WorldWideScience

Sample records for passive groundwater treatment

  1. Two passive groundwater treatment installations at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, W.D.; Craig, P.M.; Stone, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    Groundwater is being successfully treated by reactive media at two DOE sites. Passive treatment utilizing containerized treatment media has been installed on a radioactive groundwater seep at Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and on a TCE plume at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio. In both applications, flow is conducted by gravity through canisters of reactive treatment media. The canister-based treatment installation at ORNL utilizes a natural sodium-chabazite zeolite to remove radiological cations (Sr, Cs) from contaminated groundwater at greater than 99.9% efficiency. Portsmouth is currently conducting tests on three different types of treatment media for reductive dehalogenation of TCE

  2. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2007-11-06

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  3. Removal of As, Mn, Mo, Se, U, V and Zn from groundwater by zero-valent iron in a passive treatment cell: reaction progress modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Stan J.; Metzler, Donald R.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2002-05-01

    Three treatment cells were operated at a site near Durango, CO. One treatment cell operated for more than 3 years. The treatment cells were used for passive removal of contamination from groundwater at a uranium mill tailings repository site. Zero-valent iron [Fe(0)] that had been powdered, bound with aluminosilicate and molded into plates was used as a reactive material in one treatment cell. The others used granular Fe(0) and steel wool. The treatment cells significantly reduced concentrations of As, Mn, Mo, Se, U, V and Zn in groundwater that flowed through it. Zero-valent iron [Fe(0)], magnetite (Fe 3O 4), calcite (CaCO 3), goethite (FeOOH) and mixtures of contaminant-bearing phases were identified in the solid fraction of one treatment cell. A reaction progress approach was used to model chemical evolution of water chemistry as it reacted with the Fe(0). Precipitation of calcite, ferrous hydroxide [Fe(OH) 2] and ferrous sulfide (FeS) were used to simulate observed changes in major-ion aqueous chemistry. The amount of reaction progress differed for each treatment cell. Changes in contaminant concentrations were consistent with precipitation of reduced oxides (UO 2, V 2O 3), sulfides (As 2S 3, ZnS), iron minerals (FeSe 2, FeMoO 4) and carbonate (MnCO 3). Formation of a free gas phase and precipitation of minerals contributed to loss of hydraulic conductivity in one treatment cell.

  4. Evaluating groundwater flow using passive electrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, E.; Revil, A.; Singha, K.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate quantification of groundwater flow patterns, both in magnitude and direction, is a necessary component of evaluating any hydrologic system. Groundwater flow patterns are often determined using a dense network of wells or piezometers, which can be limited due to logistical or regulatory constraints. The self-potential (SP) method, a passive geophysical technique that relies on currents generated by water movement through porous materials, is a re-emerging alternative or addition to traditional piezometer networks. Naturally generated currents can be measured as voltage differences at the ground surface using only two electrodes, or a more complex electrode array. While the association between SP measurements and groundwater flow was observed as early as 1890s, the method has seen resurgence in hydrology since the governing equations were refined in the 1980s. The method can be used to analyze hydrologic processes at various temporal and spatial scales. Here we present the results of multiple SP surveys collected a multiple scales (1 to 10s of meters). Here single SP grid surveys are used to evaluate flow patterns through artic hillslopes at a discrete point in time. Additionally, a coupled groundwater and electrical model is used to analyze multiple SP data sets to evaluate seasonal changes in groundwater flow through an alpine meadow.

  5. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  6. Review of passive groundwater remediation systems: Lessons learned Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    One of the proposed solutions for treatment of the contaminated groundwater in the Bear Creek Valley is the installation of a passive treatment system. Such a system would use a reactive media installed in a continuous trench or in a gate as part of a barrier wall and gate system. This report evaluates information on five similar systems [no information was available on two additional systems] and evaluates the shortcomings and the advantages of each. Section 5 provides a short summary of the findings and presents some recommendations on how to avoid some of the common problems encountered with the existing systems

  7. Measurement and Treatment of Passive Muscle Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Henrik

    , which aimed to investigate: 1) The development of a clinical method to evaluate and distinguish neural (reflex mediated stiffness) and non-neural (passive muscle stiffness) components of muscle stiffness in adults with CP by objective and reliable measurements. 2) The association between increased...... and reliability of the method, and argue for the use of the method in the clinical practice. The device is able to distinguish between passive muscle stiffness and reflex-mediated stiffness in subjects with CP. It shows good high intrarater and interrater reliability in evaluation of passive muscle stiffness...... to measure muscle stiffness, and distinguish between passive muscle stiffness and reflex-mediated stiffness. Furthermore, it is a reliable device to measure changes in passive ROM. Treatment of passive muscle stiffness should be directed towards intense training, comprising many repetitions with a functional...

  8. Passive sampling and analyses of common dissolved fixed gases in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, Brian Patrick; Watson, David B.

    2008-01-01

    An in situ passive sampler and gas chromatographic protocol for analysis of the major and several minor fixed gases in groundwater was developed. A gas-tight syringe, mated to a short length of silicone tubing, was equilibrated with dissolved gases in groundwater by immersing in monitoring wells and was used to transport and to inject a 0.5 mL gas sample into a gas chromatograph. Using Ar carrier gas, a HaySep DB porous polymer phase, and sequential thermal conductivity and reductive gas detectors allowed good sensitivity for He, Ne, H2, N2, O2, CO, CH4, CO2, and N2O. Within 4 days of immersion in groundwater, samplers initially filled with either He or air attained the same and constant gas composition at an Oak Ridge, Tennessee, site heavily impacted by uranium, acidity, and nitrate. Between June 2006 and July 2007, 12 permanent groundwater wells were used to test the passive samplers in groundwater contaminated by a group of four closed radioactive wastewater seepage ponds; over a thousand passive gas samples from these wells averaged 56% CO2, 32.4% N2, 2.5% O2, 2.5% N2O, 0.20% CH4, 0.096% H2, and 0.023% CO with an average recovery of 95 14% of the injected gas volume

  9. LONG-TERM GEOCHEMICAL BEHAVIOR OF A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive, in-situ reactive barriers have proven to be viable, cost-effective systems for the remediation of Cr-contaminated groundwater at some sites. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are installed in the flow-path of groundwater, most typically as vertical treatment walls. Re...

  10. Passive sampling as a tool for identifying micro-organic compounds in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, N; Cerar, S; Koroša, A; Auersperger, P

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the use of a simple and cost efficient passive sampling device with integrated active carbon with which to test the possibility of determining the presence of micro-organic compounds (MOs) in groundwater and identifying the potential source of pollution as well as the seasonal variability of contamination. Advantage of the passive sampler is to cover a long sampling period by integrating the pollutant concentration over time, and the consequently analytical costs over the monitoring period can be reduced substantially. Passive samplers were installed in 15 boreholes in the Maribor City area in Slovenia, with two sampling campaigns covered a period about one year. At all sampling sites in the first series a total of 103 compounds were detected, and 144 in the second series. Of all detected compounds the 53 most frequently detected were selected for further analysis. These were classified into eight groups based on the type of their source: Pesticides, Halogenated solvents, Non-halogenated solvents, Domestic and personal, Plasticizers and additives, Other industrial, Sterols and Natural compounds. The most frequently detected MO compounds in groundwater were tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene from the Halogenated solvents group. The most frequently detected among the compound's groups were pesticides. Analysis of frequency also showed significant differences between the two sampling series, with less frequent detections in the summer series. For the analysis to determine the origin of contamination three groups of compounds were determined according to type of use: agriculture, urban and industry. Frequency of detection indicates mixed land use in the recharge areas of sampling sites, which makes it difficult to specify the dominant origin of the compound. Passive sampling has proved to be useful tool with which to identify MOs in groundwater and for assessing groundwater quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Potassium ferrate treatment of RFETS' contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The potassium ferrate treatment study of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) groundwater was performed under the Sitewide Treatability Studies Program (STSP). This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of potassium ferrate in a water treatment system to remove the contaminants of concern (COCS) from groundwater at the RFETS. Potassium ferrate is a simple salt where the iron is in the plus six valence state. It is the iron at the plus six valence state (Fe +6 ) that makes it an unique water treatment chemical, especially in waters where the pH is greater than seven. In basic solutions where the solubility of the oxides/hydroxides of many of the COCs is low, solids are formed as the pH is raised. By using ferrate these solids are agglomerated so they can be effectively removed by sedimentation in conventional water treatment equipment. The objective of this study was to determine the quality of water after treatment with potassium ferrate and to determine if the Colorado Water Quality Control Commission (CWQCC) discharge limits for the COCs listed in Table 1.0-1 could be met. Radionuclides in the groundwater were of special concern

  12. Bedrock refractive-flow cells: A passive treatment analog to funnel-and-gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, V.; Edwards, D.

    1997-01-01

    Funnel-and-gate technology provides a mechanism to passively treat groundwater contaminant plumes, but depends on placement of a sufficient barrier (open-quotes funnelclose quotes) in the plume flow path to channel the plume to a pass-through treatment zone (open-quotes gateclose quotes). Conventional barrier technologies limit funnel-and-gate deployment to unconsolidated overburden applications. A method has been developed which allows similar passive treatment to be applied to bedrock plumes. Rather than use barriers as the funnel, the method uses engineered bedrock zones, installed via precision blasting or other means, to refract groundwater flow along a preferred path to treatment (gate). The method requires orienting the refractive cell based on the Tangent Law and extending refractive cell limbs down gradient of the gate to disperse head and control flow. A typical Refractive-Flow cell may be open-quotes Yclose quotesshaped, with each limb 3-10 ft [1-3 m] wide and several tens to a few hundred feet [10 - 100 m] in length. Treatment takes place at the center of the X. MODFLOW modeling has been used to successfully simulate desired flow. Engineered blasting has been used at full scale application to create bedrock rubble zones for active collection/flow control for several years. The method provides a previously unavailable method to passively treat contaminated groundwater in bedrock at low cost

  13. Integrated passive flux measurement in groundwater: design and performance of iFLUX samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreydt, Goedele; Razaei, Meisam; Meire, Patrick; Van Keer, Ilse; Bronders, Jan; Seuntjens, Piet

    2017-04-01

    The monitoring and management of soil and groundwater is a challenge. Current methods for the determination of movement or flux of pollution in groundwater use no direct measurements but only simulations based on concentration measurements and Darcy velocity estimations. This entails large uncertainties which cause remediation failures and higher costs for contaminated site owners. On top of that, the lack of useful data makes it difficult to get approval for a risk-based management approach which completely avoids costly remedial actions. The iFLUX technology is a key development of Dr. Goedele Verreydt at the University of Antwerp and VITO. It is supported by the passive flux measurement technology as invented by Prof. Mike Annable and his team at the University of Florida. The iFLUX technology includes an in situ measurement device for capturing dynamic groundwater quality and quantity, the iFLUX sampler, and an associated interpretation and visualization method. The iFLUX sampler is a modular passive sampler that provides simultaneous in situ point determinations of a time-averaged target compound mass flux and water flux. The sampler is typically installed in a monitoring well where it intercepts the groundwater flow and captures the compounds of interest. The sampler consists of permeable cartridges which are each packed with a specific sorbent matrix. The sorbent matrix of the water flux cartridge is impregnated with known amounts of water soluble resident tracers. These tracers are leached from the matrix at rates proportional to the groundwater flux. The measurements of the contaminants and the remaining resident tracer are used to determine groundwater and target compound fluxes. Exposure times range from 1 week to 6 months, depending on the expected concentration and groundwater flow velocity. The iFLUX sampler technology has been validated and tested at several field projects. Currently, 4 cartridges are tested and available: 1 waterflux cartridge to

  14. Engineered passive bioreactive barriers: risk-managing the legacy of industrial soil and groundwater pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, Robert M

    2004-06-01

    Permeable reactive barriers are a technology that is one decade old, with most full-scale applications based on abiotic mechanisms. Though there is extensive literature on engineered bioreactors, natural biodegradation potential, and in situ remediation, it is only recently that engineered passive bioreactive barrier technology is being considered at the commercial scale to manage contaminated soil and groundwater risks. Recent full-scale studies are providing the scientific confidence in our understanding of coupled microbial (and genetic), hydrogeologic, and geochemical processes in this approach and have highlighted the need to further integrate engineering and science tools.

  15. Ambient plasma treatment of silicon wafers for surface passivation recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jia; Prinz, Markus; Markert, Thomas; Aberle, Armin G.; Mueller, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effect of an ambient plasma treatment powered by compressed dry air on the passivation quality of silicon wafers coated with intrinsic amorphous silicon sub-oxide is investigated. While long-time storage deteriorates the effective lifetime of all samples, a short ambient plasma treatment improves their passivation qualities. By studying the influence of the plasma treatment parameters on the passivation layers, an optimized process condition was identified which even boosted the passivation quality beyond its original value obtained immediately after deposition. On the other hand, the absence of stringent requirement on gas precursors, vacuum condition and longtime processing makes the ambient plasma treatment an excellent candidate to replace conventional thermal annealing in industrial heterojunction solar cell production.

  16. U1/U2 crib groundwater biological treatment demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koegler, S.S.; Brouns, T.M.; Heath, W.O.

    1989-11-01

    The primary objective of the biological treatment project is to develop and demonstrate a process for Hanford groundwater remediation. Biodenitrification using facultative anaerobic microorganisms is a promising technology for the simultaneous removal of nitrates and organics from contaminated aqueous streams. During FY 1988, a consortium of Hanford groundwater microorganisms was shown to degrade both nitrates and carbon tetrachloride (CC1 4 ). A pilot-scale treatment system was designed and constructed based on the results of laboratory-and-bench-scale testing. This report summarizes the results of biological groundwater treatment studies performed during FY 1989 at the pilot-scale. These tests were conducted using a simulated Hanford groundwater with a continuous stirred-tank bioreactor, and a fluidized-bed bioreactor that was added to the pilot-scale treatment system in FY 1989. The pilot-scale system demonstrated continuous degradation of nitrates and CC1 4 in a simulated groundwater. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, G.L. [Environmental Resources Management, Inc., Exton, PA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater recovery and treatment (pump and treat systems) continue to be the most commonly selected remedial technology for groundwater restoration and protection programs at hazardous waste sites and RCRA facilities nationwide. Implementing a typical groundwater recovery and treatment system includes the initial assessment of groundwater quality, characterizing aquifer hydrodynamics, recovery system design, system installation, testing, permitting, and operation and maintenance. This paper focuses on methods used to assess the long-term efficiency of a pump and treat system. Regulatory agencies and industry alike are sensitive to the need for accurate assessment of the performance and success of groundwater recovery systems for contaminant plume abatement and aquifer restoration. Several assessment methods are available to measure the long-term performance of a groundwater recovery system. This paper presents six assessment techniques: degree of compliance with regulatory agency agreement (Consent Order of Record of Decision), hydraulic demonstration of system performance, contaminant mass recovery calculation, system design and performance comparison, statistical evaluation of groundwater quality and preferably, integration of the assessment methods. Applying specific recovery system assessment methods depends upon the type, amount, and quality of data available. Use of an integrated approach is encouraged to evaluate the success of a groundwater recovery and treatment system. The methods presented in this paper are for engineers and corporate management to use when discussing the effectiveness of groundwater remediation systems with their environmental consultant. In addition, an independent (third party) system evaluation is recommended to be sure that a recovery system operates efficiently and with minimum expense.

  18. Improvement of crystalline silicon surface passivation by hydrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, I.; Vetter, M.; Orpella, A.; Voz, C.; Puigdollers, J.; Alcubilla, R.; Kharchenko, A.V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2004-01-01

    A completely dry low-temperature process has been developed to passivate 3.3 Ω cm p-type crystalline silicon surface with excellent results. Particularly, we have investigated the use of a hydrogen plasma treatment, just before hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC x :H) deposition, without breaking the vacuum. We measured effective lifetime, τ eff , through a quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique. Experimental results show that hydrogen plasma treatment improves surface passivation compared to classical HF dip. S eff values lower than 19 cm s -1 were achieved using a hydrogen plasma treatment and an a-SiC x :H film deposited at 300 deg. C

  19. Proven Alternatives for Aboveground Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    This issue paper, developed for EPA's Engineering Forum, identifies and summarizes experiences with proven aboveground treatment alternatives for arsenic in groundwater, and provides information on their relative effectiveness and cost.

  20. Distinct kinetics and mechanisms of mZVI particles aging in saline and fresh groundwater: H2 evolution and surface passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jia; Tang, Fenglin; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf; Lu, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Application of microscale zero-valent iron (mZVI) is a promising technology for in-situ contaminated groundwater remediation; however, its longevity is negatively impacted by surface passivation, especially in saline groundwater. In this study, the aging behavior of mZVI particles was investigated in three media (milli-Q water, fresh groundwater and saline groundwater) using batch experiments to evaluate their potential corrosion and passivation performance under different field conditions. The results indicated that mZVI was reactive for 0-7 days of exposure to water and then gradually lost H2-generating capacity over the next hundred days in all of the tested media. In comparison, mZVI in saline groundwater exhibited the fastest corrosion rate during the early phase (0-7 d), followed by the sharpest kinetic constant decline in the latter phases. The SEM-EDS and XPS analyses demonstrated that in the saline groundwater, a thin and compact oxide film was immediately formed on the surface and significantly shielded the iron reactive site. Nevertheless, in fresh groundwater and milli-Q water, a passive layer composed of loosely and unevenly distributed precipitates slowly formed, with abundant reactive sites available to support continuous iron corrosion. These findings provide insight into the molecular-scale mechanism that governs mZVI passivation and provide implications for long-term mZVI application in saline contaminated groundwater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simplified Method for Groundwater Treatment Using Dilution and Ceramic Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, S.; Ariff, N. A.; Kadir, M. N. Abdul; Denan, F.

    2016-07-01

    Groundwater is one of the natural resources that is not susceptible to pollutants. However, increasing activities of municipal, industrial, agricultural or extreme land use activities have resulted in groundwater contamination as occured at the Research Centre for Soft Soil Malaysia (RECESS), Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM). Thus, aims of this study is to treat groundwater by using rainwater and simple ceramic filter as a treatment agent. The treatment uses rain water dilution, ceramic filters and combined method of dilute and filtering as an alternate treatment which are simple and more practical compared to modern or chemical methods. The water went through dilution treatment processes able to get rid of 57% reduction compared to initial condition. Meanwhile, the water that passes through the filtering process successfully get rid of as much as 86% groundwater parameters where only chloride does not pass the standard. Favorable results for the combination methods of dilution and filtration methods that can succesfully eliminate 100% parameters that donot pass the standards of the Ministry of Health and the Interim National Drinking Water Quality Standard such as those found in groundwater in RECESS, UTHM especially sulfate and chloride. As a result, it allows the raw water that will use clean drinking water and safe. It also proves that the method used in this study is very effective in improving the quality of groundwater.

  2. In situ treatment of cyanide-contaminated groundwater by iron cyanide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Smith, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Groundwater contamination with cyanide is common at many former or active industrial sites. Metal-cyanide complexes typically dominate aqueous speciation of cyanide in groundwater systems, with iron-cyanide complexes often most abundant. Typically, metal-cyanide complexes behave as nonadsorbing solutes in sand-gravel aquifer systems in the neutral pH range, rendering cyanide relatively mobile in groundwater systems. Groundwater pump-and-treat systems have often been used to manage cyanide contamination in groundwater. This study examined the feasibility of using in situ precipitation of iron cyanide in a reactive barrier to attenuate the movement of cyanide in groundwater. Laboratory column experiments were performed in which cyanide solutions were passed through mixtures of sand and elemental iron filings. Removal of dissolved cyanide was evaluated in a variety of cyanide-containing influents under various flow rates and sand-to-iron weight ratios. Long-term column tests performed with various cyanide-containing influents under both oxic and anoxic conditions, at neutral pH and at flow rates typical of sand-gravel porous media, yielded effluent concentrations of total cyanide as low as 0.5 mg/L. Effluent cyanide concentrations achieved were close to the solubilities of Turnbull's blue-hydrous ferric oxide solid solutions, indicating co-precipitation of the two solids. Maximum cyanide removal efficiency was achieved with approximately 10% by weight of iron in the sand-iron mixtures; higher iron contents did not increase removal efficiency significantly. Results obtained indicate that in situ precipitation is a promising passive treatment approach for cyanide in groundwater

  3. An application of baseflow isolation and passive wetland treatment to watershed restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, K.L.; Rightnour, T.A.; Zug, F.R. III

    1999-01-01

    The project site, located in West Virginia, is a reclaimed wood waste disposal area situated on Pennsylvanian coal strata. Following reclamation of the disposal area, flow in the adjacent stream was observed to have elevated iron and manganese concentrations. The source of the groundwater baseflow entering this portion of the stream appeared to be hydrologically related to the landfill by its close proximity. The source of the metals contamination was not determined, but may be related to percolation from the disposal area into the underlying coal strata. The observable contamination was typical of alkaline coal mine drainage and met the criteria for passive wetland treatment. However, the contaminated baseflow entered the stream along the sides and bottom of the channel at several locations over a 100-meter section and could not be collected for accurate characterization of pollutant loading. Treatment of the entire contaminated stream flow to comply with NPDES permit requirements would have been prohibitively expensive, and insufficient space was available for a treatment facility of adequate size within the narrow stream valley. Given these constraints, it was decided to isolate the contaminated baseflow from the surface flow by construction of a lined stream relocation on top of a gravity-drained collection zone in the existing stream channel. The collection zone consists of a bed of coarse aggregate with a central collection pipe discharging to a submerged outlet, which prevents air from entering the collection zone and minimizes the formation of iron precipitates. The relocated stream channel was formed in place on top of the collection zone with compacted earth, and lined with one layer of polypropylene geomembrane covered by two layers of geotextile. Gabion baskets were then placed on top of the liner for stream stabilization and shaping of the final channel. Accurate discharge characterization at the end of the collection pipe allowed the design of a

  4. Soil treatment and groundwater control for No. 6 fuel oil and PCB contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girioni, M.J.; St. Hilaire, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that as part of a Short-Term Measure ordered by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), soil contaminated by No. 6 fuel oil and low-level polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was excavated, treated and recycled on-site as an asphalt base course for a parking lot at an industrial complex in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Approximately 300 cubic yards of contaminated soil were treated with an asphalt emulsion and utilized as a aggregate component for asphalt processed at ambient temperatures during the month of December 1990. In order to determine if the contaminated soils to be recycled would be classified as a hazardous waste (as defined by the Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Regulations, 310 CMR 30.000), or if the soil to be recycled would pose a significant risk to health, safety or the environment, analytical testing of the contaminated soil was conducted prior, during and after treatment. Analytical testing included Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses of the untreated and treated soil. An alternative solution to the standard groundwater pump-and-treat method was designed and constructed to control and recover the highly viscous floating petroleum product. A series of precast leaching galleys (oil collection chambers) and a precast leach pit (groundwater discharge structure) were constructed to alter the local groundwater table to induce groundwater flow by gravity into the leaching chambers. Passive (i.e., nonpumping) groundwater flow to the leaching chambers was induced by placing of the groundwater discharge structure hydraulically downgradient of the leaching chambers. Collected oil, separated by gravity, will be periodically vacuumed, as necessary, for proper off-site disposal. Excess water discharges to the downgradient leach pit

  5. Groundwater Treatment at SRS: An Innovative Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorque, M.A.; Golshir, G.H.; Davis, B.

    1998-03-01

    The SRS is located in southwestern South Carolina, occupying an almost circular area of approximately 800 km2 within Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties. The site lies approximately 36 km southeast of Augusta, Georgia, and is bounded by the Savannah River along its southwestern border. Prior to the establishment of the SRS in 1952, the area was largely a rural agricultural community. As part of the defense complex, the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the national defense.From 1955 until 1988, unlined earthen basins were used to dispose of wastewater from the SRS separations facilities located in the F and H areas. Approximately 300 million liters of wastewater was transported annually from the process area through underground piping to the basins. The wastewater was allowed to evaporate and to seep into the underlying formations. There were three basins in the F-Area covering a total of about 3 hectares; while the H-Area was served by four basins covering about 6 hectares. The seepage basins closure was started in 1989 and SCDHEC certified the closures as completed in 1991.Groundwater monitoring conducted in accordance with the provisions of the RCRA Permits determined that the underlying hydrogeologic units were contaminated by tritium, radioactive metals (primarily Cesium 137, Strontium 90, and Uranium 235), nitrate and heavy metals, some of which are defined as hazardous by RCRA. Under the terms and conditions of the RCRA Post- Closure Permits, it was necessary to remediate the contaminated groundwater plumes

  6. Passivation of bimetallic catalysts used in water treatment: prevention and reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianming; Gillham, Robert W; Gui, Lai

    2013-01-01

    relatively low costs and environmentally friendly nature. This study suggests that the use of bimetals in above-groundwater treatment applications could become practical with appropriate engineering design.

  7. The X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility: A field-scale test of trichloroethylene dechlorination using iron filings for the X-120/X-749 groundwater plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, L.; West, O.R.; Korte, N.E.

    1997-09-01

    The dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents by zero-valence iron has recently become the subject of intensive research and development as a potentially cost-effective, passive treatment for contaminated groundwater through reactive barriers. Because of its successful application in the laboratory and other field sites, the X-625 Groundwater Treatment Facility (GTF) was constructed to evaluate reactive barrier technology for remediating trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The X-625 GTF was built to fulfill the following technical objectives: (1) to test reactive barrier materials (e.g., iron filings) under realistic groundwater conditions for long term applications, (2) to obtain rates at which TCE degrades and to determine by-products for the reactive barrier materials tested, and (3) to clean up the TCE-contaminated water in the X-120 plume. The X-625 is providing important field-scale and long-term for the evaluation and design of reactive barriers at PORTS. The X-625 GTS is a unique facility not only because it is where site remediation is being performed, but it is also where research scientists and process engineers can test other promising reactive barrier materials. In addition, the data collected from X-625 GTF can be used to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of replacing the activated carbon units in the pump-and-treat facilities at PORTS

  8. Hydraulic performance of permeable barriers for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, D.J.A.; Shikaze, S.G.; Cherry, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The passive interception and in situ treatment of dissolved contaminants in groundwater by permeable reactive barriers has recently gained favor at an increasing number of sites as an alternative to conventional approaches to groundwater remediation such as the pump-and-treat method. Permeable reactive barriers have two essential functions. The first is that the barriers must be installed in a position such that all of the plume passes through the reactive system. The second function is to achieve acceptable treatment of the contamination by physical, chemical or biological means within or downgradient of the barrier. In this paper, issues associated with the hydraulic performance of permeable reaction barriers are evaluated using a three-dimensional groundwater flow model. The efficiency of plume capture by permeable wall and funnel-and-gate systems is examined for some generic and for site-specific hydrogeologic systems. The results have important implications to decisions pertaining to the selection, design and installation of permeable reactive barrier systems

  9. Proven Alternatives for Aboveground Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    issue paper does not address three technologies that have been used to treat water containing arsenic: • Biological treatment • Phytoremediation ...arsenic in water, and no aboveground treatments of groundwater conducted at full scale were found. Phytoremediation and electrokinetics are not...Roundtable. September 1998. http://www.frtr.gov/costperf.htm. 1.16 U.S. EPA. Office of Research and Development. Arsenic & Mercury - Workshop on Removal

  10. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J; Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D; Leighton, T G

    2011-01-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  11. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D [Urology Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT, London (United Kingdom); Leighton, T G, E-mail: fiammetta.fedele@gstt.nhs.uk [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, S017 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  12. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, F.; Thomas, K.; Leighton, T. G.; Ryves, S.; Phillips, D.; Coleman, A. J.

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  13. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D [Urology Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT, London (United Kingdom); Leighton, T G, E-mail: fiammetta.fedele@gstt.nhs.uk [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, S017 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  14. Phosphate interference during in situ treatment for arsenic in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Joseph H; McBean, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by arsenic is a problem in many areas of the world, particularly in West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh, where reducing conditions in groundwater are the cause. In situ treatment is a novel approach wherein, by introduction of dissolved oxygen (DO), advantages over other treatment methods can be achieved through simplicity, not using chemicals, and not requiring disposal of arsenic-rich wastes. A lab-scale test of in situ treatment by air sparging, using a solution with approximately 5.3 mg L(-1) ferrous iron and 200 μg L(-1) arsenate, showed removal of arsenate in the range of 59%. A significant obstacle exists, however, due to the interference of phosphate since phosphate competes for adsorption sites on oxidized iron precipitates. A lab-scale test including 0.5 mg L(-1) phosphate showed negligible removal of arsenate. In situ treatment by air sparging demonstrates considerable promise for removal of arsenic from groundwater where iron is present in considerable quantities and phosphates are low.

  15. Passive flow regulators for drug delivery and hydrocephalus treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappel, E.; Dumont-Fillon, D.; Mefti, S.

    2014-03-01

    Passive flow regulators are usually intended to deliver or drain a fluid at a constant rate independently from pressure variations. New designs of passive flow regulators made of a stack of a silicon membrane anodically bonded to a Pyrex substrate are proposed. A first design has been built for the derivation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) towards peritoneum for hydrocephalus treatment. The device allows draining CSF at the patient production rate independently from postural changes. The flow rate is regulated at 20 ml/h in the range 10 to 40 mbar. Specific features to adjust in vivo the nominal flow rate are shown. A second design including high pressure shut-off feature has been made. The intended use is drug delivery with pressurized reservoir of typically 100 to 300 mbar. In both cases, the membrane comprises several holes facing pillars in the Pyrex substrate. These pillars are machined in a cavity which ensures a gap between the membrane and the pillars at rest. The fluid in the pressurized reservoir is directly in contact with the top surface of the membrane, inducing its deflection towards Pyrex substrate and closing progressively the fluidic pathway through each hole of the membrane. Since the membrane deflection is highly non-linear, FEM simulations have been performed to determine both radial position and diameter of the membrane holes that ensure a constant flow rate for a given range of pressure.

  16. Passive Biobarrier for Treating Co-Mingled Perchlorate and RDX in Groundwater at an Active Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-31

    monitoring K hydraulic conductivity; sorption coefficient MCL Maximum Contaminant Level mg/kg milligram(s) per kilogram mg/L milligram(s) per liter...low concentrations. The effectiveness of the barrier for reducing migration of perchlorate and explosives in groundwater at the EEA of NSWCDD was...at NSWCDD suggests that an emulsified oil biobarrier is a viable alternative to reduce the migration of co-mingled perchlorate and explosives in

  17. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and passivity of Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    200 ◦C for 20 h in salt bath and air cooled), B (heating up to 800 ◦C for 20 h and water ... chloride ions on passivity was associated with the formation of copper oxides/hydroxide and ... passive layer inhibits copper redeposition and/or preferen-.

  18. Decentralized wastewater treatment using passively aerated biological filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elela, Sohair I; Hellal, Mohamed S; Aly, Olfat H; Abo-Elenin, Salah A

    2017-10-13

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of a novel pilot-scale passively aerated biological filter (PABF) as a low energy consumption system for the treatment of municipal wastewater. It consists of four similar compartments, each containing 40% of a non-woven polyester fabric as a bio-bed. The PABF was fed with primary treated wastewater under a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.5 hr and a hydraulic loading rate of 5.5 m 2 /m 3 /d. The effect of media depth, HRT, dissolved oxygen (DO) and surface area of the media on the removal efficiency of pollutants was investigated. Results indicated that increasing media depth along the axis of the reactor and consequently increasing the HRT and DO resulted in great removal of different pollutants. A significant increase in the DO levels in the final effluent up to 6.7 mg/l resulted in good nitrification processes. Statistical analysis using SPSS showed that the reactor performance has significant removal efficiency (p filter systems.

  19. Passivation of defects in polycrystalline Cu2O thin films by hydrogen or cyanide treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, S.; Kato, S.; Okamoto, Y.; Sakurai, T.; Akimoto, K.; Fujiwara, N.; Kobayashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the passivation of defects in polycrystalline nitrogen-doped cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) thin films with hydrogen or cyanide treatment were studied. In the photoluminescence (PL) measurements, although the emission was not observed before treatment, luminescence of Cu 2 O at around 680 nm was observed after each treatment. This improvement in the luminescence property may be due to the passivation of non-radiative recombination centers by H or CN. The hole carrier concentration increased from the order of 10 16 to 10 17 cm -3 with hydrogen or cyanide treatment. From these results, both the hydrogen and cyanide treatments were found to be very effective to passivate defects and improve the optical and electrical properties of polycrystalline Cu 2 O thin films. The thermal stability of the passivation effects by the cyanide treatment is, however, superior to that by the hydrogen treatment

  20. Semi-passive, Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-term Treatment of Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank W. Schwartz

    2005-12-13

    This research involves a combined experimental and modeling study that builds on our previous DOE-sponsored work in investigating how KMnO{sub 4} can be better used with in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated ethylenes (e.g., PCE, TCE, DCE). This study aims to provide scientific basis for developing a new long-term, semi-passive ISCO scheme that uses controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a reactive barrier component. Specific objectives of the study are (1) to construct controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a new reactive barrier component that could deliver permanganate at a controlled rate over long time periods of years, (2) to quantitatively describe release mechanisms associated with the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}, (3) to demonstrate efficacy of the new remediation scheme using proof-of-concept experiments, and (4) to design advanced forms of controlled release systems through numerical optimization. The new scheme operates in a long-term, semi-passive manner to control spreading of a dissolved contaminant plume with periodic replacement of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} installed in the subsurface. As a first step in developing this remedial concept, we manufactured various prototype controlled release KMnO{sub 4} forms. Then we demonstrated using column experiments that the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} could deliver small amount of permanganate into flowing water at controlled rates over long time periods of years. An analytical model was also used to estimate the diffusivities and durations of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}. Finally, proof-of-concept flow-tank experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} scheme in controlling dissolved TCE plume in a long-term, semi-passive manner. Another important thrust of our research effort involved numerical optimization of controlled release systems. This study used a numerical model that is capable of describing release patterns of active

  1. Sampling and treatment of rock cores and groundwater under reducing environments of deep underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebashi, Katsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Tanaka, Tadao

    2005-01-01

    A method of sampling and treatment of undisturbed rock cores and groundwater under maintained reducing environments of deep underground was developed and demonstrated in a Neogene's sandy mudstone layer at depth of GL-100 to -200 m. Undisturbed rock cores and groundwater were sampled and transferred into an Ar gas atmospheric glove box with minimized exposure to the atmosphere. The reducing conditions of the sampled groundwater and rock cores were examined in the Ar atmospheric glove box by measuring pH and Eh of the sampled groundwater and sampled groundwater contacting with disk type rock samples, respectively. (author)

  2. Arsenic contaminated groundwater and its treatment options in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S M; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S M; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2012-12-20

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues.

  3. Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater and Its Treatment Options in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayedur Rahman Chowdhury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues.

  4. Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater and Its Treatment Options in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Ashekuzzaman, S. M.; Jiang, Anlun; Sharifuzzaman, S. M.; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) causes health concerns due to its significant toxicity and worldwide presence in drinking water and groundwater. The major sources of As pollution may be natural process such as dissolution of As-containing minerals and anthropogenic activities such as percolation of water from mines, etc. The maximum contaminant level for total As in potable water has been established as 10 µg/L. Among the countries facing As contamination problems, Bangladesh is the most affected. Up to 77 million people in Bangladesh have been exposed to toxic levels of arsenic from drinking water. Therefore, it has become an urgent need to provide As-free drinking water in rural households throughout Bangladesh. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on the recent data on arsenic contamination status, its sources and reasons of mobilization and the exposure pathways in Bangladesh. Very little literature has focused on the removal of As from groundwaters in developing countries and thus this paper aims to review the As removal technologies and be a useful resource for researchers or policy makers to help identify and investigate useful treatment options. While a number of technological developments in arsenic removal have taken place, we must consider variations in sources and quality characteristics of As polluted water and differences in the socio-economic and literacy conditions of people, and then aim at improving effectiveness in arsenic removal, reducing the cost of the system, making the technology user friendly, overcoming maintenance problems and resolving sludge management issues. PMID:23343979

  5. Reactive barrier technologies for treatment of contaminated groundwater at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marozas, D.C.; Bujewski, G.E.; Castaneda, N.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is supporting the investigation of reactive barrier technologies to mitigate the risks associated with mixed organic/radioactive waste at several DOE sites. Groundwater from a small contaminated plume at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is being used to evaluate passive reactive material treatment. Permeable reactive barriers which intercept contaminants and destroy the VOC component while containing radionuclides are attractive for a number of reasons relating to public and regulatory acceptance. In situ treatment keeps contaminants away from the earth's surface, there is no above-ground treatment equipment that could expose workers and the public and operational costs are expected to be lower than currently used technologies. This paper will present results from preliminary site characterization and in-field small-scale column testing of reactive materials at RFETS. Successful demonstration is expected to lead to full-scale implementation of the technology at several DOE sites, including Rocky Flats

  6. Passive movements for the treatment and prevention of contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Rama K R; Swaminathan, Narasimman; Harvey, Lisa A

    2013-12-28

    Contractures, a common complication following immobility, lead to restricted joint range of motion. Passive movements (PMs) are widely used for the treatment and prevention of contractures; however, it is not clear whether they are effective. The aim of this review was to determine the effects of PMs on persons with contractures or at risk of developing contractures. Specifically, the aim was to determine whether PMs increase joint mobility. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid SP), EMBASE (Ovid SP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED; SSCI; CPCI-S; CPCI-SSH), PEDro and PsycINFO (Ovid SP). The search was run on 21 November 2013. Randomised controlled trials of PMs administered for the treatment or prevention of contractures were included. Studies were included if they compared the effectiveness of PMs versus no intervention, sham intervention or placebo in people with or at risk of contracture. Studies that involved other co-interventions were included, provided the co-interventions were administered in the same way to all groups. Interventions administered through mechanical devices and interventions that involved sustained stretch were excluded. Three independent review authors screened studies for inclusion. Two review authors then extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes were joint mobility and occurrence of adverse events such as joint subluxations or dislocations, heterotopic ossification, autonomic dysreflexia and fractures or muscle tears. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, pain, spasticity, activity limitations and participation restrictions. We used standard methodological procedures as advocated by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Two identified studies randomly assigned a total of 122 participants with neurological conditions comparing PMs versus no PMs. Data from 121 participants were available for

  7. Wet chemical treatment of boron doped emitters on n-type (100) c-Si prior to amorphous silicon passivation

    OpenAIRE

    Meddeb, H.; Bearda, Twan; Payo, M. Recaman; Abdelwahab, I.; Abdulraheem, Yaser; Ezzaouia, H.; Gordon, I.; Szlufcik, J.; POORTMANS, Jef

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the cleaning process on the amorphous silicon passivation of homojunction emitters is investigated. A significant variation in the passivation quality following different cleaning sequences is not observed, even though differences in cleaning performance are evident. These results point out the effectiveness of our cleaning treatment and provide a hydrogen termination for intrinsic amorphous silicon passivation. A post-deposition treatment improves the passivation level yield...

  8. In Situ Catalytic Groundwater Treatment Using Palladium Catalysts and Horizontal Flow Treatment Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    may enter the soil , and subsequently the groundwater, along any portion of this unlined channel. The area south of the buildings has not been...the 1960s in the northwestern corner of Site 19, and an estimated 250,000 gallons of JP-4 jet fuel were released. Soil was excavated and...16,000 Pd catalyst treatment system $61,000 Pd catalyst with eggshell coating (20 kg @ $245 per lb) $11,000 Skid-mounted reactor system and

  9. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  10. Acute lethal toxicity following passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Savoy, A C; Lupan, D M; Manalo, P B; Roberts, J S; Schlageter, A M; Weinhold, L C; Kozel, T R

    1997-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans alters the course of murine cryptococcosis. During studies of passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis, we noted the occurrence of an acute, lethal toxicity. Toxicity was characterized by scratching, lethargy, respiratory distress, collapse, and death within 20 to 60 min after injection of antibody. The toxic effect was observed only in mice with ...

  11. Evaluation of an integrated treatment system for MGP site groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheible, O.K.; Grey, G.M.; Maiello, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Initially studied at bench scale, process sequences comprising dissolved air flotation (DAF), aerobic biological oxidation, air stripping, filtration, and carbon adsorption were demonstrated at pilot scale at a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site in New Jersey. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were the primary organics in the groundwater, ranging from levels of 2 to 8 mg/L and 0.3 to 27 mg/L, respectively; chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were from 60 to 4,500 mg/L. Significant levels of dense, emulsified, and nonaqueous tars and oils were present in the more highly contaminated waters and were effectively removed by DAF. Carbon-based fluidized-bed biological treatment of the DAF subnatant at COD loadings between 2 and 4 g/L-d yielded effluent-soluble COD levels between 40 and 60 mg/L, with both residual BTEX and PAH concentrations ranging from nondetect levels to 0.1 mg/L. Subsequent polishing by filtration and carbon adsorption resulted in additional COD removal and nondetect levels of volatiles and semivolatiles. Air stripping was effective in lieu of the biological process for both volatile organic compound (VOC) and PAH removal

  12. Electronically Induced Redox Barriers for Treatment of Groundwater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sale, Tom; Gilbert, David

    2006-01-01

    ...) and Colorado State University (CSU). The focus is an innovative electrolytic approach for managing redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater, referred to as electrically induced redox barrier (e-barriers...

  13. Hydrologic Education and Undergraduate Research in a Passive Wetland Treatment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, K. C.; Lohr, L.

    2012-12-01

    Legacy coal mine drainage has been found to impair surface water throughout southwestern Pennsylvania. Though few of our incoming students know what "acid mine drainage" is, nearly all have seen the orange streams and seeps that are its most obvious characteristic. On the other end of the spectrum, our geology majors are typically finding jobs in the oil and gas industry related to shale gas, or in environmental fields especially related to local and regional surface water. To take advantage of their early familiarity with local stream impacts and the likelihood they will have to deal with mine effluent during their post-academic careers, we have leveraged a local passive wetland treatment system to bring a relevant, real-life scenario into the classroom and lab. Moraine State Park, in western PA, is centered on Lake Arthur, an artificial reservoir of Muddy Creek. The park, particularly the lake, is a destination for recreational visitors, including boating and fishing enthusiasts. There is concern among visitors and park administrators about the health of the local streams and the lake. The area has been extensively undermined, with most coal mines sealed prior to the damming of the reservoir. One such instance of these sealed mine ports failed along one of the many embayments of Lake Arthur and a passive treatment system was installed. It was used as an example of the environmental impacts to the area for park guests, with an access road and signage. However, at this time, the three-pond system may be failing, five years beyond its projected life span and showing signs of stress and downstream contamination. Though the system is small, it provides a robust opportunity for hydrologic and geochemical analyses. We have used the pond system extensively for undergraduate research. Over the past five years, a Master's thesis was completed, and numerous undergraduate projects followed. Students have measured precipitate thickness and deposition rates, endeavored to

  14. In Situ Treatment of Chlorinated Ethene-Contaminated Groundwater Using horizontal Flow Treatment Wells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferland, Derek

    2000-01-01

    The limitations of conventional containment technologies for groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents have motivated development of innovative technologies to achieve national groundwater...

  15. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M.; Liang, L.; Gu, B.; Houk, T.C.; Fernando, Q.

    1997-04-01

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc) 99 ] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a)

  16. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Liang, L.; Gu, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Fernando, Q. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc){sup 99}] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a).

  17. Treatment of groundwater contaminated with low levels of military munitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricka, R.M.; Sharp, W.

    1993-01-01

    The site of interest is a military base that was established in the late 1800s. In its early history this facility was used as a powder depot to fill projectiles with miximite (a propellant). Since World War I, this facility was used to produce artillery ammunition, bombs, high explosives, pyrotechnics and other ordinances. Weapons production at this facility has ceased, but as a result of the past activities at this facility, contaminants are migrating into the groundwater. One source of drinking water for this installation is a screened well in a stratified-drift aquifer system at a depth of 75-85 feet below land surface. In the 1980s sampling of this well revealed low level contamination of trichloroethylene (TCE), RDX and HMX. TCE levels exceeded drinking water standards and an air stripping column was installed to remove the TCE. RDX and HMX, concentrations were below drinking water standards. Health Advisory (HA) levels for RDX and HMX were published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in November 1988. The lifetime HA levels are 2 ppb and 400 ppb for RDX and HMX, respectively (McLellan et al. 1988a, and McLellan et al. 1988b). It is expected that continuous withdrawals from this well will increase RDX and HMX concentrations. In addition, it is believed that future USEPA regulations will adapt the HA as a drinking water standard. This study was initiated in an effort to have an appropriate cost effective technology ready to meet any such standard. RDX and HMX RDX and HMX are military explosives. RDX (Hexahydro-l,3,5-trinitro-l,3,5-triazine) is a code name for Research Department Explosive. This explosive is described as a white crystalline solid with about 1.3 times the explosive power of trinitrotoluene (TNT). RDX is classified as a EPA Group C compound: Possible Human Carcinogen (McLellan et. al. 1988a). HMX (Octahydro-1, 3, 5, 7- tetranitro-l, 3, 5, 7-tetrazocine) is a code name for High Melting Explosive. This explosive is described as a

  18. Biological drinking water treatment of anaerobic groundwater in trickling filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, W.W.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Drinking water production from anaerobic groundwater is usually achieved by so called conventional techniques such as aeration and sand filtration. The notion conventional implies a long history and general acceptation of the application, but doesn’t necessarily mean a thorough understanding of the

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  20. EVALUATION OF A TWO-STAGE PASSIVE TREATMENT APPROACH FOR MINING INFLUENCE WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A two-stage passive treatment approach was assessed at bench-scale using two Colorado Mining Influenced Waters (MIWs). The first-stage was a limestone drain with the purpose of removing iron and aluminum and mitigating the potential effects of mineral acidity. The second stage w...

  1. Identification of manganese as a toxicant in a groundwater treatment system: Addressing naturally occurring toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodfellow, W. Jr.; Sohn, V.; Richey, M.; Yost, J.

    1995-01-01

    Effluent from a groundwater remediation system at a bulk oil storage and distribution terminal has been chronically toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The remediation system was designed in response to a hydrocarbon plume in the area of the terminal. The remediation system consists of a series of groundwater recovery wells and groundwater intercept trench systems with groundwater treatment and phased-separated hydrocarbon recovery systems. The groundwater treatment and petroleum recovery systems consist of oil/water separators, product recovery tanks, air strippers, filters, and carbon adsorption units. The characteristics of this effluent are low total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, and hardness concentrations as well as meeting stringent NPDES permit requirements for lead, copper, zinc, mercury, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and BTEX. Additional priority pollutant evaluations revealed no compounds of concern. Performance of a Toxicity identification Evaluation (TIE) indicated that manganese was the principle toxicant in the effluent. Manganese is a naturally occurring constituent in this groundwater source and is not added to the treatment system. This paper will present the results of the TIE with a discussion of treatability/control options for manganese control at this facility. Recommendations for addressing naturally occurring toxicants that are not a result of the facility's operations will also be presented

  2. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of passive film on electrochemical surface treatment for indium tin oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yung-Fu; Chen, Chi-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid baths accompanying with applied voltages were used to treat the ITO surface. ► We investigated the changes in ITO surfaces by examining the potentiodynamic behavior of ITO films. ► AFM analysis showed the formation of a passive layer could assist to planarize surface. ► XPS analysis indicated this passive layer was mainly composed of SnO 2. ► A better planarization was obtained by treating in 3.0 wt.% tartaric acid at 0.5 V due to weak complexation strength. - Abstract: Changes in indium tin oxide (ITO) film surface during electrochemical treatment in oxalic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid were investigated. Controlling the voltage applied on ITO film allows the formation of a passive layer, effectively protecting the film surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry showed that the passive layer composition was predominantly SnO 2 in tartaric acid, while a composite of tin oxide and tin carboxylate in citric or oxalic acid. Even though the passive films on ITO surface generated in these organic acids, the indium or tin could complex with the organic acid anions, enhancing the dissolution of ITO films. The experimental results show that the interaction between the dissolution and passivation could assist to planarize the ITO surface. We found that the optimal treatment at 0.5 V in 3 wt.% tartaric acid could provide the ITO surface with root-mean-squared roughness less than 1.0 nm, due to the weak complexing characteristics of tartaric acid.

  4. Toxicological and chemical assessment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater after electrochemical and advanced oxidation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radić, Sandra; Crnojević, Helena; Vujčić, Valerija; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Cvetković, Želimira; Petra, Cvjetko; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Oreščanin, Višnja

    2016-02-01

    Owing to its proven toxicity and mutagenicity, arsenic is regarded a principal pollutant in water used for drinking. The objective of this study was the toxicological and chemical evaluation of groundwater samples obtained from arsenic enriched drinking water wells before and after electrochemical and ozone-UV-H2O2-based advanced oxidation processes (EAOP). For this purpose, acute toxicity test with Daphnia magna and chronic toxicity test with Lemna minor L. were employed as well as in vitro bioassays using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs). Several oxidative stress parameters were estimated in L.minor. Physicochemical analysis showed that EAOP treatment was highly efficient in arsenic but also in ammonia and organic compound removal from contaminated groundwater. Untreated groundwater caused only slight toxicity to HPBLs and D. magna in acute experiments. However, 7-day exposure of L. minor to raw groundwater elicited genotoxicity, a significant growth inhibition and oxidative stress injury. The observed genotoxicity and toxicity of raw groundwater samples was almost completely eliminated by EAOP treatment. Generally, the results obtained with L. minor were in agreement with those obtained in the chemical analysis suggesting the sensitivity of the model organism in monitoring of arsenic-contaminated groundwater. In parallel to chemical analysis, the implementation of chronic toxicity bioassays in a battery is recommended in the assessment of the toxic and genotoxic potential of such complex mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of highly polluted groundwater by novel iron removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S J; Kang, C D; Lee, J W; Kim, W S

    2001-01-01

    The removal of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in groundwater has been generally achieved by simple aeration, or the addition of an oxidizing agent. Aeration has been shown to be very efficient in insolubilization ferrous iron at a pH level greater than 6.5. In this study, pH was maintained over 6.5 using limestone granules under constant aeration to oxidize ferrous iron in groundwater in a limestone packed column. A sedimentation unit coupled with a membrane filtration was also developed to precipitate and filtrate the oxidized ferric compound simultaneously. Several bench-scale studies, including the effects of the limestone granule sizes, amounts and hydraulic retention time on iron removal in the limestone packed column were investigated. It was found that 550 g/L of the 7-8 mesh size limestone granules, and 20 min of hydraulic retention time in the limestone packed column, were necessary for the sufficient oxidation of 40 mg/L of iron(II) in groundwater. Long-term operation was successfully achieved in contaminated waters by removing the iron deposits on the surface of the limestone granule by continuous aeration from the bottom of the column. Periodic reverse flow helped to remove caking and fouling of membrane surface caused by the continuous filtration. Recycling of the treated water from the membrane right after reverse flow operation made possible an admissible limit of iron concentration of the treated water for drinking. The pilot-scale process was constructed and has been tested in the rural area of Korea.

  6. Installation of reactive metals groundwater collection and treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, J.K.; Primrose, A.L.; Uhland, J.

    1998-01-01

    Three groundwater plumes contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site are scheduled for remediation by 1999 based on the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) (DOE, 1996). These three plumes are among the top 20 environmental cleanup sites at Rocky Flats. One of these plumes, the Mound Site Plume, is derived from a previous drum storage area, and daylights as seeps near the South Walnut Creek drainage. Final design for remediation of the Mound Site Plume has been completed based on use of reactive metals to treat the contaminated groundwater, and construction is scheduled for early 1998. The two other plumes, the 903 Pad/Ryan's Pit and the East Trenches Plumes, are derived from VOCs either from drums that leaked or that were disposed of in trenches. These two plumes are undergoing characterization and conceptual design in 1998 and construction is scheduled in 1999. The contaminants of concern in these plumes are tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride and low levels of uranium and americium

  7. The application of illite supported nanoscale zero valent iron for the treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, C; Landsberger, S; Li, Y L

    2017-09-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero valent iron I-NZVI was investigated as a remediation strategy for uranium contaminated groundwater from the former Cimarron Fuel Fabrication Site in Oklahoma, USA. The 1 L batch-treatment system was applied in the study. The result shows that 99.9% of uranium in groundwater was removed by I-NZVI within 2 h. Uranium concentration in the groundwater stayed around 27 μg/L, and there was no sign of uranium release into groundwater after seven days of reaction time. Meanwhile the release of iron was significantly decreased compared to NZVI which can reduce the treatment impact on the water environment. To study the influence of background pH of the treatment system on removal efficiency of uranium, the groundwater was adjusted from pH 2-10 before the addition of I-NZVI. The pH of the groundwater was from 2.1 to 10.7 after treatment. The removal efficiency of uranium achieved a maximum in neutral pH of groundwater. The desorption of uranium on the residual solid phase after treatment was investigated in order to discuss the stability of uranium on residual solids. After 2 h of leaching, 0.07% of the total uranium on residual solid phase was leached out in a HNO 3 leaching solution with a pH of 4.03. The concentration of uranium in the acid leachate was under 3.2 μg/L which is below the EPA's maximum contaminant level of 30 μg/L. Otherwise, the concentration of uranium was negligible in distilled water leaching solution (pH = 6.44) and NaOH leaching solution (pH = 8.52). A desorption study shows that an acceptable amount of uranium on the residuals can be released into water system under strong acid conditions in short terms. For long term disposal management of the residual solids, the leachate needs to be monitored and treated before discharge into a hazardous landfill or the water system. For the first time, I-NZVI was applied for the treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater. These results provide proof that I-NZVI has

  8. Sizing criteria for a low footprint passive mine water treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, D J; Williams, K P

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present data from a novel vertical flow mine water treatment system, demonstrate how these data can be used to generate sizing formulae for this technology, and present a comparison between the size of system based on these formulae and those of conventionally designed passive systems. The paper focuses on passive treatment of circum-neutral ferruginous mine waters bearing up to 50 mgl(-1) of iron in either ferrous or ferric form. The Vertical Flow Reactor (VFR) operates by passing mine water down through an accreting bed of ochre, the ochre bed being responsible for the intensification of iron removal by self-filtration and/or autocatalytic iron oxidation and precipitation. Key to the design and operation of the VFR system is the decrease in permeability in this ochre bed over time. The paper demonstrates that the VFR system can remove iron at many times the 10 g/m2/day removal rate - an often employed figure for the sizing of aerobic settling ponds and wetlands. The paper demonstrates that VFRs are viable and novel passive treatment system for mine waters with a smaller footprint than conventional systems.

  9. Implementation of a permeable reactive barrier for treatment of groundwater impacted by strontium-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przepiora, A.; Bodine, D.; Dollar, P.; Smith, P.

    2014-01-01

    A funnel and gate permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system was constructed to treat strontium-90 (Sr- 90) in groundwater migrating from a legacy waste disposal area into an adjacent wetland. The PRB system was designed to contain and direct the Sr-90 impacted groundwater into treatment 'gates' containing zeolite using a low permeability 'funnel' sections constructed with soil-bentonite slurry. The constructed PRB met all dimension and permeability specifications. Initial performance monitoring results indicate that the PRB captured the Sr-90 impacted groundwater plume and the beta radiation values in groundwater emerging from the treatment gates ranged from 35 to 86 Becquerel's per litre (Bq/L), equivalent to a reduction by 88% to 99% from the influent values. Those initial performance results were influenced by residual impacts present in the aquifer material prior to PRB installation. It is anticipated that the clean-up target of 5 Bq/L will be achieved with time as treated groundwater emerging from the PRB flushes through the downgradient aquifer zone. (author)

  10. Influence of thermal treatments on radiocarbon dating of groundwater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Iuliana Madalina; Sava, Tiberiu Bogdan; Pacesila, Doru Gheorghe; Gaza, Oana; Simion, Corina Anca; Stefan, Bianca Maria; Sava, Gabriela Odilia; Ghita, Dan Gabriel; Mosu, Vasile

    2017-06-01

    Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in water provides information about the formation of oceanic circulation of the water volumes, the hydrogeological systems, and also valuable information can be gained about the aquifer storage and the degree of containment relative to the surface waters. Radiocarbon dating refers to the determination of small quantities of the naturally occurring carbon 14 in the water, which can be integrated in the groundwater mass through the gaseous CO2, carbonaceous deposits dissolved by water and organic remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the temperature and pressure over the amount of each isotope of carbon during the sample preparation stage. The first step was to evaporate several underground water samples at 65°C under different conditions until the carbonates were obtained, then the CO2 was extracted with orto-phosphoric acid and transformed to graphite. The second step was to obtain graphite from an untreated water sample. Finally, the samples were measured with the 1MV Cockcroft-Walton Tandetron Accelerator by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

  11. Passive breath gating equipment for cone beam CT-guided RapidArc gastric cancer treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Weigang; Li, Guichao; Ye, Jinsong; Wang, Jiazhou; Peng, Jiayuan; Gong, Min; Yu, Xiaoli; Studentski, Matthew T.; Xiao, Ying; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report preliminary results of passive breath gating (PBG) equipment for cone-beam CT image-guided gated RapidArc gastric cancer treatments. Material and methods: Home-developed PBG equipment integrated with the real-time position management system (RPM) for passive patient breath hold was used in CT simulation, online partial breath hold (PBH) CBCT acquisition, and breath-hold gating (BHG) RapidArc delivery. The treatment was discontinuously delivered with beam on during BH and beam off for free breathing (FB). Pretreatment verification PBH CBCT was obtained with the PBG-RPM system. Additionally, the reproducibility of the gating accuracy was evaluated. Results: A total of 375 fractions of breath-hold gating RapidArc treatments were successfully delivered and 233 PBH CBCTs were available for analysis. The PBH CBCT images were acquired with 2–3 breath holds and 1–2 FB breaks. The imaging time was the same for PBH CBCT and conventional FB CBCT (60 s). Compared to FB CBCT, the motion artifacts seen in PBH CBCT images were remarkably reduced. The average BHG RapidArc delivery time was 103 s for one 270-degree arc and 269 s for two full arcs. Conclusions: The PBG-RPM based PBH CBCT verification and BHG RapidArc delivery was successfully implemented clinically. The BHG RapidArc treatment was accomplished using a conventional RapidArc machine with high delivery efficiency

  12. Performance evaluation of a hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment system using multivariate statistical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Jack, E-mail: jack.wallace@ce.queensu.ca [Department of Civil Engineering, Queen’s University, Ellis Hall, 58 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Champagne, Pascale, E-mail: champagne@civil.queensu.ca [Department of Civil Engineering, Queen’s University, Ellis Hall, 58 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Monnier, Anne-Charlotte, E-mail: anne-charlotte.monnier@insa-lyon.fr [National Institute for Applied Sciences – Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Performance of a hybrid passive landfill leachate treatment system was evaluated. • 33 Water chemistry parameters were sampled for 21 months and statistically analyzed. • Parameters were strongly linked and explained most (>40%) of the variation in data. • Alkalinity, ammonia, COD, heavy metals, and iron were criteria for performance. • Eight other parameters were key in modeling system dynamics and criteria. - Abstract: A pilot-scale hybrid-passive treatment system operated at the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada, treats municipal landfill leachate and provides for subsequent natural attenuation. Collected leachate is directed to a hybrid-passive treatment system, followed by controlled release to a natural attenuation zone before entering the nearby Little Sturgeon River. The study presents a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the system using multivariate statistical techniques to determine the interactions between parameters, major pollutants in the leachate, and the biological and chemical processes occurring in the system. Five parameters (ammonia, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), “heavy” metals of interest, with atomic weights above calcium, and iron) were set as criteria for the evaluation of system performance based on their toxicity to aquatic ecosystems and importance in treatment with respect to discharge regulations. System data for a full range of water quality parameters over a 21-month period were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), as well as principal components (PC) and partial least squares (PLS) regressions. PCA indicated a high degree of association for most parameters with the first PC, which explained a high percentage (>40%) of the variation in the data, suggesting strong statistical relationships among most of the parameters in the system. Regression analyses identified 8 parameters (set as independent variables) that were most frequently retained for modeling

  13. Evaluation of biological hydrogen sulfide oxidation coupled with two-stage upflow filtration for groundwater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Audrey D; Raymer, Blake J; Jahn, Johna

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide in groundwater can be oxidized by aerobic bacteria to form elemental sulfur and biomass. While this treatment approach is effective for conversion of hydrogen sulfide, it is important to have adequate control of the biomass exiting the biological treatment system to prevent release of elemental sulfur into the distribution system. Pilot scale tests were conducted on a Florida groundwater to evaluate the use of two-stage upflow filtration downstream of biological sulfur oxidation. The combined biological and filtration process was capable of excellent removal of hydrogen sulfide and associated turbidity. Additional benefits of this treatment approach include elimination of odor generation, reduction of chlorine demand, and improved stability of the finished water.

  14. In situ treatment of arsenic-contaminated groundwater by air sparging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Joseph H; McBean, Edward A

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a major problem in some areas of the world, particularly in West Bengal (India) and Bangladesh where it is caused by reducing conditions in the aquifer. In situ treatment, if it can be proven as operationally feasible, has the potential to capture some advantages over other treatment methods by being fairly simple, not using chemicals, and not necessitating disposal of arsenic-rich wastes. In this study, the potential for in situ treatment by injection of compressed air directly into the aquifer (i.e. air sparging) is assessed. An experimental apparatus was constructed to simulate conditions of arsenic-rich groundwater under anaerobic conditions, and in situ treatment by air sparging was employed. Arsenic (up to 200 μg/L) was removed to a maximum of 79% (at a local point in the apparatus) using a solution with dissolved iron and arsenic only. A static "jar" test revealed arsenic removal by co-precipitation with iron at a molar ratio of approximately 2 (iron/arsenic). This is encouraging since groundwater with relatively high amounts of dissolved iron (as compared to arsenic) therefore has a large theoretical treatment capacity for arsenic. Iron oxidation was significantly retarded at pH values below neutral. In terms of operation, analysis of experimental results shows that periodic air sparging may be feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Efficiency of a postoperative treatment after rotator cuff repair with a continuous passive motion device (CPM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, J W-P; König, D P; Imhoff, A B; Martinek, V; Braun, S; Hübscher, M; Koch, C; Dreithaler, B; Bernholt, J; Preis, S; Loew, M; Rickert, M; Speck, M; Bös, L; Bidner, A; Eysel, P

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to prove that a postoperative combined continuous passive motion (CPM) and physiotherapy treatment protocol (CPM group) can achieve 90 degrees active abduction in the shoulder joint earlier than physiotherapy alone (PT group). The indication was a complete tear of the rotator cuff. The study was conducted under in-patient and out-patient conditions. 55 patients were included in this study. The prospective, randomized multicenter study design complies with DIN EN 540. The primary endpoint was the time span until 90 degrees active abduction was achieved by the patients. Patients in the CPM group reached the primary endpoint on average 12 days earlier than the control group. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0292). Analyzing the secondary endpoints, e. g., pain and disablement, the results in the CPM group showed again advantages of the combined treatment protocol (CPM + physiotherapy). The postoperative treatment of a total tear of the rotator cuff with a combined continuous passive motion and physiotherapy protocol provided a significantly earlier range of motion in the shoulder joint than physiotherapy alone. There was no report of CPM-related adverse effects.

  16. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier.

  17. Laboratory evaluation of the potential for in situ treatment of chromate-contaminated groundwater by chemical precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.C.; Beck, M.A.; Jurgensmeier, C.A.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of a series of small-scale batch tests performed to assess the effectiveness of chemical precipitation in the remediation of chromate-contaminated groundwater. These tests involved treatment of chromate solutions with ferrous and sulfide ions. In addition, tests were conducted that involved treatment of mixtures of chromate-contaminated groundwater and uncontaminated soil with the ferrous ion. A combination of ferrous sulfate and sodium sulfide was also tested in the groundwater treatment tests, since this approach has been shown to be an efficient method for treating electroplating wastewaters

  18. Effect of Organic Matter on Cr(VI Removal from Groundwaters by Fe(II Reductive Precipitation for Groundwater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gröhlich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its toxicity, Cr(VI is undesirable in groundwater. Its chemical reduction to Cr(III species, followed by precipitation is the most widely practiced treatment technique for the removal of Cr(VI from polluted waters. The resulting Cr(III species present low solubility, is much less toxic, and can be subsequently removed either by precipitation, or by adsorption onto iron oxy-hydroxides and co-precipitation. The effects of several parameters, such as the pH value of water to be treated, the applied Fe(II dose, and the presence of appropriate mineral surfaces, are well investigated and understood. However, the impact of the presence of humic acids (HAs in this process has only been considered by rather few studies. The main aim of this study was to determine the effect of humic substances on Fe(II reductive precipitation of Cr(VI within a pH range relevant for drinking water treatment. Jar test experiments were performed, using artificial groundwater of defined composition and initial Cr(VI concentration 100 μg/L, ferrous sulphate dosages 0.25–2 mg Fe(II/L, and pH values 6.5–8. It was found that Cr(VI and total chromium (Cr(total can be reliably removed in the absence of HAs in the tested pH range with the addition of Fe(II dosage of 1 mg Fe(II/L. Further on, the results indicated that the reduction of Cr(VI is only slightly affected by the presence of HAs. However, increased residual total Cr concentrations were found at lower Fe(II dosages and/or higher pH values. Additionally, the removal of the Cr(III species formed during Cr(VI reduction was strongly inhibited by the presence of HAs under the examined experimental conditions, since residual concentrations higher than 60 μg/L were determined. The results of this study will have implications to the ongoing discussion of a new, stricter, European Union regulation limit, regarding the presence of total chromium in drinking water.

  19. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G.

    1997-01-01

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment)

  20. Novel passive co-treatment of acid mine drainage and municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosnider, William H J; Winfrey, Brandon K; Nairn, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory-scale, four-stage continuous-flow reactor system was constructed to test the viability of high-strength acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) passive co-treatment. Synthetic AMD of pH 2.6 and acidity of 1870 mg L(-1) as CaCO3 equivalent containing a mean 46, 0.25, 2.0, 290, 55, 1.2, and 390 mg L(-1) of Al, As, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn, respectively, was added at a 1:2 ratio with raw MWW from the City of Norman, OK, to the system which had a total residence time of 6.6 d. During the 135-d experiment, dissolved Al, As, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were consistently decreased by 99.8, 87.8, 97.7, 99.8, 13.9, 87.9, and 73.4%, respectively, pH increased to 6.79, and net acidic influent was converted to net alkaline effluent. At a wasting rate of 0.69% of total influent flow, the system produced sludge with total Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn concentrations at least an order of magnitude greater than the influent mix, which presents a metal reclamation opportunity. Results indicate that AMD and MWW passive co-treatment is a viable approach to use wastes as resources to improve water quality with minimal use of fossil fuels and refined materials.

  1. Assessing cellulolysis in passive treatment systems for mine drainage: a modified enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Corina M; Gould, W Douglas; Lindsay, Matthew B J; Blowes, David W; Ptacek, Carol J; Condon, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    A modified cellulase enzyme assay was developed to monitor organic matter degradation in passive treatment systems for mine drainage. This fluorogenic substrate method facilitates assessment of exo-(1,4)-β-D-glucanase, endo-(1,4)-β-D-glucanase, and β-glucosidase, which compose an important cellulase enzyme system. The modified method was developed and refined using samples of organic carbon-amended mine tailings from field experiments where sulfate reduction was induced as a strategy for managing water quality. Sample masses (3 g) and the number of replicates ( ≥ 3) were optimized. Matrix interferences within these metal-rich samples were found to be insignificant. Application of this modified cellulase assay method provided insight into the availability and degradation of organic carbon within the amended tailings. Results of this study indicate that cellulase enzyme assays can be applied to passive treatment systems for mine drainage, which commonly contain elevated concentrations of metals. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Acute lethal toxicity following passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, A C; Lupan, D M; Manalo, P B; Roberts, J S; Schlageter, A M; Weinhold, L C; Kozel, T R

    1997-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans alters the course of murine cryptococcosis. During studies of passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis, we noted the occurrence of an acute, lethal toxicity. Toxicity was characterized by scratching, lethargy, respiratory distress, collapse, and death within 20 to 60 min after injection of antibody. The toxic effect was observed only in mice with a cryptococcal infection and was reduced or absent in the early and late stages of disease. The clinical course and histopathology were consistent with those for shock. There was considerable variation between mouse strains in susceptibility to toxicity. Swiss Webster mice from the Charles River colony were most susceptible, followed by C3H/He, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice. DBA/2 mice and Swiss Webster mice from the Simonsen colony were resistant. Acute toxicity was mimicked by injection of preformed complexes of MAb and purified polysaccharide. The toxic effect was also produced by injection of MAbs into mice that were preloaded with polysaccharide. The toxic effect was not blocked by treatment of mice with chloropheniramine or anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies or by depletion of complement components via pretreatment with cobra venom factor. Toxicity was reduced by treatment of mice with high doses of epinephrine, dexamethasone, or chlorpromazine. Finally, the toxic effect was completely blocked by treatment of mice with the platelet-activating factor antagonist WEB 2170 BS or by pretreatment of mice with the liposome-encapsulated drug dichloromethylene diphosphonate, a procedure which depletes macrophages from the spleen and liver. PMID:9125564

  3. A pilot study for the extraction and treatment of groundwater from a manufactured gas plant site. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    This report describes a pilot study involving treatment of contaminated groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site on the eastern seaboard of the US. The work was performed in order to provide the design basis for a full-scale groundwater extraction and treatment system at the site, as well as to develop a generic approach to selection of groundwater treatment sequences at other MGP sites. It included three main components: hydrogeologic investigations, bench-scale treatability studies, and pilot-scale treatability studies. Technologies evaluated in bench-scale work included gravity settling, filtration, and dissolved air flotation (DAF) for primary treatment of nonaqueous phase materials; biological degradation, air stripping, and carbon adsorption for secondary treatment of dissolved organics; and carbon adsorption as tertiary treatment of remaining dissolved contaminants. Pilot-scale studies focused on collecting system performance data fore three distinct levels of contamination. Two treatment trains were evaluated. One consisted of DAF, fluidized-bed biotreatment, and filtration plus carbon adsorption; the other used the same steps except to substitute air stripping for fluidized bed treatment. The final effluents produced by both treatment sequences were similar and demonstrated complete treatment of the groundwater. Besides detailing system design and performance for the treatability studies, the report includes an analysis of groundwater treatment applications to MGP sites in general, including a discussion of capital and operating costs

  4. Pilot-scale comparison of two hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment systems operated in a cold climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Sean; Champagne, Pascale; Anderson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment systems employ active pretreatment to remove dissolved inorganic constituents and decrease the oxygen demand of the leachate prior to treatment in a passive system. In a 1-year pilot-scale study, two passive treatment systems - a peat and wood shaving biological trickle filter and a sand and gravel constructed wetland - were installed to treat leachate from the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada. Leachate was pretreated in a fixed-film aerobic reactor, which provided reductions in COD (26%), and masses of ammonia (21%), Al (69%), Ca (57%), Fe (73%) and Sr (37%). A comparison of the performance of the hybrid-passive treatment systems indicated different extents of heterotrophic nitrification; the peat and wood shaving filter removed 49% of the ammonia and nitrified 29%, while the constructed wetland removed 99% of the ammonia and nitrified 90%. Hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment was determined to be feasible in cold climates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ecological benefits of passive wetland treatment systems designed for acid mine drainage: With emphasis on watershed restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCleary, E.C.; Kepler, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Western Pennsylvania has been a large source of coal for much of the US since the late 1800's. During the extraction of the coal resources, acid mine drainage (AMD) often resulted. AMD from abandoned discharges has effectively rendered thousands of kilometers of streams lifeless in the Appalachian coal region. Restoration of these streams has been limited in previous years primarily because of the lack of cost-effective treatment for AMD. Conventional treatment can treat AMD effectively but is costly to operate and maintain and is effective only when receiving human attention. Passive wetland treatment systems have proven to be the only realistic AMD treatment strategy, in terms of watershed restoration activities. If ecosystem health is the reason for implementing effluent standards then it can be reasonably argued that passive wetland treatment systems supply the most effective overall treatment, even if they do not meet one or more of the current effluent standards. Recent advancements in passive wetland treatment system technology have provided a management tool that could be used to treat the majority of AMD discharges cost-effectively, and when used strategically could reasonably be employed to restore the thousands of kilometers of AMD-affected streams in the coal regions of Appalachia. Secondary benefits that have been observed with passive wetland treatment systems suggest that these systems may be providing for accelerated ecological recovery independent of regulated effluent standards

  6. A new separation and treatment method for soil and groundwater restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchens, G.D. [Lynntech, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination by organic compounds is a widespread environmental pollution problem. In many cases, contaminated soil is excavated and transported to a landfill or is incinerated to remove contaminants. These remediation practices are expensive, environmentally disruptive, require extensive permitting, and only move contamination from one location to another. Onsite and in situ treatment techniques offer a safer, more cost-effective, and permanent solution. Many soil and groundwater contaminants are highly volatile, enabling the use of methods such as in situ vacuum extraction and air injection for their removal. However, these methods are often difficult to use because of slow volatilization rates and the lack of effective methods to treat the extracted hazardous material. This Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program focuses on developing an in situ soil and groundwater remediation technique that is effective against volatile as well as nonvolatile compounds and that will shorten treatment times. The technique forms the basis of a new catalytic process to degrade extracted contaminants onsite. Key hardware elements on which the new technique is based have been proven in preliminary research. The method has a high potential for public and regulatory acceptance because of its low environment impact.

  7. A new separation and treatment method for soil and groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchens, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination by organic compounds is a widespread environmental pollution problem. In many cases, contaminated soil is excavated and transported to a landfill or is incinerated to remove contaminants. These remediation practices are expensive, environmentally disruptive, require extensive permitting, and only move contamination from one location to another. Onsite and in situ treatment techniques offer a safer, more cost-effective, and permanent solution. Many soil and groundwater contaminants are highly volatile, enabling the use of methods such as in situ vacuum extraction and air injection for their removal. However, these methods are often difficult to use because of slow volatilization rates and the lack of effective methods to treat the extracted hazardous material. This Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program focuses on developing an in situ soil and groundwater remediation technique that is effective against volatile as well as nonvolatile compounds and that will shorten treatment times. The technique forms the basis of a new catalytic process to degrade extracted contaminants onsite. Key hardware elements on which the new technique is based have been proven in preliminary research. The method has a high potential for public and regulatory acceptance because of its low environment impact

  8. Fluidized bed ash and passive treatment reduce the adverse effects of acid mine drainage on aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Clint M; Nairn, Robert W

    2010-10-15

    Elevated concentrations of acidity and metals in acid mine drainage (AMD) may be effectively addressed by active and passive treatment technologies. However, typical evaluations consider only chemical water quality with little if any regard for biological metrics. Robust evaluations including both chemical and biological indicators of water quality improvement are needed. In this study, injection of alkaline fluidized bed ash (FBA) into a flooded underground coal mine was coupled with a five-cell passive treatment system to ameliorate an abandoned AMD discharge in eastern Oklahoma. The passive system included process units promoting both aerobic and anaerobic treatment mechanisms. Resulting water quality changes and biological responses were evaluated. Organisms of two distinct functional groups (the filter-feeding mollusk Corbicula fluminea and the wide-spectrum feeding fish Lepomis macrochirus) were exposed to mine waters in several treatment cells. The combination of treatment technologies was hypothesized to limit potential negative effects on these aquatic organisms. Tissues were harvested and analyzed for concentrations of several metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Ni, Cu and Zn) of interest. Organismal responses, such as hepatosomatic index, condition factor, and condition index, did not vary significantly among organisms exposed within different treatment cells when compared to non-AMD impaired waters. Metal tissue accumulation trends, compared to aqueous concentrations, were observed for Fe, Ni and Zn. Exposure experiments with these two organisms indicated that FBA introductions coupled with passive treatment decreased the potential adverse effects of AMD to biological systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. HEAVY METALS AS UNWANTED COMPONENTS OF BACKWASH WATER DERIVED FROM GROUNDWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nowak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some aspects of the problem of heavy metals presence in wastewater and sewage sludge from water treatment. In the first part, issues on quality of wastewaters and sludge produced during water treatment along with actions aimed at the neutralization of such wastes, were discussed. Subsequent parts of the work present the example of 12 groundwater treatment stations in a particular municipality, and the problem of backwash water quality, in particular, heavy metals contents. The analysis covered a period of three years: 2013, 2014, and 2015. The authors, using the discussed examples, have shown that besides hydrated iron and manganese oxides, also other toxic contaminants can be present in backwash water from groundwater treatment. In particular, the qualitative analysis of the backwash water revealed the presence of heavy metals, mainly zinc. The test results for backwash water were compared with those of filtrate qualitative assessment, wherein the heavy metals were not found. This fact indicated the metal retention in the filter bed and their unsustainable immobilization resulting in penetration of heavy metals from deposit to the backwash water along with other impurities, mainly iron and manganese oxides. The main conclusion from the study is to demonstrate the need for constant monitoring of the backwash water quality, including the presence of toxic heavy metals. This is also important because of the requirement to minimize the negative environmental impact of wastes generated during the water treatment process.

  10. Large scale treatment of total petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater using bioaugmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poi, Gregory; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Mok, Puah Chum; Ball, Andrew S

    2018-05-15

    Bioaugmentation or the addition of microbes to contaminated sites has been widely used to treat contaminated soil or water; however this approach is often limited to laboratory based studies. In the present study, large scale bioaugmentation has been applied to total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-contaminated groundwater at a petroleum facility. Initial TPH concentrations of 1564 mg L -1 in the field were reduced to 89 mg L -1 over 32 days. This reduction was accompanied by improved ecotoxicity, as shown by Brassica rapa germination numbers that increased from 52 at day 0 to 82% by the end of the treatment. Metagenomic analysis indicated that there was a shift in the microbial community when compared to the beginning of the treatment. The microbial community was dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes from day 0 to day 32, although differences at the genus level were observed. The predominant genera at the beginning of the treatment (day 0 just after inoculation) were Cloacibacterium, Sediminibacterium and Brevundimonas while at the end of the treatment members of Flavobacterium dominated, reaching almost half the population (41%), followed by Pseudomonas (6%) and Limnobacter (5.8%). To the author's knowledge, this is among the first studies to report the successful large scale biodegradation of TPH-contaminated groundwater (18,000 L per treatment session) at an offshore petrochemical facility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary results of ecotoxicological assessment of an Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) passive treatment system testing water quality of depurated lixiviates

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Sarmiento, Aguasanta; Bonnail, Estefanía; Nieto Liñán, José Miguel; Valls Casillas, Tomás Ángel del

    2017-01-01

    The current work reports on the preliminary results of a toxicity test using screening experiments to check the efficiency of an innovative passive treatment plant designed for acid mine drainage purification. Bioassays took place with water samples before and after the treatment system and in the river, once treated water is discharged. Due to the high toxicity of the water collected at the mouth of the mine (before the treatment plant), the bioassay was designed and developed with respect t...

  12. Organic carbon amendments for passive in situ treatment of mine drainage: Field experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Matthew B.J., E-mail: mbjlindsay@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Blowes, David W.; Condon, Peter D.; Ptacek, Carol J. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Organic carbon amendments can support passive treatment of mine drainage. > Decreased transport of sulfide-oxidation products under sulfate-reducing conditions. > Treatment effectiveness dependent on organic carbon source and amendment rate. - Abstract: A field-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate various organic C sources as amendments for passive treatment of tailings pore water. Varied mixtures of peat, spent-brewing grain (SBG) and municipal biosolids (MB) were assessed for the potential to promote dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) and metal-sulfide precipitation. Five amended cells and one control were constructed in the vadose zone of a sulfide- and carbonate-rich tailings deposit, and the geochemistry, microbiology and mineralogy were monitored for 4 a. Increases in pore-water concentrations of dissolved organic C (DOC) and decreases in aqueous SO{sub 4} concentrations of >2500 mg L{sup -1} were observed in cells amended with peat + SBG and peat + SBG + MB. Removal of SO{sub 4} was accompanied by shifts in {delta}{sup 34}S-SO{sub 4} values of >+30 per mille, undersaturation of pore water with respect to gypsum [CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O], and increased populations of SO{sub 4}-reducing bacteria (SRB). Decreases in aqueous concentrations of Zn, Mn, Ni, Sb and Tl were observed for these cells relative to the control. Organic C introduction also supported growth of Fe-reducing bacteria (IRB) and increases in Fe and As concentrations. Enhanced Fe and As mobility occurred in all cells; however, maximum concentrations were observed in cells amended with MB. Subsequent decreases in Fe and As concentrations were attributed to DSR and metal-sulfide precipitation. The common presence of secondary Zn-S and Fe-S phases was observed by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) spectroscopy. Selective extractions indicated that large decreases in water-soluble SO{sub 4} occurred in cells that supported DSR

  13. Organic carbon amendments for passive in situ treatment of mine drainage: Field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Blowes, David W.; Condon, Peter D.; Ptacek, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Organic carbon amendments can support passive treatment of mine drainage. → Decreased transport of sulfide-oxidation products under sulfate-reducing conditions. → Treatment effectiveness dependent on organic carbon source and amendment rate. - Abstract: A field-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate various organic C sources as amendments for passive treatment of tailings pore water. Varied mixtures of peat, spent-brewing grain (SBG) and municipal biosolids (MB) were assessed for the potential to promote dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) and metal-sulfide precipitation. Five amended cells and one control were constructed in the vadose zone of a sulfide- and carbonate-rich tailings deposit, and the geochemistry, microbiology and mineralogy were monitored for 4 a. Increases in pore-water concentrations of dissolved organic C (DOC) and decreases in aqueous SO 4 concentrations of >2500 mg L -1 were observed in cells amended with peat + SBG and peat + SBG + MB. Removal of SO 4 was accompanied by shifts in δ 34 S-SO 4 values of >+30 per mille, undersaturation of pore water with respect to gypsum [CaSO 4 .2H 2 O], and increased populations of SO 4 -reducing bacteria (SRB). Decreases in aqueous concentrations of Zn, Mn, Ni, Sb and Tl were observed for these cells relative to the control. Organic C introduction also supported growth of Fe-reducing bacteria (IRB) and increases in Fe and As concentrations. Enhanced Fe and As mobility occurred in all cells; however, maximum concentrations were observed in cells amended with MB. Subsequent decreases in Fe and As concentrations were attributed to DSR and metal-sulfide precipitation. The common presence of secondary Zn-S and Fe-S phases was observed by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) spectroscopy. Selective extractions indicated that large decreases in water-soluble SO 4 occurred in cells that supported DSR. Furthermore, amendments that supported

  14. Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

    2007-12-31

    TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with

  15. Characterization and comparison of iron oxyhydroxide precipitates from biotic and abiotic groundwater treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arturi, Katarzyna R.; Bender Koch, Christian; Søgaard, Erik G.

    2017-01-01

    Removal of iron is an important step in groundwater treatment for drinking water production. It is performed to prevent organoleptic issues and clogging in water supply systems. Iron can be eliminated with a purely physico-chemical (abiotic) method or biotically with the help of iron......-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Each of the purification methods requires different operating conditions and results in formation of iron oxyhydroxide (FeOOH) precipitates. Knowledge about the differences in composition and properties of the biotic and abiotic precipitates is desirable from a technical, but also...

  16. Biological fluidized-bed treatment of groundwater from a manufactured gas plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, G.M.; Scheible, O.K.; Maiello, J.A.; Guarini, W.J.; Sutton, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Bench- and pilot-scale biological treatability studies were performed as part of a comprehensive study for developing an on-site treatment system for contaminated groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site. The bench-scale work, which included evaluations of activated sludge and fluidized-bed biological processes, indicated that a carbon-based fluidized-bed process was most appropriate. The process was then demonstrated on a pilot level at the site. The bench and pilot studies demonstrated significant reductions of chemical oxygen demand (COD), and all target organics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

  17. Tritium monitoring in groundwater and evaluation of model predictions for the Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R.; Freshley, M.D.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1997-08-01

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) disposal site, also known as the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS), receives treated effluent containing tritium, which is allowed to infiltrate through the soil column to the water table. Tritium was first detected in groundwater monitoring wells around the facility in July 1996. The SALDS groundwater monitoring plan requires revision of a predictive groundwater model and reevaluation of the monitoring well network one year from the first detection of tritium in groundwater. This document is written primarily to satisfy these requirements and to report on analytical results for tritium in the SALDS groundwater monitoring network through April 1997. The document also recommends an approach to continued groundwater monitoring for tritium at the SALDS. Comparison of numerical groundwater models applied over the last several years indicate that earlier predictions, which show tritium from the SALDS approaching the Columbia River, were too simplified or overly robust in source assumptions. The most recent modeling indicates that concentrations of tritium above 500 pCi/L will extend, at most, no further than ∼1.5 km from the facility, using the most reasonable projections of ETF operation. This extent encompasses only the wells in the current SALDS tritium-tracking network

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF AQUAFIX AND SAPS PASSIVE MINE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES AT SUMMITVILLE MINE SITE, INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated two passive water treatment (PWT) technologies for metals removal from acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site in southern Colorado...

  19. Laboratory evaluation of the in situ chemical treatment approach to soil and groundwater remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorton, E.C.; Trader, D.E.

    1993-10-01

    Results of initial proof of principle laboratory testing activities successfully demonstrated the viability of the in situ chemical treatment approach for remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by hexavalent chromium. Testing activities currently in progress further indicate that soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium and uranium at concentrations of several hundred parts per million can be successfully treated with 100 ppM hydrogen sulfide gas mixtures. Greater than 90% immobilization of hexavalent chromium and 50% immobilization of uranium have been achieved in these tests after a treatment period of one day. Activities associated with further development and implementation of the in situ chemical treatment approach include conducting additional bench scale tests with contaminated geomedia, and undertaking scale-up laboratory tests and a field demonstration. This report discusses the testing and further development of this process

  20. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun, E-mail: xjxie@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pi, Kunfu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, Chongxuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO{sub 4} and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles

  1. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-01-01

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO 4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na 2 HAsO 4 ) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. - Highlights:

  2. Treatment of groundwater for nitrate removal by portable ion exchange resin, OSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriburo, A.; Pessi, M.; Castagnino, G.; Garat, S.; Hackenbruch, R.; Laguardia, J.; Yelpo, L.; Amondarain, A.; Brunetto, C.

    2010-01-01

    The locations of Palmitas in the Province of Soriano is supplied with groundwater from a shallow and high nitrogen content in sedimentary aquifer (Asencio Formation). Due to lack of alternative sources, groundwater or surface water, it was decided to test the water treatment from a perforation whose tenors were of the order of 51-66 mg / L of nitrates. The methodology used for the removal of nitrate is ion exchange resins .The main issue raised in this case was the disposal of effluent from the washing of the resins, because there is no collective sanitation network Palmitas nor a sufficient stream flow for discharge . Several alternatives (installation of a transitional deposit, haulage trucks, dumping at distant points, etc.), which were ruled by their poor viability and / or high costs were studied. Finally it was decided to install a device that will have three cylinders with resins were transportable, for which should have a weight less than 75 kg and those which would be used alternately. Regeneration of the resins is carried out in the city of Mercedes, distant 40 km, where the necessary water for the discharge conditions exist with a high content of sodium chloride, resulting from ion exchange. This pilot project represents a first step in treatment for nitrate removal in groundwater using transportable resins which aims to supply the public . Due to the nature of the above location , the chosen methodology had to be adapted to fulfill their duties satisfactorily. The first results of this project to a year of commissioning implementation, which has been funded by SBI and developed by his staff, in order to be used in other places with similar problems are presented in this report

  3. New perspectives on the passive treatment of ferruginous circumneutral mine waters in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsford, D J

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines major physico-chemical processes during the passive treatment of ferruginous circumneutral drainage from abandoned coal mines in the UK. Data collected over several years of studies on mine water treatment systems shed new light on the relative importance of hydraulics, settling velocity, Fe(II) oxidation rates and cascade aeration, which, in turn, informs the design of future systems. This paper demonstrates that (1) the complex settling behaviour of Fe(III) precipitates may be described by a first-order volumetric process and that settling rate is different for different mine waters; (2) the hydraulic efficiency (ratio of time to peak tracer concentration to nominal residence time) of the settling ponds studied was widely variable at low flow rates in comparison to constructed wetlands; (3) aeration cascades contribute dissolved oxygen and lead to a rise in pH due to CO2 degassing, which are very important in reducing the required time for iron oxidation and removal; (4) for at least 10 of the 30 sites examined, modelling of the rates of Fe(II) oxidation and particulate settling reveals that removal of iron is primarily dependent on settling rate; and (5) that substantial increases in pH can be brought about by forced aeration of mine water over several hours. Findings of this study apply to the majority of coal mine water treatment sites in the UK and may have broader application to other ferruginous waters with circumneutral pH or after treatment to increase pH.

  4. Passivation of phosphorus diffused silicon surfaces with Al2O3: Influence of surface doping concentration and thermal activation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Armin; Benick, Jan; Kimmerle, Achim; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2014-01-01

    Thin layers of Al 2 O 3 are well known for the excellent passivation of p-type c-Si surfaces including highly doped p + emitters, due to a high density of fixed negative charges. Recent results indicate that Al 2 O 3 can also provide a good passivation of certain phosphorus-diffused n + c-Si surfaces. In this work, we studied the recombination at Al 2 O 3 passivated n + surfaces theoretically with device simulations and experimentally for Al 2 O 3 deposited with atomic layer deposition. The simulation results indicate that there is a certain surface doping concentration, where the recombination is maximal due to depletion or weak inversion of the charge carriers at the c-Si/Al 2 O 3 interface. This pronounced maximum was also observed experimentally for n + surfaces passivated either with Al 2 O 3 single layers or stacks of Al 2 O 3 capped by SiN x , when activated with a low temperature anneal (425 °C). In contrast, for Al 2 O 3 /SiN x stacks activated with a short high-temperature firing process (800 °C) a significant lower surface recombination was observed for most n + diffusion profiles without such a pronounced maximum. Based on experimentally determined interface properties and simulation results, we attribute this superior passivation quality after firing to a better chemical surface passivation, quantified by a lower interface defect density, in combination with a lower density of negative fixed charges. These experimental results reveal that Al 2 O 3 /SiN x stacks can provide not only excellent passivation on p + surfaces but also on n + surfaces for a wide range of surface doping concentrations when activated with short high-temperature treatments

  5. Effects of passivation treatment on performance of CdS/CdSe quantum-dot co-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubtimtae, Auttasit; Lee, Ming-Way

    2012-01-01

    Carrier recombination can greatly reduce the efficiencies of quantum-dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). This work aims to find a general preparation route to reduce carrier recombination in QDSSCs. The effects of a series of passivation treatments on CdS/CdSe quantum-dot (QD) co-sensitized solar cells are investigated. The QDs were synthesized on a nanoporous TiO 2 electrode by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction processes. The different types of treatment included a blocking layer, a fluoride-ion coating, a ZnS coating, annealing, a TiO 2 scattering layer and an Au counterelectrode. The power conversion efficiency was observed to become three times larger after treatment. The effectiveness of each treatment method is as follows in descending order: blocking layer ≅ TiO 2 scattering layer > Au counterelectrode > F − ions and ZnS coatings > annealing. The best cell yields a current density of 14.6 mA/cm 2 and a respectable power conversion efficiency of η = 3.11% under AM 1.5 sun. The passivation procedure makes a useful general guide for researchers for the preparation of QDSSCs. - Highlights: ► Used a series of treatments to passivate quantum-dot sensitized solar cells ► Efficiency increased by a factor of three after going through all the treatments ► Contribution to efficiency due to each treatment determined quantitatively ► Obtained a best efficiency of 3.11%

  6. Ex situ treatment of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in groundwater using a fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Todd S; Condee, Charles; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2013-02-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a suspected human carcinogen that has traditionally been treated in water using ultraviolet irradiation (UV). The objective of this research was to examine the application of a laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) as an alternative technology for treating NDMA to part-per-trillion (ng/L) concentrations in groundwater. Previous studies have shown that the bacterium Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 is capable of cometabolizing NDMA during growth on propane as a primary substrate in batch culture (Fournier et al., 2009) and in a bench-scale membrane bioreactor (Hatzinger et al., 2011) to low ng/L concentrations. R. ruber ENV425 was inoculated into the FBR during this study. With a hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 20 min, the FBR was found to be an effective means to treat 10-20 μg/L of NDMA to effluent concentrations less than 100 ng/L. When the HRT was increased to 30 min and oxygen and propane addition rates were optimized, the FBR system demonstrated treatment of the NDMA to effluent concentrations of less than 10 ng/L. Short-term shutdowns and the presence of trichloroethene (TCE) at 6 μg/L as a co-contaminant had minimal effect on the treatment of NDMA in the FBR. The data suggest that the FBR technology can be a viable alternative to UV for removing NDMA from groundwater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Permeable Reactive Barriers: a multidisciplinary approach of a new emerging sustainable groundwater treatment technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diels, L.; Bastiaens, L. [Vito, Mol (BL); O' Hannessin, S. [EnviroMetal Technologies Inc., Ontario (Canada); Cortina, J.L. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. d' Enginyeria Quimica; Alvarez, P.J. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa-City (United States). Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing; Ebert, M. [Christian-Albrechts Univ. Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften; Schad, H. [I.M.E.S. GmbH, Amtzell (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Permeable reactive barriers or zones are becoming an interesting sustainable and cost-effective technology for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater. The technology is based on chemical processes as the dehalogenating activity of zerovalent iron, biological processes in bioscreens or reactive zones and on sorption technology (e.g. heavy metal adsorption or adsorption on granular activated carbon). Three technical sessions will be devoted to this nowadays becoming mature technology. This special session intends to pay attention to the discussion about some questions related to PRBs. These include the sustainability (e.g. life time and clogging) especially for zerovalent iron barriers, the need and quality of feasibility tests, drawbacks and restrictions of PRBs. Combined with long term performance monitoring os these systems will be discussed. Further attention will be paid to cost evaluation and the relationship between zerovalent barriers and bacterial growth. Also attention will be paid to new reactive materials (e.g. activated carbon for organics and inorganic materials for heavy metals) and consequences (e.g. environmental impact). Finally the session will combine al these approaches in a discussion about combined barriers or multibarriers for treatment of mixed pollution (e.g. landfill leachates contaminated groundwater). Specialists involved in these subjects will introduce these topics and allow for a large and intensive discussion to improve future applications of this technology. (orig.)

  8. Self-passivation Rule and the Effect of Post-treatment in GBs of Solar Cell Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengyan; Chen, Shiyou; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xingao

    Grain boundaries (GBs) existing in polycrystalline semiconductors alloys inducing a great deal of deep defect levels are usually harmful to cells' photovoltaic performance. Experimental and theoretical investigations verified that these defect levels come from the GBs' dangling bonds. We find that, the defect levels in anion core of GB can be passivated by its cations, called by self-passivation. For instance, the post-treated by CdCl2, Cd can eliminate the defect levels by saturating Te dangling bonds in the grain boundary of CdTe. We verify that the idea of self-passivation rule can perfectly explain the benign GBs of CISe and CZTS by sodium treatment. The present work reveals a general mechanism about how dopants in GBs eliminate the defect states through passivating the dangling bonds in covalent polycrystalline semiconductors, and sheds light on how to passivate dangling bonds in GBs with alterative processes. National Science Foundation of China, international collaboration project of MOST, Pujiang plan, Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar), and Shanghai Rising-star program.

  9. Investigation of positive roles of hydrogen plasma treatment for interface passivation based on silicon heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liping; Liu, Wenzhu; Liu, Jinning; Shi, Jianhua; Meng, Fanying; Liu, Zhengxin; Guo, Wanwu; Bao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The positive roles of H 2 -plasma treatment (HPT) have been investigated by using different treatment procedures in view of the distinctly improved passivation performance of amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions (SHJs). It has been found that a hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film and crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interface with a high stretching mode (HSM) is detrimental to passivation. A moderate pre-HPT introduces atomic H, which plays an effective tuning role in decreasing the interfacial HSM; unfortunately, an epitaxial layer is formed. Further improvement in passivation can be achieved in terms of increasing the HSM of a-Si:H film treated by appropriate post-HPT based on the a-Si:H thickness. The minority carrier lifetime of crystalline wafers can be improved by treated films containing a certain quantity of crystallites. The microstructure factor R and the maximum intensity of the dielectric function ε 2max have been found to be critical microstructure parameters that describe high-quality a-Si:H passivation layers, which are associated with the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition phase induced by multi-step HPT. Finally, the open circuit voltage and conversion efficiency of the SHJ solar cell can be improved by implementing an effective HPT process. (paper)

  10. In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications

  11. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Review of candidate processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Ally, M.

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the screening and preliminary evaluation of candidate treatment for use in treating mixed contaminants volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides in groundwater. Treating mixed contaminants presents unusual difficulties. Typically, VOCs are the most abundant contaminants, but the presence of radionuclides results in additional health concerns that must be addressed, usually by a treatment approach different from that used for VOCs. Furthermore, the presence of radionuclides may yield mixed solid wastes if the VOCs are treated by conventional means. These issues were specifically addressed in the evaluation of candidate treatment processes for testing in this program. Moreover, because no research or early development of a particular process would be performed, the technology review also focused on technologies that could be readily adapted and integrated for use with mixed contaminants. The objective is to couple emerging or available processes into treatment modules for use in situ. The three year project, to be completed in September 1996, includes a full-scale field demonstration. The findings reported in this document encompass all activities through the treatment process evaluations

  12. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Review of candidate processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Siegrist, R.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ally, M. [and others

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the screening and preliminary evaluation of candidate treatment for use in treating mixed contaminants volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides in groundwater. Treating mixed contaminants presents unusual difficulties. Typically, VOCs are the most abundant contaminants, but the presence of radionuclides results in additional health concerns that must be addressed, usually by a treatment approach different from that used for VOCs. Furthermore, the presence of radionuclides may yield mixed solid wastes if the VOCs are treated by conventional means. These issues were specifically addressed in the evaluation of candidate treatment processes for testing in this program. Moreover, because no research or early development of a particular process would be performed, the technology review also focused on technologies that could be readily adapted and integrated for use with mixed contaminants. The objective is to couple emerging or available processes into treatment modules for use in situ. The three year project, to be completed in September 1996, includes a full-scale field demonstration. The findings reported in this document encompass all activities through the treatment process evaluations.

  13. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  14. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE, IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT, HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-01-01

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU

  15. Effects of residential wastewater treatment systems on ground-water quality in west-central Jefferson County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dennis C.; Hillier, D.E.; Nickum, Edward; Dorrance, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The use of residential wastewater-treatment systems in Evergreen Meadows, Marshdale, and Herzman Mesa, Colo., has degraded ground-water quality to some extent in each community. Age of community; average lot size; slope of land surface; composition, permeability, and thickness of surficial material; density, size , and orientation of fractures; maintenance of wastewater-treatment systems; and presence of animals are factors possibly contributing to the degradation of ground-water quality. When compared with effluent from aeration-treatment tanks, effluent fom septic-treatment tanks is characterized by greater biochemical oxygen demand and greater concentrations of detergents. When compared with effluent from septic-treatment tanks, effluent from aeration-treatment tanks is characterized by greater concentrations of dissolved oxygen, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, and dissolved solids. (USGS)

  16. Wetland-based passive treatment systems for gold ore processing effluents containing residual cyanide, metals and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, R; Ordóñez, A; Loredo, J; Younger, P L

    2013-10-01

    Gold extraction operations generate a variety of wastes requiring responsible disposal in compliance with current environmental regulations. During recent decades, increased emphasis has been placed on effluent control and treatment, in order to avoid the threat to the environment posed by toxic constituents. In many modern gold mining and ore processing operations, cyanide species are of most immediate concern. Given that natural degradation processes are known to reduce the toxicity of cyanide over time, trials have been made at laboratory and field scales into the feasibility of using wetland-based passive systems as low-cost and environmentally friendly methods for long-term treatment of leachates from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. Laboratory experiments on discrete aerobic and anaerobic treatment units supported the development of design parameters for the construction of a field-scale passive system at a gold mine site in northern Spain. An in situ pilot-scale wetland treatment system was designed, constructed and monitored over a nine-month period. Overall, the results suggest that compost-based constructed wetlands are capable of detoxifying cyanidation effluents, removing about 21.6% of dissolved cyanide and 98% of Cu, as well as nitrite and nitrate. Wetland-based passive systems can therefore be considered as a viable technology for removal of residual concentrations of cyanide from leachates emanating from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities.

  17. The importance of biological oxidation of iron in the aerobic cells of the Wheal Jane pilot passive treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G; Swash, P; Kotilainen, S

    2005-02-01

    The passive treatment system designed to treat the mine water discharge of the abandoned Wheal Jane tin mine in Cornwall consisted of a sequence of artificial wetland cells, an anaerobic cell and a final series of rock filters. Three systems were operated which differed only in the pre-treatment of the mine water before discharge to the aerobic wetland cells. The aerobic cells were designed to promote aerobic oxidation and precipitation of iron which could exceed a concentration of 100 mg/l in the raw mine water discharge. The largest investment of land area was to the artificial wetland cells and it was important to understand the processes of oxidation and precipitation of iron so that the performance of this aspect the pilot passive treatment plant (PPTP) could be managed as efficiently as possible. The generally low pH of the influent mine water and inevitable trend of decreasing pH due to hydrolysis of Fe(III) meant that distinguishing between biotic and abiotic mechanisms was fundamental for further design planning of passive treatment systems. This paper describes these observations.

  18. Evaluation of Fenton's Reagent and Activated Persulfate for Treatment of a Pharmaceutical Waste Mixture in Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Kakarla, Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Soil and groundwater beneath the Kærgård Plantage megasite in Denmark are contaminated with a complex mixture of pharmaceutical wastes, including sulfonamides, barbiturates, aniline, pyridine chlorinated solvents (DNAPL), benzene, toluene, mercury, and cyanide. Regulatory agencies in Denmark...... capacity of the aquifer sediments, pH dropped to within the range of 1 to 3 for all tests. Due to the presence of significant quantities of mercury and cyanide in the target treatment zone and the lowering of pH, batch and continuous-flow column reactors were used to measure mobilization of the mercury......, cyanide, chromium and other metals both within the aqueous and vapour phases. Except the alkaline activation, all the investigated techniques for activating persulfate were able to remove more than 80% of the primary contaminants. Optimization and more dosages led to 98-99% destruction of primary...

  19. Phytoremediation of explosives in groundwater using innovative wetlands-based treatment technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, F.J.; Behrends, L.L.; Coonrod, H.S.; Phillips, W.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Environmental Research Center; Bader, D.F. [Army Environmental Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Many army ammunition plants across the country have problems with groundwater contaminated with explosives. A field demonstration was initiated at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant near Milan, Tennessee early in 1996 to demonstrate the feasibility of treating contaminated groundwater with constructed wetlands. Two different systems were designed and installed. A lagoon system consisted of two cells in series with each cell having dimensions of 24 x 9.4 x 0.6 m (L x W x H). A gravel-bed system consisted of three gravel-beds operated in series with a primary anaerobic cell having dimensions of 32 x 11 x 1.4 m (L x W x H), followed by a pair of secondary cells each with dimensions of 5.5 x 11 x 1.4 m (L x W x H). The primary cell is maintained anaerobic by adding powdered milk to the water every two weeks. The secondary cells are maintained aerobic via reciprocation, whereby water is pumped back and forth from one cell to another to cause a recurrent fill and drain action. The lagoons were planted with sago pond weed, water stargrass, elodea, and parrot feather. The gravel-bed wetlands were planted with canary grass, wool grass, sweet flag, and parrot feather. Water began flowing to each of the wetland treatment systems at 19 L min{sup {minus}1} starting in June 1996. The design hydraulic retention time through each treatment system was approximately 10 days. Influent and effluent water samples were collected every 2 weeks. Intensive sampling of water interior to the wetlands occurred every 2 months.

  20. ALTERNATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT AT 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DADO MA

    2008-07-31

    This study focuses on the remediation methods and technologies applicable for use at 200-PO-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. The 200-PO-I Groundwater au requires groundwater remediation because of the existence of contaminants of potential concern (COPC). A screening was conducted on alternative technologies and methods of remediation to determine which show the most potential for remediation of groundwater contaminants. The possible technologies were screened to determine which would be suggested for further study and which were not applicable for groundwater remediation. COPCs determined by the Hanford Site groundwater monitoring were grouped into categories based on properties linking them by remediation methods applicable to each COPC group. The screening considered the following criteria. (1) Determine if the suggested method or technology can be used for the specific contaminants found in groundwater and if the technology can be applied at the 200-PO-I Groundwater au, based on physical characteristics such as geology and depth to groundwater. (2) Evaluate screened technologies based on testing and development stages, effectiveness, implementability, cost, and time. This report documents the results of an intern research project conducted by Mathew Dado for Central Plateau Remediation in the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The study was conducted under the technical supervision of Gloria Cummins and management supervision of Theresa Bergman and Becky Austin.

  1. Prediction of Groundwater Quality Improvement Down-Gradient of In Situ Permeable Treatment Barriers and Fully-Remediated Source Zones. ESTCP Cost and Performance Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Paul C; Carlson, Pamela M; Dahlen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In situ permeable treatment barriers (PTB) are designed so that contaminated groundwater flows through an engineered treatment zone within which contaminants are eliminated or the concentrations are significantly reduced...

  2. As(III) oxidation by MnO2 during groundwater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, J C J; Rietveld, L C; van Halem, D

    2017-03-15

    The top layer of natural rapid sand filtration was found to effectively oxidise arsenite (As(III)) in groundwater treatment. However, the oxidation pathway has not yet been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether naturally formed manganese oxide (MnO 2 ), present on filter grains, could abiotically be responsible for As(III) oxidation in the top of a rapid sand filter. For this purpose As(III) oxidation with two MnO 2 containing powders was investigated in aerobic water containing manganese(II) (Mn(II)), iron(II) (Fe(II)) and/or iron(III) (Fe(III)). The first MnO 2 powder was a very pure - commercially available - natural MnO 2 powder. The second originated from a filter sand coating, produced over 22 years in a rapid filter during aeration and filtration. Jar test experiments showed that both powders oxidised As(III). However, when applying the MnO 2 in aerated, raw groundwater, As(III) removal was not enhanced compared to aeration alone. It was found that the presence of Fe(II)) and Mn(II) inhibited As(III) oxidation, as Fe(II) and Mn(II) adsorption and oxidation were preferred over As(III) on the MnO 2 surface (at pH 7). Therefore it is concluded that just because MnO 2 is present in a filter bed, it does not necessarily mean that MnO 2 will be available to oxidise As(III). However, unlike Fe(II), the addition of Fe(III) did not hinder As(III) oxidation on the MnO 2 surface; resulting in subsequent effective As(V) removal by the flocculating hydrous ferric oxides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plant Chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, although the measurement principles of both techniques a...

  4. An XPS study of bromine in methanol etching and hydrogen peroxide passivation treatments for cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, S.; Sellin, P.J.; Watts, J.F.; Baker, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CdZnTe single crystal etched in bromine-in-methanol and passivated in H 2 O 2 . ► XPS depth used to accurately determine enriched Te layer and TeO 2 thickness. ► For 0.2 and 2.0 (v/v) % bromine-in-methanol treatments, enriched Te layer thickness determined to be 1.3 and 1.8 nm, respectively. ► After passivation in 30 wt.% H 2 O 2 , the oxide thickness varies between 1.0 and 1.25 nm depending on the calculation method. - Abstract: The performance of single crystal CdZnTe radiation detectors is dependent on both the bulk and the surface properties of the material. After single crystal fabrication and mechanical polishing, modification of the surface to remove damage and reduce the surface leakage current is generally achieved through chemical etching followed by a passivation treatment. In this work, CdZnTe single crystals have been chemically etched using a bromine in methanol (BM) treatment. The BM concentrations employed were 0.2 and 2.0 (v/v) % and exposure times varied between 5 and 120 s. Angle resolved XPS and sputter depth profiling has been employed to characterize the surfaces for the different exposure conditions. A Te rich surface layer was formed for all exposures and the layer thickness was found to be independent of exposure time. The enriched Te layer thickness was accurately determined by calibrating the sputter rate against a CdTe layer of known thickness. For BM concentrations of 0.2 (v/v) % and 2 (v/v) %, the Te layer thickness was determined to be 1.3 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.2 nm, respectively. The BM etched surfaces have subsequently been passivated in a 30 wt.% H 2 O 2 solution employing exposure time of 15 s. The oxide layer thickness has been calculated using two standard XPS methodologies, based on the Beer–Lambert expression. The TeO 2 thickness calculated from ARXPS data are slightly higher than the thickness obtained by the simplified Beer–Lambert expression. For BM exposures of 30–120 s followed by a passivation

  5. Preliminary engineering assessment of treatment alternatives for groundwater from the Hanford 200 Area 200-BP-5 plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of the Preliminary Engineering Assessment of Treatment Alternatives (PEATA), an engineering evaluation of potential treatment alternatives for groundwater extracted from the 200-BP-5 Area's 216-BY Cribs and 216-B-5 Reverse Well plumes. The primary objective of the PEATA was to identify treatment technologies that are worth further consideration (i.e., treatability testing or a more refined engineering evaluation). It will also provide a basis for evaluating the results of the treatability testing that is currently being conducted on the presumptive remedy of ion exchange with disposal of spent resin and will serve as a guide for selection of other technologies for additional testing. Because there are little data or past experience with groundwater similar to the BY-Crib and B-5 Reverse Well Plumes, treatment efficiencies cannot be predicted with certainty and rigorous treatment system designs and costs cannot be developed. This applies to all alternatives, including the presumptive remedy of ion exchange. The approach for this study was to develop conceptual designs and approximate costs for the treatment technologies that were most likely to be effective on the BY-Crib and B-5 Reverse Well groundwater

  6. Kansas City plant ultraviolet/ozone/hydrogen peroxide groundwater treatment system overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stites, M.E.; Hughes, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    The Kansas City Plant (KCP) has committed to the utilization of a groundwater treatment system, for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), that discharges a minimal amount of pollutants to the environment. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) system utilizing ozone, ultraviolet radiation, and hydrogen peroxide serves in this capacity. Packed tower aeration and activated carbon filtration are listed as best available technologies (BATs) by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the removal of VOCs in water. The disadvantage to these BATs is that they transfer the VOCs from the water medium to the air or carbon media respectively. Operation of the system began in May 1988 at a flow rate of 22.7 liters per minute (lpm) (6 gallons per minute (gpm)). An additional 102.2 lpm (27 gpm) of flow were added in October 1990. Various efforts to optimize and track the treatment unites efficiency have been carried out. A maximum influent reading of 26,590 parts per billion (ppb) of total VOCs has been recorded. Following the addition of flows, removal efficiency has averaged approximately 95%. Both air and water effluents are factored into this calculation. (author)

  7. Antireflection/Passivation Step For Silicon Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Gerald T.; Kachare, Akaram H.; Daud, Taher

    1988-01-01

    New process excludes usual silicon oxide passivation. Changes in principal electrical parameters during two kinds of processing suggest antireflection treatment almost as effective as oxide treatment in passivating cells. Does so without disadvantages of SiOx passivation.

  8. Edible Oil Barriers for Treatment of Chlorinated Solvent and Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    The groundwater potentiometric surface beneath SWMU 17 is relatively flat with some tidal influence resulting in fluctuating groundwater flow...after its application, the pH within most of the aquifer would be expected to vary between background (~5) and 9. A titration experiment determined

  9. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  10. Identification and treatment of lithium as the primary toxicant in a groundwater treatment facility effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kszos, L.A.; Crow, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    6 Li is used in manufacturing nuclear weapons, shielding, and reactor control rods. Li compounds have been used at DOE facilities and Li-contaminated waste has historically been land disposed. Seep water from burial grounds near Y-12 contain small amounts of chlorinated hydrocarbons, traces of PCBs, and 10-19 mg/L Li. Seep treatment consists of oil-water separation, filtration, air stripping, and carbon adsorption. Routine biomonitoring tests using fathead minnows and Ceriodaphniadubia are conducted. Evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that toxicity was most likely due to Li. Laboratory tests showed that 1 mg Li/L reduced the survival of both species; 0.5 mg Li/L reduced Ceriodaphnia reproduction and minnow growth. However, the toxicity was greatly reduced in presence of sodium (up to 4 mg Li/L, Na can fully negate the toxic effect of Li). Because of the low Na level discharged from the treatment facility, Li removal from the ground water was desired. SuperLig reg-sign columns were used (Li-selective organic macrocycle bonded to silica gel). Bench-scale tests showed that the material was very effective for removing Li from the effluent, reducing the toxicity

  11. Evaluation of the Hanford 200 West Groundwater Treatment System: Fluidized Bed Bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, Brian B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jackson, Dennis G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dickson, John O. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Eddy-Dilek, Carol A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-12

    A fluidized bed reactor (FBR) in the 200W water treatment facility at Hanford is removing nitrate from groundwater as part of the overall pump-treat-reinject process. Control of the FBR bed solids has proven challenging, impacting equipment, increasing operations and maintenance (O&M), and limiting the throughput of the facility. In response to the operational challenges, the Department of Energy Richland Office (DOE-RL) commissioned a technical assistance team to facilitate a system engineering evaluation and provide focused support recommendations to the Hanford Team. The DOE Environmental Management (EM) technical assistance process is structured to identify and triage technologies and strategies that address the target problem(s). The process encourages brainstorming and dialog and allows rapid identification and prioritization of possible options. Recognizing that continuous operation of a large-scale FBR is complex, requiring careful attention to system monitoring data and changing conditions, the technical assistance process focused on explicit identification of the available control parameters (“knobs”), how these parameters interact and impact the FBR system, and how these can be adjusted under different scenarios to achieve operational goals. The technical assistance triage process was performed in collaboration with the Hanford team.

  12. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH IGZO TFTs.

  13. Understanding the hydrologic impacts of wastewater treatment plant discharge to shallow groundwater: Before and after plant shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Laura E.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Barber, Larry B.; Duris, Joseph W.; Hutchinson, Kasey J.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Effluent-impacted surface water has the potential to transport not only water, but wastewater-derived contaminants to shallow groundwater systems. To better understand the effects of effluent discharge on in-stream and near-stream hydrologic conditions in wastewater-impacted systems, water-level changes were monitored in hyporheic-zone and shallow-groundwater piezometers in a reach of Fourmile Creek adjacent to and downstream of the Ankeny (Iowa, USA) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Water-level changes were monitored from approximately 1.5 months before to 0.5 months after WWTP closure. Diurnal patterns in WWTP discharge were closely mirrored in stream and shallow-groundwater levels immediately upstream and up to 3 km downstream of the outfall, indicating that such discharge was the primary control on water levels before shutdown. The hydrologic response to WWTP shutdown was immediately observed throughout the study reach, verifying the far-reaching hydraulic connectivity and associated contaminant transport risk. The movement of WWTP effluent into alluvial aquifers has implications for potential WWTP-derived contamination of shallow groundwater far removed from the WWTP outfall.

  14. Online flow cytometry reveals microbial dynamics influenced by concurrent natural and operational events in groundwater used for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Michael D; Epting, Jannis; Page, Rebecca M; Sigrist, Jürg A; Huggenberger, Peter; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-12-07

    Detailed measurements of physical, chemical and biological dynamics in groundwater are key to understanding the important processes in place and their influence on water quality - particularly when used for drinking water. Measuring temporal bacterial dynamics at high frequency is challenging due to the limitations in automation of sampling and detection of the conventional, cultivation-based microbial methods. In this study, fully automated online flow cytometry was applied in a groundwater system for the first time in order to monitor microbial dynamics in a groundwater extraction well. Measurements of bacterial concentrations every 15 minutes during 14 days revealed both aperiodic and periodic dynamics that could not be detected previously, resulting in total cell concentration (TCC) fluctuations between 120 and 280 cells μL -1 . The aperiodic dynamic was linked to river water contamination following precipitation events, while the (diurnal) periodic dynamic was attributed to changes in hydrological conditions as a consequence of intermittent groundwater extraction. Based on the high number of measurements, the two patterns could be disentangled and quantified separately. This study i) increases the understanding of system performance, ii) helps to optimize monitoring strategies, and iii) opens the possibility for more sophisticated (quantitative) microbial risk assessment of drinking water treatment systems.

  15. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory and field research has shown that permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) containing a variety of materials can treat arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater. Sites where these PRBs are located include a mine tailings facility, fertilizer and chemical manufacturing sites, a...

  16. Estimating Differences in the Cost of Groundwater Treatment of Trichioroethylene Based on Different Cleanup Goals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atchue, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    ...) to develop a health-based groundwater (GW) cleanup standard for trichloroethylene (TCE). Reevaluation of the health risk of TCE exposure may provide sufficient evidence for EPA program offices...

  17. Passive safety; Passive Sicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueckert, J. [Skoda Auto a.s., Mlada Boleslav (Czech Republic). Interieurentwicklung und Versuche; Hau, M. [Skoda Auto a.s., Mlada Boleslav (Czech Republic). Koordination der Fahrzeugsicherung

    2004-05-01

    The specifications for passive safety are partly based on the legal requirements for all export markets combined with the strict internal standards of Volkswagen Group. The Euro NCAP tests and their precisely defined testing methods using the new point assessment are very important. (orig.)

  18. Hanford groundwater scenario studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnett, R.C.; Gephart, R.E.; Deju, R.A.; Cole, C.R.; Ahlstrom, S.W.

    1977-05-01

    This report documents the results of two Hanford groundwater scenario studies. The first study examines the hydrologic impact of increased groundwater recharge resulting from agricultural development in the Cold Creek Valley located west of the Hanford Reservation. The second study involves recovering liquid radioactive waste which has leaked into the groundwater flow system from a hypothetical buried tank containing high-level radioactive waste. The predictive and control capacity of the onsite Hanford modeling technology is used to evaluate both scenarios. The results of the first study indicate that Cold Creek Valley irrigationis unlikely to cause significant changes in the water table underlying the high-level waste areas or in the movement of radionuclides already in the groundwater. The hypothetical tank leak study showed that an active response (in this case waste recovery) can be modeled and is a possible alternative to passive monitoring of radionuclide movement in the unlikely event that high-level waste is introduced into the groundwater

  19. Pilot plant experiences using physical and biological treatment steps for the remediation of groundwater from a former MGP site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirthensohn, T. [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences-Vienna, Department of IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria)], E-mail: thomas.wirthensohn@boku.ac.at; Schoeberl, P. [Wienenergie Gasnetz GmbH, Referat 17-Altlasten, Josefstaedterstrasse 10-12, 1080 Vienna (Austria); Ghosh, U. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Fuchs, W. [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences-Vienna, Department of IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2009-04-15

    The production of manufactured gas at a site in Vienna, Austria led to the contamination of soil and groundwater with various pollutants including PAHs, hydrocarbons, phenols, BTEX, and cyanide. The site needs to be remediated to alleviate potential impacts to the environment. The chosen remediation concept includes the excavation of the core contaminated site and the setup of a hydraulic barrier to protect the surrounding aquifer. The extracted groundwater will be treated on-site. To design the foreseen pump-and-treat system, a pilot-scale plant was built and operated for 6 months. The scope of the present study was to test the effectiveness of different process steps, which included an aerated sedimentation basin, a submerged fixed film reactor (SFFR), a multi-media filter, and an activated carbon filter. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 7.0 h during normal flow conditions and 3.5 h during high flow conditions. The treatment system was effective in reducing the various organic and inorganic pollutants in the pumped groundwater. However, it was also demonstrated that appropriate pre-treatment was essential to overcome problems with clogging due to precipitation of tar and sulfur compounds. The reduction of the typical contaminants, PAHs and BTEX, was more than 99.8%. All water quality parameters after treatment were below the Austrian legal requirements for discharge into public water bodies.

  20. Pilot plant experiences using physical and biological treatment steps for the remediation of groundwater from a former MGP site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirthensohn, T; Schoeberl, P; Ghosh, U; Fuchs, W

    2009-04-15

    The production of manufactured gas at a site in Vienna, Austria led to the contamination of soil and groundwater with various pollutants including PAHs, hydrocarbons, phenols, BTEX, and cyanide. The site needs to be remediated to alleviate potential impacts to the environment. The chosen remediation concept includes the excavation of the core contaminated site and the setup of a hydraulic barrier to protect the surrounding aquifer. The extracted groundwater will be treated on-site. To design the foreseen pump-and-treat system, a pilot-scale plant was built and operated for 6 months. The scope of the present study was to test the effectiveness of different process steps, which included an aerated sedimentation basin, a submerged fixed film reactor (SFFR), a multi-media filter, and an activated carbon filter. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 7.0 h during normal flow conditions and 3.5h during high flow conditions. The treatment system was effective in reducing the various organic and inorganic pollutants in the pumped groundwater. However, it was also demonstrated that appropriate pre-treatment was essential to overcome problems with clogging due to precipitation of tar and sulfur compounds. The reduction of the typical contaminants, PAHs and BTEX, was more than 99.8%. All water quality parameters after treatment were below the Austrian legal requirements for discharge into public water bodies.

  1. Pilot plant experiences using physical and biological treatment steps for the remediation of groundwater from a former MGP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirthensohn, T.; Schoeberl, P.; Ghosh, U.; Fuchs, W.

    2009-01-01

    The production of manufactured gas at a site in Vienna, Austria led to the contamination of soil and groundwater with various pollutants including PAHs, hydrocarbons, phenols, BTEX, and cyanide. The site needs to be remediated to alleviate potential impacts to the environment. The chosen remediation concept includes the excavation of the core contaminated site and the setup of a hydraulic barrier to protect the surrounding aquifer. The extracted groundwater will be treated on-site. To design the foreseen pump-and-treat system, a pilot-scale plant was built and operated for 6 months. The scope of the present study was to test the effectiveness of different process steps, which included an aerated sedimentation basin, a submerged fixed film reactor (SFFR), a multi-media filter, and an activated carbon filter. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 7.0 h during normal flow conditions and 3.5 h during high flow conditions. The treatment system was effective in reducing the various organic and inorganic pollutants in the pumped groundwater. However, it was also demonstrated that appropriate pre-treatment was essential to overcome problems with clogging due to precipitation of tar and sulfur compounds. The reduction of the typical contaminants, PAHs and BTEX, was more than 99.8%. All water quality parameters after treatment were below the Austrian legal requirements for discharge into public water bodies

  2. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report

  3. Amine treatment induced perovskite nanowire network in perovskite solar cells: efficient surface passivation and carrier transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke; Cui, Can; Wang, Peng; Lin, Ping; Qiang, Yaping; Xu, Lingbo; Xie, Jiangsheng; Yang, Zhengrui; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Deren

    2018-02-01

    In the fabrication of high efficiency organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs), an additional interface modifier is usually applied for enhancing the interface passivation and carrier transport. In this paper, we develop an innovative method with in-situ growth of one-dimensional perovskite nanowire (1D PNW) network triggered by Lewis amine over the perovskite films. To our knowledge, this is the first time to fabricate PSCs with shape-controlled perovskite surface morphology, which improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 14.32% to 16.66% with negligible hysteresis. The amine molecule can passivate the trap states on the polycrystalline perovskite surface to reduce trap-state density. Meanwhile, as a fast channel, the 1D PNWs would promote carrier transport from the bulk perovskite film to the electron transport layer. The PSCs with 1D PNW modification not only exhibit excellent photovoltaic performances, but also show good stability with only 4% PCE loss within 30 days in the ambient air without encapsulation. Our results strongly suggest that in-situ grown 1D PNW network provides a feasible and effective strategy for nanostructured optoelectronic devices such as PSCs to achieve superior performances.

  4. Petrol contaminated groundwater treatment with air-stripper in Balassagyarmat, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Peter; Bernath, Balazs

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater is a common environmental problem in Hungary. Leakage of underground storage tanks, pipe break or illegal tapping as well as lorry accidents can be mentioned as main reasons. MEGATERRA Ltd. elaborated, adopted and tested several groundwater clean-up methods. These methods are based on detailed survey and investigation, sampling and analysis, delineation of contaminated groundwater, risk assessment, establishment of monitoring wells, pumping tests and remediation action plan. One of these methods was implemented by MEGATERRA Ltd. in Balassagyarmat, Hungary. Contamination source was a 10 m 3 vol. simple wall underground fuel-storage tank, which had been emptied. When the remediation started in April 1998, the petrol had already been accumulated on the ground water table forming a 5-7 m wide and 10-15 m long plume being expanded to SSE-NNW direction. The area of the dissolved hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater-body was 1 000 m 2 and its concentration reached up to 30-40 mg/l TPH. The free-phase hydrocarbon layer was 10 cm thick. For the remediation of contaminated groundwater MEGATERRA Ltd. applied pump and treat method, namely groundwater pumping using extraction well, skimming of free-phase hydrocarbon, stripping of the contaminated ground water in air-stripper tower and draining of the treated groundwater into a drainage ditch. In the centre of the plume we established an extraction well with 300 mm diameter in a 500 mm borehole. Peristaltic skimmer pump was used inside the extraction well to remove the free phase petrol from the ground water surface.Because of the intense volatility of the pollutant we applied aeration (stripping) technology. The extracted contaminated groundwater was cleaned in air-stripper equipment being able to eliminate efficiently the volatile pollutants from the water. The aeration tower is a compact cylindrical shaped column with 650 mm in diameter. Its height depends on the pollutant's type The

  5. Remedial Process Optimization and Green In-Situ Ozone Sparging for Treatment of Groundwater Impacted with Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, J.

    2012-12-01

    A former natural gas processing station is impacted with TPH and BTEX in groundwater. Air sparging and soil vapor extraction (AS/AVE) remediation systems had previously been operated at the site. Currently, a groundwater extraction and treatment system is operated to remove the chemicals of concern (COC) and contain the groundwater plume from migrating offsite. A remedial process optimization (RPO) was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of historic and current remedial activities and recommend an approach to optimize the remedial activities. The RPO concluded that both the AS/SVE system and the groundwater extraction system have reached the practical limits of COC mass removal and COC concentration reduction. The RPO recommended an in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) study to evaluate the best ISCO oxidant and approach. An ISCO bench test was conducted to evaluate COC removal efficiency and secondary impacts to recommend an application dosage. Ozone was selected among four oxidants based on implementability, effectiveness, safety, and media impacts. The bench test concluded that ozone demand was 8 to 12 mg ozone/mg TPH and secondary groundwater by-products of ISCO include hexavalent chromium and bromate. The pH also increased moderately during ozone sparging and the TDS increased by approximately 20% after 48 hours of ozone treatment. Prior to the ISCO pilot study, a capture zone analysis (CZA) was conducted to ensure containment of the injected oxidant within the existing groundwater extraction system. The CZA was conducted through a groundwater flow modeling using MODFLOW. The model indicated that 85%, 90%, and 95% of an injected oxidant could be captured when a well pair is injecting and extracting at 2, 5, and 10 gallons per minute, respectively. An ISCO pilot test using ozone was conducted to evaluate operation parameters for ozone delivery. The ozone sparging system consisted of an ozone generator capable of delivering 6 lbs/day ozone through two ozone

  6. Explicit treatment for Dirichlet, Neumann and Cauchy boundary conditions in POD-based reduction of groundwater models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosses, Moritz; Nowak, Wolfgang; Wöhling, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has become a popular model reduction method in the field of groundwater modeling. It is used to mitigate the problem of long run times that are often associated with physically-based modeling of natural systems, especially for parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. POD-based techniques reproduce groundwater head fields sufficiently accurate for a variety of applications. However, no study has investigated how POD techniques affect the accuracy of different boundary conditions found in groundwater models. We show that the current treatment of boundary conditions in POD causes inaccuracies for these boundaries in the reduced models. We provide an improved method that splits the POD projection space into a subspace orthogonal to the boundary conditions and a separate subspace that enforces the boundary conditions. To test the method for Dirichlet, Neumann and Cauchy boundary conditions, four simple transient 1D-groundwater models, as well as a more complex 3D model, are set up and reduced both by standard POD and POD with the new extension. We show that, in contrast to standard POD, the new method satisfies both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. It can also be applied to Cauchy boundaries, where the flux error of standard POD is reduced by its head-independent contribution. The extension essentially shifts the focus of the projection towards the boundary conditions. Therefore, we see a slight trade-off between errors at model boundaries and overall accuracy of the reduced model. The proposed POD extension is recommended where exact treatment of boundary conditions is required.

  7. Combination of Successive Alkalinity Producing System (SAPS) and Aeration for Passive Treatment of Highly Acidic Mine Drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, C.; Ji, S.

    2015-12-01

    Passive treatment system has been widely used for remediation of mine drainage since its advantage of low installation and maintenance cost. The system, however, has also a disadvantage in assuring remediation and management efficiency if the drainage is highly acidic mine drainage. To remediate acid mine drainage (AMD) especially showing high acidity, passive treatment system which consists of successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) and subsequent aeration pond was proposed and its mechanisms and efficiency was evaluated in this research. Target AMD was obtained from Waryong coal mine and showed typical characteristics of AMD having high metal concentration and low pH (acidity > 300 mg/L as CaCO3). Four experimental cases were conducted; untreated, treated with SAPS, treated with aeration, treated with SAPS and aeration to compare role and mechanism of each unit. Between organic matter and limestone layer which constitute SAPS, the former eliminated most of Fe(III) and Al in the AMD so that the latter was kept from being clogged by precipitates. Net acidity of the AMD rapidly decreased by supplement of alkalinity at the limestone layer. A primary function of SAPS, producing alkalinity constantly without clogging, was attained due to addition a portion of limestone particle into the organic matter layer. The discharge from SAPS had low ORP and DO values because of an anaerobic environment formed at the organic matter layer although its alkalinity was increased. This water quality was unfavorable for Fe(II) to be oxidized. Installation of aeration pond after SAPS, therefore, could be effective way of enhancing oxidation rate of Fe(II). Among the experimental cases, the combination of SAPS and aeration pond was only able to remediate the AMD. This concluded that to remediate highly acidic mine drainage with passive treatment system, three critical conditions were required; pre-precipitation of Fe(III) and Al at organic matter layer in SAPS, constant alkalinity

  8. [CPM--Continuous Passive Motion: treatment of injured or operated knee-joints using passive movement. A meta-analysis of current literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, P

    2004-04-01

    There is still a controversial discussion in literature about the use of motor driven splints in knee surgery--as the principle of continuous passive motion, CPM. For this reason it seemed useful for an evaluation to look through the papers which were published since 1990. It was obvious, that negative results were published often before this year, but this papers are still quoted standard works. In medical data bases subito-doc.de, medscape.com, medica.de and zbmed.de 230 papers were found by search CPM, continuous passive motion and arthromot. Coincidentally there was a search for authors who were already quoted in other papers. 36 papers concerning CPM after knee surgery were utilized. The role of CPM regarding the range of motion, swelling, duration of hospital stay, use of analgesics, costs, postoperative manipulations, wound healing and thrombo embolic complications was evaluated. Although the results of this partial retrospective, partial prospective, sometimes randomized or double blinded studies are in contradiction, there can only be found a trend to better results. New clinical studies for evidence based guidelines in the handling of continuous passive motion after knee surgery are necessary.

  9. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Robert S.; Li, Zhaohui; Roy, Stephen J.; Burt, Todd; Johnson, Timothy L.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector

  10. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

    1999-08-30

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

  11. Iron-mineral accretion from acid mine drainage and its application in passive treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, K.; Sapsford, D.J.; Johnson, D.B.; Kay, C.M.; Wolkersdorfer, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study demonstrates substantial removal of iron (Fe) from acid mine drainage (pH ≈3) in a passive vertical flow reactor (VFR) with an equivalent footprint of 154 m2 per L/s mine water and residence times of >23 h. Average Fe removal rate was 67% with a high of 85% over the 10-month trial. The fraction of Fe passing a 0.22 µm filter (referred to here as Fe-filt) was seen to be removed in the VFR even when Fe(II) was absent, indicating that the contribution of microbial Fe(II) oxidation and precipitation was not the dominant removal mechanism in the VFR. Removal rates of Fe-filt in the VFR were up to 70% in residence times as low as 8 h compared with laboratory experiments where much smaller changes in Fe-filt were observed over 60 h. Centrifugation indicated that 80–90% of the influent Fe had particle sizes mine water revealed the abundance of extracellular polymeric substance-generating Fe-oxidizing bacterium ‘Ferrovum myxofaciens’, which may aid the removal of iron and explain the unusual appearance and physical properties of the sludge. PMID:26675674

  12. Iron-mineral accretion from acid mine drainage and its application in passive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, K; Sapsford, D J; Johnson, D B; Kay, C M; Wolkersdorfer, C

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates substantial removal of iron (Fe) from acid mine drainage (pH ≈3) in a passive vertical flow reactor (VFR) with an equivalent footprint of 154 m(2) per L/s mine water and residence times of >23 h. Average Fe removal rate was 67% with a high of 85% over the 10-month trial. The fraction of Fe passing a 0.22 µm filter (referred to here as Fe-filt) was seen to be removed in the VFR even when Fe(II) was absent, indicating that the contribution of microbial Fe(II) oxidation and precipitation was not the dominant removal mechanism in the VFR. Removal rates of Fe-filt in the VFR were up to 70% in residence times as low as 8 h compared with laboratory experiments where much smaller changes in Fe-filt were observed over 60 h. Centrifugation indicated that 80-90% of the influent Fe had particle sizes water was contacted with VFR sludge, the Fe-filt fraction was destabilized, leading to an appreciably higher removal of this fraction. Heterogeneous precipitation and/or aggregation of nanoparticulate Fe(III) precipitates are considered predominant removal mechanisms. Microbial analyses of the mine water revealed the abundance of extracellular polymeric substance-generating Fe-oxidizing bacterium 'Ferrovum myxofaciens', which may aid the removal of iron and explain the unusual appearance and physical properties of the sludge.

  13. Laboratory studies and model simulations of sorbent material behavior for an in-situ passive treatment barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloysius, D.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study combining laboratory experiments and model simulations in support of the design and construction of a passive treatment barrier (or filter wall) for retarding the migration of Sr-90 within a water-bearing surficial sand and gravel layer. Preliminary evaluation was used to select materials for column testing. A one-dimensional finite-difference model was used to simulate the laboratory column results and extrapolation of the calibrated model was then used to assess barrier performance over extended time frames with respect to Sr-90 breakthrough and loading on the filter media. The final results of the study showed that 20 by 50 mesh clinoptilolite will attenuate Sr-90 with a maximum life expentancy of approximately 10 years. This time period is based on allowable limits of Sr-90 activity on the filter media and is also a function of site-specific conditions

  14. Treatment of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater Beneath an Occupied Building at the Young-Rainey STAR Center, Pinellas, FL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Joe [Navarro Research and Engineering; Surovchak, Scott [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Legacy Management; Tabor, Charles [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater contamination, consisting of two dissolved-phase plumes originating from chlorinated solvent source areas, in the southeastern portion of the Young- Rainey Star Center (also known as the Pinellas County, Florida, Site) in Largo, Florida, has migrated beyond the property boundary, beneath the roadways, and beneath adjacent properties to the south and east. Groundwater contamination will persist as long as the onsite contaminant source remains. The origin of the contamination appears to be multiple long-term point sources beneath Building 100, a 4.5 ha (11 acre) building that housed manufacturing facilities during US DOE operations at the site. The site is now owned by Pinellas County, and most of the space inside the building is leased to private companies, so DOE chose not to conduct characterization or remediation through the floor of the building, instead choosing to conduct all work from outside the building. Injection of emulsified soybean oil and a microbial culture has been used at other areas of the site to accelerate naturally occurring bacterial processes that degrade groundwater contaminants to harmless compounds, and that same approach was chosen for this task. The technical approach consisted of installing horizontal wells from outside the building footprint, extending through and around the identified subsurface treatment areas, and terminating beneath the building. Two 107 m (350 ft) long wells, two 122 m (400 ft) long wells, and four 137 m (450 ft) long wells have been installed to intersect the inferred source areas and confirmed contaminant plumes beneath the building. DOE then injected emulsified vegetable oil and a microbial culture into the horizontal wells at each of several target areas beneath the building where the highest groundwater contaminant concentrations have been detected. The target areas are the northwest corner of the building between the old drum storage pad locations and monitoring well PIN12-S35B, the vicinity of

  15. The Effects of Acid Passivation, Tricresyl Phosphate Presoak, and UV/Ozone Treatment on the Tribology of Perfluoropolyether-Lubricated 440C Stainless Steel Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Jansen, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The boundary-lubrication performance of two perfluoropolyether (PFPE) thin films in the presence of passivated 440C stainless steel is presented. The study used a standard ball on disk (BoD) tribometer in dry nitrogen and a vacuum spiral orbit tribometer (SOT). Stainless steel surfaces were passivated with one of four techniques: high and low temperature chromic acid bath, a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) soak, or UV/Ozone treated for 15 min. After passivation, each BoD disk had a 400A film of Krytox 16256 (PFPE) applied to it. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding cycles before an increase in friction occurred. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was not altered as a result of the various passivation techniques. The resulting surface chemistry of each passivation technique was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SOT was used to examine the effects of the TCP treatment on the lubricated lifetime of another PFPE, Brayco 815Z, under rolling conditions. None of the passivation techniques were found to dramatically increase the oxide film thickness or lubricated lifetimes.

  16. Recovery and reuse of sludge from active and passive treatment of mine drainage-impacted waters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonimaro, Tsiverihasina V; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Bussière, Bruno; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Zagury, Gérald J

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of mine drainage-impacted waters generates considerable amounts of sludge, which raises several concerns, such as storage and disposal, stability, and potential social and environmental impacts. To alleviate the storage and management costs, as well as to give the mine sludge a second life, recovery and reuse have recently become interesting options. In this review, different recovery and reuse options of sludge originating from active and passive treatment of mine drainage are identified and thoroughly discussed, based on available laboratory and field studies. The most valuable products presently recovered from the mine sludge are the iron oxy-hydroxides (ochre). Other by-products include metals, elemental sulfur, and calcium carbonate. Mine sludge reuse includes the removal of contaminants, such as As, P, dye, and rare earth elements. Mine sludge can also be reused as stabilizer for contaminated soil, as fertilizer in agriculture/horticulture, as substitute material in construction, as cover over tailings for acid mine drainage prevention and control, as material to sequester carbon dioxide, and in cement and pigment industries. The review also stresses out some of the current challenges and research needs. Finally, in order to move forward, studies are needed to better estimate the contribution of sludge recovery/reuse to the overall costs of mine water treatment.

  17. Performance of a passive treatment system for net-acidic coal mine drainage over five years of operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Romy; Aplin, Andrew C; Jarvis, Adam P

    2010-09-15

    A full-scale passive treatment system (PTS) was commissioned in 2003 to treat two net-acidic coal mine water discharges in the Durham coalfield, UK. The principal aim of the PTS was to decrease concentrations of iron (3.2) and alkalinity (> or =0 mg L(-1) CaCO(3) eq). Secondary objectives were to decrease zinc (treatment, water qualities were improved by 84% in the case of Fe, 87% Al, 83% acidity, 51% Zn, 23% Mn and 29% SO(4)(2)(-). Alkalinity (74%) and pH (95% as H(+)) were increased. Area adjusted removal rates (Fe=1.49+/-0.66 g d(-1) m(-2); acidity=6.7+/-4.9 g d(-1) m(-2)) were low compared to design criteria, mainly due to load limitation. Disregarding seasonality effects, acidity removal and effluent pH were stable over time. A substantial temporal decrease in calcium and alkalinity generation suggests that limestone is increasingly armoured. Once pH is no longer buffered by the carbonate system, metals could be remobilized, putting treatment efficiency at risk. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Remediation of groundwater contaminated by exa valent chromium. Part 1.: Treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, S.; Vaccari, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chromium compounds have been used in several industrial activities and they are often found in soil and groundwater of former industrial sites. Chromium exists in various oxidation states, but the trivalent and hexavalent oxidation ones are of major environmental concern due to their stability in the environment. In particular, Cr(V I) is highly soluble and mobile and is very toxic with mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. The present paper describes the main chemical, physical and toxicological properties of Cr(V I), its fate in the subsoil and both the conventional and innovative technologies for its removal from contaminated groundwater. The paper includes also a brief description of few interesting foreign case studies. [it

  19. Biosphere modelling for a deep radioactive waste repository: treatment of the groundwater-soil pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeyens, B.; Grogan, H.A.; Dorp, F. van

    1991-07-01

    The effect of radionuclide transfer from near-surface groundwater to the rooting zone soil, via a deep soil layer, is modelled in this report. The possible extent of upward solute movement is evaluated for a region in northern Switzerland. The concentration of 237 Np and 129 I in the deep and top soil, and hence growing crops, are evaluated assuming a constant unit activity concentration in the groundwater. A number of parameter variations are considered, namely variable soil sorption coefficients, reduced infiltration of rain water and decreased groundwater flow. A release to an alternative smaller recipient region in northern Switzerland is also evaluated. For the parameter ranges considered uncertainty in the solid-liquid distribution coefficient has the largest effect on overall uncertainty. These calculations have been presented within the international Biosphere Model Validation Study (BIOMOVS). A description of the test scenario, and the model calculations submitted, have been included in this report for completeness. To place the groundwater-soil-crop-man pathway in context, its contribution to the total dose to man is evaluated for the 237 Np- 233 U- 229 Th decay chain. The results obtained using the two-layer soil model, described in this report, are compared with the single-layer soil model used during Project Gewaehr 1985. The more realistic two-layer soil model indicated an increase in importance of the drinking water pathway. It should be noted, however, that not all the critical pathways have been treated in this study with the same degree of conservatism. (author) 16 figs., 15 tabs., 31 refs

  20. Treatment of co-mingled benzene, toluene and TCE in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Fei; Jin, Song

    2014-06-30

    This work addressed a hypothetical but practical scenario that includes biological oxidation and reductive dechlorination in treating groundwater containing co-mingled plume of trichloroethene (TCE), benzene and toluene. Groundwater immediately downgradient from the commonly used zero-valent iron (ZVI) has shown alkaline pH (up to 10.7). The elevated pH may influence BTEX compounds (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylenes) biodegradation, which could also be inhibited by elevated concentrations of TCE. Data from this work suggests that the inhibition coefficients (IC) value for 100 μg/L and 500 μg/L of TCE on benzene and toluene degradation are 2.1-2.8 at pH 7.9, and 3.5-6.1 at pH 10.5. For a co-mingled plume, it appears to be more effective to reduce TCE by ZVI before addressing benzene and toluene biodegradation. The ample buffering capacity of most groundwater and the adaptation of benzene and toluene-degrading microbes are likely able to eliminate the adverse influence of pH shifts downgradient from a ZVI-PRB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In-situ porous reactive wall for treatment of Cr(VI) and trichloroethylene in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowes, D.W.; Bennett, T.A.; Gillham, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    A permeable reactive wall for treating groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and trichloroethylene (TCE) was installed at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, NC in June, 1996. The porous reactive wall is 46 m long, 0.6 m wide, and 7.3 m deep. The reactive wall was installed in less then six hours using a continuous trenching technique which simultaneously removed the aquifer material and replaced it with reactive material. The wall is composed of 100% elemental iron in the form of iron filings. Preliminary laboratory experiments, with site groundwater and reactive materials similar to the full-scale wall components, were successful in decreasing 11 mg/L Cr(VI) to < 0.01 mg/L and 1700 μg/L TCE to < 1 μg/L. Detailed field monitoring commenced in November, 1996. The monitoring program includes groundwater sampling upgradient, downgradient and within the reactive wall, and collection of core samples for mineralogical and microbiological study. Preliminary results from the monitoring program indicate that the wall successfully removes Cr(VI) from influent concentrations of 6 mg/L to < 0.01 mg/L, and TCE from 5600 μg/L to 5.3 μg/L within the wall

  2. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. Copyright © 2015

  3. Effect of heat treatment conditions on the passivation behavior of WE43C Mg–Y–Nd alloy in chloride containing alkaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakraphan Ninlachart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mg–Y–Nd alloy (WE43C or Elektron 43 is a heat treatable magnesium wrought alloy that can be used up to 250 °C for aerospace application. This alloy has excellent mechanical properties (UTS: up to 345 MPa at room temperature and improved corrosion resistance. Electrochemical passivation studies were conducted on this alloy under different heat treatment conditions in 0.1 M NaOH solution with the addition of chloride from 0 to 1000 ppm. The passive potential range typically extended to more than 1.5 VAg/AgCl. The transpassive potential was not dependent on the heat treatment condition of the alloy when the chloride concentration increased up to 500 ppm. However, pitting protection potential varied with the heat treatment condition when the chloride addition was 500 ppm or more. The specimen surface was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Raman spectroscopy to understand the passivation behavior of this alloy. The passivated surface of the WE43C specimens indicated that the surface layer consisted of MgO, Mg(OH2, and rare earth oxide phases, and the heat treatment conditions did not significantly affect the composition of the surface film.

  4. Wet chemical treatment of boron doped emitters on n-type (1 0 0) c-Si prior to amorphous silicon passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meddeb, H., E-mail: hosny.meddeb@gmail.com [KACST-Intel Consortium Center of Excellence in Nano-manufacturing Applications (CENA), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Research and Technology Center of Energy, Photovoltaic Department, Borj-Cedria Science and Technology Park, BP 95, 2050 (Tunisia); University of Carthage, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerta (Tunisia); Bearda, T.; Recaman Payo, M.; Abdelwahab, I. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Abdulraheem, Y. [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering & Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Ezzaouia, H. [Research and Technology Center of Energy, Photovoltaic Department, Borj-Cedria Science and Technology Park, BP 95, 2050 (Tunisia); Gordon, I.; Szlufcik, J. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Poortmans, J. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), K.U. Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Faculty of Sciences, University of Hasselt, Martelarenlaan 42, 3500 Hasselt (Belgium)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • The influence of the cleaning process using different HF-based cleaning on the amorphous silicon passivation of homojunction boron doped emitters is analyzed. • The effect of boron doping level on surface characteristics after wet chemical cleaning: For heavily doped surfaces, the reduction in contact angle was less pronounced, which proves that such surfaces are more resistant to oxide formation and remain hydrophobic for a longer time. In the case of low HF concentration, XPS measurements show higher oxygen concentrations for samples with higher doping level, probably due to the incomplete removal of the native oxide. • Higher effective lifetime is achieved at lower doping for all considered different chemical pre-treatments. • A post-deposition annealing improves the passivation level yielding emitter saturation currents determined by Auger recombination in the order of 70 fA/cm{sup 2} and below. • The dominance of Auger recombination over other type of B-induced defects on lifetime quality in the case of our p+ emitter. - Abstract: The influence of the cleaning process on the amorphous silicon passivation of homojunction emitters is investigated. A significant variation in the passivation quality following different cleaning sequences is not observed, even though differences in cleaning performance are evident. These results point out the effectiveness of our cleaning treatment and provide a hydrogen termination for intrinsic amorphous silicon passivation. A post-deposition treatment improves the passivation level yielding emitter saturation currents determined by Auger recombination in the order of 70 fA/cm{sup 2} and below.

  5. Regulatory and Technical Issues Concerning the Detection and Treatment of NDMA-Contaminated Groundwater at NASA WSTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, D. T.; Zigmond, M. J.; Tufts, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was established in 1963 primarily to provide rocket engine testing services for several NASA programs. The groundwater underlying the site has been contaminated as a result of historical operations. Groundwater contaminants include several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and two semi-volatile compounds: N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrodimethylamine (DMN). This paper discusses some of the technical, analytical, regulatory, and health risk issues associated with the contaminant plume. The plume has moved approximately 2.5 miles downgradient of the facility industrial boundary, with evidence of continued migration. As a result, NASA has proposed a pump and treat system using air strippers and ultraviolet (UV) oxidation to stabilize future movement of the contaminant plume. The system has been designed to treat 1,076 gallons (4,073 liters) per minute, with provisions for future expansion. The UV oxidation process was selected to treat NDMA-contaminated groundwater based on successes at other NDMA-contaminated sites. Bench- and pilot-scale testing of WSTF groundwater confirmed the ability of UV oxidation to destroy NDMA and generated sufficient data to design the proposed full-scale treatment system. NDMA is acutely toxic and is a probable human carcinogen. EPA-recommended health risk criteria for the residential consumption of NDMA/DMN-contaminated groundwater was used to determine that a 1.0 x 10(exp -6) excess cancer risk corresponds to 1.7 parts per trillion (ppt). EPA analytical methods are unable to detect NDMA and DMN in the low ppt range. EPA's current Appendix IX analytical method used to screen for NDMA, Method 8270, can detect NDMA only at levels that are orders of magnitude greater than the recommended health risk level. Additionally, EPA Method 607, the most sensitive EPA approved method, has a detection limit of 150 ppt. This corresponds to an excess cancer

  6. Phytotoxicity and groundwater impacts of leaching from thermal treatment residues in roadways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoungthong, Khamphe; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing; Zhang, Hua

    2018-01-01

    The use of coal fly ash (CFA), municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWIBA) and flue gas desulfurization residue (FGDR) in road construction has become very common owing to its economical advantages. However, these residues may contain toxic constituents that pose an environmental risk if they leach out and flow through the soil, surface water and groundwater. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the ecotoxicity and groundwater impact of these residues before decisions can be made regarding their utilization for road construction. In this study, the physico-chemical characteristics, leaching and phytotoxicity of these residues were investigated. Specifically, multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the contributions of the leaching constituents of the CFA, MSWIBA and FGDR leachates to the germination index of wheat seeds. B, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe and Pb were found to be more toxic to the wheat seeds than the other heavy metals. Furthermore, the leached concentrations of the constituents from the CFA, MSWIBA and FGDR were below the regulatory threshold limits of the Chinese identification standard for hazardous wastes. Analyses conducted using a numerical groundwater model (WiscLEACH) indicated that the predicted field concentrations of metals from the CFA, MSWIBA and FGDR increased with time up to about 30years at the point of compliance, then decreased with time and distance. Overall, this study demonstrated that the risks resulting from MSWIBA, CFA and FGDR leaching could be assessed before its utilization for road construction, providing crucial information for the adoption of these alternative materials. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Groundbreaking technology: in-situ anaerobic bioremediation for treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic in-situ bioremediation is a technique often used to cleanse contaminated soil and groundwater. 'Anaerobic in-situ bioremediation' is a phrase with distinct terms all having relevance in the application of this technique. Anaerobic implies the absence of dissolved oxygen, while 'in-situ' simply means that the environmental cleansing occurs with out removing, displacing, or significantly disturbing the specimen or surrounding area. 'Bioremediation' is a term used to describe the biological use of microbes or plants to detoxify the environment. In order to properly implement this complex process, one must have an understanding of microbiology, biochemistry, genetics, metabolic processes, and structure and function of natural microbial communities. (author)

  8. [Comparison of long-term dental treatment effects of children treated under general anesthesia and passive restraint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, F; Xia, B; Zhang, S; Ma, W L; Xiao, Y M; Ge, L H

    2017-02-09

    Objective: To compare the long-term dental treatment effects, oral health habits and oral-health-related qualities of life of children treated under general anesthesia (GA) and passive restraint (PR), respectively. Methods: Twenty seven 2 to 4-year-old children treated under GA and thirty four children treated under PR were recruited in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. Up to 2 years after the treatment, a follow up assessment was conducted. The data of general information, dental plaque level and the unplanned treatments were recorded and analyzed. The questionnaire of oral health habits and early childhood oral health impact scale (ECOHIS) for each child was also completed and analyzed. The survival rate and median survival time of the deciduous teeth were calculated. Multivariate analysis was performed by using Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Twenty-five children under GA and 32 under PR were finally included, with a total of 1 098 deciduous teeth. The postoperative dental plaque indicesin both GA and PR groups had significantly improved than that of before the treatments ( P= 0.019, P< 0.001). The oral health habits had also improved, and the improvement in PR group was more obvious than that in GA group. Totally 128 teeth (27.0%) appeared unplanned treatments in GA group and 232 teeth (37.2%) in PR group during the follow-ups. The new caries and recurrent caries in PR group were significantly more than that in GA group ( P< 0.001, P= 0.012). No significant differences were found between the two groups in restoration failure, secondary caries and endodontic diseases ( P= 0.129, P= 0.822, P= 0.642). However, the time of occurrence of endodontic disease and secondary caries in GA group were significantly longer than that in PR group ( P< 0.01, P< 0.001). The median survival time of teeth in GA group was 1 018 days comparing to 944 days in PR group. The difference was statistically significant ( P

  9. Drinking-water treatment, climate change, and childhood gastrointestinal illness projections for northern Wisconsin (USA) communities drinking untreated groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uejio, Christopher K.; Christenson, Megan; Moran, Colleen; Gorelick, Mark

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the relative importance of climate change and drinking-water treatment for gastrointestinal illness incidence in children (age first quantified the observed (1991-2010) precipitation and gastrointestinal illness associations after controlling for seasonality and temporal trends. Precipitation likely transported pathogens into drinking-water sources or into leaking water-distribution networks. Building on observed relationships, the second analysis projected how climate change and drinking-water treatment installation may alter gastrointestinal illness incidence. Future precipitation values were modeled by 13 global climate models and three greenhouse-gas emissions levels. The second analysis was rerun using three pathways: (1) only climate change, (2) climate change and the same slow pace of treatment installation observed over 1991-2010, and (3) climate change and the rapid rate of installation observed over 2011-2016. The results illustrate the risks that climate change presents to small rural groundwater municipalities without drinking water treatment. Climate-change-related seasonal precipitation changes will marginally increase the gastrointestinal illness incidence rate (mean: ˜1.5%, range: -3.6-4.3%). A slow pace of treatment installation somewhat decreased precipitation-associated gastrointestinal illness incidence (mean: ˜3.0%, range: 0.2-7.8%) in spite of climate change. The rapid treatment installation rate largely decreases the gastrointestinal illness incidence (mean: ˜82.0%, range: 82.0-83.0%).

  10. Passive aerobic treatment of net-alkaline, iron-laden drainage from a flooded underground anthracite mine, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the results of a continuous 4.5-day laboratory aeration experiment and the first year of passive, aerobic treatment of abandoned mine drainage (AMD) from a typical flooded underground anthracite mine in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. During 1991-2006, the AMD source, locally known as the Otto Discharge, had flows from 20 to 270 L/s (median 92 L/s) and water quality that was consistently suboxic (median 0.9 mg/L O2) and circumneutral (pH ??? 6.0; net alkalinity >10) with moderate concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (medians of 11, 2.2, and treatment system was conceptualized consisting of a 2 m deep pond with innovative aeration and recirculation to promote rapid oxidation of Fe2+, two 0.3 m deep wetlands to facilitate iron solids removal, and a supplemental oxic limestone drain for dissolved manganese and trace-metal removal. The system was constructed, but without the aeration mechanism, and began operation in June 2005. During the first 12 months of operation, estimated detention times in the treatment system ranged from 9 to 38 h. However, in contrast with 80-100% removal of Fe2+ over similar elapsed times during the laboratory aeration experiment, the treatment system typically removed less than 35% of the influent Fe2+. Although concentrations of dissolved CO2 decreased progressively within the treatment system, the PCO2 values for treated effluent remained elevated (10-2.4 to 10-1.7atm). The elevated PCO 2 maintained the pH within the system at values less than 7 and hence slowed the rate of Fe2+ oxidation compared to the aeration experiment. Kinetic models of Fe2+ oxidation that consider effects of pH and dissolved O2 were incorporated in the geochemical computer program PHREEQC to evaluate the effects of detention time, pH, and other variables on Fe2+ oxidation and removal rates. These models and the laboratory aeration experiment indicate that performance of this and other aerobic

  11. High-Strength Domestic Wastewater Treatment and Reuse with Onsite Passive Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Anda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the preliminary monitoring results of an onsite pilot wastewater treatment plant consisting of a septic tank, an anaerobic up-flow filter, and a horizontal subsurface flow wetland system planted with Agapanthus africanus. The system was designed to treat heavily polluted domestic wastewater produced in a research and development (R&D center, reaching additional goals of zero energy consumption and eliminating the use of chemical additives. First water quality data shows that organic load in the treated sewage were removed achieving more than 95% efficiency. Nutrients were removed by almost 50%, and fecal and total coliform counts decreased by 99.96%. The results were compared to official Mexican regulations for wastewater discharged into lakes and reservoirs complied with all of them except for nutrients. In this pilot project, the resulting treated wastewater was directly reused for watering the green areas of the R&D center. The result was that the excess of nutrients improved the quality of the grass, avoiding the use of synthetic fertilizers, and created a wetland habitat for small wildlife species living in the area.

  12. ANALYSIS OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE PASSIVE CO-TREATMENT AT CERRO RICO DE POTOSÍ, BOLIVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H.J. Strosnider

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a worldwide environmental problem. The passive co-treatment of AMD with municipal waste water (MWW is a cost effective approach that uses nutrients in MWW in order to treat high concentrations of metals and sulfate found in AMD. Cerro Rico de Potosí in Bolivia is one of the biggest mining cities in the world, and it is constantly facing problems with AMD. The goal of this study was to determine the reaction rates of Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, and other metals found in an AMD discharge from Cerro Rico by a three-stage reactor system. The AMD had a pH of 3.58 and acidity of 1080 mg/L as CaCO3 equivalent containing 12, 68, 17 and 550 mg/L of dissolved Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn respectively. The reaction rates of Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn were 1.43, 2.09, 0.01, and 0.10 d-1, respectively.

  13. Performance assessment of laboratory and field-scale multi-step passive treatment of iron-rich acid mine drainage for design improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonimaro, Tsiverihasina V; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Bussière, Bruno; Genty, Thomas; Zagury, Gérald J

    2018-04-17

    Multi-step passive systems for the treatment of iron-rich acid mine drainage (Fe-rich AMD) perform satisfactorily at the laboratory scale. However, their field-scale application has revealed dissimilarities in performance, particularly with respect to hydraulic parameters. In this study, the assessment of factors potentially responsible for the variations in performance of laboratory and field-scale multi-step systems was undertaken. Three laboratory multi-step treatment scenarios, involving a combination of dispersed alkaline substrate (DAS) units, anoxic dolomitic drains, and passive biochemical reactors (PBRs), were set up in 10.7-L columns. The field-scale treatment consisted of two PBRs separated by a wood ash (WA) reactor. The parameters identified as possibly influencing the performances of the laboratory and field-scale experiments were the following: AMD chemistry (electrical conductivity and Fe and SO 4 2- concentrations), flow rate (Q), and saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ). Based on these findings, the design of an efficient passive multi-step treatment system is suggested to consider the following: (1) Fe pretreatment, using materials with high k sat and low HRT. If a PBR is to be used, the Fe load should be PBR/DAS filled with a mixture with at least 20% of neutralizing agent; (3) include Q and k sat (> 10 -3  cm/s) in the long-term prediction. Finally, mesocosm testing is strongly recommended prior to construction of full-scale systems for the treatment of Fe-rich AMD.

  14. Passive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojesen, Emile

    2018-01-01

    This paper does not present an advocacy of a passive education as opposed to an active education nor does it propose that passive education is in any way 'better' or more important than active education. Through readings of Maurice Blanchot, Jacques Derrida and B.S. Johnson, and gentle critiques of Jacques Rancière and John Dewey, passive…

  15. Technical framework for groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This document provides the technical framework for groundwater restoration under Phase II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. A preliminary management plan for Phase II has been set forth in a companion document titled ''Preplanning Guidance Document for Groundwater Restoration''. General principles of site characterization for groundwater restoration, restoration methods, and treatment are discussed in this document to provide an overview of standard technical approaches to groundwater restoration

  16. Development of groundwater treatment methods using radiation-induced graft polymerization adsorbent at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory. Annual report for 2008 fiscal year (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyatomi, Yosuke; Shimada, Akiomi; Ogata, Nobuhisa; Sugihara, Kozo; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Seko, Noriaki; Kasai, Noboru; Ueki, Yuji; Tamada, Masao

    2011-02-01

    The concentrations of fluorine (7.2-10mg/L) and boron (0.8-1.5mg/L) dissolved in groundwater pumped from the shafts during excavation of the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU), Tono Geoscience Center, shall be reduced to levels below the environmental standards for fluorine: 0.8mg/L and boron: 1mg/L. Coagulation and ion exchange methods are being applied for fluorine and boron, respectively, at the operating water treatment facility at the MIU. As well, collaborative research on groundwater treatment started in 2006 between the Environmental and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate and the Tono Geoscientific Research Unit, Geological Isolation Research and Development Directorate on a novel method to remove the fluorine and boron. The Quantum Beam Directorate has synthesized fibrous adsorbents with radiation-induced graft polymerization and applied the adsorbents to collect rare metals dissolved in hot springs and sea water. The results of previous testing indicated that the adsorbent was able to remove more than 95% of the boron and fluorine and that performance of adsorbent for boron removal was better than the performance using ion-exchange resin. It was also apparent that the pH of groundwater had an influence on the performance of the adsorbent with respect to boron removal. Therefore we reran the recycling tests using groundwater from the neutralization tank at the groundwater treatment facility were repeated. The results indicated that the performance of the adsorbent using neutral groundwater for boron removal was higher than using uncontrolled groundwater. However the bed volume (BV) with recycled adsorbent decreased compared to first use. It is thought that sulfur added at the groundwater treatment facility was retained by the adsorbent despite elution, and affected the performance such that repeat usage resulted in decreased efficiency. In addition, it is considered that the goals established in the first

  17. INFLUENCE OF GROUNDWATER GEOCHEMISTRY ON THE LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS CONTAINING ZERO-VALENT IRON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive barriers that couple subsurface fluid flow with a passive chemical treatment zone are emerging, cost effective approaches for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. Factors such as the build-up of surface precipitates, bio-fouling, and changes in subsurface tr...

  18. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donohue, Shane; McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick; Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100 m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar

  19. Geophysical and hydrogeological characterisation of the impacts of on-site wastewater treatment discharge to groundwater in a poorly productive bedrock aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohue, Shane [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McCarthy, Valerie; Rafferty, Patrick [Department of Applied Sciences, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Dublin Road, Dundalk (Ireland); Orr, Alison; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    Contaminants discharging from on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSWTSs) can impact groundwater quality, threatening human health and surface water ecosystems. Risk of negative impacts becomes elevated in areas of extreme vulnerability with high water tables, where thin unsaturated intervals limit vadose zone attenuation. A combined geophysical/hydrogeological investigation into the effects of an OSWTS, located over a poorly productive aquifer (PPA) with thin subsoil cover, aimed to characterise effluent impacts on groundwater. Groundwater, sampled from piezometers down-gradient of the OSWTS percolation area displayed spatially erratic, yet temporally consistent, contaminant distributions. Electrical resistivity tomography identified an area of gross groundwater contamination close to the percolation area and, when combined with seismic refraction and water quality data, indicated that infiltrating effluent reaching the water table discharged to a deeper more permeable zone of weathered shale resting on more competent bedrock. Subsurface structure, defined by geophysics, indicated that elevated chemical and microbiological contaminant levels encountered in groundwater samples collected from piezometers, down-gradient of sampling points with lower contaminant levels, corresponded to those locations where piezometers were screened close to the weathered shale/competent rock interface; those immediately up-gradient were too shallow to intercept this interval, and thus the more impacted zone of the contaminant plume. Intermittent occurrence of faecal indicator bacteria more than 100 m down gradient of the percolation area suggested relatively short travel times. Study findings highlight the utility of geophysics as part of multidisciplinary investigations for OSWTS contaminant plume characterisation, while also demonstrating the capacity of effluent discharging to PPAs to impact groundwater quality at distance. Comparable geophysical responses observed in similar

  20. Hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer is not associated with post-treatment testosterone suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States); Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org; And others

    2013-04-15

    Background: To investigate post-treatment changes in serum testosterone in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between April 2008 and October 2011, 228 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved prospective protocol. Patients received doses ranging from 70 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) to 72.5 CGE at 2.5 CGE per fraction using passively scattered protons. Three patients were excluded for receiving androgen deprivation therapy (n = 2) or testosterone supplementation (n = 1) before radiation. Of the remaining 226 patients, pretreatment serum testosterone levels were available for 217. Of these patients, post-treatment serum testosterone levels were available for 207 in the final week of treatment, 165 at the six-month follow-up, and 116 at the 12-month follow-up. The post-treatment testosterone levels were compared with the pretreatment levels using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for matched pairs. Results: The median pretreatment serum testosterone level was 367.7 ng/dl (12.8 nmol/l). The median changes in post-treatment testosterone value were as follows: +3.0 ng/dl (+0.1 nmol/l) at treatment completion; +6.0 ng/dl (+0.2 nmol/l) at six months after treatment; and +5.0 ng/dl (0.2 nmol/l) at 12 months after treatment. None of these changes were statistically significant. Conclusion: Patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy do not experience testosterone suppression. Our findings are consistent with physical measurements demonstrating that proton radiotherapy is associated with less scatter radiation exposure to tissues beyond the beam paths compared with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy.

  1. Effects of nitrate on the treatment of lead contaminated groundwater by nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yiming; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Zhou, Xuefei; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Weixian; Keller, Arturo A; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-09-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) is efficient for removing Pb(2+) and nitrate from water. However, the influence of nitrate, a common groundwater anion, on Pb(2+) removal by nZVI is not well understood. In this study, we showed that under excess Fe(0) conditions (molar ratio of Fe(0)/nitrate>4), Pb(2+) ions were immobilized more quickly (nitrate-free systems (∼ 15 min) due to increasing pH. With nitrate in excess (molar ratio of Fe(0)/nitratenitrate stimulated the formation of crystal PbxFe3-xO4 (ferrite), which provided additional Pb(2+) removal. However, ∼ 7% of immobilized Pb(2+) ions were released into aqueous phase within 2h due to ferrite deformation. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) values below -600 mV correlated with excess Fe(0) conditions (complete Pb(2+) immobilization), while ORP values ≥-475 mV characterized excess nitrate conditions (ferrite process and Pb(2+) release occurrence). This study indicates that ORP monitoring is important for proper management of nZVI-based remediation in the subsurface to avoid lead remobilization in the presence of nitrate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Discovery, interception, and treatment of a groundwater plume: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.; Ketelle, D.

    1996-01-01

    A radiological groundwater plume was discovered to be discharging into a surface stream and portions of the storm drain network at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A CERCLA removal action was initiated to address the discharges. The plume was found to be migrating 65 degrees oblique to the overall hydraulic gradient and was identified only after historic data were analyzed and field tests were performed under the working hypothesis of stratabound flow and transport. A detailed geologic and hydrologic analysis was performed that accurately predicted the 3-dimensional plume configuration from a single point datum where significantly elevated contaminant levels were found in a bedrock core hole. Subsequent sampling found that direct discharges of contamination existed in the stream only in the location of the predicted stratum. The affected storm drain outfall discharges were suspected to be the major contributors to 90 Sr surface water risk from ORNL. Thus, the selected removal action focused on eliminating the known seepage to the storm drain network. Intercept system operations reduced the total surface water 90 Sr flux by about 90%. Ongoing investigations seek to identify the source of the plume with the hope that the intercept system may eventually be deactivated. However, the efficiency of the system exceeded expectations and demonstrated that a good understanding of the hydrodynamics is a prerequisite to success. The relatively trouble free operation of the system also indicates that simple technologies can serve as effective measures to address immediate problems

  3. A novel conversion of the groundwater treatment sludge to magnetic particles for the adsorption of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Suiyi; Fang, Shuai; Huo, Mingxin; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yu; Yang, Xia; Geng, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Bian, Dejun; Huo, Hongliang

    2015-07-15

    Iron sludge, produced from filtration and backwash of groundwater treatment plant, has long been considered as a waste for landfill. In this study, iron sludge was reused to synthesize Fe3O4 magnetic particles (MPs) by using a novel solvothermal process. Iron sludge contained abundant amounts of silicon, iron, and aluminum and did not exhibit magnetic properties. After treatment for 4h, the amorphous Fe in iron sludge was transformed into magnetite Fe3O4, which could be easily separated from aqueous solution with a magnet. The prepared particles demonstrated the intrinsic properties of soft magnetic materials and could aggregate into a size of 1 μm. MPs treated for 10h exhibited excellent magnetic properties and a saturation magnetization value of 9 emu/g. The obtained particles presented the optimal adsorption of methylene blue under mild conditions, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 99.4 mg/g, which was higher than that of granular active carbon. The simple solvothermal method can be used to prepare Fe3O4 MPs from iron sludge, and the products could be applied to treatment of dyeing wastewater. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Passive aerobic treatment of net-alkaline, iron-laden drainage from a flooded underground anthracite mine, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the results of a continuous 4.5-day laboratory aeration experiment and the first year of passive, aerobic treatment of abandoned mine drainage (AMD) from a typical flooded underground anthracite mine in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. During 1991-2006, the AMD source, locally known as the Otto Discharge, had flows from 20 to 270 L/s (median 92 L/s) and water quality that was consistently suboxic (median 0.9 mg/L O2) and circumneutral (pH ??? 6.0; net alkalinity >10) with moderate concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (medians of 11, 2.2, and aeration experiment demonstrated rapid oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe 2+) without supplemental alkalinity; the initial Fe2+ concentration of 16.4 mg/L decreased to less than 0.5 mg/L within 24 h; pH values increased rapidly from 5.8 to 7.2, ultimately attaining a steady-state value of 7.5. The increased pH coincided with a rapid decrease in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) from an initial value of 10 -1.1atm to a steady-state value of 10-3.1atm. From these results, a staged aerobic treatment system was conceptualized consisting of a 2 m deep pond with innovative aeration and recirculation to promote rapid oxidation of Fe2+, two 0.3 m deep wetlands to facilitate iron solids removal, and a supplemental oxic limestone drain for dissolved manganese and trace-metal removal. The system was constructed, but without the aeration mechanism, and began operation in June 2005. During the first 12 months of operation, estimated detention times in the treatment system ranged from 9 to 38 h. However, in contrast with 80-100% removal of Fe2+ over similar elapsed times during the laboratory aeration experiment, the treatment system typically removed less than 35% of the influent Fe2+. Although concentrations of dissolved CO2 decreased progressively within the treatment system, the PCO2 values for treated effluent remained elevated (10-2.4 to 10-1.7atm). The

  5. The treatment of water-conducting features in groundwater flow and transport modelling of the Borrowdale Volcanic Group in Nirex 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.P.; Norris, S.; Todman, S.J.; Watson, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    In the Nirex 97 assessment of the post-closure performance of a repository at Sellafield, the potential repository host rock was the Borrowdale Volcanic Group (BVG). The treatment of water-conducting features in groundwater flow and transport modelling of the BVG is discussed. Groundwater flow in the BVG is predominantly through a subset of the total set of discontinuities - the Flowing Features (FFs). FFs can be identified in core samples by the presence of recent calcite. In boreholes, the FFs are clustered, and the clustering appears to be significant hydro-geologically. However, there is uncertainty about the connectivity of the clusters. A range of models is possible, from the case of isolated clusters to the case where the clusters form a well-connected network. The radiological risk from the repository was determined from radionuclide transport calculations based on the groundwater flow fields obtained from the regional-scale flow calculations. For rocks, such as the BVG, in which groundwater flows predominantly through discontinuities, diffusion into immobile water int the rock matrix between the discontinuities was modelled. Data from the site characterization and research programmes could be used to develop and parameterize groundwater flow and transport models for use in repository performance assessments. (author)

  6. Fate of sulfamethoxazole, 4-nonylphenol, and 17beta-estradiol in groundwater contaminated by wastewater treatment plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B; Keefe, Steffanie H; Leblanc, Denis R; Bradley, Paul M; Chapelle, Francis H; Meyer, Michael T; Loftin, Keith A; Kolpin, Dana W; Rubio, Fernando

    2009-07-01

    Organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) were measured in samples collected from monitoring wells located along a 4.5-km transect of a plume of groundwater contaminated by 60 years of continuous rapid infiltration disposal of wastewater treatment plant effluent. Fifteen percent of the 212 OWCs analyzed were detected, including the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SX), the nonionic surfactant degradation product 4-nonylphenol (NP), the solvent tetrachloroethene (PCE), and the disinfectant 1,4-dichlorobenzene (DCB). Comparison of the 2005 sampling results to data collected from the same wells in 1985 indicates that PCE and DCB are transported more rapidly in the aquiferthan NP, consistent with predictions based on compound hydrophobicity. Natural gradient in situ tracer experiments were conducted to evaluate the subsurface behavior of SX, NP, and the female sex hormone 17beta-estradiol (E2) in two oxic zones in the aquifer: (1) a downgradient transition zone at the interface between the contamination plume and the overlying uncontaminated groundwater and (2) a contaminated zone located beneath the infiltration beds, which have not been loaded for 10 years. In both zones, breakthrough curves for the conservative tracer bromide (Br-) and SX were nearly coincident, whereas NP and E2 were retarded relative to Br- and showed mass loss. Retardation was greater in the contaminated zone than in the transition zone. Attenuation of NP and E2 in the aquifer was attributed to biotransformation, and oxic laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments from the transition and contaminated zones show that uniform-ring-labeled 14C 4-normal-NP was biodegraded more rapidly 130-60% recovered as 14CO2 in 13 days) than 4-14C E2 (20-90% recovered as 14CO2 in 54 days). There was little difference in mineralization potential between sites.

  7. Fate of sulfamethoxazole, 4-nonylphenol, and 17β-estradiol in groundwater contaminated by wastewater treatment plant effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Meyer, Michael T.; Loftin, Keith A.; Koplin, Dana W.; Rubio, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) were measured in samples collected from monitoring wells located along a 4.5-km transect of a plume of groundwater contaminated by 60 years of continuous rapid infiltration disposal of wastewater treatment plant effluent. Fifteen percent of the 212 OWCs analyzed were detected, including the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SX), the nonionic surfactant degradation product 4-nonylphenol (NP), the solvent tetrachloroethene (PCE), and the disinfectant 1,4-dichlorobenzene (DCB). Comparison of the 2005 sampling results to data collected from the same wells in 1985 indicates that PCE and DCB are transported more rapidly in the aquifer than NP, consistent with predictions based on compound hydrophobicity. Natural gradient in situ tracer experiments were conducted to evaluate the subsurface behavior of SX, NP, and the female sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) in two oxic zones in the aquifer: (1) a downgradient transition zone at the interface between the contamination plume and the overlying uncontaminated groundwater and (2) a contaminated zone located beneath the infiltration beds, which have not been loaded for 10 years. In both zones, breakthrough curves for the conservative tracer bromide (Br−) and SX were nearly coincident, whereas NP and E2 were retarded relative to Br− and showed mass loss. Retardation was greater in the contaminated zone than in the transition zone. Attenuation of NP and E2 in the aquifer was attributed to biotransformation, and oxic laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments from the transition and contaminated zones show that uniform-ring-labeled 14C 4-normal-NP was biodegraded more rapidly (30−60% recovered as 14CO2 in 13 days) than 4-14C E2 (20−90% recovered as 14CO2in 54 days). There was little difference in mineralization potential between sites.

  8. Combination of novel coalescing oil water separator and electrocoagulation technique for treatment of petroleum compound contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladzad, Sepideh; Fallah, Narges; Nasernejad, Bahram

    2017-07-01

    In the present study a combination of a novel coalescing oil water separator (COWS) and electrocoagulation (EC) technique was used for treatment of petroleum product contaminated groundwater. In the first phase, COWS was used as the primary treatment. Two different types of coalescing media and two levels of flow rates were examined in order to find the optimum conditions. The effluent of COWS was collected in optimum conditions and was treated using an EC process in the second phase of the research. In this phase, preliminary experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect of EC reaction time and sedimentation time on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency. Best conditions for EC reaction time and sedimentation time were obtained to be 5 min and 30 min, respectively. Response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the effect of initial pH, current density and aeration rate on settling velocity (V s ) and effluent COD. The optimum conditions, for achieving maximum values of V s as well as the values of effluent COD, in the range of results were obtained at conditions of 7, 34 mA·cm -2 and 1.5 L·min -1 for initial pH, current density and aeration rate, respectively.

  9. Experimental plant for the physical-chemical treatment of groundwater polluted by Municipal Solid Waste (MSW leachate, with ammonia recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Raboni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents the results of the experimental treatment of groundwater (flow rate: 300 m3 h-1 polluted by the leachate of an old MSW landfill (7 million tonnes in northern Italy. The process consists of a coagulation-flocculation pre-treatment at pH > 11, and subsequent ammonia stripping, after heating the water to 35-38 °C by means of the biogas produced by the landfill. The stripped ammonia was recovered by absorption with sulfuric acid, producing a 30% solution of ammonium sulfate, which was reused as a base fertilizer. In addition, the paper reports important operational aspects related to the scaling of the stripping tower’s packing and its effect on pH and temperature profiles inside the towers caused by the closed loop, which recirculates the stripping air coming from the ammonia absorption towers with sulfuric acid. The average removal efficiency of ammonia reached 95.4% with an inlet mean concentration of 199.0 mg L-1.

  10. Performance of a Zerovalent Iron Reactive Barrier for the Treatment of Arsenic in Groundwater: Part 1. Hydrogeochemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developments and improvements of remedial technologies are needed to effectively manage arsenic contamination in groundwater at hazardous waste sites. In June 2005, a 9.1 m long, 14 m deep, and 1.8 to 2.4 m wide (in the direction of groundwater flow) pilot-scale permeable reacti...

  11. Passivation process and the mechanism of packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system during the treatment of ABS resin wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling; Zhang, Yunhong; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    This study provides mechanistic insights into the passivation of the packing particles during the treatment of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin wastewater by the Fe0/GAC system. The granular-activated carbon (GAC) and iron chippings (Fe0) were mixed together with a volumetric ratio of 1:1. GAC has a mean particle size of approximately 3-5 mm, a specific surface of 748 m2 g(-1), a total pore volume of 0.48 mL g(-1) and a bulk density of 0.49 g cm(-3). The iron chippings have a compact and non-porous surface morphology. The results show that the packing particles in the Fe0/GAC system would lose their activity because the removal of TOC and PO4(3-) for ABS resin wastewater could not carried out by the Fe0/GAC system after 40 days continuous running. Meanwhile, the availability of O2 and intrinsic reactivity of Fe0 play a key role on the form of passive film with different iron oxidation states. The passive film on the surface of iron chippings was formed by two phases: (a) local corrosion phase (0-20 d) and (b) co-precipitation phase (20-40 d), while that of GAC was mainly formed by the co-precipitation of corrosion products with SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) because SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) would not easily reach the Fe0 surface. Therefore, in order to avoid the occurrence of filler passivation, high concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) in wastewater should be removed before the treatment process of the Fe/GAC system.

  12. Comparative efficacy of active and passive distraction during restorative treatment in children using an iPad versus audiovisual eyeglasses: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, R H; Baghdadi, Z D

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of two types of distraction techniques: passive, using audiovisual glasses (AV glasses), versus active, using an iPad, as an adjunct to local analgesia during vital pulp therapy in children. Pain behaviour, and heart rates from an exposure group (treatment with the aid of an iPad) and control group (treatment with the aid of AV glasses) were compared in a randomised, split-mouth design using the Wilcoxon signed rank test (pain and behaviour) and paired t test for heart rate scores at p 0.05. Children (39) (mean age 6.27 years) received the two treatment sessions. Generally, AV glasses had higher pain and behaviour scores than iPad. Pain results demonstrated marginal significant differences between the two distraction techniques during local analgesia administration (p 0.076) and caries removal (p 0.071). A significant difference between the two techniques during local analgesia administration only (p 0.017), in favour of an iPad. Average heart rates over the treatment intervals were lower among iPad group than those using AV glasses group. Patients preferred an iPad more than AV glasses (24 versus 15). Treatment sessions were significantly shorter for iPad. Active distraction using an iPad demonstrated better performance than passive distraction using AV glasses.

  13. In Situ Treatment and Management Strategies for 1,4-Dioxane-Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    and Figure 71). The surviving microorganisms that were tolerant of catalysis treatment were able to thrive in the post-catalysis biodegradation phase... microorganisms thrived during the biodegradation process. This was consistent with oxidation process that biodiversity was inhibited by the chemical reaction...During the biodegradation phase, microorganisms were able to grow in relatively suitable conditions and thus more species thrived after biodegradation

  14. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  15. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J.; Houk, T.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3 1/2 year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc 99 ) (activities up to 926 pCi/L)

  16. A hybrid treatment of ozonation with limestone adsorption processes for the removal of Fe2+ in groundwater: Fixed bed column study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Nor Azliza; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2017-10-01

    During pumping of groundwater to the surface, the reaction between dissolved iron (Fe2+) and oxygen causes oxidation to ferric iron (Fe3+), thereby increasing the concentration of Fe2+. In this research, the potential application of ozonation with limestone adsorption to remove Fe2+ from groundwater was investigated through batch ozonation and fixed-bed-column studies. Groundwater samples were collected from a University Science Malaysia tube well (initial concentration of Fe2+, Co=1.563 mg/L). The effect of varying ozone dosages (10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5, and 25 g/Nm3) was analyzed to determine the optimum ozone dosage for treatment. The characteristics of the column data and breakthrough curve were analyzed and predicted using mathematical models, such as Adam Bohart, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models. The data fitted well to the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models, with correlation coefficient r2>0.93, but not to the Adam Bohart (r2=0.47). The total Fe2+ removed was 72% (final concentration of Fe2+, Ct=0.426 mg/L) at the maximum dosage of 25 g/Nm3 through ozonation only. However, the efficiency of Fe2+ removal was increased up to 99.5% (Ct=0.008 mg/L) when the hybrid treatment of ozonation with limestone adsorption was applied in this study. Thus, this integrated treatment was considerably more effective in removing Fe2+ than single ozonation treatment.

  17. Selection of water treatment processes special study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. The restoration of contaminated aquifers is to be undertaken in Phase II of the UMTRA Project. To begin implementation of Phase II, DOE requested that groundwater restoration methods and technologies be investigated by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). and that the results of the TAC investigations be documented in special study reports. Many active and passive methods are available to clean up contaminated groundwater. Passive groundwater treatment includes natural flushing, geochemical barriers, and gradient manipulation by stream diversion or slurry walls. Active groundwater.cleanup techniques include gradient manipulation by well extraction or injection. in-situ biological or chemical reclamation, and extraction and treatment. Although some or all of the methods listed above may play a role in the groundwater cleanup phase of the UMTRA Project, the extraction and treatment (pump and treat) option is the only restoration alternative discussed in this report. Hence, all sections of this report relate either directly or indirectly to the technical discipline of process engineering

  18. The effect of passive heating on heat shock protein 70 and interleukin-6: a possible treatment tool for metabolic diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Faulkner, SH; Jackson, S; Fatania, G; Leicht, CA

    2017-01-01

    Exercise and physical activity remain the gold standard methods of enhancing and maintaining health and wellbeing. However, in populations that benefit most from exercise, adherence is often poor and alternatives to exercise are important to bring about health improvements. Recent work suggests a role for passive heating (PH) and heat shock proteins (HSP) in improving cardio-metabolic health. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of HSP70 and IL-6 in response to either exerc...

  19. Treatment of heavy metals and radionuclides in groundwater and wastewater by magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, D.; Elder, G.R.; Tucker, P.M.; Dunn, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Removal of trace quantities of heavy metal or radionuclide contamination from solutions at high flow rate presents a considerable technical challenge. Low flow methods of treatment such as particle gravity settling require expensive large volume equipment, whereas traditional methods of filtration demand significant energy costs. Magnetic filtration can be used to provide a low cost method of solid-liquid separation at high flow rate, provided contaminants can be selectively bound to a magnetic solid particle. This paper describes recent progress with this technique including performance tests of composite materials produced to selectively remove specific contaminants such as cesium, uranium, lead, cadmium, and mercury from solution

  20. Treatment of groundwater containing Mn(II), Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) by bioaugmented quartz-sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaohui; Chang, Yangyang; Liang, Jinsong; Chen, Chen; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-12-01

    High concentrations of iron (Fe(II)) and manganese (Mn(II)) often occur simultaneously in groundwater. Previously, we demonstrated that Fe(II) and Mn(II) could be oxidized to biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO) via aeration and microbial oxidation, and the formed BFMO could further oxidize and adsorb other pollutants (e.g., arsenic (As(III)) and antimony (Sb(III))). To apply this finding to groundwater remediation, we established four quartz-sand columns for treating groundwater containing Fe(II), Mn(II), As(III), and Sb(III). A Mn-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) was inoculated into two parallel bioaugmented columns. Long-term treatment (120 d) showed that bioaugmentation accelerated the formation of Fe-Mn oxides, resulting in an increase in As and Sb removal. The bioaugmented columns also exhibited higher overall treatment effect and anti-shock load capacity than that of the non-bioaugmented columns. To clarify the causal relationship between the microbial community and treatment effect, we compared the biomass of active bacteria (reverse-transcribed real-time PCR), bacterial community composition (Miseq 16S rRNA sequencing) and community function (metagenomic sequencing) between the bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented columns. Results indicated that the QJX1 strain grew steadily and attached onto the filter material surface in the bioaugmented columns. In general, the inoculated strain did not significantly alter the composition of the indigenous bacterial community, but did improve the relative abundances of xenobiotic metabolism genes and Mn oxidation gene. Thus, bioaugmentation intensified microbial degradation/utilization for the direct removal of pollutants and increased the formation of Fe-Mn oxides for the indirect removal of pollutants. Our study provides an alternative method for the treatment of groundwater containing high Fe(II), Mn(II) and As/Sb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

    1994-01-03

    This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

  2. Self-Passivation by Fluorine Plasma Treatment and Low-Temperature Annealing in SiGe Nano wires for Biochemical Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.; Chen, C.; Kuo, P.; Chen, Y.; Chang, T.; Lai, C.; Whang, A. J.; Lai, Y.; Chen, H.; Hsieh, I.

    2014-01-01

    Nano wires are widely used as highly sensitive sensors for electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Modifying the band structure of strained-Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors by applying the in-plane tensile strain reportedly improves electron and hole mobility. The oxidation-induced Ge condensation increases the Ge fraction in a SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) and substantially increases hole mobility. However, oxidation increases the number of surface states, resulting in hole mobility degradation. In this work, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) was used as a biochemical reagent. The hydroxyl molecule on the oxide surface was replaced by the methoxy groups of the APTMS molecule. We proposed a surface plasma treatment to improve the electrical properties of SiGe nano wires. Fluorine plasma treatment can result in enhanced rates of thermal oxidation and speed up the formation of a self-passivation oxide layer. Like a capping oxide layer, the self-passivation oxide layer reduces the rate of follow-up oxidation. Pre oxidation treatment also improved the sensitivity of SiGe nano wires because the Si-F binding was held at a more stable interface state compared to bare nano wire on the SiGe surface. Additionally, the sensitivity can be further improved by either the N 2 plasma posttreatment or the low-temperature post annealing due to the suppression of out diffusion of Ge and F atoms from the SiGe nano wire surface.

  3. Selective removal of dissolved toxic metals from groundwater by ultrafiltration in combination with chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Le, V.T.; McConeghy, G.J.; Martin, J.F.

    1989-09-01

    An alternative in-place process for the removal of toxic heavy metals based on aqueous solution chemistry and treatment is being evaluated under the auspices of the Emerging Technologies Program funded through the USEPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program. The technique involves the contacting of aqueous solutions containing the heavy metal contaminants with low concentrations of polyelectrolytes, and then removing the polyelectrolytes from solution with ultrafiltration membranes. The first phase of the program is considered complete. Success has been achieved for the separation of soluble, heavy metal ions: cadmium, lead, and mercury even in the presence of an organic compound, toluene. Removal was successful at alkaline conditions, using any combination of membrane material or polyelectrolyte. Arsenic was removed, but not effectively, using the current polyelectrolytes, simply because arsenic is present as an anionic species rather than as a cationic species. Optimization of the process variables is nearing completion and pilot and field testing will take place in the second year of the program to verify the process under realistic conditions and to establish process economics

  4. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  5. Impact of wastewater treatment plant discharge of lidocaine, tramadol, venlafaxine and their metabolites on the quality of surface waters and groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa-Gómez, Paola C; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2012-05-01

    The presence of the anesthetic lidocaine (LDC), the analgesic tramadol (TRA), the antidepressant venlafaxine (VEN) and the metabolites O-desmethyltramadol (ODT) and O-desmethylvenlafaxine (ODV) was investigated in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, in surface waters and in groundwater. The analytes were detected in all effluent samples and in only 64% of the surface water samples. The mean concentrations of the analytes in effluent samples from WWTPs with wastewater from only households and hospitals were 107 (LDC), 757 (TRA), 122 (ODT), 160 (VEN) and 637 ng L(-1) (ODV), while the mean concentrations in effluents from WWTPs treating additionally wastewater from pharmaceutical industries as indirect dischargers were for some pharmaceuticals clearly higher. WWTP effluents were identified as important sources of the analyzed pharmaceuticals and their metabolites in surface waters. The concentrations of the compounds found in surface waters ranged from Infiltration of the target analytes into groundwater was not observed.

  6. Case study: Free product recovery and site remediation using horizontal trenching, soil vapor treatment and groundwater extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, E.P.; Johnston, H.S. Jr.; Farrell, M.; Twedell, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Sites with soil and groundwater impacted by petroleum hydrocarbons have been remediated using a variety of traditional techniques. However, when the site impacted lies within a very confined downtown area of an expanding metropolitan city, a more complex array of technologies must be considered. The Law Enforcement Center site is the City of Charlotte's worst known underground storage tank (UST) release to date. A cost effective free product recovery, soil vapor and groundwater extraction system is being piloted here using new horizontal trenching technology and state of the art equipment. On-site low permeability soil required that an alternative to standard recovery wells be developed for groundwater recovery and vapor extraction. Operation and maintenance (O and M) of the large number of recovery wells required would have been extremely costly over the expected lifetime of the project. Although horizontal trenching was the best solution to the O and M costs, many problems were encountered during their installation

  7. Mechanistic investigations of Se(VI) treatment in anoxic groundwater using granular iron and organic carbon: An EXAFS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Blair D.; Blowes, David W.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Ptacek, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate treatment of aqueous Se(VI) under anoxic conditions. ► We utilize granular Fe 0 and organic carbon to promote Se(VI) removal. ► We characterize Se speciation using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. ► Granular Fe 0 promotes removal of Se(VI) by reduction to Se(0). ► Organic carbon promotes removal through sorption processes without reduction. - Abstract: The removal of aqueous Se(VI) from a simulated groundwater by granular iron (GI), organic carbon (OC), and a mixture of these reactive materials (GI–OC) was evaluated in laboratory batch experiments. The experiments were performed under anoxic conditions to simulate subsurface treatment. A total reaction time of 120 h (5 d) was chosen to investigate the rapid changes in speciation occurring over reaction times that are reasonable for permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems. After 120 h, concentrations of Se decreased by >90% in the GI system, 15% in the OC system and 35% in the GI–OC mixture. Analysis of the materials after contact with Se using synchrotron-radiation based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicated the presence of Se(IV) and Se(0) on the margins of GI grains after 6 h with evidence of Se-O and Se-Se bonding, whereas Se(VI) was not observed. After 72 h, Se(0) was the only form of Se present in the GI experiments. In the OC batches, the XAS analysis indicated binding consistent with sorption of aqueous Se(VI) onto the OC with only minor reduction to Se(IV) and Se(0) after 120 h. Selenium XAS spectra collected for the GI–OC mixture were consistent with spectra for Se(IV) and Se(0) on both the margins of GI grains and OC particles, suggesting that the presence of dissolved Fe may have mediated the reduction of sorbed Se(VI). The results suggest that the application of granular Fe is effective at inducing aqueous Se removal in anoxic conditions through reductive precipitation processes.

  8. Assessing quality and quantity of groundwater DOC in relation to plant export from different over-winter green-cover treatments in tillage farming systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premrov, Alina; Coxon, Catherine; Hackett, Richard; Richards, Karl

    2010-05-01

    The biogeochemistry of nitrogen is often connected to carbon and C/N dynamics. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) electron donor availability can be related to groundwater denitrification (Buss, et al. 2005). Therefore groundwater nitrate attenuation processes are also frequently linked to carbon availability. In recent years the role of over-winter green cover in tillage farming has been studied extensively. Nevertheless further research on the biogeochemical effect of green cover on soil/sediment and groundwater quality is still needed. In particular plant roots are known to exude different types of organic compounds, but their role in groundwater quality has not been investigated in depth. According to Cannavo et al. (2004a,b), in addition to quantity, the quality of water-extractable soil organic matter (e.g. molecular size/weight) has also an important role for microbial activity. In this study we investigate the effect of over-winter green-cover on potential DOC export to shallow groundwater (2 - 5 m below ground level), located on tillage land in Oak Park, Carlow, Ireland. The experiment includes three over-winter green-cover treatments: natural green-cover, mustard and no-cover (sprayed with herbicide following harvest); and is underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer. The site is equipped with 4 shallow piezometers per treatment (total no. of piezometers is 20, including treatments and surrounding piezometers). In addition to monitoring the quantity of DOC concentrations in shallow groundwater under different green cover treatments over time, an attempt was made to evaluate the quality of dissolved organic matter in shallow groundwater using Excitation Emission Fluorescence Matrix (EEFM) profiles obtained from analyses performed on a Varian Fluorescence Spectrophotometer of a single batch of samples (from all 20 installed piezometers in September 2009). To evaluate the quality of dissolved organic matter in shallow groundwater, computation of the

  9. Development of groundwater treatment method using radiation-induced graft polymerization adsorbent at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory. Annual report on 2007 fiscal year (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyatomi, Yosuke; Shimada, Akiomi; Ogata, Nobuhisa; Sugihara, Kozo; Seko, Noriaki; Kasai, Noboru; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Yuji; Tamada, Masao

    2009-11-01

    The concentrations of fluorine (7.2-10mg/L) and boron (0.8-1.5mg/L) dissolved in groundwater pumped from shafts during excavation at the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU), Tono Geoscience Centre, must be reduced to the levels below the environmental standards (fluorine:0.8mg/L, boron:1mg/L). Coagulation treatment and ion exchange treatment are applied for fluorine and boron at a current water treatment facility in MIU, respectively. A collaborative research on groundwater treatment for fluorine and boron was started by the Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate and the Tono Geoscientific Research Unit, Geological Isolation Research and Development Directorate in 2006. This is because the Quantum Beam Science Directorate has synthesized fibrous adsorbents with radiation-induced graft polymerization and applied them to collect rare metals dissolved in hot springs and sea water. Boron adsorbent synthesized by grafting showed higher removal rate than that of the ion-exchange resin. Additionally, the durability and the repetitive use of the boron adsorbent were evaluated to estimate the capacity of the boron adsorption. Therefore we produced a test equipment to do scale-up test of the adsorbent. Effects of flow rate and the repetitive use on the adsorption capacity of boron were investigated. As a result, it concluded that the adsorption capacity of the boron adsorbent did not change even when the flow rate increased from SV 50h -1 to 100h -1 . In addition, enough durability was confirmed for the repetitive use of the adsorbent. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbent was affected by pH of the groundwater especially in high alkaline range above a pH of 10. (author)

  10. Arsenate and Arsenite Sorption on Magnetite: Relations to Groundwater Arsenic Treatment Using Zerovalent Iron and Natural Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a zerovalent iron corrosion product; it is also formed in natural soil and sediment. Sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) on magnetite is an important process of arsenic removal from groundwater using zerovalent iron-based permeable reactive ba...

  11. Groundwater Potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    4Department of Geology, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Corresponding ... integrated for the classification of the study area into different groundwater potential zones. .... table is mainly controlled by subsurface movement of water into ...

  12. Compositional properties of passivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerber, Florian; van der Schaft, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    The classical passivity theorem states that the negative feedback interconnection of passive systems is again passive. The converse statement, - passivity of the interconnected system implies passivity of the subsystems -, turns out to be equally valid. This result implies that among all feasible

  13. Interior design for passive solar homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  14. Interior design for passive solar homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building from incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitably of various interior elements.

  15. TU-C-17A-12: Towards a Passively Optimized Phase-Space Monte Carlo (POPMC) Treatment Planning Method: A Proof of Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y M; Bednarz, B; Zankowski, C; Svatos, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The advent of on-line/off-line adaptive, and biologically-conformal radiation therapy has led to a need for treatment planning solutions that utilize voxel-specific penalties, requiring optimization over a large solution space that is performed quickly, and the dose in each voxel calculated accurately. This work proposes a “passive” optimization framework, which is executed concurrently during Monte Carlo dose calculation, evaluating the cost/benefit of each history during transport, and creates a passively optimized fluence map. Methods: The Monte Carlo code Geant4 v9.6 was used for this study. The standard voxel geometry implementation was modified to support the passive optimization framework, with voxel-specific optimization parameters. Dose-benefit functions, which will increase a particle history’s weight upon dose deposition, were defined in a central collection of voxels to effectively create target structures. Histories that deposit energy to voxels are reweighted based on a voxel’s dose multiplied by its cost/benefit value. Upon full termination of each history, the dose contributions of that history are reweighted to reflect a contribution proportional to the history’s final weight. A parallel-planar 1.25 MeV photon fluence is transported through the geometry, and re-weighted at each dose deposition step. The resulting weight is tallied with the incident spatial and directional coordinates in a phase-space distribution. Results: A uniform incident fluence was reweighted during MC dose calculations to create an optimized fluence map which would generate dose profiles in target volumes that exhibit the same dose characteristics as the prescribed optimization parameters. An optimized dose profile, calculated concurrently with the phase-space, reflects the resulting dose distribution. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of passively optimizing an incident fluence map during Monte Carlo dose calculations. The flexibility of

  16. The Effects of Acid Passivation, Tricresyl Phosphate Pre-Soak, and UV/Ozone Treatment on the Tribology of Perfluoropolyether-Lubricated 440C Stainless Steel Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar

    1997-01-01

    The boundary-lubrication performance of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) thin films in the presence of passivated 440 C stainless steel is presented. The study utilized a standard ball-on-disc tribometer. Stainless steel surfaces were passivated with one of four techniques: 1) submersion in a chromic acid bath for 30 minutes at 46 C, 2) submersion in a chromic acid bath for 60 minutes at 56 C, 3) submersion in a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) bath for 2 days at 107 C, or 4) UV/Ozone treated for 15 minutes. After passivation, each disc had a 400 A film of PFPE (hexafluoropropene oxide) applied to it reproducibly (+/- 20%) and uniformly (+/- 15%) using a film deposition device. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding wear cycles required to induce an increase in the friction coefficient from an initial value characteristic of the lubricated wear couple to a final, or failure value, characteristic of an unlubricated, unpassivated wear couple. The lubricated lifetime of the 440 C couple was not altered as a result of the various passivation techniques. The resulting surface chemistry of each passivation technique was examined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that chromic acid passivation altered the Cr to Fe ratio of the surface. TCP passivation resulted in a FePO4 layer on the surface, while UV/Ozone passivation only removed the carbonaceous contamination layer. None of the passivation techniques were found to dramatically increase the oxide film thickness.

  17. Use of Interface Treatment to Reduce Emissions from Residuals in Lower Permeability Zones to Groundwater flowing Through More Permeable Zones (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P.; Cavanagh, B.; Clifton, L.; Daniels, E.; Dahlen, P.

    2013-12-01

    Many soil and groundwater remediation technologies rely on fluid flow for contaminant extraction or reactant delivery (e.g., soil vapor extraction, pump and treat, in situ chemical oxidation, air sparging, enhanced bioremediation). Given that most unconsolidated and consolidated settings have permeability contrasts, the outcome is often preferential treatment of more permeable zones and ineffective treatment of the lower permeability zones. When this happens, post-treatment contaminant emissions from low permeability zone residuals can cause unacceptable long-term impacts to groundwater in the transmissive zones. As complete remediation of the impacted lower permeability zones may not be practicable with conventional technologies, one might explore options that lead to reduction of the contaminant emissions to acceptable levels, rather than full remediation of the lower permeability layers. This could be accomplished either by creating a sustained emission reaction/attenuation zone at the high-low permeability interface, or by creating a clean soil zone extending sufficiently far into the lower permeability layer to cause the necessary reduction in contaminant concentration gradient and diffusive emission. These options are explored in proof-of-concept laboratory-scale physical model experiments. The physical models are prepared with two layers of contrasting permeability and either dissolved matrix storage or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the lower permeability layer. A dissolved oxidant is then delivered to the interface via flow across the higher permeability layer and changes in contaminant emissions from the low permeability zone are monitored before, during, and after oxidant delivery. The use of three oxidants (dissolved oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and sodium persulfate) for treatment of emissions from petroleum hydrocarbon residuals is examined.

  18. Treatment of 9L gliosarcoma in rats by ferrociphenol-loaded lipid nanocapsules based on a passive targeting strategy via the EPR effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ngoc Trinh; Morille, Marie; Bejaud, Jerome; Legras, Pierre; Vessieres, Anne; Jaouen, Gerard; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Passirani, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    To study a passive targeting strategy, via the enhanced permeability and retention effect following systemic administration of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) loaded with ferrociphenol, FcdiOH. Long chains of polyethylene glycol (DSPE-mPEG2000) were incorporated onto the surface of LNCs by post-insertion technique. Stealth properties of LNCs were investigated by in vitro complement consumption and macrophage uptake, and in vivo pharmacokinetics in healthy rats. Antitumour effect of FcdiOH-loaded LNCs was evaluated in subcutaneous and intracranial 9L gliosarcoma rat models. LNCs and DSPE-mPEG2000-LNCs presented low complement activation and weak macrophage uptake. DSPE-mPEG2000-LNCs exhibited prolonged half-life and extended area under the curve in healthy rats. In a subcutaneous gliosarcoma model, a single intravenous injection of FcdiOH-LNCs (400 μL, 2.4 mg/rat) considerably inhibited tumour growth when compared to the control. DSPE-mPEG2000-FcdiOH-LNCs exhibited a strong antitumour effect by nearly eradicating the tumour by the end of the study. In intracranial gliosarcoma model, treatment with DSPE-mPEG2000-FcdiOH-LNCs and FcdiOH-LNCs statistically improved median survival time (28 and 27.5 days, respectively) compared to the control (25 days). These results demonstrate the interesting perspectives for the systemic treatment of glioma thanks to bio-organometallic chemotherapy via lipid nanocapsules.

  19. Mineralogy and geochemistry of Zn-rich mine-drainage precipitates from an MgO passive treatment system by synchrotron-based X-ray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Macías, Francisco; Caraballo, Manuel A; Nieto, José Miguel; Román-Ross, Gabriela; Tucoulou, Rémi; Ayora, Carlos

    2011-09-15

    Synchrotron radiation-induced micro-X-ray analysis were applied to characterize the newly formed phases that precipitate in a passive treatment system using magnesium oxide to remove high concentrations of zinc (ca. 440 mg/L) and other minor metals from neutral pretreated waters in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Iberian Peninsula). Micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) maps of polished samples were used to find spatial correlations among metals, pinpointing zones of interest where micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) data were exploited to identify the mineral phases responsible for metal retention. This coupled technique identified hydrozincite (Zn(5)(CO(3))(2)(OH)(6)) and minor loseyite ((Mn,Zn)(7)(CO(3))(2)(OH)(10)) as the mineral sinks for Zn and also other potentially toxic elements such as Co and Ni. Although hydrozincite retains traces of Mn, this metal is mainly retained by precipitation of loseyite. The precipitation of zinc hydroxy-carbonates and their ability to uptake other metals (Mn, Co, and Ni) is hence of potential interest not only for the treatment of contaminated waters but also for the generation of a solid waste that could be exploited as a new Zn economic resource.

  20. Biochemical oxygen demand and nutrient processing in a novel multi-stage raw municipal wastewater and acid mine drainage passive co-treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosnider, W H; Winfrey, B K; Nairn, R W

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory-scale, four-stage continuous flow reactor system was constructed to test the viability of high-strength acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) passive co-treatment. The synthetic AMD had pH 2.60 and 1860 mg/L acidity as CaCO(3) equivalent with 46, 0.25, 2, 290, 55, 1.2 and 390 mg/L of Al, As, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn, respectively. The AMD was introduced to the system at a 1:2 ratio with raw MWW from the City of Norman, Oklahoma USA containing 265 ± 94 mg/L BOD(5), 11.5 ± 5.3 mg/L PO(4)(-3), and 20.8 ± 1.8 mg/L NH(4)(+)-N. During the 135 d experiment, PO(4)(-3) and NH(4)(+)-N were decreased to treatment is a viable ecological engineering approach for the developed and developing world that can be optimized and applied to improve water quality with minimal use of fossil fuels and refined materials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of acute tacrine treatment on passive-avoidance response, open-field behavior, and toxicity in 17- and 30-day-old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S Y; Han, Y F; Yu, Z L; Yang, R; Dong, H; Ko, K M

    2006-09-01

    The potential of tacrine in altering cognitive/behavioral function as well as in causing toxicity was evaluated in mice of 17 and 30 days of age. Cognitive and behavioral studies were performed using a step-through passive avoidance task and a habituation open-field test with a 24-h retention interval. Tacrine was subcutaneously injected (1.25-80 micro mol/kg) 30 min prior to the first session of both tests. During the training session in step-through task, tacrine treatment dose-dependently decreased the number of footshocks, with IC(50) values being 7.8 and 23.3 micro mol/kg in 17- and 30-day-old mice, respectively. Treatment with tacrine at a low dose (5 micro mol/kg) significantly prolonged the retention latency in 17-day-old mice only, but it shortened the retention latency at high doses of 20 and 40 micro mol/kg in 17- and 30-day-old, respectively. During the acquisition session in the open-field test, tacrine treatment dose-dependently decreased the locomotor activity in 17- and 30-day-old mice, with IC(50) values being 15.1 and 24.7 micro mol/kg, respectively. High doses of tacrine invariably increased the locomotor activity during the recall session. Tacrine treatment at a dose of 40 micro mol/kg caused a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase activity in 17- and 30-day-old mice at 6 h post-dosing, with the extent of stimulation in 30-day-old mice being more prominent. In conclusion, tacrine was more potent in enhancing/disrupting the cognitive function, inhibiting locomotor activity as well as in causing hepatotoxicity in 17-day-old than in 30-day-old mice.

  2. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  3. Passive solar technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  4. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  5. Attenuation and diel cycling of coal-mine drainage constituents in a passive treatment wetland: A case study from Lambert Run, West Virginia, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesper, Dorothy J.; Smilley, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    This study reports changes in coal-mine drainage constituent concentrations through a passive treatment wetland and over diel cycles. The purpose of the study was to determine what physiochemical mechanisms control attenuation of metals and if they varied by location and through time. The source water was slightly acidic (average pH 5.43); downstream degassing of CO 2 contributed to an increase in pH prior to discharge from the site (average pH 7.05). Aluminum, Fe, rare earth elements (REE) and Y were removed to a greater extent than were Mn, Co and Ni. At acidic pH, the REE and Y were generally complexed by SO 4 . At higher pH, carbonate complexes became more important. The REE and Y concentrations were normalized to the North American Shale Composite standard; the normalized patterns were coherent near the source but anomalies of Ce and Y were present further downstream indicating oxidation and sorption processes. Four sets of diel-based samples were collected, one from a shallow, surface-flow wetland and three from a deeper, newly constructed wetland. Well-defined diel cycles were observed for concentrations of Si, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, As, REE and Y in the shallow wetland. In all cases, the concentrations increased (up to 863%) during night and decreased during the day. These cycles had an inverse relationship with the temperature cycle (pH had no discernable cycle). The consistency of concentration cycles suggests a common mechanism, most likely associated with the formation of Fe oxyhydroxides. The increased rate of Fe 2+ oxidation in warm water can account for the cycles in Fe; scavenging of the other elements by the Fe precipitate can account for the consistency of the cycles even though the elements include cations, anions (H 2 AsO 4 - or HAsO 4 -2 ), and neutral species (H 4 SiO 4 0 ). While REE and Y had clear cycles in the constructed wetland, the other elements did not. This is partially due to the lower elemental concentrations (including Fe) but the cycles

  6. Groundwater restoration long beyond closure at the Homestake-Milan and United Nuclear-Church Rock uranium mill tailings piles, New Mexico, USA: full-scale programs requiring more than 20 years of active treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, W.P.

    1998-01-01

    Since as early as 1975, groundwater contamination from New Mexico uranium mill tailings has been investigated with two sites -Homestake-Milan and United Nuclear-Church Rock -showing severe enough groundwater damage to merit listing on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund National Priority List -a nationwide list based on severity of pollution and water resource usefulness. These two sites provide valuable case studies for the first - 1950s -and second - 1970s -generations of uranium mill tailings facilities demonstrating the severity of contamination which ineffective control can allow and the challenge of full scale groundwater restoration. While the groundwater restoration at these sites began in the 1970s and 1980s, active treatment is anticipated into the 21st century. This paper summarizes the groundwater restoration programs at two of these sites - Homestake Mining Company's (HMC) Milan Mill (now called the ''Grants Project'') and United Nuclear Corporation's (UNC) Church Rock Mill. The two sites are summarized with respect to operations, groundwater impact, tailings disposal systems, hydrogeological characteristics of the site and affected areas, applicable standards, and remedial technology applied. This review provides a basis for initial comparisons with uranium mill tailings groundwater restoration challenges outside the USA. These sites provide an important benchmark the complexity of restoration at for large-scale uranium mill tailings sites. The longevity of the restoration efforts demonstrate the results of low-intensity responses to contamination upon detection and delayed enforcement actions. These ''witnesses'' to the value of effective pollution prevention in tailings design and full review and monitoring of tailings operations, have potential to be models of effective groundwater restoration. (orig.)

  7. WE-FG-202-09: Voxel-Level Analysis of Adverse Treatment Response in Pediatric Patients Treated for Ependymoma with Passive Scattering Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, C [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We identified patients treated for ependymoma with passive scattering proton therapy who subsequently developed treatment-related imaging changes on MRI. We sought to determine if there is any spatial correlation between imaged response, dose, and LET. Methods: A group of 14 patients treated for ependymoma were identified as having post-treatment MR imaging changes observable as T2-FLAIR hyperintensity with or without enhancement on T1 post-contrast sequences. MR images were registered with treatment planning CT images and regions of treatment-related change contoured by a practicing radiation oncologist. The contoured regions were identified as response with voxels represented as 1 while voxels within the brain outside of the response region were represented as 0. An in-house Monte Carlo system was used to recalculate treatment plans to obtain dose and LET information. Voxels were binned according to LET values in 0.3 keV µm{sup −1} bins. Dose and corresponding response value (0 or 1) for each voxel for a given LET bin were then plotted and fit with the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman dose response model to determine TD{sub 50} and m parameters for each LET value. Response parameters from all patients were then collated, and linear fits of the data were performed. Results: The response parameters TD50 and m both show trends with LET. Outliers were observed due to low numbers of response voxels in some cases. TD{sub 50} values decreased with LET while m increased with LET. The former result would indicate that for higher LET values, the dose is more effective, which is consistent with relative biological effectiveness (RBE) models for proton therapy. Conclusion: A novel method of voxel-level analysis of image biomarker-based adverse patient treatment response in proton therapy according to dose and LET has been presented. Fitted TD{sub 50} values show a decreasing trend with LET supporting the typical models of proton RBE. Funding provided by NIH Program Project

  8. Geochemical and stable isotopic constraints on the generation and passive treatment of acidic, Fe-SO{sub 4} rich waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthies, Romy, E-mail: rmatthies@uwaterloo.ca [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Aplin, Andrew C., E-mail: andrew.aplin@ncl.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Boyce, Adrian J., E-mail: a.boyce@suerc.gla.ac.uk [Scottish Universities Environment Research Centre, East Kilbride, G75 0QF (United Kingdom); Jarvis, Adam P., E-mail: a.p.jarvis@ncl.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Reducing and Alkalinity Producing Systems (RAPS) remediate net-acidic metalliferous mine drainage by creating anoxic conditions in which bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) raises alkalinity and drives the precipitation of iron and other chalcophilic elements as sulfides. We report chemical and stable isotopic data from a study monitoring the biogeochemical processes involved in the generation of mine waters and their remediation by two RAPS. Sulfur isotopes show that sulfate in all mine waters has a common source (pyrite oxidation), whilst oxygen isotopes show that oxidation of pyritic sulfur is mediated by Fe(III){sub aq}. The isotopic composition of dissolved sulfide, combined with the sulfur and oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate in RAPS effluents, proves BSR and details its dual isotope systematics. The occurrence and isotopic composition of solid phase iron sulfides indicate the removal of reduced sulfur within the RAPS, with significant amounts of elemental sulfur indicating reoxidation steps. However, only 0 to 9% of solid phase iron occurs as Fe sulfides, with approximately 70% of the removed iron occurs as Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. Some of the (hydr)oxide is supplied to the wetland as solids and is simply filtered by the wetland substrate, playing no role in alkalinity generation or proton removal. However, the majority of iron is supplied as dissolved Fe(II), indicating that acid generating oxidation and hydrolysis reactions dominate iron removal. The overall contribution of BSR to the sulfur geochemistry in the RAPS is limited and sulfate retention is dominated by sulfate precipitation, comparable to aerobic treatment systems, and show that the proton acidity resulting from iron oxidation and hydrolysis must be subsequently neutralised by calcite dissolution and/or BSR deeper in the RAPS sediments. BSR is not as important as previously thought for metal removal in RAPS. The results have practical consequences for the design, treatment performance and long

  9. Improvement of pre-treatment method for 36Cl/Cl measurement of Cl in natural groundwater by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Takuma

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of 36 Cl/Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a useful method to trace hydrological processes in groundwater. For accurate estimation, separation of SO 4 2- from Cl - in groundwater is required because 36 S affects AMS measurement of 36 Cl. Previous studies utilized the difference in solubility between BaSO 4 and BaCl 2 (BaSO 4 method) to chemically separate SO 4 2- from Cl - . However, the accuracy of the BaSO 4 method largely depends on operator skill, and consequently Cl - recovery is typically incomplete (70-80%). In addition, the method is time consuming (>1 week), and cannot be applied directly to dilute solutions. In this study, a method based on ion-exchange column chromatography (column method) was developed for separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- . Optimum conditions were determined for the diameter and height of column, type and amount of resin, type and concentration of eluent, and flow rate. The recovery of Cl - was almost 100%, which allowed complete separation from SO 4 2- . The separation procedure was short ( 4 methods, and then analyzed by AMS to estimate 36 S counts and 36 Cl/Cl values. 36 S counts in samples processed by the column method were stable and lower than those from the BaSO 4 method. The column method has the following advantages over the BaSO 4 method: (1) complete and stable separation of Cl - and SO 4 2- , (2) less operator influence on results, (3) short processing time ( - , and (5) concentration of Cl - and separation from SO 4 2- in the one system for dilute solutions.

  10. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ''point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies

  11. Passivation condition of carbon steel in bentonite/sand mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawakami, Susumu

    2002-03-01

    It is essential to understand the corrosion type of carbon steel under the repository conditions for the lifetime assessment of carbon steel overpack used for geological isolation of high-level radioactive waste. According to the previous study, carbon steel is hard to passivate in buffer material assuming a chemical condition range of groundwater in Japan. However, concrete support will be constructed around the overpack in the case of repository in the soft rock system and groundwater having a higher pH may infiltrate to buffer material. There is a possibility that the corrosion type of carbon steel will be influenced by the rise of the pH in groundwater. In this study, anodic polarization experiments were performed to understand the passivation condition of carbon steel in buffer material saturated with water contacted with concrete. An ordinary concrete an a low-alkalinity concrete were used in the experiment. The results of the experiments showed that the carbon steel can passivate under the condition that water having pH > 13 infiltrate to the buffer material assuming present property of buffer material. If the low-alkalinity concrete is selected as the support material, passivation can not occur on carbon steel overpack. The effect of the factors of buffer material such as dry density and mixing ratio of sand on the passivation of carbon steel was also studied. The results of the study showed that the present property of buffer material is enough to prevent passivation of carbon steel. (author)

  12. Water use and groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elton, J.J.; Livingstone, B.

    1998-01-01

    A general review of the groundwater resources in Saskatchewan and their vulnerability to contamination was provided. In particular, the use of water and the effects on water by the oil and gas industry in Saskatchewan were discussed. It was suggested that public concerns over scarcity and contamination of water are gradually changing perceptions about Canada's abundance of water. Saskatchewan's surface water covers 12 per cent of the province. About 90 per cent of the rural populations and 80 per cent of municipalities depend on groundwater supplies. Regulations affecting oil and gas operations that could affect water resources have become more stringent. Techniques used in the detection and monitoring of groundwater affected by salt and petroleum hydrocarbons were described. Electromagnetic surveys are used in detecting salt-affected soils and groundwater. Laboratory analysis of chloride concentrations are needed to define actual chloride concentrations in groundwater. Wells and barriers can be installed to control and recover chloride plumes. Deep well injection and reverse osmosis are other methods, but there is no cheap or simple treatment or disposal method for salt-impacted groundwater. Spills or leaks of petroleum hydrocarbons from various sources can also lead to contamination of groundwater. Various assessment and remediation methods are described. Although there is no scarcity of techniques, all of them are difficult, costly, and may take several years to complete. 11 refs., 1 tab

  13. Complexed iron removal from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munter, R.; Ojaste, H.; Sutt, J. [Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia). Dept. of Environmental & Chemical Technology

    2005-07-01

    The paper demonstrates an intensive work carried out and results obtained on the pilot plant of the City of Kogalym Water Treatment Station (Tjumen, Siberia, Russian Federation) to elaborate on a contemporary nonreagent treatment technology for the local iron-rich groundwater. Several filter materials (Birm, Pyrolox, hydroanthracite, Everzit, granulated activated carbon) and chemical oxidants (ozone, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and potassium permanganate) were tested to solve the problem with complexed iron removal from groundwater. The final elaborated technology consists of raw water intensive aeration in the gas-degas treatment unit followed by sequential filtration through hydroanthracite and the special anthracite Everzit.

  14. Active-to-Passive Environmental Cleanup Transition Strategies - 13220

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaughan, Thomas F.; Aylward, Robert S.; Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B.; Whitaker, Wade C.; Mills, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    The Savannah River Site uses a graded approach to environmental cleanup. The selection of groundwater and vadose zone remediation technologies for a specific contamination area is based on the size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration, and configuration of the plume. These attributes are the result of the nature and mass of the source of contamination and the subsurface characteristics in the area of the plume. Many large plumes consist of several zones that are most efficiently addressed with separate complementary corrective action/remedial technologies. The highest concentrations of contaminants are found in the source zone. The most robust, high mass removal technologies are often best suited for remediation of the source zone. In the primary plume zone, active remedies, such as pump-and-treat, may be necessary to remove contaminants and exert hydraulic control of the plume. In the dilute fringe zone, contaminants are generally lower in concentration and can often be treated with passive techniques. A key determination in achieving an acceptable and cost-effective end state for a given waste unit is when to transition from an active treatment system to a more passive or natural approach (e.g., monitored natural attenuation or enhanced attenuation). This paper will discuss the considerations for such a transition as well as provide examples of successful transitions at the Savannah River Site. (authors)

  15. Longevity of granular iron in groundwater treatment processes: solution composition effects on reduction of organohalides and nitroaromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Jörg; Vikesland, Peter J; Kohn, Tamar; Burris, David R; Ball, William P; Roberts, A Lynn

    2003-03-15

    Although granular iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are increasingly employed to contain subsurface contaminants, information pertaining to system longevity is sparse. The present investigation redresses this situation by examining the long-term effects of carbonate, silica, chloride, and natural organic matter (NOM) on reactivity of Master Builders iron toward organohalides and nitroaromatic contaminants. Six columns were operated for 1100 days (approximately 4500 pore volumes) and five others for 407 days (approximately 1800 pore volumes). Nine were continuously exposed to mixtures of contaminant species, while the other two were only intermittently exposed in order to differentiate deactivation induced by water (and inorganic cosolutes) from that resulting from contaminant reduction. Contaminants investigated were trichloroethylene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,1-dichloroethane, 2-nitrotoluene, 4-nitroacetophenone, and 4-nitroanisole. Column reactivity declined substantially over the first 300 days and was dependent on the feed solution chemistry. High carbonate concentrations enhanced reactivity slightly within the first 90 days but produced poorer performance over the long term. Both silica and NOM adversely affected reactivity, while chloride evinced a somewhat mixed effect. Observed contrasts in relative reactivities suggest that trichloroethylene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, and nitroaromatic compounds all react at different types of reactive sites. Our results indicate that differences in groundwater chemistry should be considered in the PRB design process.

  16. Removal of dissolved organic matter in municipal effluent with ozonation, slow sand filtration and nanofiltration as high quality pre-treatment option for artificial groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linlin, Wu; Xuan, Zhao; Meng, Zhang

    2011-04-01

    In the paper the combination process of ozonation, slow sand filtration (SSF) and nanofiltration (NF) was investigated with respect to dissolved organic matter (DOM) removal as high quality pre-treatment option for artificial groundwater recharge. With the help of ozonation leading to breakdown of the large organic molecules, SSF preferentially removes soluble microbial by-product-like substances and DOM with molecular weight (MW) less than 1.0 kDa. NF, however, removes aromatic, humic acid-like and fulvic acid-like substances efficiently and specially removes DOM with MW above 1.0 kDa. The residual DOM of the membrane permeate is dominated by small organics with MW 500 Da, which can be further reduced by the aquifer treatment, despite of the very low concentration. Consequently, the O(3)/SSF/NF system offers a complementary process in DOM removal. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) can be reduced from 6.5±1.1 to 0.7±0.3 mg L(-1) and from 267±24 to 52±6 μg L(-1), respectively. The very low DOC concentration of 0.6±0.2 mg L(-1) and THMFP of 44±4 μg L(-1) can be reached after the aquifer treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Health Issues Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases ... Children > Safety & Prevention > Immunizations > Immunizations: Active vs. Passive Safety & ...

  18. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  19. Pilot-scale passive bioreactors for the treatment of acid mine drainage: efficiency of mushroom compost vs. mixed substrates for metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hocheol; Yim, Gil-Jae; Ji, Sang-Woo; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Hwang, Taewoon

    2012-11-30

    Pilot-scale field-testing of passive bioreactors was performed to evaluate the efficiency of a mixture of four substrates (cow manure compost, mushroom compost, sawdust, and rice straw) relative to mushroom compost alone, and of the effect of the Fe/Mn ratio, during the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) over a 174-day period. Three 141 L columns, filled with either mushroom compost or the four substrate mixture (in duplicate), were set-up and fed with AMD from a closed mine site, in South Korea, using a 4-day hydraulic retention time. In the former bioreactor, effluent deterioration was observed over 1-2 months, despite the good efficiency predicted by the physicochemical characterization of mushroom compost. Steady state effluent quality was then noted for around 100 days before worsening in AMD source water occurred in response to seasonal variations in precipitation. Such changes in AMD quality resulted in performance deterioration in all reactors followed by a slow recovery toward the end of testing. Both substrates (mushroom compost and mixtures) gave satisfactory performance in neutralizing pH (6.1-7.8). Moreover, the system was able to consistently reduce sulfate from day 49, after the initial leaching out from organic substrates. Metal removal efficiencies were on the order of Al (∼100%) > Fe (68-92%) > Mn (49-61%). Overall, the mixed substrates showed comparable performance to mushroom compost, while yielding better effluent quality upon start-up. The results also indicated mushroom compost could release significant amounts of Mn and sulfate during bioreactor operation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fifteen-year Assessment of a Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treatment of Chromate and Trichloroethylene in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fifteen-year performance of a granular iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB; Elizabeth City, North Carolina) is reviewed with respect to contaminant treatment (hexavalent chromium and trichloroethylene) and hydraulic performance. Due to in-situ treatment of the chromium sou...

  1. Electropotential measurements of passivation and corrosion of steel coupons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, G.S.; Wright, R.R.

    1977-02-01

    There is considerable interest at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) in the preparation of mild steel to resist corrosion (passivation) both in moist air and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) environments. Steel prepared by the usual procedures to prevent rusting, such as oiling, plastic coating, painting, or phosphating, cannot be used in the presence of UF 6 . Tests have shown that a chromate treatment or an ammoniacal citrate treatment for passivation are effective. The electropotential behavior of these two passivation treatments is described. The initial electropotential measurement, when compared to that of an unpassivated coupon, gives the electropotential degree in volts of passivation. Continual exposure in the test, when compared to the unpassivated coupon, gives a profile of the durability of the passivation film. The chromate passivation treatment was slightly superior to the citrate passivation

  2. L2-gain and passivity techniques in nonlinear control

    CERN Document Server

    van der Schaft, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    This standard text gives a unified treatment of passivity and L2-gain theory for nonlinear state space systems, preceded by a compact treatment of classical passivity and small-gain theorems for nonlinear input-output maps. The synthesis between passivity and L2-gain theory is provided by the theory of dissipative systems. Specifically, the small-gain and passivity theorems and their implications for nonlinear stability and stabilization are discussed from this standpoint. The connection between L2-gain and passivity via scattering is detailed. Feedback equivalence to a passive system and resulting stabilization strategies are discussed. The passivity concepts are enriched by a generalised Hamiltonian formalism, emphasising the close relations with physical modeling and control by interconnection, and leading to novel control methodologies going beyond passivity. The potential of L2-gain techniques in nonlinear control, including a theory of all-pass factorizations of nonlinear systems, and of parametrization...

  3. Passivation of defect states in Si and Si/SiO2 interface states by cyanide treatment: improvement of characteristics of pin-junction amorphous Si and crystalline Si-based metal-oxide-semiconductor junction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, N.; Fujinaga, T.; Niinobe, D.; Maida, O.; Takahashi, M.; Kobayashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    Defect states in Si can be passivated by cyanide treatment which simply involves immersion of Si materials in KCN solutions, followed by rinse. When the cyanide treatment is applied to pin-junction amorphous Si [a-Si] solar cells, the initial conversion efficiency increases. When the crown-ether cyanide treatment using a KCN solution of xylene containing 18-crown-6 is performed on i-a-Si films, decreases in the photo- and dark current densities with the irradiation time are prevented. The cyanide treatment can also passivate interface states present at Si/SiO 2 interfaces, leading to an increase in the conversion efficiency of 2 / Si (100)> solar cells.. Si-CN bonds formed by the reaction of defect states with cyanide ions have a high bond energy of about 4.5 eV and hence heat treatment at 800 0 C does not rupture the bonds, making thermal stability of the cyanide treatment.. When the cyanide treatment is applied to ultrathin SiO 2 /Si structure, the leakage current density is markedly decreased (Authors)

  4. Non-Chromate Passivation of Zinc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Bech-Nielsen, G.

    1993-01-01

    Phos). The treatments are within the same concentration region, and they have a mutual pat-ent pending. Although some tests still need to be conducted, the following aspects are clear at the present time: The general appearance of the passivated zinc surface is very similar to a standard yellow chromate treatment...... successfully. The corrosion resistance against white rust on zinc and zinc alloys is just as good as that of yellow chromate, although the result de-pends on the corrosion test method as well as on the nature of the zinc substrate pas-sivated. The passivation procedure is simply a dip for approxi-mately 2...

  5. Compendium of ordinances for groundwater protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    Groundwater is an extremely important resource in the Tennessee Valley. Nearly two-thirds of the Tennessee Valley's residents rely, at least in part, on groundwater supplies for drinking water. In rural areas, approximately ninety-five percent of residents rely on groundwater for domestic supplies. Population growth and economic development increase the volume and kinds of wastes requiring disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal problems associated with increases in conventional wastewater and solid waste, technological advancements in recent decades have resulted in new chemicals and increased usage in agriculture, industry, and the home. Unfortunately, there has not been comparable progress in identifying the potential long-term effects of these chemicals, in managing them to prevent contamination of groundwater, or in developing treatment technologies for removing them from water once contamination has occurred. The challenge facing residence of the Tennessee Valley is to manage growth and economic and technological development in ways that will avoid polluting the groundwater resource. Once groundwater has been contaminated, cleanup is almost always very costly and is sometimes impractical or technically infeasible. Therefore, prevention of contamination -- not remedial treatment--is the key to continued availability of usable groundwater. This document discusses regulations to aid in this prevention.

  6. The Rush to Remediate: Long Term Performance Favors Passive Systems at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.; Cauthen, K.; Beul, R. R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the long-term performance of groundwater remediation systems at SRS and compare active versus passive systems. The presentation will focus on the limited effectiveness of active pump and treat systems and share the experience with more passive and natural systems such as soil vapor extraction, barometric pumping, bioremediation, and phytoremediation. Three remediation projects are presented. In each case the waste source is capped with clay or synthetic barriers; however, extensive groundwater contamination remains. The first project features the cleanup of the largest plume in the United States. The second project entails solvent and vinyl chloride remediation of groundwater beneath a hazardous waste landfill. The third project discusses tritium containment from a 160-acre radioactive waste disposal area. Special emphasis is placed on performance data from alternate technology cleanup. The goals are to share remediation data, successes and lessons learned, while making a case for passive systems use in groundwater remediation

  7. Groundwater Pollution Arising From The Disposal Of Creosote Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Flyvbjerg, J.

    1992-01-01

    Creosote-contaminated groundwater contains a complex mixture of phenols, aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogen-, sulphur- or oxygen-containing heterocyclic, aromatic compounds. One of the most important factors that limits the spreading of these contaminants in groundwater aquifers is degradation by...... enhancement of the native population of subsurface micro-organisms to degrade the contaminants (in situ treatment) and withdrawal of the groundwater followed by treatment by various wastewater treatment processes (above-ground treatment)....

  8. Reengineering water treatment units for removal of Sr-90, I-129, Tc-99, and uranium from contaminated groundwater at the DOE's Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    The 33 years of active operation of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins to dispose of liquid low-level radioactive waste at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has resulted in the contamination of the groundwater underlying these basins with a wide variety of radionuclides and stable metals. The current Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit requires the operation of a pump-and-treat system capable of (1) maintaining hydraulic control of a specified contaminated groundwater plume, (2) treatment of the extracted groundwater, and (3) reinjection of the treated water hydraulically upgradient of the basins. Two multimillion-dollar water treatment units (WTUs) were designed and built in 1997 and the basic design consists of (1) reverse osmosis concentration, (2) chemical addition, neutralization, precipitation, polymer addition, flocculation, and clarification of the reverse osmosis concentrate, and (3) final polishing of the clarified water by ion exchange (IX) and sorption. During startup of these units numerous process optimizations were identified and, therefore, the WTUs have been recently reengineered. A systematic approach of: (1) developing a technical baseline through laboratory studies, (2) scale-up and plant testing, (3) plant modification, and (4) system performance monitoring was the basis for reengineering the WTUs. Laboratory experiments were conducted in order to establish a technical baseline for further scale-up/plant testing and system modifications. These studies focused on the following three areas of the process: (1) contaminant removal during chemical addition, neutralization and precipitation, (2) solids separation by flocculation, coagulation, clarification, and filtration, and (3) contaminant polishing of the clarified liquid by IX/sorption. Using standard laboratory-scale jar tests, the influences of pH and Fe concentration on contaminant removal during precipitation/neutralization were evaluated. The results of

  9. Indicators to identify the source of pesticide contamination to groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorling, Lærke; Brüsch, Walter; Tuxen, Nina

    In Denmark groundwater is synonym with drinking water. The mainstream Danish political approach favors prevention and action at source over advanced treatments of polluted groundwater. The main pollutants are nitrate and pesticides. Pesticides in groundwater can originate from either diffuse or p...

  10. Radon measurements of groundwater in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Cortes, A.

    1991-01-01

    Radon measurement has important applications in hydrogeological studies. Specifically, radon measurement is used to determine the fluctuations of the piezometric levels in groundwater and, in some cases, the path of the water, which is one of the key parameters for evaluating hydrogeological resources. Water from springs and deep wells in the Basin of Mexico and the valley of San Luis Potosi were sampled, measured and analyzed by previous authors. In this work, a method for measuring 222 Rn in groundwater by using a passive detector is presented and the results are compared with a similar experiment performed at the same time, using a dynamic method. The aim of the work is to develop a method for detecting, evaluating and measuring the 222 Rn in groundwater by using SSNTD technology. (author)

  11. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  12. Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater Treatment Pilot Study at the Sharpe Army Depot (SHAD) Lathrop, California. Task Order 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    I- I IIIIII 11HI ca~ 1- 1.cc III I HHo I H [I I 5-12 December 1990 Revision: 1 in Table 5-6, the performance of F-1 AA, in terms of the equilibrium...required. In treatment of water for boiler makeup, the relative freedom of Amberlite I RA-402 from *. ..IOEAIGCHRCEITC organic fouling insures good...hydroxide form) 1400 F (600 C) medium pressure boilers . This represents a considerable f chloride form) 1700 F (77 0C) saving over the use of deionization

  13. Combined biological treatment of sinter plant waste water, blast furnace gas scrubber water polluted groundwater and coke plant effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine van Hoorn [Corus Staal, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Waste water from the Corus coke plant in IJmuiden had been handled by the activated sludge process since start-up in 1972 but in the eighties it was clear that although this removed most phenols, the rest of the COD and thiocyanate must also be removed before discharge. The paper describes the original water treatment process and the higher pressure gas scrubber system for removal of SO{sub 2}, heavy metals and other harmful components. It goes on to describe development of a combined biological treatment system, the heart of which is the so-called Bio 2000. The performance of this new plant is discussed. COD concentrations are very constant but Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) concentrations fluctuate. COD, TKN and heavy metals are in compliance but cyanide and suspended solids are not always so. A method of overcoming this is being sought. This paper was presented at a COMA meeting in March 2005 held in Scunthorpe, UK. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Long-Term Capacity of Plant Mulch to Remediate Trichloroethylene in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive reactive barriers are commonly used to treat groundwater that is contaminated with chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE). A number of passive reactive barriers have been constructed with plant mulch as the reactive medium. The TCE is removed in these barr...

  15. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  16. Passive solar construction handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  17. Arsenic speciation and uranium concentrations in drinking water supply wells in Northern Greece: Correlations with redox indicative parameters and implications for groundwater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A.; Hug, Stephan J.; Ammann, Adrian; Zikoudi, Antonia; Hatziliontos, Christodoulos

    2007-01-01

    The cities in the Aksios and Kalikratia areas in Northern Greece rely on arsenic contaminated groundwater for their municipal water supply. As remedial action strongly depends on arsenic speciation, the presence of other possible contaminants, and on the general water composition, a detailed study with samples from 21 representative locations was undertaken. Arsenic concentrations were typically 10-70 μg/L. In the groundwaters of the Aksios area with lower Eh values (87-172 mV), pH 7.5-8.2 and 4-6 mM HCO 3 alkalinity, As(III) predominated. Manganese concentrations were mostly above the EC standard of 0.05 mg/L (0.1-0.7 mg/L). In groundwaters of the Kalikratia area with higher Eh values (272-352 mV), pH 6.7-7.5 and 6-12 mM HCO 3 alkalinity, As(V) was the main species. Uranium in the groundwaters was also investigated and correlations with total arsenic concentrations and speciation were examined to understand more of the redox chemistry of the examined groundwaters. Uranium concentrations were in the range 0.01-10 μg/L, with the higher concentrations to occur in the oxidizing groundwaters of the Kalikratia area. Uranium and total arsenic concentrations showed no correlation, whereas uranium concentrations correlated strongly with As(III)/As(tot) ratios, depicting their use as a possible indicator of groundwater redox conditions. Finally, boron was found to exceed the EC drinking water standard of 1 mg/L in some wells in the Kalikratia area and its removal should also be considered in the design of a remedial action

  18. In Situ Bioremediation of Energetic Compounds in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    negligible. Thus, this project clearly shows that in situ bioremediation of explosives in groundwater using active-passive cosubstrate addition can...Arlington, NJ, offices), the National Research Council (NRC) Biotechnology Research Institute (Montreal, Canada) and the Environmental Technology...NDAB are unlikely to accumulate during in situ anaerobic bioremediation explosives using cheese whey as a cosubstrate. 7.4 ADEQUATE DISTRIBUTION OF

  19. Passivity and Evolutionary Game Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Shinkyu; Shamma, Jeff S.; Martins, Nuno C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates an energy conservation and dissipation -- passivity -- aspect of dynamic models in evolutionary game theory. We define a notion of passivity using the state-space representation of the models, and we devise systematic methods to examine passivity and to identify properties of passive dynamic models. Based on the methods, we describe how passivity is connected to stability in population games and illustrate stability of passive dynamic models using numerical simulations.

  20. Passivity and Evolutionary Game Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Shinkyu

    2018-03-21

    This paper investigates an energy conservation and dissipation -- passivity -- aspect of dynamic models in evolutionary game theory. We define a notion of passivity using the state-space representation of the models, and we devise systematic methods to examine passivity and to identify properties of passive dynamic models. Based on the methods, we describe how passivity is connected to stability in population games and illustrate stability of passive dynamic models using numerical simulations.

  1. Groundwater Managment Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset outlines the location of the five Groundwater Management Districts in Kansas. GMDs are locally formed and elected boards for regional groundwater...

  2. Aktiv kontra passiv forvaltning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    2017-01-01

    Fordele og ulemper ved aktiv og passiv forvaltning har fået fornyet opmærksomhed blandt andet i forbindelse med den forestående implementering af MiFID II. Som bidrag til denne diskussion indeholder dette nummer af Finans/Invest tre artikler, der behandler aktiv og passiv forvaltning fra...... forskellige vinkler. Denne leder forklarer, hvorfor valget mellem aktiv og passiv forvaltning er mere kompliceret, end hvad man kunne tro ved første øjekast, og konkluderer, at der vil være plads til - og behov for - begge typer forvaltning....

  3. Most energetic passive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Huber, Marcus; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Tura, Jordi; Acín, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Passive states are defined as those states that do not allow for work extraction in a cyclic (unitary) process. Within the set of passive states, thermal states are the most stable ones: they maximize the entropy for a given energy, and similarly they minimize the energy for a given entropy. Here we find the passive states lying in the other extreme, i.e., those that maximize the energy for a given entropy, which we show also minimize the entropy when the energy is fixed. These extremal properties make these states useful to obtain fundamental bounds for the thermodynamics of finite-dimensional quantum systems, which we show in several scenarios.

  4. Techniques for active passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  5. Passive radon daughter dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, R.G.C.; Johnson, J.R.

    1986-03-01

    On the basis of an extensive review of the recent literature concerning passive radon daughter dosimeters, we have reached the following conclusions: 1) Passive dosimeters for measuring radon are available and reliable. 2) There does not presently exist an acceptable passive dosimeter for radon daughters. There is little if any hope for the development of such a device in the foreseeable future. 3) We are pessimistic about the potential of 'semi-passive dosimeters' but are less firm about stating categorically that these devices cannot be developed into a useful radon daughter dosimeter. This report documents and justifies these conclusions. It does not address the question of the worker's acceptance of these devices because at the present time, no device is sufficiently advanced for this question to be meaningful. 118 refs

  6. Passive Mixing inside Microdroplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengmin Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Droplet-based micromixers are essential units in many microfluidic devices for widespread applications, such as diagnostics and synthesis. The mixers can be either passive or active. When compared to active methods, the passive mixer is widely used because it does not require extra energy input apart from the pump drive. In recent years, several passive droplet-based mixers were developed, where mixing was characterized by both experiments and simulation. A unified physical understanding of both experimental processes and simulation models is beneficial for effectively developing new and efficient mixing techniques. This review covers the state-of-the-art passive droplet-based micromixers in microfluidics, which mainly focuses on three aspects: (1 Mixing parameters and analysis method; (2 Typical mixing element designs and the mixing characters in experiments; and, (3 Comprehensive introduction of numerical models used in microfluidic flow and diffusion.

  7. Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 7, Groundwater protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) uses large quantities of groundwater for drinking, processing, and non-contact cooling. Continued industrial and residential growth along with additional agricultural irrigation in areas adjacent to SRS will increase the demand for groundwater. This increasing demand will require a comprehensive management system to ensure the needed quality and quantity of groundwater is available for all users. The Groundwater Protection Program and the Waste Management Program establish the overall framework for protecting this resource. Ground water under SRS is monitored extensively for radiological, hazardous, and water quality constituents. Groundwater quality is known to have been affected at 33 onsite locations, but none of the contaminant plumes have migrated offsite. Onsite and offsite drinking water supplies are monitored to ensure they are not impacted. The site has more than 1800 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological constituents. SRS is complying with all applicable regulations related to groundwater protection, waste treatment, and waste disposal. The existing waste storage facilities are permitted or are being permitted. Existing hazardous- and mixed-waste storage facilities are being included in the site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit. Part B permitting has been initiated for many of the planned hazardous- and mixed-waste treatment and disposal facilities

  8. CANDU passive shutdown systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, R S; Olmstead, R A [AECL CANDU, Sheridan Park Research Community, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-01

    CANDU incorporates two diverse, passive shutdown systems, independent of each other and from the reactor regulating system. Both shutdown systems function in the low pressure, low temperature, moderator which surrounds the fuel channels. The shutdown systems are functionally different, physically separate, and passive since the driving force for SDS1 is gravity and the driving force for SDS2 is stored energy. The physics of the reactor core itself ensures a degree of passive safety in that the relatively long prompt neutron generation time inherent in the design of CANDU reactors tend to retard power excursions and reduces the speed required for shutdown action, even for large postulated reactivity increases. All passive systems include a number of active components or initiators. Hence, an important aspect of passive systems is the inclusion of fail safe (activated by active component failure) operation. The mechanisms that achieve the fail safe action should be passive. Consequently the passive performance of the CANDU shutdown systems extends beyond their basic modes of operation to include fail safe operation based on natural phenomenon or stored energy. For example, loss of power to the SDS1 clutches results in the drop of the shutdown rods by gravity, loss of power or instrument air to the injection valves of SDS2 results in valve opening via spring action, and rigorous self checking of logic, data and timing by the shutdown systems computers assures a fail safe reactor trip through the collapse of a fluctuating magnetic field or the discharge of a capacitor. Event statistics from operating CANDU stations indicate a significant decrease in protection system faults that could lead to loss of production and elimination of protection system faults that could lead to loss of protection. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the passive shutdown systems employed by CANDU. (author). 4 figs, 3 tabs.

  9. DOE groundwater protection strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, S.

    1988-01-01

    EH is developing a DOE-wide Groundwater Quality Protection Strategy to express DOE's commitment to the protection of groundwater quality at or near its facilities. This strategy responds to a September 1986 recommendation of the General Accounting Office. It builds on EPA's August 1984 Ground-Water Protection Strategy, which establishes a classification system designed to protect groundwater according to its value and vulnerability. The purposes of DOE's strategy are to highlight groundwater protection as part of current DOE programs and future Departmental planning, to guide DOE managers in developing site-specific groundwater protection practices where DOE has discretion, and to guide DOE's approach to negotiations with EPA/states where regulatory processes apply to groundwater protection at Departmental facilities. The strategy calls for the prevention of groundwater contamination and the cleanup of groundwater commensurate with its usefulness. It would require long-term groundwater protection with reliance on physical rather than institutional control methods. The strategy provides guidance on providing long-term protection of groundwater resources; standards for new remedial actions;guidance on establishing points of compliance; requirements for establishing classification review area; and general guidance on obtaining variances, where applicable, from regulatory requirements. It also outlines management tools to implement this strategy

  10. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  11. Evaluation of synthetic zeolite as engineering passive permeable reactive barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, O.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of toxic pollutants in groundwater brings about significant changes in the properties of water resources and has to be avoided in order to preserve the environmental quality. Heavy metals are among the most dangerous inorganic water pollutants, that related to many anthropogenic sources and their compounds are extremely toxic. The treatment of contaminated groundwater is among the most difficult and expensive environmental problems. Over the past years, permeable reactive barriers have provided an increasingly important role in the passive insitu treatment of contaminated groundwater. There are a large number of materials that are able to immobilize contaminants by sorption, including granulated active carbon, zeolite, montmorillonite, peat, compost, sawdust, etc. Zeolite X is a synthetic counterpart of the naturally occurring mineral Faujasite. It has one of the largest cavities and cavity entrances of any known zeolites. The main aim of this work is to examine the possibility of using synthetic zeolite X as an engineering permeable reactive barrier to remove heavy metals from a contaminated groundwater. Within this context, the following investigations were carried out: 1. Review on the materials most commonly used as engineered permeable reactive barriers to identify the important features to be considered in the examination of the proposed permeable reactive barrier material (zeolite X). 2. Synthesis of zeolite X and characterization of the synthesized material using different techniques. 3. Batch tests were carried out to characterize the equilibrium and kinetic sorption properties of the synthesized zeolite X towards the concerned heavy metals; zinc and cadmium ions. 4. Column tests were also performed to determine the design factors for permeable reactive barrier against zinc and cadmium ions solutions.Breakthrough curves measured in such experiments used to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients for both metal ions. 5. Analytical

  12. Treat mine water using passive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinmann, R.L.P.; Hedin, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Passive treatment represents an alternative to conventional chemical treatment of coal mine drainage. When successful, passive systems require less investment, less maintenance and usually are less expensive than conventional chemical treatment systems. As a result, during the last seven years, more than 500 passive systems have been constructed in the United States to treat coal mine drainage. Some exist as an alternative to conventional treatment; others serve as an inexpensive pretreatment step than can decrease subsequent chemical requirements. Sulfide minerals present in rock disturbed during mining can oxidize to form an acidic metal-laden solution, commonly known as acid mine drainage (AMD). Alkalinity present in the rock may partially or completely neutralize AMD, but if either acidity or excessive metal contaminants remain, the water must be treated before it can be discharged legally. The principal regulated contaminant metals of coal mine drainage are iron and manganese. Metal mine drainage often contains more toxic metals, such as cadmium, nickel, copper and zinc. Chemical treatment of AMD is estimated to cost America's mining industry more than $1 million a day. Three principal passive technologies are used in the treatment of coal mine drainage: Aerobic wetlands, wetlands constructed with an organic substrate and anoxic limestone drains (ALDS). The selection of the technology or combination of technologies to be used depends on the quality of the water being treated

  13. Sources of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, H.; Al-Masri, M. S.

    2007-09-01

    In spite of the importance of water for life, either for drinking, irrigation, industry or other wide uses in many fields, human beings seem to contaminate it and make it unsuitable for human uses. This is due to disposal of wastes in the environment without treatment. In addition to population increase and building expanding higher living costs, industrial and economical in growth that causes an increase in water consumption. All of these factors have made an increase pressure on our water environment quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, there is an increase of potential risks to the water environmental due to disposal of domestic and industrial wastewater in areas near the water sources. Moreover, the use of unacceptable irrigation systems may increase soil salinity and evaporation rates. The present report discusses the some groundwater sources and problem, hot and mineral waters that become very important in our life and to our health due to its chemical and radioactivity characteristics.(authors)

  14. Analysis and integrated modelling of groundwater infiltration to sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Balling, Jonas Dueholm; Larsen, Uffe Bay Bøgh

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of groundwater to sewer systems is a problem for the capacity of the system as well as for treatment processes at waste water treatment plants. This paper quantifies the infiltration of groundwater to a sewer system in Frederikshavn Municipality, Denmark, by measurements of sewer flo...

  15. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  16. Occurrence and potential transport of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds from wastewater-treatment plant influent and effluent to groundwater and canal systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    An increased demand for fresh groundwater resources in South Florida has prompted Miami-Dade County to expand its water reclamation program and actively pursue reuse plans for aquifer recharge, irrigation, and wetland rehydration. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD) and the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), initiated a study in 2008 to assess the presence of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds in the influent and effluent at three regional wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) operated by the WASD and at one WWTP operated by the City of Homestead, Florida (HSWWTP).

  17. Emerging organic contaminants in groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Marianne; Lapworth, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (ECs) are compounds now being found in groundwater from agricultural, urban sources that were previously not detectable, or thought to be significant. ECs include pesticides and degradates, pharmaceuticals, industrial compounds, personal care products, fragrances, water treatment by-products, flame retardants and surfactants, as well as ‘life-style’ compounds such as caffeine and nicotine. ECs may have adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health. Freq...

  18. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  19. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, David [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Neri, Robin [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  20. Groundwater Molybdenum from Emerging Industries in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuo-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Min; Kao, Jimmy C M; Lin, Kae-Long

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the influence of emerging industries development on molybdenum (Mo) groundwater contamination. A total of 537 groundwater samples were collected for Mo determination, including 295 samples from potentially contaminated areas of 3 industrial parks in Taiwan and 242 samples from non-potentially contaminated areas during 2008-2014. Most of the high Mo samples are located downstream from a thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panel factory. Mean groundwater Mo concentrations from potentially contaminated areas (0.0058 mg/L) were significantly higher (p industry and following wastewater batch treatment were 0.788 and 0.0326 mg/L, respectively. This indicates that wastewater containing Mo is a possible source of both groundwater and surface water contamination. Nine samples of groundwater exceed the World Health Organization's suggested drinking water guideline of 0.07 mg/L. A non-carcinogenic risk assessment for Mo in adults and children using the Mo concentration of 0.07 mg/L yielded risks of 0.546 and 0.215, respectively. These results indicate the importance of the development of a national drinking water quality standard for Mo in Taiwan to ensure safe groundwater for use. According to the human health risk calculation, the groundwater Mo standard is suggested as 0.07 mg/L. Reduction the discharge of Mo-contaminated wastewater from factories in the industrial parks is also the important task in the future.

  1. The link between exercise and titin passive stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Sophie; Mueller, Patrick J; Chung, Charles S

    2017-09-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review focuses on how in vivo and molecular measurements of cardiac passive stiffness can predict exercise tolerance and how exercise training can reduce cardiac passive stiffness. What advances does it highlight? This review highlights advances in understanding the relationship between molecular (titin-based) and in vivo (left ventricular) passive stiffness, how passive stiffness modifies exercise tolerance, and how exercise training may be therapeutic for cardiac diseases with increased passive stiffness. Exercise can help alleviate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular co-morbidities associated with sedentary behaviour; this may be especially true in diseases that are associated with increased left ventricular passive stiffness. In this review, we discuss the inverse relationship between exercise tolerance and cardiac passive stiffness. Passive stiffness is the physical property of cardiac muscle to produce a resistive force when stretched, which, in vivo, is measured using the left ventricular end diastolic pressure-volume relationship or is estimated using echocardiography. The giant elastic protein titin is the major contributor to passive stiffness at physiological muscle (sarcomere) lengths. Passive stiffness can be modified by altering titin isoform size or by post-translational modifications. In both human and animal models, increased left ventricular passive stiffness is associated with reduced exercise tolerance due to impaired diastolic filling, suggesting that increased passive stiffness predicts reduced exercise tolerance. At the same time, exercise training itself may induce both short- and long-term changes in titin-based passive stiffness, suggesting that exercise may be a treatment for diseases associated with increased passive stiffness. Direct modification of passive stiffness to improve exercise tolerance is a potential therapeutic approach. Titin passive stiffness itself may

  2. Constructing passive houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehler, S. [Oehler Faigle Archkom Solar Architektur, Bretten (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Everybody can learn to build energy-efficient. It needs theoretical and practical experience. 1997 we built the first freestanding Passive House in Europe, the Passive House Oehler. There had been a lot of questions, starting with the insecurity, whether the calculation program of the Passive House Institute, the PHPP, is working properly in our case. Nobody knew at that time because nobody tried it out before. It took us a lot of time to find out and every detail of the construction hat to be invented to meet the very high demand of thermal quality. All the following houses needed less time and had fewer open questions, adding one piece of experience with every building. 2002 we realised the biggest Passive House, the office building Energon Ulm with 420 working spaces. In the meantime we have learned a lot like how to produce prefabricated timber elements for the facades, providing good insulation, air tightness and avoiding serious thermal bridges. We have proofed, that any kind of building type can be a Passive House. And with increasing experience the freedom of design and construction is growing. Even the economical efficiency increased. The Energon Ulm is providing a much better indoor climate than any other office building and was build 10 % cheaper than an average German office building. At present the Passive House Standard is the most efficient solution for the user to live in the desired comfort zone between 20 C and 25 C. This zone of individual feeling-well can be described with the term ''operative temperature''. This term is defined by factors like air temperature, radiation temperature of warm and cold surfaces, air speed and humidity. The result of all these factors has to be within 18 C to 25 C without accepting one of the factors getting extreme.

  3. Improved amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation for heterojunction solar cells by low-temperature chemical vapor deposition and post-annealing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Liguo; Jiang, Yuanjian; Wei, Changchun; Xu, Shengzhi; Zhao, Ying

    2014-10-07

    In this study, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films are deposited using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) system. The Si-H configuration of the a-Si:H/c-Si interface is regulated by optimizing the deposition temperature and post-annealing duration to improve the minority carrier lifetime (τeff) of a commercial Czochralski (Cz) silicon wafer. The mechanism of this improvement involves saturation of the microstructural defects with hydrogen evolved within the a-Si:H films due to the transformation from SiH2 into SiH during the annealing process. The post-annealing temperature is controlled to ∼180 °C so that silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) could be prepared without an additional annealing step. To achieve better performance of the SHJ solar cells, we also optimize the thickness of the a-Si:H passivation layer. Finally, complete SHJ solar cells are fabricated using different temperatures for the a-Si:H film deposition to study the influence of the deposition temperature on the solar cell parameters. For the optimized a-Si:H deposition conditions, an efficiency of 18.41% is achieved on a textured Cz silicon wafer.

  4. Groundwater sustainability strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; VanderSteen, Jonathan; Sophocleous, Marios A.; Taniguchi, Makoto; Alley, William M.; Allen, Diana M.; Zhou, Yangxiao

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater extraction has facilitated significant social development and economic growth, enhanced food security and alleviated drought in many farming regions. But groundwater development has also depressed water tables, degraded ecosystems and led to the deterioration of groundwater quality, as well as to conflict among water users. The effects are not evenly spread. In some areas of India, for example, groundwater depletion has preferentially affected the poor. Importantly, groundwater in some aquifers is renewed slowly, over decades to millennia, and coupled climate–aquifer models predict that the flux and/or timing of recharge to many aquifers will change under future climate scenarios. Here we argue that communities need to set multigenerational goals if groundwater is to be managed sustainably.

  5. Costs of groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged

  6. Passive containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleimola, F.W.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a containment system that provides complete protection entirely by passive means for the loss of coolant accident in a nuclear power plant and wherein all stored energy released in the coolant blowdown is contained and absorbed while the nuclear fuel is prevented from over-heating by a high containment back-pressure and a reactor vessel refill system. The primary containment vessel is restored to a high sub-atmospheric pressure within a few minutes after accident initiation and the decay heat is safely transferred to the environment while radiolytic hydrogen is contained by passive means. 20 claims, 14 figures

  7. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  8. Dynamics of Agricultural Groundwater Extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellegers, P.J.G.J.; Zilberman, D.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural shallow groundwater extraction can result in desiccation of neighbouring nature reserves and degradation of groundwater quality in the Netherlands, whereas both externalities are often not considered when agricultural groundwater extraction patterns are being determined. A model is

  9. Passiv-Sammler

    OpenAIRE

    Fritsche, U.

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a passive collector for air pollution for the determination of emission rates for dry and wet deposits on construction materials such as natural stone, whereby the collector has a surrogate surface of the stone under investigation, the surrogate surface being linked to a collecting vessel such that any dry or wet contamination occurring can be collected.

  10. Passive houses in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halse, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    The paper analyzes the introduction of passive houses in the Norwegian house market. Passive houses are houses with extremely low levels of energy consumption for heating, and have not yet been built in Norway, but have started to enter the market in Germany and some other countries. The construction sector is analyzed as a sectoral innovation system. The different elements of the innovation system are studied. This includes government agencies, producers, consumers, finance and education. The analysis shows that passive and low-energy houses are on the verge of market breakthrough. This can partly be explained by economic calculations, and partly by processes of learning and change in the institutional set-up of the sector. The construction sector is a sector characterized by low innovative intensity and little interaction between different agents. Those working to promote passive houses have to some extent managed to cope with these challenges. This has happened by breaking away from the traditional focus of Norwegian energy efficiency policies on technology and the economically rational agents, by instead focusing on knowledge and institutional change at the level of the producers. (Author)

  11. Hood River Passive House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, David [BA-PIRC, Spokane, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  12. Passive THz metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present our activities in the fabrication and characterization of passive THz metamaterials. We use two fabrication processes to develop metamaterials either as free-standing metallic membranes or patterned metallic multi-layers on the substrates to achieve different functionalities...

  13. Intrinsically Passive Handling and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, Stefano; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Khodabandehloo, Koorosh

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a control philosophy called Intrinsically Passive Control, which has the feature to properly behave during interaction with any passive objects. The controlled robot will never become unstable due to the physical structure of the controller.

  14. Groundwater Assessment Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Podgorski, Joel; Berg, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The Groundwater Assessment Platform is a free, interactive online GIS platform for the mapping, sharing and statistical modeling of groundwater quality data. The modeling allows users to take advantage of publicly available global datasets of various environmental parameters to produce prediction maps of their contaminant of interest.

  15. Hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline Si thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorka, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen passivation is a key process step in the fabrication of polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) thin film solar cells. In this work a parallel plate rf plasma setup was used for the hydrogen passivation treatment. The main topics that have been investigated are (i) the role of plasma parameters (like hydrogen pressure, electrode gap and plasma power), (ii) the dynamics of the hydrogen treatment and (iii) passivation of poly-Si with different material properties. Passivation was characterized by measuring the open-circuit voltage V OC of poly-Si reference samples. Optimum passivation conditions were found by measurements of the breakdown voltage V brk of the plasma for different pressures p and electrode gaps d. For each pressure, the best passivation was achieved at a gap d that corresponded to the minimum in V brk . Plasma simulations were carried out, which indicate that best V OC corresponds to a minimum in ion energy. V OC was not improved by a larger H flux. Investigations of the passivation dynamic showed that a plasma treatment in the lower temperature range (≤400 C) is slow and takes several hours for the V OC to saturate. Fast passivation can be successfully achieved at elevated temperatures around 500 C to 600 C with a plateau time of 10 min. It was found that prolonged hydrogenation leads to a loss in V OC , which is less pronounced within the observed optimum temperature range (500 C-600 C). Electron beam evaporation has been investigated as an alternative method to fabricate poly-Si absorbers. The material properties have been tuned by alteration of substrate temperature T dep =200-700 C and were characterized by Raman, ESR and V OC measurements. Largest grains were obtained after solid phase crystallization (SPC) of a-Si, deposited in the temperature range of 300 C. The defect concentration of Si dangling bonds was lowered by passivation by about one order of magnitude. The lowest dangling bond concentration of 2.5.10 16 cm -3 after passivation was

  16. Detailing new and emerging groundwater pollutants and their potential risk to groundwater environments

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Marianne; Lapworth, Dan; Manamsa, Katya

    2014-01-01

    Many different sources and pathways into groundwater: wastewater, biosolids from water treatment and animal wastes are important Frequently detected groups of ECs include antimicrobials, lifestyle compounds, pharmaceuticals Although mostly detected in low ng/L concentrations in groundwater there are many examples of hot spots TPs can be found at concentrations higher than the parent and may be more mobile or polar, and more toxic ECs can be typical of source/landuse Some are re...

  17. Development and calibration of a passive sampler for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaserzon, S.L.; Kennedy, K.; Hawker, D.W.; Holling, N.; Escher, B.I.; Booij, K.; Mueller, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    N-Nitrosamines such as N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) are organic compounds of environmental concern in groundwater, wastewater and potable water due to their potent carcinogenicity in laboratory animal studies and probable human carcinogenicity. While passive sampling techniques have become a widely

  18. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2017-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important prerequisites for preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to identify, and existing approaches for pathogen detection are costly and only provide semi-quantitative information. Microbial indicators that are readily quantified often do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Pathogens of emerging concern and increasing detections of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in groundwater are topics of growing concern. Adequate removal of pathogens during soil passage is therefore critical for safe groundwater extraction. Processes that enhance pathogen transport (e.g., high velocity zones and preferential flow) and diminish pathogen removal (e.g., reversible retention and enhanced survival) are of special concern because they increase the risk of groundwater contamination, but are still incompletely understood. Improved theory and modeling tools are needed to analyze experimental data, test hypotheses, understand coupled processes and controlling mechanisms, predict spatial and/or temporal variability in model parameters and uncertainty in pathogen concentrations, assess risk, and develop mitigation and best management approaches to protect groundwater.

  19. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2017-06-01

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important prerequisites for preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to identify, and existing approaches for pathogen detection are costly and only provide semi-quantitative information. Microbial indicators that are readily quantified often do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Pathogens of emerging concern and increasing detections of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in groundwater are topics of growing concern. Adequate removal of pathogens during soil passage is therefore critical for safe groundwater extraction. Processes that enhance pathogen transport (e.g., high velocity zones and preferential flow) and diminish pathogen removal (e.g., reversible retention and enhanced survival) are of special concern because they increase the risk of groundwater contamination, but are still incompletely understood. Improved theory and modeling tools are needed to analyze experimental data, test hypotheses, understand coupled processes and controlling mechanisms, predict spatial and/or temporal variability in model parameters and uncertainty in pathogen concentrations, assess risk, and develop mitigation and best management approaches to protect groundwater.

  20. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  1. Passive solar heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiberg, K

    1981-11-10

    The present work treats the possibilities for heating according to the passive solar heating method. Problems of 'spatial organization in an energy-saving society' are distinguished from among other social problems. The final delimination of the actual problems under investigation consists of the use of passive solar heating and especially the 'consequences of such solar heating exploitation upon the form and structures' of planning and construction. In the concluding chapter an applied example shows how this method can be used in designing an urban area and what are its limitations. The results indicate the possibilities and difficulties in attempting to transfer this ideal and general method into models and directives for form and structure from which examples of the actual possibilities in practical planning can be given.

  2. Fluorine geochemistry in bedrock groundwater of South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Gi-Tak; Yun, Seong-Taek; Mayer, Bernhard; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Seong-Yong; Kwon, Jang-Soon; Kim, Kangjoo; Koh, Yong-Kwon

    2007-01-01

    High fluoride concentrations (median = 4.4 mg/L) in deep bedrock groundwater of South Korea prevent the usage of it as a drinking water source. The hydrogeochemistry of deep thermal groundwaters (N = 377) in diverse bedrocks has been studied in order to evaluate the geologic and geochemical controls on fluoride concentrations in groundwater. The groundwater samples were clustered geologically, and the average and median concentrations of fluoride were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test. The order of median fluoride concentration with respect to geology is as follows: metamorphic rocks ≥ granitoids ≥ complex rock >> volcanic rocks ≥ sedimentary rocks. This result indicates that the geological source of fluoride in groundwater is related to the mineral composition of metamorphic rocks and granitoids. With respect to groundwater chemistry, the fluoride concentration was highest in Na-HCO 3 type groundwater and lowest in Ca-HCO 3 type groundwater. Ionic relationships also imply that the geochemical behavior of fluoride in groundwater is related to the geochemical process releasing Na and removing Ca ions. The thermodynamic relationship between the activities of Ca and F indicates that fluoride concentration is controlled by the equilibrium of fluorite (CaF 2 ). In other words, the upper limits of fluoride concentration are determined by the Ca ion; i.e., Ca concentrations play a crucial role in fluoride behavior in deep thermal groundwater. The result of this study suggests that the high fluoride in groundwater originates from geological sources and fluoride can be removed by fluorite precipitation when high Ca concentration is maintained. This provides a basis for a proper management plan to develop the deep thermal groundwater and for treatment of high fluoride groundwater frequently found in South Korea

  3. Groundwater management in northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Zoran; Iurkiewicz, Adrian

    2009-03-01

    Groundwater is vital and the sole resource in most of the studied region of northern Iraq. It has a significant role in agriculture, water supply and health, and the elimination of poverty in rural areas. Although Iraq is currently dramatically disturbed by complex political and socio-economic problems, in its northern part, i.e. the Kurdish-inhabited region, fast urbanization and economic expansion are visible everywhere. Monitoring and water management schemes are necessary to prevent aquifer over-exploitation in the region. Artificial recharge with temporary runoff water, construction of subsurface dams and several other aquifer management and regulation measures have been designed, and some implemented, in order to improve the water situation. Recommendations, presented to the local professionals and decision-makers in water management, include creation of Water Master Plans and Water User Associations, synchronization of drilling programmes, rehabilitation of the existing well fields, opening of new well fields, and the incorporation of new spring intakes in some areas with large groundwater reserves, as well as construction of numerous small-scale schemes for initial in situ water treatment where saline groundwater is present.

  4. Qademah Fault Passive Data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this field trip we collect passive data to 1. Convert passive to surface waves 2. Locate Qademah fault using surface wave migration INTRODUCTION: In this field trip we collected passive data for several days. This data will be used to find the surface waves using interferometry and then compared to active-source seismic data collected at the same location. A total of 288 receivers are used. A 3D layout with 5 m inline intervals and 10 m cross line intervals is used, where we used 12 lines with 24 receivers at each line. You will need to download the file (rec_times.mat), it contains important information about 1. Field record no 2. Record day 3. Record month 4. Record hour 5. Record minute 6. Record second 7. Record length P.S. 1. All files are converted from original format (SEG-2) to matlab format P.S. 2. Overlaps between records (10 to 1.5 sec.) are already removed from these files

  5. Concept research on general passive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xu; Yang Yanhua; Zheng Mingguang

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarized the current passive techniques used in nuclear power plants. Through classification and analysis, the functional characteristics and inherent identification of passive systems were elucidated. By improving and extending the concept of passive system, the general passive concept was proposed, and space and time relativity was discussed and assumption of general passive system were illustrated. The function of idealized general passive system is equivalent with the current passive system, but the design of idealized general passive system is more flexible. (authors)

  6. Global depletion of groundwater resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wada, Y.; Beek, L.P.H. van; van Kempen, C.M.; Reckman, J.W.T.M.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    In regions with frequent water stress and large aquifer systems groundwater is often used as an additional water source. If groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge for extensive areas and long times, overexploitation or persistent groundwater depletion occurs. Here we

  7. Saline groundwater in crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampen, P.

    1992-11-01

    The State-of-art report describes research made on deep saline groundwaters and brines found in crystalline bedrock, mainly in site studies for nuclear waste disposal. The occurrence, definitions and classifications of saline groundwaters are reviewed with a special emphasis on the different theories concerning the origins of saline groundwaters. Studies of the saline groundwaters in Finland and Sweden have been reviewed more thoroughly. Also the mixing of different bodies of groundwaters, observations of the contact of saline groundwaters and permafrost, and the geochemical modelling of saline groundwaters as well as the future trends of research have been discussed. (orig.)

  8. Tratamento de água subterrânea contaminada com compostos organoclorados usando ferro elementar e o reagente de Fenton Treatment of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated compounds using elemental iron and Fenton's reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Langbeck de Arruda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The remediation of groundwater containing organochlorine compounds was evaluated using a reductive system with zero-valent iron, and the reductive process coupled with Fenton's reagent. The concentration of the individual target compounds reached up to 400 mg L-1 in the sample. Marked reductions in the chlorinated compounds were observed in the reductive process. The degradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics in terms of the contaminant and was dependent on the sample contact time with the solid reducing agent. An oxidative test with Fenton's reagent, followed by the reductive assay, showed that tetrachloroethylene was further reduced up to three times the initial concentration. The destruction of chloroform, however, demands an additional treatment.

  9. Fluid phase passivation and polymer encapsulation of InP/InGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxland, R K; Rahman, F

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of effective passivation techniques for improving and stabilizing the characteristics of InP/InGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Two different methods for carrying out sulfur-based surface passivations are compared. These include exposure to gaseous hydrogen sulfide and immersion treatment in an ammonium sulfide solution. The temporal behaviour of effects resulting from such passivation treatments is reported. It is shown that liquid phase passivation has a larger beneficial effect on device performance than gas phase passivation. This is explained in terms of the polarity of passivating species and the exposed semiconductor surface. Finally, device encapsulation in a novel chalcogenide polymer is shown to be effective in preserving the benefits of surface passivation treatments. The relevant properties of this encapsulation material are also discussed

  10. Highly air stable passivation of graphene based field effect devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagade, Abhay A; Neumaier, Daniel; Schall, Daniel; Otto, Martin; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Elorza, Amaia Zurutuza; Kurz, Heinrich

    2015-02-28

    The sensitivity of graphene based devices to surface adsorbates and charge traps at the graphene/dielectric interface requires proper device passivation in order to operate them reproducibly under ambient conditions. Here we report on the use of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as passivation layer on graphene field effect devices (GFETs). We show that successful passivation produce hysteresis free DC characteristics, low doping level GFETs stable over weeks though operated and stored in ambient atmosphere. This is achieved by selecting proper seed layer prior to deposition of encapsulation layer. The passivated devices are also demonstrated to be robust towards the exposure to chemicals and heat treatments, typically used during device fabrication. Additionally, the passivation of high stability and reproducible characteristics is also shown for functional devices like integrated graphene based inverters.

  11. Fe doped TiO2 photocatalyst for the removal of As(III) under visible radiation and its potential application on the treatment of As-contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garza-Arévalo, J.I.; García-Montes, I.; Reyes, M.Hinojosa; Guzmán-Mar, J.L.; Rodríguez-González, V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Incorporation of Fe in TiO 2 lattice extended absorption to visible light region. • TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 in anatase crystalline form was synthesized by sol–gel method. • TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 showed the highest photocatalytic activity for As(III) oxidation. • TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 had the highest adsorption capacity for the removal of generated As(V). • TiO 2 –Fe is a promising material on the treatment of As contaminated groundwater. - Abstract: The Fe doped TiO 2 catalyst was evaluated under visible radiation for As(III) removal. The TiO 2 –Fe was synthesized by sol–gel technique at 0.0, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 wt% iron doping concentrations. The semiconductors were characterized by X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance UV–vis, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen physisorption, SEM–EDS and potentiometric titration for point of zero charge determination. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) was assessed in aqueous suspension contained 5 mg L −1 As(III) at pH 7 with 0.25 g L −1 catalyst loading. The incorporation of iron ions in TiO 2 lattice extended the absorption to visible light region and create surface oxygen vacancies which favor photocatalytic oxidation reaction of As(III) using a small doping amount of Fe (1.0 wt%) in TiO 2 powder. Additionally, TiO 2 –Fe 1.0 showed the highest adsorption capacity for As(V) removal compared to sol–gel TiO 2 and P25 indicating that this catalyst is a promising material for As contaminated groundwater treatment.

  12. Fe doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst for the removal of As(III) under visible radiation and its potential application on the treatment of As-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza-Arévalo, J.I.; García-Montes, I. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451, México (Mexico); Reyes, M.Hinojosa [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, IPICYT, División de Materiales Avanzados, Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216, México (Mexico); Guzmán-Mar, J.L. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-González, V. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, IPICYT, División de Materiales Avanzados, Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216, México (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Incorporation of Fe in TiO{sub 2} lattice extended absorption to visible light region. • TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 in anatase crystalline form was synthesized by sol–gel method. • TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 showed the highest photocatalytic activity for As(III) oxidation. • TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 had the highest adsorption capacity for the removal of generated As(V). • TiO{sub 2}–Fe is a promising material on the treatment of As contaminated groundwater. - Abstract: The Fe doped TiO{sub 2} catalyst was evaluated under visible radiation for As(III) removal. The TiO{sub 2}–Fe was synthesized by sol–gel technique at 0.0, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 wt% iron doping concentrations. The semiconductors were characterized by X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance UV–vis, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen physisorption, SEM–EDS and potentiometric titration for point of zero charge determination. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) was assessed in aqueous suspension contained 5 mg L{sup −1} As(III) at pH 7 with 0.25 g L{sup −1} catalyst loading. The incorporation of iron ions in TiO{sub 2} lattice extended the absorption to visible light region and create surface oxygen vacancies which favor photocatalytic oxidation reaction of As(III) using a small doping amount of Fe (1.0 wt%) in TiO{sub 2} powder. Additionally, TiO{sub 2}–Fe 1.0 showed the highest adsorption capacity for As(V) removal compared to sol–gel TiO{sub 2} and P25 indicating that this catalyst is a promising material for As contaminated groundwater treatment.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF GROUNDWATER HYDROCHEMISTRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... It was concluded that water quality of the study area is unsuitable for irrigation ... Key words: Assessment, characterization, Groundwater quality, .... The in-situ measurement was ..... framework of the aquifer in and around East.

  14. Groundwater Capture Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Source water protection areas are delineated for each groundwater-based public water supply system using available geologic and hydrogeologic information to...

  15. Wetland Groundwater Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Greg

    1993-01-01

    This technical note summarizes hydrologic and hydraulic (H AND H) processes and the related terminology that will likely be encountered during an evaluation of the effect of ground-water processes on wetland function...

  16. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The U-234 and Th-230 radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas and geothermal brine from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. Pb-210 is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The U-234/Th-230 ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. 19 refs., 3 figs

  17. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The 234 U and 230 Th radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10 4 to 10 5 in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas, and geothermal brine form the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na + and Cl - ions, and RaCl 2 is soluble in brines. 210 Pb is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The 234 U/ 230 Th ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  18. In-Situ Treatment of Groundwater Contaminated with Underground Coal Gasification Products / Oczyszczanie In-Situ WÓD Podziemnych Zanieczyszczonych Przez Produkty Podziemnego Zgazowania WĘGLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suponik, Tomasz; Lutyński, Marcin

    2013-12-01

    In the paper the contaminants that may be generated in Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) process were listed and include mainly mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, heavy metals, cyanides, ammonium, chloride and sulphate. As a method of UCG contaminated groundwater treatment a Permeable Reactive Barrier technology was proposed. To assess the effectiveness of this technology two tests were carried out. Granulated activated carbon (GAC) and zeolite, and granulated activated carbon and scrap iron were applied in the first and second test respectively. For these materials the hydro geological parameters called reactive material parameters were determined and discussed. The results of the experiments showed that GAC seems to be the most effective material for phenols, BTX, PAH, cyanides and slightly lowers ammonia removal, while zeolites and scrap iron removed free cyanide, ammonia and heavy metals respectively. Podziemne Zgazowanie Węgla (PZW) jest alternatywną metodą pozyskiwania energii z węgla. Jest to zespół przemian termicznych i chemicznych przebiegających bezpośrednio w złożu węgla, zachodzących pomiędzy substancją organiczną a czynnikiem zgazowującym, jakim może być powietrze, tlen, para wodna, dwutlenek węgla. Poza wieloma zaletami metoda ta niesie za sobą także wiele zagrożeń, które były rozważane w ramach projektu HUGE 2 (nr RFCR-CT-2011-00002). Jednym z nich jest zagrożenie środowiska wód podziemnych produktami PZW, do których należą wielopierścieniowe węglowodory aromatyczne, BTX, fenole, metale ciężkie, cyjanki, jony amonowe, chlorki i siarczany. W celu zminimalizowania tego zagrożenia w pracy rozważono zastosowanie w obszarze reaktora PZW technologii Przepuszczalnej Bariery Reaktywnej (PRB). W technologii tej zanieczyszczenia usuwane są in-situ poprzez przepływ wód przez odpowiednio dobrany materiał reaktywny. W tablicy 1 przedstawiono podstawowe parametry bariery, które należy określić, aby

  19. Hanford statewide groundwater flow and transport model calibration report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, A.; Panday, S.; Denslow, C.; Fecht, K.; Knepp, A.

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the results of the development and calibration of a three-dimensional, finite element model (VAM3DCG) for the unconfined groundwater flow system at the Hanford Site. This flow system is the largest radioactively contaminated groundwater system in the United States. Eleven groundwater plumes have been identified containing organics, inorganics, and radionuclides. Because groundwater from the unconfined groundwater system flows into the Columbia River, the development of a groundwater flow model is essential to the long-term management of these plumes. Cost effective decision making requires the capability to predict the effectiveness of various remediation approaches. Some of the alternatives available to remediate groundwater include: pumping contaminated water from the ground for treatment with reinjection or to other disposal facilities; containment of plumes by means of impermeable walls, physical barriers, and hydraulic control measures; and, in some cases, management of groundwater via planned recharge and withdrawals. Implementation of these methods requires a knowledge of the groundwater flow system and how it responds to remedial actions

  20. Passive Power Filters

    CERN Document Server

    Künzi, R.

    2015-06-15

    Power converters require passive low-pass filters which are capable of reducing voltage ripples effectively. In contrast to signal filters, the components of power filters must carry large currents or withstand large voltages, respectively. In this paper, three different suitable filter struc tures for d.c./d.c. power converters with inductive load are introduced. The formulas needed to calculate the filter components are derived step by step and practical examples are given. The behaviour of the three discussed filters is compared by means of the examples. P ractical aspects for the realization of power filters are also discussed.

  1. Shallow bedrock limits groundwater seepage-based headwater climate refugia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lane, John W.; Snyder, Craig D.; White, Eric A.; Johnson, Zachary; Nelms, David L.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.

    2018-01-01

    Groundwater/surface-water exchanges in streams are inexorably linked to adjacent aquifer dynamics. As surface-water temperatures continue to increase with climate warming, refugia created by groundwater connectivity is expected to enable cold water fish species to survive. The shallow alluvial aquifers that source groundwater seepage to headwater streams, however, may also be sensitive to seasonal and long-term air temperature dynamics. Depth to bedrock can directly influence shallow aquifer flow and thermal sensitivity, but is typically ill-defined along the stream corridor in steep mountain catchments. We employ rapid, cost-effective passive seismic measurements to evaluate the variable thickness of the shallow colluvial and alluvial aquifer sediments along a headwater stream supporting cold water-dependent brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in Shenandoah National Park, VA, USA. Using a mean depth to bedrock of 2.6 m, numerical models predicted strong sensitivity of shallow aquifer temperature to the downward propagation of surface heat. The annual temperature dynamics (annual signal amplitude attenuation and phase shift) of potential seepage sourced from the shallow modeled aquifer were compared to several years of paired observed stream and air temperature records. Annual stream water temperature patterns were found to lag local air temperature by ∼8–19 d along the stream corridor, indicating that thermal exchange between the stream and shallow groundwater is spatially variable. Locations with greater annual signal phase lag were also associated with locally increased amplitude attenuation, further suggestion of year-round buffering of channel water temperature by groundwater seepage. Numerical models of shallow groundwater temperature that incorporate regional expected climate warming trends indicate that the summer cooling capacity of this groundwater seepage will be reduced over time, and lower-elevation stream sections may no longer serve as larger

  2. Integrated groundwater data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Peter; Brodaric, Boyan; Stenson, Matt; Booth, Nathaniel; Jakeman, Anthony J.; Barreteau, Olivier; Hunt, Randall J.; Rinaudo, Jean-Daniel; Ross, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The goal of a data manager is to ensure that data is safely stored, adequately described, discoverable and easily accessible. However, to keep pace with the evolution of groundwater studies in the last decade, the associated data and data management requirements have changed significantly. In particular, there is a growing recognition that management questions cannot be adequately answered by single discipline studies. This has led a push towards the paradigm of integrated modeling, where diverse parts of the hydrological cycle and its human connections are included. This chapter describes groundwater data management practices, and reviews the current state of the art with enterprise groundwater database management systems. It also includes discussion on commonly used data management models, detailing typical data management lifecycles. We discuss the growing use of web services and open standards such as GWML and WaterML2.0 to exchange groundwater information and knowledge, and the need for national data networks. We also discuss cross-jurisdictional interoperability issues, based on our experience sharing groundwater data across the US/Canadian border. Lastly, we present some future trends relating to groundwater data management.

  3. Expansion of passive safety function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Nobuhiko; Nei, Hiromichi; Kumada, Toshiaki.

    1995-01-01

    Expansion of the use of passive safety functions is proposed. Two notions are presented. One is that, in the design of passive safety nuclear reactors where aversion of active components is stressed, some active components are purposely introduced, by which a system is built in such a way that it behaves in an apparently passive manner. The second notion is that, instead of using a passive safety function alone, a passive safety function is combined with some active components, relating the passivity in the safety function with enhanced controllability in normal operation. The nondormant system which the authors propose is one example of the first notion. This is a system in which a standby safety system is a portion of the normal operation system. An interpretation of the nondormant system via synergetics is made. As an example of the second notion, a PIUS density lock aided with active components is proposed and is discussed

  4. Hydraulic retention time and pH affect the performance and microbial communities of passive bioreactors for treatment of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomo; Hamai, Takaya; Hori, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuki; Kobayashi, Mikio; Sato, Yuya; Inaba, Tomohiro; Ogata, Atsushi; Habe, Hiroshi; Sakata, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    For acceleration of removing toxic metals from acid mine drainage (AMD), the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and pH on the reactor performance and microbial community structure in the depth direction of a laboratory-scale packed-bed bioreactor containing rice bran as waste organic material were investigated. The HRT was shortened stepwise from 25 to 12 h, 8 h, and 6 to 5 h under the neutral condition using AMD neutralized with limestone (pH 6.3), and from 25 to 20 h, 12 h, and 8 to 7 h under the acid condition using AMD (pH 3.0). Under the neutral condition, the bioreactor stably operated up to 6 h HRT, which was shorter than under the acid condition (up to 20 h HRT). During stable sulfate reduction, both the organic matter-remaining condition and the low oxidation-reduction potential condition in lower parts of the reactor were observed. Principal coordinate analysis of Illumina sequencing data of 16S rRNA genes revealed a dynamic transition of the microbial communities at the boundary between stable and unstable operation in response to reductions in HRT. During stable operation under both the neutral and acid conditions, several fermentative operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes dominated in lower parts of the bioreactor, suggesting that co-existence of these OTUs might lead to metabolic activation of sulfate-reducing bacteria. In contrast, during unstable operation at shorter HRTs, an OTU from the candidate phylum OP11 were found under both conditions. This study demonstrated that these microorganisms can be used to monitor the treatment of AMD, which suggests stable or deteriorated performance of the system.

  5. Passive cooling containment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J.J.; Iotti, R.C.; Wright, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure and temperature transients of nuclear reactor containment following postulated loss of coolant accident with a coincident station blackout due to total loss of all alternating current power are studied analytically and experimentally for the full scale NPR (New Production Reactor). All the reactor and containment cooling under this condition would rely on the passive cooling system which removes reactor decay heat and provides emergency core and containment cooling. Containment passive cooling for this study takes place in the annulus between containment steel shell and concrete shield building by natural convection air flow and thermal radiation. Various heat transfer coefficients inside annular air space were investigated by running the modified CONTEMPT code CONTEMPT-NPR. In order to verify proper heat transfer coefficient, temperature, heat flux, and velocity profiles were measured inside annular air space of the test facility which is a 24 foot (7.3m) high, steam heated inner cylinder of three foot (.91m) diameter and five and half foot (1.7m) diameter outer cylinder. Comparison of CONTEMPT-NPR and WGOTHIC was done for reduced scale NPR

  6. Modeling In Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Secody, Roland E

    2007-01-01

    .... An innovative technology was recently developed which uses dual-screened treatment wells to mix an electron donor into perchlorate-contaminated groundwater in order to effect in situ bioremediation...

  7. Groundwater arsenic remediation using zerovalent iron: Batch and column tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, increasing efforts have been made to explore the applicability and limitations of zerovalent iron (Fe0) for the treatment of arsenicbearing groundwater and wastewater. The experimental batch and column tests have demonstrated that arsenate and arsenite are removed effec...

  8. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2015-01-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameter...

  9. Passive-solar construction handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  10. Investigations of Chemical and Biological Treatment Options for the Attenuation of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine Contamination in Groundwater at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerspink, B. P.; Wang, D.; Ware, D.; Marina, O.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Goering, T.; Boukhalfa, H.

    2017-12-01

    High-explosive compounds including hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) were used extensively in weapons research and testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, NM. Liquid effluents containing RDX released at LANL's Technical Area 16 (TA-16) resulted in the contamination of alluvial, perched-intermediate, and regional groundwater bodies. Past investigations have shown persistent RDX contamination in the perched-intermediate zone located between 225 to 311 m below ground surface, where transport studies have shown that RDX and its degradation products transport conservatively. In this study, we compared RDX degradation by chemical treatments using reduction by sodium dithionite, oxidation by potassium permanganate, and alkaline hydrolysis by carbonate/bicarbonate buffering, with microbial degradation under biostimulated conditions. The experiments were conducted using groundwater and sediments representative of the contaminated aquifer beneath TA-16. Batch testing showed that all chemical treatments degraded RDX very rapidly, with half-lives ranging from 50 minutes to 22 hours. Comparatively, RDX degradation in biostimulated reactors under strict anaerobic conditions was significantly slower, with half-lives of about 3 weeks. Results from column experiments with chemically treated sediments deviated from the results of the batch testing. Dithionite treated sediments reduced RDX with no breakthrough observed before clogging occurred at 50 pour volumes. Treatments by oxidation using potassium permanganate, and hydrolysis under buffered alkaline conditions, were less effective with complete RDX breakthrough after 2 pore volumes. No known degradation products were observed in the column effluents. RDX degradation in biostimulated columns was very effective initially for both treatments. However, the column biostimulated with safflower oil clogged very rapidly. The column biostimulated with molasses was very effective when molasses was

  11. Controlling groundwater pumping online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekri, Slim

    2009-08-01

    Groundwater over-pumping is a major problem in several countries around the globe. Since controlling groundwater pumping through water flow meters is hardly feasible, the surrogate is to control electricity usage. This paper presents a framework to restrict groundwater pumping by implementing an annual individual electricity quota without interfering with the electricity pricing policy. The system could be monitored online through prepaid electricity meters. This provides low transaction costs of individual monitoring of users compared to the prohibitive costs of water flow metering and monitoring. The public groundwater managers' intervention is thus required to determine the water and electricity quota and watch the electricity use online. The proposed framework opens the door to the establishment of formal groundwater markets among users at very low transaction costs. A cost-benefit analysis over a 25-year period is used to evaluate the cost of non-action and compare it to the prepaid electricity quota framework in the Batinah coastal area of Oman. Results show that the damage cost to the community, if no active policy is implemented, amounts to (-$288) million. On the other hand, the implementation of a prepaid electricity quota with an online management system would result in a net present benefit of $199 million.

  12. Passive magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  13. The onshore influence of offshore fresh groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew C.; Werner, Adrian D.; Morgan, Leanne K.

    2018-06-01

    Freshwater contained within the submarine extensions of coastal aquifers is increasingly proposed as a freshwater source for coastal communities. However, the extent to which offshore freshwater supports onshore pumping is currently unknown on a global scale. This study provides the first attempt to examine the likely prevalence of situations where offshore freshwater influences onshore salinities, considering various sites from around the world. The groundwater conditions in twenty-seven confined and semi-confined coastal aquifers with plausible connections to inferred or observed offshore freshwater are explored. The investigation uses available onshore salinities and groundwater levels, and offshore salinity knowledge, in combination with analytical modelling, to develop simplified conceptual models of the study sites. Seven different conceptual models are proposed based on the freshwater-saltwater extent and insights gained from analytical modelling. We consider both present-day and pre-development conditions in assessing potential modern contributions to offshore fresh groundwater. Conceptual models also include interpretations of whether offshore freshwater is a significant factor influencing onshore salinities and well pumping sustainability. The results indicate that onshore water levels have declined between pre-development and present-day conditions in fourteen of the fifteen regions for which pre-development data are available. Estimates of the associated steady-state freshwater extents show the potential for considerable offshore fresh groundwater losses accompanying these declines. Both present-day and pre-development heads are insufficient to account for the observed offshore freshwater in all cases where adequate data exist. This suggests that paleo-freshwater and/or aquifer heterogeneities contribute significantly to offshore freshwater extent. Present-day heads indicate that active seawater intrusion (SWI) will eventually impact onshore pumping

  14. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.; Van Halem, Doris; Verberk, J. Q J C; Amy, Gary L.; Van Dijk, Johannis C.

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  15. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.

    2012-06-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  16. European vehicle passive safety network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Janssen, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    The general objective of the European Vehicle Passive Safety Network is to contribute to the reduction of the number of road traffic victims in Europe by passive safety measures. The aim of the road safety policy of the European Commission is to reduce the annual total of fatalities to 18000 in

  17. Passive films at the nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, Vincent; Marcus, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nanoscale data on growth, structure and local properties of passive films reviewed. ► Preferential role of defects of passive films on the corrosion resistance emphasized. ► Effect of grain boundaries on local electronic properties shown by new data. ► Use of atomistic modeling to test mechanistic hypotheses illustrated. - Abstract: The nanometer scale chemical and structural aspects of ultrathin oxide passive films providing self-protection against corrosion to metals and alloys in aqueous environments are reviewed. Data on the nucleation and growth of 2D anodic oxide films, details on the atomic structure and nanostructure of 3D passive films, the preferential role of surface step edges in dissolution in the passive state and the preferential role of grain boundaries of the passive films in passivity breakdown are presented. Future perspectives are discussed, and exemplified by new data obtained on the relationship between the nanostructure of oxide passive films and their local electronic properties. Atomistic corrosion modeling by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) is illustrated by the example of interactions of chloride ions with hydroxylated oxide surfaces, including the role of surface step edges. Data obtained on well-defined substrate surfaces with surface analytical techniques are emphasized.

  18. Udviklingen i bilers passive sikkerhed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hels, Tove; Lyckegaard, Allan; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    man mellem aktiv og passiv sikkerhed, det vil sige faktorer, der nedsætter • risikoen for, at der sker et uheld (aktiv sikkerhed), henholdsvis • graden af alvorlighed, givet at uheldet er sket (passiv sikkerhed). Rapporten begrænser sig til at undersøge, om der kan påvises en generel sammenhæng mellem...

  19. The Passive in Singapore English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhiming; Wee, Lionel

    1999-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the two passive (or passive-like) constructions in Singapore English which exhibit substrate influence from Malay and Chinese. The paper shows that while substrate languages contribute to the grammar of Singapore English, the continued prestige of standard English exerts normative pressure and mitigates the effect of…

  20. A study of the condition for the passivation of carbon steel in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Morimoto, Masataka; Honda, Akira

    1999-01-01

    It is important to study the corrosion behavior of materials to be used for overpack for high-level radioactive waste disposal. Carbon steel is one of the candidate materials. The type of corrosion on carbon steel depends on whether the carbon steel is passivated or not. In this study, the condition for the passivation of carbon steel was studied using bentonite as the buffer material. Anodic polarization in bentonite and the measurements of pH of porewater in bentonite was measured. The results of these experiments showed that the possibility of passivation is small in highly compacted bentonite in groundwater in Japan. Therefore, localized corrosion on carbon steel due to the breakdown of passive film is unlikely in bentonite. In other words, general corrosion seems to be the most probable type of corrosion under repository condition in Japan. (author)

  1. Application of optimization modeling to groundwater remediation at US Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakr, A.A.; Dal Santo, D.J.; Smalley, R.C.; Phillips, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines and explores the fundamentals of the current strategies for groundwater hydraulic and quality management modeling and presents a scheme for the application of such strategies to DOE facilities. The discussion focuses on the DOE-Savannah River Operations (DOE-SR) facility. Remediation of contaminated groundwater at active and abandoned waste disposal sites has become a major element of environmental programs. Traditional groundwater remediation programs (e.g., pumping and treatment) may not represent optimal water quality management strategies at sites to be remediated. Complex, interrelated environmental (geologic/geohydrologic), institutional, engineering, and economic conditions at a site may require a more comprehensive management strategy. Groundwater management models based on the principles of operations research have been developed and used to determine optimal management strategies for water resources needs and for hypothetical remediation programs. Strategies for groundwater remediation programs have ranged from the simple removal of groundwater to complex, hydraulic gradient control programs involving groundwater removal, treatment, and recharge

  2. Belgrade waterworks groundwater source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, A.; Dasic, M.; Vukcevic, G.; Vasiljevic, Lj.; Nikolic, S.

    2002-01-01

    Paper deals with Belgrade Waterworks groundwater source, its characteristics, conception of protection programme, contaminations on source and with parameters of groundwater quality degradation. Groundwaters present natural heritage with their strategic and slow renewable natural resources attributes, and as such they require priority in protection. It is of greatest need that existing source is to be protected and used optimally for producing quality drinkable water. The concept of source protection programme should be based on regular water quality monitoring, identification of contaminators, defining areas of their influences on the source and their permanent control. However, in the last 10 years, but drastically in the last 3, because of the overall situation in the country, it is very characteristic downfall in volume of business, organisation and the level of supply of the technical equipment

  3. Basin F Subregional Groundwater Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mazion, Edward

    2001-01-01

    The groundwater flow system at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) is complex. To evaluate proposed remedial alternatives, interaction of the local groundwater flow system with the present contamination control systems must be understood...

  4. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE

  5. Extreme groundwater levels caused by extreme weather conditions - the highest ever measured groundwater levels in Middle Germany and their management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstorf, F.; Kramer, S.; Koch, T.; Pfützner, B.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme weather conditions during the years 2009 - 2011 in combination with changes in the regional water management led to maximum groundwater levels in large areas of Germany in 2011. This resulted in extensive water logging, with problems especially in urban areas near rivers, where water logging produced huge problems for buildings and infrastructure. The acute situation still exists in many areas and requires the development of solution concepts. Taken the example of the Elbe-Saale-Region in the Federal State of Saxony-Anhalt, were a pilot research project was carried out, the analytical situation, the development of a management tool and the implementation of a groundwater management concept are shown. The central tool is a coupled water budget - groundwater flow model. In combination with sophisticated multi-scale parameter estimation, a high-resolution groundwater level simulation was carried out. A decision support process with an intensive stakeholder interaction combined with high-resolution simulations enables the development of a management concept for extreme groundwater situations in consideration of sustainable and environmentally sound solutions mainly on the base of passive measures.

  6. Scaling of ammonia stripping towers in the treatment of groundwater polluted by municipal solid waste landfill leachate: study of the causes of scaling and its effects on stripping performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Viotti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the causes of the scaling of stripping towers used for the treatment of groundwater polluted by the leachate from an old municipal solid waste (MSW landfill in northern Italy. The effects of the scaling on the stripping performance are also reported. The whole process consists of a coagulation-flocculation pre-treatment at pH > 11, followed by an ammonia stripping stage, after heating the water to 38°C in order to improve removal efficiency. The stripped ammonia is recovered by absorption with sulfuric acid, producing a 30% solution of ammonium sulfate (reused as a base fertilizer. The effluent air stream is recirculated to the stripping towers (closed loop systems in order to avoid an excessive temperature drop inside the packings, mainly in winter, with consequent loss of efficiency and risk of icing. The progressive scaling of the packing has resulted in a loss of ammonia removal efficiency from an initial value of 98% (clean packing down to 80% after six months of continuous operation, necessitating a chemical cleaning. Optimum conditions for design and operation of the stripping process are also documented.

  7. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  8. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), stomach (mean and V 20 Gy ), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V 20 Gy and mean dose), and small bowel (V 15 Gy absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing

  9. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  10. [Passive euthanasia and living will].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Máté

    2014-07-06

    This article deals with the intentional distinction between murder of first degree and passive euthanasia. In Hungary, active euthanasia is considered to be a murder of first degree, whilst the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg and Switzerland have legalized the active form of mercy killing in Europe. The palliative terminal care, when e.g. giving pain-killer morphine to the patient, might result in decreasing the patient's life-span, and thus causing indirect euthanasia. However, the legal institution of living will exists in several counter-euthanasia countries. The living will allows future patients to express their decision in advance to refuse a life-sustaining treatment, e.g. in case of irreversible coma. The institution of living will exists in Germany and in Hungary too. Nevertheless, the formal criteria of living will make it hardly applicable. The patient ought to express his/her will before a notary public in advance, and he/she should hand it over when being hospitalized. If the patient is not able to present his/her living will to his/her doctor in the hospital, then his/her only hope remains that he/she has given a copy of the living will to the family doctor previously, and the family doctor will notify the hospital.

  11. Groundwater-surface water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, P.A.; Clausen, B.; Hunt, B.; Cameron, S.; Weir, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter discusses natural and modified interactions between groundwater and surface water. Theory on recharge to groundwater from rivers is introduced, and the relative importance of groundwater recharge from rivers is illustrated with an example from the Ngaruroro River, Hawke's Bay. Some of the techniques used to identify and measure recharge to groundwater from gravel-bed rivers will be outlined, with examples from the Ngaruroro River, where the recharge reach is relatively well defined, and from the Rakaia River, where it is poorly defined. Groundwater recharged from rivers can have characteristic chemical and isotopic signatures, as shown by Waimakariri River water in the Christchurch-West Melton groundwater system. The incorporation of groundwater-river interaction in a regional groundwater flow model is outlined for the Waimea Plains, and relationships between river scour and groundwater recharge are examined for the Waimakariri River. Springs are the result of natural discharge from groundwater systems and are important water sources. The interactions between groundwater systems, springs, and river flow for the Avon River in New Zealand will be outlined. The theory of depletion of stream flow by groundwater pumpage will be introduced with a case study from Canterbury, and salt-water intrusion into groundwater systems with examples from Nelson and Christchurch. The theory of artificial recharge to groundwater systems is introduced with a case study from Hawke's Bay. Wetlands are important to flora, and the relationship of the wetland environment to groundwater hydrology will be discussed, with an example from the South Taupo wetland. (author). 56 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs

  12. PATHS groundwater hydrologic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.W.; Schur, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation capability for two-dimensional groundwater pollution problems was developed as part of the Transport Modeling Task for the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). Our approach was to use the data limitations as a guide in setting the level of modeling detail. PATHS Groundwater Hydrologic Model is the first level (simplest) idealized hybrid analytical/numerical model for two-dimensional, saturated groundwater flow and single component transport; homogeneous geology. This document consists of the description of the PATHS groundwater hydrologic model. The preliminary evaluation capability prepared for WISAP, including the enhancements that were made because of the authors' experience using the earlier capability is described. Appendixes A through D supplement the report as follows: complete derivations of the background equations are provided in Appendix A. Appendix B is a comprehensive set of instructions for users of PATHS. It is written for users who have little or no experience with computers. Appendix C is for the programmer. It contains information on how input parameters are passed between programs in the system. It also contains program listings and test case listing. Appendix D is a definition of terms.

  13. Automated Groundwater Screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard B.

    2005-01-01

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application

  14. Controlling groundwater over abstraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, Al Majd; Molle, Francois

    2017-01-01

    The control of groundwater over abstraction is a vexing problem worldwide. Jordan is one of the countries facing severe water scarcity which has implemented a wide range of measures and policies over the past 20 years. While the gap between formal legal and policy frameworks and local practices on

  15. Groundwater quota versus tiered groundwater pricing : two cases of groundwater management in north-west China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnoudse, Eefje; Qu, Wei; Bluemling, B.; Herzfeld, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties in monitoring groundwater extraction cause groundwater regulations to fail worldwide. In two counties in north-west China local water authorities have installed smart card machines to monitor and regulate farmers’ groundwater use. Data from a household survey and in-depth interviews are

  16. HANFORD GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHARBONEAU, B; THOMPSON, M; WILDE, R.; FORD, B.; GERBER, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    By 1990 nearly 50 years of producing plutonium put approximately 1.70E + 12 liters (450 billion gallons) of liquid wastes into the soil of the 1,518-square kilometer (586-square mile) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The liquid releases consisted of chemicals used in laboratory experiments, manufacturing and rinsing uranium fuel, dissolving that fuel after irradiation in Hanford's nuclear reactors, and in liquefying plutonium scraps needed to feed other plutonium-processing operations. Chemicals were also added to the water used to cool Hanford's reactors to prevent corrosion in the reactor tubes. In addition, water and acid rinses were used to clean plutonium deposits from piping in Hanford's large radiochemical facilities. All of these chemicals became contaminated with radionuclides. As Hanford raced to help win World War II, and then raced to produce materials for the Cold War, these radioactive liquid wastes were released to the Site's sandy soils. Early scientific experiments seemed to show that the most highly radioactive components of these liquids would bind to the soil just below the surface of the land, thus posing no threat to groundwater. Other experiments predicted that the water containing most radionuclides would take hundreds of years to seep into groundwater, decaying (or losing) most of its radioactivity before reaching the groundwater or subsequently flowing into the Columbia River, although it was known that some contaminants like tritium would move quickly. Evidence today, however, shows that many contaminants have reached the Site's groundwater and the Columbia River, with more on its way. Over 259 square kilometers (100 square miles) of groundwater at Hanford have contaminant levels above drinking-water standards. Also key to successfully cleaning up the Site is providing information resources and public-involvement opportunities to Hanford's stakeholders. This large, passionate, diverse, and

  17. Removal of Volatile Organic Contaminants (VOCs) from the Groundwater Sources of Drinking Water via Granular Activated Carbon Treatment (WaterRF Report 4440)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall goal of this project was to assess the feasibility of granular activated carbon (GAC) for the treatment of selected carcinogenic volatile organic compounds (cVOC) to sub-μg/L levels. The project consisted of three tasks. The task objectives are: Task I - determine c...

  18. Sustainable Groundwater Management Using Economic Incentive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, T.; Shih, J.; Sanchirico, J. N.

    2006-12-01

    Although groundwater accounts for about 20% of the water consumption in the US, recent urban development, land use changes and agricultural activities in many regions (for example, Chesapeake Bay and eastern shore of Maryland) have resulted in deleterious impacts on groundwater quality. These impacts have dramatically increased potential human health and ecological system risks. One example is nitrogen pollution delivered to local waterways from septic systems via groundwater. Conventional approaches for nitrogen removal, such as pumping and treatment (nitrification-denitrification) process, tend to be expensive. On the other hand, economic incentive approaches (such as marketable permits) have the potential to increase the efficiency of environmental policy by reducing compliance costs for regulated entities and individuals and/or achieving otherwise uneconomical pollution reduction. The success of the sulfur dioxide trading market has led to the creation of trading markets for other pollutants, especially at the regional, state, and smaller (e.g. watershed) scales. In this paper, we develop an integrated framework, which includes a groundwater flow and transport model, and a conceptual management model. We apply this framework to a synthetic set up which includes one farm and two development areas in order to investigate the potential of using economic incentive approaches for groundwater quality management. The policy analysis is carried out by setting up the objective of the modeling framework to minimize the total cost of achieving groundwater quality goals at specific observation point using either a transferable development right (TDR) system between development areas and/or using a tax for fertilizer usage in the farm area. The TDR system consists of a planning agency delineating a region into restricted-use (e.g., agriculture, open space) and high intensity zones (e.g., residential, commercial uses). The agency then endows landowners in the restricted area

  19. Soil, groundwater cleanup takes the gamble out of casino operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Colorado's rich stores of gold and silver sparked development of towns like Black Hawk and Central City in the 1890s. Today, these communities are the homes of limited-stakes gaming operations. However casino operators are discovering that having gold and silver underground in the form of tailings is not as desirable as collecting it aboveground in slot machines. A unique environmental engineering approach allowed construction of two new casinos and reclamation of the tailings, as well as cleanup of petroleum-saturated soils and groundwater. A treatment system was designed and constructed to treat groundwater at the Black Hawk site. The most economical alternative for disposing treated groundwater was to discharge it into nearby North Clear Creek. An NPDES permit was obtained requiring treatment of the groundwater for petroleum, heavy metals and pH before discharging it

  20. Technical options for the remediation of contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-06-01

    This report provides a description of the nature and extent of problems related to radioactive groundwater contamination by outlining the environmental impacts, the sources of contamination and the contaminants of concern radionuclides and their associated contaminants - the main exposure pathways and transport processes and the assessment of risks associated with contaminated groundwater. The main emphasis of this report is on methodologies used in groundwater remediation and available technologies. The methodology section outlines the importance of an initial scoping analysis including the evaluation of uncertainties of the available data and the necessity for defining clear objectives for data collection. This is then followed by comprehensive site characterization, setting of goals and developing alternatives which will be analysed in detail. Available technologies are grouped generally into in situ methods aiming at a containment of the contaminants in place and engineered treatment methods involving an alteration of groundwater flow, quantity and/or quality to achieve compliance with set goals. Groundwater remediation by natural flushing allows the natural groundwater movement and geochemical processes to decrease the contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels over a specified period of time. This method is increasingly accepted in areas where the use of groundwater can be temporarily restricted or engineered cleanup methods do not offer particular advantage over the natural processes. The application of technological methods for remediating contaminated groundwaters has to be considered in conjunction with management options such as diversion and development of alternative water sources. The experience with groundwater contamination accrued in IAEA Member States is concentrated in those countries with active uranium mining and milling facilities and nuclear energy programmes. This experience is reported in the Annexes, which include case studies. It

  1. Technical options for the remediation of contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    This report provides a description of the nature and extent of problems related to radioactive groundwater contamination by outlining the environmental impacts, the sources of contamination and the contaminants of concern radionuclides and their associated contaminants - the main exposure pathways and transport processes and the assessment of risks associated with contaminated groundwater. The main emphasis of this report is on methodologies used in groundwater remediation and available technologies. The methodology section outlines the importance of an initial scoping analysis including the evaluation of uncertainties of the available data and the necessity for defining clear objectives for data collection. This is then followed by comprehensive site characterization, setting of goals and developing alternatives which will be analysed in detail. Available technologies are grouped generally into in situ methods aiming at a containment of the contaminants in place and engineered treatment methods involving an alteration of groundwater flow, quantity and/or quality to achieve compliance with set goals. Groundwater remediation by natural flushing allows the natural groundwater movement and geochemical processes to decrease the contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels over a specified period of time. This method is increasingly accepted in areas where the use of groundwater can be temporarily restricted or engineered cleanup methods do not offer particular advantage over the natural processes. The application of technological methods for remediating contaminated groundwaters has to be considered in conjunction with management options such as diversion and development of alternative water sources. The experience with groundwater contamination accrued in IAEA Member States is concentrated in those countries with active uranium mining and milling facilities and nuclear energy programmes. This experience is reported in the Annexes, which include case studies. It

  2. French concepts of ''passive safety''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennielou, Y.; Serret, M.

    1990-01-01

    N 4 model, the French 1400 MW PWR of the 90's, exhibits many advanced features. As far as safety is concerned, the fully computerized control room design takes advantage of the operating experience feedback and largely improves the man machine interface. New post-accident procedures have been developed (the so-called ''physical states oriented procedures''). A complete consistent set of ''Fundamental Safety Rules'' have been issued. This however doesn't imply any significant modification of standard PWR with regard to the passive aspects of safety systems or functions. Nevertheless, traditional PWR safety systems largely use passive aspects: natural circulation, reactivity coefficients, gravity driven control rods, injection accumulators, so on. Moreover, probability calculations allow for comparison between the respective contributions of passive and of active failures. In the near future, eventual options of future French PWRs to be commissioned after 2000 will be evaluated; simplification, passive and forgiving aspects of safety systems will be thoroughly considered. (author)

  3. Effectiveness of passive alcohol sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Author's abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of passive alcohol sensors for youth alcohol enforcement conducted as part of normal or typical police operations. Three municipal police departments of 100 or more sworn ...

  4. Review of risk from potential emerging contaminants in UK groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Marianne; Lapworth, Dan; Crane, Emily; Hart, Alwyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the types of emerging organic groundwater contaminants (EGCs) which are beginning to be found in the UK. EGCs are compounds being found in groundwater that were previously not detectable or known to be significant and can come from agricultural, urban and rural point sources. EGCs include nanomaterials, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, industrial compounds, personal care products, fragrances, water treatment by-products, flame retardants and surfactants, as well a...

  5. In-Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate in Groundwater and Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Liyan

    2012-01-01

    Historical, uncontrolled disposal practices have made perchlorate a significant threat to drinking water supplies in the United States. In-situ bioremediation (ISB) technologies are cost effective and provide an environmental friendly solution for treating contaminated groundwater and soil. In situ bioremediation was considered as an option for treatment of perchlorate in groundwater and soil in Lockheed Martin Corporation's Beaumont Site 2 (Beaumont, CA). Based on the perchlorate distribu...

  6. Passive heat removal in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    CANDU has a tradition of incorporating passive systems and passive components whenever they are shown to offer performance that is equal to or better than that of active systems, and to be economic. Examples include the two independent shutdown systems that employ gravity and stored energy respectively, the dousing subsystem of the CANDU 6 containment system, and the ability of the moderator to cool the fuel in the event that all coolant is lost from the fuel channels. CANDU 9 continues this tradition, incorporating a reserve water system (RWS) that increases the inventory of water in the reactor building and profiles a passive source of makeup water and/or heat sinks to various key process systems. The key component of the CANDU 9 reserve water system is a large (2500 cubic metres) water tank located at a high elevation in the reactor building. The reserve water system, while incorporating the recovery system functions, and the non-dousing functions of the dousing tank in CANDU 6, embraces other key systems to significantly extend the passive makeup/heat sink capability. The capabilities of the reserve water system include makeup to the steam generators secondary side if all other sources of water are lost; makeup to the heat transport system in the event of a leak in excess of the D 2 O makeup system capability; makeup to the moderator in the event of a moderator leak when the moderator heat sink is required; makeup to the emergency core cooling (ECC) system to assure NPSH to the ECC pumps during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), and provision of a passive heat sink for the shield cooling system. Other passive designs are now being developed by AECL. These will be incorporated in future CANDU plants when their performance has been fully proven. This paper reviews the passive heat removal systems and features of current CANDU plants and the CANDU 9, and briefly reviews some of the passive heat removal concepts now being developed. (author)

  7. Key issues for passive safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayns, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The paper represents a summary of the introductory presentation made at this Advisory Group Meeting on the Technical Feasibility and Reliability of Passive Safety Systems. It was intended as an overview of our views on what are the key issues and what are the technical problems which might dominate any future developments of passive safety systems. It is, therefore, not a ''review paper'' as such and only record the highlights. (author)

  8. Key issues for passive safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayns, M R [AEA Technology, Harwell, Didcot (United Kingdom). European Institutions; Hicken, E F [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    The paper represents a summary of the introductory presentation made at this Advisory Group Meeting on the Technical Feasibility and Reliability of Passive Safety Systems. It was intended as an overview of our views on what are the key issues and what are the technical problems which might dominate any future developments of passive safety systems. It is, therefore, not a ``review paper`` as such and only record the highlights. (author).

  9. Quantifying Potential Groundwater Recharge In South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basant, S.; Zhou, Y.; Leite, P. A.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater in South Texas is heavily relied on for human consumption and irrigation for food crops. Like most of the south west US, woody encroachment has altered the grassland ecosystems here too. While brush removal has been widely implemented in Texas with the objective of increasing groundwater recharge, the linkage between vegetation and groundwater recharge in South Texas is still unclear. Studies have been conducted to understand plant-root-water dynamics at the scale of plants. However, little work has been done to quantify the changes in soil water and deep percolation at the landscape scale. Modeling water flow through soil profiles can provide an estimate of the total water flowing into deep percolation. These models are especially powerful with parameterized and calibrated with long term soil water data. In this study we parameterize the HYDRUS soil water model using long term soil water data collected in Jim Wells County in South Texas. Soil water was measured at every 20 cm intervals up to a depth of 200 cm. The parameterized model will be used to simulate soil water dynamics under a variety of precipitation regimes ranging from well above normal to severe drought conditions. The results from the model will be compared with the changes in soil moisture profile observed in response to vegetation cover and treatments from a study in a similar. Comparative studies like this can be used to build new and strengthen existing hypotheses regarding deep percolation and the role of soil texture and vegetation in groundwater recharge.

  10. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-01-01

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft 3 /min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft 3 /min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm

  11. Groundwater remediation at the Hanford site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, W.

    1993-01-01

    Ion exchange resin and adsorption technology has been used successfully to treat diversified types of toxic waste water for many years. Even though the Hanford Site presents many unique problems, the author believes these technologies can remediate the groundwater at this site. However, treatment of the sludge in tanks generally is beyond the pale of these technologies except for the possibility of experimental studies being performed at the University of Idaho (Troescher)

  12. Mass transport by groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledoux, E.; Goblet, P.; Jamet, Ph.; De Marsily, G.; Des Orres, P.E.; Lewi, J.

    1991-01-01

    The first analyses of the safety of radioactive waste disposal published in 1970s were mostly of a generic type using the models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. These simply constructed models gave way to more sophisticated techniques in order to represent better the complexity and diversity of geological media. In this article, it is attempted to review the various concepts used to quantify radionuclide migration and the evolution of their incorporation into the models. First, it was examined how the type of discontinuity occurring in geological media affects the choice of a representative model. The principle of transport in the subsurface was reviewed, and the effect that coupled processes exert to groundwater flow and mass migration was discussed. The processes that act directly to cause groundwater flow were distinguished. The method of validating such models by comparing the results with the geochemical systems in nature was explained. (K.I.)

  13. Hydrogen passivation of silicon sheet solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Milstein, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Significant improvements in the efficiencies of dendritic web and edge-supported-pulling silicon sheet solar cells have been obtained after hydrogen ion beam passivation for a period of ten minutes or less. We have studied the effects of the hydrogen ion beam treatment with respect to silicon material damage, silicon sputter rate, introduction of impurities, and changes in reflectance. The silicon sputter rate for constant ion beam flux of 0.60 +- 0.05 mA/cm 2 exhibits a maximum at approximately 1400-eV ion beam energy

  14. Hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline Si thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorka, Benjamin

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogen passivation is a key process step in the fabrication of polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) thin film solar cells. In this work a parallel plate rf plasma setup was used for the hydrogen passivation treatment. The main topics that have been investigated are (i) the role of plasma parameters (like hydrogen pressure, electrode gap and plasma power), (ii) the dynamics of the hydrogen treatment and (iii) passivation of poly-Si with different material properties. Passivation was characterized by measuring the open-circuit voltage V{sub OC} of poly-Si reference samples. Optimum passivation conditions were found by measurements of the breakdown voltage V{sub brk} of the plasma for different pressures p and electrode gaps d. For each pressure, the best passivation was achieved at a gap d that corresponded to the minimum in V{sub brk}. Plasma simulations were carried out, which indicate that best V{sub OC} corresponds to a minimum in ion energy. V{sub OC} was not improved by a larger H flux. Investigations of the passivation dynamic showed that a plasma treatment in the lower temperature range ({<=}400 C) is slow and takes several hours for the V{sub OC} to saturate. Fast passivation can be successfully achieved at elevated temperatures around 500 C to 600 C with a plateau time of 10 min. It was found that prolonged hydrogenation leads to a loss in V{sub OC}, which is less pronounced within the observed optimum temperature range (500 C-600 C). Electron beam evaporation has been investigated as an alternative method to fabricate poly-Si absorbers. The material properties have been tuned by alteration of substrate temperature T{sub dep}=200-700 C and were characterized by Raman, ESR and V{sub OC} measurements. Largest grains were obtained after solid phase crystallization (SPC) of a-Si, deposited in the temperature range of 300 C. The defect concentration of Si dangling bonds was lowered by passivation by about one order of magnitude. The lowest dangling bond concentration

  15. 2011 Mound Site Groundwater Plume Rebound Exercise and Follow-Up - 13440

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, Gwendolyn [Mound Site Manager, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Cato, Rebecca; Lupton, Greg [S.M. Stoller Company, contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Mound Site facility near Miamisburg, Ohio, opened in 1948 to support early atomic weapons programs. It grew into a research, development, and production facility performing work in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons and energy programs. The plant was in operation until 1995. During the course of operation, an onsite landfill was created. The landfill was located over a finger of a buried valley aquifer, which is a sole drinking water source for much of the Miami Valley. In the 1980's, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were discovered in groundwater at the Mound site. The site was placed on the National Priorities List on November 21, 1989. DOE signed a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Federal Facility Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The agreement became effective in October 1990. The area that included the landfill was designated Operational Unit 1 (OU-1). In 1995, a Record of Decision was signed that called for the installation and operation of a pump and treatment (P and T) system in order to prevent the VOCs in OU-1 groundwater from being captured by the onsite water production wells. In addition to the P and T system, a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system was installed in 1997 to accelerate removal of VOCs from groundwater in the OU-1 area. The SVE system was successful in removing large amounts of VOCs and continued to operate until 2007, when the amount of VOCs removed became minimal. A rebound study was started in February 2003 to determine how the groundwater system and contaminants would respond to shutting down the P and T system. The rebound test was stopped in February 2004 because predetermined VOC threshold concentrations were exceeded down-gradient of the landfill. The P and T and SVE systems were restarted after the termination of the rebound test. In 2006, the remediation of the Mound site was

  16. Measuring and understanding total dissolved gas pressure in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, C.; Roy, J. W.; Randell, J.; Castellon, L.

    2009-05-01

    Since dissolved gases are important to a number of aspects of groundwater (e.g. age dating, active or passive bioremediation, greenhouse gas fluxes, understanding biogeochemical processes involving gases, assessing potential impacts of coal bed methane activities), accurate concentration measurements, and understanding of their subsurface behaviour are important. Researchers have recently begun using total dissolved gas pressure (TGP) sensor measurements, more commonly applied for surface water monitoring, in concert with gas composition analyses to estimate more accurate groundwater gas concentrations in wells. We have used hydraulic packers to isolate the well screens where TDP is being measured, and pump tests to indicate that in-well degassing may reduce TDG below background groundwater levels. Thus, in gas-charged groundwater zones, TGPs can be considerably underestimated in the absence of pumping or screen isolation. We have also observed transient decreased TGPs during pumping that are thought to result from ebullition induced when the water table or water level in the well is lowered below a critical hydrostatic pressure.

  17. Groundwater contaminant plume ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    Containment plumes at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites were ranked to assist in Subpart B (i.e., restoration requirements of 40 CFR Part 192) compliance strategies for each site, to prioritize aquifer restoration, and to budget future requests and allocations. The rankings roughly estimate hazards to the environment and human health, and thus assist in determining for which sites cleanup, if appropriate, will provide the greatest benefits for funds available. The rankings are based on the scores that were obtained using the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Modified Hazard Ranking System (MHRS). The MHRS and HRS consider and score three hazard modes for a site: migration, fire and explosion, and direct contact. The migration hazard mode score reflects the potential for harm to humans or the environment from migration of a hazardous substance off a site by groundwater, surface water, and air; it is a composite of separate scores for each of these routes. For ranking the containment plumes at UMTRA Project sites, it was assumed that each site had been remediated in compliance with the EPA standards and that relict contaminant plumes were present. Therefore, only the groundwater route was scored, and the surface water and air routes were not considered. Section 2.0 of this document describes the assumptions and procedures used to score the groundwater route, and Section 3.0 provides the resulting scores for each site. 40 tabs

  18. Simulation of the regional groundwater-flow system of the Menominee Indian Reservation, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.; Dunning, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    A regional, two-dimensional, steady-state groundwater-flow model was developed to simulate the groundwater-flow system and groundwater/surface-water interactions within the Menominee Indian Reservation. The model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, to contribute to the fundamental understanding of the region’s hydrogeology. The objectives of the regional model were to improve understanding of the groundwater-flow system, including groundwater/surface-water interactions, and to develop a tool suitable for evaluating the effects of potential regional water-management programs. The computer code GFLOW was used because of the ease with which the model can simulate groundwater/surface-water interactions, provide a framework for simulating regional groundwater-flow systems, and be refined in a stepwise fashion to incorporate new data and simulate groundwater-flow patterns at multiple scales. Simulations made with the regional model reproduce groundwater levels and stream base flows representative of recent conditions (1970–2013) and illustrate groundwater-flow patterns with maps of (1) the simulated water table and groundwater-flow directions, (2) probabilistic areas contributing recharge to high-capacity pumped wells, and (3) estimation of the extent of infiltrated wastewater from treatment lagoons.

  19. Medical Futility and Involuntary Passive Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair-Collins, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Conflicts between providers and patients or their families surrounding end-of-life care are both regrettable and extremely challenging, interpersonally and ethically, for all involved. These conflicts often implicate the concept of medical futility. The concept of futility is too often conflated with distinct concepts that are more ethically salient, including the fiduciary responsibility to assess surrogate decision-making, and distributive justice. By distinguishing these concepts from futility, it becomes clear that there are some situations in which forgoing life-sustaining treatment over objection is permissible, and perhaps even obligatory. But the justification lies in the constellation of rights and responsibilities surrounding surrogate decision-making, or in distributive justice, but not futility. Once futility is disambiguated from these other concepts, the practice of withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment over the objection of a valid surrogate or a competent patient, based on the alleged futility of such treatment, is more clearly described as involuntary passive euthanasia.

  20. Integrating groundwater stress in life-cycle assessments – An evaluation of water abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Ryle Nørskov; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Henriksen, H. J.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding groundwater abstraction effects is vital for holistic impact assessments in areas depending on groundwater resources. The objective of our study was to modify the state-of-the-art AWaRe (available water remaining), freshwater impact assessment specifically for use in LCAs in areas...... and adjusts demarcations in order to improve the representation of the heterogeneity of groundwater catchments. The applicability of AGWaRe was demonstrated on three groundwater systems producing 5 million m3 water for the city of Copenhagen, namely Advanced Treatment of Groundwater, Simple Treatment...... of Groundwater and Infiltration of Reclaimed water. Results were normalised to compare with other effects of supplying water to an average Danish person. The normalised impacts for drinking water for one person ranged between 0.1 and 39 PE (person equivalent) for the three systems, which indicates that effects...

  1. Approaches to groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.; Klavetter, E.; Peters, R.

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain Project is to estimate the groundwater travel time at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine whether the site complies with the criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 CFR 60.113 (a). The numerical standard for performance in these criteria is based on the groundwater travel time along the fastest path of likely radionuclide transport from the disturbed zone to the accessible environment. The concept of groundwater travel time as proposed in the regulations, does not have a unique mathematical statement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ambiguities associated with the regulatory specification of groundwater travel time, two different interpretations of groundwater travel time, and the effect of the two interpretations on estimates of the groundwater travel time

  2. Approaches to groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.; Klavetter, E.; Peters, R.

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain Project is to estimate the groundwater travel time at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine whether the site complies with the criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations. The numerical standard for performance in these criteria is based on the groundwater travel time along the fastest path of likely radionuclide transport from the disturbed zone to the accessible environment. The concept of groundwater travel time, as proposed in the regulations, does not have a unique mathematical statement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss (1) the ambiguities associated with the regulatory specification of groundwater travel time, (2) two different interpretations of groundwater travel time, and (3) the effect of the two interpretations on estimates of the groundwater travel time. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Ground-water travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, H.; Grisak, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Containment and Isolation Working Group considered issues related to the postclosure behavior of repositories in crystalline rock. This working group was further divided into subgroups to consider the progress since the 1978 GAIN Symposium and identify research needs in the individual areas of regional ground-water flow, ground-water travel time, fractional release, and cumulative release. The analysis and findings of the Ground-Water Travel Time Subgroup are presented

  4. Regional ground-water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Containment and Isolation Working Group considered issues related to the postclosure behavior of repositories in crystalline rock. This working group was further divided into subgroups to consider the progress since the 1978 GAIN Symposium and identify research needs in the individual areas of regional ground-water flow, ground-water travel time, fractional release, and cumulative release. The analysis and findings of the Ground-Water Regime Subgroup are presented

  5. Adsorptive Iron Removal from Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron is commonly present in groundwater worldwide. The presence of iron in the water supply is not harmful to human health, however it is undesirable. Bad taste, discoloration, staining, deposition in the distribution system leading to aftergrowth, and incidences of high turbidity are some of the aesthetic and operational problems associated with iron in water supplies. Iron removal from groundwater is, therefore, a major concern for water supply companies using groundwater sources....

  6. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New Mexico Administrative Code), 'Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,'specifically 40 CFR 264.90 through 264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  9. Materials for passively safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, T.

    1993-01-01

    Future nuclear power capacity will be based on reactor designs that include passive safety features if recent progress in advanced nuclear power developments is realized. There is a high potential for nuclear systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the current generation of reactors, especially when passive or intrinsic characteristics are applied to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction and to minimize the burden on equipment and operating personnel. Taylor, has listed the following common generic technical features as the most important goals for the principal reactor development systems: passive stability, simplification, ruggedness, case of operation, and modularity. Economic competitiveness also depends on standardization and assurance of licensing. The performance of passively safe reactors will be greatly influenced by the successful development of advanced fuels and materials that will provide lower fuel-cycle costs. A dozen new designs of advanced power reactors have been described recently, covering a wide spectrum of reactor types, including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, heavy-water reactors, modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), and fast breeder reactors. These new designs address the need for passive safety features as well as the requirement of economic competitiveness

  10. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas; Schatz, Aaron L.; Conley, S. F.; Brown, W. L.

    2013-01-01

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwater monitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons

  11. Groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, J.W.; Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1995-05-23

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring program for the Hanford Site 300 Area Process Trenches (300 APT). The 300 APT are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulated unit. The 300 APT are included in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit No. WA890008967, and are subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring. This document describes a compliance monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the 300 APT. This plan describes the 300 APT monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the 300 APT. This plan will be used to meet groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the 300 APT becomes part of the Permit and through the postclosure care period until certification of final closure.

  12. Arsenic levels in groundwater aquifer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Miodrag Jelic

    resistance (ρ); dielectric constant (ε); magnetic permeability (η); electrochemical activity ..... comprises grey sands of different particle size distribution ..... groundwater: testing pollution mechanisms for sedimentary aquifers in. Bangladesh.

  13. Design, placement, and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells for the management of hazardous waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, S.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater monitoring is an important technical requirement in managing hazardous waste disposal facilities. The purpose of monitoring is to assess whether and how a disposal facility is affecting the underlying groundwater system. This paper focuses on the regulatory and technical aspects of the design, placement, and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells for hazardous waste disposal facilities. Such facilities include surface impoundments, landfills, waste piles, and land treatment facilities. 8 refs., 4 figs

  14. Degradation of sucralose in groundwater and implications for age dating contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, W D; Van Stempvoort, D R; Spoelstra, J; Brown, S J; Schiff, S L

    2016-01-01

    The artificial sweetener sucralose has been in use in Canada and the US since about 2000 and in the EU since 2003, and is now ubiquitous in sanitary wastewater in many parts of the world. It persists during sewage treatment and in surface water environments and as such, has been suggested as a powerful tracer of wastewater. In this study, longer-term persistence of sucralose was examined in groundwater by undertaking a series of three sampling snapshots of a well constrained wastewater plume in Canada (Long Point septic system) over a 6-year period from 2008 to 2014. A shrinking sucralose plume in 2014, compared to earlier sampling, during this period when sucralose use was likely increasing, provides clear evidence of degradation. However, depletion of sucralose from a mean of 40 μg/L in the proximal plume zone, occurred at a relatively slow rate over a period of several months to several years. Furthermore, examination of septic tank effluent and impacted groundwater at six other sites in Canada, revealed that sucralose was present in all samples of septic tank effluent (6-98 μg/L, n = 32) and in all groundwater samples (0.7-77 μg/L, n = 64). Even though sucralose degradation is noted in the Long Point plume, its ubiquitous presence in the groundwater plumes at all seven sites implies a relatively slow rate of decay in many groundwater septic plume environments. Thus, sucralose has the potential to be used as an indicator of 'recent' wastewater contamination. The presence of sucralose identifies groundwater that was recharged after 2000 in Canada and the US and after 2003 in the EU and many Asian countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Passive inhalation of cannabis smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B; Mason, P A; Moffat, A C; King, L J; Marks, V

    1984-09-01

    Six volunteers each smoked simultaneously, in a small unventilated room (volume 27 950 liter), a cannabis cigarette containing 17.1 mg delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). A further four subjects - passive inhalers - remained in the room during smoking and afterwards for a total of 3 h. Blood and urine samples were taken from all ten subjects and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for THC metabolites. The blood samples from the passive subjects taken up to 3 h after the start of exposure to cannabis smoke showed a complete absence of cannabinoids. In contrast, their urine samples taken up to 6 h after exposure showed significant concentrations of cannabinoid metabolites (less than or equal to 6.8 ng ml-1). These data, taken with the results of other workers, show passive inhalation of cannabis smoke to be possible. These results have important implications for forensic toxicologists who are frequently called upon to interpret cannabinoid levels in body fluids.

  16. Active Versus Passive Academic Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Rajeev K.; Grimpe, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines determinants of networking by academics. Using information from a unique large survey of German researchers, the key contribution focuses on the active versus passive networking distinction. Is active networking by researchers a substitute or a complement to passive networking......? Other contributions include examining the role of geographic factors in networking and whether research bottlenecks affect a researcher's propensity to network. Are the determinants of European conference participation by German researchers different from conferences in rest of the world? Results show...... that some types of passive academic networking are complementary to active networking, while others are substitute. Further, we find differences in factors promoting participation in European conferences versus conferences in rest of the world. Finally, publishing bottlenecks as a group generally do...

  17. Protocol Monitoring Passive Solar Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Ham, E.R.; Bosselaar, L.

    1998-01-01

    A method has been developed by means of which the contribution of passive solar energy to the Dutch energy balance can be quantified univocally. The contribution was 57 PJ in 1990 and also 57 PJ in 1995. The efficiency of passive solar energy systems increased from -31.5% to -28.1% in the period 1990-1995, mainly as a result of the use of extra insulating glazing. As a result of the reduction of energy consumption for heating in houses it is expected that the extra contribution of 2 PJ will not be realized in the year 2010. It is suggested that the method to determine the absolute contribution of passive solar energy to the energy demand of dwellings is to be included in the protocol monitoring renewable energy. For the method to be included in the energy statistics of Statistics Netherlands (CBS) it can be considered only to take into account the difference compared to 1990. 11 refs

  18. Pharmaceuticals as Groundwater Tracers - Applications and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheytt, T. J.; Mersmann, P.; Heberer, T.

    2003-12-01

    Pharmaceutically active substances and metabolites are found at concentrations up to the microgram/L-level in groundwater samples from the Berlin (Germany) area and from several other places world wide. Among the compounds detected in groundwater are clofibric acid, propyphenazone, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and carbamazepine. Clofibric acid, the active metabolite of clofibrate and etofibrate (blood lipid regulators) is detected in groundwater at maximum concentrations of 7300 ng/L. Among the most important input paths of drugs are excretion and disposal into the sewage system. Groundwater contamination is likely to be due to leaky sewage systems, influent streams, bank filtration, and irrigation with effluent water from sewage treatment plants. There are no known natural sources of the above mentioned pharmaceuticals. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers may include: (a) Quantification of infiltration from underground septic tanks (b) Detection of leaky sewage systems / leaky sewage pipes (c) Estimation of the effectiveness of sewage treatment plants (d) Identification of transport pathways of other organic compounds (e) Quantification of surface water / groundwater interaction (f) Characterization of the biodegradation potential. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers is limited by variations in input. These variations depend on the amount of drugs prescribed and used in the study area, the social structure of the community, the amount of hospital discharge, and temporal concentration variations. Furthermore, the analysis of trace amounts of pharmaceuticals is sophisticated and expensive and may therefore limit the applicability of pharmaceuticals as tracers. Finally, the transport and degradation behavior of pharmaceuticals is not fully understood. Preliminary experiments in the laboratory were conducted using sediment material and groundwater from the Berlin area to evaluate the transport and sorption behavior of selected drugs. Results of the column experiments

  19. Optimization of surface passivation for InGaAs/InP pin photodetectors using ammonium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheela, D; Das Gupta, Nandita

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the effect of the process parameters during chemical and electrochemical passivation of InGaAs/InP PIN photodetectors using (NH 4 ) 2 S x (x >1) has been studied in detail. It has been observed that the time of passivation, temperature of the sulfide solution and illumination during electrochemical treatment play significant roles in the efficacy of the passivation process. These parameters therefore have to be carefully optimized in order to reduce the dark current of the detectors to a minimum value. The yield of the process is also found to improve with sulfur passivation

  20. Investigations on passive containment cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knebel, J.U.; Cheng, X.; Neitzel, H.J.; Erbacher, F.J.; Hofmann, F.

    1997-01-01

    The composite containment design for advanced LWRs that has been examined under the PASCO project is a promising design concept for purely passive decay heat removal after a severe accident. The passive cooling processes applied are natural convection and radiative heat transfer. Heat transfer through the latter process removes at an emission coefficient of 0.9 about 50% of the total heat removed via the steel containment, and thus is an essential factor. The heat transferring surfaces must have a high emission coefficient. The sump cooling concept examined under the SUCO project achieves a steady, natural convection-driven flow from the heat source to the heat sink. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Passive solar offices: integrated design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, B

    1992-05-06

    Passive solar design in out-of-town offices can remove the need for air-conditioning by making greater use of daylight and natural ventilation. To promote the use of passive solar energy a series of design studies are being run by the Energy Technology Support Unit on behalf of the Department of Energy. The three reported here are designs for out-of-town business buildings. Each is a hypothetical building designed to a realistic brief for an organisation taking the role of real client. (author).

  2. The Danish Reportive Passive as a Non-Canonical Passive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsnes, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Danish passive utterance and cognitive verbs allow a construction where the subject of an infinitival complement is raised: Peter siges at være bortrejst (‘Peter is said to be out of town’). Contrary to English, these verbs are not ECM-verbs or subject-to-object raising verbs in the active...

  3. Effect of Organic and Inorganic Passivation in Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Mauricio Solis; Sánchez, Rafael S; González-Pedro, Victoria; Boix, Pablo P; Mhaisalkar, S G; Rincón, Marina E; Bisquert, Juan; Mora-Seró, Iván

    2013-05-02

    The effect of semiconductor passivation on quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) has been systematically characterized for CdS and CdS/ZnS. We have found that passivation strongly depends on the passivation agent, obtaining an enhancement of the solar cell efficiency for compounds containing amine and thiol groups and, in contrast, a decrease in performance for passivating agents with acid groups. Passivation can induce a change in the position of TiO2 conduction band and also in the recombination rate and nature, reflected in a change in the β parameter. Especially interesting is the finding that β, and consequently the fill factor can be increased with the passivation treatment. Applying this strategy, record cells of 4.65% efficiency for PbS-based QDSCs have been produced.

  4. Ecotoxicity assessment of artificial groundwater recharge with reclaimed water: a pilot-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhao, Xuan

    2013-11-01

    A demonstration of artificial groundwater recharge with tertiary effluent was evaluated using a set of bioassays (acute toxicity to Daphnia, genotoxicity, estrogenic and antiestrogenic toxicity). Around 95 % genotoxicity and 53 % antiestrogenicity were removed from the feed water by ozonation, whereas significant reduction of acute toxicity to Daphnia magna was achieved during a 3 days vadose soil treatment. The toxicity was further removed to the same level as the local groundwater during a 20 days aquifer soil treatment. The pilot study has shown that ozonation and soil treatments can improve the quality of municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents for possible groundwater recharge purposes.

  5. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  6. Nitrate pollution of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Concern about the possible health risks associated with the consumption of nitrate has led many countries, including South Africa, to propose that 10mg of nitrogen (as nitrate or nitrite) per liter should be the maximum allowable limit for domestic water supplies. Groundwater in certain parts of South Africa and Namibia contains nitrate in concentrations which exceed this limit. The CSIR's Natural Isotope Division has been studying the nitrogen isotope composition of the nitrate as an aid to investigation into the sources of this nitrate contamination

  7. Granulated Bog Iron Ores as Sorbents in Passive (BioRemediation Systems for Arsenic Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Debiec

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main element of PbRS (passive (bioremediation systems are sorbents, which act as natural filters retaining heavy metals and carriers of microorganisms involved in water treatment. Thus, the effectiveness of PbRS is determined by the quality of the (adsorbents, which should be stable under various environmental conditions, have a wide range of applications and be non-toxic to (microorganisms used in these systems. Our previous studies showed that bog iron ores (BIOs meet these requirements. However, further investigation of the physical and chemical parameters of BIOs under environmental conditions is required before their large-scale application in PbRS. The aim of this study was (i to investigate the ability of granulated BIOs (gBIOs to remove arsenic from various types of contaminated waters, and (ii to estimate the application potential of gBIOs in technologies dedicated to water treatment. These studies were conducted on synthetic solutions of arsenic and environmental samples of arsenic contaminated water using a set of adsorption columns filled with gBIOs. The experiments performed in a static system revealed that gBIOs are appropriate arsenic and zinc adsorbent. Dynamic adsorption studies confirmed these results and showed, that the actual sorption efficiency of gBIOs depends on the adsorbate concentration and is directly proportional to them. Desorption analysis showed that As-loaded gBIOs are characterized by high chemical stability and they may be reused for the (adsorption of other elements, i.e., zinc. It was also shown that gBIOs may be used for remediation of both highly oxygenated waters and groundwater or settling ponds, where the oxygen level is low, as both forms of inorganic arsenic (arsenate and arsenite were effectively removed. Arsenic concentration after treatment was <100 μg/L, which is below the limit for industrial water.

  8. Granulated bog iron ores as sorbents in passive (bio)remediation systems for arsenic removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiec, Klaudia; Rzepa, Grzegorz; Bajda, Tomasz; Uhrynowski, Witold; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Krzysztoforski, Jan; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2018-03-01

    The main element of PbRS (passive (bio)remediation systems) are sorbents, which act as natural filters retaining heavy metals and carriers of microorganisms involved in water treatment. Thus, the effectiveness of PbRS is determined by the quality of the (ad)sorbents, which should be stable under various environmental conditions, have a wide range of applications and be non-toxic to (micro)organisms used in these systems. Our previous studies showed that bog iron ores (BIOs) meet these requirements. However, further investigation of the physical and chemical parameters of BIOs under environmental conditions is required before their large-scale application in PbRS. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the ability of granulated BIOs (gBIOs) to remove arsenic from various types of contaminated waters, and (ii) to estimate the application potential of gBIOs in technologies dedicated to water treatment. These studies were conducted on synthetic solutions of arsenic and environmental samples of arsenic contaminated water using a set of adsorption columns filled with gBIOs. The experiments performed in a static system revealed that gBIOs are appropriate arsenic and zinc adsorbent. Dynamic adsorption studies confirmed these results and showed that the actual sorption efficiency of gBIOs depends on the adsorbate concentration and is directly proportional to them. Desorption analysis showed that As-loaded gBIOs are characterized by high chemical stability and they may be reused for the (ad)sorption of other elements, i.e. zinc. It was also shown that gBIOs may be used for remediation of both highly oxygenated waters and groundwater or settling ponds, where the oxygen level is low, as both forms of inorganic arsenic (arsenate and arsenite) were effectively removed. Arsenic concentration after treatment was <100 µg/L, which is below the limit for industrial water.

  9. Sustainable groundwater management in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Steven P.; Rogers, Laurel Lynn; Faunt, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) uses data collection, modeling tools, and scientific analysis to help water managers plan for, and assess, hydrologic issues that can cause “undesirable results” associated with groundwater use. This information helps managers understand trends and investigate and predict effects of different groundwater-management strategies.

  10. Groundwater protection management program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a groundwater protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office has prepared a ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (groundwater protection plan) of sufficient scope and detail to reflect the program's significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter 3, for special program planning. The groundwater protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor groundwater resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies project technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA groundwater protection management program. In addition, the groundwater protection plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA sites (long-term care at disposal sites and groundwater restoration at processing sites). This plan will be reviewed annually and updated every 3 years in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1

  11. Hanford Sitewide Groundwater Remediation Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knepp, A.J.; Isaacs, J.D.

    1997-09-01

    This document fulfills the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-13-81, to develop a concise statement of strategy that describe show the Hanford Site groundwater remediation will be accomplished. The strategy addresses objectives and goals, prioritization of activities, and technical approaches for groundwater cleanup. The strategy establishes that the overall goal of groundwater remediation on the Hanford Site is to restore groundwater to its beneficial uses in terms of protecting human health and the environment, and its use as a natural resource. The Hanford Future Site Uses Working Group established two categories for groundwater commensurate with various proposed landuses: (1) restricted use or access to groundwater in the Central Plateau and in a buffer zone surrounding it and (2) unrestricted use or access to groundwater for all other areas. In recognition of the Hanford Future Site Uses Working Group and public values, the strategy establishes that the sitewide approach to groundwater cleanup is to remediate the major plumes found in the reactor areas that enter the Columbia River and to contain the spread and reduce the mass of the major plumes found in the Central Plateau

  12. Isotope hydrology: Investigating groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinchuk, V.; Froehlich, K.; Gonfiantini, R.

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater quality has worsened in many regions, with sometimes serious consequences. Decontaminating groundwater is an extremely slow process, and sometimes impossible, because of the generally long residence time of the water in most geological formations. Major causes of contamination are poor groundwater management (often dictated by immediate social needs) and the lack of regulations and control over the use and disposal of contaminants. These types of problems have prompted an increasing demand for investigations directed at gaining insight into the behaviour of contaminants in the hydrological cycle. Major objectives are to prevent pollution and degradation of groundwater resources, or, if contamination already has occurred, to identify its origin so that remedies can be proposed. Environmental isotopes have proved to be a powerful tool for groundwater pollution studies. The IAEA has had a co-ordinated research programme since 1987 on the application of nuclear techniques to determine the transport of contaminants in groundwater. An isotope hydrology project is being launched within the framework of the IAEA's regional co-operative programme in Latin America (known as ARCAL). Main objectives are the application of environmental isotopes to problems of groundwater assessment and contamination in Latin America. In 1989, another co-ordinated research programme is planned under which isotopic and other tracers will be used for the validation of mathematical models in groundwater transport studies

  13. Technical approach to groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Technical Approach to Groundwater Restoration (TAGR) provides general technical guidance to implement the groundwater restoration phase of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The TAGR includes a brief overview of the surface remediation and groundwater restoration phases of the UMTRA Project and describes the regulatory requirements, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and regulatory compliance. A section on program strategy discusses program optimization, the role of risk assessment, the observational approach, strategies for meeting groundwater cleanup standards, and remedial action decision-making. A section on data requirements for groundwater restoration evaluates the data quality objectives (DQO) and minimum data required to implement the options and comply with the standards. A section on sits implementation explores the development of a conceptual site model, approaches to site characterization, development of remedial action alternatives, selection of the groundwater restoration method, and remedial design and implementation in the context of site-specific documentation in the site observational work plan (SOWP) and the remedial action plan (RAP). Finally, the TAGR elaborates on groundwater monitoring necessary to evaluate compliance with the groundwater cleanup standards and protection of human health and the environment, and outlines licensing procedures

  14. Preservation of FFTF Data Related to Passive Safety Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR). A key area deserving special attention for preservation is the data relating to passive safety testing that was conducted in FFTF and EBR-II during the 1980's. Accidents at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Station and Unit 2 at Three Mile Island changed the safety paradigm of the nuclear power industry. New emphasis was placed on assured safety based on intrinsic plant characteristics that protect not only the public, but the significant investment in the plant as well. Plants designated to perform in this manner are considered to be passively safe since no active sensor/alarm system or human intervention is required to bring the reactor to a safe shutdown condition. The liquid metal reactor (LMR) has several key characteristics needed for a passively safe reactor: reactor coolant with superior heat transfer capability and very high boiling point, low (atmospheric) system pressures, and reliable negative reactivity feedback. The credibility of the design for a passively safe LMR rests on two issues: the validity of analytic methods used to predict passive safety performance and the availability of relevant test data to calibrate design tools. Safety analysis methods used to analyze LMRs under the old safety paradigm were focused on calculating the source term for the Core Disruptive Accident. Passive safety design requires refined analysis methods for transient events because treatment of the detailed reactivity feedbacks is important in predicting the response of the reactor. Similarly, analytic tools should be calibrated against actual test experience in existing LMR facilities. The principal objectives of the combined FFTF natural circulation and Passive Safety Testing program were: (1) to verify natural circulation as a reliable means to safely remove decay heat, (2) to extend passive safety

  15. The need for (further) development of water treatment processes against the background of the European water outline regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, S.; Boerke, P.; Abo-Rady, M.; Engelmann, U.; Felix, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the German state of Sachsen, large areas have been contaminated by coal, lignite and uranium mining. Pollutants like sulfate, chloride, heavy metals and radionuclides are emitted into groundwater and surface water. Regeneration of the water according to the European Water Directive (EG-WRRL) can be achieved only by (further) development of passive water treatment methods. This means that pollutants, seepage mechanisms and experience so far must be revisited. Exemplary technologies are presented which are low-cost, sustainable and appropriate for the conditions prevailing in Sachsen. Areas that require further investigation are defined, and it is shown how the European water standards may be achieved. (orig.)

  16. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  17. Isotopic Survey of Lake Davis and the Local Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridley, M N; Moran, J E; Singleton, M J

    2007-08-21

    In September 2007, California Fish and Game (CAFG) plans to eradicate the northern pike from Lake Davis. As a result of the eradication treatment, local residents have concerns that the treatment might impact the local groundwater quality. To address the concerns of the residents, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recommended measuring the naturally occurring stable oxygen isotopes in local groundwater wells, Lake Davis, and the Lake Davis tributaries. The purpose of these measurements is to determine if the source of the local groundwater is either rain/snowmelt, Lake Davis/Big Grizzly Creek water or a mixture of Lake Davis/Big Grizzly Creek and rain/snowmelt. As a result of natural evaporation, Lake Davis and the water flowing into Big Grizzly Creek are naturally enriched in {sup 18}oxygen ({sup 18}O), and if a source of a well's water is Lake Davis or Big Grizzly Creek, the well water will contain a much higher concentration of {sup 18}O. This survey will allow for the identification of groundwater wells whose water source is Lake Davis or Big Grizzly Creek. The results of this survey will be useful in the development of a water-quality monitoring program for the upcoming Lake Davis treatment. LLNL analyzed 167 groundwater wells (Table 1), 12 monthly samples from Lake Davis (Table 2), 3 samples from Lake Davis tributaries (Table 2), and 8 Big Grizzly Creek samples (Table 2). Of the 167 groundwater wells sampled and analyzed, only 2 wells contained a significant component of evaporated water, with an isotope composition similar to Lake Davis water. The other 163 groundwater wells have isotope compositions which indicate that their water source is rain/snowmelt.

  18. Hydrogen passivation of multi-crystalline silicon solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志华; 廖显伯; 刘祖明; 夏朝凤; 陈庭金

    2003-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen passivation on multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells are reported in this paper.Hydrogen plasma was generated by means of ac glow discharge in a hydrogen atmosphere. Hydrogen passivation was carried out with three different groups of mc-Si solar cells after finishing contacts. The experimental results demonstrated that the photovoltaic performances of the solar cell samples have been improved after hydrogen plasma treatment, with a relative increase in conversion efficiency up to 10.6%. A calculation modelling has been performed to interpret the experimental results using the model for analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures developed at Pennsylvania State University.

  19. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C x F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH 4 F. The charcoal laden with NH 4 F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH 4 F as a mixture of NH 3 and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH 4 F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH 3 concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information, results of laboratory tests

  20. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information

  1. Groundwater: from mystery to management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimhan, T N

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater has been used for domestic and irrigation needs from time immemorial. Yet its nature and occurrence have always possessed a certain mystery because water below the land surface is invisible and relatively inaccessible. The influence of this mystery lingers in some tenets that govern groundwater law. With the birth of modern geology during the late nineteenth century, groundwater science became recognized in its own right. Over the past two centuries, groundwater has lost its shroud of mystery, and its scientific understanding has gradually grown hand-in-hand with its development for human use. Groundwater is a component of the hydrological cycle, vital for human sustenance. Its annual renewability from precipitation is limited, and its chemical quality is vulnerable to degradation by human action. In many parts of the world, groundwater extraction is known to greatly exceed its renewability. Consequently, its rational management to benefit present and future generations is a matter of deep concern for many nations. Groundwater management is a challenging venture, requiring an integration of scientific knowledge with communal will to adapt to constraints of a finite common resource. As scientists and policy makers grapple with the tasks of groundwater management, it is instructive to reflect on the evolution of groundwater knowledge from its initial phase of demystification at the beginning of the nineteenth century, through successive phases of technological conquest, scientific integration, discovery of unintended consequences and the present recognition of an imperative for judicious management. The following retrospective provides a broad context for unifying the technical contributions that make up this focus issue on groundwater resources, climate and vulnerability.

  2. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  3. Influence of basalt/groundwater interactions on radionuclide migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    The work presented here is a partial summary of the experimental results obtained in the Laboratory Analog Program. Two aspects of this effort are (1) the interaction between simulated basaltic groundwater and basalt fissures that were either freshly cleaved or laboratory altered by hydrothermal treatment with the simulated groundwater and (2) the effect of this interaction on radionuclide migration through these basalt fissures. The following conclusions of this study bear heavily on the predicted safety of a basalt repository: Sorption properties of freshly fissured basalt and naturally aged basalt are quite different for different chemical species. Analog experiments predict that aged basalt would be an effective retarder of cesium, but would be much less so for actinide elements. Distribution ratios measured from batch experiments with finely ground rock samples (presenting unaltered rock surfaces) are not a reliable means of predicting radionuclide migration in geological repositories. As the near-repository area is resaturated by groundwater, its ability to retard actinide migration will be degraded with time. Disturbing the natural flow of groundwater through the repository area by constructing and backfilling the repository will modify the composition of groundwater. This modified groundwater is likely to interact with and to modify naturally aged basalt surfaces downstream from the repository

  4. Rationales behind irrationality of decision making in groundwater quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Daniel; Sorek, Shaul; Gilron, Jack

    2012-01-01

    This issue paper presents how certain policies regarding management of groundwater quality lead to unexpected and undesirable results, despite being backed by seemingly reasonable assumptions. This happened in part because the so-called reasonable decisions were not based on an integrative and quantitative methodology. The policies surveyed here are: (1) implementation of a program for aquifer restoration to pristine conditions followed, after failure, by leaving it to natural attenuation; (2) the "Forget About The Aquifer" (FATA) approach, while ignoring possible damage that contaminated groundwater can inflict on the other environmental systems; (3) groundwater recharge in municipal areas while neglecting the presence of contaminants in the unsaturated zone and conditions exerted by upper impervious surfaces; (4) the Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) practice considering aquifers to be "filters of infinite capacity"; and (5) focusing on well contamination vs. aquifer contamination to conveniently defer grappling with the problem of the aquifer as a whole. Possible reasons for the failure of these seemingly rational policies are: (1) the characteristic times of processes associated with groundwater that are usually orders of magnitude greater than the residence times of decision makers in their managerial position; (2) proliferation of improperly trained "groundwater experts" or policymakers with sectoral agendas alongside legitimate differences of opinion among groundwater scientists; (3) the neglect of the cyclic nature of natural phenomena; and (4) ignoring future long-term costs because of immediate costs. © 2011, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  5. Smoking and Passive Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell V. Luepker, MD, MS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature on associations between cardiovascular diseases and tobacco use, including recent trends in smoking behaviors and clinical approaches for cessation of smoking. Methods: A literature review of recent scientific findings for smoking and cardiovascular diseases and recommendations for obtaining cessation. Results: Tobacco smoking is causally related to cardiovascular disease, with nearly a half million deaths annually attributed to cigarette smoking in the United States. The human, economic, medical, and indirect costs are enormous. Secondhand smoke as inhaled from the environment also plays an important role in the genesis of cardiovascular diseases. A recent trend in the use of e-cigarettes is noted particularly among youth. For children, prevention is the best strategy. For adult smokers, behavioral treatments, self-help approaches, and pharmacologic therapies are readily available. Clinicians can have a significant impact on patients’ smoking habits. Adding to individual strategies, regulatory community and public health approaches provide the potential for eliminating the use of tobacco. Conclusion: Tobacco smoke causes cardiovascular morbidity and death. Clinicians can play a role in preventing smoking and promoting cessation.

  6. Assessing groundwater policy with coupled economic-groundwater hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin B.; Brown, Casey; Yang, Yi-Chen E.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2014-03-01

    This study explores groundwater management policies and the effect of modeling assumptions on the projected performance of those policies. The study compares an optimal economic allocation for groundwater use subject to streamflow constraints, achieved by a central planner with perfect foresight, with a uniform tax on groundwater use and a uniform quota on groundwater use. The policies are compared with two modeling approaches, the Optimal Control Model (OCM) and the Multi-Agent System Simulation (MASS). The economic decision models are coupled with a physically based representation of the aquifer using a calibrated MODFLOW groundwater model. The results indicate that uniformly applied policies perform poorly when simulated with more realistic, heterogeneous, myopic, and self-interested agents. In particular, the effects of the physical heterogeneity of the basin and the agents undercut the perceived benefits of policy instruments assessed with simple, single-cell groundwater modeling. This study demonstrates the results of coupling realistic hydrogeology and human behavior models to assess groundwater management policies. The Republican River Basin, which overlies a portion of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of the United States, is used as a case study for this analysis.

  7. Bioremediation Of Groundwater Contaminated Wtih Gasoline Hydrocarbons And Oxygenates Using A Membrane-Based Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to operate a novel, field-scale, aerobic bioreactor and assess its performance in the ex situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with gasoline from a leaking underground storage tank in Pascoag, RI. The groundwater contained elevated concentrat...

  8. Surface Passivation in Empirical Tight Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Tan, Yaohua; Jiang, Zhengping; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2016-03-01

    Empirical Tight Binding (TB) methods are widely used in atomistic device simulations. Existing TB methods to passivate dangling bonds fall into two categories: 1) Method that explicitly includes passivation atoms is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules only. 2) Method that implicitly incorporates passivation does not distinguish passivation atom types. This work introduces an implicit passivation method that is applicable to any passivation scenario with appropriate parameters. This method is applied to a Si quantum well and a Si ultra-thin body transistor oxidized with SiO2 in several oxidation configurations. Comparison with ab-initio results and experiments verifies the presented method. Oxidation configurations that severely hamper the transistor performance are identified. It is also shown that the commonly used implicit H atom passivation overestimates the transistor performance.

  9. Groundwater geophysics. A tool for hydrology. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, Reinhard (ed.) [Landesamt fuer Natur und Umwelt, Flintbek (Germany). Abt. Geologie/Boden

    2009-07-01

    Access to clean water is a human right and a basic requirement for economic development. The safest kind of water supply is the use of groundwater. Since groundwater normally has a natural protection against pollution by the covering layers, only minor water treatment is required. Detailed knowledge on the extent, hydraulic properties, and vulnerability of groundwater reservoirs is necessary to enable a sustainable use of the resources. This book addresses students and professionals in Geophysics and Hydrogeology. The aim of the authors is to demonstrate the application of geophysical techniques to provide a database for hydrogeological decisions like drillhole positioning or action plans for groundwater protection. Physical fundamentals and technical aspects of modern geophysical reconnaissance methods are discussed in the first part of the book. Beside 'classical' techniques like seismic, resistivity methods, radar, magnetic, and gravity methods emphasis is on relatively new techniques like complex geoelectric, radiomagnetotellurics, vertical groundwater flow determination, or nuclear magnetic resonance. An overview of direct push techniques is given which can fill the gap between surface and borehole geophysics. The applications of these techniques for hydrogeological purposes are illustrated in the second part of the book. The investigation of pore aquifers is demonstrated by case histories from Denmark, Germany, and Egypt. Examples for the mapping of fracture zone and karst aquifers as well as for saltwater intrusions leading to reduced groundwater quality are shown. The assessment of hydraulic conductivities of aquifers by geophysical techniques is discussed with respect to the use of porosity - hydraulic conductivity relations and to geophysical techniques like NMR or SIP which are sensitive to the effective porosity of the material. The classification of groundwater protective layers for vulnerability maps as required by the EU water framework

  10. Reliability assessment of passive containment isolation system using APSRA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, A.K.; Jain, Vikas; Gartia, M.R.; Srivastava, A.; Prasad, Hari; Anthony, A.; Gaikwad, A.J.; Bhatia, S.; Sinha, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology known as APSRA (Assessment of Passive System ReliAbility) has been employed for evaluation of the reliability of passive systems. The methodology has been applied to the passive containment isolation system (PCIS) of the Indian advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR). In the APSRA methodology, the passive system reliability evaluation is based on the failure probability of the system to carryout the desired function. The methodology first determines the operational characteristics of the system and the failure conditions by assigning a predetermined failure criterion. The failure surface is predicted using a best estimate code considering deviations of the operating parameters from their nominal states, which affect the PCIS performance. APSRA proposes to compare the code predictions with the test data to generate the uncertainties on the failure parameter prediction, which is later considered in the code for accurate prediction of failure surface of the system. Once the failure surface of the system is predicted, the cause of failure is examined through root diagnosis, which occurs mainly due to failure of mechanical components. The failure probability of these components is evaluated through a classical PSA treatment using the generic data. The reliability of the PCIS is evaluated from the probability of availability of the components for the success of the passive containment isolation system

  11. Electrochemical dissolution of fresh and passivated chalcopyrite electrodes. Effect of pyrite on the reduction of Fe3+ ions and transport processes within the passive film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera, O.G.; Quiroz, L.; Dixon, D.G.; Asselin, E.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • FeS 2 increased the dissolution rate of fresh and passivated CuFeS 2 electrodes. • Fe 3+ reduction was the rate controlling step in the dissolution of fresh CuFeS 2 . • Diffusion within the passive film controlled the dissolution rate of passivated CuFeS 2 . - Abstract: The effect of pyrite (FeS 2 ) on the electrochemical dissolution of fresh and passivated chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2 ) electrodes has been studied. Current density values for the dissolution of CuFeS 2 were calculated from EIS measurements. FeS 2 increased the dissolution rate of fresh and passivated CuFeS 2 electrodes indicating that the galvanic effect continued even after the electrode was chemically passivated. The dissolution rate of CuFeS 2 decreased by a factor of 3 after the passivation treatment. Due to the low diffusion rates of ions within the CuFeS 2 passive film and due to an increase in the resistance to the transfer of electrons at the electrode/film interface, the activity of FeS 2 for the reduction of Fe 3+ ions was also reduced by a factor of 2.3 even though FeS 2 was not exposed to any chemical treatment. The results in this work indicate that the dissolution rate of the fresh CuFeS 2 electrode was controlled by the reduction of Fe 3+ ions whereas for the passivated CuFeS 2 electrode the dissolution rate was controlled by diffusion within the passive film

  12. Passive Scalar Evolution in Peripheral Region

    OpenAIRE

    Lebedev, V. V.; Turitsyn, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    We consider evolution of a passive scalar (concentration of pollutants or temperature) in a chaotic (turbulent) flow. A universal asymptotic behavior of the passive scalar decay (homogenization) related to peripheral regions (near walls) is established. The passive scalar moments and its pair correlation function in the peripheral region are analyzed. A special case investigated in our paper is the passive scalar decay along a pipe.

  13. Two or three decades of passive directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the direction of passive solar architecture. The topics of the paper include design temperatures for buildings, active vs passive, fuel vs philosophy, engineering vs architecture, the thermal scale: heating vs cooling, fuel subsidies, divergent practices, sustainability, lighting, health, the place of passive technology

  14. Active house concept versus passive House

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Vehler, R.; Verhoeven, M.; Fremouw, M.

    2009-01-01

    The passive house concept is the present trend in energy efficient sustainable dwellings. Within the passive house concept every effort is made to minimize the energy use. Substantial savings can be achieved by passive energy systems, especially natural ventilation, summer shading and winter solar

  15. Innovative solutions in passive house details

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlecnik, E.; Hilderson, W.

    2008-01-01

    For the realization of the first passive house demonstration projects in Belgium, passive houses were requested by convinced clients, designed by architects with experience in low energy building, and built by contractors with a feeling for working in building teams. These first passive house

  16. A Lexical Approach to Passive in ESL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Fred

    Dissatisfaction with the standard transformational grammar approach to teaching passive voice sentences gave rise to the method developed. It is based on the framework of a lexical-functional grammar, which claims that both active and passive sentences are base-generated, and that both active and passive verb forms occur in the lexicon. It would…

  17. Characterization of colloids in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.; Klenze, R.

    1987-07-01

    Natural colloids in the Gorleben aquifer systems have been investigated as for their chemical composition, quantification and size distribution. Humic substances appear to be the major organic materials in these groundwaters, generating humic colloids which are analysed to be humic acid (and fulvic acid) loaded with a large number of trace heavy metal ions. These metal ions include natural homologues of actinides and some fission products in trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent state. Concentrations of trivalent and tetravalent heavy metal ions are linearly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DDC) concentration in different groundwaters. The DOC is found to be present as humic colloids. The Am 3+ ions introduced in such a groundwater readily undergo the generation of its pseudocolloids through sorption or ion exchange reactions with humic colloids. The chemical behaviour of Am(III), being similar to the trivalent metal ions, e.g. Fe 3+ , REE etc. found in natural colloids, has been investigated by laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). Groundwaters from Ispra, Markham Clinton and Felslabor Grimsel. Bidistilled water and one of Gorleben groundwaters, Gohy 1011, are taken for the purpose of comparison. This groundwater contains the least amount of natural colloids of all Gorleben groundwaters hitherto investigated. An indirect quantification is made by comparison of the LPAS results with experiment from Latex solution. (orig./IRB)

  18. Calculation of groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnett, R.C.; Sagar, B.; Baca, R.G.

    1984-12-01

    Pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time is one indicator of the isolation capability of the geologic system surrounding a repository. Two distinct modeling approaches exist for prediction of groundwater flow paths and travel times from the repository location to the designated accessible environment boundary. These two approaches are: (1) the deterministic approach which calculates a single value prediction of groundwater travel time based on average values for input parameters and (2) the stochastic approach which yields a distribution of possible groundwater travel times as a function of the nature and magnitude of uncertainties in the model inputs. The purposes of this report are to (1) document the theoretical (i.e., mathematical) basis used to calculate groundwater pathlines and travel times in a basalt system, (2) outline limitations and ranges of applicability of the deterministic modeling approach, and (3) explain the motivation for the use of the stochastic modeling approach currently being used to predict groundwater pathlines and travel times for the Hanford Site. Example calculations of groundwater travel times are presented to highlight and compare the differences between the deterministic and stochastic modeling approaches. 28 refs

  19. Deep groundwater chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikberg, P.; Axelsen, K.; Fredlund, F.

    1987-06-01

    Starting in 1977 and up till now a number of places in Sweden have been investigated in order to collect the necessary geological, hydrogeological and chemical data needed for safety analyses of repositories in deep bedrock systems. Only crystalline rock is considered and in many cases this has been gneisses of sedimentary origin but granites and gabbros are also represented. Core drilled holes have been made at nine sites. Up to 15 holes may be core drilled at one site, the deepest down to 1000 m. In addition to this a number of boreholes are percussion drilled at each site to depths of about 100 m. When possible drilling water is taken from percussion drilled holes. The first objective is to survey the hydraulic conditions. Core drilled boreholes and sections selected for sampling of deep groundwater are summarized. (orig./HP)

  20. Global scale groundwater flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  1. Groundwater pollution: Are we monitoring appropriate parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundwater pollution is a worldwide phenomenon with potentially disastrous consequences. Prevention of pollution is the ideal approach. However, in practice groundwater quality monitoring is the main tool for timely detection of pollutants and protection of groundwater resources. Monitoring groundwater quality is a ...

  2. Stable High-Performance Perovskite Solar Cells via Grain Boundary Passivation

    KAUST Repository

    Niu, Tianqi; Lu, Jing; Munir, Rahim; Li, Jianbo; Barrit, Dounya; Zhang, Xu; Hu, Hanlin; Yang, Zhou; Amassian, Aram; Zhao, Kui; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2018-01-01

    the energy offset between the semiconducting molecules and the perovskite influences trap states and intergrain carrier transport. The superior optoelectronic properties are attained by optimizing the molecular passivation treatments. These benefits

  3. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  4. Carbon footprint assessment of Western Australian Groundwater Recycling Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Andrew; Hamilton, Stacey; Biswas, Wahidul K.

    2017-04-01

    This research has determined the carbon footprint or the carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 eq) of potable water production from a groundwater recycling scheme, consisting of the Beenyup wastewater treatment plant, the Beenyup groundwater replenishment trial plant and the Wanneroo groundwater treatment plant in Western Australia, using a life cycle assessment approach. It was found that the scheme produces 1300 tonnes of CO2 eq per gigalitre (GL) of water produced, which is 933 tonnes of CO2 eq higher than the desalination plant at Binningup in Western Australia powered by 100% renewable energy generated electricity. A Monte Carlo Simulation uncertainty analysis calculated a Coefficient of Variation value of 5.4%, thus confirming the accuracy of the simulation. Electricity input accounts for 83% of the carbon dioxide equivalent produced during the production of potable water. The chosen mitigation strategy was to consider the use of renewable energy to generate electricity for carbon intensive groundwater replenishment trial plant. Depending on the local situation, a maximum of 93% and a minimum of 21% greenhouse gas saving from electricity use can be attained at groundwater replenishment trial plant by replacing grid electricity with renewable electricity. In addition, the consideration of vibrational separation (V-Sep) that helps reduce wastes generation and chemical use resulted in a 4.03 tonne of CO2 eq saving per GL of water produced by the plant.

  5. Carbon footprint assessment of Western Australian Groundwater Recycling Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Andrew; Hamilton, Stacey; Biswas, Wahidul K

    2017-04-01

    This research has determined the carbon footprint or the carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 eq) of potable water production from a groundwater recycling scheme, consisting of the Beenyup wastewater treatment plant, the Beenyup groundwater replenishment trial plant and the Wanneroo groundwater treatment plant in Western Australia, using a life cycle assessment approach. It was found that the scheme produces 1300 tonnes of CO 2 eq per gigalitre (GL) of water produced, which is 933 tonnes of CO 2 eq higher than the desalination plant at Binningup in Western Australia powered by 100% renewable energy generated electricity. A Monte Carlo Simulation uncertainty analysis calculated a Coefficient of Variation value of 5.4%, thus confirming the accuracy of the simulation. Electricity input accounts for 83% of the carbon dioxide equivalent produced during the production of potable water. The chosen mitigation strategy was to consider the use of renewable energy to generate electricity for carbon intensive groundwater replenishment trial plant. Depending on the local situation, a maximum of 93% and a minimum of 21% greenhouse gas saving from electricity use can be attained at groundwater replenishment trial plant by replacing grid electricity with renewable electricity. In addition, the consideration of vibrational separation (V-Sep) that helps reduce wastes generation and chemical use resulted in a 4.03 tonne of CO 2 eq saving per GL of water produced by the plant.

  6. Traffic classification with passive measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Hoang Phong

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This is a master thesis from a collaboration between Oslo University College and Uninett Research. Uninett have a passive monitoring device on a 2.5 Gbps backbone link between Trondheim and Narvik. They uses measurement with optical splitters and specialized measuring interfaces to trace traffic with Gigabit speed. We would like to investigate the structure and patterns in these data. It is of special interest to classify the traffic belonging to different services and protocols. ...

  7. EP1000 passive plant description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiu, G.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, a group of European Utilities, together with Westinghouse and its Industrial Partner GENESI (an Italian consortium including ANSALDO and FIAT), initiated a program designated EPP (European Passive Plant) to evaluate Westinghouse Passive Nuclear Plant Technology for application in Europe. In Phase I of the European Passive Plant Program which was completed in 1996, a 1000 MWe passive plant reference design (EP1000) was established which conforms to the European Utility Requirements (EUR) and is expected to meet the European Safety Authorities requirements. Phase 2 of the program was initiated in 1997 with the objective of developing the Nuclear Island design details and performing supporting analyses to start development of Safety Case Report (SCR) for submittal to European Licensing Authorities. The first part of Phase 2, 'Design Definition' phase (Phase 2A) will be completed at the end of 1998, the main efforts being design definition of key systems and structures, development of the Nuclear Island layout, and performing preliminary safety analyses to support design efforts. The second part, 'Phase 2B', includes both the analyses and evaluations required to demonstrate the adequacy of the design, and to support the preparation of Safety Case Report. The second part of Phase 2 of the program will start at the beginning of 1999 and will be completed in the 2001. Incorporation of the EUR has been a key design requirement for the EP1000 from the beginning of the program. Detailed design solutions to meet the EUR have been defined and the safety approach has also been developed based on the EUR guidelines. This paper integrates and updates the plant description reported in the IAEA TECDOC-968. The most significant developments of the EP1000 plant design during Phase 2A of the EPP program are described and reference is made to the key design requirements set by the EUR Rev. B document. (author)

  8. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  9. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  10. Passive sampler for dissolved organic matter in freshwater environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Buuan; Simpson, André J

    2006-12-15

    A passive sampler for the isolation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from freshwater environments is described. The sampler consists of a molecular weight selective membrane (1000 kDa) and an anion exchange resin (diethylaminoethylcellulose (DEAE-cellulose)). NMR indicates the samplers isolate DOM that is nearly indistinguishable from that isolated using the batch DEAE-cellulose procedure. In a comparative study DOM isolated from Lake Ontario cost approximately 0.30 dollars/mg to isolate using the passive samplers while DOM isolated using the traditional batch procedure cost approximately 8-10 dollars/mg. The samplers have been shown to be effective in a range of freshwater environments including a large inland lake (Lake Ontario), fast flowing tributary, and wetland. Large amounts (gram quantities of DOM) can be easily isolated by increasing the size or number of samplers deployed. Samplers are easy to construct, negate the need for pressure filtering, and also permit a range of temporal and spatial experiments that would be very difficult or impossible to perform using conventional approaches. For example, DOM can be monitored on a regular basis at numerous different locations, or samplers could be set at different depths in large lakes. Furthermore, they could potentially be deployed into hard to reach environments such as wells, groundwater aquifers, etc., and as they are easy to use, they can be mailed to colleagues or included with expeditions going to difficult to reach places such as the Arctic and Antarctic.

  11. In planta passive sampling devices for assessing subsurface chlorinated solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Mikhil K; Limmer, Matt A; Waltermire, Kendra; Morrison, Glenn C; Burken, Joel G

    2014-06-01

    Contaminant concentrations in trees have been used to delineate groundwater contaminant plumes (i.e., phytoscreening); however, variability in tree composition hinders accurate measurement of contaminant concentrations in planta, particularly for long-term monitoring. This study investigated in planta passive sampling devices (PSDs), termed solid phase samplers (SPSs) to be used as a surrogate tree core. Characteristics studied for five materials included material-air partitioning coefficients (Kma) for chlorinated solvents, sampler equilibration time and field suitability. The materials investigated were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyoxymethylene (POM) and plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Both PDMS and LLDPE samplers demonstrated high partitioning coefficients and diffusivities and were further tested in greenhouse experiments and field trials. While most of the materials could be used for passive sampling, the PDMS SPSs performed best as an in planta sampler. Such a sampler was able to accurately measure trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) concentrations while simultaneously incorporating simple operation and minimal impact to the surrounding property and environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Degradation of materials and passivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, W.

    1997-01-01

    Demanding for a reduction in materials degradation is a serious problem all over the world. Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) is, among others, a very valuable tool to follow many degradation processes. Evidently, Fe is the most important Moessbauer element considering the overall presence of iron in everyday life. MS may contribute to our knowledge about nearly all fields of materials degradation, chemical, mechanical, thermal, irradiative, etc. Following some general lines, corrosion is considered in particular. MS is applicable to investigate the bulk of materials as well as their surface layers with an information depth of ca. 250 nm. In general, it has to be applied as a surface sensitive method in combination with other relevant methods in order to get a detailed insight into ongoing processes. Some examples have been selected to elucidate the application of MS in this field. Another class of examples concerns attempts to prevent corrosion, i.e., the application of coatings and transforming chemicals. A very effective and most natural way to reduce corrosion is the passivation of materials. The effect of passive layers and their destruction by environmental influences are discussed using results of MS and related methods. It is outlined that passivity is not restricted to chemically treated metals but can be considered as a general concept for preventing different kinds of materials from degradation. (orig.)

  13. Passive infrared motion sensing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    In the last 10 years passive IR based (8--12 microns) motion sensing has matured to become the dominant method of volumetric space protection and surveillance. These systems currently cost less than $25 to produce and yet use traditionally expensive IR optics, filters, sensors and electronic circuitry. This IR application is quite interesting in that the volumes of systems produced and the costs and performance level required prove that there is potential for large scale commercial applications of IR technology. This paper will develop the basis and principles of operation of a staring motion sensor system using a technical approach. A model for the motion of the target is developed and compared to the background. The IR power difference between the target and the background as well as the optical requirements are determined from basic principles and used to determine the performance of the system. Low cost reflective and refractive IR optics and bandpass IR filters are discussed. The pyroelectric IR detector commonly used is fully discussed and characterized. Various schemes for ''false alarms'' have been developed and are also explained. This technology is also used in passive IR based motion sensors for other applications such as lighting control. These applications are also discussed. In addition the paper will discuss new developments in IR surveillance technology such as the use of linear motion sensing arrays. This presentation can be considered a ''primer'' on the art of Passive IR Motion Sensing as applied to Surveillance Technology

  14. Progress Toward Cleanup of Operable Unit 1 Groundwater at the US DOE Mound, Ohio, Site: Success of a Phase-Combined Remedy – 15310

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, Gwendolyn [U.S. Department of Energy, Harrison, OH (United States). Office of Legacy Management; Cato, Rebecca [Stoller Newport News Nuclear Inc., Weldon Spring, MS (United States); Looney, Brian [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Huntsman, Brent [Terran Corporation, Beavercreek, OH (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) soil and groundwater have been affected by volatile organic compounds (VOC) Present groundwater remedy is collection, treatment, and disposal (pump and treat [P&T]) Several combinations of technologies were used to address soil and groundwater contamination Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) is a viable alternative Majority of source term has been excavated VOC concentrations in groundwater have decreased Attenuation mechanisms have been observed in the subsurface at OU-1

  15. Current Status of Groundwater Monitoring Networks in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Yong Lee; Kideok D. Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Korea has been operating groundwater monitoring systems since 1996 as the Groundwater Act enacted in 1994 enforces nationwide monitoring. Currently, there are six main groundwater monitoring networks operated by different government ministries with different purposes: National Groundwater Monitoring Network (NGMN), Groundwater Quality Monitoring Network (GQMN), Seawater Intrusion Monitoring Network (SIMN), Rural Groundwater Monitoring Network (RGMN), Subsidiary Groundwater Monitoring Network ...

  16. The passive of reflexive verbs in Icelandic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlíf Árnadóttir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Reflexive Passive in Icelandic is reminiscent of the so-called New Passive (or New Impersonal in that the oblique case of a passivized object NP is preserved. As is shown by recent surveys, however, speakers who accept the Reflexive Passive do not necessarily accept the New Passive, whereas conversely, speakers who accept the New Passive do also accept the Reflexive Passive. Based on these results we suggest that there is a hierarchy in the acceptance of passive sentences in Icelandic, termed the Passive Acceptability Hierarchy. The validity of this hierarchy is confirmed by our diachronic corpus study of open access digital library texts from Icelandic journals and newspapers dating from the 19th and 20th centuries (tímarit.is. Finally, we sketch an analysis of the Reflexive Passive, proposing that the different acceptability rates of the Reflexive and New Passives lie in the argument status of the object. Simplex reflexive pronouns are semantically dependent on the verbs which select them, and should therefore be analyzed as syntactic arguments only, and not as semantic arguments of these verbs.

  17. Environmental impact of passive house nursery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vares, S., Email: sirje.vares@vtt.fi

    2012-06-15

    It is often believed that reduction in energy use automatically leads to the total reduction of the carbon footprint and other emissions. To achieve better energy efficiency more raw materials may be needed not only for insulation and better windows but also for heating systems like ground source heat and solar panels. The use of advanced building systems increase the use of electricity and in winter where electricity production is already inadequate the additional stand-by power plants must be taken in use. These are not as effective as CHP plants for heat production. Moreover also the passive house structures can be produced in dozens ways and from many different materials which all have different service life, different need for maintenance and also different effect on the overall carbon footprint. Finally as the nursery is the overall concept, besides the building structures outdoor playgrounds and specific operations requiring day care trips, personnel commuting and waste treatment must be taken into account. (orig.)

  18. Decadal variations in groundwater quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Søren; Postma, Dieke; Thorling, Lærke

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five years of groundwater quality monitoring in a sandy aquifer beneath agricultural fields showed large temporal and spatial variations in major ion groundwater chemistry, which were linked closely to the nitrate (NO3) content of agricultural recharge. Between 1988 and 2013, the NO3 content...... of water in the oxidized zone of the aquifer nearly halved, following implementation of action plans to reduce N leaching from agriculture. However, due to denitrification by pyrite oxidation in the aquifer, a plume of sulfate-rich water migrates through the aquifer as a legacy of the historical NO3...... loading. Agriculture thus is an important determinant of major ion groundwater chemistry. Temporal and spatial variations in the groundwater quality were simulated using a 2D reactive transport model, which combined effects of the historical NO3 leaching and denitrification, with dispersive mixing...

  19. Groundwater Vulnerability Regions of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The regions onThis map represent areas with similar hydrogeologic characteristics thought to represent similar potentials for contamination of groundwater and/or...

  20. Non-invasive multilevel groundwater samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, E.; Heiser, J.

    1993-01-01

    Two non-intrusive, passive multilayer groundwater sampling devices are described which collect data simultaneously at small vertical intervals in the same well, without disturbing the geohydrological environment. One system uses membranes, the other uses remotely operated stainless steel cylinders connected in tandem. When used in several wells sufficient information is collected to allow a three dimensional characterization of contaminants and flow in the aquifer. The systems were used during field trials at Savannah River Laboratory in November 1991 and June 1992, and collected water quality and flow data over a 3 meter interval below the water table in each of two wells. Data from 1991 indicate weak vertical profiles in temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH over the 3 m sampling interval. Other measurements indicated a relatively uniform horizontal specific discharge of about 6 cm/year over the same sampling interval. No statistically significant vertical structure was evident for discharge. This presentation will compare this information with data obtained from field trials in June 1992

  1. Assessment of emerging groundwater contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Marianne; Lapworth, Dan; Manamsa, Katya; Crane, Emily; White, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging contaminants in groundwater are important. These have been studied at a range of scales. An increasing range of compounds is being detected Urban areas show impact of sewage and industrial wastewater. Some ECs are probably no threat to drinking water at such µg/L concentrations, e.g. caffeine Others may prove to be in the future. There is little information on their impact on other groundwater receptors in the environment. We are still far from understanding which of these comp...

  2. Groundwater sampling in uranium reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, T.R.

    1977-03-01

    The groundwater sampling program is based on the premise that ground water geochemistry reflects the chemical composition of, and geochemical processes active in the strata from which the sample is obtained. Pilot surveys have shown that wells are the best source of groundwater, although springs are sampled on occasion. The procedures followed in selecting a sampling site, the sampling itself, and the field measurements, as well as the site records made, are described

  3. The behavior of dissolution/passivation and the transformation of passive films during electrocoagulation: Influences of initial pH, Cr(VI) concentration, and alternating pulsed current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhao-hui; Xu, Hai-yin; Zeng, Guang-ming; Luo, Yuan-ling; Yang, Xia; Huang, Jing; Wang, Li-ke; Song, Pei-pei

    2015-01-01

    behavior of dissolution/passivation and the transformation of passive films during the Fe-EC process for Cr(VI) treatment

  4. Distribution of Iron in Rural Groundwater of Benue State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... absence of any other alternative.Some form of treatment like filtering and or Reverse Osmosis if can be afforded may be required to reduce the risk to health over time. The study has demonstrated the need for groundwater quality monitoring and management in the rural areas to ensure the safety of water being provided.

  5. Removal of both dissolved and particulate iron from groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, K.; Abrahamse, A.; Leijssen, H.; Rietveld, L.; Van Dijk, H.

    2008-01-01

    Iron is the primary source for discolouration problems in the drinking water distribution system. The removal of iron from groundwater is a common treatment step in the production of drinking water. Even when clear water meets the drinking water standards, the water quality in the distribution

  6. Groundwater flow model and its implications for contaminant behavior

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What sets hydrogeology apart from many of the other geosciences is an emphasis on treating problems mathematically. The mathematical approach involves representing a groundwater process by an equation and solving that equation. These equations are fundamental to the quantitative treatment of flow and provide the ...

  7. An innovative funnel and gate approach to groundwater remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.O.; Wilkey, M.L.; Willis, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, office of Science and Technology (EM-50) sponsored a demonstration project of the Barrier Member Containment Corporation's patented EnviroWall trademark system at the Savannah River site. With this system, contaminated groundwater can be funneled into a treatment system without pumping the contaminated water to the surface. The EnviroWall trademark barrier and pass-through system, an innovative product of sic years of research and development, provides a means to enhance groundwater flow on the upgradient side of an impermeable wall and direct it to an in situ treatment system. The EnviroWall trademark system is adaptable to most site conditions. Remedial applications range form plume containment to more robust designs that incorporate groundwater manipulation coupled with in situ treatment. Several key innovations of the EnviroWall trademark system include the following: a method for guide box installation; a means for using interlocking seals at vertical seams; a down-hole video camera for inspecting seams and panels, installation of horizontal- and vertical-collection systems; installation of vertical monitoring wells and instrumentation on each side of the barrier; site-specific backfill design; and a pass-through system for funneling groundwater into a treatment system

  8. Groundwater quality in arid regions: The case of Hassi Messaoud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After chemical quality study, it has been realized that the groundwater of Hassi Messaoud region isn't drinking one according to WHO and Algerian standards for drinking water. This water is highly mineralized and very hard and its major concentrations are often higher than recommended standards, so it requires treatment ...

  9. Hoe Creek groundwater restoration, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renk, R.R.; Crader, S.E.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the summer of 1989, approximately 6.5 million gallons of contaminated groundwater were pumped from 23 wells at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site, near Gillette, Wyoming. The organic contaminants were removed using activated carbon before the water was sprayed on 15.4 acres at the sites. Approximately 2647 g (5.8 lb) of phenols and 10,714 g (23.6 lb) of benzene were removed from the site aquifers. Phenols, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene concentrations were measured in 43 wells. Benzene is the only contaminant at the site exceeds the federal standard for drinking water (5 {mu}g/L). Benzene leaches into the groundwater and is slow to biologically degrade; therefore, the benzene concentration has remained high in the groundwater at the site. The pumping operation affected groundwater elevations across the entire 80-acre site. The water levels rebounded quickly when the pumping operation was stopped on October 1, 1989. Removing contaminated groundwater by pumping is not an effective way to clean up the site because the continuous release of benzene from coal tars is slow. Benzene will continue to leach of the tars for a long time unless its source is removed or the leaching rate retarded through mitigation techniques. The application of the treated groundwater to the surface stimulated plant growth. No adverse effects were noted or recorded from some 60 soil samples taken from twenty locations in the spray field area. 20 refs., 52 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. A Review: Passive System Reliability Analysis – Accomplishments and Unresolved Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Arun Kumar, E-mail: arunths@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Chandrakar, Amit [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai (India); Vinod, Gopika [Reactor Safety Division, Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-10-10

    Reliability assessment of passive safety systems is one of the important issues, since safety of advanced nuclear reactors rely on several passive features. In this context, a few methodologies such as reliability evaluation of passive safety system (REPAS), reliability methods for passive safety functions (RMPS), and analysis of passive systems reliability (APSRA) have been developed in the past. These methodologies have been used to assess reliability of various passive safety systems. While these methodologies have certain features in common, but they differ in considering certain issues; for example, treatment of model uncertainties, deviation of geometric, and process parameters from their nominal values. This paper presents the state of the art on passive system reliability assessment methodologies, the accomplishments, and remaining issues. In this review, three critical issues pertaining to passive systems performance and reliability have been identified. The first issue is applicability of best estimate codes and model uncertainty. The best estimate codes based phenomenological simulations of natural convection passive systems could have significant amount of uncertainties, these uncertainties must be incorporated in appropriate manner in the performance and reliability analysis of such systems. The second issue is the treatment of dynamic failure characteristics of components of passive systems. REPAS, RMPS, and APSRA methodologies do not consider dynamic failures of components or process, which may have strong influence on the failure of passive systems. The influence of dynamic failure characteristics of components on system failure probability is presented with the help of a dynamic reliability methodology based on Monte Carlo simulation. The analysis of a benchmark problem of Hold-up tank shows the error in failure probability estimation by not considering the dynamism of components. It is thus suggested that dynamic reliability methodologies must be

  11. Groundwater Model Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed E. Hassan

    2006-01-24

    Models have an inherent uncertainty. The difficulty in fully characterizing the subsurface environment makes uncertainty an integral component of groundwater flow and transport models, which dictates the need for continuous monitoring and improvement. Building and sustaining confidence in closure decisions and monitoring networks based on models of subsurface conditions require developing confidence in the models through an iterative process. The definition of model validation is postulated as a confidence building and long-term iterative process (Hassan, 2004a). Model validation should be viewed as a process not an end result. Following Hassan (2004b), an approach is proposed for the validation process of stochastic groundwater models. The approach is briefly summarized herein and detailed analyses of acceptance criteria for stochastic realizations and of using validation data to reduce input parameter uncertainty are presented and applied to two case studies. During the validation process for stochastic models, a question arises as to the sufficiency of the number of acceptable model realizations (in terms of conformity with validation data). Using a hierarchical approach to make this determination is proposed. This approach is based on computing five measures or metrics and following a decision tree to determine if a sufficient number of realizations attain satisfactory scores regarding how they represent the field data used for calibration (old) and used for validation (new). The first two of these measures are applied to hypothetical scenarios using the first case study and assuming field data consistent with the model or significantly different from the model results. In both cases it is shown how the two measures would lead to the appropriate decision about the model performance. Standard statistical tests are used to evaluate these measures with the results indicating they are appropriate measures for evaluating model realizations. The use of validation

  12. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    electron microscope. The corrosion rate of the nonequilibrium sputtered alloys, as determined by polarization resistance, is significantly reduced compared to the most corrosion resistant commercial magnesium alloys. The open circuit potentials of the sputter deposited alloys are significantly more noble compared to commercial, equilibrium phase magnesium alloys. Galvanic corrosion susceptibility has also been considerably reduced. Nonequilibrium magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys have been shown to achieve passivity autonomously by alteration of the composition chemistry of the surface oxide/hydroxide layer. Self-healing properties are also evident, as corrosion propagation can be arrested after initial pitting of the material. A clear relationship exists between the corrosion resistance of sputter vapor deposited magnesium alloys and the amount of ion bombardment incurred by the alloy during deposition. Argon pressure, the distance between the source and the substrate, and alloy morphology play important roles in determining the ability of the alloy to develop a passive film. Thermal effects, both during and after alloy deposition, alter the stress state of the alloys, precipitation of second phases, and the mechanical stability of the passive film. An optimal thermal treatment has been developed in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the magnesium-yttrium-titanium alloys. The significance of the results includes the acquisition of electrochemical data for these novel materials, as well as expanding the utilization of magnesium alloys by the improvement in their corrosion resistance. The magnesium alloys developed in this work are more corrosion resistant than any commercial magnesium alloy. Structural components comprised of these alloys would therefore exhibit unprecedented corrosion performance. Coatings of these alloys on magnesium components would provide a corrosion resistant yet galvanically-compatible coating. The broad impact of these contributions is

  13. Passive film growth on carbon steel and its nanoscale features at various passivating potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Imaged the topography of passivated steel at various film-forming potentials. • Characterized the nanoscale features of passive films. • Determined the composition of passive films formed at various potentials. - Abstract: In this work, the passivation and topographic sub-structure of passive films on a carbon steel in a carbonate/bicarbonate solution was characterized by electrochemical measurements, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When passivating at a potential near the active-passive transition, the film contains the mixture of Fe_3O_4, Fe_2O_3 and FeOOH, with numerous nanoscale features. As the film-forming potential shifts positively, the passive film becomes more compact and the nanoscale features disappear. When the film is formed at a passive potential where the oxygen evolution is enabled, the content of FeOOH in the film increases, resulting in an amorphous topography and reduced corrosion resistance.

  14. Sidewall passivation for InGaN/GaN nanopillar light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Hyuck; Abraham, Michael; Yu, Shih-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); You, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Li; Xu, Jian, E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mohney, Suzanne E., E-mail: mohney@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We studied the effect of sidewall passivation on InGaN/GaN multiquantum well-based nanopillar light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this research, the effects of varying etch rate, KOH treatment, and sulfur passivation were studied for reducing nanopillar sidewall damage and improving device efficiency. Nanopillars prepared under optimal etching conditions showed higher photoluminescence intensity compared with starting planar epilayers. Furthermore, nanopillar LEDs with and without sulfur passivation were compared through electrical and optical characterization. Suppressed leakage current under reverse bias and four times higher electroluminescence (EL) intensity were observed for passivated nanopillar LEDs compared with unpassivated nanopillar LEDs. The suppressed leakage current and EL intensity enhancement reflect the reduction of non-radiative recombination at the nanopillar sidewalls. In addition, the effect of sulfur passivation was found to be very stable, and further insight into its mechanism was gained through transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Groundwater Quality Assessment in Eti-Osa, Lagos-Nigeria using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    routine monitoring and thorough treatment before consumption. The study demonstrates ... The use of groundwater has increased significantly in ... the south by Atlantic Ocean, in the east by Ojo local ... of 2500mm and temperature of 300C.

  16. Bikini Atoll groundwater development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing during the 1950's has left the soil and ground water on Bikini Atoll contaminated with cesium-137, and to a lesser extent, strontium-90. Plans currently are underway for the clean-up and resettlement of the atoll by removal of approximately the upper 30 cm of soil. Any large-scale resettlement program must include provisions for water supply. This will be achieved principally by catchment and storage of rain water, however, since rainfall in Bikini is highly seasonal and droughts occur frequently, ground water development must also be considered. The quantity of potable ground water that can be developed is limited by its salinity and radiological quality. The few ground water samples available from Bikini, which have been collected from only about the top meter of the groundwater body, indicate that small bodies of potable ground water exist on Bikini and Eneu, the two principal living islands, but that cesium and strontium in the Bikioni ground water exceed drinking water standards. In order to make a reasonable estimate of the ground water development potential for the atoll, some 40 test boreholes will be drilled during July/August 1985, and a program of water quality monitoring initiated. This paper will describe preliminary results of the drilling and monitoring work

  17. The passive-aggressive organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2005-10-01

    Passive-aggressive organizations are friendly places to work: People are congenial, conflict is rare, and consensus is easy to reach. But, at the end of the day, even the best proposals fail to gain traction, and a company can go nowhere so imperturbably that it's easy to pretend everything is fine. Such companies are not necessarily saddled with mulishly passive-aggressive employees. Rather, they are filled with mostly well-intentioned people who are the victirms of flawed processes and policies. Commonly, a growing company's halfhearted or poorly thought-out attempts to decentralize give rise to multiple layers of managers, whose authority for making decisions becomes increasingly unclear. Some managers, as a result, hang back, while others won't own up to the calls they've made, inviting colleagues to second-guess or overturn the decisions. In such organizations, information does not circulate freely, and that makes it difficult for workers to understand the impact of their actions on company performance and for managers to correctly appraise employees' value to the organization. A failure to accurately match incentives to performance stifles initiative, and people do just enough to get by. Breaking free from this pattern is hard; a long history of seeing corporate initiatives ignored and then fade away tends to make people cynical. Often it's best to bring in an outsider to signal that this time things will be different. He or she will need to address every obstacle all at once: clarify decision rights; see to it that decisions stick; and reward people for sharing information and adding value, not for successfully negotiating corporate politics. If those steps are not taken, it's only a matter of time before the diseased elements of a passive-aggressive organization overwhelm the remaining healthy ones and drive the company into financial distress.

  18. Analysis of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) chirality in groundwater: A tool for dating groundwater movement in agricultural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Clifford P; McCarty, Gregory W; Bialek-Kalinski, Krystyna; Zabetakis, Kara; Torrents, Alba; Hapeman, Cathleen J

    2016-08-01

    To better address how much groundwater contributes to the loadings of pollutants from agriculture we developed a specific dating tool for groundwater residence times. This tool is based on metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid, which is a major soil metabolite of metolachlor. The chiral forms of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) and the chiral forms of metolachlor were examined over a 6-year period in samples of groundwater and water from a groundwater-fed stream in a riparian buffer zone. This buffer zone bordered cropland receiving annual treatments with metolachlor. Racemic (rac) metolachlor was applied for two years in the neighboring field, and subsequently S-metolachlor was used which is enriched by 88% with the S-enantiomer. Chiral analyses of the samples showed an exponential increase in abundance of the S-enantiomeric forms for MESA as a function of time for both the first order riparian buffer stream (R(2)=0.80) and for groundwater within the riparian buffer (R(2)=0.96). However, the S-enrichment values for metolachlor were consistently high indicating different delivery mechanisms for MESA and metolachlor. A mean residence time of 3.8years was determined for depletion of the initially-applied rac-metolachlor. This approach could be useful in dating groundwater and determining the effectiveness of conservation measures. A mean residence time of 3.8years was calculated for groundwater feeding a first-order stream by plotting the timed-decay for the R-enantiomer of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Architectural Qualities in Passive Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    that it is possible to build this type of houses, but the knowledge and discussion about the architectural quality in the buildings is hardly present. The question is if the strategies for optimising energy use and indoor environment collide with the architectural qualities of buildings. This paper brings forth...... this discussion based in literature and four case studies. The paper highlights cases on how passive strategies for optimising energy use and indoor environment affect, restrict, inspire or create possibilities for the architectural expression and there through the architectural quality of the building....

  20. Passive Containment DataSet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data is for Figures 6 and 7 in the journal article. The data also includes the two EPANET input files used for the analysis described in the paper, one for the looped system and one for the block system.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Grayman, W., R. Murray , and D. Savic. Redesign of Water Distribution Systems for Passive Containment of Contamination. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION. American Water Works Association, Denver, CO, USA, 108(7): 381-391, (2016).

  1. Passive longitudinal phase space linearizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Craievich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the possibility to passively linearize the bunch compression process in electron linacs for the next generation x-ray free electron lasers. This can be done by using the monopole wakefields in a dielectric-lined waveguide. The optimum longitudinal voltage loss over the length of the bunch is calculated in order to compensate both the second-order rf time curvature and the second-order momentum compaction terms. Thus, the longitudinal phase space after the compression process is linearized up to a fourth-order term introduced by the convolution between the bunch and the monopole wake function.

  2. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fripp, Jon

    2000-01-01

    .... Acid mine drainage (AMD) can have severe impacts to aquatic resources, can stunt terrestrial plant growth and harm wetlands, contaminate groundwater, raise water treatment costs, and damage concrete and metal structures...

  3. Removal of Iron and Manganese in Groundwater using Natural Biosorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharudin, F.; Tadza, M. Y. Mohd; Imran, S. N. Mohd; Jani, J.

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to measure and compare the concentration of iron, manganese and hardness of the river and groundwater and to determine the effectiveness of iron and manganese removal by using natural biosorbent which is banana peels. The samples of river and groundwater were collected at riverbank filtration site at Jenderam Hilir, Dengkil. Based on the water quality investigation, the concentration of iron and manganese in the samples of groundwater have exceeded the drinking water quality standard which are 0.3 mg/L for iron and 0.1 mg/L for manganese. The removal process of the iron and manganese in the groundwater was done by using 2, 4 and 8 grams of banana peels activated carbon. It is found that with higher amount of activated banana peels, the removal of iron and manganese is more effective. The ranges of percentage of iron and manganese removal are between 82.25% to 90.84% and 98.79% to 99.43% respectively. From the result, banana peels activated carbon can be concluded as a one of the most effective low-cost adsorbent for groundwater treatment.

  4. Electrical Resistivity Technique for Groundwater Exploration in Quaternary Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziman, M.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Fahmy, K. A.; Faizal, T. B. M.; Sabariah, M.; Ambak, K.; Ismail, M. A. M.

    2018-04-01

    The water security for University Tun Hussein Onn (UTHM) campus was initiated to find alternative sources of water supply. This research began with finding the soil profiles using the geophysical electrical resistivity method across UTHM campus. The resistivity results were calibrated with previous borehole data as well as via groundwater drilling. The drilling work was discovered the groundwater aquifer characterized by the fractured fresh igneous rock at a depth between 43 meter and 55 meter. Further drilling was continued until 100 meter in depth. However, due to not encounter a new rock fractured zone causes the groundwater quantity did not improve even was drilled up to 100 meter depth. In the perspective of water resources, it showed a good potential for water resources for local usages at 104 m3 per day. In addition, the groundwater quality showed the water treatment was required to fulfil the criterion of the national drinking water standards. This study concluded that the first layer of fractured bedrock at UTHM was able to produce significant amounts of groundwater for local consumption usage.

  5. Review: Micro-organic contaminants in groundwater in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weihong; Xie, Wei; Su, Xiaosi; Wen, Chuanlei; Cao, Zhipeng; Wan, Yuyu

    2018-03-01

    Micro-organic contaminants (MOs) in groundwater, which may have adverse effects on human health and ecosystems worldwide, are gaining increased attention in China. A great deal of research has been conducted to investigate their sources, occurrences and behavior in aquifers. This paper reviews the main sources, distribution, concentrations and behavior of a wide range of MOs in groundwater in China. These MOs include well-established persistent organic pollutants—polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), endocrine disrupting chemicals (poly brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), phthalic acid esters (PAEs), bisphenol A (BPA)—and some contaminants of emerging concern such as pharmaceutical and personal care products (antibiotics, caffeine, shampoos) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). The results reveal that the main MOs in groundwater are PAHs, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), PBDEs, PAEs, and antibiotics. Moreover, some PFCs such as perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have only recently been observed in groundwater as emerging organic contaminants. Additionally, most MOs are distributed in populated and industrialized areas such as the southeast coast of China. Finally, industrial emissions, wastewater treatment plant effluents and agricultural wastewater are found to be dominant sources of MOs in groundwater. Based on the existing pollution levels, regulation and amelioration of MOs are warranted.

  6. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  7. Liquid effluent retention facility final-status groundwater monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.D.; Chou, C.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    The following sections describe the groundwater-monitoring program for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The LERF is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The LERF is included in the open-quotes Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit WA890008967close quotes, (referred to herein as the Permit) (Ecology 1994) and is subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring (WAC 173-303-645). This document describes a RCRA/WAC groundwater detection-monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the LERF. This plan describes the LERF monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the LERF. This plan will be used to meet the groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the LERF becomes part of the Permit and through the post-closure care period, until certification of final closure

  8. Application of ozone micro-nano-bubbles to groundwater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liming; Xia, Zhiran

    2018-01-15

    Ozone is widely used for water treatment because of its strong oxidation ability. However, the efficiency of ozone in groundwater remediation is limited because of its relatively low solubility and rapid decomposition in the aqueous phase. Methods for increasing the stability of ozone within the subsurface are drawing increasing attention. Micro-nano-bubbles (MNBs), with diameters ranging from tens of nanometres to tens of micrometres, present rapid mass transfer rates, persist for a relatively long time in water, and transport with groundwater flow, which significantly improve gas concentration and provide a continuous gas supply. Therefore, MNBs show a considerable potential for application in groundwater remediation. In this study, the characteristics of ozone MNBs were examined, including their size distribution, bubble quantity, and zeta potential. The mass transfer rate of ozone MNBs was experimentally investigated. Ozone MNBs were then used to treat organics-contaminated water, and they showed remarkable cleanup efficiency. Column tests were also conducted to study the efficiency of ozone MNBs for organics-contaminated groundwater remediation. Based on the laboratory tests, field monitoring was conducted on a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated site. The results showed that ozone MNBs can greatly improve remediation efficiency and represent an innovative technology for in situ remediation of organics-contaminated groundwater. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment of liquid effluent from uranium mines and mills. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Treatment and control of liquid effluents produced during uranium mining and milling operations is an integral part of environmental project management. Research has continued to add to the large body of science that has been built up around the treatment of radioactive and non-radioactive effluents to minimize their long-term environmental impact. The objective of the meetings on which this publication is based was to exchange information on active effluent treatment technologies that have application during operations and passive treatment techniques such as constructed wetlands and use of micro-organisms that are applicable during project reclamation and long-term care and maintenance. Papers describe effluent treatment case histories from active uranium mining and processing operations as well as effluent treatment research on both active and passive systems that have potential application under a wide range of operating and post-operational conditions including new information on high-density sludge from effluent neutralization (Australia), aerated manganese hydroxide for removal of radium (China), nanofiltration and macropore resins to treat mine water (Australia and China), in situ microbial treatment and permeable reactive walls for treatment of contaminated groundwater (Germany), construction of wetlands to treat mine water runoff (Australia and Germany), biogenic granules to remove 226 Ra from mill effluent (India), self-remediation of acidic in situ leach aquifers (Kazakhstan) and sorption characteristics of soil for self-remediation of contaminated groundwater (Hungary). These and other topics presented in this publication will be of interest to technical personnel who deal with day-to-day practical aspects of liquid effluent control and treatment at uranium production facilities worldwide

  10. Forekomsten af passiv rygning i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T S; Møller, L; Holstein, B E

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence of passive smoking in the adult population in Denmark has not been described previously. This article publishes data from three investigations all of which were carried out in 1987. One was an interview investigation of a random section of the Danish population carried out by the D...... inconvenienced by passive smoking at work and a corresponding fraction had taken steps to reduce the extent of passive smoking in their daily life. Udgivelsesdato: 1990-Aug-27...... showed consistent results as regards the occurrence of passive smoking among adult Danes. About 12% of non-smokers were exposed to passive smoking for at least eight hours and 40% for at least one hour daily. Altogether 73% were exposed to passive smoking daily. About one third of the non-smokers were...

  11. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.

    1993-07-01

    The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate

  12. Imaging Preferential Flow Pathways of Contaminants from Passive Acid Mine Drainage Mitigation Sites Using Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, N.; Mount, G.; Terry, N.; Herndon, E.; Singer, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Critical Zone represents the surficial and shallow layer of rock, air, water, and soil where most interactions between living organisms and the Earth occur. Acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal extraction can influence both biological and geochemical processes across this zone. Conservative estimates suggest that more than 300 million gallons of AMD are released daily, making this acidic solution of water and contaminants a common issue in areas with legacy or current coal extraction. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) provides a rapid and minimally invasive method to identify and monitor contaminant pathways from AMD remediation systems in the subsurface of the Critical Zone. The technique yields spatially continuous data of subsurface resistivity that can be inverted to determine electrical conductivity as a function of depth. Since elevated concentrations of heavy metals can directly influence soil conductivity, ERI data can be used to trace the flow pathways or perhaps unknown mine conduits and transport of heavy metals through the subsurface near acid mine drainage sources. This study aims to examine preferential contaminant migration from those sources through substrate pores, fractures, and shallow mine workings in the near subsurface surrounding AMD sites in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. We utilize time lapse ERI measures during different hydrologic conditions to better understand the variability of preferential flow pathways in relation to changes in stage and discharge within the remediation systems. To confirm ERI findings, and provide constraint to geochemical reactions occurring in the shallow subsurface, we conducted Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometry analysis of groundwater samples from boreholes along the survey transects. Through these combined methods, we can provide insight into the ability of engineered systems to contain and isolate metals in passive acid mine drainage treatment systems.

  13. Funnel-and-gate remediation systems augmented with passive filter wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Paul F

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of funnel-and-gate structures augmented with passive wells containing filter cartridges to capture contaminated groundwater in hypothetical, homogeneous and heterogeneous, unconfined aquifers. Perpendicular to groundwater flow, linear structures were 15 m wide, 1 m thick, and keyed into the base of the aquifer. Gates occupied 4 m of the total width of each simulated structure; one gate was 5 m from a contaminant plume's leading tip, while others occupied cross-gradient margins of the plume. Results suggest a modest reduction in remediation timeframes, up to 425 d per well added in these simulations; however, incremental benefits are highly variable and case specific.

  14. Field Scale Groundwater Nitrate Loading Model for the Central Valley, California, 1945-Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T.; Dzurella, K.; Bell, A.; Kourakos, G.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic groundwater nitrate contamination in the Central Valley aquifer system, California, is widespread, with over 40% of domestic wells in some counties exceeding drinking water standards. Sources of groundwater nitrate include leaky municipal wastewater systems, municipal wastewater recharge, onsite wastewater treatment (septic) systems, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, animal farming, application of organic waste materials (sludge, biosolids, animal manure) to agricultural lands, and synthetic fertilizer. At the site or field scale, nitrogen inputs to the landscape are balanced by plant nitrogen uptake and harvest, atmospheric nitrogen losses, surface runoff of nitrogen, soil nitrogen storage changes, and leaching to groundwater. Irrigated agriculture is a dominant player in the Central Valley nitrogen cycle: The largest nitrogen fluxes are synthetic fertilizer and animal manure applications to cropland, crop nitrogen uptake, and groundwater nitrogen losses. We construct a historic field/parcel scale groundwater nitrogen loading model distinguishing urban and residential areas, individual animal farming areas, leaky wastewater lagoons, and approximately 50 different categories of agricultural crops. For non-agricultural landuses, groundwater nitrate loading is based on reported leaching values, animal population, and human population. For cropland, groundwater nitrate loading is computed from mass balance, taking into account diverse and historically changing management practices between different crops. Groundwater nitrate loading is estimated for 1945 to current. Significant increases in groundwater nitrate loading are associated with the expansion of synthetic fertilizer use in the 1950s to 1970s. Nitrate loading from synthetic fertilizer use has stagnated over the past 20 years due to improvements in nutrient use efficiency. However, an unbroken 60 year exponential increase in dairy production until the late 2000s has significantly impacted the

  15. Non-voluntary passive euthanasia: the social consequences of euphemisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Gwen M

    2007-11-01

    Non-voluntary passive euthanasia, the commonest form of euthanasia, is seldom mentioned in the UK. This article illustrates how the legal reasoning in Airedale NHS Trust v Bland contributed towards this conceptual deletion. By upholding the impermissibility of euthanasia, whilst at the same time permitting 'euthanasia' under the guise of 'withdrawing futile treatment', it is argued that the court (logically) allowed (withdrawing futile treatment and euthanasia). The Bland reasoning was incorporated into professional guidance, which extended the court's ruling to encompass patients who, unlike Anthony Bland, were sentient. But since the lawfulness of (withdrawing futile treatment and euthanasia) hinges on the futility of treatment, and since the guidance provides advice about withdrawing treatment from patients who differ from those considered in court, the lawfulness of such 'treatment decisions' is unclear. Legislation is proposed in order to redress the ambiguity that arose when moral decisions about 'euthanasia' were translated into medical decisions about 'treatment'.

  16. Columbia County Habitat for Humanity Passive Townhomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-03-01

    Columbia County Habitat for Humanity (CCHH) (New York, Climate Zone 5A) built a pair of townhomes to Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS+ 2015) criteria to explore approaches for achieving Passive House performance (specifically with respect to exterior wall, space-conditioning, and ventilation strategies) within the labor and budget context inherent in a Habitat for Humanity project. CCHH’s goal is to eventually develop a cost-justified Passive House prototype design for future projects.

  17. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce

    KAUST Repository

    Alsalah, Dhafer

    2015-10-05

    agricultural management practices are needed alongside groundwater treatment strategies to improve food safety.

  18. Passive Nuclear Plants Program (UPDATE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimeno, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The light water passive plants program (PCNP), today Advanced Nuclear Power Plants Program (PCNA), was constituted in order to reach the goals of the Spanish Electrical Sector in the field of advanced nuclear power plants, optimize the efforts of all Spanish initiatives, and increase joint presence in international projects. The last update of this program, featured in revision 5th of the Program Report, reflects the consolidation of the Spanish sector's presence in International programs of the advanced power plants on the basis of the practically concluded American ALWR program. Since the beginning of the program , the PCNP relies on financing from the Electrical sector, Ocide, SEPI-Endesa, Westinghouse, General Electric, as well as from the industrial cooperators, Initec, UTE (Initec- Empresarios Agrupados), Ciemat, Enusa, Ensa and Tecnatom. The program is made up of the following projects, already concluded: - EPRI's Advanced Light Water Plants Certification Project - Westinghouse's AP600 Project - General Electric's SBWR Project (presently paralyzed) and ABWR project Currently, the following project are under development, at different degrees of advance: - EPP project (European Passive Plant) - EBWR project (European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor)

  19. A Portable Passive Physiotherapeutic Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasheek Naidu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The public healthcare system in South Africa is in need of urgent attention in no small part because there has been an escalation in the number of stroke victims which could be due to the increase in hypertension in this urbanizing society. There is a growing need for physiotherapists and occupational therapists in the country, which is further hindered by the division between urban and rural areas. A possible solution is a portable passive physiotherapeutic exoskeleton device. The exoskeleton device has been formulated to encapsulate methodologies that enable the anthropomorphic integration between a biological and mechatronic limb. A physiotherapeutic mechanism was designed to be portable and adjustable, without limiting the spherical motion and workspace of the human arm. The exoskeleton was designed to be portable in the sense that it could be transported geographically. It is a complete device allowing for motion in the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand joints. The inverse kinematics was solved iteratively via the Damped Least Squares (DLS method. The electronic and computer system allowed for professional personnel to either change an individual joint or a combination of joints angles via the kinematic models. A ramp PI controller was established to provide a smooth response to simulate the passive therapy motion.

  20. Liberal theory of passive citizenship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salatić Stevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this seminar paper I will focus on the analysis of liberal theory of citizenship. The focus of the study will be on the liberal-communitarian dispute in the theory of citizenship, with main ideas of the most important representatives of liberal discourse in the field of citizenship also being discussed. I will look more closely at the ideas of T.H. Marshall, as the most significant writer of liberal orthodoxy in the second half of the twentieth century, his contribution to liberal theory of passive citizenship, but I will also deal with the ideas of his biggest critics, both from the aspect of liberalism and from the aspect of communitarianism, including Anthony Giddens, Claus Offe, Michael Mann, Barrington Moore and Brian Turner. The emphasis will be on Marshall's term 'conquest of citizenship', as well as on the derivation of various theories of state from the obtained rights achieved through the expansion of the concept of citizenship. Finally, I will say something about modern obstacles to theories of passive citizenship derived from the communitarian school.