. The construction sector is a sector characterized by low innovative intensity and little interaction between different agents. Those working to promote passive houses have to some extent managed to cope with these challenges. This has happened by breaking away from the traditional focus of Norwegian energy efficiency policies on technology and the economically rational agents, by instead focusing on knowledge and institutional change at the level of the producers. (Author)

  10. Hood River Passive House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, David [BA-PIRC, Spokane, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  11. Passive THz metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present our activities in the fabrication and characterization of passive THz metamaterials. We use two fabrication processes to develop metamaterials either as free-standing metallic membranes or patterned metallic multi-layers on the substrates to achieve different functionalities...

  12. Passive cooling applications for nuclear power plants using pulsating steam-water heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparna, J.; Chandraker, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Gen IV reactors incorporate passive principles in their system design as an important safety philosophy. Passive safety systems use inherent physical phenomena for delivering the desired safe action without any external inputs or intrusion. The accidents in Fukushima have renewed the focus on passive self-manageable systems capable of unattended operation, for long hours even in extended station blackout (SBO) and severe accident conditions. Generally, advanced reactors use water or atmospheric air as their ultimate heat sink and employ passive principles in design for enhanced safety. This paper would be discussing the experimental results on pulsating steam water heat-pipe devices and their applications in passive cooling. (author)

  13. Piping reliability improvement through passive seismic supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltus, R.; Rubbers, A.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear plants designed in the 1970's were equipped with large quantities of snubbers in auxiliary piping systems. The experience revealed a poor performance of snubbers during periodic inspection, while non-nuclear facility piping survived through strong earthquakes. Consequently, seismic design rules evolved towards more realistic criteria and passive dynamic supports were developed to reduce snubber quantities. These solutions improve the pipe reliability during normal operation while reducing the radiation exposure in a sample line is presented with the impact on pipe stresses compared to the results obtained with passive supports named Limit Stops. (author)

  14. The passive diffusion of Leptospira interrogans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koens, Lyndon; Lauga, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental measurements, the passive diffusion of the bacterium Leptospira interrogans is investigated theoretically. By approximating the cell shape as a straight helix and using the slender-body-theory approximation of Stokesian hydrodynamics, the resistance matrix of Leptospira is first determined numerically. The passive diffusion of the helical cell is then obtained computationally using a Langevin formulation which is sampled in time in a manner consistent with the experimental procedure. Our results are in excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental results with no adjustable parameters. (paper)

  15. The passive diffusion of Leptospira interrogans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koens, Lyndon; Lauga, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent experimental measurements, the passive diffusion of the bacterium Leptospira interrogans is investigated theoretically. By approximating the cell shape as a straight helix and using the slender-body-theory approximation of Stokesian hydrodynamics, the resistance matrix of Leptospira is first determined numerically. The passive diffusion of the helical cell is then obtained computationally using a Langevin formulation which is sampled in time in a manner consistent with the experimental procedure. Our results are in excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental results with no adjustable parameters.

  16. Smart portable rehabilitation devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leahey Matt

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s. Methods In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Results Laboratory tests of the devices

  17. Smart portable rehabilitation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Danaher, Gil; Jensen, Katherine; Pelletier, Philip; Prugnarola, Jennifer; Stuart, Ryan; Arango, Roberto; Leahey, Matt; Pavone, Robert; Provo, Andrew; Yasevac, Dan

    2005-07-12

    The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s). In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Laboratory tests of the devices demonstrated that they were able to meet their design

  18. Intrinsically Passive Handling and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Khodabandehloo, Koorosh

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a control philosophy called Intrinsically Passive Control, which has the feature to properly behave during interaction with any passive objects. The controlled robot will never become unstable due to the physical structure of the controller.

  19. A passive sampler for atmospheric ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosjean, D.; Hisham, M.W.M.

    1992-01-01

    A simple, cost-effective passive sampler has been developed for the determination of atmospheric ozone. This passive sampler is based on a colorant which fades upon reaction with ozone, whose concentration can be determined by reflectance measurement of the color change. Direct, on-site measurements are possible, and no chemical analyses are needed. Sampler design and validation studies have been carried out and included quantitative determination of color change vs exposure time (1-8 days), color change vs. ozone concentration (30-350 ppb), and response to changes in sampler configuration that modify the passive sampling rate. With indigo carmine as the colorant, the detection limits are 30 ppb. day and 120 ppb. day using a plastic grid and Teflon filter, respectively, as diffusion barriers. Interferences from nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and peroxyacetyl nitrate are 15, 4 and 16%, respectively, thus resulting in a negligible bias when measuring ozone in ambient air

  20. A passive radon dosemeter suitable for workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, C.; Orlando, P.; Patrizii, L.; Tommasino, L.; Tonnarini, S.; Trevisi, R.; Viola, P.

    2002-01-01

    The results obtained in different international intercomparisons on passive radon monitors have been analysed with the aim of identifying a suitable radon monitoring device for workplaces. From this analysis, the passive radon device, first developed for personal dosimetry in mines by the National Radiation Protection Board, UK (NRPB), has shown the most suitable set of characteristics. This radon monitor consists of a diffusion chamber, made of conductive plastic with less than 2 cm height, containing a CR-39 film (Columbia Resin 1939), as track detector. Radon detectors in workplaces may be exposed only during the working hours, thus requiring the storage of the detectors in low-radon zones when not exposed. This paper describes how this problem can be solved. Since track detectors are also efficient neutron dosemeters, care should be taken when radon monitors are used in workplaces, where they may be exposed to neutrons, such as on high altitude mountains, in the surroundings of high energy X ray facilities (where neutrons are produced by (gamma, n) reactions) or around high energy particle accelerators. To this end, the response of these passive radon monitors to high energy neutron fields has been investigated. (author)