WorldWideScience

Sample records for partitioned waveform inversion

  1. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dongliang

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  2. Elastic reflection waveform inversion with variable density

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhenchun; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Guo, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) provides a better description of the subsurface than those given by the acoustic assumption. However it suffers from a more serious cycle skipping problem compared with the latter. Reflection waveform inversion

  3. Workflows for Full Waveform Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Christian; Krischer, Lion; Afanasiev, Michael; van Driel, Martin; May, Dave A.; Rietmann, Max; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Despite many theoretical advances and the increasing availability of high-performance computing clusters, full seismic waveform inversions still face considerable challenges regarding data and workflow management. While the community has access to solvers which can harness modern heterogeneous computing architectures, the computational bottleneck has fallen to these often manpower-bounded issues that need to be overcome to facilitate further progress. Modern inversions involve huge amounts of data and require a tight integration between numerical PDE solvers, data acquisition and processing systems, nonlinear optimization libraries, and job orchestration frameworks. To this end we created a set of libraries and applications revolving around Salvus (http://salvus.io), a novel software package designed to solve large-scale full waveform inverse problems. This presentation focuses on solving passive source seismic full waveform inversions from local to global scales with Salvus. We discuss (i) design choices for the aforementioned components required for full waveform modeling and inversion, (ii) their implementation in the Salvus framework, and (iii) how it is all tied together by a usable workflow system. We combine state-of-the-art algorithms ranging from high-order finite-element solutions of the wave equation to quasi-Newton optimization algorithms using trust-region methods that can handle inexact derivatives. All is steered by an automated interactive graph-based workflow framework capable of orchestrating all necessary pieces. This naturally facilitates the creation of new Earth models and hopefully sparks new scientific insights. Additionally, and even more importantly, it enhances reproducibility and reliability of the final results.

  4. Resolution analysis in full waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fichtner, A.; Trampert, J.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method for the quantitative resolution analysis in full seismic waveform inversion that overcomes the limitations of classical synthetic inversions while being computationally more efficient and applicable to any misfit measure. The method rests on (1) the local quadratic

  5. Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps

    KAUST Repository

    Beydoun, Wafik B.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    After receiving an outstanding response to its inaugural workshop in 2013, SEG once again achieved great success with its 2015 SEG Middle East Workshop, “Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps,” which took place 30 March–1 April 2015 in Abu Dhabi

  6. Source-independent elastic waveform inversion using a logarithmic wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Min, Dong Joon

    2012-01-01

    The logarithmic waveform inversion has been widely developed and applied to some synthetic and real data. In most logarithmic waveform inversion algorithms, the subsurface velocities are updated along with the source estimation. To avoid estimating

  7. Multiparameter Elastic Full Waveform Inversion with Facies-based Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Naeini, Ehsan Zabihi; Sun, Bingbing

    2018-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) incorporates all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters described by the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion beyond improved acoustic imaging, like

  8. Waveform inversion for acoustic VTI media in frequency domain

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the background model using a single scattered wavefield from an inverted perturbation. However, current

  9. Multiparameter Elastic Full Waveform Inversion With Facies Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Naeini, Ehsan Zabihi

    2017-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) aims fully benefit from all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters describing the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion as a tool beyond acoustic

  10. Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps

    KAUST Repository

    Beydoun, Wafik B.

    2015-09-01

    After receiving an outstanding response to its inaugural workshop in 2013, SEG once again achieved great success with its 2015 SEG Middle East Workshop, “Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps,” which took place 30 March–1 April 2015 in Abu Dhabi, UAE. The workshop was organized by SEG, and its partner sponsors were Saudi Aramco (gold sponsor), ExxonMobil, and CGG. Read More: http://library.seg.org/doi/10.1190/tle34091106.1

  11. Towards full waveform ambient noise inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Korbinian; Ermert, Laura; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    In this work we investigate fundamentals of a method—referred to as full waveform ambient noise inversion—that improves the resolution of tomographic images by extracting waveform information from interstation correlation functions that cannot be used without knowing the distribution of noise sources. The fundamental idea is to drop the principle of Green function retrieval and to establish correlation functions as self-consistent observables in seismology. This involves the following steps: (1) We introduce an operator-based formulation of the forward problem of computing correlation functions. It is valid for arbitrary distributions of noise sources in both space and frequency, and for any type of medium, including 3-D elastic, heterogeneous and attenuating media. In addition, the formulation allows us to keep the derivations independent of time and frequency domain and it facilitates the application of adjoint techniques, which we use to derive efficient expressions to compute first and also second derivatives. The latter are essential for a resolution analysis that accounts for intra- and interparameter trade-offs. (2) In a forward modelling study we investigate the effect of noise sources and structure on different observables. Traveltimes are hardly affected by heterogeneous noise source distributions. On the other hand, the amplitude asymmetry of correlations is at least to first order insensitive to unmodelled Earth structure. Energy and waveform differences are sensitive to both structure and the distribution of noise sources. (3) We design and implement an appropriate inversion scheme, where the extraction of waveform information is successively increased. We demonstrate that full waveform ambient noise inversion has the potential to go beyond ambient noise tomography based on Green function retrieval and to refine noise source location, which is essential for a better understanding of noise generation. Inherent trade-offs between source and structure

  12. Elastic reflection waveform inversion with variable density

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuanyuan

    2017-08-17

    Elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) provides a better description of the subsurface than those given by the acoustic assumption. However it suffers from a more serious cycle skipping problem compared with the latter. Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to build a good background model, which can serve as an initial model for elastic FWI. Therefore, we introduce the concept of RWI for elastic media, and propose elastic RWI with variable density. We apply Born modeling to generate the synthetic reflection data by using optimized perturbations of P- and S-wave velocities and density. The inversion for the perturbations in P- and S-wave velocities and density is similar to elastic least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM). An incorrect initial model will lead to some misfits at the far offsets of reflections; thus, can be utilized to update the background velocity. We optimize the perturbation and background models in a nested approach. Numerical tests on the Marmousi model demonstrate that our method is able to build reasonably good background models for elastic FWI with absence of low frequencies, and it can deal with the variable density, which is needed in real cases.

  13. Image-domain full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2013-08-20

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear with respect to changes in velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we define the image-domain objective function to minimize the difference of the suboffset-domain common image gathers (CIGs) obtained by migrating the observed data and the calculated data. The derivation shows that the gradient of this new objective function is the combination of the gradient of the conventional FWI and the image-domain differential semblance optimization (DSO). Compared to the conventional FWI, the imagedomain FWI is immune to cycle skipping problems by smearing the nonzero suboffset images along wavepath. It also can avoid the edge effects and the gradient artifacts that are inherent in DSO due to the falsely over-penalized focused images. This is achieved by subtracting the focused image associated with the calculated data from the unfocused image associated with the observed data in the image-domain misfit function. The numerical results of the Marmousi model show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive the initial model than the conventional FWI. © 2013 SEG.

  14. Image-domain full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear with respect to changes in velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we define the image-domain objective function to minimize the difference of the suboffset-domain common image gathers (CIGs) obtained by migrating the observed data and the calculated data. The derivation shows that the gradient of this new objective function is the combination of the gradient of the conventional FWI and the image-domain differential semblance optimization (DSO). Compared to the conventional FWI, the imagedomain FWI is immune to cycle skipping problems by smearing the nonzero suboffset images along wavepath. It also can avoid the edge effects and the gradient artifacts that are inherent in DSO due to the falsely over-penalized focused images. This is achieved by subtracting the focused image associated with the calculated data from the unfocused image associated with the observed data in the image-domain misfit function. The numerical results of the Marmousi model show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive the initial model than the conventional FWI. © 2013 SEG.

  15. Facies Constrained Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-05-26

    Current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion (FWI) as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example for reservoir analysis, face inherent limitations on resolution and also on the potential trade-off between elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues. However, current approaches to add such constraints are based on averaged type rock physics regularization terms. Since the true earth model consists of different facies, averaging over those facies naturally leads to smoothed models. To overcome this, we propose a novel way to utilize facies based constraints in elastic FWI. A so-called confidence map is calculated and updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and the prior information. The numerical example shows that the proposed method can reduce the cross-talks and also can improve the resolution of inverted elastic properties.

  16. Facies Constrained Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.; Zabihi Naeini, E.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion (FWI) as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example for reservoir analysis, face inherent limitations on resolution and also on the potential trade-off between elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues. However, current approaches to add such constraints are based on averaged type rock physics regularization terms. Since the true earth model consists of different facies, averaging over those facies naturally leads to smoothed models. To overcome this, we propose a novel way to utilize facies based constraints in elastic FWI. A so-called confidence map is calculated and updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and the prior information. The numerical example shows that the proposed method can reduce the cross-talks and also can improve the resolution of inverted elastic properties.

  17. Retrieving rupture history using waveform inversions in time sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, L.; Xu, C.; Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    The rupture history of large earthquakes is generally regenerated using the waveform inversion through utilizing seismological waveform records. In the waveform inversion, based on the superposition principle, the rupture process is linearly parameterized. After discretizing the fault plane into sub-faults, the local source time function of each sub-fault is usually parameterized using the multi-time window method, e.g., mutual overlapped triangular functions. Then the forward waveform of each sub-fault is synthesized through convoluting the source time function with its Green function. According to the superposition principle, these forward waveforms generated from the fault plane are summarized in the recorded waveforms after aligning the arrival times. Then the slip history is retrieved using the waveform inversion method after the superposing of all forward waveforms for each correspond seismological waveform records. Apart from the isolation of these forward waveforms generated from each sub-fault, we also realize that these waveforms are gradually and sequentially superimposed in the recorded waveforms. Thus we proposed a idea that the rupture model is possibly detachable in sequent rupture times. According to the constrained waveform length method emphasized in our previous work, the length of inverted waveforms used in the waveform inversion is objectively constrained by the rupture velocity and rise time. And one essential prior condition is the predetermined fault plane that limits the duration of rupture time, which means the waveform inversion is restricted in a pre-set rupture duration time. Therefore, we proposed a strategy to inverse the rupture process sequentially using the progressively shift rupture times as the rupture front expanding in the fault plane. And we have designed a simulation inversion to test the feasibility of the method. Our test result shows the prospect of this idea that requiring furthermore investigation.

  18. Anisotropic wave-equation traveltime and waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Shihang

    2016-09-06

    The wave-equation traveltime and waveform inversion (WTW) methodology is developed to invert for anisotropic parameters in a vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) meidum. The simultaneous inversion of anisotropic parameters v0, ε and δ is initially performed using the wave-equation traveltime inversion (WT) method. The WT tomograms are then used as starting background models for VTI full waveform inversion. Preliminary numerical tests on synthetic data demonstrate the feasibility of this method for multi-parameter inversion.

  19. SeisFlows-Flexible waveform inversion software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrak, Ryan T.; Borisov, Dmitry; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Tromp, Jeroen

    2018-06-01

    SeisFlows is an open source Python package that provides a customizable waveform inversion workflow and framework for research in oil and gas exploration, earthquake tomography, medical imaging, and other areas. New methods can be rapidly prototyped in SeisFlows by inheriting from default inversion or migration classes, and code can be tested on 2D examples before application to more expensive 3D problems. Wave simulations must be performed using an external software package such as SPECFEM3D. The ability to interface with external solvers lends flexibility, and the choice of SPECFEM3D as a default option provides optional GPU acceleration and other useful capabilities. Through support for massively parallel solvers and interfaces for high-performance computing (HPC) systems, inversions with thousands of seismic traces and billions of model parameters can be performed. So far, SeisFlows has run on clusters managed by the Department of Defense, Chevron Corp., Total S.A., Princeton University, and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

  20. Anisotropic wave-equation traveltime and waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Shihang; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    The wave-equation traveltime and waveform inversion (WTW) methodology is developed to invert for anisotropic parameters in a vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) meidum. The simultaneous inversion of anisotropic parameters v0, ε and δ is initially

  1. Full Waveform Inversion for Reservoir Characterization - A Synthetic Study

    KAUST Repository

    Zabihi Naeini, E.; Kamath, N.; Tsvankin, I.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Most current reservoir-characterization workflows are based on classic amplitude-variation-with-offset (AVO) inversion techniques. Although these methods have generally served us well over the years, here we examine full-waveform inversion (FWI

  2. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the unwrapped phase

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2011-01-01

    Phase wrapping in the frequency-domain (or cycle skipping in the time-domain) is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion. The unwrapped phase has the potential to provide us with a robust and reliable waveform inversion

  3. Source-independent time-domain waveform inversion using convolved wavefields: Application to the encoded multisource waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full waveform inversion requires a good estimation of the source wavelet to improve our chances of a successful inversion. This is especially true for an encoded multisource time-domain implementation, which, conventionally, requires separate

  4. Source-independent elastic waveform inversion using a logarithmic wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    The logarithmic waveform inversion has been widely developed and applied to some synthetic and real data. In most logarithmic waveform inversion algorithms, the subsurface velocities are updated along with the source estimation. To avoid estimating the source wavelet in the logarithmic waveform inversion, we developed a source-independent logarithmic waveform inversion algorithm. In this inversion algorithm, we first normalize the wavefields with the reference wavefield to remove the source wavelet, and then take the logarithm of the normalized wavefields. Based on the properties of the logarithm, we define three types of misfit functions using the following methods: combination of amplitude and phase, amplitude-only, and phase-only. In the inversion, the gradient is computed using the back-propagation formula without directly calculating the Jacobian matrix. We apply our algorithm to noise-free and noise-added synthetic data generated for the modified version of elastic Marmousi2 model, and compare the results with those of the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion. For the noise-free data, the source-independent algorithms yield velocity models close to true velocity models. For random-noise data, the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion yields better results than the source-independent method, whereas for coherent-noise data, the results are reversed. Numerical results show that the source-independent and source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion methods have their own merits for random- and coherent-noise data. © 2011.

  5. Full Waveform Inversion Using Nonlinearly Smoothed Wavefields

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Y.; Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Li, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of low frequency information in the acquired data makes full waveform inversion (FWI) conditionally converge to the accurate solution. An initial velocity model that results in data with events within a half cycle of their location in the observed data was required to converge. The multiplication of wavefields with slightly different frequencies generates artificial low frequency components. This can be effectively utilized by multiplying the wavefield with itself, which is nonlinear operation, followed by a smoothing operator to extract the artificially produced low frequency information. We construct the objective function using the nonlinearly smoothed wavefields with a global-correlation norm to properly handle the energy imbalance in the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. Similar to the multi-scale strategy, we progressively reduce the smoothing width applied to the multiplied wavefield to welcome higher resolution. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state technique, which is similar to the conventional FWI except for the adjoint source. Examples on the Marmousi 2 model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed FWI method to mitigate the cycle-skipping problem in the case of a lack of low frequency information.

  6. Full Waveform Inversion Using Nonlinearly Smoothed Wavefields

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Y.

    2017-05-26

    The lack of low frequency information in the acquired data makes full waveform inversion (FWI) conditionally converge to the accurate solution. An initial velocity model that results in data with events within a half cycle of their location in the observed data was required to converge. The multiplication of wavefields with slightly different frequencies generates artificial low frequency components. This can be effectively utilized by multiplying the wavefield with itself, which is nonlinear operation, followed by a smoothing operator to extract the artificially produced low frequency information. We construct the objective function using the nonlinearly smoothed wavefields with a global-correlation norm to properly handle the energy imbalance in the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. Similar to the multi-scale strategy, we progressively reduce the smoothing width applied to the multiplied wavefield to welcome higher resolution. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state technique, which is similar to the conventional FWI except for the adjoint source. Examples on the Marmousi 2 model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed FWI method to mitigate the cycle-skipping problem in the case of a lack of low frequency information.

  7. Full waveform inversion for mechanized tunneling reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamert, Andre; Musayev, Khayal; Lambrecht, Lasse; Friederich, Wolfgang; Hackl, Klaus; Baitsch, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In mechanized tunnel drilling processes, exploration of soil structure and properties ahead of the tunnel boring machine can greatly help to lower costs and improve safety conditions during drilling. We present numerical full waveform inversion approaches in time and frequency domain of synthetic acoustic data to detect different small scale structures representing potential obstacles in front of the tunnel boring machine. With the use of sensitivity kernels based on the adjoint wave field in time domain and in frequency domain it is possible to derive satisfactory models with a manageable amount of computational load. Convergence to a suitable model is assured by the use of iterative model improvements and gradually increasing frequencies. Results of both, time and frequency approach, will be compared for different obstacle and source/receiver setups. They show that the image quality strongly depends on the used receiver and source positions and increases significantly with the use of transmission waves due to the installed receivers and sources at the surface and/or in bore holes. Transmission waves lead to clearly identified structure and position of the obstacles and give satisfactory guesses for the wave speed. Setups using only reflected waves result in blurred objects and ambiguous position of distant objects and allow to distinguish heterogeneities with higher or lower wave speed, respectively.

  8. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the unwrapped phase

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2011-01-01

    Phase wrapping in the frequency-domain (or cycle skipping in the time-domain) is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion. The unwrapped phase has the potential to provide us with a robust and reliable waveform inversion, with reduced local minima. We propose a waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase objective function in the frequency-domain. The unwrapped phase, or what we call the instantaneous traveltime, is given by the imaginary part of dividing the derivative of the wavefield with respect to the angular frequency by the wavefield itself. As a result, the objective function is given a traveltime-like function, which allows us to smooth it and reduce its nonlinearity. The gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm based on the adjoint-state technique. We apply both our waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase and the conventional waveform inversion and show that our inversion algorithm gives better convergence to the true model than the conventional waveform inversion. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  9. Conditioning the full-waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual trade-off between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation

  10. Full Waveform Inversion Using Oriented Time Migration Method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2016-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) for reflection events is limited by its linearized update requirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate the resulting gradient can have

  11. Interferometric full-waveform inversion of time-lapse data

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2017-01-01

    surveys. To overcome this challenge, we propose the use of interferometric full waveform inversion (IFWI) for inverting the velocity model from data recorded by baseline and monitor surveys. A known reflector is used as the reference reflector for IFWI

  12. Velocity Building by Reflection Waveform Inversion without Cycle-skipping

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Wu, Zedong

    2017-01-01

    Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) provides estimation of low wavenumber model components using reflections generated from a migration/demigration process. The resulting model tends to be a good initial model for FWI. In fact, the optimization

  13. Spectral implementation of full waveform inversion based on reflections

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Using the reflection imaging process as a source to model reflections for full waveform inversion (FWI), referred to as reflection FWI (RFWI), allows us to update the background component of the model, and avoid using the relatively costly migration

  14. Centered Differential Waveform Inversion with Minimum Support Regularization

    KAUST Repository

    Kazei, Vladimir; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse full-waveform inversion has two major challenges. The first one is the reconstruction of a reference model (baseline model for most of approaches). The second is inversion for the time-lapse changes in the parameters. Common model

  15. Centered Differential Waveform Inversion with Minimum Support Regularization

    KAUST Repository

    Kazei, Vladimir

    2017-05-26

    Time-lapse full-waveform inversion has two major challenges. The first one is the reconstruction of a reference model (baseline model for most of approaches). The second is inversion for the time-lapse changes in the parameters. Common model approach is utilizing the information contained in all available data sets to build a better reference model for time lapse inversion. Differential (Double-difference) waveform inversion allows to reduce the artifacts introduced into estimates of time-lapse parameter changes by imperfect inversion for the baseline-reference model. We propose centered differential waveform inversion (CDWI) which combines these two approaches in order to benefit from both of their features. We apply minimum support regularization commonly used with electromagnetic methods of geophysical exploration. We test the CDWI method on synthetic dataset with random noise and show that, with Minimum support regularization, it provides better resolution of velocity changes than with total variation and Tikhonov regularizations in time-lapse full-waveform inversion.

  16. Improving waveform inversion using modified interferometric imaging condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuebao; Liu, Hong; Shi, Ying; Wang, Weihong; Zhang, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    Similar to the reverse-time migration, full waveform inversion in the time domain is a memory-intensive processing method. The computational storage size for waveform inversion mainly depends on the model size and time recording length. In general, 3D and 4D data volumes need to be saved for 2D and 3D waveform inversion gradient calculations, respectively. Even the boundary region wavefield-saving strategy creates a huge storage demand. Using the last two slices of the wavefield to reconstruct wavefields at other moments through the random boundary, avoids the need to store a large number of wavefields; however, traditional random boundary method is less effective at low frequencies. In this study, we follow a new random boundary designed to regenerate random velocity anomalies in the boundary region for each shot of each iteration. The results obtained using the random boundary condition in less illuminated areas are more seriously affected by random scattering than other areas due to the lack of coverage. In this paper, we have replaced direct correlation for computing the waveform inversion gradient by modified interferometric imaging, which enhances the continuity of the imaging path and reduces noise interference. The new imaging condition is a weighted average of extended imaging gathers can be directly used in the gradient computation. In this process, we have not changed the objective function, and the role of the imaging condition is similar to regularization. The window size for the modified interferometric imaging condition-based waveform inversion plays an important role in this process. The numerical examples show that the proposed method significantly enhances waveform inversion performance.

  17. Frequency domain, waveform inversion of laboratory crosswell radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Mazzella, Aldo T.; Horton, Robert J.; McKenna, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    A new waveform inversion for crosswell radar is formulated in the frequency-domain for a 2.5D model. The inversion simulates radar waves using the vector Helmholtz equation for electromagnetic waves. The objective function is minimized using a backpropagation method suitable for a 2.5D model. The inversion is tested by processing crosswell radar data collected in a laboratory tank. The estimated model is consistent with the known electromagnetic properties of the tank. The formulation for the 2.5D model can be extended to inversions of acoustic and elastic data.

  18. Seismic Broadband Full Waveform Inversion by shot/receiver refocusing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haffinger, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Full waveform inversion is a tool to obtain high-resolution property models of the subsurface from seismic data. However, the technique is computationally expens- ive and so far no multi-dimensional implementation exists to achieve a resolution that can directly be used for seismic interpretation

  19. Multisource waveform inversion of marine streamer data using normalized wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-01

    Multisource full-waveform inversion based on the L1- and L2-norm objective functions cannot be applied to marine streamer data because it does not take into account the unmatched acquisition geometries between the observed and modeled data. To apply multisource full-waveform inversion to marine streamer data, we construct the L1- and L2-norm objective functions using the normalized wavefield. The new residual seismograms obtained from the L1- and L2-norms using the normalized wavefield mitigate the problem of unmatched acquisition geometries, which enables multisource full-waveform inversion to work with marine streamer data. In the new approaches using the normalized wavefield, we used the back-propagation algorithm based on the adjoint-state technique to efficiently calculate the gradients of the objective functions. Numerical examples showed that multisource full-waveform inversion using the normalized wavefield yields much better convergence for marine streamer data than conventional approaches. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  20. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the phase derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    Phase wrapping in the frequency domain or cycle skipping in the time domain is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion when the starting model is far from the true model. Since the phase derivative does not suffer from

  1. Multisource waveform inversion of marine streamer data using normalized wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    Multisource full-waveform inversion based on the L1- and L2-norm objective functions cannot be applied to marine streamer data because it does not take into account the unmatched acquisition geometries between the observed and modeled data. To apply

  2. A nonlinear approach of elastic reflection waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang

    2016-09-06

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) embodies the original intention of waveform inversion at its inception as it is a better representation of the mostly solid Earth. However, compared with the acoustic P-wave assumption, EFWI for P- and S-wave velocities using multi-component data admitted mixed results. Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem and this nonlinearity only increases under the elastic assumption. Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) can mitigate the nonlinearity by relying on transmissions from reflections focused on inverting low wavenumber components of the model. In our elastic endeavor, we split the P- and S-wave velocities into low wavenumber and perturbation components and propose a nonlinear approach to invert for both of them. The new optimization problem is built on an objective function that depends on both background and perturbation models. We utilize an equivalent stress source based on the model perturbation to generate reflection instead of demigrating from an image, which is applied in conventional RWI. Application on a slice of an ocean-bottom data shows that our method can efficiently update the low wavenumber parts of the model, but more so, obtain perturbations that can be added to the low wavenumbers for a high resolution output.

  3. A nonlinear approach of elastic reflection waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) embodies the original intention of waveform inversion at its inception as it is a better representation of the mostly solid Earth. However, compared with the acoustic P-wave assumption, EFWI for P- and S-wave velocities using multi-component data admitted mixed results. Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem and this nonlinearity only increases under the elastic assumption. Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) can mitigate the nonlinearity by relying on transmissions from reflections focused on inverting low wavenumber components of the model. In our elastic endeavor, we split the P- and S-wave velocities into low wavenumber and perturbation components and propose a nonlinear approach to invert for both of them. The new optimization problem is built on an objective function that depends on both background and perturbation models. We utilize an equivalent stress source based on the model perturbation to generate reflection instead of demigrating from an image, which is applied in conventional RWI. Application on a slice of an ocean-bottom data shows that our method can efficiently update the low wavenumber parts of the model, but more so, obtain perturbations that can be added to the low wavenumbers for a high resolution output.

  4. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the phase derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-26

    Phase wrapping in the frequency domain or cycle skipping in the time domain is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion when the starting model is far from the true model. Since the phase derivative does not suffer from the wrapping effect, its inversion has the potential of providing a robust and reliable inversion result. We propose a new waveform inversion algorithm using the phase derivative in the frequency domain along with the exponential damping term to attenuate reflections. We estimate the phase derivative, or what we refer to as the instantaneous traveltime, by taking the derivative of the Fourier-transformed wavefield with respect to the angular frequency, dividing it by the wavefield itself and taking the imaginary part. The objective function is constructed using the phase derivative and the gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm. Numerical examples show that our inversion algorithm with a strong damping generates a tomographic result even for a high ‘single’ frequency, which can be a good initial model for full waveform inversion and migration.

  5. Simultaneous inversion of the background velocity and the perturbation in full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    The gradient of standard full-waveform inversion (FWI) attempts to map the residuals in the data to perturbations in the model. Such perturbations may include smooth background updates from the transmission components and high wavenumber updates

  6. Advances in Global Full Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Modrak, R. T.; Orsvuran, R.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Peter, D. B.

    2017-12-01

    Information about Earth's interior comes from seismograms recorded at its surface. Seismic imaging based on spectral-element and adjoint methods has enabled assimilation of this information for the construction of 3D (an)elastic Earth models. These methods account for the physics of wave excitation and propagation by numerically solving the equations of motion, and require the execution of complex computational procedures that challenge the most advanced high-performance computing systems. Current research is petascale; future research will require exascale capabilities. The inverse problem consists of reconstructing the characteristics of the medium from -often noisy- observations. A nonlinear functional is minimized, which involves both the misfit to the measurements and a Tikhonov-type regularization term to tackle inherent ill-posedness. Achieving scalability for the inversion process on tens of thousands of multicore processors is a task that offers many research challenges. We initiated global "adjoint tomography" using 253 earthquakes and produced the first-generation model named GLAD-M15, with a transversely isotropic model parameterization. We are currently running iterations for a second-generation anisotropic model based on the same 253 events. In parallel, we continue iterations for a transversely isotropic model with a larger dataset of 1,040 events to determine higher-resolution plume and slab images. A significant part of our research has focused on eliminating I/O bottlenecks in the adjoint tomography workflow. This has led to the development of a new Adaptable Seismic Data Format based on HDF5, and post-processing tools based on the ADIOS library developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We use the Ensemble Toolkit for workflow stabilization & management to automate the workflow with minimal human interaction.

  7. 2D acoustic-elastic coupled waveform inversion in the Laplace domain

    KAUST Repository

    Bae, Hoseuk; Shin, Changsoo; Cha, Youngho; Choi, Yun Seok; Min, Dongjoo

    2010-01-01

    Although waveform inversion has been intensively studied in an effort to properly delineate the Earth's structures since the early 1980s, most of the time- and frequency-domain waveform inversion algorithms still have critical limitations

  8. Full waveform inversion based on scattering angle enrichment with application to real dataset

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI). However, the drawback of the existing RWI methods is inability to utilize diving waves and the extra sensitivity

  9. Waveform inversion for acoustic VTI media in frequency domain

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2016-09-06

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the background model using a single scattered wavefield from an inverted perturbation. However, current RWI methods are mostly based on isotropic media assumption. We extend the idea of the combining inversion for the background model and perturbations to address transversely isotropic with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI) media taking into consideration of the optimal parameter sensitivity information. As a result, we apply Born modeling corresponding to perturbations in only for the variable e to derive the relative reflected waveform inversion formulation. To reduce the number of parameters, we assume the background part of η = ε and work with a single variable to describe the anisotropic part of the wave propagation. Thus, the optimization variables are the horizontal velocity v, η = ε and the e perturbation. Application to the anisotropic version of Marmousi model with a single frequency of 2.5 Hz shows that this method can converge to the accurate result starting from a linearly increasing isotropic initial velocity. Application to a real dataset demonstrates the versatility of the approach.

  10. Full waveform inversion using envelope-based global correlation norm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2018-05-01

    To increase the feasibility of full waveform inversion on real data, we suggest a new objective function, which is defined as the global correlation of the envelopes of modelled and observed data. The envelope-based global correlation norm has the advantage of the envelope inversion that generates artificial low-frequency information, which provides the possibility to recover long-wavelength structure in an early stage. In addition, the envelope-based global correlation norm maintains the advantage of the global correlation norm, which reduces the sensitivity of the misfit to amplitude errors so that the performance of inversion on real data can be enhanced when the exact source wavelet is not available and more complex physics are ignored. Through the synthetic example for 2-D SEG/EAGE overthrust model with inaccurate source wavelet, we compare the performance of four different approaches, which are the least-squares waveform inversion, least-squares envelope inversion, global correlation norm and envelope-based global correlation norm. Finally, we apply the envelope-based global correlation norm on the 3-D Ocean Bottom Cable (OBC) data from the North Sea. The envelope-based global correlation norm captures the strong reflections from the high-velocity caprock and generates artificial low-frequency reflection energy that helps us recover long-wavelength structure of the model domain in the early stages. From this long-wavelength model, the conventional global correlation norm is sequentially applied to invert for higher-resolution features of the model.

  11. Multiparameter Elastic Full Waveform Inversion with Facies-based Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-dong; Alkhalifah, Tariq; Naeini, Ehsan Zabihi; Sun, Bingbing

    2018-03-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) incorporates all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters described by the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion beyond improved acoustic imaging, like in reservoir delineation, faces inherent challenges related to the limited resolution and the potential trade-off between the elastic model parameters. Some anisotropic parameters are insufficiently updated because of their minor contributions to the surface collected data. Adding rock physics constraints to the inversion helps mitigate such limited sensitivity, but current approaches to add such constraints are based on including them as a priori knowledge mostly valid around the well or as a global constraint for the whole area. Since similar rock formations inside the Earth admit consistent elastic properties and relative values of elasticity and anisotropy parameters (this enables us to define them as a seismic facies), utilizing such localized facies information in FWI can improve the resolution of inverted parameters. We propose a novel approach to use facies-based constraints in both isotropic and anisotropic elastic FWI. We invert for such facies using Bayesian theory and update them at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and a prior information. We take the uncertainties of the estimated parameters (approximated by radiation patterns) into consideration and improve the quality of estimated facies maps. Four numerical examples corresponding to different acquisition, physical assumptions and model circumstances are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Multiparameter Elastic Full Waveform Inversion with Facies-based Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2018-03-20

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) incorporates all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters described by the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion beyond improved acoustic imaging, like in reservoir delineation, faces inherent challenges related to the limited resolution and the potential trade-off between the elastic model parameters. Some anisotropic parameters are insufficiently updated because of their minor contributions to the surface collected data. Adding rock physics constraints to the inversion helps mitigate such limited sensitivity, but current approaches to add such constraints are based on including them as a priori knowledge mostly valid around the well or as a global constraint for the whole area. Since similar rock formations inside the Earth admit consistent elastic properties and relative values of elasticity and anisotropy parameters (this enables us to define them as a seismic facies), utilizing such localized facies information in FWI can improve the resolution of inverted parameters. We propose a novel approach to use facies-based constraints in both isotropic and anisotropic elastic FWI. We invert for such facies using Bayesian theory and update them at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and a prior information. We take the uncertainties of the estimated parameters (approximated by radiation patterns) into consideration and improve the quality of estimated facies maps. Four numerical examples corresponding to different acquisition, physical assumptions and model circumstances are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Full Waveform Inversion Using Oriented Time Migration Method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2016-04-12

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) for reflection events is limited by its linearized update requirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate the resulting gradient can have an inaccurate update direction leading the inversion to converge into what we refer to as local minima of the objective function. In this thesis, I first look into the subject of full model wavenumber to analysis the root of local minima and suggest the possible ways to avoid this problem. And then I analysis the possibility of recovering the corresponding wavenumber components through the existing inversion and migration algorithms. Migration can be taken as a generalized inversion method which mainly retrieves the high wavenumber part of the model. Conventional impedance inversion method gives a mapping relationship between the migration image (high wavenumber) and model parameters (full wavenumber) and thus provides a possible cascade inversion strategy to retrieve the full wavenumber components from seismic data. In the proposed approach, consider a mild lateral variation in the model, I find an analytical Frechet derivation corresponding to the new objective function. In the proposed approach, the gradient is given by the oriented time-domain imaging method. This is independent of the background velocity. Specifically, I apply the oriented time-domain imaging (which depends on the reflection slope instead of a background velocity) on the data residual to obtain the geometrical features of the velocity perturbation. Assuming that density is constant, the conventional 1D impedance inversion method is also applicable for 2D or 3D velocity inversion within the process of FWI. This method is not only capable of inverting for velocity, but it is also capable of retrieving anisotropic parameters relying on linearized representations of the reflection response. To eliminate the cross-talk artifacts between different parameters, I

  14. Full Waveform Inversion for Reservoir Characterization - A Synthetic Study

    KAUST Repository

    Zabihi Naeini, E.

    2017-05-26

    Most current reservoir-characterization workflows are based on classic amplitude-variation-with-offset (AVO) inversion techniques. Although these methods have generally served us well over the years, here we examine full-waveform inversion (FWI) as an alternative tool for higher-resolution reservoir characterization. An important step in developing reservoir-oriented FWI is the implementation of facies-based rock physics constraints adapted from the classic methods. We show that such constraints can be incorporated into FWI by adding appropriately designed regularization terms to the objective function. The advantages of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated on both isotropic and VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) models with pronounced lateral and vertical heterogeneity. The inversion results are explained using the theoretical radiation patterns produced by perturbations in the medium parameters.

  15. Image-domain full waveform inversion: Field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2014-08-05

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is the result of cycle skipping which degrades the low-wavenumber update in the absence of low-frequencies and long-offset data. An image-domain objective function is defined as the normed difference between the predicted and observed common image gathers (CIGs) in the subsurface offset domain. This new objective function is not constrained by cycle skipping at the far subsurface offsets. To test the effectiveness of this method, we apply it to marine data recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive to the initial model and the absence of low-frequency data compared with conventional FWI. The liability, however, is that it is almost an order of magnitude more expensive than standard FWI.

  16. Image-domain full waveform inversion: Field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is the result of cycle skipping which degrades the low-wavenumber update in the absence of low-frequencies and long-offset data. An image-domain objective function is defined as the normed difference between the predicted and observed common image gathers (CIGs) in the subsurface offset domain. This new objective function is not constrained by cycle skipping at the far subsurface offsets. To test the effectiveness of this method, we apply it to marine data recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive to the initial model and the absence of low-frequency data compared with conventional FWI. The liability, however, is that it is almost an order of magnitude more expensive than standard FWI.

  17. A new optimization approach for source-encoding full-waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moghaddam, P.P.; Keers, H.; Herrmann, F.J.; Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Waveform inversion is the method of choice for determining a highly heterogeneous subsurface structure. However, conventional waveform inversion requires that the wavefield for each source is computed separately. This makes it very expensive for realistic 3D seismic surveys. Source-encoding waveform

  18. Full Waveform Inversion with Multisource Frequency Selection of Marine Streamer Data

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    The theory and practice of multisource full waveform inversion of marine supergathers are described with a frequency-selection strategy. The key enabling property of frequency selection is that it eliminates the crosstalk among sources, thus overcoming the aperture mismatch of marine multisource inversion. Tests on multisource full waveform inversion of synthetic marine data and Gulf of Mexico data show speedups of 4× and 8×, respectively, compared to conventional full waveform inversion.

  19. Full Waveform Inversion with Multisource Frequency Selection of Marine Streamer Data

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2017-10-27

    The theory and practice of multisource full waveform inversion of marine supergathers are described with a frequency-selection strategy. The key enabling property of frequency selection is that it eliminates the crosstalk among sources, thus overcoming the aperture mismatch of marine multisource inversion. Tests on multisource full waveform inversion of synthetic marine data and Gulf of Mexico data show speedups of 4× and 8×, respectively, compared to conventional full waveform inversion.

  20. Multiparameter Elastic Full Waveform Inversion With Facies Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-08-17

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) aims fully benefit from all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters describing the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example in reservoir analysis, faces inherent challenges related to the limited resolution and the potential trade-off between the elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues, but current approaches to add such constraints are based on including them as a priori knowledge mostly valid around the well or as a boundary condition for the whole area. Since certain rock formations inside the Earth admit consistent elastic properties and relative values of elastic and anisotropic parameters (facies), utilizing such localized facies information in FWI can improve the resolution of inverted parameters. We propose a novel confidence map based approach to utilize the facies-based constraints in both isotropic and anisotropic elastic FWI. We invert for such a confidence map using Bayesian theory, in which the confidence map is updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and a prior information. The numerical examples show that the proposed method can reduce the trade-offs and also can improve the resolution of the inverted elastic and anisotropic properties.

  1. Source-independent time-domain waveform inversion using convolved wavefields: Application to the encoded multisource waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2011-09-01

    Full waveform inversion requires a good estimation of the source wavelet to improve our chances of a successful inversion. This is especially true for an encoded multisource time-domain implementation, which, conventionally, requires separate-source modeling, as well as the Fourier transform of wavefields. As an alternative, we have developed the source-independent time-domain waveform inversion using convolved wavefields. Specifically, the misfit function consists of the convolution of the observed wavefields with a reference trace from the modeled wavefield, plus the convolution of the modeled wavefields with a reference trace from the observed wavefield. In this case, the source wavelet of the observed and the modeled wavefields are equally convolved with both terms in the misfit function, and thus, the effects of the source wavelets are eliminated. Furthermore, because the modeled wavefields play a role of low-pass filtering, the observed wavefields in the misfit function, the frequency-selection strategy from low to high can be easily adopted just by setting the maximum frequency of the source wavelet of the modeled wavefields; and thus, no filtering is required. The gradient of the misfit function is computed by back-propagating the new residual seismograms and applying the imaging condition, similar to reverse-time migration. In the synthetic data evaluations, our waveform inversion yields inverted models that are close to the true model, but demonstrates, as predicted, some limitations when random noise is added to the synthetic data. We also realized that an average of traces is a better choice for the reference trace than using a single trace. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. Heeding the waveform inversion nonlinearity by unwrapping the model and data

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traveltime inversion, waveform inversion provides relatively higher-resolution inverted models. This feature, however, comes at the cost of introducing complex nonlinearity to the inversion operator complicating the convergence process. We

  3. Interferometric full-waveform inversion of time-lapse data

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2017-08-17

    One of the key challenges associated with time-lapse surveys is ensuring the repeatability between the baseline and monitor surveys. Non-repeatability between the surveys is caused by varying environmental conditions over the course of different surveys. To overcome this challenge, we propose the use of interferometric full waveform inversion (IFWI) for inverting the velocity model from data recorded by baseline and monitor surveys. A known reflector is used as the reference reflector for IFWI, and the data are naturally redatumed to this reference reflector using natural reflections as the redatuming operator. This natural redatuming mitigates the artifacts introduced by the repeatability errors that originate above the reference reflector.

  4. Real time monitoring of moment magnitude by waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Friederich, W.; Meier, T.

    2012-01-01

    An instantaneous measure of the moment magnitude (Mw) of an ongoing earthquake is estimated from the moment rate function (MRF) determined in real-time from available seismic data using waveform inversion. Integration of the MRF gives the moment function from which an instantaneous Mw is derived. By repeating the inversion procedure at regular intervals while seismic data are coming in we can monitor the evolution of seismic moment and Mw with time. The final size and duration of a strong earthquake can be obtained within 12 to 15 minutes after the origin time. We show examples of Mw monitoring for three large earthquakes at regional distances. The estimated Mw is only weakly sensitive to changes in the assumed source parameters. Depending on the availability of seismic stations close to the epicenter, a rapid estimation of the Mw as a prerequisite for the assessment of earthquake damage potential appears to be feasible.

  5. Elastic reflection based waveform inversion with a nonlinear approach

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem due to the complex reflectivity of the Earth, and this nonlinearity only increases under the more expensive elastic assumption. In elastic media, we need a good initial P-wave velocity and even a better initial S-wave velocity models with accurate representation of the low model wavenumbers for FWI to converge. However, inverting for the low wavenumber components of P- and S-wave velocities using reflection waveform inversion (RWI) with an objective to fit the reflection shape, rather than produce reflections, may mitigate the limitations of FWI. Because FWI, performing as a migration operator, is in preference of the high wavenumber updates along reflectors. We propose a nonlinear elastic RWI that inverts for both the low wavenumber and perturbation components of the P- and S-wave velocities. To generate the full elastic reflection wavefields, we derive an equivalent stress source made up by the inverted model perturbations and incident wavefields. We update both the perturbation and propagation parts of the velocity models in a nested fashion. Applications on synthetic isotropic models and field data show that our method can efficiently update the low and high wavenumber parts of the models.

  6. Elastic reflection based waveform inversion with a nonlinear approach

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang

    2017-08-16

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem due to the complex reflectivity of the Earth, and this nonlinearity only increases under the more expensive elastic assumption. In elastic media, we need a good initial P-wave velocity and even a better initial S-wave velocity models with accurate representation of the low model wavenumbers for FWI to converge. However, inverting for the low wavenumber components of P- and S-wave velocities using reflection waveform inversion (RWI) with an objective to fit the reflection shape, rather than produce reflections, may mitigate the limitations of FWI. Because FWI, performing as a migration operator, is in preference of the high wavenumber updates along reflectors. We propose a nonlinear elastic RWI that inverts for both the low wavenumber and perturbation components of the P- and S-wave velocities. To generate the full elastic reflection wavefields, we derive an equivalent stress source made up by the inverted model perturbations and incident wavefields. We update both the perturbation and propagation parts of the velocity models in a nested fashion. Applications on synthetic isotropic models and field data show that our method can efficiently update the low and high wavenumber parts of the models.

  7. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu; Fei, Tong; Luo, Yi; Guo, Bowen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source

  8. A Joint Method of Envelope Inversion Combined with Hybrid-domain Full Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUI, C.; Hou, W.

    2017-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) aims to construct high-precision subsurface models by fully using the information in seismic records, including amplitude, travel time, phase and so on. However, high non-linearity and the absence of low frequency information in seismic data lead to the well-known cycle skipping problem and make inversion easily fall into local minima. In addition, those 3D inversion methods that are based on acoustic approximation ignore the elastic effects in real seismic field, and make inversion harder. As a result, the accuracy of final inversion results highly relies on the quality of initial model. In order to improve stability and quality of inversion results, multi-scale inversion that reconstructs subsurface model from low to high frequency are applied. But, the absence of very low frequencies (time domain and inversion in the frequency domain. To accelerate the inversion, we adopt CPU/GPU heterogeneous computing techniques. There were two levels of parallelism. In the first level, the inversion tasks are decomposed and assigned to each computation node by shot number. In the second level, GPU multithreaded programming is used for the computation tasks in each node, including forward modeling, envelope extraction, DFT (discrete Fourier transform) calculation and gradients calculation. Numerical tests demonstrated that the combined envelope inversion + hybrid-domain FWI could obtain much faithful and accurate result than conventional hybrid-domain FWI. The CPU/GPU heterogeneous parallel computation could improve the performance speed.

  9. Full-waveform inversion of surface waves in exploration geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, D.; Gao, F.; Williamson, P.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a data fitting approach to estimate high-resolution properties of the Earth from seismic data by minimizing the misfit between observed and calculated seismograms. In land seismics, the source on the ground generates high-amplitude surface waves, which generally represent most of the energy recorded by ground sensors. Although surface waves are widely used in global seismology and engineering studies, they are typically treated as noise within the seismic exploration community since they mask deeper reflections from the intervals of exploration interest. This is mainly due to the fact that surface waves decay exponentially with depth and for a typical frequency range (≈[5-50] Hz) sample only the very shallow part of the subsurface, but also because they are much more sensitive to S-wave than P-wave velocities. In this study, we invert surface waves in the hope of using them as additional information for updating the near surface. In a heterogeneous medium, the main challenge of surface wave inversion is associated with their dispersive character, which makes it difficult to define a starting model for conventional FWI which can avoid cycle-skipping. The standard approach to dealing with this is by inverting the dispersion curves in the Fourier (f-k) domain to generate locally 1-D models, typically for the shear wavespeeds only. However this requires that the near-surface zone be more or less horizontally invariant over a sufficient distance for the spatial Fourier transform to be applicable. In regions with significant topography, such as foothills, this is not the case, so we revert to the time-space domain, but aim to minimize the differences of envelopes in the early stages of the inversion to resolve the cycle-skipping issue. Once the model is good enough, we revert to the classic waveform-difference inversion. We first present a few synthetic examples. We show that classical FWI might be trapped in a local minimum even for

  10. A new parameterization for waveform inversion in acoustic orthorhombic media

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil

    2016-05-26

    Orthorhombic anisotropic model inversion is extra challenging because of the multiple parameter nature of the inversion problem. The high number of parameters required to describe the medium exerts considerable trade-off and additional nonlinearity to a full-waveform inversion (FWI) application. Choosing a suitable set of parameters to describe the model and designing an effective inversion strategy can help in mitigating this problem. Using the Born approximation, which is the central ingredient of the FWI update process, we have derived radiation patterns for the different acoustic orthorhombic parameterizations. Analyzing the angular dependence of scattering (radiation patterns) of the parameters of different parameterizations starting with the often used Thomsen-Tsvankin parameterization, we have assessed the potential trade-off between the parameters and the resolution in describing the data and inverting for the parameters. The analysis led us to introduce new parameters ϵd, δd, and ηd, which have azimuthally dependent radiation patterns, but keep the scattering potential of the transversely isotropic parameters stationary with azimuth (azimuth independent). The novel parameters ϵd, δd, and ηd are dimensionless and represent a measure of deviation between the vertical planes in orthorhombic anisotropy. Therefore, these deviation parameters offer a new parameterization style for an acoustic orthorhombic medium described by six parameters: three vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) parameters, two deviation parameters, and one parameter describing the anisotropy in the horizontal symmetry plane. The main feature of any parameterization based on the deviation parameters, is the azimuthal independency of the modeled data with respect to the VTI parameters, which allowed us to propose practical inversion strategies based on our experience with the VTI parameters. This feature of the new parameterization style holds for even the long-wavelength components of

  11. Multiparameter elastic full waveform inversion with facies-based constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-dong; Alkhalifah, Tariq; Naeini, Ehsan Zabihi; Sun, Bingbing

    2018-06-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) incorporates all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters described by the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize FWI beyond improved acoustic imaging, like in reservoir delineation, faces inherent challenges related to the limited resolution and the potential trade-off between the elastic model parameters. Some anisotropic parameters are insufficiently updated because of their minor contributions to the surface collected data. Adding rock physics constraints to the inversion helps mitigate such limited sensitivity, but current approaches to add such constraints are based on including them as a priori knowledge mostly valid around the well or as a global constraint for the whole area. Since similar rock formations inside the Earth admit consistent elastic properties and relative values of elasticity and anisotropy parameters (this enables us to define them as a seismic facies), utilizing such localized facies information in FWI can improve the resolution of inverted parameters. We propose a novel approach to use facies-based constraints in both isotropic and anisotropic elastic FWI. We invert for such facies using Bayesian theory and update them at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and a priori information. We take the uncertainties of the estimated parameters (approximated by radiation patterns) into consideration and improve the quality of estimated facies maps. Four numerical examples corresponding to different acquisition, physical assumptions and model circumstances are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Early arrival waveform inversion of shallow seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2013-09-22

    We estimate the near-surface velocity distribution over Wadi Qudaid in Saudi Arabia by applying early arrival waveform inversion (EWI) to shallow seismic land data collected with source-receiver offsets no longer than 232 m. The main purpose is to characterize the shallow subsurface for its water storage and reuse potential. To enhance the accuracy of EWI, we extracted a natural source wavelet from the data, and also corrected for the attenuation effects with an estimated factor Q. Results suggest that, compared to traveltime tomography, EWI can generate a highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data. The more accurate EWI tomogram can make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi; in this case we find an increase of 18% of storage potential in the EWI tomogram relative to the traveltime tomogram. This approach suggests that FWI might be a more accurate means for economically characterizing the water storage potential for wadis’ throughout the world.

  13. Conditioning the full waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual tradeoff between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain in which the small scattering angles of the gradient update is initially muted out. A model update hierarchical filtering strategy includes applying varying degree of filtering to the different parameter updates. A feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using both FWI and reection based FWI (RFWI), two strategies to combat the tradeoff between anisotropic parameters are outlined.

  14. Conditioning the full waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-08-05

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual tradeoff between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain in which the small scattering angles of the gradient update is initially muted out. A model update hierarchical filtering strategy includes applying varying degree of filtering to the different parameter updates. A feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using both FWI and reection based FWI (RFWI), two strategies to combat the tradeoff between anisotropic parameters are outlined.

  15. Full-waveform inversion: From near surface to deep

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-11-01

    The ancient Persian Gulf port city of Muscat provided a spectacular setting for the SEG\\'s 2013 Workshop on Full-waveform Inversion (FWI). This active R&D topic attracted about 36 oral presentations and 20 or so posters, which added up to three intense days of ideas, images, and discussion. FWI has progressed from academic research topic to commercial workflow component in roughly 10 years, with many case studies documenting improved imaging and business value and others documenting a definite need for improved understanding of algorithms and applicability. Along with fundamental research issues of worldwide importance, the meeting provided an opportunity to showcase implications of the Middle East\\'s particular exploration challenges for the further development of FWI.

  16. Efficient scattering angle filtering for Full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the scattering angles between the state and the adjoint variables for the energy admitted into an inversion gradient or an image can help improve these functions for objectives in full waveform inversion (FWI) or seismic imaging. However, the access of the scattering angle information usually requires an axis extension that could be costly, especially in 3D. For the purpose of a scattering angle filter, I develop techniques that utilize the mapping nature (no domain extension) of the filter for constant-velocity background models to interpolate between such filtered gradients using the actual velocity. The concept has well known roots in the application of phase-shift-plus-interpolation utilized commonly in the downward continuation process. If the difference between the minimum and maximum velocity of the background medium is large, we obtain filtered gradients corresponding to more constant velocity backgrounds and use linear interpolation between such velocities. The accuracy of this approximation for the Marmousi model gradient demonstrates the e ectiveness of the approach.

  17. Estimation of fracture parameters using elastic full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-08-17

    Current methodologies to characterize fractures at the reservoir scale have serious limitations in spatial resolution and suffer from uncertainties in the inverted parameters. Here, we propose to estimate the spatial distribution and physical properties of fractures using full-waveform inversion (FWI) of multicomponent surface seismic data. An effective orthorhombic medium with five clusters of vertical fractures distributed in a checkboard fashion is used to test the algorithm. A shape regularization term is added to the objective function to improve the estimation of the fracture azimuth, which is otherwise poorly constrained. The cracks are assumed to be penny-shaped to reduce the nonuniqueness in the inverted fracture weaknesses and achieve a faster convergence. To better understand the inversion results, we analyze the radiation patterns induced by the perturbations in the fracture weaknesses and orientation. Due to the high-resolution potential of elastic FWI, the developed algorithm can recover the spatial fracture distribution and identify localized “sweet spots” of intense fracturing. However, the fracture azimuth can be resolved only using long-offset data.

  18. Monofrequency waveform acquisition and inversion: A new paradigm

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    In seismic inversion, we tend to use the geometrical behavior of the wavefield (the kinematics), extracted from the data, to constrain the long wavelength model components and use the recorded reections to invert for the short wavelength features in a process referred to as full waveform inversion (FWI). For such a recipe, single frequency (the right frequency) data are capable of providing the ingredients for both model components. A frequency that provides model wavelengths (through the transmission components) low enough to update the background and high enough (reections) to map the scattering may render the other frequencies almost obsolete, especially large offset data are available to provide the transition from background to scattering components. Thus, I outline a scenario in which we acquire dedicated mono frequency data, allowing for more time to inject more of that single frequency energy at a reduced cost. The cost savings can be utilized to acquire larger offsets, which is an important for constraining the background model. Combing this single frequency data with a hierarchical scattering angle filter strategy in FWI, and potentially reection FWI, provides an opportunity to invert for complex models starting even with poor initial velocity models. The objective of this new paradigm is a high resolution model of the Earth to replace our focus on the image, which requires a band of frequencies.

  19. Efficient scattering angle filtering for Full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-08-19

    Controlling the scattering angles between the state and the adjoint variables for the energy admitted into an inversion gradient or an image can help improve these functions for objectives in full waveform inversion (FWI) or seismic imaging. However, the access of the scattering angle information usually requires an axis extension that could be costly, especially in 3D. For the purpose of a scattering angle filter, I develop techniques that utilize the mapping nature (no domain extension) of the filter for constant-velocity background models to interpolate between such filtered gradients using the actual velocity. The concept has well known roots in the application of phase-shift-plus-interpolation utilized commonly in the downward continuation process. If the difference between the minimum and maximum velocity of the background medium is large, we obtain filtered gradients corresponding to more constant velocity backgrounds and use linear interpolation between such velocities. The accuracy of this approximation for the Marmousi model gradient demonstrates the e ectiveness of the approach.

  20. Velocity Building by Reflection Waveform Inversion without Cycle-skipping

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang

    2017-05-26

    Reflection waveform inversion (RWI) provides estimation of low wavenumber model components using reflections generated from a migration/demigration process. The resulting model tends to be a good initial model for FWI. In fact, the optimization images to combine the migration velocity analysis (MVA) objectives (given here by RWI) and the FWI ones. However, RWI may still encounter cycle-skipping at far offsets if the velocity model is highly inaccurate. Similar to MVA, RWI is devoted to focusing reflection data to its true image positions, yet because of the cycle skipping potential we tend to initially use only near offsets. To make the inversion procedure more robust, we introduce the extended image into our RWI. Extending the model perturbations (or image) allows us to better fit the data at larger offsets even with an inaccurate velocity. Thus, we implement a nested approach to optimize the velocity and extended image simultaneously using the objective function of RWI. We slowly reduce the extension, as the image becomes focused, to allow wavepath updates from far offsets to near as a natural progression from long wavelength updates to shorter ones. Applications on synthetic data demonstrate the effectiveness of our method without much additional cost to RWI.

  1. Density reconstruction in multiparameter elastic full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min'ao; Yang, Jizhong; Dong, Liangguo; Liu, Yuzhu; Huang, Chao

    2017-12-01

    Elastic full-waveform inversion (EFWI) is a quantitative data fitting procedure that recovers multiple subsurface parameters from multicomponent seismic data. As density is involved in addition to P- and S-wave velocities, the multiparameter EFWI suffers from more serious tradeoffs. In addition, compared with P- and S-wave velocities, the misfit function is less sensitive to density perturbation. Thus, a robust density reconstruction remains a difficult problem in multiparameter EFWI. In this paper, we develop an improved scattering-integral-based truncated Gauss-Newton method to simultaneously recover P- and S-wave velocities and density in EFWI. In this method, the inverse Gauss-Newton Hessian has been estimated by iteratively solving the Gauss-Newton equation with a matrix-free conjugate gradient algorithm. Therefore, it is able to properly handle the parameter tradeoffs. To give a detailed illustration of the tradeoffs between P- and S-wave velocities and density in EFWI, wavefield-separated sensitivity kernels and the Gauss-Newton Hessian are numerically computed, and their distribution characteristics are analyzed. Numerical experiments on a canonical inclusion model and a modified SEG/EAGE Overthrust model have demonstrated that the proposed method can effectively mitigate the tradeoff effects, and improve multiparameter gradients. Thus, a high convergence rate and an accurate density reconstruction can be achieved.

  2. Spectral implementation of full waveform inversion based on reflections

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2014-01-01

    Using the reflection imaging process as a source to model reflections for full waveform inversion (FWI), referred to as reflection FWI (RFWI), allows us to update the background component of the model, and avoid using the relatively costly migration velocity analysis (MVA), which usually relies on extended images. However, RFWI requires a good image to represent the current reflectivity, as well as, some effort to obtain good smooth gradients. We develop a spectral implementation of RFWI where the wavefield extrapolations and gradient evaluation are performed in the wavenumber domain, obtaining clean dispersion free and fast extrapolations. The gradient, in this case, yields three terms, two of which provide us with each side of the rabbit ear kernel, and the third, often ignored, provides a normalization of the reflectivity within the kernel, which can be used to obtain a reflectivity free background update. Since the image is imperfect (it is an adjoint, not an inverse), an optimization process for the third term scaling is implemented to achieve the smoothest gradient update. A rare application of RFWI on the reflectivity infested Marmousi model shows some of the potential of the approach.

  3. Monofrequency waveform acquisition and inversion: A new paradigm

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-08-05

    In seismic inversion, we tend to use the geometrical behavior of the wavefield (the kinematics), extracted from the data, to constrain the long wavelength model components and use the recorded reections to invert for the short wavelength features in a process referred to as full waveform inversion (FWI). For such a recipe, single frequency (the right frequency) data are capable of providing the ingredients for both model components. A frequency that provides model wavelengths (through the transmission components) low enough to update the background and high enough (reections) to map the scattering may render the other frequencies almost obsolete, especially large offset data are available to provide the transition from background to scattering components. Thus, I outline a scenario in which we acquire dedicated mono frequency data, allowing for more time to inject more of that single frequency energy at a reduced cost. The cost savings can be utilized to acquire larger offsets, which is an important for constraining the background model. Combing this single frequency data with a hierarchical scattering angle filter strategy in FWI, and potentially reection FWI, provides an opportunity to invert for complex models starting even with poor initial velocity models. The objective of this new paradigm is a high resolution model of the Earth to replace our focus on the image, which requires a band of frequencies.

  4. Accumulated energy norm for full waveform inversion of marine data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Changsoo; Ha, Wansoo

    2017-12-01

    Macro-velocity models are important for imaging the subsurface structure. However, the conventional objective functions of full waveform inversion in the time and the frequency domain have a limited ability to recover the macro-velocity model because of the absence of low-frequency information. In this study, we propose new objective functions that can recover the macro-velocity model by minimizing the difference between the zero-frequency components of the square of seismic traces. Instead of the seismic trace itself, we use the square of the trace, which contains low-frequency information. We apply several time windows to the trace and obtain zero-frequency information of the squared trace for each time window. The shape of the new objective functions shows that they are suitable for local optimization methods. Since we use the acoustic wave equation in this study, this method can be used for deep-sea marine data, in which elastic effects can be ignored. We show that the zero-frequency components of the square of the seismic traces can be used to recover macro-velocities from synthetic and field data.

  5. Multi-parameter full waveform inversion using Poisson

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2016-07-21

    In multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI), the success of recovering each parameter is dependent on characteristics of the partial derivative wavefields (or virtual sources), which differ according to parameterisation. Elastic FWIs based on the two conventional parameterisations (one uses Lame constants and density; the other employs P- and S-wave velocities and density) have low resolution of gradients for P-wave velocities (or ). Limitations occur because the virtual sources for P-wave velocity or (one of the Lame constants) are related only to P-P diffracted waves, and generate isotropic explosions, which reduce the spatial resolution of the FWI for these parameters. To increase the spatial resolution, we propose a new parameterisation using P-wave velocity, Poisson\\'s ratio, and density for frequency-domain multi-parameter FWI for isotropic elastic media. By introducing Poisson\\'s ratio instead of S-wave velocity, the virtual source for the P-wave velocity generates P-S and S-S diffracted waves as well as P-P diffracted waves in the partial derivative wavefields for the P-wave velocity. Numerical examples of the cross-triangle-square (CTS) model indicate that the new parameterisation provides highly resolved descent directions for the P-wave velocity. Numerical examples of noise-free and noisy data synthesised for the elastic Marmousi-II model support the fact that the new parameterisation is more robust for noise than the two conventional parameterisations.

  6. Scattering-angle based filtering of the waveform inversion gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach to maneuver the complex non-linearity associated with the problem of velocity update. In anisotropic media, the non-linearity becomes far more complex with the potential trade-off between the multiparameter description of the model. A gradient filter helps us in accessing the parts of the gradient that are suitable to combat the potential non-linearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which the low scattering angle of the gradient update is initially muted out in the FWI implementation, in what we may refer to as a scattering angle continuation process. The result is a low wavelength update dominated by the transmission part of the update gradient. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce vertically near-zero wavenumber updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Relaxing the filtering at a later stage in the FWI implementation allows for smaller scattering angles to contribute higher-resolution information to the model. The benefits of the extended domain based filtering of the gradient is not only it's ability in providing low wavenumber gradients guided by the scattering angle, but also in its potential to provide gradients free of unphysical energy that may correspond to unrealistic scattering angles.

  7. Conditioning the full-waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-04-23

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual trade-off between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which small scattering-angles of the gradient update are initially muted out. The model update hierarchical filtering strategy include applying varying degrees of filtering to the different anisotropic parameter updates, a feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using FWI and reflection-based FWI, when the modeled data are obtained with the single-scattering theory, allows access to additional low model wavenumber components. Combining such access to wavenumbers with scattering-angle filters applied to the individual parameter gradients allows for multiple strategies to avoid complex FWI nonlinearity as well as the parameter trade-off.

  8. Scattering-angle based filtering of the waveform inversion gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-11-22

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach to maneuver the complex non-linearity associated with the problem of velocity update. In anisotropic media, the non-linearity becomes far more complex with the potential trade-off between the multiparameter description of the model. A gradient filter helps us in accessing the parts of the gradient that are suitable to combat the potential non-linearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which the low scattering angle of the gradient update is initially muted out in the FWI implementation, in what we may refer to as a scattering angle continuation process. The result is a low wavelength update dominated by the transmission part of the update gradient. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce vertically near-zero wavenumber updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Relaxing the filtering at a later stage in the FWI implementation allows for smaller scattering angles to contribute higher-resolution information to the model. The benefits of the extended domain based filtering of the gradient is not only it\\'s ability in providing low wavenumber gradients guided by the scattering angle, but also in its potential to provide gradients free of unphysical energy that may correspond to unrealistic scattering angles.

  9. The Modularized Software Package ASKI - Full Waveform Inversion Based on Waveform Sensitivity Kernels Utilizing External Seismic Wave Propagation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present the modularized software package ASKI which is a flexible and extendable toolbox for seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as sensitivity or resolution analysis operating on the sensitivity matrix. It utilizes established wave propagation codes for solving the forward problem and offers an alternative to the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have typically been written for solving inverse problems. It is available under the GPL at www.rub.de/aski. The Gauss-Newton FWI method for 3D-heterogeneous elastic earth models is based on waveform sensitivity kernels and can be applied to inverse problems at various spatial scales in both Cartesian and spherical geometries. The kernels are derived in the frequency domain from Born scattering theory as the Fréchet derivatives of linearized full waveform data functionals, quantifying the influence of elastic earth model parameters on the particular waveform data values. As an important innovation, we keep two independent spatial descriptions of the earth model - one for solving the forward problem and one representing the inverted model updates. Thereby we account for the independent needs of spatial model resolution of forward and inverse problem, respectively. Due to pre-integration of the kernels over the (in general much coarser) inversion grid, storage requirements for the sensitivity kernels are dramatically reduced.ASKI can be flexibly extended to other forward codes by providing it with specific interface routines that contain knowledge about forward code-specific file formats and auxiliary information provided by the new forward code. In order to sustain flexibility, the ASKI tools must communicate via file output/input, thus large storage capacities need to be accessible in a convenient way. Storing the complete sensitivity matrix to file, however, permits the scientist full manual control over each step in a customized procedure of sensitivity/resolution analysis and full

  10. Full-waveform inversion using a nonlinearly smoothed wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuanyuan

    2017-12-08

    Conventional full-waveform inversion (FWI) based on the least-squares misfit function faces problems in converging to the global minimum when using gradient methods because of the cycle-skipping phenomena. An initial model producing data that are at most a half-cycle away from the observed data is needed for convergence to the global minimum. Low frequencies are helpful in updating low-wavenumber components of the velocity model to avoid cycle skipping. However, low enough frequencies are usually unavailable in field cases. The multiplication of wavefields of slightly different frequencies adds artificial low-frequency components in the data, which can be used for FWI to generate a convergent result and avoid cycle skipping. We generalize this process by multiplying the wavefield with itself and then applying a smoothing operator to the multiplied wavefield or its square to derive the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield, which is rich in low frequencies. The global correlation-norm-based objective function can mitigate the dependence on the amplitude information of the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. Therefore, we have evaluated the use of this objective function when using the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. The proposed objective function has much larger convexity than the conventional objective functions. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state technique, which is similar to that of the conventional FWI except for the adjoint source. We progressively reduce the smoothing width applied to the nonlinear wavefield to naturally adopt the multiscale strategy. Using examples on the Marmousi 2 model, we determine that the proposed FWI helps to generate convergent results without the need for low-frequency information.

  11. Waveform inversion of lateral velocity variation from wavefield source location perturbation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    It is challenge in waveform inversion to precisely define the deep part of the velocity model compared to the shallow part. The lateral velocity variation, or what referred to as the derivative of velocity with respect to the horizontal distance

  12. Time-domain full waveform inversion using the gradient preconditioning based on transmitted waves energy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiao-bo; Tan, Jun; Song, Peng; Li, Jin-shan; Xia, Dong-ming; Liu, Zhao-lun

    2017-01-01

    The gradient preconditioning approach based on seismic wave energy can effectively avoid the huge storage consumption in the gradient preconditioning algorithms based on Hessian matrices in time-domain full waveform inversion (FWI), but the accuracy

  13. Application of multi-source waveform inversion to marine streamer data using the global correlation norm

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    Conventional multi-source waveform inversion using an objective function based on the least-square misfit cannot be applied to marine streamer acquisition data because of inconsistent acquisition geometries between observed and modelled data

  14. Full waveform inversion using oriented time-domain imaging method for vertical transverse isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full waveform inversion for reection events is limited by its linearized update re-quirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate, the resulting gradient can have an inaccurate

  15. Waveform inversion with exponential damping using a deconvolution-based objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    The lack of low frequency components in seismic data usually leads full waveform inversion into the local minima of its objective function. An exponential damping of the data, on the other hand, generates artificial low frequencies, which can

  16. 3D Multisource Full‐Waveform Inversion using Dynamic Random Phase Encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a multisource full‐waveform inversion algorithm using a dynamic phase encoding strategy with dual‐randomization—both the position and polarity of simultaneous sources are randomized and changed every iteration. The dynamic dual

  17. Selective data extension for full-waveform inversion: An efficient solution for cycle skipping

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Standard full-waveform inversion (FWI) attempts to minimize the difference between observed and modeled data. However, this difference is obviously sensitive to the amplitude of observed data, which leads to difficulties because we often do

  18. Multi-stage full waveform inversion strategy for 2D elastic VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Min, Dong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the multi-parametric full waveform inversion (FWI) is to find an optimal parameterization, which helps us recover the subsurface anisotropic parameters as well as seismic velocities, with minimal tradeoff. As a

  19. Multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data using the normalized wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    Even though the encoded multi-source approach dramatically reduces the computational cost of waveform inversion, it is generally not applicable to marine streamer data. This is because the simultaneous-sources modeled data cannot be muted to comply

  20. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2018-01-01

    hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI

  1. Efficient full waveform inversion using the excitation representation of the source wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Kalita, Mahesh; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative method of data-fitting, aiming at high-resolution recovery of the unknown model parameters. However, its conventional implementation is a cumbersome process, requiring a long computational time and large

  2. Full-waveform inversion with reflected waves for 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pattnaik, Sonali; Tsvankin, Ilya; Wang, Hui; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Full-waveform inversion in anisotropic media using reflected waves suffers from the strong non-linearity of the objective function and trade-offs between model parameters. Estimating long-wavelength model components by fixing parameter perturbations

  3. Inverting reflections using full-waveform inversion with inaccurate starting models

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for inverting seismic reflections using full-waveform inversion (FWI) with inaccurate starting models. For a layered medium, near-offset reflections (with zero angle of incidence) are unlikely to be cycle-skipped regardless

  4. Wavefront picking for 3D tomography and full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient approach for picking firstbreak wavefronts on coarsely sampled time slices of 3D shot gathers. Our objective was to compute a smooth initial velocity model for multiscale full-waveform inversion (FWI). Using

  5. Simultaneous inversion of the background velocity and the perturbation in full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-09-02

    The gradient of standard full-waveform inversion (FWI) attempts to map the residuals in the data to perturbations in the model. Such perturbations may include smooth background updates from the transmission components and high wavenumber updates from the reflection components. However, if we fix the reflection components using imaging, the gradient of what is referred to as reflected-waveform inversion (RWI) admits mainly transmission background-type updates. The drawback of existing RWI methods is that they lack an optimal image capable of producing reflections within the convex region of the optimization. Because the influence of velocity on the data was given mainly by its background (propagator) and perturbed (reflectivity) components, we have optimized both components simultaneously using a modified objective function. Specifically, we used an objective function that combined the data generated from a source using the background velocity, and that by the perturbed velocity through Born modeling, to fit the observed data. When the initial velocity was smooth, the data modeled from the source using the background velocity will mainly be reflection free, and most of the reflections were obtained from the image (perturbed velocity). As the background velocity becomes more accurate and can produce reflections, the role of the image will slowly diminish, and the update will be dominated by the standard FWI gradient to obtain high resolution. Because the objective function was quadratic with respect to the image, the inversion for the image was fast. To update the background velocity smoothly, we have combined different components of the gradient linearly through solving a small optimization problem. Application to the Marmousi model found that this method converged starting with a linearly increasing velocity, and with data free of frequencies below 4 Hz. Application to the 2014 Chevron Gulf of Mexico imaging challenge data set demonstrated the potential of the

  6. 2D acoustic-elastic coupled waveform inversion in the Laplace domain

    KAUST Repository

    Bae, Hoseuk

    2010-04-01

    Although waveform inversion has been intensively studied in an effort to properly delineate the Earth\\'s structures since the early 1980s, most of the time- and frequency-domain waveform inversion algorithms still have critical limitations in their applications to field data. This may be attributed to the highly non-linear objective function and the unreliable low-frequency components. To overcome the weaknesses of conventional waveform inversion algorithms, the acoustic Laplace-domain waveform inversion has been proposed. The Laplace-domain waveform inversion has been known to provide a long-wavelength velocity model even for field data, which may be because it employs the zero-frequency component of the damped wavefield and a well-behaved logarithmic objective function. However, its applications have been confined to 2D acoustic media.We extend the Laplace-domain waveform inversion algorithm to a 2D acoustic-elastic coupled medium, which is encountered in marine exploration environments. In 2D acoustic-elastic coupled media, the Laplace-domain pressures behave differently from those of 2D acoustic media, although the overall features are similar to each other. The main differences are that the pressure wavefields for acoustic-elastic coupled media show negative values even for simple geological structures unlike in acoustic media, when the Laplace damping constant is small and the water depth is shallow. The negative values may result from more complicated wave propagation in elastic media and at fluid-solid interfaces.Our Laplace-domain waveform inversion algorithm is also based on the finite-element method and logarithmic wavefields. To compute gradient direction, we apply the back-propagation technique. Under the assumption that density is fixed, P- and S-wave velocity models are inverted from the pressure data. We applied our inversion algorithm to the SEG/EAGE salt model and the numerical results showed that the Laplace-domain waveform inversion

  7. Optimal Inversion Parameters for Full Waveform Inversion using OBS Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Chung, W.; Shin, S.; Kim, D.; Lee, D.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, full Waveform Inversion (FWI) has been the most researched technique in seismic data processing. It uses the residuals between observed and modeled data as an objective function; thereafter, the final subsurface velocity model is generated through a series of iterations meant to minimize the residuals.Research on FWI has expanded from acoustic media to elastic media. In acoustic media, the subsurface property is defined by P-velocity; however, in elastic media, properties are defined by multiple parameters, such as P-velocity, S-velocity, and density. Further, the elastic media can also be defined by Lamé constants, density or impedance PI, SI; consequently, research is being carried out to ascertain the optimal parameters.From results of advanced exploration equipment and Ocean Bottom Seismic (OBS) survey, it is now possible to obtain multi-component seismic data. However, to perform FWI on these data and generate an accurate subsurface model, it is important to determine optimal inversion parameters among (Vp, Vs, ρ), (λ, μ, ρ), and (PI, SI) in elastic media. In this study, staggered grid finite difference method was applied to simulate OBS survey. As in inversion, l2-norm was set as objective function. Further, the accurate computation of gradient direction was performed using the back-propagation technique and its scaling was done using the Pseudo-hessian matrix.In acoustic media, only Vp is used as the inversion parameter. In contrast, various sets of parameters, such as (Vp, Vs, ρ) and (λ, μ, ρ) can be used to define inversion in elastic media. Therefore, it is important to ascertain the parameter that gives the most accurate result for inversion with OBS data set.In this study, we generated Vp and Vs subsurface models by using (λ, μ, ρ) and (Vp, Vs, ρ) as inversion parameters in every iteration, and compared the final two FWI results.This research was supported by the Basic Research Project(17-3312) of the Korea Institute of

  8. Application of weighted early-arrival waveform inversion to shallow land data

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han; Zhang, Dongliang; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    predictions and shows that the effects of noise and unpredicted amplitude variations in the inversion are reduced using this weighted early arrival waveform inversion (WEWI). We also apply this method to a 2D land data set for estimating the near

  9. Waveform inversion of lateral velocity variation from wavefield source location perturbation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-22

    It is challenge in waveform inversion to precisely define the deep part of the velocity model compared to the shallow part. The lateral velocity variation, or what referred to as the derivative of velocity with respect to the horizontal distance, with well log data can be used to update the deep part of the velocity model more precisely. We develop a waveform inversion algorithm to obtain the lateral velocity variation by inverting the wavefield variation associated with the lateral shot location perturbation. The gradient of the new waveform inversion algorithm is obtained by the adjoint-state method. Our inversion algorithm focuses on resolving the lateral changes of the velocity model with respect to a fixed reference vertical velocity profile given by a well log. We apply the method on a simple-dome model to highlight the methods potential.

  10. 2-D traveltime and waveform inversion for improved seismic imaging: Naga Thrust and Fold Belt, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Zelt, Colin A.; Bally, Albert W.; Dasgupta, Rahul

    2008-05-01

    Exploration along the Naga Thrust and Fold Belt in the Assam province of Northeast India encounters geological as well as logistic challenges. Drilling for hydrocarbons, traditionally guided by surface manifestations of the Naga thrust fault, faces additional challenges in the northeast where the thrust fault gradually deepens leaving subtle surface expressions. In such an area, multichannel 2-D seismic data were collected along a line perpendicular to the trend of the thrust belt. The data have a moderate signal-to-noise ratio and suffer from ground roll and other acquisition-related noise. In addition to data quality, the complex geology of the thrust belt limits the ability of conventional seismic processing to yield a reliable velocity model which in turn leads to poor subsurface image. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of traveltime and waveform inversion as supplements to conventional seismic imaging and interpretation processes. Both traveltime and waveform inversion utilize the first arrivals that are typically discarded during conventional seismic processing. As a first step, a smooth velocity model with long wavelength characteristics of the subsurface is estimated through inversion of the first-arrival traveltimes. This velocity model is then used to obtain a Kirchhoff pre-stack depth-migrated image which in turn is used for the interpretation of the fault. Waveform inversion is applied to the central part of the seismic line to a depth of ~1 km where the quality of the migrated image is poor. Waveform inversion is performed in the frequency domain over a series of iterations, proceeding from low to high frequency (11-19 Hz) using the velocity model from traveltime inversion as the starting model. In the end, the pre-stack depth-migrated image and the waveform inversion model are jointly interpreted. This study demonstrates that a combination of traveltime and waveform inversion with Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration is a promising approach

  11. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source-domain FTI is capable of automatically generating a background velocity that can kinematically match the reconstructed plane-wave sources of early arrivals with true plane-wave sources. This method does not require picking first arrivals for inversion, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based first-arrival tomographic inversion. Moreover, compared with conventional Born-based methods, source-domain FTI can distinguish between slower or faster initial model errors via providing the correct sign of the model gradient. In addition, this method does not need estimation of the source wavelet, which is a requirement for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. The model derived from source-domain FTI is then used as input to early-arrival waveform inversion to obtain the short-wavelength velocity components. We have tested the workflow on synthetic and field seismic data sets. The results show source-domain FTI can generate reasonable background velocities for early-arrival waveform inversion even when subsurface velocity reversals are present and the workflow can produce a high-resolution near-surface velocity model.

  12. Spatially-Variant Tikhonov Regularization for Double-Difference Waveform Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Zhigang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Double-difference waveform inversion is a potential tool for quantitative monitoring for geologic carbon storage. It jointly inverts time-lapse seismic data for changes in reservoir geophysical properties. Due to the ill-posedness of waveform inversion, it is a great challenge to obtain reservoir changes accurately and efficiently, particularly when using time-lapse seismic reflection data. Regularization techniques can be utilized to address the issue of ill-posedness. The regularization parameter controls the smoothness of inversion results. A constant regularization parameter is normally used in waveform inversion, and an optimal regularization parameter has to be selected. The resulting inversion results are a trade off among regions with different smoothness or noise levels; therefore the images are either over regularized in some regions while under regularized in the others. In this paper, we employ a spatially-variant parameter in the Tikhonov regularization scheme used in double-difference waveform tomography to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness. We compare the results obtained using a spatially-variant parameter with those obtained using a constant regularization parameter and those produced without any regularization. We observe that, utilizing a spatially-variant regularization scheme, the target regions are well reconstructed while the noise is reduced in the other regions. We show that the spatially-variant regularization scheme provides the flexibility to regularize local regions based on the a priori information without increasing computational costs and the computer memory requirement.

  13. Waveform inversion with exponential damping using a deconvolution-based objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2016-09-06

    The lack of low frequency components in seismic data usually leads full waveform inversion into the local minima of its objective function. An exponential damping of the data, on the other hand, generates artificial low frequencies, which can be used to admit long wavelength updates for waveform inversion. Another feature of exponential damping is that the energy of each trace also exponentially decreases with source-receiver offset, where the leastsquare misfit function does not work well. Thus, we propose a deconvolution-based objective function for waveform inversion with an exponential damping. Since the deconvolution filter includes a division process, it can properly address the unbalanced energy levels of the individual traces of the damped wavefield. Numerical examples demonstrate that our proposed FWI based on the deconvolution filter can generate a convergent long wavelength structure from the artificial low frequency components coming from an exponential damping.

  14. Full waveform inversion using envelope-based global correlation norm

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2018-01-01

    Various parameterizations have been suggested to simplify inversions of first arrivals, or P −waves, in orthorhombic anisotropic media, but the number and type of retrievable parameters have not been decisively determined. We show that only six

  15. Full waveform inversion using oriented time-domain imaging method for vertical transverse isotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-07-11

    Full waveform inversion for reection events is limited by its linearized update re-quirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate, the resulting gradient can have an inaccurate update direction leading the inversion to converge what we refer to as local minima of the objective function. In our approach, we consider mild lateral variation in the model, and thus, use a gradient given by the oriented time-domain imaging method. Specifically, we apply the oriented time-domain imaging on the data residual to obtain the geometrical features of the velocity perturbation. After updating the model in the time domain, we convert the perturbation from the time domain to depth using the average velocity. Considering density is constant, we can expand the conventional 1D impedance inversion method to 2D or 3D velocity inversion within the process of full waveform inversion. This method is not only capable of inverting for velocity, but it is also capable of retrieving anisotropic parameters relying on linearized representations of the reection response. To eliminate the cross-talk artifacts between different parameters, we utilize what we consider being an optimal parametrization for this step. To do so, we extend the prestack time-domain migration image in incident angle dimension to incorporate angular dependence needed by the multiparameter inversion. For simple models, this approach provides an efficient and stable way to do full waveform inversion or modified seismic inversion and makes the anisotropic inversion more practicable. The proposed method still needs kinematically accurate initial models since it only recovers the high-wavenumber part as conventional full waveform inversion method does. Results on synthetic data of isotropic and anisotropic cases illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method.

  16. Application of multi-source waveform inversion to marine streamer data using the global correlation norm

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-05-02

    Conventional multi-source waveform inversion using an objective function based on the least-square misfit cannot be applied to marine streamer acquisition data because of inconsistent acquisition geometries between observed and modelled data. To apply the multi-source waveform inversion to marine streamer data, we use the global correlation between observed and modelled data as an alternative objective function. The new residual seismogram derived from the global correlation norm attenuates modelled data not supported by the configuration of observed data and thus, can be applied to multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data. We also show that the global correlation norm is theoretically the same as the least-square norm of the normalized wavefield. To efficiently calculate the gradient, our method employs a back-propagation algorithm similar to reverse-time migration based on the adjoint-state of the wave equation. In numerical examples, the multi-source waveform inversion using the global correlation norm results in better inversion results for marine streamer acquisition data than the conventional approach. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  17. Taming waveform inversion non-linearity through phase unwrapping of the model and objective functions

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-09-25

    Traveltime inversion focuses on the geometrical features of the waveform (traveltimes), which is generally smooth, and thus, tends to provide averaged (smoothed) information of the model. On other hand, general waveform inversion uses additional elements of the wavefield including amplitudes to extract higher resolution information, but this comes at the cost of introducing non-linearity to the inversion operator, complicating the convergence process. We use unwrapped phase-based objective functions in waveform inversion as a link between the two general types of inversions in a domain in which such contributions to the inversion process can be easily identified and controlled. The instantaneous traveltime is a measure of the average traveltime of the energy in a trace as a function of frequency. It unwraps the phase of wavefields yielding far less non-linearity in the objective function than that experienced with conventional wavefields, yet it still holds most of the critical wavefield information in its frequency dependency. However, it suffers from non-linearity introduced by the model (or reflectivity), as reflections from independent events in our model interact with each other. Unwrapping the phase of such a model can mitigate this non-linearity as well. Specifically, a simple modification to the inverted domain (or model), can reduce the effect of the model-induced non-linearity and, thus, make the inversion more convergent. Simple numerical examples demonstrate these assertions.

  18. Taming waveform inversion non-linearity through phase unwrapping of the model and objective functions

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Traveltime inversion focuses on the geometrical features of the waveform (traveltimes), which is generally smooth, and thus, tends to provide averaged (smoothed) information of the model. On other hand, general waveform inversion uses additional elements of the wavefield including amplitudes to extract higher resolution information, but this comes at the cost of introducing non-linearity to the inversion operator, complicating the convergence process. We use unwrapped phase-based objective functions in waveform inversion as a link between the two general types of inversions in a domain in which such contributions to the inversion process can be easily identified and controlled. The instantaneous traveltime is a measure of the average traveltime of the energy in a trace as a function of frequency. It unwraps the phase of wavefields yielding far less non-linearity in the objective function than that experienced with conventional wavefields, yet it still holds most of the critical wavefield information in its frequency dependency. However, it suffers from non-linearity introduced by the model (or reflectivity), as reflections from independent events in our model interact with each other. Unwrapping the phase of such a model can mitigate this non-linearity as well. Specifically, a simple modification to the inverted domain (or model), can reduce the effect of the model-induced non-linearity and, thus, make the inversion more convergent. Simple numerical examples demonstrate these assertions.

  19. Full waveform inversion for time-distance helioseismology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Inferring interior properties of the Sun from photospheric measurements of the seismic wavefield constitutes the helioseismic inverse problem. Deviations in seismic measurements (such as wave travel times) from their fiducial values estimated for a given model of the solar interior imply that the model is inaccurate. Contemporary inversions in local helioseismology assume that properties of the solar interior are linearly related to measured travel-time deviations. It is widely known, however, that this assumption is invalid for sunspots and active regions and is likely for supergranular flows. Here, we introduce nonlinear optimization, executed iteratively, as a means of inverting for the subsurface structure of large-amplitude perturbations. Defining the penalty functional as the L 2 norm of wave travel-time deviations, we compute the total misfit gradient of this functional with respect to the relevant model parameters at each iteration around the corresponding model. The model is successively improved using either steepest descent, conjugate gradient, or the quasi-Newton limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm. Performing nonlinear iterations requires privileging pixels (such as those in the near field of the scatterer), a practice that is not compliant with the standard assumption of translational invariance. Measurements for these inversions, although similar in principle to those used in time-distance helioseismology, require some retooling. For the sake of simplicity in illustrating the method, we consider a two-dimensional inverse problem with only a sound-speed perturbation.

  20. Frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion using encoded simultaneous sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, W.; Son, W.; Pyun, S.; Min, D.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, numerous studies have endeavored to develop robust full waveform inversion and migration algorithms. These processes require enormous computational costs, because of the number of sources in the survey. To avoid this problem, the phase encoding technique for prestack migration was proposed by Romero (2000) and Krebs et al. (2009) proposed the encoded simultaneous-source inversion technique in the time domain. On the other hand, Ben-Hadj-Ali et al. (2011) demonstrated the robustness of the frequency-domain full waveform inversion with simultaneous sources for noisy data changing the source assembling. Although several studies on simultaneous-source inversion tried to estimate P- wave velocity based on the acoustic wave equation, seismic migration and waveform inversion based on the elastic wave equations are required to obtain more reliable subsurface information. In this study, we propose a 2-D frequency-domain elastic full waveform inversion technique using phase encoding methods. In our algorithm, the random phase encoding method is employed to calculate the gradients of the elastic parameters, source signature estimation and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix. The crosstalk for the estimated source signature and the diagonal entries of approximate Hessian matrix are suppressed with iteration as for the gradients. Our 2-D frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion algorithm is composed using the back-propagation technique and the conjugate-gradient method. Source signature is estimated using the full Newton method. We compare the simultaneous-source inversion with the conventional waveform inversion for synthetic data sets of the Marmousi-2 model. The inverted results obtained by simultaneous sources are comparable to those obtained by individual sources, and source signature is successfully estimated in simultaneous source technique. Comparing the inverted results using the pseudo Hessian matrix with previous inversion results

  1. Full waveform inversion using envelope-based global correlation norm

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2018-01-28

    Various parameterizations have been suggested to simplify inversions of first arrivals, or P −waves, in orthorhombic anisotropic media, but the number and type of retrievable parameters have not been decisively determined. We show that only six parameters can be retrieved from the dynamic linearized inversion of P −waves. These parameters are different from the six parameters needed to describe the kinematics of P −waves. Reflection-based radiation patterns from the P − P scattered waves are remapped into the spectral domain to allow for our resolution analysis based on the effective angle of illumination concept. Singular value decomposition of the spectral sensitivities from various azimuths, offset coverage scenarios, and data bandwidths allows us to quantify the resolution of different parameterizations, taking into account the signal-to-noise ratio in a given experiment. According to our singular value analysis, when the primary goal of inversion is determining the velocity of the P −waves, gradually adding anisotropy of lower orders (isotropic, vertically transversally isotropic, orthorhombic) in hierarchical parameterization is the best choice. Hierarchical parametrization reduces the tradeoff between the parameters and makes gradual introduction of lower anisotropy orders straightforward. When all the anisotropic parameters affecting P −wave propagation need to be retrieved simultaneously, the classic parameterization of orthorhombic medium with elastic stiffness matrix coefficients and density is a better choice for inversion. We provide estimates of the number and set of parameters that can be retrieved from surface seismic data in different acquisition scenarios. To set up an inversion process, the singular values determine the number of parameters that can be inverted and the resolution matrices from the parameterizations can be used to ascertain the set of parameters that can be resolved.

  2. Crustal velocity structure of central Gansu Province from regional seismic waveform inversion using firework algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyang; Wang, Yanbin; Zhang, Yuansheng

    2017-04-01

    The firework algorithm (FWA) is a novel swarm intelligence-based method recently proposed for the optimization of multi-parameter, nonlinear functions. Numerical waveform inversion experiments using a synthetic model show that the FWA performs well in both solution quality and efficiency. We apply the FWA in this study to crustal velocity structure inversion using regional seismic waveform data of central Gansu on the northeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau. Seismograms recorded from the moment magnitude ( M W) 5.4 Minxian earthquake enable obtaining an average crustal velocity model for this region. We initially carried out a series of FWA robustness tests in regional waveform inversion at the same earthquake and station positions across the study region, inverting two velocity structure models, with and without a low-velocity crustal layer; the accuracy of our average inversion results and their standard deviations reveal the advantages of the FWA for the inversion of regional seismic waveforms. We applied the FWA across our study area using three component waveform data recorded by nine broadband permanent seismic stations with epicentral distances ranging between 146 and 437 km. These inversion results show that the average thickness of the crust in this region is 46.75 km, while thicknesses of the sedimentary layer, and the upper, middle, and lower crust are 3.15, 15.69, 13.08, and 14.83 km, respectively. Results also show that the P-wave velocities of these layers and the upper mantle are 4.47, 6.07, 6.12, 6.87, and 8.18 km/s, respectively.

  3. Frequency Domain Multi-parameter Full Waveform Inversion for Acoustic VTI Media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) for transversely isotropic (TI) media with vertical axis of symmetry (VTI) suffers from the trade-off between the parameters. The trade-off results in the leakage of one parameter's update into the other

  4. A New Wave Equation Based Source Location Method with Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    with illumination artifacts. We develop a waveform inversion approach with an additional penalty term in the objective function to reward the focusing of the source image. This penalty term is relaxed early to allow for data fitting, and avoid cycle skipping, using

  5. Time-domain incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion of Gulf of Mexico data

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah; Wang, Xin; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    We apply the incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion (TDIGN-FWI) to Gulf of Mexico (GOM) data in the space-time domain. In our application, iterative least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM) is used to estimate the model update at each

  6. Micro-seismic Imaging Using a Source Independent Waveform Inversion Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-01-01

    waveform inversion (FWI) is widely used. The FWI method updates the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the observed data and the predicted data. Using FWI to locate and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking

  7. Probabilistic full waveform inversion based on tectonic regionalization - development and application to the Australian upper mantle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Käufl, P.; Fichtner, A.; Igel, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a first study to investigate the feasibility of a probabilistic 3-D full waveform inversion based on spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation and Monte Carlo exploration of the model space. Through a tectonic regionalization we reduce the dimension of the model space to

  8. Extracting Low-Frequency Information from Time Attenuation in Elastic Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuebao; Liu, Hong; Shi, Ying; Wang, Weihong

    2017-03-01

    Low-frequency information is crucial for recovering background velocity, but the lack of low-frequency information in field data makes inversion impractical without accurate initial models. Laplace-Fourier domain waveform inversion can recover a smooth model from real data without low-frequency information, which can be used for subsequent inversion as an ideal starting model. In general, it also starts with low frequencies and includes higher frequencies at later inversion stages, while the difference is that its ultralow frequency information comes from the Laplace-Fourier domain. Meanwhile, a direct implementation of the Laplace-transformed wavefield using frequency domain inversion is also very convenient. However, because broad frequency bands are often used in the pure time domain waveform inversion, it is difficult to extract the wavefields dominated by low frequencies in this case. In this paper, low-frequency components are constructed by introducing time attenuation into the recorded residuals, and the rest of the method is identical to the traditional time domain inversion. Time windowing and frequency filtering are also applied to mitigate the ambiguity of the inverse problem. Therefore, we can start at low frequencies and to move to higher frequencies. The experiment shows that the proposed method can achieve a good inversion result in the presence of a linear initial model and records without low-frequency information.

  9. Acoustic 2D full waveform inversion to solve gas cloud challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srichand Prajapati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing conventional inversion algorithm does not provide satisfactory results due to the complexity of propagated wavefield though the gas cloud. Acoustic full waveform inversion has been developed and applied to a realistic synthetic offshore shallow gas cloud feature with Student-t approach, with and without simultaneous sources encoding. As a modeling operator, we implemented the grid based finite-difference method in frequency domain using second order elastic wave equation. Jacobin operator and its adjoint provide a necessary platform for solving full waveform inversion problem in a reduced Hessian matrix. We invert gas cloud model in 5 frequency band selected from 1 to 12 Hz, each band contains 3 frequencies. The inversion results are highly sensitive to the misfit. The model allows better convergence and recovery of amplitude losses. This approach gives better resolution then the existing least-squares approach. In this paper, we implement the full waveform inversion for low frequency model with minimum number of iteration providing a better resolution of inversion results.

  10. Parallel inverse halftoning by look-up table (LUT) partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Umair F.; Sait, Sadiq M.

    2008-01-01

    The Look-Up Table (LUT) method for inverse halftoning is not only computation-less and fast but yields good results. The method employs a single LUT that is stored in a ROM and contains pre-computed contone (gray level) values for inverse halftone operation. This paper proposes an algorithm that can perform parallel inverse halftone operations by partitioning the single LUT into N smaller look-Up Tables (s- LUTs). Therefore, up to k (k<-N) pixels can be concurrently fetched from the halftone image and their contone values fetched concurrently from separate s- LUT. Obviously, this parallelization increases the speed of inverse halftoning by upto k times. In this proposed method, the total entries in all s- LUTs remain equal to the entries in the single LUT of the serial LUT method. Some degradation in image quality is also possible due to pixel loss during fetching. This is because some other contone value is being fetched from that s-LUT. The complete implementation of the algorithm requires two CPLDs (Complex Programmable Logic Devices) for the computational portion, external content addressable memories (CAM) and static RAMs to store s-LUTs. (author)

  11. Full-waveform inversion with reflected waves for 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Pattnaik, Sonali

    2016-09-06

    Full-waveform inversion in anisotropic media using reflected waves suffers from the strong non-linearity of the objective function and trade-offs between model parameters. Estimating long-wavelength model components by fixing parameter perturbations, referred to as reflection-waveform inversion (RWI), can mitigate nonlinearity-related inversion issues. Here, we extend RWI to acoustic VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media. To minimize trade-offs between the model parameters, we employ a new hierarchical two-stage approach that operates with the P-wave normal-moveout velocity and anisotropy coefficents ζ and η. First, is estimated using a fixed perturbation in ζ, and then we invert for η by fixing the updated perturbation in . The proposed 2D algorithm is tested on a horizontally layered VTI model.

  12. Salvus: A scalable software suite for full-waveform modelling & inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, M.; Boehm, C.; van Driel, M.; Krischer, L.; Fichtner, A.

    2017-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI), whether at the lab, exploration, or planetary scale, requires the cooperation of five principal components. (1) The geometry of the domain needs to be properly discretized and an initial guess of the model parameters must be projected onto it; (2) Large volumes of recorded waveform data must be collected, organized, and processed; (3) Synthetic waveform data must be efficiently and accurately computed through complex domains; (4) Suitable misfit functions and optimization techniques must be used to relate discrepancies in data space to perturbations in the model; and (5) Some form of workflow management must be employed to schedule and run (1) - (4) in the correct order. Each one of these components can represent a formidable technical challenge which redirects energy from the true task at hand: using FWI to extract new information about some underlying continuum.In this presentation we give an overview of the current status of the Salvus software suite, which was introduced to address the challenges listed above. Specifically, we touch on (1) salvus_mesher, which eases the discretization of complex Earth models into hexahedral meshes; (2) salvus_seismo, which integrates with LASIF and ObsPy to streamline the processing and preparation of seismic data; (3) salvus_wave, a high-performance and scalable spectral-element solver capable of simulating waveforms through general unstructured 2- and 3-D domains, and (4) salvus_opt, an optimization toolbox specifically designed for full-waveform inverse problems. Tying everything together, we also discuss (5) salvus_flow: a workflow package designed to orchestrate and manage the rest of the suite. It is our hope that these developments represent a step towards the automation of large-scale seismic waveform inversion, while also lowering the barrier of entry for new applications. We include several examples of Salvus' use in (extra-) planetary seismology, non-destructive testing, and medical

  13. Multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data using the normalized wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Even though the encoded multi-source approach dramatically reduces the computational cost of waveform inversion, it is generally not applicable to marine streamer data. This is because the simultaneous-sources modeled data cannot be muted to comply with the configuration of the marine streamer data, which causes differences in the number of stacked-traces, or energy levels, between the modeled and observed data. Since the conventional L2 norm does not account for the difference in energy levels, multi-source inversion based on the conventional L2 norm does not work for marine streamer data. In this study, we propose the L2, approximated L2, and L1 norm using the normalized wavefields for the multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data. Since the normalized wavefields mitigate the different energy levels between the observed and modeled wavefields, the multi-source waveform inversion using the normalized wavefields can be applied to marine streamer data. We obtain the gradient of the objective functions using the back-propagation algorithm. To conclude, the gradient of the L2 norm using the normalized wavefields is exactly the same as that of the global correlation norm. In the numerical examples, the new objective functions using the normalized wavefields generate successful results whereas conventional L2 norm does not.

  14. Seismic waveform inversion best practices: regional, global and exploration test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrak, Ryan; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    Reaching the global minimum of a waveform misfit function requires careful choices about the nonlinear optimization, preconditioning and regularization methods underlying an inversion. Because waveform inversion problems are susceptible to erratic convergence associated with strong nonlinearity, one or two test cases are not enough to reliably inform such decisions. We identify best practices, instead, using four seismic near-surface problems, one regional problem and two global problems. To make meaningful quantitative comparisons between methods, we carry out hundreds of inversions, varying one aspect of the implementation at a time. Comparing nonlinear optimization algorithms, we find that limited-memory BFGS provides computational savings over nonlinear conjugate gradient methods in a wide range of test cases. Comparing preconditioners, we show that a new diagonal scaling derived from the adjoint of the forward operator provides better performance than two conventional preconditioning schemes. Comparing regularization strategies, we find that projection, convolution, Tikhonov regularization and total variation regularization are effective in different contexts. Besides questions of one strategy or another, reliability and efficiency in waveform inversion depend on close numerical attention and care. Implementation details involving the line search and restart conditions have a strong effect on computational cost, regardless of the chosen nonlinear optimization algorithm.

  15. Full waveform inversion in the frequency domain using classified time-domain residual wavefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Woohyun; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Byoung-Yeop; Lee, Ho-Young; Joo, Yonghwan

    2017-04-01

    We perform the acoustic full waveform inversion in the frequency domain using residual wavefields that have been separated in the time domain. We sort the residual wavefields in the time domain according to the order of absolute amplitudes. Then, the residual wavefields are separated into several groups in the time domain. To analyze the characteristics of the residual wavefields, we compare the residual wavefields of conventional method with those of our residual separation method. From the residual analysis, the amplitude spectrum obtained from the trace before separation appears to have little energy at the lower frequency bands. However, the amplitude spectrum obtained from our strategy is regularized by the separation process, which means that the low-frequency components are emphasized. Therefore, our method helps to emphasize low-frequency components of residual wavefields. Then, we generate the frequency-domain residual wavefields by taking the Fourier transform of the separated time-domain residual wavefields. With these wavefields, we perform the gradient-based full waveform inversion in the frequency domain using back-propagation technique. Through a comparison of gradient directions, we confirm that our separation method can better describe the sub-salt image than the conventional approach. The proposed method is tested on the SEG/EAGE salt-dome model. The inversion results show that our algorithm is better than the conventional gradient based waveform inversion in the frequency domain, especially for deeper parts of the velocity model.

  16. Visco-elastic controlled-source full waveform inversion without surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Marco; Krause, Martin; Bleibinhaus, Florian

    2016-04-01

    We developed a frequency-domain visco-elastic full waveform inversion for onshore seismic experiments with topography. The forward modeling is based on a finite-difference time-domain algorithm by Robertsson that uses the image-method to ensure a stress-free condition at the surface. The time-domain data is Fourier-transformed at every point in the model space during the forward modeling for a given set of frequencies. The motivation for this approach is the reduced amount of memory when computing kernels, and the straightforward implementation of the multiscale approach. For the inversion, we calculate the Frechet derivative matrix explicitly, and we implement a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme that allows for computing the resolution matrix. To reduce the size of the Frechet derivative matrix, and to stabilize the inversion, an adapted inverse mesh is used. The node spacing is controlled by the velocity distribution and the chosen frequencies. To focus the inversion on body waves (P, P-coda, and S) we mute the surface waves from the data. Consistent spatiotemporal weighting factors are applied to the wavefields during the Fourier transform to obtain the corresponding kernels. We test our code with a synthetic study using the Marmousi model with arbitrary topography. This study also demonstrates the importance of topography and muting surface waves in controlled-source full waveform inversion.

  17. Moment tensor inversions using strong motion waveforms of Taiwan TSMIP data, 1993–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kaiwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Gung, Yuancheng; Dreger, Douglas; Lee, William H K.; Chiu, Hung-Chie

    2011-01-01

    Earthquake source parameters are important for earthquake studies and seismic hazard assessment. Moment tensors are among the most important earthquake source parameters, and are now routinely derived using modern broadband seismic networks around the world. Similar waveform inversion techniques can also apply to other available data, including strong-motion seismograms. Strong-motion waveforms are also broadband, and recorded in many regions since the 1980s. Thus, strong-motion data can be used to augment moment tensor catalogs with a much larger dataset than that available from the high-gain, broadband seismic networks. However, a systematic comparison between the moment tensors derived from strong motion waveforms and high-gain broadband waveforms has not been available. In this study, we inverted the source mechanisms of Taiwan earthquakes between 1993 and 2009 by using the regional moment tensor inversion method using digital data from several hundred stations in the Taiwan Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP). By testing different velocity models and filter passbands, we were able to successfully derive moment tensor solutions for 107 earthquakes of Mw >= 4.8. The solutions for large events agree well with other available moment tensor catalogs derived from local and global broadband networks. However, for Mw = 5.0 or smaller events, we consistently over estimated the moment magnitudes by 0.5 to 1.0. We have tested accelerograms, and velocity waveforms integrated from accelerograms for the inversions, and found the results are similar. In addition, we used part of the catalogs to study important seismogenic structures in the area near Meishan Taiwan which was the site of a very damaging earthquake a century ago, and found that the structures were dominated by events with complex right-lateral strike-slip faulting during the recent decade. The procedures developed from this study may be applied to other strong-motion datasets to compliment or fill

  18. Full-waveform inversion of GPR data for civil engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kruk, Jan; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Hugenschmidt, Johannes; Klotzsche, Anja; Busch, Sebastian; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Conventional GPR ray-based techniques are often limited in their capability to image complex structures due to the pertaining approximations. Due to the increased computational power, it is becoming more easy to use modeling and inversion tools that explicitly take into account the detailed electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics. In this way, new civil engineering application avenues are opening up that enable an improved high resolution imaging of quantitative medium properties. In this contribution, we show recent developments that enable the full-waveform inversion of off-ground, on-ground and crosshole GPR data. For a successful inversion, a proper start model must be used that generates synthetic data that overlaps the measured data with at least half a wavelength. In addition, the GPR system must be calibrated such that an effective wavelet is obtained that encompasses the complexity of the GPR source and receiver antennas. Simple geometries such as horizontal layers can be described with a limited number of model parameters, which enable the use of a combined global and local search using the Simplex search algorithm. This approach has been implemented for the full-waveform inversion of off-ground and on-ground GPR data measured over horizontally layered media. In this way, an accurate 3D frequency domain forward model of Maxwell's equation can be used where the integral representation of the electric field is numerically evaluated. The full-waveform inversion (FWI) for a large number of unknowns uses gradient-based optimization methods where a 3D to 2D conversion is used to apply this method to experimental data. Off-ground GPR data, measured over homogeneous concrete specimens, were inverted using the full-waveform inversion. In contrast to traditional ray-based techniques we were able to obtain quantitative values for the permittivity and conductivity and in this way distinguish between moisture and chloride effects. For increasing chloride

  19. The natural combination of full and image-based waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-06-01

    Integrating migration velocity analysis and full waveform inversion can help reduce the high non-linearity of the classic full waveform inversion objective function. The combination of inverting for the long and short wavelength components of the velocity model using a dual objective function that is sensitive to both components is still very expensive and have produced mixed results. We develop an approach that includes both components integrated to complement each other. We specifically utilize the image to generate reflections in our synthetic data only when the velocity model is not capable of producing such reflections. As a result, we get the migration velocity analysis working when we need it, and we mitigate its influence when the velocity model produces accurate reflections (possibly first for the low frequencies). This is achieved using a novel objective function that includes both objectives. Applications to a layered model and the Marmousi model demonstrate the main features of the approach. © 2015 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  20. Full Waveform Inversion of Diving & Reflected Waves based on Scale Separation for Velocity and Impedance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, Romain; Zhou, Wei; Operto, Stéphane; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is an appealing method for quantitative high-resolution subsurface imaging (Virieux et al., 2009). For crustal-scales exploration from surface seismic, FWI generally succeeds in recovering a broadband of wavenumbers in the shallow part of the targeted medium taking advantage of the broad scattering-angle provided by both reflected and diving waves. In contrast, deeper targets are often only illuminated by short-spread reflections, which favor the reconstruction of the short wavelengths at the expense of the longer ones, leading to a possible notch in the intermediate part of the wavenumber spectrum. To update the velocity macromodel from reflection data, image-domain strategies (e.g., Symes & Carazzone, 1991) aim to maximize a semblance criterion in the migrated domain. Alternatively, recent data-domain strategies (e.g., Xu et al., 2012, Ma & Hale, 2013, Brossier et al., 2014), called Reflection FWI (RFWI), inspired by Chavent et al. (1994), rely on a scale separation between the velocity macromodel and prior knowledge of the reflectivity to emphasize the transmission regime in the sensitivity kernel of the inversion. However, all these strategies focus on reflected waves only, discarding the low-wavenumber information carried out by diving waves. With the current development of very long-offset and wide-azimuth acquisitions, a significant part of the recorded energy is provided by diving waves and subcritical reflections, and high-resolution tomographic methods should take advantage of all types of waves. In this presentation, we will first review the issues of classical FWI when applied to reflected waves and how RFWI is able to retrieve the long wavelength of the model. We then propose a unified formulation of FWI (Zhou et al., 2014) to update the low wavenumbers of the velocity model by the joint inversion of diving and reflected arrivals, while the impedance model is updated thanks to reflected wave only. An alternate inversion of

  1. Simultaneous inversion of seismic velocity and moment tensor using elastic-waveform inversion of microseismic data: Application to the Aneth CO2-EOR field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Huang, L.

    2017-12-01

    Moment tensors are key parameters for characterizing CO2-injection-induced microseismic events. Elastic-waveform inversion has the potential to providing accurate results of moment tensors. Microseismic waveforms contains information of source moment tensors and the wave propagation velocity along the wavepaths. We develop an elastic-waveform inversion method to jointly invert the seismic velocity model and moment tensor. We first use our adaptive moment-tensor joint inversion method to estimate moment tensors of microseismic events. Our adaptive moment-tensor inversion method jointly inverts multiple microseismic events with similar waveforms within a cluster to reduce inversion uncertainty for microseismic data recorded using a single borehole geophone array. We use this inversion result as the initial model for our elastic-waveform inversion to minimize the cross-correlated-based data misfit between observed data and synthetic data. We verify our method using synthetic microseismic data and obtain improved results of both moment tensors and seismic velocity model. We apply our new inversion method to microseismic data acquired at a CO2-enhanced oil recovery field in Aneth, Utah, using a single borehole geophone array. The results demonstrate that our new inversion method significantly reduces the data misfit compared to the conventional ray-theory-based moment-tensor inversion.

  2. Tsunami waveform inversion by numerical finite-elements Green’s functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Piatanesi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, the steady increase in the quantity and quality of the data concerning tsunamis has led to an increasing interest in the inversion problem for tsunami data. This work addresses the usually ill-posed problem of the hydrodynamical inversion of tsunami tide-gage records to infer the initial sea perturbation. We use an inversion method for which the data space consists of a given number of waveforms and the model parameter space is represented by the values of the initial water elevation field at a given number of points. The forward model, i.e. the calculation of the synthetic tide-gage records from an initial water elevation field, is based on the linear shallow water equations and is simply solved by applying the appropriate Green’s functions to the known initial state. The inversion of tide-gage records to determine the initial state results in the least square inversion of a rectangular system of linear equations. When the inversions are unconstrained, we found that in order to attain good results, the dimension of the data space has to be much larger than that of the model space parameter. We also show that a large number of waveforms is not sufficient to ensure a good inversion if the corresponding stations do not have a good azimuthal coverage with respect to source directivity. To improve the inversions we use the available a priori information on the source, generally coming from the inversion of seismological data. In this paper we show how to implement very common information about a tsunamigenic seismic source, i.e. the earthquake source region, as a set of spatial constraints. The results are very satisfactory, since even a rough localisation of the source enables us to invert correctly the initial elevation field.

  3. Elastic full waveform inversion based on the homogenization method: theoretical framework and 2-D numerical illustrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdeville, Yann; Métivier, Ludovic

    2018-05-01

    Seismic imaging is an efficient tool to investigate the Earth interior. Many of the different imaging techniques currently used, including the so-called full waveform inversion (FWI), are based on limited frequency band data. Such data are not sensitive to the true earth model, but to a smooth version of it. This smooth version can be related to the true model by the homogenization technique. Homogenization for wave propagation in deterministic media with no scale separation, such as geological media, has been recently developed. With such an asymptotic theory, it is possible to compute an effective medium valid for a given frequency band such that effective waveforms and true waveforms are the same up to a controlled error. In this work we make the link between limited frequency band inversion, mainly FWI, and homogenization. We establish the relation between a true model and an FWI result model. This relation is important for a proper interpretation of FWI images. We numerically illustrate, in the 2-D case, that an FWI result is at best the homogenized version of the true model. Moreover, it appears that the homogenized FWI model is quite independent of the FWI parametrization, as long as it has enough degrees of freedom. In particular, inverting for the full elastic tensor is, in each of our tests, always a good choice. We show how the homogenization can help to understand FWI behaviour and help to improve its robustness and convergence by efficiently constraining the solution space of the inverse problem.

  4. Heeding the waveform inversion nonlinearity by unwrapping the model and data

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traveltime inversion, waveform inversion provides relatively higher-resolution inverted models. This feature, however, comes at the cost of introducing complex nonlinearity to the inversion operator complicating the convergence process. We use unwrapped-phase-based objective functions to reduce such nonlinearity in a domain in which the high-frequency component is given by the traveltime inversion. Such information is packaged in a frequency-dependent attribute (or traveltime) that can be easily manipulated at different frequencies. It unwraps the phase of the wavefield yielding far less nonlinearity in the objective function than those experienced with the conventional misfit objective function, and yet it still holds most of the critical waveform information in its frequency dependency. However, it suffers from nonlinearity introduced by the model (or reflectivity), as events interact with each other (something like cross talk). This stems from the sinusoidal nature of the band-limited reflectivity model. Unwrapping the phase for such a model can mitigate this nonlinearity as well. Specifically, a simple modification to the inverted domain (or model), can reduce the effect of the model-induced nonlinearity and, thus, make the inversion more convergent. Simple examples are used to highlight such features.

  5. Multi-parameter Full-waveform Inversion for Acoustic VTI Medium with Surface Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X.; Jiao, K.; Sun, D.; Huang, W.; Vigh, D.

    2013-12-01

    Full-waveform Inversion (FWI) attracts wide attention recently in oil and gas industry as a new promising tool for high resolution subsurface velocity model building. While the traditional common image point gather based tomography method aims to focus post-migrated data in depth domain, FWI aims to directly fit the observed seismic waveform in either time or frequency domain. The inversion is performed iteratively by updating the velocity fields to reduce the difference between the observed and the simulated data. It has been shown the inversion is very sensitive to the starting velocity fields, and data with long offsets and low frequencies is crucial for the success of FWI to overcome this sensitivity. Considering the importance of data with long offsets and low frequencies, in most geologic environment, anisotropy is an unavoidable topic for FWI especially at long offsets, since anisotropy tends to have more pronounced effects on waves traveled for a great distance. In VTI medium, this means more horizontal velocity will be registered in middle-to-long offset data, while more vertical velocity will be registered in near-to-middle offset data. Up to date, most of real world applications of FWI still remain in isotropic medium, and only a few studies have been shown to account for anisotropy. And most of those studies only account for anisotropy in waveform simulation, but not invert for those anisotropy fields. Multi-parameter inversion for anisotropy fields, even in VTI medium, remains as a hot topic in the field. In this study, we develop a strategy for multi-parameter FWI for acoustic VTI medium with surface seismic data. Because surface seismic data is insensitivity to the delta fields, we decide to hold the delta fields unchanged during our inversion, and invert only for vertical velocity and epsilon fields. Through parameterization analysis and synthetic tests, we find that it is more feasible to invert for the parameterization as vertical and horizontal

  6. Practical waveform inversion in anisotropic media: The natural combination of the data and image objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-09-06

    Addressing anisotropy in full wavenumber inversion (FWI) is crucial to obtaining credible models, and it is extremely challenging considering the multi parameter nature of the inversion. A successful FWI in anisotropic media takes into account the sensitivity of the data (or the wave) to the long and short wavelength components of the anisotropic parameters. Considering the low sensitivity of FWI to the anellipticity parameter ? when parametrizing the acoustic transversely isotropic model with the horizontal velocity, η and ε, we develop a combined FWI and reflection waveform inversion (RWI) to invert for the anisotropic parameters that influence surface seismic data. This practical waveform inversion (PWI) separates the parameters to their resolvable scales, with information accessed from the data fitting (FWI) and the image focusing (RWI) objectives. With this parametrization, the RWI role is to obtain a smooth ηmodel, as well as velocity, while FWI focusses on the scattering potential of the horizontal velocity. The parameter η is used to produce the Born scattered wavefield for the RWI part and eventually fit the amplitude for the imperfect physics in the FWI part.

  7. Micro-seismic waveform matching inversion based on gravitational search algorithm and parallel computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Xing, H. L.

    2016-12-01

    Micro-seismic events induced by water injection, mining activity or oil/gas extraction are quite informative, the interpretation of which can be applied for the reconstruction of underground stress and monitoring of hydraulic fracturing progress in oil/gas reservoirs. The source characterises and locations are crucial parameters that required for these purposes, which can be obtained through the waveform matching inversion (WMI) method. Therefore it is imperative to develop a WMI algorithm with high accuracy and convergence speed. Heuristic algorithm, as a category of nonlinear method, possesses a very high convergence speed and good capacity to overcome local minimal values, and has been well applied for many areas (e.g. image processing, artificial intelligence). However, its effectiveness for micro-seismic WMI is still poorly investigated; very few literatures exits that addressing this subject. In this research an advanced heuristic algorithm, gravitational search algorithm (GSA) , is proposed to estimate the focal mechanism (angle of strike, dip and rake) and source locations in three dimension. Unlike traditional inversion methods, the heuristic algorithm inversion does not require the approximation of green function. The method directly interacts with a CPU parallelized finite difference forward modelling engine, and updating the model parameters under GSA criterions. The effectiveness of this method is tested with synthetic data form a multi-layered elastic model; the results indicate GSA can be well applied on WMI and has its unique advantages. Keywords: Micro-seismicity, Waveform matching inversion, gravitational search algorithm, parallel computation

  8. Eruption mass estimation using infrasound waveform inversion and ash and gas measurements: Evaluation at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan [Comparison of eruption masses at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan calculated by infrasound waveform inversion and ground-based sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, David; Izbekov, Pavel; Kim, Keehoon; Yokoo, Akihiko; Lopez, Taryn

    2017-01-01

    Eruption mass and mass flow rate are critical parameters for determining the aerial extent and hazard of volcanic emissions. Infrasound waveform inversion is a promising technique to quantify volcanic emissions. Although topography may substantially alter the infrasound waveform as it propagates, advances in wave propagation modeling and station coverage permit robust inversion of infrasound data from volcanic explosions. The inversion can estimate eruption mass flow rate and total eruption mass if the flow density is known. However, infrasound-based eruption flow rates and mass estimates have yet to be validated against independent measurements, and numerical modeling has only recently been applied to the inversion technique. Furthermore we present a robust full-waveform acoustic inversion method, and use it to calculate eruption flow rates and masses from 49 explosions from Sakurajima Volcano, Japan.

  9. Frequency Domain Multi-parameter Full Waveform Inversion for Acoustic VTI Media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2017-05-26

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) for transversely isotropic (TI) media with vertical axis of symmetry (VTI) suffers from the trade-off between the parameters. The trade-off results in the leakage of one parameter\\'s update into the other during the inversion. It affects the accuracy and convergence of the inversion. The sensitivity analyses suggested a parameterisation using the horizontal velocity vh, epsilon and eta to reduce the trade-off for surface recorded seismic data.We test the (vh, epsilon, eta) parameterisation for acoustic VTI media using a scattering integral (SI) based inversion. The data is modeled in frequency domain and the model is updated using a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. We applied the method to the VTI Marmousi II model and in the inversion, we keep eta parameter fixed as the background initial model and we invert simultaneously for both vh and epsilon. The results show the suitability of the parameterisation for multi-parameter VTI acoustic inversion as well as the accuracy of the inversion approach.

  10. High-resolution Fracture Characterization Using Elastic Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-05-26

    Current methodologies to characterize fractures at the reservoir scale have serious limitations in spatial resolution. Here, we propose to estimate both the spatial distribution and physical properties of fractures using full waveform inversion (FWI) of multicomponent surface seismic data. An effective orthorhombic medium with five clusters of vertical fractures distributed in a checkboard fashion is used to test the algorithm. To better understand the inversion results, we analyze the FWI radiation patterns of the fracture weaknesses. A shape regularization term is added to the objective function to improve the inversion for the horizontal weakness, which is otherwise poorly constrained. Alternatively, a simplified model of penny-shaped cracks is used to reduce the nonuniqueness in the inverted weaknesses and achieve a faster convergence.

  11. High-resolution Fracture Characterization Using Elastic Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.; Tsvankin, I.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Current methodologies to characterize fractures at the reservoir scale have serious limitations in spatial resolution. Here, we propose to estimate both the spatial distribution and physical properties of fractures using full waveform inversion (FWI) of multicomponent surface seismic data. An effective orthorhombic medium with five clusters of vertical fractures distributed in a checkboard fashion is used to test the algorithm. To better understand the inversion results, we analyze the FWI radiation patterns of the fracture weaknesses. A shape regularization term is added to the objective function to improve the inversion for the horizontal weakness, which is otherwise poorly constrained. Alternatively, a simplified model of penny-shaped cracks is used to reduce the nonuniqueness in the inverted weaknesses and achieve a faster convergence.

  12. A New Wave Equation Based Source Location Method with Full-waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2017-05-26

    Locating the source of a passively recorded seismic event is still a challenging problem, especially when the velocity is unknown. Many imaging approaches to focus the image do not address the velocity issue and result in images plagued with illumination artifacts. We develop a waveform inversion approach with an additional penalty term in the objective function to reward the focusing of the source image. This penalty term is relaxed early to allow for data fitting, and avoid cycle skipping, using an extended source. At the later stages the focusing of the image dominates the inversion allowing for high resolution source and velocity inversion. We also compute the source location explicitly and numerical tests show that we obtain good estimates of the source locations with this approach.

  13. Elastic full-waveform inversion of transmission data in 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Kamath, Nishant; Tsvankin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) has been implemented mostly for isotropic media, with extensions to anisotropic models typically limited to acoustic approximations. Here, we develop elastic FWI for transmitted waves in 2D heterogeneous VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media. The model is parameterized in terms of the P- and S-wave vertical velocities and the P-wave normal-moveout and horizontal velocities. To test the FWI algorithm, we introduce Gaussian anomalies in the Thomsen parameters of a homogeneous VTI medium and perform FWI of transmission data for different configurations of the source and receiver arrays. The inversion results strongly depend on the acquisition geometry and the aperture because of the parameter trade-offs. In contrast to acoustic FWI, the elastic inversion helps constrain the S-wave vertical velocity, which for our model is decoupled from the other parameters.

  14. Elastic full-waveform inversion of transmission data in 2D VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Kamath, Nishant

    2014-08-05

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) has been implemented mostly for isotropic media, with extensions to anisotropic models typically limited to acoustic approximations. Here, we develop elastic FWI for transmitted waves in 2D heterogeneous VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media. The model is parameterized in terms of the P- and S-wave vertical velocities and the P-wave normal-moveout and horizontal velocities. To test the FWI algorithm, we introduce Gaussian anomalies in the Thomsen parameters of a homogeneous VTI medium and perform FWI of transmission data for different configurations of the source and receiver arrays. The inversion results strongly depend on the acquisition geometry and the aperture because of the parameter trade-offs. In contrast to acoustic FWI, the elastic inversion helps constrain the S-wave vertical velocity, which for our model is decoupled from the other parameters.

  15. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Complex Crustal Structure Beneath Western Turkey Revealed by 3D Seismic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubuk-Sabuncu, Yesim; Taymaz, Tuncay; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present a 3D radially anisotropic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle structure beneath the Sea of Marmara and surroundings based on the full waveform inversion method. The intense seismic activity and crustal deformation are observed in the Northwest Turkey due to transition tectonics between the strike-slip North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the extensional Aegean region. We have selected and simulated complete waveforms of 62 earthquakes (Mw > 4.0) occurred during 2007-2015, and recorded at (Δ Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK Project No: ÇAYDAG-114Y066), and EU-HORIZON-2020: COST Actions: Earth System Science and Environmental Management: ES1401 - Time Dependent Seismology (TIDES).

  17. Full waveform inversion based on scattering angle enrichment with application to real dataset

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI). However, the drawback of the existing RWI methods is inability to utilize diving waves and the extra sensitivity to the migrated image. We propose a combined FWI and RWI optimization problem through dividing the velocity into the background and perturbed components. We optimize both the background and perturbed components, as independent parameters. The new objective function is quadratic with respect to the perturbed component, which will reduce the nonlinearity of the optimization problem. Solving this optimization provides a true amplitude image and utilizes the diving waves to update the velocity of the shallow parts. To insure a proper wavenumber continuation, we use an efficient scattering angle filter to direct the inversion at the early stages to direct energy corresponding to large (smooth velocity) scattering angles to the background velocity update and the small (high wavenumber) scattering angles to the perturbed velocity update. This efficient implementation of the filter is fast and requires less memory than the conventional approach based on extended images. Thus, the new FWI procedure updates the background velocity mainly along the wavepath for both diving and reflected waves in the initial stages. At the same time, it updates the perturbation with mainly reflections (filtering out the diving waves). To demonstrate the capability of this method, we apply it to a real 2D marine dataset.

  18. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanchen; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2018-03-01

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  19. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2018-03-26

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  20. Full-waveform inversion of GPR data acquired between boreholes in Rustrel carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinard Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Full waveform inversion (FWI of seismic or Ground Penetrating Radar data provides high-resolution quantitative images of the constitutive parameters of the rock/soil which control seismic/GPR wave propagation. We developed a 2D inversion tool in the frequency domain adapted to the multi-parameter physics controlling GPR propagation in isotropic non dispersive media, i.e. dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity. This inversion engine was previously tested using synthetic 2D data to mitigate the trade-off between the two parameter classes. In this paper, we present the required processing techniques and first inversion results obtained on a real GPR dataset acquired in carbonates with a cross-hole configuration. The presence of the 2 m diameter underground gallery at depth constitutes a nice target to test the robustness, efficiency and resolution of the inversion in such high-contrasts context. Starting from a time tomographic image for the dielectric permittivity and from a homogeneous conductivity, we show that FWI is efficient to retrieve high resolution images of dielectric permittivity but struggles with electrical conductivity. As a quality control, we compare real and synthetic radargrams computed from the tomography and final images, showing the efficiency of the process to reconstruct some events but also underlying some issues, particularly on large incidence angles amplitude traces.

  1. 3D Multisource Full‐Waveform Inversion using Dynamic Random Phase Encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-10-17

    We have developed a multisource full‐waveform inversion algorithm using a dynamic phase encoding strategy with dual‐randomization—both the position and polarity of simultaneous sources are randomized and changed every iteration. The dynamic dual‐randomization is used to promote the destructive interference of crosstalk noise resulting from blending a large number of common shot gathers into a supergather. We compare our multisource algorithm with various algorithms in a numerical experiment using the 3D SEG/EAGE overthrust model and show that our algorithm provides a higher‐quality velocity tomogram than the other methods that use only monorandomization. This suggests that increasing the degree of randomness in phase encoding should improve the quality of the inversion result.

  2. Full-waveform Inversion of Crosshole GPR Data Collected in Strongly Heterogeneous Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Chalk is an important reservoir rock for hydrocarbons and for groundwater resources for many major cities. Therefore, this rock type has been extensively investigated using both geological and geophysical methods. Many applications of crosshole GPR tomography rely on the ray approximation...... and corresponding inversions of first break traveltimes and/or maximum first-cycle amplitudes. Due to the inherent limitations associated with such approaches, the resulting models tend to be overly smooth and cannot adequately capture the small-scale heterogeneities. In contrast, the full-waveform inversion uses...... address the importance of (i) adequate starting models, both in terms of the dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, (ii) the estimation of the source wavelet, (iii) and the effects of data sampling density when imaging this rock type. Moreover, we discuss the resolution of the bedding...

  3. 3D elastic-orthorhombic anisotropic full-waveform inversion: Application to field OBC data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    For the purpose of extracting higher resolution information from a 3D field data set, we apply a 3D elastic orthorhombic (ORT) anisotropic full waveform inversion (FWI) to hopefully better represent the physics of the Earth. We utilize what we consider as the optimal parameterization for surface acquired seismic data over a potentially orthorhombic media. This parameterization admits the possibility of incorporating a hierarchical implementation moving from higher anisotropy symmetry to lower ones. From the analysis of the radiation pattern of this new parameterization, we focus the inversion of the 3D data on the parameters that may have imprint on the data with minimal tradeoff, and as a result we invert for the horizontal P-wave velocity model, an ε1 model, its orthorhombic deviation, and the shear wave velocity. The inverted higher resolution models provide reasonable insights of the medium.

  4. 3D elastic-orthorhombic anisotropic full-waveform inversion: Application to field OBC data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2016-09-06

    For the purpose of extracting higher resolution information from a 3D field data set, we apply a 3D elastic orthorhombic (ORT) anisotropic full waveform inversion (FWI) to hopefully better represent the physics of the Earth. We utilize what we consider as the optimal parameterization for surface acquired seismic data over a potentially orthorhombic media. This parameterization admits the possibility of incorporating a hierarchical implementation moving from higher anisotropy symmetry to lower ones. From the analysis of the radiation pattern of this new parameterization, we focus the inversion of the 3D data on the parameters that may have imprint on the data with minimal tradeoff, and as a result we invert for the horizontal P-wave velocity model, an ε1 model, its orthorhombic deviation, and the shear wave velocity. The inverted higher resolution models provide reasonable insights of the medium.

  5. Total variation regularization for seismic waveform inversion using an adaptive primal dual hybrid gradient method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Peng; Liao, Wenyuan; Huang, Jianping; Li, Zhenchuan

    2018-04-01

    Full waveform inversion is an effective tool for recovering the properties of the Earth from seismograms. However, it suffers from local minima caused mainly by the limited accuracy of the starting model and the lack of a low-frequency component in the seismic data. Because of the high velocity contrast between salt and sediment, the relation between the waveform and velocity perturbation is strongly nonlinear. Therefore, salt inversion can easily get trapped in the local minima. Since the velocity of salt is nearly constant, we can make the most of this characteristic with total variation regularization to mitigate the local minima. In this paper, we develop an adaptive primal dual hybrid gradient method to implement total variation regularization by projecting the solution onto a total variation norm constrained convex set, through which the total variation norm constraint is satisfied at every model iteration. The smooth background velocities are first inverted and the perturbations are gradually obtained by successively relaxing the total variation norm constraints. Numerical experiment of the projection of the BP model onto the intersection of the total variation norm and box constraints has demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of our adaptive primal dual hybrid gradient method. A workflow is designed to recover complex salt structures in the BP 2004 model and the 2D SEG/EAGE salt model, starting from a linear gradient model without using low-frequency data below 3 Hz. The salt inversion processes demonstrate that wavefield reconstruction inversion with a total variation norm and box constraints is able to overcome local minima and inverts the complex salt velocity layer by layer.

  6. Microseismic imaging using a source-independent full-waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-09-06

    Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate microseismic and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, waveform inversion of microseismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We develop a source independent FWI of microseismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for source wavelet in z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also the angle gather is calculated to see if the velocity model is correct. By inverting for all the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for part of the SEG overthrust model.

  7. Application of weighted early-arrival waveform inversion to shallow land data

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-03-01

    Seismic imaging of deep land targets is usually difficult since the near-surface velocities are not accurately estimated. Recent studies have shown that inverting traces weighted by the energy of the early-arrivals can improve the accuracy of estimating shallow velocities. In this work, it is explained by showing that the associated misfit gradient function tends to be sensitive to the kinetics of wave propagation and insensitive to the dynamics. A synthetic example verifies the theoretical predictions and shows that the effects of noise and unpredicted amplitude variations in the inversion are reduced using this weighted early arrival waveform inversion (WEWI). We also apply this method to a 2D land data set for estimating the near-surface velocity distribution. The reverse time migration images suggest that, compared to the tomogram inverted directly from the early arrival waveforms, the WEWI tomogram provides a more convincing velocity model and more focused reflections in the deeper part of the image. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Microseismic imaging using a source-independent full-waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-01-01

    Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate microseismic and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, waveform inversion of microseismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We develop a source independent FWI of microseismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for source wavelet in z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also the angle gather is calculated to see if the velocity model is correct. By inverting for all the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for part of the SEG overthrust model.

  9. Characterization of a viscoelastic heterogeneous object with an effective model by nonlinear full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesgouez, A.

    2018-05-01

    The determination of equivalent viscoelastic properties of heterogeneous objects remains challenging in various scientific fields such as (geo)mechanics, geophysics or biomechanics. The present investigation addresses the issue of the identification of effective constitutive properties of a binary object by using a nonlinear and full waveform inversion scheme. The inversion process, without any regularization technique or a priori information, aims at minimizing directly the discrepancy between the full waveform responses of a bi-material viscoelastic cylindrical object and its corresponding effective homogeneous object. It involves the retrieval of five constitutive equivalent parameters. Numerical simulations are performed in a laboratory-scale two-dimensional configuration: a transient acoustic plane wave impacts the object and the diffracted fluid pressure, solid stress or velocity component fields are determined using a semi-analytical approach. Results show that the retrieval of the density and of the real parts of both the compressional and the shear wave velocities have been carried out successfully regarding the number and location of sensors, the type of sensors, the size of the searching space, the frequency range of the incident plane pressure wave, and the change in the geometric or mechanical constitution of the bi-material object. The retrieval of the imaginary parts of the wave velocities can reveal in some cases the limitations of the proposed approach.

  10. Resolution of VTI anisotropy with elastic full-waveform inversion: theory and basic numerical examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornova, O.; Leaney, S.; Liang, L.

    2018-03-01

    Extracting medium properties from seismic data faces some limitations due to the finite frequency content of the data and restricted spatial positions of the sources and receivers. Some distributions of the medium properties make low impact on the data (including none). If these properties are used as the inversion parameters, then the inverse problem becomes over-parametrized, leading to ambiguous results. We present an analysis of multiparameter resolution for the linearized inverse problem in the framework of elastic full-waveform inversion. We show that the spatial and multiparameter sensitivities are intertwined and non-sensitive properties are spatial distributions of some non-trivial combinations of the conventional elastic parameters. The analysis accounts for the Hessian information and frequency content of the data; it is semi-analytical (in some scenarios analytical), easy to interpret, and enhances results of the widely used radiation pattern analysis. Single-type scattering is shown to have limited sensitivity, even for full-aperture data. Finite-frequency data lose multiparameter sensitivity at smooth and fine spatial scales. Also, we establish ways to quantify a spatial-multiparameter coupling and demonstrate that the theoretical predictions agree well with the numerical results.

  11. Acceleration for 2D time-domain elastic full waveform inversion using a single GPU card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinpeng; Zhu, Peimin

    2018-05-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a challenging procedure due to the high computational cost related to the modeling, especially for the elastic case. The graphics processing unit (GPU) has become a popular device for the high-performance computing (HPC). To reduce the long computation time, we design and implement the GPU-based 2D elastic FWI (EFWI) in time domain using a single GPU card. We parallelize the forward modeling and gradient calculations using the CUDA programming language. To overcome the limitation of relatively small global memory on GPU, the boundary saving strategy is exploited to reconstruct the forward wavefield. Moreover, the L-BFGS optimization method used in the inversion increases the convergence of the misfit function. A multiscale inversion strategy is performed in the workflow to obtain the accurate inversion results. In our tests, the GPU-based implementations using a single GPU device achieve >15 times speedup in forward modeling, and about 12 times speedup in gradient calculation, compared with the eight-core CPU implementations optimized by OpenMP. The test results from the GPU implementations are verified to have enough accuracy by comparing the results obtained from the CPU implementations.

  12. Full seismic waveform inversion of the African crust and Mantle - Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Michael; Ermert, Laura; Staring, Myrna; Trampert, Jeannot; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We report on the progress of a continental-scale full-waveform inversion (FWI) of Africa. From a geodynamic perspective, Africa presents an especially interesting case. This interest stems from the presence of several anomalous features such as a triple junction in the Afar region, a broad region of high topography to the south, and several smaller surface expressions such as the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Congo Basin. The mechanisms behind these anomalies are not fully clear, and debate on their origin spans causative mechanisms from isostatic forcing, to the influence of localized asthenospheric upwelling, to the presence of deep mantle plumes. As well, the connection of these features to the African LLSVP is uncertain. Tomographic images of Africa present unique challenges due to uneven station coverage: while tectonically active areas such as the Afar rift are well sampled, much of the continent exhibits a severe dearth of seismic stations. As well, while mostly surrounded by tectonically active spreading plate boundaries (a fact which contributes to the difficulties in explaining the South's high topography), sizeable seismic events (M > 5) in the continent's interior are relatively rare. To deal with these issues, we present a combined earthquake and ambient noise full-waveform inversion of Africa. The noise component serves to boost near-surface sensitivity, and aids in mitigating issues related to the sparse source / station coverage. The earthquake component, which includes local and teleseismic sources, aims to better resolve deeper structure. This component also has the added benefit of being especially useful in the search for mantle plumes: synthetic tests have shown that the subtle scattering of elastic waves off mantle plumes makes the plumes an ideal target for FWI [1]. We hope that this new model presents a fresh high-resolution image of sub-African geodynamic structure, and helps advance the debate regarding the causative mechanisms of its surface

  13. The optimized gradient method for full waveform inversion and its spectral implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of the full waveform inversion (FWI) implementation is wavefield extrapolation, and specifically its accuracy and cost. To obtain accurate, dispersion free wavefields, the extrapolation for modelling is often expensive. Combining an efficient extrapolation with a novel gradient preconditioning can render an FWI implementation that efficiently converges to an accurate model. We, specifically, recast the extrapolation part of the inversion in terms of its spectral components for both data and gradient calculation. This admits dispersion free wavefields even at large extrapolation time steps, which improves the efficiency of the inversion. An alternative spectral representation of the depth axis in terms of sine functions allows us to impose a free surface boundary condition, which reflects our medium boundaries more accurately. Using a newly derived perfectly matched layer formulation for this spectral implementation, we can define a finite model with absorbing boundaries. In order to reduce the nonlinearity in FWI, we propose a multiscale conditioning of the objective function through combining the different directional components of the gradient to optimally update the velocity. Through solving a simple optimization problem, it specifically admits the smoothest approximate update while guaranteeing its ascending direction. An application to the Marmousi model demonstrates the capability of the proposed approach and justifies our assertions with respect to cost and convergence.

  14. Time-domain full waveform inversion using the gradient preconditioning based on transmitted waves energy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiao-bo

    2017-06-01

    The gradient preconditioning approach based on seismic wave energy can effectively avoid the huge storage consumption in the gradient preconditioning algorithms based on Hessian matrices in time-domain full waveform inversion (FWI), but the accuracy is affected by the energy of reflected waves when strong reflectors are present in velocity model. To address this problem, we propose a gradient preconditioning method, which scales the gradient based on the energy of the “approximated transmitted wavefield” simulated by the nonreflecting acoustic wave equation. The method does not require computing or storing the Hessian matrix or its inverse. Furthermore, it can effectively eliminate the effects caused by geometric diffusion and non-uniformity illumination on gradient. The results of model experiments confirm that the time-domain FWI using the gradient preconditioning based on transmitted waves energy can achieve higher inversion precision for high-velocity body and the deep strata below when compared with using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic waves energy.

  15. Time-domain incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion of Gulf of Mexico data

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2013-09-22

    We apply the incomplete Gauss-Newton full-waveform inversion (TDIGN-FWI) to Gulf of Mexico (GOM) data in the space-time domain. In our application, iterative least-squares reverse-time migration (LSRTM) is used to estimate the model update at each non-linear iteration, and the number of LSRTM iterations is progressively increased after each non-linear iteration. With this method, model updating along deep reflection wavepaths are automatically enhanced, which in turn improves imaging below the reach of diving-waves. The forward and adjoint operators are implemented in the space-time domain to simultaneously invert the data over a range of frequencies. A multiscale approach is used where higher frequencies are down-weighted significantly at early iterations, and gradually included in the inversion. Synthetic data results demonstrate the effectiveness of reconstructing both the high- and low-wavenumber features in the model without relying on diving waves in the inversion. Results with Gulf of Mexico field data show a significantly improved migration image in both the shallow and deep sections.

  16. Mini-batch optimized full waveform inversion with geological constrained gradient filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Jia, Junxiong; Wu, Bangyu; Gao, Jinghuai

    2018-05-01

    High computation cost and generating solutions without geological sense have hindered the wide application of Full Waveform Inversion (FWI). Source encoding technique is a way to dramatically reduce the cost of FWI but subject to fix-spread acquisition setup requirement and slow convergence for the suppression of cross-talk. Traditionally, gradient regularization or preconditioning is applied to mitigate the ill-posedness. An isotropic smoothing filter applied on gradients generally gives non-geological inversion results, and could also introduce artifacts. In this work, we propose to address both the efficiency and ill-posedness of FWI by a geological constrained mini-batch gradient optimization method. The mini-batch gradient descent optimization is adopted to reduce the computation time by choosing a subset of entire shots for each iteration. By jointly applying the structure-oriented smoothing to the mini-batch gradient, the inversion converges faster and gives results with more geological meaning. Stylized Marmousi model is used to show the performance of the proposed method on realistic synthetic model.

  17. High-resolution moisture profiles from full-waveform probabilistic inversion of TDR signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloy, Eric; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Jacques, Diederik

    2014-11-01

    This study presents an novel Bayesian inversion scheme for high-dimensional undetermined TDR waveform inversion. The methodology quantifies uncertainty in the moisture content distribution, using a Gaussian Markov random field (GMRF) prior as regularization operator. A spatial resolution of 1 cm along a 70-cm long TDR probe is considered for the inferred moisture content. Numerical testing shows that the proposed inversion approach works very well in case of a perfect model and Gaussian measurement errors. Real-world application results are generally satisfying. For a series of TDR measurements made during imbibition and evaporation from a laboratory soil column, the average root-mean-square error (RMSE) between maximum a posteriori (MAP) moisture distribution and reference TDR measurements is 0.04 cm3 cm-3. This RMSE value reduces to less than 0.02 cm3 cm-3 for a field application in a podzol soil. The observed model-data discrepancies are primarily due to model inadequacy, such as our simplified modeling of the bulk soil electrical conductivity profile. Among the important issues that should be addressed in future work are the explicit inference of the soil electrical conductivity profile along with the other sampled variables, the modeling of the temperature-dependence of the coaxial cable properties and the definition of an appropriate statistical model of the residual errors.

  18. The optimized gradient method for full waveform inversion and its spectral implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2016-03-28

    At the heart of the full waveform inversion (FWI) implementation is wavefield extrapolation, and specifically its accuracy and cost. To obtain accurate, dispersion free wavefields, the extrapolation for modelling is often expensive. Combining an efficient extrapolation with a novel gradient preconditioning can render an FWI implementation that efficiently converges to an accurate model. We, specifically, recast the extrapolation part of the inversion in terms of its spectral components for both data and gradient calculation. This admits dispersion free wavefields even at large extrapolation time steps, which improves the efficiency of the inversion. An alternative spectral representation of the depth axis in terms of sine functions allows us to impose a free surface boundary condition, which reflects our medium boundaries more accurately. Using a newly derived perfectly matched layer formulation for this spectral implementation, we can define a finite model with absorbing boundaries. In order to reduce the nonlinearity in FWI, we propose a multiscale conditioning of the objective function through combining the different directional components of the gradient to optimally update the velocity. Through solving a simple optimization problem, it specifically admits the smoothest approximate update while guaranteeing its ascending direction. An application to the Marmousi model demonstrates the capability of the proposed approach and justifies our assertions with respect to cost and convergence.

  19. An introduction to this special section: Full-waveform inversion and the way forward

    KAUST Repository

    Guitton, Antoine; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lost in the endless valleys and hills of the full-waveform inversion (FWI) misfit functional, we tend to stop and wonder: Are we heading in the right direction? Are we in the right valley? Or within a bigger context, is FWI the way to go? The practice of updating an Earth model and generating synthetic data from it that we can compare to the field data is an appealing concept. If the two data sets (the modeled and field) match, using some measure of misfit, we might have found a good Earth model. This process depends on our ability to fully replicate (simulate) the physics of wave propagation inside the Earth. In principle, our field data carry information from every point in the Earth, but these data are also constrained by the geometry of seismic acquisition.

  20. Waveform inversion of very long period impulsive signals associated with magmatic injection beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohminato, T.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.; Kedar, S.

    1998-01-01

    We use data from broadband seismometers deployed around the summit of Kilauea Volcano to quantify the mechanism associated with a transient in the flow of magma feeding the east rift eruption of the volcano. The transient is marked by rapid inflation of the Kilauea summit peaking at 22 ??rad 4.5 hours after the event onset, followed by slow deflation over a period of 3 days. Superimposed on the summit inflation is a series of sawtooth displacement pulses, each characterized by a sudden drop in amplitude lasting 5-10 s followed by an exponential recovery lasting 1-3 min. The sawtooth waveforms display almost identical shapes, suggesting a process involving the repeated activation of a fixed source. The particle motion associated with each sawtooth is almost linear, and its major swing shows compressional motion at all stations. Analyses of semblance and particle motion are consistent with a point source located 1 km beneath the northeast edge of the Halemaumau pit crater. To estimate the source mechanism, we apply a moment tensor inversion to the waveform data, assuming a point source embedded in a homogeneous half-space with compressional and shear wave velocities representative of the average medium properties at shallow depth under Kilauea. Synthetic waveforms are constructed by a superposition of impulse responses for six moment tensor components and three single force components. The origin times of individual impulses are distributed along the time axis at appropriately small, equal intervals, and their amplitudes are determined by least squares. In this inversion, the source time functions of the six tensor and three force components are determined simultaneously. We confirm the accuracy of the inversion method through a series of numerical tests. The results from the inversion show that the waveform data are well explained by a pulsating transport mechanism operating on a subhorizontal crack linking the summit reservoir to the east rift of Kilauea. The crack

  1. Multi-stage full waveform inversion strategy for 2D elastic VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2015-08-19

    One of the most important issues in the multi-parametric full waveform inversion (FWI) is to find an optimal parameterization, which helps us recover the subsurface anisotropic parameters as well as seismic velocities, with minimal tradeoff. As a result, we analyze three different parameterizations for elastic VTI media in terms of the influence of the S-waves on the gradient direction for c13, the spatial coverage of gradient direction and the degree of trade-offs between the parameters. Based on the dependency results, we design a multi-stage elastic VTI FWI strategy to enhance both the spatial coverage of the FWI and the robustness to the trade-offs among the parameters as well as FWI for the c13 structure.

  2. Study on orthorhombic parameters for 3D elastic full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2015-08-21

    For a better understanding of the influence of the parameterizations on the multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) for 3D elastic orthorhombic media, we analyze the virtual sources for each cij parameter. Because the virtual sources for cij parameters can be regarded as bases of the virtual sources for other parameterizations, the insights developed here explains many of the scattering phenomena of the different parameters. The resulting radiation patterns provide insights on which parameter set is the best in the multi-parameter FWI for 3D elastic orthorhombic media. In this study, we analyze the virtual source for each cij parameter as a linear combination of several moment tensors. After that, we analyze the strain fields deformed by incident waves as momenta of the virtual source and their influences on sensitivity kernels of each cij parameter.

  3. Gradient for the acoustic VTI full waveform inversion based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2015-08-19

    The instantaneous traveltime is able to reduce the non-linearity of full waveform inversion (FWI) that originates from the wrapping of the phase. However, the adjoint state method in this case requires a total of 5 modeling calculations to compute the gradient. Also, considering the larger modeling cost for anisotropic wavefield extrapolation and the necessity to use a line-search algorithm to estimate a step length that depends on the parameters scale, we propose to calculate the gradient based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels. We, specifically, use the sensitivity kernels computed using dynamic ray-tracing to build the gradient. The resulting update is computed using a matrix decomposition and accordingly the computational cost is reduced. We consider a simple example where an anomaly is embedded into a constant background medium and we compute the update for the VTI wave equation parameterized using vh, η and ε.

  4. Multisource full waveform inversion of marine streamer data with frequency selection

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    Multisource migration with frequency selection is now extended to multisource full waveform inversion (FWI) of supergathers for marine streamer data. There are three advantages of this approach compared to conventional FWI for marine streamer data. 1. The multisource FWI method with frequency selection is computationally more efficient than conventional FWI. 2. A supergather requires more than an order of magnitude less storage than the the original data. 3. Frequency selection overcomes the acquisition mismatch between the observed data and the simulated multisource supergathers for marine data. This mismatch problem has prevented the efficient application of FWI to marine geometries in the space-time domain. Preliminary result of applying multisource FWI with frequency selection to a synthetic marine data set suggests it is at least four times more efficient than standard FWI.

  5. Study on orthorhombic parameters for 3D elastic full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    For a better understanding of the influence of the parameterizations on the multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) for 3D elastic orthorhombic media, we analyze the virtual sources for each cij parameter. Because the virtual sources for cij parameters can be regarded as bases of the virtual sources for other parameterizations, the insights developed here explains many of the scattering phenomena of the different parameters. The resulting radiation patterns provide insights on which parameter set is the best in the multi-parameter FWI for 3D elastic orthorhombic media. In this study, we analyze the virtual source for each cij parameter as a linear combination of several moment tensors. After that, we analyze the strain fields deformed by incident waves as momenta of the virtual source and their influences on sensitivity kernels of each cij parameter.

  6. Full Waveform Inversion Using an Energy-Based Objective Function with Efficient Calculation of the Gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2017-05-26

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) using an energy-based objective function has the potential to provide long wavelength model information even without low frequency in the data. However, without the back-propagation method (adjoint-state method), its implementation is impractical for the model size of general seismic survey. We derive the gradient of the energy-based objective function using the back-propagation method to make its FWI feasible. We also raise the energy signal to the power of a small positive number to properly handle the energy signal imbalance as a function of offset. Examples demonstrate that the proposed FWI algorithm provides a convergent long wavelength structure model even without low-frequency information, which can be used as a good starting model for the subsequent conventional FWI.

  7. Gradient for the acoustic VTI full waveform inversion based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    The instantaneous traveltime is able to reduce the non-linearity of full waveform inversion (FWI) that originates from the wrapping of the phase. However, the adjoint state method in this case requires a total of 5 modeling calculations to compute the gradient. Also, considering the larger modeling cost for anisotropic wavefield extrapolation and the necessity to use a line-search algorithm to estimate a step length that depends on the parameters scale, we propose to calculate the gradient based on the instantaneous traveltime sensitivity kernels. We, specifically, use the sensitivity kernels computed using dynamic ray-tracing to build the gradient. The resulting update is computed using a matrix decomposition and accordingly the computational cost is reduced. We consider a simple example where an anomaly is embedded into a constant background medium and we compute the update for the VTI wave equation parameterized using vh, η and ε.

  8. An introduction to this special section: Full-waveform inversion and the way forward

    KAUST Repository

    Guitton, Antoine

    2013-09-01

    Lost in the endless valleys and hills of the full-waveform inversion (FWI) misfit functional, we tend to stop and wonder: Are we heading in the right direction? Are we in the right valley? Or within a bigger context, is FWI the way to go? The practice of updating an Earth model and generating synthetic data from it that we can compare to the field data is an appealing concept. If the two data sets (the modeled and field) match, using some measure of misfit, we might have found a good Earth model. This process depends on our ability to fully replicate (simulate) the physics of wave propagation inside the Earth. In principle, our field data carry information from every point in the Earth, but these data are also constrained by the geometry of seismic acquisition.

  9. Monte Carlo full-waveform inversion of crosshole GPR data using multiple-point geostatistical a priori information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordua, Knud Skou; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We present a general Monte Carlo full-waveform inversion strategy that integrates a priori information described by geostatistical algorithms with Bayesian inverse problem theory. The extended Metropolis algorithm can be used to sample the a posteriori probability density of highly nonlinear...... inverse problems, such as full-waveform inversion. Sequential Gibbs sampling is a method that allows efficient sampling of a priori probability densities described by geostatistical algorithms based on either two-point (e.g., Gaussian) or multiple-point statistics. We outline the theoretical framework......) Based on a posteriori realizations, complicated statistical questions can be answered, such as the probability of connectivity across a layer. (3) Complex a priori information can be included through geostatistical algorithms. These benefits, however, require more computing resources than traditional...

  10. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari Basin: Full waveform inversion

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    (P)) and attenuation (Q sub(P) sup(-1)) character of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). In this paper, we apply frequency domain full-waveform inversion (FWI) to surface-towed 2D multichannel seismic data from the Krishna-Godavari (KG) Basin, India, to image...

  11. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari basin: Full waveform inversion.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    (QP−1) character of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). In this paper, we apply frequency domain full-waveform inversion (FWI) to surface-towed 2D multichannel seismic data from the Krishna-Godavari (KG) Basin, India, to image the fine-scale (100...

  12. Research Note: Full-waveform inversion of the unwrapped phase of a model

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-12-06

    Reflections in seismic data induce serious non-linearity in the objective function of full- waveform inversion. Thus, without a good initial velocity model that can produce reflections within a half cycle of the frequency used in the inversion, convergence to a solution becomes difficult. As a result, we tend to invert for refracted events and damp reflections in data. Reflection induced non-linearity stems from cycle skipping between the imprint of the true model in observed data and the predicted model in synthesized data. Inverting for the phase of the model allows us to address this problem by avoiding the source of non-linearity, the phase wrapping phenomena. Most of the information related to the location (or depths) of interfaces is embedded in the phase component of a model, mainly influenced by the background model, while the velocity-contrast information (responsible for the reflection energy) is mainly embedded in the amplitude component. In combination with unwrapping the phase of data, which mitigates the non-linearity introduced by the source function, I develop a framework to invert for the unwrapped phase of a model, represented by the instantaneous depth, using the unwrapped phase of the data. The resulting gradient function provides a mechanism to non-linearly update the velocity model by applying mainly phase shifts to the model. In using the instantaneous depth as a model parameter, we keep track of the model properties unfazed by the wrapping phenomena. © 2013 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  13. Sensitivity analysis for elastic full-waveform inversion in VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Kamath, Nishant

    2014-08-05

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) is generally nonunique, and the results are strongly influenced by the geometry of the experiment and the type of recorded data. Studying the sensitivity of different subsets of data to the model parameters may help in choosing an optimal acquisition design, inversion workflow, and parameterization. Here, we derive the Fréchet kernel for FWI of multicomponent data from a 2D VTI (tranversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) medium. The kernel is obtained by linearizing the elastic wave equation using the Born approximation and employing the asymptotic Green\\'s function. The amplitude of the kernel (‘radiation pattern’) yields the angle-dependent energy scattered by a perturbation in a certain model parameter. The perturbations are described in terms of the P- and S-wave vertical velocities and the P-wave normal-moveout and horizontal velocities. The background medium is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic, which allows us to obtain simple expressions for the radiation patterns corresonding to all four velocities. These patterns help explain the FWI results for multicomponent transmission data generated for Gaussian anomalies in the Thomsen parameters inserted into a homogeneous VTI medium.

  14. Waveform inversion in acoustic orthorhombic media with a practical set of parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) in anisotropic media is overall challenging, mainly because of the large computational cost, especially in 3D, and the potential trade-offs between the model parameters needed to describe such a media. We propose an efficient 3D FWI implementation for orthorhombic anisotropy under the acoustic assumption. Our modeling is based on solving the pseudo-differential orthorhombic wave equation split into a differential operator and a scalar one. The modeling is computationally efficient and free of shear wave artifacts. Using the adjoint state method, we derive the gradients with respect to a practical set of parameters describing the acoustic orthorhombic model, made of one velocity and five dimensionless parameters. This parameterization allows us to use a multi-stage model inversion strategy based on the continuity of the scattering potential of the parameters as we go from higher symmetry anisotropy to lower ones. We apply the proposed approach on a modified SEG-EAGE overthrust synthetic model. The quality of the inverted model suggest that we may recover only 4 parameters, with different resolution scales depending on the scattering potential of these parameters.

  15. Sensitivity analysis for elastic full-waveform inversion in VTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Kamath, Nishant; Tsvankin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) is generally nonunique, and the results are strongly influenced by the geometry of the experiment and the type of recorded data. Studying the sensitivity of different subsets of data to the model parameters may help in choosing an optimal acquisition design, inversion workflow, and parameterization. Here, we derive the Fréchet kernel for FWI of multicomponent data from a 2D VTI (tranversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) medium. The kernel is obtained by linearizing the elastic wave equation using the Born approximation and employing the asymptotic Green's function. The amplitude of the kernel (‘radiation pattern’) yields the angle-dependent energy scattered by a perturbation in a certain model parameter. The perturbations are described in terms of the P- and S-wave vertical velocities and the P-wave normal-moveout and horizontal velocities. The background medium is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic, which allows us to obtain simple expressions for the radiation patterns corresonding to all four velocities. These patterns help explain the FWI results for multicomponent transmission data generated for Gaussian anomalies in the Thomsen parameters inserted into a homogeneous VTI medium.

  16. Waveform inversion in acoustic orthorhombic media with a practical set of parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil

    2017-08-17

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) in anisotropic media is overall challenging, mainly because of the large computational cost, especially in 3D, and the potential trade-offs between the model parameters needed to describe such a media. We propose an efficient 3D FWI implementation for orthorhombic anisotropy under the acoustic assumption. Our modeling is based on solving the pseudo-differential orthorhombic wave equation split into a differential operator and a scalar one. The modeling is computationally efficient and free of shear wave artifacts. Using the adjoint state method, we derive the gradients with respect to a practical set of parameters describing the acoustic orthorhombic model, made of one velocity and five dimensionless parameters. This parameterization allows us to use a multi-stage model inversion strategy based on the continuity of the scattering potential of the parameters as we go from higher symmetry anisotropy to lower ones. We apply the proposed approach on a modified SEG-EAGE overthrust synthetic model. The quality of the inverted model suggest that we may recover only 4 parameters, with different resolution scales depending on the scattering potential of these parameters.

  17. Fast in-memory elastic full-waveform inversion using consumer-grade GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen Bergslid, Tore; Birger Raknes, Espen; Arntsen, Børge

    2017-04-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique to estimate subsurface properties by using the recorded waveform produced by a seismic source and applying inverse theory. This is done through an iterative optimization procedure, where each iteration requires solving the wave equation many times, then trying to minimize the difference between the modeled and the measured seismic data. Having to model many of these seismic sources per iteration means that this is a highly computationally demanding procedure, which usually involves writing a lot of data to disk. We have written code that does forward modeling and inversion entirely in memory. A typical HPC cluster has many more CPUs than GPUs. Since FWI involves modeling many seismic sources per iteration, the obvious approach is to parallelize the code on a source-by-source basis, where each core of the CPU performs one modeling, and do all modelings simultaneously. With this approach, the GPU is already at a major disadvantage in pure numbers. Fortunately, GPUs can more than make up for this hardware disadvantage by performing each modeling much faster than a CPU. Another benefit of parallelizing each individual modeling is that it lets each modeling use a lot more RAM. If one node has 128 GB of RAM and 20 CPU cores, each modeling can use only 6.4 GB RAM if one is running the node at full capacity with source-by-source parallelization on the CPU. A parallelized per-source code using GPUs can use 64 GB RAM per modeling. Whenever a modeling uses more RAM than is available and has to start using regular disk space the runtime increases dramatically, due to slow file I/O. The extremely high computational speed of the GPUs combined with the large amount of RAM available for each modeling lets us do high frequency FWI for fairly large models very quickly. For a single modeling, our GPU code outperforms the single-threaded CPU-code by a factor of about 75. Successful inversions have been run on data with frequencies up to 40

  18. Micro-seismic Imaging Using a Source Independent Waveform Inversion Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-04-18

    Micro-seismology is attracting more and more attention in the exploration seismology community. The main goal in micro-seismic imaging is to find the source location and the ignition time in order to track the fracture expansion, which will help engineers monitor the reservoirs. Conventional imaging methods work fine in this field but there are many limitations such as manual picking, incorrect migration velocity and low signal to noise ratio (S/N). In traditional surface survey imaging, full waveform inversion (FWI) is widely used. The FWI method updates the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the observed data and the predicted data. Using FWI to locate and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. Use the FWI technique, and overcomes the difficulties of manual pickings and incorrect velocity model for migration. However, the technique of waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces its own problems. There is significant nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We have developed a source independent FWI of micro-seismic events to simultaneously invert for the source image, source function and velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. To examine the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model the extended image for source wavelet in z-axis is extracted. Also the angle gather is calculated to check the applicability of the migration velocity. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity in the synthetic experiments with both parts of the Marmousi and the SEG

  19. The OSCAR experiment: using full-waveform inversion in the analysis of young oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverton, Akela; Morgan, Joanna; Wilson, Dean; Hobbs, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The OSCAR experiment aims to derive an integrated model to better explain the effects of heat loss and alteration by hydrothermal fluids, associated with the cooling of young oceanic crust at an axial ridge. High-resolution seismic imaging of the sediments and basaltic basement can be used to map fluid flow pathways between the oceanic crust and the surrounding ocean. To obtain these high-resolution images, we undertake full-waveform inversion (FWI), an advanced seismic imaging technique capable of resolving velocity heterogeneities at a wide range of length scales, from background trends to fine-scale geological/crustal detail, in a fully data-driven automated manner. This technology is widely used within the petroleum sector due to its potential to obtain high-resolution P-wave velocity models that lead to improvements in migrated seismic images of the subsurface. Here, we use the P-wave velocity model obtained from travel-time tomography as the starting model in the application of acoustic, time-domain FWI to a multichannel streamer field dataset acquired in the east Pacific along a profile between the Costa Rica spreading centre and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) borehole 504B, where the crust is approximately six million years old. FWI iteratively improves the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the predicted data and the field data. It seeks to find a high-fidelity velocity model that is capable of matching individual seismic waveforms of the original raw field dataset, with an initial focus on matching the low-frequency components of the early arriving energy. Quality assurance methods adopted during the inversion ensure convergence in the direction of the global minimum. We demonstrate that FWI is able to recover fine-scale, high-resolution velocity heterogeneities within the young oceanic crust along the profile. The highly resolved FWI velocity model is useful in the identification of the layer 2A/2B interface and low-velocity layers that

  20. Iterative Multiparameter Elastic Waveform Inversion Using Prestack Time Imaging and Kirchhoff approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaniani, Hassan

    This thesis proposes a "standard strategy" for iterative inversion of elastic properties from the seismic reflection data. The term "standard" refers to the current hands-on commercial techniques that are used for the seismic imaging and inverse problem. The method is established to reduce the computation time associated with elastic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) methods. It makes use of AVO analysis, prestack time migration and corresponding forward modeling in an iterative scheme. The main objective is to describe the iterative inversion procedure used in seismic reflection data using simplified mathematical expression and their numerical applications. The frame work of the inversion is similar to (FWI) method but with less computational costs. The reduction of computational costs depends on the data conditioning (with or without multiple data), the level of the complexity of geological model and acquisition condition such as Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Many processing methods consider multiple events as noise and remove it from the data. This is the motivation for reducing the computational cost associated with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) forward modeling and Reverse Time Migration (RTM)-based techniques. Therefore, a one-way solution of the wave equation for inversion is implemented. While less computationally intensive depth imaging methods are available by iterative coupling of ray theory and the Born approximation, it is shown that we can further reduce the cost of inversion by dropping the cost of ray tracing for traveltime estimation in a way similar to standard Prestack Time Migration (PSTM) and the corresponding forward modeling. This requires the model to have smooth lateral variations in elastic properties, so that the traveltime of the scatterpoints can be approximated by a Double Square Root (DSR) equation. To represent a more realistic and stable solution of the inverse problem, while considering the phase of supercritical angles, the

  1. Sensitivity and inversion of full seismic waveforms in stratified porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, L. de

    2007-12-01

    Characterization of porous media parameters, and particularly the porosity, permeability and fluid properties are very useful in many applications (hydrologic, natural hazards or oil industry). The aim of my research is to evaluate the possibility to determine these properties from the full seismic wave fields. First, I am interested in the useful parameters and the specific properties of the seismic waves in the poro-elastic theory, often called Biot (1956) theory. I then compute seismic waves propagation in fluid saturated stratified porous media with a reflectivity method coupled with the discrete wavenumber integration method. I first used this modeling to study the possibilities to determine the carbon dioxide concentration and localization thanks to the reflected P-waves in the case of the deep geological storage of Sleipner (North Sea). The sensitivity of the seismic response to the poro-elastic parameters are then generalized by the analytical computation of the Frechet derivatives which are expressed in terms of the Green's functions of the unperturbed medium. The numerical tests show that the porosity and the consolidation are the main parameters to invert. The sensitivity operators are then introduced in a inversion algorithm based on iterative modeling of the full waveform. The classical algorithm of generalized least-square inverse problem is solved by the quasi-Newton technique (Tarantola, 1984). The inversion of synthetic data show that we can invert for the porosity and the fluid and solid parameters (densities and mechanical modulus, or volume rate of fluid and mineral) can be correctly rebuilt if the other parameters are well known. However, the strong seismic coupling of the porous parameters leads to difficulties to invert simultaneously for several parameters. One way to get round these difficulties is to use additional information and invert for one single parameter for the fluid properties (saturating rate) or for the lithology. An other way

  2. A recipe for practical full-waveform inversion in orthorhombic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-09-06

    Multi parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) usually suffers from the inherent tradeoffin the multi parameter nature of the model space. In orthorhombic anisotropy, such tradeoffis magnified by the large number of parameters involved in representing the elastic or even the acoustic approximation of such a medium. However, using a new parameterization with distinctive scattering features, we can condition FWI to invert for the parameters the data are sensitive to at different stages, scales, and locations in the model. Specifically, with a combination made up of a velocity and particular dimensionless ratios of the elastic coefficients, the scattering potential of the anisotropic parameters have stationary scattering radiation patterns as a function of the type of anisotropy. With our new parametrization, the data is mainly sensitive to the scattering potential of 4 parameters: the horizontal velocity in the x direction, x, which provides scattering mainly near zero offset in the x vertical plane, εd, which is the ratio of the horizontal velocity squared in the x and x direction, and δ3 describing the anellipticity in the horizontal plane. Since, with this parametrization, the radiation pattern for the horizontal velocity and ε is azimuth independent, we can perform an initial VTI inversion for these two parameters, and then use the other two parameters to fit the azimuth variation in the data. This can be done at the reservoir level or any region of the model. Including the transmission from reflections, the migration velocity analysis (MVA) component, into the picture, the multi azimuth surface seismic data are mainly sensitive to the long wavelength components of uh, δ3, and εd through the diving waves, and η1, ηd, and δ3, in the transmission to or from reflectors (especially, in the presence of large offsets). They are also sensitive to the short wavelength component of uh and ε.

  3. A recipe for practical full-waveform inversion in orthorhombic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Masmoudi, Nabil; Oh, Juwon

    2016-01-01

    Multi parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) usually suffers from the inherent tradeoffin the multi parameter nature of the model space. In orthorhombic anisotropy, such tradeoffis magnified by the large number of parameters involved in representing the elastic or even the acoustic approximation of such a medium. However, using a new parameterization with distinctive scattering features, we can condition FWI to invert for the parameters the data are sensitive to at different stages, scales, and locations in the model. Specifically, with a combination made up of a velocity and particular dimensionless ratios of the elastic coefficients, the scattering potential of the anisotropic parameters have stationary scattering radiation patterns as a function of the type of anisotropy. With our new parametrization, the data is mainly sensitive to the scattering potential of 4 parameters: the horizontal velocity in the x direction, x, which provides scattering mainly near zero offset in the x vertical plane, εd, which is the ratio of the horizontal velocity squared in the x and x direction, and δ3 describing the anellipticity in the horizontal plane. Since, with this parametrization, the radiation pattern for the horizontal velocity and ε is azimuth independent, we can perform an initial VTI inversion for these two parameters, and then use the other two parameters to fit the azimuth variation in the data. This can be done at the reservoir level or any region of the model. Including the transmission from reflections, the migration velocity analysis (MVA) component, into the picture, the multi azimuth surface seismic data are mainly sensitive to the long wavelength components of uh, δ3, and εd through the diving waves, and η1, ηd, and δ3, in the transmission to or from reflectors (especially, in the presence of large offsets). They are also sensitive to the short wavelength component of uh and ε.

  4. Regularized Laplace-Fourier-Domain Full Waveform Inversion Using a Weighted l 2 Objective Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Hyunggu; Kwon, Jungmin; Shin, Changsoo; Zhou, Hongbo; Cogan, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) can be applied to obtain an accurate velocity model that contains important geophysical and geological information. FWI suffers from the local minimum problem when the starting model is not sufficiently close to the true model. Therefore, an accurate macroscale velocity model is essential for successful FWI, and Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is appropriate for obtaining such a velocity model. However, conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI remains an ill-posed and ill-conditioned problem, meaning that small errors in the data can result in large differences in the inverted model. This approach also suffers from certain limitations related to the logarithmic objective function. To overcome the limitations of conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI, we introduce a weighted l 2 objective function, instead of the logarithmic objective function, as the data-domain objective function, and we also introduce two different model-domain regularizations: first-order Tikhonov regularization and prior model regularization. The weighting matrix for the data-domain objective function is constructed to suitably enhance the far-offset information. Tikhonov regularization smoothes the gradient, and prior model regularization allows reliable prior information to be taken into account. Two hyperparameters are obtained through trial and error and used to control the trade-off and achieve an appropriate balance between the data-domain and model-domain gradients. The application of the proposed regularizations facilitates finding a unique solution via FWI, and the weighted l 2 objective function ensures a more reasonable residual, thereby improving the stability of the gradient calculation. Numerical tests performed using the Marmousi synthetic dataset show that the use of the weighted l 2 objective function and the model-domain regularizations significantly improves the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI. Because the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is improved, the

  5. Wavefront picking for 3D tomography and full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-09-08

    We have developed an efficient approach for picking firstbreak wavefronts on coarsely sampled time slices of 3D shot gathers. Our objective was to compute a smooth initial velocity model for multiscale full-waveform inversion (FWI). Using interactive software, first-break wavefronts were geometrically modeled on time slices with a minimal number of picks. We picked sparse time slices, performed traveltime tomography, and then compared the predicted traveltimes with the data in-between the picked slices. The picking interval was refined with iterations until the errors in traveltime predictions fell within the limits necessary to avoid cycle skipping in early arrivals FWI. This approach was applied to a 3D ocean-bottom-station data set. Our results indicate that wavefront picking has 28% fewer data slices to pick compared with picking traveltimes in shot gathers. In addition, by using sparse time samples for picking, data storage is reduced by 88%, and therefore allows for a faster visualization and quality control of the picks. Our final traveltime tomogram is sufficient as a starting model for early arrival FWI. © 2016 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. From tomography to full-waveform inversion with a single objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-02-17

    In full-waveform inversion (FWI), a gradient-based update of the velocity model requires an initial velocity that produces synthetic data that are within a half-cycle, everywhere, from the field data. Such initial velocity models are usually extracted from migration velocity analysis or traveltime tomography, among other means, and are not guaranteed to adhere to the FWI requirements for an initial velocity model. As such, we evaluated an objective function based on the misfit in the instantaneous traveltime between the observed and modeled data. This phase-based attribute of the wavefield, along with its phase unwrapping characteristics, provided a frequency-dependent traveltime function that was easy to use and quantify, especially compared to conventional phase representation. With a strong Laplace damping of the modeled, potentially low-frequency, data along the time axis, this attribute admitted a first-arrival traveltime that could be compared with picked ones from the observed data, such as in wave equation tomography (WET). As we relax the damping on the synthetic and observed data, the objective function measures the misfit in the phase, however unwrapped. It, thus, provided a single objective function for a natural transition from WET to FWI. A Marmousi example demonstrated the effectiveness of the approach.

  7. Full–waveform inversion using the excitation representation of the source wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Kalita, Mahesh

    2016-09-06

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative method of data-fitting, aiming at high resolution recovery of the unknown model parameters. However, it is a cumbersome process, requiring a long computational time and large memory space/disc storage. One of the reasons for this computational limitation is the gradient calculation step. Based on the adjoint state method, it involves the temporal cross-correlation of the forward propagated source wavefield with the backward propagated residuals, in which we usually need to store the source wavefield, or include an extra extrapolation step to propagate the source wavefield from its storage at the boundary. We propose, alternatively, an amplitude excitation gradient calculation based on the excitation imaging condition concept that represents the source wavefield history by a single, specifically the most energetic arrival. An excitation based Born modeling allows us to derive the adjoint operation. In this case, the source wavelet is injected by a cross-correlation step applied to the data residual directly. Representing the source wavefield through the excitation amplitude and time, we reduce the large requirements for both storage and the computational time. We demonstrate the application of this approach on a 2-layer model with an anomaly and the Marmousi II model.

  8. Efficient full waveform inversion using the excitation representation of the source wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Kalita, Mahesh

    2017-05-16

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative method of data-fitting, aiming at high-resolution recovery of the unknown model parameters. However, its conventional implementation is a cumbersome process, requiring a long computational time and large memory space/disk storage. One of the reasons for this computational limitation is the gradient calculation step. Based on the adjoint state method, it involves the temporal cross-correlation of the forward propagated sourcewavefield with the backward propagated residuals, inwhichwe usually need to store the source wavefield, or include an extra extrapolation step to propagate the source wavefield from its storage at the boundary. We propose, alternatively, an amplitude excitation gradient calculation based on the excitation imaging condition concept that represents the source wavefield history by a single, specifically the most energetic arrival. An excitation based Born modelling allows us to derive the adjoint operation. In this case, the source wavelet is injected by a cross-correlation step applied to the data residual directly. Representing the source wavefield through the excitation amplitude and time, we reduce the large requirements for both storage and the computational time. We demonstrate the application of this approach on a two-layer model with an anomaly, the Marmousi II model and a marine data set acquired by CGG.

  9. Inverting reflections using full-waveform inversion with inaccurate starting models

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2015-08-19

    We present a method for inverting seismic reflections using full-waveform inversion (FWI) with inaccurate starting models. For a layered medium, near-offset reflections (with zero angle of incidence) are unlikely to be cycle-skipped regardless of the low-wavenumber velocity error in the initial models. Therefore, we use them as a starting point for FWI, and the subsurface velocity model is then updated during the FWI iterations using reflection wavepaths from varying offsets that are not cycle-skipped. To enhance low-wavenumber updates and accelerate the convergence, we take several passes through the non-linear Gauss-Seidel iterations, where we invert traces from a narrow range of near offsets and finally end at the far offsets. Every pass is followed by applying smoothing to the cumulative slowness update. The smoothing is strong at the early stages and relaxed at later iterations to allow for a gradual reconstruction of the subsurface model in a multiscale manner. Applications to synthetic and field data, starting from inaccurate models, show significant low-wavenumber updates and flattening of common-image gathers after many iterations.

  10. Resolution limits of migration and linearized waveform inversion images in a lossy medium

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Dutta, Gaurav; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The vertical-and horizontal-resolution limits Delta x(lossy) and Delta z(lossy) of post-stack migration and linearized waveform inversion images are derived for lossy data in the far-field approximation. Unlike the horizontal resolution limit Delta x proportional to lambda z/L in a lossless medium which linearly worsens in depth z, Delta x(lossy) proportional to z(2)/QL worsens quadratically with depth for a medium with small Q values. Here, Q is the quality factor, lambda is the effective wavelength, L is the recording aperture, and loss in the resolution formulae is accounted for by replacing lambda with z/Q. In contrast, the lossy vertical-resolution limit Delta z(lossy) only worsens linearly in depth compared to Delta z proportional to lambda for a lossless medium. For both the causal and acausal Q models, the resolution limits are linearly proportional to 1/Q for small Q. These theoretical predictions are validated with migration images computed from lossy data.

  11. Resolution limits of migration and linearized waveform inversion images in a lossy medium

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-03-10

    The vertical-and horizontal-resolution limits Delta x(lossy) and Delta z(lossy) of post-stack migration and linearized waveform inversion images are derived for lossy data in the far-field approximation. Unlike the horizontal resolution limit Delta x proportional to lambda z/L in a lossless medium which linearly worsens in depth z, Delta x(lossy) proportional to z(2)/QL worsens quadratically with depth for a medium with small Q values. Here, Q is the quality factor, lambda is the effective wavelength, L is the recording aperture, and loss in the resolution formulae is accounted for by replacing lambda with z/Q. In contrast, the lossy vertical-resolution limit Delta z(lossy) only worsens linearly in depth compared to Delta z proportional to lambda for a lossless medium. For both the causal and acausal Q models, the resolution limits are linearly proportional to 1/Q for small Q. These theoretical predictions are validated with migration images computed from lossy data.

  12. Optimal Full Waveform Inversion Strategy in Azimuthally Rotated Elastic Orthorhombic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2017-05-26

    The elastic orthorhombic assumption is one of the most practical Earth models that takes into account the horizontal anisotropic layering and vertical fracture network. In this model, the rotation angle of the vertical planes of symmetry is a crucial parameter needed to increase the convergence of an anisotropic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as to provide the fracture geometry along azimuthal direction. As an initial step, we investigate the possibility of recovering the azimuth angle via FWI, which may offer high-resolution information. We first utilize our new parameterization with deviation parameters, which provides the opportunity for multi-stage FWI. Based on the radiation patterns and gradient directions of each parameter, we show that the azimuth angle mainly affects the parameters that have azimuth-dependent radiation patterns, so that we can hierarchically build up the subsurface model from isotropic to VTI to azimuthally rotated orthorhombic models with less trade-offs. From the numerical example for a synthetic 3D model, we expect that both a deviation parameter and the azimuth angle can be recovered in the last stage of FWI with minimum trade-offs.

  13. Building a good initial model for full-waveform inversion using frequency shift filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanchao; Wang, Shangxu; Yuan, Sanyi; Lian, Shijie

    2018-05-01

    Accurate initial model or available low-frequency data is an important factor in the success of full waveform inversion (FWI). The low-frequency helps determine the kinematical relevant components, low-wavenumber of the velocity model, which are in turn needed to avoid FWI trap in local minima or cycle-skipping. However, in the field, acquiring data that common point of low- and high-frequency signal, then utilize the high-frequency data to obtain the low-wavenumber velocity model. It is well known that the instantaneous amplitude envelope of a wavelet is invariant under frequency shift. This means that resolution is constant for a given frequency bandwidth, and independent of the actual values of the frequencies. Based on this property, we develop a frequency shift filter (FSF) to build the relationship between low- and high-frequency information with a constant frequency bandwidth. After that, we can use the high-frequency information to get a plausible recovery of the low-wavenumber velocity model. Numerical results using synthetic data from the Marmousi and layer model demonstrate that our proposed envelope misfit function based on the frequency shift filter can build an initial model with more accurate long-wavelength components, when low-frequency signals are absent in recorded data.

  14. Full waveform inversion based on the optimized gradient and its spectral implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2014-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) despite it\\'s potential suffers from the ability to converge to the desired solution due to the high nonlinearity of the objective function at conventional seismic frequencies. Even if frequencies necessary for the convergence are available, the high number of iterations required to approach a solution renders FWI as very expensive (especially in 3D). A spectral implementation in which the wavefields are extrapolated and gradients are calculated in the wavenumber domain allows for a cleaner more efficient implementation (no finite difference dispersion errors). In addition, we use not only an up and down going wavefield decomposition of the gradient to access the smooth background update, but also a right and left propagation decomposition to allow us to do that for large dips. To insure that the extracted smooth component of the gradient has the right decent direction, we solve an optimization problem to search for the smoothest component that provides a negative (decent) gradient. Application to the Marmousi model shows that this approach works well with linear increasing initial velocity model and data with frequencies above 2Hz.

  15. An application of multiscale early arrival waveform inversion to shallow seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han; Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the near surface velocity distribution by applying multiscale early arrival waveform inversion (MEWI) to shallow seismic land data. This data set is collected at Wadi Qudaid in western Saudi Arabia with the purpose of characterizing the shallow subsurface for its water storage and reuse potential. To enhance the accuracy of MEWI, we correct for the attenuation effects with an estimated factor Q, and also extract a natural source wavelet from the data. We then applied MEWI to invert the processed data for tomograms on different scales starting from a traveltime tomogram as our initial velocity model. Results suggest that, compared to traveltime tomography, MEWI can generate a more highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data by inverting its low-frequency components on coarse grids and its high-frequency components on fine grids. The estimated water table in the MEWI tomogram is generally consistent with, but 9% deeper than, the traveltime tomogram, showing that the water storage in this wadi might be less than expected from the traveltime tomogram. We believe that the more accurate MEWI tomogram will make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi and wadis throughout the world. © 2014 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  16. Full–waveform inversion using the excitation representation of the source wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Kalita, Mahesh; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an iterative method of data-fitting, aiming at high resolution recovery of the unknown model parameters. However, it is a cumbersome process, requiring a long computational time and large memory space/disc storage. One of the reasons for this computational limitation is the gradient calculation step. Based on the adjoint state method, it involves the temporal cross-correlation of the forward propagated source wavefield with the backward propagated residuals, in which we usually need to store the source wavefield, or include an extra extrapolation step to propagate the source wavefield from its storage at the boundary. We propose, alternatively, an amplitude excitation gradient calculation based on the excitation imaging condition concept that represents the source wavefield history by a single, specifically the most energetic arrival. An excitation based Born modeling allows us to derive the adjoint operation. In this case, the source wavelet is injected by a cross-correlation step applied to the data residual directly. Representing the source wavefield through the excitation amplitude and time, we reduce the large requirements for both storage and the computational time. We demonstrate the application of this approach on a 2-layer model with an anomaly and the Marmousi II model.

  17. Truncated Gauss-Newton Implementation for Multi-Parameter Full Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Yang, J.; Dong, L.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a numerical optimization method which aims at minimizing the difference between the synthetic and recorded seismic data to obtain high resolution subsurface images. A practical implementation for FWI is the adjoint-state method (AD), in which the data residuals at receiver locations are simultaneously back-propagated to form the gradient. Scattering-integral method (SI) is an alternative way which is based on the explicit building of the sensitivity kernel (Fréchet derivative matrix). Although it is more memory-consuming, SI is more efficient than AD when the number of the sources is larger than the number of the receivers. To improve the convergence of FWI, the information carried out by the inverse Hessian operator is crucial. Taking account accurately of the effect of this operator in FWI can correct illumination deficits, reserve the amplitude of the subsurface parameters, and remove artifacts generated by multiple reflections. In multi-parameter FWI, the off-diagonal blocks of the Hessian operator reflect the coupling between different parameter classes. Therefore, incorporating its inverse could help to mitigate the trade-off effects. In this study, we focus on the truncated Gauss-Newton implementation for multi-parameter FWI. The model update is computed through a matrix-free conjugate gradient solution of the Newton linear system. Both the gradient and the Hessian-vector product are calculated using the SI approach instead of the first- and second-order AD. However, the gradient expressed by kernel-vector product is calculated through the accumulation of the decomposed vector-scalar products. Thus, it's not necessary to store the huge sensitivity matrix beforehand. We call this method the matrix decomposition approach (MD). And the Hessian-vector product is replaced by two kernel-vector products which are then calculated by the above MD. By this way, we don't need to solve two additional wave propagation problems as in the

  18. Frequency-domain full-waveform inversion with non-linear descent directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yu; Pan, Wenyong; Innanen, Kristopher A.

    2018-05-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly non-linear inverse problem, normally solved iteratively, with each iteration involving an update constructed through linear operations on the residuals. Incorporating a flexible degree of non-linearity within each update may have important consequences for convergence rates, determination of low model wavenumbers and discrimination of parameters. We examine one approach for doing so, wherein higher order scattering terms are included within the sensitivity kernel during the construction of the descent direction, adjusting it away from that of the standard Gauss-Newton approach. These scattering terms are naturally admitted when we construct the sensitivity kernel by varying not the current but the to-be-updated model at each iteration. Linear and/or non-linear inverse scattering methodologies allow these additional sensitivity contributions to be computed from the current data residuals within any given update. We show that in the presence of pre-critical reflection data, the error in a second-order non-linear update to a background of s0 is, in our scheme, proportional to at most (Δs/s0)3 in the actual parameter jump Δs causing the reflection. In contrast, the error in a standard Gauss-Newton FWI update is proportional to (Δs/s0)2. For numerical implementation of more complex cases, we introduce a non-linear frequency-domain scheme, with an inner and an outer loop. A perturbation is determined from the data residuals within the inner loop, and a descent direction based on the resulting non-linear sensitivity kernel is computed in the outer loop. We examine the response of this non-linear FWI using acoustic single-parameter synthetics derived from the Marmousi model. The inverted results vary depending on data frequency ranges and initial models, but we conclude that the non-linear FWI has the capability to generate high-resolution model estimates in both shallow and deep regions, and to converge rapidly, relative to a

  19. Assessment of eruption intensity using infrasound waveform inversion at Mt. Etna, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Moreno, A.; Iezzi, A. M.; Lamb, O. D.; Zuccarello, L.; Fee, D.; De Angelis, S.

    2017-12-01

    Mt. Etna, Italy, a 3,330 m stratovolcano, is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. It is topped by five craters: Voragine, Bocca Nuova, the North-East, South-East, and New South-East Crater. Its activity during the past decade can be separated into two main types: i) nearly-continuous degassing interspersed by mild-to-vigorous Strombolian activity within the summit craters, and ii) effusive flank eruptions. In June 2017, we deployed a large temporary network of 14 infrasound sensors (Chaparral UHP60) and 12 broadband seismometers (Guralp EX-120s). We also recorded Thermal Infrared (TIR) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle images of activity at the summit vents. Our primary objective is to quantify the intensity and mechanisms of infrasound sources at Mt. Etna, and use these results to improve models of volcanic plumes. From June 2017 until the time of writing, the infrasound network detected signals associated with nearly-continuous degassing and discrete small-to-moderate explosions originating at two distinct locations within the Voragine Crater and the New South-East Crater, respectively. During periods of increased explosive activity, we recorded 20-30 discrete events/day with infrasonic amplitudes of up to 7.5 Pa at 1 km distance from the active vent. The explosions exhibited sinusoidal acoustic waveforms, often with similar characteristics, durations of 1-3 s, and a 2 Hz peak frequency. Due to the relatively dense station coverage and the azimuthal distribution of the network, our deployment offers an opportunity to characterize, with unprecedented resolution, infrasound sources at Mt. Etna. Here we present preliminary results of 3D acoustic wave-field simulations, using a Finite Difference Time Domain modelling scheme, and a preliminary assessment of volumetric eruption rates through acoustic waveform inversion. We investigate the effects of local topography and atmospheric winds on the propagation of the acoustic wavefield, and discuss the implications for

  20. Imaging paleoslabs in the D″ layer beneath Central America and the Caribbean using seismic waveform inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F E; Kawai, Kenji; Konishi, Kensuke; Geller, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    D″ (Dee double prime), the lowermost layer of the Earth's mantle, is the thermal boundary layer (TBL) of mantle convection immediately above the Earth's liquid outer core. As the origin of upwelling of hot material and the destination of paleoslabs (downwelling cold slab remnants), D″ plays a major role in the Earth's evolution. D″ beneath Central America and the Caribbean is of particular geodynamical interest, because the paleo- and present Pacific plates have been subducting beneath the western margin of Pangaea since ~250 million years ago, which implies that paleoslabs could have reached the lowermost mantle. We conduct waveform inversion using a data set of ~7700 transverse component records to infer the detailed three-dimensional S-velocity structure in the lowermost 400 km of the mantle in the study region so that we can investigate how cold paleoslabs interact with the hot TBL above the core-mantle boundary (CMB). We can obtain high-resolution images because the lowermost mantle here is densely sampled by seismic waves due to the full deployment of the USArray broadband seismic stations during 2004-2015. We find two distinct strong high-velocity anomalies, which we interpret as paleoslabs, just above the CMB beneath Central America and Venezuela, respectively, surrounded by low-velocity regions. Strong low-velocity anomalies concentrated in the lowermost 100 km of the mantle suggest the existence of chemically distinct denser material connected to low-velocity anomalies in the lower mantle inferred by previous studies, suggesting that plate tectonics on the Earth's surface might control the modality of convection in the lower mantle.

  1. Selective data extension for full-waveform inversion: An efficient solution for cycle skipping

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2017-12-29

    Standard full-waveform inversion (FWI) attempts to minimize the difference between observed and modeled data. However, this difference is obviously sensitive to the amplitude of observed data, which leads to difficulties because we often do not process data in absolute units and because we usually do not consider density variations, elastic effects, or more complicated physical phenomena. Global correlation methods can remove the amplitude influence for each trace and thus can mitigate such difficulties in some sense. However, this approach still suffers from the well-known cycle-skipping problem, leading to a flat objective function when observed and modeled data are not correlated well enough. We optimize based on maximizing not only the zero-lag global correlation but also time or space lags of the modeled data to circumvent the half-cycle limit. We use a weighting function that is maximum value at zero lag and decays away from zero lag to balance the role of the lags. The resulting objective function is less sensitive to the choice of the maximum lag allowed and has a wider region of convergence compared with standard FWI. Furthermore, we develop a selective function, which passes to the gradient calculation only positive correlations, to mitigate cycle skipping. Finally, the resulting algorithm has better convergence behavior than conventional methods. Application to the Marmousi model indicates that this method converges starting with a linearly increasing velocity model, even with data free of frequencies less than 3.5 Hz. Application to the SEG2014 data set demonstrates the potential of our method.

  2. Lithospheric architecture of the South-Western Alps revealed by multiparameter teleseismic full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.; Paul, A.; Zhao, L.

    2018-02-01

    The Western Alps, although being intensively investigated, remains elusive when it comes to determining its lithospheric structure. New inferences on the latter are important for the understanding of processes and mechanisms of orogeny needed to unravel the dynamic evolution of the Alps. This situation led to the deployment of the CIFALPS temporary experiment, conducted to address the lack of seismological data amenable to high-resolution seismic imaging of the crust and the upper mantle. We perform a 3-D isotropic full-waveform inversion (FWI) of nine teleseismic events recorded by the CIFALPS experiment to infer 3-D models of both density and P- and S-wave velocities of the Alpine lithosphere. Here, by FWI is meant the inversion of the full seismograms including phase and amplitude effects within a time window following the first arrival up to a frequency of 0.2 Hz. We show that the application of the FWI at the lithospheric scale is able to generate images of the lithosphere with unprecedented resolution and can furnish a reliable density model of the upper lithosphere. In the shallowest part of the crust, we retrieve the shape of the fast/dense Ivrea body anomaly and detect the low velocities of the Po and SE France sedimentary basins. The geometry of the Ivrea body as revealed by our density model is consistent with the Bouguer anomaly. A sharp Moho transition is followed from the external part (30 km depth) to the internal part of the Alps (70-80 km depth), giving clear evidence of a continental subduction event during the formation of the Alpine Belt. A low-velocity zone in the lower lithosphere of the S-wave velocity model supports the hypothesis of a slab detachment in the western part of the Alps that is followed by asthenospheric upwelling. The application of FWI to teleseismic data helps to fill the gap of resolution between traditional imaging techniques, and enables integrated interpretations of both upper and lower lithospheric structures.

  3. Mitigating nonlinearity in full waveform inversion using scaled-Sobolev pre-conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberi, M. AH; Pratt, R. G.

    2018-04-01

    The Born approximation successfully linearizes seismic full waveform inversion if the background velocity is sufficiently accurate. When the background velocity is not known it can be estimated by using model scale separation methods. A frequently used technique is to separate the spatial scales of the model according to the scattering angles present in the data, by using either first- or second-order terms in the Born series. For example, the well-known `banana-donut' and the `rabbit ear' shaped kernels are, respectively, the first- and second-order Born terms in which at least one of the scattering events is associated with a large angle. Whichever term of the Born series is used, all such methods suffer from errors in the starting velocity model because all terms in the Born series assume that the background Green's function is known. An alternative approach to Born-based scale separation is to work in the model domain, for example, by Gaussian smoothing of the update vectors, or some other approach for separation by model wavenumbers. However such model domain methods are usually based on a strict separation in which only the low-wavenumber updates are retained. This implies that the scattered information in the data is not taken into account. This can lead to the inversion being trapped in a false (local) minimum when sharp features are updated incorrectly. In this study we propose a scaled-Sobolev pre-conditioning (SSP) of the updates to achieve a constrained scale separation in the model domain. The SSP is obtained by introducing a scaled Sobolev inner product (SSIP) into the measure of the gradient of the objective function with respect to the model parameters. This modified measure seeks reductions in the L2 norm of the spatial derivatives of the gradient without changing the objective function. The SSP does not rely on the Born prediction of scale based on scattering angles, and requires negligible extra computational cost per iteration. Synthetic

  4. Applications of multiscale waveform inversion to marine data using a flooding technique and dynamic early-arrival windows

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-11-01

    A recently developed time-domain multiscale waveform tomography (MWT) method is applied to synthetic and field marine data. Although the MWT method was already applied to synthetic data, the synthetic data application leads to a development of a hybrid method between waveform tomography and the salt flooding technique commonly use in subsalt imaging. This hybrid method can overcome a convergence problem encountered by inversion with a traveltime velocity tomogram and successfully provides an accurate and highly resolved velocity tomogram for the 2D SEG/EAGE salt model. In the application of MWT to the field data, the inversion process is carried out using a multiscale method with a dynamic early-arrival muting window to mitigate the local minima problem of waveform tomography and elastic effects. With the modified MWT method, reasonably accurate results as verified by comparison of migration images and common image gathers were obtained. The hybrid method with the salt flooding technique is not used in this field data example because there is no salt in the subsurface according to our interpretation. However, we believe it is applicable to field data applications. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. Least-squares Migration and Full Waveform Inversion with Multisource Frequency Selection

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2013-09-01

    Multisource Least-Squares Migration (LSM) of phase-encoded supergathers has shown great promise in reducing the computational cost of conventional migration. But for the marine acquisition geometry this approach faces the challenge of erroneous misfit due to the mismatch between the limited number of live traces/shot recorded in the field and the pervasive number of traces generated by the finite-difference modeling method. To tackle this mismatch problem, I present a frequency selection strategy with LSM of supergathers. The key idea is, at each LSM iteration, to assign a unique frequency band to each shot gather, so that the spectral overlap among those shots—and therefore their crosstallk—is zero. Consequently, each receiver can unambiguously identify and then discount the superfluous sources—those that are not associated with the receiver in marine acquisition. To compare with standard migration, I apply the proposed method to 2D SEG/EAGE salt model and obtain better resolved images computed at about 1/8 the cost; results for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model, with Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) survey, show a speedup of 40×. This strategy is next extended to multisource Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) of supergathers for marine streamer data, with the same advantages of computational efficiency and storage savings. In the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, to mitigate spectral leakage due to delayed onsets of sine waves detected at receivers, I double the simulation time and retain only the second half of the simulated records. To compare with standard FWI, I apply the proposed method to 2D velocity model of SEG/EAGE salt and to Gulf Of Mexico (GOM) field data, and obtain a speedup of about 4× and 8×. Formulas are then derived for the resolution limits of various constituent wavepaths pertaining to FWI: diving waves, primary reflections, diffractions, and multiple reflections. They suggest that inverting multiples can provide some low and intermediate

  6. Imaging disturbance zones ahead of a tunnel by elastic full-waveform inversion: Adjoint gradient based inversion vs. parameter space reduction using a level-set method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Lamert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present and compare two flexible and effective methodologies to predict disturbance zones ahead of underground tunnels by using elastic full-waveform inversion. One methodology uses a linearized, iterative approach based on misfit gradients computed with the adjoint method while the other uses iterative, gradient-free unscented Kalman filtering in conjunction with a level-set representation. Whereas the former does not involve a priori assumptions on the distribution of elastic properties ahead of the tunnel, the latter introduces a massive reduction in the number of explicit model parameters to be inverted for by focusing on the geometric form of potential disturbances and their average elastic properties. Both imaging methodologies are validated through successful reconstructions of simple disturbances. As an application, we consider an elastic multiple disturbance scenario. By using identical synthetic time-domain seismograms as test data, we obtain satisfactory, albeit different, reconstruction results from the two inversion methodologies. The computational costs of both approaches are of the same order of magnitude, with the gradient-based approach showing a slight advantage. The model parameter space reduction approach compensates for this by additionally providing a posteriori estimates of model parameter uncertainty. Keywords: Tunnel seismics, Full waveform inversion, Seismic waves, Level-set method, Adjoint method, Kalman filter

  7. Global seismic attenuation imaging using full-waveform inversion: a comparative assessment of different choices of misfit functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoǧlu, Haydar; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of synthetic tests that aim at evaluating the relative performance of three different definitions of misfit functionals in the context of 3-D imaging of shear wave attenuation in the earth's upper mantle at the global scale, using long-period full-waveform data. The synthetic tests are conducted with simple hypothetical upper-mantle models that contain Qμ anomalies centred at different depths and locations, with or without additional seismic velocity anomalies. To build synthetic waveform data sets, we performed simulations of 50 events in the hypothetical (target) models, using the spectral element method, filtered in the period range 60-400 s. The selected events are chosen among 273 events used in the development of radially anisotropic model SEMUCB-WM1 and recorded at 495 stations worldwide. The synthetic Z-component waveforms correspond to paths and time intervals (fundamental mode and overtone Rayleigh waves) that exist in the real waveform data set. The inversions for shear attenuation structure are carried out using a Gauss-Newton optimization scheme in which the gradient and Hessian are computed using normal mode perturbation theory. The three different misfit functionals considered are based on time domain waveform (WF) and waveform envelope (E-WF) differences, as well as spectral amplitude ratios (SA), between observed and predicted waveforms. We evaluate the performance of the three misfit functional definitions in the presence of seismic noise and unresolved S-wave velocity heterogeneity and discuss the relative importance of physical dispersion effects due to 3-D Qμ structure. We observed that the performance of WF is poorer than the other two misfit functionals in recovering attenuation structure, unless anelastic dispersion effects are taken into account in the calculation of partial derivatives. WF also turns out to be more sensitive to seismic noise than E-WF and SA. Overall, SA performs best for attenuation imaging. Our

  8. Geophysical characterization of peatlands using crosshole GPR full-waveform inversion: Case study from a bog in northwestern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmäck, J.; Klotzsche, A.; Van Der Kruk, J.; Vereecken, H.; Bechtold, M.

    2017-12-01

    The characterization of peatlands is of particular interest, since areas with peat soils represent global hotspots for the exchange of greenhouse gases. Their effect on global warming depends on several parameters, like mean annual water level and land use. Models of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon accumulation in peatlands can be improved by including small-scale soil properties that e.g. act as gas traps and periodically release gases to the atmosphere during ebullition events. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is well suited to non- or minimal invasively characterize and improve our understanding of dynamic processes that take place in the critical zone. It uses high frequency electromagnetic waves to image and characterize the dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the critical zone, which can be related to hydrogeological properties like porosity, soil water content, salinity and clay content. In the last decade, the full-waveform inversion of crosshole GPR data has proved to be a powerful tool to improve the image resolution compared to standard ray-based methods. This approach was successfully applied to several different aquifers and was able to provide decimeter-scale resolution images including small-scale high contrast layers that can be related to zones of high porosity, zones of preferential flow or clay lenses. The comparison to independently measured e.g. logging data proved the reliability of the method. Here, for the first time crosshole GPR full-waveform inversion is used to image three peatland plots with different land use that are part of the "Ahlen-Falkenberger Moor peat bog complex" in northwestern Germany. The full-waveform inversion of the acquired data returned higher resolution images than standard ray-based GPR methods, and, is able to improve our understanding of subsurface structures. The comparison of the different plots is expected to provide new insights into gas content and gas trapping structures across different

  9. Estimation of Dynamic Friction Process of the Akatani Landslide Based on the Waveform Inversion and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Mangeney, A.; Moretti, L.; Matsushi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding physical parameters, such as frictional coefficients, velocity change, and dynamic history, is important issue for assessing and managing the risks posed by deep-seated catastrophic landslides. Previously, landslide motion has been inferred qualitatively from topographic changes caused by the event, and occasionally from eyewitness reports. However, these conventional approaches are unable to evaluate source processes and dynamic parameters. In this study, we use broadband seismic recordings to trace the dynamic process of the deep-seated Akatani landslide that occurred on the Kii Peninsula, Japan, which is one of the best recorded large slope failures. Based on the previous results of waveform inversions and precise topographic surveys done before and after the event, we applied numerical simulations using the SHALTOP numerical model (Mangeney et al., 2007). This model describes homogeneous continuous granular flows on a 3D topography based on a depth averaged thin layer approximation. We assume a Coulomb's friction law with a constant friction coefficient, i. e. the friction is independent of the sliding velocity. We varied the friction coefficients in the simulation so that the resulting force acting on the surface agrees with the single force estimated from the seismic waveform inversion. Figure shows the force history of the east-west components after the band-pass filtering between 10-100 seconds. The force history of the simulation with frictional coefficient 0.27 (thin red line) the best agrees with the result of seismic waveform inversion (thick gray line). Although the amplitude is slightly different, phases are coherent for the main three pulses. This is an evidence that the point-source approximation works reasonably well for this particular event. The friction coefficient during the sliding was estimated to be 0.38 based on the seismic waveform inversion performed by the previous study and on the sliding block model (Yamada et al., 2013

  10. 3D elastic full-waveform inversion for OBC data using the P-wave excitation amplitude

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2017-08-17

    We suggest a fast and efficient 3D elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) algorithm based on the excitation amplitude (maximum energy arrival) of the P-wave in the source wavefield. It evaluates the gradient direction significantly faster than its conventional counterpart. In addition, it removes the long-wavelength artifacts from the gradient, which are often originated from SS correlation process. From these advantages, the excitation approach offers faster convergence not only for the S wave velocity, but also for the entire process of multi-parameter inversion, compared to the conventional FWI. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated through the synthetic Marmousi and a real OBC data from North Sea.

  11. 3D elastic full-waveform inversion for OBC data using the P-wave excitation amplitude

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Kalita, Mahesh; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    We suggest a fast and efficient 3D elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) algorithm based on the excitation amplitude (maximum energy arrival) of the P-wave in the source wavefield. It evaluates the gradient direction significantly faster than its conventional counterpart. In addition, it removes the long-wavelength artifacts from the gradient, which are often originated from SS correlation process. From these advantages, the excitation approach offers faster convergence not only for the S wave velocity, but also for the entire process of multi-parameter inversion, compared to the conventional FWI. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated through the synthetic Marmousi and a real OBC data from North Sea.

  12. A flexible, extendable, modular and computationally efficient approach to scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.; Lamara, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new conceptual approach to scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) that allows a flexible, extendable, modular and both computationally and storage-efficient numerical implementation. To achieve maximum modularity and extendability, interactions between the three fundamental steps carried out sequentially in each iteration of the inversion procedure, namely, solving the forward problem, computing waveform sensitivity kernels and deriving a model update, are kept at an absolute minimum and are implemented by dedicated interfaces. To realize storage efficiency and maximum flexibility, the spatial discretization of the inverted earth model is allowed to be completely independent of the spatial discretization employed by the forward solver. For computational efficiency reasons, the inversion is done in the frequency domain. The benefits of our approach are as follows: (1) Each of the three stages of an iteration is realized by a stand-alone software program. In this way, we avoid the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have often been written for solving inverse problems. (2) The solution of the forward problem, required for kernel computation, can be obtained by any wave propagation modelling code giving users maximum flexibility in choosing the forward modelling method. Both time-domain and frequency-domain approaches can be used. (3) Forward solvers typically demand spatial discretizations that are significantly denser than actually desired for the inverted model. Exploiting this fact by pre-integrating the kernels allows a dramatic reduction of disk space and makes kernel storage feasible. No assumptions are made on the spatial discretization scheme employed by the forward solver. (4) In addition, working in the frequency domain effectively reduces the amount of data, the number of kernels to be computed and the number of equations to be solved. (5) Updating the model by solving a large equation system can be

  13. Combined Inversion of Broadband and Short‐Period Waveform Data for Regional Moment Tensors: A Case Study in the Alborz Mountains, Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donner, Stefanie; Krüger, Frank; Rössler, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we suggest a novel approach for the retrieval of regional moment tensors for earthquakes with small to moderate magnitudes. The first modification is the combined inversion of broadband and short‐period waveform data. The broadband waveforms are inverted in a frequency range suitable.......1). In this area, several factors exacerbate the difficulty of performing inversion for moment tensors, for example, a heterogeneous station network and large azimuthal gaps. We have demonstrated that our approach supplies reliable moment tensors when inversion from broadband data alone fails. In one case, we...... successfully retrieved a stable solution from short‐period waveform data alone. Thus, our approach enables successful determination of seismic moment tensors wherever a sparse network of broadband stations has thus far prevented it....

  14. Waveform inversion for orthorhombic anisotropy with P-waves: feasibility & resolution

    KAUST Repository

    Kazei, Vladimir; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2018-01-01

    Various parameterizations have been suggested to simplify inversions of first arrivals, or P −waves, in orthorhombic anisotropic media, but the number and type of retrievable parameters have not been decisively determined. We show that only six

  15. Crosshole Tomography, Waveform Inversion, and Anisotropy: A Combined Approach Using Simulated Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, M.; Pratt, R. G.; Kamei, R.; McDowell, G.

    2012-12-01

    Crosshole seismic tomography has been used by Vale to provide geophysical images of mineralized massive sulfides in the Eastern Deeps deposit at Voisey's Bay, Labrador, Canada. To date, these data have been processed using traveltime tomography, and we seek to improve the resolution of these images by applying acoustic Waveform Tomography. Due to the computational cost of acoustic waveform modelling, local descent algorithms are employed in Waveform Tomography; due to non-linearity an initial model is required which predicts first-arrival traveltimes to within a half-cycle of the lowest frequency used. Because seismic velocity anisotropy can be significant in hardrock settings, the initial model must quantify the anisotropy in order to meet the half-cycle criterion. In our case study, significant velocity contrasts between the target massive sulfides and the surrounding country rock led to difficulties in generating an accurate anisotropy model through traveltime tomography, and our starting model for Waveform Tomography failed the half-cycle criterion at large offsets. We formulate a new, semi-global approach for finding the best-fit 1-D elliptical anisotropy model using simulated annealing. Through random perturbations to Thompson's ɛ parameter, we explore the L2 norm of the frequency-domain phase residuals in the space of potential anisotropy models: If a perturbation decreases the residuals, it is always accepted, but if a perturbation increases the residuals, it is accepted with the probability P = exp(-(Ei-E)/T). This is the Metropolis criterion, where Ei is the value of the residuals at the current iteration, E is the value of the residuals for the previously accepted model, and T is a probability control parameter, which is decreased over the course of the simulation via a preselected cooling schedule. Convergence to the global minimum of the residuals is guaranteed only for infinitely slow cooling, but in practice good results are obtained from a variety

  16. Multiparameter elastic full-waveform inversion in the presence of azimuthally rotated orthorhombic anisotropy: Application to 9-C land data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2017-08-17

    To examine the feasibility of elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) for azimuthally rotated orthorhombic (rORT) media, we analyze the sensitivity of the 9-component (9C) land data set acquired on the surface on each of the ORT parameters. The trade-off analysis supports that the parameter set that includes deviation parameters offers the best choice for a 9C data set. Compared to the data from an explosive source, using the 9C land data, ORT parameters show different trade-off patterns for the different source and receiver components. For this reason, finding an optimal component considering trade-offs is another important issue to better recover subsurface rotated orthorhombic anisotropy.

  17. Resolving the fine-scale velocity structure of continental hyperextension at the Deep Galicia Margin using full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, R. G.; Morgan, J. V.; Minshull, T. A.; Bayrakci, G.; Bull, J. M.; Klaeschen, D.; Reston, T. J.; Sawyer, D. S.; Lymer, G.; Cresswell, D.

    2018-01-01

    Continental hyperextension during magma-poor rifting at the Deep Galicia Margin is characterized by a complex pattern of faulting, thin continental fault blocks and the serpentinization, with local exhumation, of mantle peridotites along the S-reflector, interpreted as a detachment surface. In order to understand fully the evolution of these features, it is important to image seismically the structure and to model the velocity structure to the greatest resolution possible. Traveltime tomography models have revealed the long-wavelength velocity structure of this hyperextended domain, but are often insufficient to match accurately the short-wavelength structure observed in reflection seismic imaging. Here, we demonstrate the application of 2-D time-domain acoustic full-waveform inversion (FWI) to deep-water seismic data collected at the Deep Galicia Margin, in order to attain a high-resolution velocity model of continental hyperextension. We have used several quality assurance procedures to assess the velocity model, including comparison of the observed and modeled waveforms, checkerboard tests, testing of parameter and inversion strategy and comparison with the migrated reflection image. Our final model exhibits an increase in the resolution of subsurface velocities, with particular improvement observed in the westernmost continental fault blocks, with a clear rotation of the velocity field to match steeply dipping reflectors. Across the S-reflector, there is a sharpening in the velocity contrast, with lower velocities beneath S indicative of preferential mantle serpentinization. This study supports the hypothesis that normal faulting acts to hydrate the upper-mantle peridotite, observed as a systematic decrease in seismic velocities, consistent with increased serpentinization. Our results confirm the feasibility of applying the FWI method to sparse, deep-water crustal data sets.

  18. Tsunami Source Inversion Using Tide Gauge and DART Tsunami Waveforms of the 2017 Mw8.2 Mexico Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriano, Bruno; Fujii, Yushiro; Koshimura, Shunichi; Mas, Erick; Ruiz-Angulo, Angel; Estrada, Miguel

    2018-01-01

    On September 8, 2017 (UTC), a normal-fault earthquake occurred 87 km off the southeast coast of Mexico. This earthquake generated a tsunami that was recorded at coastal tide gauge and offshore buoy stations. First, we conducted a numerical tsunami simulation using a single-fault model to understand the tsunami characteristics near the rupture area, focusing on the nearby tide gauge stations. Second, the tsunami source of this event was estimated from inversion of tsunami waveforms recorded at six coastal stations and three buoys located in the deep ocean. Using the aftershock distribution within 1 day following the main shock, the fault plane orientation had a northeast dip direction (strike = 320°, dip = 77°, and rake =-92°). The results of the tsunami waveform inversion revealed that the fault area was 240 km × 90 km in size with most of the largest slip occurring on the middle and deepest segments of the fault. The maximum slip was 6.03 m from a 30 × 30 km2 segment that was 64.82 km deep at the center of the fault area. The estimated slip distribution showed that the main asperity was at the center of the fault area. The second asperity with an average slip of 5.5 m was found on the northwest-most segments. The estimated slip distribution yielded a seismic moment of 2.9 × 10^{21} Nm (Mw = 8.24), which was calculated assuming an average rigidity of 7× 10^{10} N/m2.

  19. Waveform inversion for orthorhombic anisotropy with P-waves: feasibility & resolution

    KAUST Repository

    Kazei, Vladimir

    2018-01-27

    Various parameterizations have been suggested to simplify inversions of first arrivals, or P −waves, in orthorhombic anisotropic media, but the number and type of retrievable parameters have not been decisively determined. We show that only six parameters can be retrieved from the dynamic linearized inversion of P −waves. These parameters are different from the six parameters needed to describe the kinematics of P −waves. Reflection-based radiation patterns from the P − P scattered waves are remapped into the spectral domain to allow for our resolution analysis based on the effective angle of illumination concept. Singular value decomposition of the spectral sensitivities from various azimuths, offset coverage scenarios, and data bandwidths allows us to quantify the resolution of different parameterizations, taking into account the signal-to-noise ratio in a given experiment. According to our singular value analysis, when the primary goal of inversion is determining the velocity of the P −waves, gradually adding anisotropy of lower orders (isotropic, vertically transversally isotropic, orthorhombic) in hierarchical parameterization is the best choice. Hierarchical parametrization reduces the tradeoff between the parameters and makes gradual introduction of lower anisotropy orders straightforward. When all the anisotropic parameters affecting P −wave propagation need to be retrieved simultaneously, the classic parameterization of orthorhombic medium with elastic stiffness matrix coefficients and density is a better choice for inversion. We provide estimates of the number and set of parameters that can be retrieved from surface seismic data in different acquisition scenarios. To set up an inversion process, the singular values determine the number of parameters that can be inverted and the resolution matrices from the parameterizations can be used to ascertain the set of parameters that can be resolved.

  20. Waveform inversion for orthorhombic anisotropy with P waves: feasibility and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazei, Vladimir; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2018-05-01

    Various parametrizations have been suggested to simplify inversions of first arrivals, or P waves, in orthorhombic anisotropic media, but the number and type of retrievable parameters have not been decisively determined. We show that only six parameters can be retrieved from the dynamic linearized inversion of P waves. These parameters are different from the six parameters needed to describe the kinematics of P waves. Reflection-based radiation patterns from the P-P scattered waves are remapped into the spectral domain to allow for our resolution analysis based on the effective angle of illumination concept. Singular value decomposition of the spectral sensitivities from various azimuths, offset coverage scenarios and data bandwidths allows us to quantify the resolution of different parametrizations, taking into account the signal-to-noise ratio in a given experiment. According to our singular value analysis, when the primary goal of inversion is determining the velocity of the P waves, gradually adding anisotropy of lower orders (isotropic, vertically transversally isotropic and orthorhombic) in hierarchical parametrization is the best choice. Hierarchical parametrization reduces the trade-off between the parameters and makes gradual introduction of lower anisotropy orders straightforward. When all the anisotropic parameters affecting P-wave propagation need to be retrieved simultaneously, the classic parametrization of orthorhombic medium with elastic stiffness matrix coefficients and density is a better choice for inversion. We provide estimates of the number and set of parameters that can be retrieved from surface seismic data in different acquisition scenarios. To set up an inversion process, the singular values determine the number of parameters that can be inverted and the resolution matrices from the parametrizations can be used to ascertain the set of parameters that can be resolved.

  1. Time-domain full waveform inversion using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic wave energy: Application to the South China Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mengxuan, Zhong; Jun, Tan; Peng, Song; Xiao-bo, Zhang; Chuang, Xie; Zhao-lun, Liu

    2017-01-01

    The gradient preconditioning algorithms based on Hessian matrices in time-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) are widely used now, but consume a lot of memory and do not fit the FWI of large models or actual seismic data well. To avoid the huge

  2. Robust inverse scattering full waveform seismic tomography for imaging complex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Sukmana, Indriani; Wibowo, Satryo; Deny, Agus; Kurniadi, Rizal; Widowati, Sri; Mubarok, Syahrul; Susilowati; Kaswandhi

    2012-01-01

    Seismic tomography becomes important tool recently for imaging complex subsurface. It is well known that imaging complex rich fault zone is difficult. In this paper, The application of time domain inverse scattering wave tomography to image the complex fault zone would be shown on this paper, especially an efficient time domain inverse scattering tomography and their run in cluster parallel computer which has been developed. This algorithm is purely based on scattering theory through solving Lippmann Schwienger integral by using Born's approximation. In this paper, it is shown the robustness of this algorithm especially in avoiding the inversion trapped in local minimum to reach global minimum. A large data are solved by windowing and blocking technique of memory as well as computation. Parameter of windowing computation is based on shot gather's aperture. This windowing technique reduces memory as well as computation significantly. This parallel algorithm is done by means cluster system of 120 processors from 20 nodes of AMD Phenom II. Benchmarking of this algorithm is done by means Marmoussi model which can be representative of complex rich fault area. It is shown that the proposed method can image clearly the rich fault and complex zone in Marmoussi model even though the initial model is quite far from the true model. Therefore, this method can be as one of solution to image the very complex mode.

  3. Robust inverse scattering full waveform seismic tomography for imaging complex structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B.; Sukmana, Indriani; Wibowo, Satryo; Deny, Agus; Kurniadi, Rizal; Widowati, Sri; Mubarok, Syahrul; Susilowati; Kaswandhi [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research (WISFIR) Lab., Complex System Research Division, Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung. and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster C (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster Computing Center, Bandung (Indonesia); Physics Department of Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster Computing Center, Bandung, Indonesia and Institut Teknologi Telkom, Bandung (Indonesia); Rock Fluid Imaging Lab., Rock Physics and Cluster Computing Center, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20

    Seismic tomography becomes important tool recently for imaging complex subsurface. It is well known that imaging complex rich fault zone is difficult. In this paper, The application of time domain inverse scattering wave tomography to image the complex fault zone would be shown on this paper, especially an efficient time domain inverse scattering tomography and their run in cluster parallel computer which has been developed. This algorithm is purely based on scattering theory through solving Lippmann Schwienger integral by using Born's approximation. In this paper, it is shown the robustness of this algorithm especially in avoiding the inversion trapped in local minimum to reach global minimum. A large data are solved by windowing and blocking technique of memory as well as computation. Parameter of windowing computation is based on shot gather's aperture. This windowing technique reduces memory as well as computation significantly. This parallel algorithm is done by means cluster system of 120 processors from 20 nodes of AMD Phenom II. Benchmarking of this algorithm is done by means Marmoussi model which can be representative of complex rich fault area. It is shown that the proposed method can image clearly the rich fault and complex zone in Marmoussi model even though the initial model is quite far from the true model. Therefore, this method can be as one of solution to image the very complex mode.

  4. Period-dependent source rupture behavior of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake estimated by multi period-band Bayesian waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, H.; Asano, K.; Iwata, T.; Aoi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies for the period-dependent source characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (e.g., Koper et al., 2011; Lay et al., 2012) were based on the short and long period source models using different method. Kubo et al. (2013) obtained source models of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake using multi period-bands waveform data by a common inversion method and discussed its period-dependent source characteristics. In this study, to achieve more in detail spatiotemporal source rupture behavior of this event, we introduce a new fault surface model having finer sub-fault size and estimate the source models in multi period-bands using a Bayesian inversion method combined with a multi-time-window method. Three components of velocity waveforms at 25 stations of K-NET, KiK-net, and F-net of NIED are used in this analysis. The target period band is 10-100 s. We divide this period band into three period bands (10-25 s, 25-50 s, and 50-100 s) and estimate a kinematic source model in each period band using a Bayesian inversion method with MCMC sampling (e.g., Fukuda & Johnson, 2008; Minson et al., 2013, 2014). The parameterization of spatiotemporal slip distribution follows the multi-time-window method (Hartzell & Heaton, 1983). The Green's functions are calculated by the 3D FDM (GMS; Aoi & Fujiwara, 1999) using a 3D velocity structure model (JIVSM; Koketsu et al., 2012). The assumed fault surface model is based on the Pacific plate boundary of JIVSM and is divided into 384 subfaults of about 16 * 16 km^2. The estimated source models in multi period-bands show the following source image: (1) First deep rupture off Miyagi at 0-60 s toward down-dip mostly radiating relatively short period (10-25 s) seismic waves. (2) Shallow rupture off Miyagi at 45-90 s toward up-dip with long duration radiating long period (50-100 s) seismic wave. (3) Second deep rupture off Miyagi at 60-105 s toward down-dip radiating longer period seismic waves then that of the first deep rupture. (4) Deep

  5. ASKI: A modular toolbox for scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion and sensitivity analysis utilizing external forward codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Schumacher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing computational resources, the development of new numerically demanding methods and software for imaging Earth’s interior remains of high interest in Earth sciences. Here, we give a description from a user’s and programmer’s perspective of the highly modular, flexible and extendable software package ASKI–Analysis of Sensitivity and Kernel Inversion–recently developed for iterative scattering-integral-based seismic full waveform inversion. In ASKI, the three fundamental steps of solving the seismic forward problem, computing waveform sensitivity kernels and deriving a model update are solved by independent software programs that interact via file output/input only. Furthermore, the spatial discretizations of the model space used for solving the seismic forward problem and for deriving model updates, respectively, are kept completely independent. For this reason, ASKI does not contain a specific forward solver but instead provides a general interface to established community wave propagation codes. Moreover, the third fundamental step of deriving a model update can be repeated at relatively low costs applying different kinds of model regularization or re-selecting/weighting the inverted dataset without need to re-solve the forward problem or re-compute the kernels. Additionally, ASKI offers the user sensitivity and resolution analysis tools based on the full sensitivity matrix and allows to compose customized workflows in a consistent computational environment. ASKI is written in modern Fortran and Python, it is well documented and freely available under terms of the GNU General Public License (http://www.rub.de/aski.

  6. Sensitivity and inversion of full seismic waveforms in stratified porous medium; Sensibilite et inversion de formes d'ondes completes en milieu poreux stratifie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, L. de

    2007-12-15

    Characterization of porous media parameters, and particularly the porosity, permeability and fluid properties are very useful in many applications (hydrologic, natural hazards or oil industry). The aim of my research is to evaluate the possibility to determine these properties from the full seismic wave fields. First, I am interested in the useful parameters and the specific properties of the seismic waves in the poro-elastic theory, often called Biot (1956) theory. I then compute seismic waves propagation in fluid saturated stratified porous media with a reflectivity method coupled with the discrete wavenumber integration method. I first used this modeling to study the possibilities to determine the carbon dioxide concentration and localization thanks to the reflected P-waves in the case of the deep geological storage of Sleipner (North Sea). The sensitivity of the seismic response to the poro-elastic parameters are then generalized by the analytical computation of the Frechet derivatives which are expressed in terms of the Green's functions of the unperturbed medium. The numerical tests show that the porosity and the consolidation are the main parameters to invert. The sensitivity operators are then introduced in a inversion algorithm based on iterative modeling of the full waveform. The classical algorithm of generalized least-square inverse problem is solved by the quasi-Newton technique (Tarantola, 1984). The inversion of synthetic data show that we can invert for the porosity and the fluid and solid parameters (densities and mechanical modulus, or volume rate of fluid and mineral) can be correctly rebuilt if the other parameters are well known. However, the strong seismic coupling of the porous parameters leads to difficulties to invert simultaneously for several parameters. One way to get round these difficulties is to use additional information and invert for one single parameter for the fluid properties (saturating rate) or for the lithology. An other

  7. 3-D acoustic waveform simulation and inversion supplemented by infrasound sensors on a tethered weather balloon at Yasur Volcano, Vanuatu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzi, A. M.; Fee, D.; Matoza, R. S.; Jolly, A. D.; Kim, K.; Christenson, B. W.; Johnson, R.; Kilgour, G.; Garaebiti, E.; Austin, A.; Kennedy, B.; Fitzgerald, R.; Gomez, C.; Key, N.

    2017-12-01

    Well-constrained acoustic waveform inversion can provide robust estimates of erupted volume and mass flux, increasing our ability to monitor volcanic emissions (potentially in real-time). Previous studies have made assumptions about the multipole source mechanism, which can be represented as the combination of pressure fluctuations from a volume change, directionality, and turbulence. The vertical dipole has not been addressed due to ground-based recording limitations. In this study we deployed a high-density seismo-acoustic network around Yasur Volcano, Vanuatu, including multiple acoustic sensors along a tethered balloon that was moved every 15-60 minutes. Yasur has frequent strombolian eruptions every 1-4 minutes from any one of three active vents within a 400 m diameter crater. Our experiment captured several explosions from each vent at 38 tether locations covering 200 in azimuth and a take-off range of 50 (Jolly et. al., in review). Additionally, FLIR, FTIR, and a variety of visual imagery were collected during the deployment to aid in the seismo-acoustic interpretations. The third dimension (vertical) of pressure sensor coverage allows us to more completely constrain the acoustic source. Our analysis employs Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) modeling to obtain the full 3-D Green's functions for each propagation path. This method, following Kim et al. (2015), takes into account realistic topographic scattering based on a high-resolution digital elevation model created using structure-from-motion techniques. We then invert for the source location and multipole source-time function using a grid-search approach. We perform this inversion for multiple events from vents A and C to examine the source characteristics of the vents, including an infrasound-derived volume flux as a function of time. These volumes fluxes are then compared to those derived independently from geochemical and seismic inversion techniques. Jolly, A., Matoza, R., Fee, D., Kennedy, B

  8. Multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion method of ultrasound waveform tomography using pulse data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongxiang; Azuma, Takashi; Qu, Xiaolei; Takagi, Shu

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we construct a multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion (CSI) method using pulse data in the time domain. CSI is a frequency-domain inversion method for ultrasound waveform tomography that does not require the forward solver through the process of reconstruction. Several prior researches show that the CSI method has a good performance of convergence and accuracy in the low-center-frequency situation. In contrast, utilizing the high-center-frequency data leads to a high-resolution reconstruction but slow convergence on large numbers of grid. Our objective is to take full advantage of all low frequency components from pulse data with the high-center-frequency data measured by the diagnostic device. First we process the raw data in the frequency domain. Then multi-frequency accelerating strategy helps restart CSI in the current frequency using the last iteration result obtained from the lower frequency component. The merit of multi- frequency accelerating strategy is that computational burden decreases at the first few iterations. Because the low frequency component of dataset computes on the coarse grid with assuming a fixed number of points per wavelength. In the numerical test, the pulse data were generated by the K-wave simulator and have been processed to meet the computation of the CSI method. We investigate the performance of the multi-frequency and single-frequency reconstructions and conclude that the multi-frequency accelerating strategy significantly enhances the quality of the reconstructed image and simultaneously reduces the average computational time for any iteration step.

  9. Time-domain full waveform inversion of exponentially damped wavefield using the deconvolution-based objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2017-11-15

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the cycle-skipping problem when the available frequency-band of data is not low enough. We apply an exponential damping to the data to generate artificial low frequencies, which helps FWI avoid cycle skipping. In this case, the least-square misfit function does not properly deal with the exponentially damped wavefield in FWI, because the amplitude of traces decays almost exponentially with increasing offset in a damped wavefield. Thus, we use a deconvolution-based objective function for FWI of the exponentially damped wavefield. The deconvolution filter includes inherently a normalization between the modeled and observed data, thus it can address the unbalanced amplitude of a damped wavefield. We, specifically, normalize the modeled data with the observed data in the frequency-domain to estimate the deconvolution filter and selectively choose a frequency-band for normalization that mainly includes the artificial low frequencies. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state method. The synthetic and benchmark data examples show that our FWI algorithm generates a convergent long wavelength structure without low frequency information in the recorded data.

  10. A parameterization study for elastic VTI Full Waveform Inversion of hydrophone components: synthetic and North Sea field data examples

    KAUST Repository

    Guitton, Antoine

    2017-08-15

    Choosing the right parameterization to describe a transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) allows us to match the scattering potential of these parameters to the available data in a way that avoids potential tradeoff and focus on the parameters to which the data are sensitive. For 2-D elastic full waveform inversion in VTI media of pressure components and for data with a reasonable range of offsets (as with those found in conventional streamer data acquisition systems), assuming that we have a kinematically accurate NMO velocity (vnmo) and anellipticity parameter η (or horizontal velocity, vh) obtained from tomographic methods, a parameterization in terms of horizontal velocity vh, η and ε is preferred to the more conventional parameterization in terms of vh, δ and ε. In the vh, η, ε parameterization and for reasonable scattering angles (<60o), ε acts as a “garbage collector” and absorbs most of the amplitude discrepancies; between modeled and observed data, more so when density ρ and shear-wave velocity vs are not inverted for (a standard practice with streamer data). On the contrary, in the vv, δ, ε parameterization, ε is mostly sensitive to large scattering angles, leaving vv exposed to strong leakages from ρ mainly. There assertions will be demonstrated on the synthetic Marmousi II as well as a North Sea OBC dataset, where inverting for the horizontal velocity rather than the vertical velocity yields more accurate models and migrated images.

  11. 3D elastic full waveform inversion using P-wave excitation amplitude: Application to OBC field data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Kalita, Mahesh; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    We propose an efficient elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) based on the P-wave excitation amplitude (maximum energy arrival) approximation in the source wavefields. Because, based on the P-wave excitation approximation (ExA), the gradient direction is approximated by the cross-correlation of source and receiver wavefields at only excitation time, it estimates the gradient direction faster than its conventional counterpart. In addition to this computational speedup, the P-wave excitation approximation automatically ignores SP and SS correlations in the approximated gradient direction. In elastic FWI for ocean bottom cable (OBC) data, the descent direction for the S-wave velocity is often degraded by undesired long-wavelength features from the SS correlation. For this reason, the P-wave excitation approach increases the convergence rate of multi-parameter FWI compared to the conventional approach. The modified 2D Marmousi model with OBC acquisition is used to verify the differences between the conventional method and ExA. Finally, the feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated on a real OBC data from North Sea.

  12. Time-domain full waveform inversion of exponentially damped wavefield using the deconvolution-based objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the cycle-skipping problem when the available frequency-band of data is not low enough. We apply an exponential damping to the data to generate artificial low frequencies, which helps FWI avoid cycle skipping. In this case, the least-square misfit function does not properly deal with the exponentially damped wavefield in FWI, because the amplitude of traces decays almost exponentially with increasing offset in a damped wavefield. Thus, we use a deconvolution-based objective function for FWI of the exponentially damped wavefield. The deconvolution filter includes inherently a normalization between the modeled and observed data, thus it can address the unbalanced amplitude of a damped wavefield. We, specifically, normalize the modeled data with the observed data in the frequency-domain to estimate the deconvolution filter and selectively choose a frequency-band for normalization that mainly includes the artificial low frequencies. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state method. The synthetic and benchmark data examples show that our FWI algorithm generates a convergent long wavelength structure without low frequency information in the recorded data.

  13. A parameterization study for elastic VTI Full Waveform Inversion of hydrophone components: synthetic and North Sea field data examples

    KAUST Repository

    Guitton, Antoine; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Choosing the right parameterization to describe a transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) allows us to match the scattering potential of these parameters to the available data in a way that avoids potential tradeoff and focus on the parameters to which the data are sensitive. For 2-D elastic full waveform inversion in VTI media of pressure components and for data with a reasonable range of offsets (as with those found in conventional streamer data acquisition systems), assuming that we have a kinematically accurate NMO velocity (vnmo) and anellipticity parameter η (or horizontal velocity, vh) obtained from tomographic methods, a parameterization in terms of horizontal velocity vh, η and ε is preferred to the more conventional parameterization in terms of vh, δ and ε. In the vh, η, ε parameterization and for reasonable scattering angles (<60o), ε acts as a “garbage collector” and absorbs most of the amplitude discrepancies; between modeled and observed data, more so when density ρ and shear-wave velocity vs are not inverted for (a standard practice with streamer data). On the contrary, in the vv, δ, ε parameterization, ε is mostly sensitive to large scattering angles, leaving vv exposed to strong leakages from ρ mainly. There assertions will be demonstrated on the synthetic Marmousi II as well as a North Sea OBC dataset, where inverting for the horizontal velocity rather than the vertical velocity yields more accurate models and migrated images.

  14. Time-domain full-waveform inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves in presence of free-surface topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yudi; Gao, Lingli; Bohlen, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Correct estimation of near-surface seismic-wave velocity when encountering lateral heterogeneity and free surface topography is one of the challenges to current shallow seismic. We propose to use time-domain full-waveform inversion (FWI) of surface waves, including both Rayleigh and Love waves, to solve this problem. We adopt a 2D time-domain finite-difference method with an improved vacuum formulation (IVF) to simulate shallow-seismic Rayleigh wave in presence of free-surface topography. We modify the IVF for SH-wave equation for the simulation of Love wave in presence of topographic free surface and prove its accuracy by benchmark tests. Checkboard model tests are performed in both cases when free-surface topography is included or neglected in FWI. Synthetic model containing a dipping planar free surface and lateral heterogeneity was then tested, in both cases of considering and neglecting free-surface topography. Both checkerboard and synthetic models show that Rayleigh- and Love-wave FWI have similar ability of reconstructing near-surface structures when free-surface topography is considered, while Love-wave FWI could reconstruct near-surface structures better than Rayleigh-wave when free-surface topography is neglected.

  15. 3D elastic full waveform inversion using P-wave excitation amplitude: Application to OBC field data

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon

    2017-12-05

    We propose an efficient elastic full waveform inversion (FWI) based on the P-wave excitation amplitude (maximum energy arrival) approximation in the source wavefields. Because, based on the P-wave excitation approximation (ExA), the gradient direction is approximated by the cross-correlation of source and receiver wavefields at only excitation time, it estimates the gradient direction faster than its conventional counterpart. In addition to this computational speedup, the P-wave excitation approximation automatically ignores SP and SS correlations in the approximated gradient direction. In elastic FWI for ocean bottom cable (OBC) data, the descent direction for the S-wave velocity is often degraded by undesired long-wavelength features from the SS correlation. For this reason, the P-wave excitation approach increases the convergence rate of multi-parameter FWI compared to the conventional approach. The modified 2D Marmousi model with OBC acquisition is used to verify the differences between the conventional method and ExA. Finally, the feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated on a real OBC data from North Sea.

  16. Monotoring of CO2 Sequestration at Sleipner Using Full Waveform Inversion in Time-lapse Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselet, A.; Singh, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    It is now widely admitted that recent increase of CO2 in the atmosphere is due to human activities. The consecutive greenhouse effect is a major ecological concern. Geological storage is one proposed way to reduce atmosphere CO2 emissions. The Sleipner methane field, North Sea, is the very first site where CO2 has been injected back into a deep saline aquifer. In 1996, the Norwegian company Statoil and its partners began the production of the methane. The extracted methane contains a relatively high ratio of CO2, between 4% and 9%, that has to be reduced below 2.5% before delivering into the pipeline. An environmental tax introduced in Norway as early as 1991 prompted the company to store the separated CO2 instead of releasing it into the atmosphere as usually done. The CO2 is injected at the base of the Utsira sands. This water bearing formation lies at a depth between 800 and 1000m and is sealed by a thick shale layer. Seismic monitoring is a key tool in this strategy from a security standpoint and for sequestration optimization itself. Consequently, 3D seismic data were acquired before injection in 1994 and after injection in 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2006. Well-log revealed that the reservoir is crossed by thin shale layers that are 1 to 10m thick. CO2 rises up and is confined vertically by the shale layers, favouring horizontal gas migration and creating gas bearing thin beds. Seismic imaging of the gas pockets is therefore a challenging problem because large velocity variations occur on very short distance. Classical processing of time-lapse data consists in subtracting repeated survey seismic traces from the pre- injection baseline traces to exhibit changes within the reservoir. This approach remains qualitative, providing only the shape and extent of the gas cloud. Instead, we propose to compare elastic models of the subsurface computed through 2D full wave form inversion, an advanced seismic imaging technique. This method is based on the wave equation

  17. Source mechanism of small long-period events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005 using template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Shearer, Peter M.; Haney, Matthew M.; Waite, Gregory P.; Moran, Seth C.; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity, observed at volcanoes worldwide, is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption. Cyclic LP “drumbeating” was the characteristic seismicity accompanying the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), WA. However, together with the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP “subevents”), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. The signal-to-noise ratios of the individual events are too low to produce reliable waveform-inversion results, but the events are repetitive and can be stacked. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005 using a master event to detect 822 network triggers. We stack waveforms for 359 high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism pointsto the volumetric oscillation (~10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (~30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice, perhaps supplied from snow melt.

  18. A new strategy for weak events in sparse networks: the first-motion polarity solutions constrained by single-station waveform inversion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtíková, Lucia; Zahradník, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 6 (2014), s. 1265-1274 ISSN 0895-0695 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/12/2336 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : weak events * sparse networks * focal mechanism * waveform inversion Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.156, year: 2014 http://srl.geoscienceworld.org/content/85/6/1265.full

  19. Focal mechanisms and moment magnitudes of micro-earthquakes in central Brazil by waveform inversion with quality assessment and inference of the local stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Juraci; Barros, Lucas Vieira; Zahradník, Jiří

    2016-11-01

    This paper documents an investigation on the use of full waveform inversion to retrieve focal mechanisms of 11 micro-earthquakes (Mw 0.8 to 1.4). The events represent aftershocks of a 5.0 mb earthquake that occurred on October 8, 2010 close to the city of Mara Rosa in the state of Goiás, Brazil. The main contribution of the work lies in demonstrating the feasibility of waveform inversion of such weak events. The inversion was made possible thanks to recordings available at 8 temporary seismic stations in epicentral distances of less than 8 km, at which waveforms can be successfully modeled at relatively high frequencies (1.5-2.0 Hz). On average, the fault-plane solutions obtained are in agreement with a composite focal mechanism previously calculated from first-motion polarities. They also agree with the fault geometry inferred from precise relocation of the Mara Rosa aftershock sequence. The focal mechanisms provide an estimate of the local stress field. This paper serves as a pilot study for similar investigations in intraplate regions where the stress-field investigations are difficult due to rare earthquake occurrences, and where weak events must be studied with a detailed quality assessment.

  20. Time-domain seismic modeling in viscoelastic media for full waveform inversion on heterogeneous computing platforms with OpenCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Giroux, Bernard

    2017-03-01

    Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) aims at recovering the elastic parameters of the Earth by matching recordings of the ground motion with the direct solution of the wave equation. Modeling the wave propagation for realistic scenarios is computationally intensive, which limits the applicability of FWI. The current hardware evolution brings increasing parallel computing power that can speed up the computations in FWI. However, to take advantage of the diversity of parallel architectures presently available, new programming approaches are required. In this work, we explore the use of OpenCL to develop a portable code that can take advantage of the many parallel processor architectures now available. We present a program called SeisCL for 2D and 3D viscoelastic FWI in the time domain. The code computes the forward and adjoint wavefields using finite-difference and outputs the gradient of the misfit function given by the adjoint state method. To demonstrate the code portability on different architectures, the performance of SeisCL is tested on three different devices: Intel CPUs, NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon PHI. Results show that the use of GPUs with OpenCL can speed up the computations by nearly two orders of magnitudes over a single threaded application on the CPU. Although OpenCL allows code portability, we show that some device-specific optimization is still required to get the best performance out of a specific architecture. Using OpenCL in conjunction with MPI allows the domain decomposition of large models on several devices located on different nodes of a cluster. For large enough models, the speedup of the domain decomposition varies quasi-linearly with the number of devices. Finally, we investigate two different approaches to compute the gradient by the adjoint state method and show the significant advantages of using OpenCL for FWI.

  1. On the sensitivity of teleseismic full-waveform inversion to earth parametrization, initial model and acquisition design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Combe, L.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.

    2018-02-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is not yet a mature imaging technology for lithospheric imaging from teleseismic data. Therefore, its promise and pitfalls need to be assessed more accurately according to the specifications of teleseismic experiments. Three important issues are related to (1) the choice of the lithospheric parametrization for optimization and visualization, (2) the initial model and (3) the acquisition design, in particular in terms of receiver spread and sampling. These three issues are investigated with a realistic synthetic example inspired by the CIFALPS experiment in the Western Alps. Isotropic elastic FWI is implemented with an adjoint-state formalism and aims to update three parameter classes by minimization of a classical least-squares difference-based misfit function. Three different subsurface parametrizations, combining density (ρ) with P and S wave speeds (Vp and Vs) , P and S impedances (Ip and Is), or elastic moduli (λ and μ) are first discussed based on their radiation patterns before their assessment by FWI. We conclude that the (ρ, λ, μ) parametrization provides the FWI models that best correlate with the true ones after recombining a posteriori the (ρ, λ, μ) optimization parameters into Ip and Is. Owing to the low frequency content of teleseismic data, 1-D reference global models as PREM provide sufficiently accurate initial models for FWI after smoothing that is necessary to remove the imprint of the layering. Two kinds of station deployments are assessed: coarse areal geometry versus dense linear one. We unambiguously conclude that a coarse areal geometry should be favoured as it dramatically increases the penetration in depth of the imaging as well as the horizontal resolution. This results because the areal geometry significantly increases local wavenumber coverage, through a broader sampling of the scattering and dip angles, compared to a linear deployment.

  2. The Linearized Bregman Method for Frugal Full-waveform Inversion with Compressive Sensing and Sparsity-promoting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xintao; Tang, Genyang; Peng, Ronghua; Liu, Shaoyong

    2018-03-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) reconstructs the subsurface properties from acquired seismic data via minimization of the misfit between observed and simulated data. However, FWI suffers from considerable computational costs resulting from the numerical solution of the wave equation for each source at each iteration. To reduce the computational burden, constructing supershots by combining several sources (aka source encoding) allows mitigation of the number of simulations at each iteration, but it gives rise to crosstalk artifacts because of interference between the individual sources of the supershot. A modified Gauss-Newton FWI (MGNFWI) approach showed that as long as the difference between the initial and true models permits a sparse representation, the ℓ _1-norm constrained model updates suppress subsampling-related artifacts. However, the spectral-projected gradient ℓ _1 (SPGℓ _1) algorithm employed by MGNFWI is rather complicated that makes its implementation difficult. To facilitate realistic applications, we adapt a linearized Bregman (LB) method to sparsity-promoting FWI (SPFWI) because of the efficiency and simplicity of LB in the framework of ℓ _1-norm constrained optimization problem and compressive sensing. Numerical experiments performed with the BP Salt model, the Marmousi model and the BG Compass model verify the following points. The FWI result with LB solving ℓ _1-norm sparsity-promoting problem for the model update outperforms that generated by solving ℓ _2-norm problem in terms of crosstalk elimination and high-fidelity results. The simpler LB method performs comparably and even superiorly to the complicated SPGℓ _1 method in terms of computational efficiency and model quality, making the LB method a viable alternative for realistic implementations of SPFWI.

  3. Comparison of seismic waveform inversion results for the rupture history of a finite fault: application to the 1986 North Palm Springs, California, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.

    1989-01-01

    The July 8, 1986, North Palm Strings earthquake is used as a basis for comparison of several different approaches to the solution for the rupture history of a finite fault. The inversion of different waveform data is considered; both teleseismic P waveforms and local strong ground motion records. Linear parametrizations for slip amplitude are compared with nonlinear parametrizations for both slip amplitude and rupture time. Inversions using both synthetic and empirical Green's functions are considered. In general, accurate Green's functions are more readily calculable for the teleseismic problem where simple ray theory and flat-layered velocity structures are usually sufficient. However, uncertainties in the variation in t* with frequency most limit the resolution of teleseismic inversions. A set of empirical Green's functions that are well recorded at teleseismic distances could avoid the uncertainties in attenuation. In the inversion of strong motion data, the accurate calculation of propagation path effects other than attenuation effects is the limiting factor in the resolution of source parameters. -from Author

  4. Time-domain full waveform inversion using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic wave energy: Application to the South China Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mengxuan, Zhong

    2017-06-01

    The gradient preconditioning algorithms based on Hessian matrices in time-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) are widely used now, but consume a lot of memory and do not fit the FWI of large models or actual seismic data well. To avoid the huge storage consumption, the gradient preconditioning approach based on seismic wave energy has been proposed it simulates the “approximated wave field” with the acoustic wave equation and uses the energy of the simulated wavefield to precondition the gradient. The method does not require computing and storing the Hessian matrix or its inverse and can effectively eliminate the effect caused by geometric diffusion and uneven illumination on gradient. The result of experiments in this article with field data from South China Sea confirms that the time-domain FWI using the gradient preconditioning based on seismic wave energy (GPWE) can achieve higher inversion accuracy for the deep high-velocity model and its underlying strata.

  5. P-wave velocity models of continental shelf of East Siberian Sea using the Laplace-domain full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S. G.; Hong, J. K.; Jin, Y. K.; Jang, U.; Niessen, F.; Baranov, B.

    2017-12-01

    2016 IBRV ARAON Arctic Cruise Leg-2, Expedition ARA07C was a multidisciplinary undertaking carried out in the East Siberian Sea (ESS) from August 25 to September 10, 2016. The program was conducted as a collaboration between the Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IORAS), and Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI). During this expedition, the multi-channel seismic (MCS) data were acquired on the continental shelf and the upper slope of the ESS, totaling 3 lines with 660 line-kilometers. The continental shelf of ESS is one of the widest shelf seas in the world and it is believed to cover the largest area of sub-sea permafrost in the Arctic. According to the present knowledge of the glacial history of the western Arctic Ocean, it is likely that during the LGM with a sea level approximately 120 m below present, the entire shelf area of the ESS was exposed to very cold air temperatures so that thick permafrost should have formed. Indeed, in water depths shallower than 80 m, sub-bottom profiles in the ESS recorded from the shelf edge to a latitude of 74°30' N in 60 m water depth exhibited acoustic facies, suggesting that at least relicts of submarine permafrost are present. In order to identify the existence and/or non-existence of subsea permafrost in our study area, we analyze the MCS data using the Laplace domain full waveform inversion (FWI). In case of the Canadian continental shelf of the Beaufort Sea, subsea permafrost has high seismic velocity values (over 2.6 km/sec) and strong refraction events were found in the MCS shotgathers. However, in the EES our proposed P-wave velocity models derived from FWI have neither found high velocity structures (over 2.6 km/sec) nor indicate strong refraction events by subsea permafrost. Instead, in 300 m depth below sea floor higher P-wave velocity structures (1.8 2.2 km/s) than normal subsea sediment layers were found, which are interpreted as cemented strata by glaciation activities.

  6. Source rupture process of the 2016 Kaikoura, New Zealand earthquake estimated from the kinematic waveform inversion of strong-motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ao; Wang, Mingfeng; Yu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Wenbo

    2018-03-01

    On 2016 November 13, an Mw 7.8 earthquake occurred in the northeast of the South Island of New Zealand near Kaikoura. The earthquake caused severe damages and great impacts on local nature and society. Referring to the tectonic environment and defined active faults, the field investigation and geodetic evidence reveal that at least 12 fault sections ruptured in the earthquake, and the focal mechanism is one of the most complicated in historical earthquakes. On account of the complexity of the source rupture, we propose a multisegment fault model based on the distribution of surface ruptures and active tectonics. We derive the source rupture process of the earthquake using the kinematic waveform inversion method with the multisegment fault model from strong-motion data of 21 stations (0.05-0.35 Hz). The inversion result suggests the rupture initiates in the epicentral area near the Humps fault, and then propagates northeastward along several faults, until the offshore Needles fault. The Mw 7.8 event is a mixture of right-lateral strike and reverse slip, and the maximum slip is approximately 19 m. The synthetic waveforms reproduce the characteristics of the observed ones well. In addition, we synthesize the coseismic offsets distribution of the ruptured region from the slips of upper subfaults in the fault model, which is roughly consistent with the surface breaks observed in the field survey.

  7. Bathymetry and composition of Titan's Ontario Lacus derived from Monte Carlo-based waveform inversion of Cassini RADAR altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hayes, A. G.; Poggiali, V.; Lunine, J. I.; Lorenz, R. D.; Seu, R.; Le Gall, A.; Notarnicola, C.; Mitchell, K. L.; Malaska, M.; Birch, S. P. D.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the Cassini RADAR was used to sound hydrocarbon lakes and seas on Saturn's moon Titan. Since the initial discovery of echoes from the seabed of Ligeia Mare, the second largest liquid body on Titan, a dedicated radar processing chain has been developed to retrieve liquid depth and microwave absorptivity information from RADAR altimetry of Titan's lakes and seas. Herein, we apply this processing chain to altimetry data acquired over southern Ontario Lacus during Titan fly-by T49 in December 2008. The new signal processing chain adopts super resolution techniques and dedicated taper functions to reveal the presence of reflection from Ontario's lakebed. Unfortunately, the extracted waveforms from T49 are often distorted due to signal saturation, owing to the extraordinarily strong specular reflections from the smooth lake surface. This distortion is a function of the saturation level and can introduce artifacts, such as signal precursors, which complicate data interpretation. We use a radar altimetry simulator to retrieve information from the saturated bursts and determine the liquid depth and loss tangent of Ontario Lacus. Received waveforms are represented using a two-layer model, where Cassini raw radar data are simulated in order to reproduce the effects of receiver saturation. A Monte Carlo based approach along with a simulated waveform look-up table is used to retrieve parameters that are given as inputs to a parametric model which constrains radio absorption of Ontario Lacus and retrieves information about the dielectric properties of the liquid. We retrieve a maximum depth of 50 m along the radar transect and a best-fit specific attenuation of the liquid equal to 0.2 ± 0.09 dB m-1 that, when converted into loss tangent, gives tanδ = 7 ± 3 × 10-5. When combined with laboratory measured cryogenic liquid alkane dielectric properties and the variable solubility of nitrogen in ethane-methane mixtures, the best-fit loss tangent is consistent with a

  8. Applications of multiscale waveform inversion to marine data using a flooding technique and dynamic early-arrival windows

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot; Schuster, Gerard T.; Valasek, Paul A.; Cao, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    an accurate and highly resolved velocity tomogram for the 2D SEG/EAGE salt model. In the application of MWT to the field data, the inversion process is carried out using a multiscale method with a dynamic early-arrival muting window to mitigate the local

  9. Preliminary assessment of the waveform inversion method for interpretation of cross-well seismic data from the thermal production test, JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Research Center for Seismology and Volcanology; Shimizu, S. [Japan National Oil Co., Chiba (Japan); Asakawa, E. [JGI Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Kamei, R.; Matsuoka, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Civil and Earth Resources Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 3L-38 and 4L-38 test wells were subjected to repeated cross-well seismic surveys before and during the gas production test from the gas-hydrate-bearing layer at a depth of about 905 to 920 m. High-resolution velocity images in the gas-hydrate-bearing layer were obtained using the frequency-domain nonlinear waveform inversion method. An acoustic waveform inversion method was used along with the frequency-domain approach in order to detect the change in acoustic properties of the gas-hydrate-bearing layer resulting from gas production. The layered structures with small lateral heterogeneities were reconstructed by tomography analysis of preprocessed waveform data using a smaller number of source-receiver pairs. Preliminary results reveal high velocity and very high attenuation in the gas-hydrate-bearing layers. No obvious velocity decreases were noted. Information for further detailed processing was also gathered.

  10. Joint inversion of teleseismic P waveforms and surface-wave group velocities from ambient seismic noise in the Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Bohuslav; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2012), s. 107-140 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1088; GA AV ČR IAA300120709; GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : receiver function * seismic noise * joint inversion * Bohemian Massif * velocity structure Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2012

  11. Interparameter trade-off quantification and reduction in isotropic-elastic full-waveform inversion: synthetic experiments and Hussar land data set application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenyong; Geng, Yu; Innanen, Kristopher A.

    2018-05-01

    The problem of inverting for multiple physical parameters in the subsurface using seismic full-waveform inversion (FWI) is complicated by interparameter trade-off arising from inherent ambiguities between different physical parameters. Parameter resolution is often characterized using scattering radiation patterns, but these neglect some important aspects of interparameter trade-off. More general analysis and mitigation of interparameter trade-off in isotropic-elastic FWI is possible through judiciously chosen multiparameter Hessian matrix-vector products. We show that products of multiparameter Hessian off-diagonal blocks with model perturbation vectors, referred to as interparameter contamination kernels, are central to the approach. We apply the multiparameter Hessian to various vectors designed to provide information regarding the strengths and characteristics of interparameter contamination, both locally and within the whole volume. With numerical experiments, we observe that S-wave velocity perturbations introduce strong contaminations into density and phase-reversed contaminations into P-wave velocity, but themselves experience only limited contaminations from other parameters. Based on these findings, we introduce a novel strategy to mitigate the influence of interparameter trade-off with approximate contamination kernels. Furthermore, we recommend that the local spatial and interparameter trade-off of the inverted models be quantified using extended multiparameter point spread functions (EMPSFs) obtained with pre-conditioned conjugate-gradient algorithm. Compared to traditional point spread functions, the EMPSFs appear to provide more accurate measurements for resolution analysis, by de-blurring the estimations, scaling magnitudes and mitigating interparameter contamination. Approximate eigenvalue volumes constructed with stochastic probing approach are proposed to evaluate the resolution of the inverted models within the whole model. With a synthetic

  12. Quantitative monitoring of CO2 injection at Sleipner using seismic full waveform inversion in the time lapse mode and rock physics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queisser, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a technology to achieve a considerable deceleration of CO 2 emission promptly. Since 1996 one of the largest CO 2 storage projects is taking place at Sleipner in the Norwegian North Sea. In order to monitor injected CO 2 , time lapse seismic monitoring surveys have been carried out. Estimating subsurface parameters from the Sleipner seismic data is a challenging problem due to the specific geology of the storage reservoir, which is further complicated by injected CO 2 . Most seismic imaging methods enable only qualitative insights into the subsurface. Motivated by the need for a quantitative seismic monitoring of the injected CO 2 , I have applied 2D seismic full waveform inversion to seismic data sets from Sleipner from 1994 (baseline), 1999 and 2006 along three seismic lines to infer subsurface parameters and parameter changes in the storage reservoir. The P-wave velocity is the major parameter, as it is the most sensitive to CO 2 injection. An energy preconditioning of the gradient has been implemented. The usual source wavelet calibration did not prove to be reliable. An alternative source calibration has been successfully applied. By comparing seismic images with inversion results, I found that using seismic images to locate CO 2 accumulations in the subsurface may be misleading. The quantitative imaging approach using full waveform inversion resulted in a consistent evolution of the model parameter with time. Major reductions in P-wave velocity and hence the CO 2 accumulations could be quantitatively imaged down to a resolution of 10 m. Observed travel time shifts due to CO 2 injection are comparable to those derived from the inversion result. In order to estimate CO 2 saturations, rock physical concepts have been combined and extended to arrive at a rock physical formulation of the subsurface at Sleipner. I used pseudo Monte Carlo rock physics modeling to assess the influence of lithologic heterogeneity on the CO 2

  13. Prestack Waveform Inversion and Well Log Examination at GC955 and WR313 in the Gulf of Mexico for Estimation of Methane Hydrate Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, W.; Goldberg, D.; Kucuk, H. M.

    2017-12-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring compounds, which, at a molecular scale, are lattice structures of ice embedded with various gas molecules in the lattice voids. Volumetric estimates of associated hydrocarbons vary greatly due to the difficulty in remotely estimating hydrate concentrations in marine sediments but embedded hydrocarbon stores are thought to represent a significant portion of global deposits. Inherent hydrate instabilities obscure our understanding of and complicates processes related to resource extraction and hydrate response to disturbances in the local environment. Understanding the spatial extent and variability of hydrate deposits have important implications for potential economic production, climate change, and assessing natural hazards risks. Seismic reflection techniques are capable of determining the extent of gas hydrate deposits, often through the observation of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). However, BSRs are not present everywhere gas hydrates exist. Using high resolution prestack time migrated seismic data and prestack waveform inversion (PWI) we produce highly resolved velocity models and compare them to co-located well logs. Coupling our PWI results with velocity-porosity relationships and nearby well control, we map hydrate properties at GC955 and WR313. Integrating small scale heterogeneities and variations along the velocity model with in-situ measurements, we develop a workflow aimed to quantify hydrate concentrations observed in seismic data over large areas in great detail regardless of the existence of a BSR.

  14. Detailed structure of the top of the melt body beneath the East Pacific Rise at 9°40'N from waveform inversion of seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, J. S.; Singh, S. C.

    1997-01-01

    We have applied waveform inversion to multichannel seismic reflection data collected at the East Pacific Rise at 9°40'N in order to determine the precise velocity structure of the magma body causing the axial magma chamber reflection. Our analysis supports the idea of a molten sill as previously suggested from forward modeling of seismic data from this location. Our inverted solution has a 30-m-thick sill with a P wave seismic velocity of 2.6 km s-1. Although not well constrained by the data we believe that the S wave velocity in the sill is not significantly different from 0.0 km s-1. The low P- and S wave velocities in the sill imply that it contains less than 30% crystals. The molten sill is underlain by a velocity gradient in which the P wave velocity increases from 2.6 to 3.5 km s-1 over a vertical distance of 50-m. The shape of our velocity-depth profile implies that accretion of material to the roof of the sill is minor compared to accretion to the floor. The underlying velocity gradient zone may represent crystal settling under gravity. We suggest that only material from the 30-m-thick layer can erupt.

  15. Modeling subduction earthquake sources in the central-western region of Colombia using waveform inversion of body waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve-Jaramillo, Hugo; Valencia-Mina, William; Cano-Saldaña, Leonardo; Vargas, Carlos A.

    2018-05-01

    Source parameters of four earthquakes located within the Wadati-Benioff zone of the Nazca plate subducting beneath the South American plate in Colombia were determined. The seismic moments for these events were recalculated and their approximate equivalent rupture area, slip distribution and stress drop were estimated. The source parameters for these earthquakes were obtained by deconvolving multiple events through teleseismic analysis of body waves recorded in long period stations and with simultaneous inversion of P and SH waves. The calculated source time functions for these events showed different stages that suggest that these earthquakes can reasonably be thought of being composed of two subevents. Even though two of the overall focal mechanisms obtained yielded similar results to those reported by the CMT catalogue, the two other mechanisms showed a clear difference compared to those officially reported. Despite this, it appropriate to mention that the mechanisms inverted in this work agree well with the expected orientation of faulting at that depth as well as with the wave forms they are expected to produce. In some of the solutions achieved, one of the two subevents exhibited a focal mechanism considerably different from the total earthquake mechanism; this could be interpreted as the result of a slight deviation from the overall motion due the complex stress field as well as the possibility of a combination of different sources of energy release analogous to the ones that may occur in deeper earthquakes. In those cases, the subevents with very different focal mechanism compared to the total earthquake mechanism had little contribution to the final solution and thus little contribution to the total amount of energy released.

  16. Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  17. Effects of Conjugate Gradient Methods and Step-Length Formulas on the Multiscale Full Waveform Inversion in Time Domain: Numerical Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youshan; Teng, Jiwen; Xu, Tao; Badal, José; Liu, Qinya; Zhou, Bing

    2017-05-01

    We carry out full waveform inversion (FWI) in time domain based on an alternative frequency-band selection strategy that allows us to implement the method with success. This strategy aims at decomposing the seismic data within partially overlapped frequency intervals by carrying out a concatenated treatment of the wavelet to largely avoid redundant frequency information to adapt to wavelength or wavenumber coverage. A pertinent numerical test proves the effectiveness of this strategy. Based on this strategy, we comparatively analyze the effects of update parameters for the nonlinear conjugate gradient (CG) method and step-length formulas on the multiscale FWI through several numerical tests. The investigations of up to eight versions of the nonlinear CG method with and without Gaussian white noise make clear that the HS (Hestenes and Stiefel in J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect 5:409-436, 1952), CD (Fletcher in Practical methods of optimization vol. 1: unconstrained optimization, Wiley, New York, 1987), and PRP (Polak and Ribière in Revue Francaise Informat Recherche Opertionelle, 3e Année 16:35-43, 1969; Polyak in USSR Comput Math Math Phys 9:94-112, 1969) versions are more efficient among the eight versions, while the DY (Dai and Yuan in SIAM J Optim 10:177-182, 1999) version always yields inaccurate result, because it overestimates the deeper parts of the model. The application of FWI algorithms using distinct step-length formulas, such as the direct method ( Direct), the parabolic search method ( Search), and the two-point quadratic interpolation method ( Interp), proves that the Interp is more efficient for noise-free data, while the Direct is more efficient for Gaussian white noise data. In contrast, the Search is less efficient because of its slow convergence. In general, the three step-length formulas are robust or partly insensitive to Gaussian white noise and the complexity of the model. When the initial velocity model deviates far from the real model or the

  18. Source mechanism of Vulcanian degassing at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, determined from waveform inversions of very long period signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra

    2005-01-01

    The source mechanism of very long period (VLP) signals accompanying volcanic degassing bursts at Popocatépetl is analyzed in the 15–70 s band by minimizing the residual error between data and synthetics calculated for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium. The waveforms of two eruptions (23 April and 23 May 2000) representative of mild Vulcanian activity are well reproduced by our inversion, which takes into account volcano topography. The source centroid is positioned 1500 m below the western perimeter of the summit crater, and the modeled source is composed of a shallow dipping crack (sill with easterly dip of 10°) intersecting a steeply dipping crack (northeast striking dike dipping 83° northwest), whose surface extension bisects the vent. Both cracks undergo a similar sequence of inflation, deflation, and reinflation, reflecting a cycle of pressurization, depressurization, and repressurization within a time interval of 3–5 min. The largest moment release occurs in the sill, showing a maximum volume change of 500–1000 m3, pressure drop of 3–5 MPa, and amplitude of recovered pressure equal to 1.2 times the amplitude of the pressure drop. In contrast, the maximum volume change in the dike is less (200–300 m3), with a corresponding pressure drop of 1–2 MPa and pressure recovery equal to the pressure drop. Accompanying these volumetric sources are single-force components with magnitudes of 108 N, consistent with melt advection in response to pressure transients. The source time histories of the volumetric components of the source indicate that significant mass movement starts within the sill and triggers a mass movement response in the dike within a few seconds. Such source behavior is consistent with the opening of a pathway for escape of pent-up gases from slow pressurization of the sill driven by magma crystallization. The opening of this pathway and associated rapid evacuation of volcanic gases induces the pressure drop. Pressure

  19. Elastic full-waveform inversion and parameterization analysis applied to walk-away vertical seismic profile data for unconventional (heavy oil) reservoir characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenyong; Innanen, Kristopher A.; Geng, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Seismic full-waveform inversion (FWI) methods hold strong potential to recover multiple subsurface elastic properties for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. Simultaneously updating multiple physical parameters introduces the problem of interparameter tradeoff, arising from the covariance between different physical parameters, which increases nonlinearity and uncertainty of multiparameter FWI. The coupling effects of different physical parameters are significantly influenced by model parameterization and acquisition arrangement. An appropriate choice of model parameterization is critical to successful field data applications of multiparameter FWI. The objective of this paper is to examine the performance of various model parameterizations in isotropic-elastic FWI with walk-away vertical seismic profile (W-VSP) dataset for unconventional heavy oil reservoir characterization. Six model parameterizations are considered: velocity-density (α, β and ρ΄), modulus-density (κ, μ and ρ), Lamé-density (λ, μ΄ and ρ‴), impedance-density (IP, IS and ρ″), velocity-impedance-I (α΄, β΄ and I_P^'), and velocity-impedance-II (α″, β″ and I_S^'). We begin analyzing the interparameter tradeoff by making use of scattering radiation patterns, which is a common strategy for qualitative parameter resolution analysis. In this paper, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the scattering radiation patterns and recommend that interparameter tradeoffs be evaluated using interparameter contamination kernels, which provide quantitative, second-order measurements of the interparameter contaminations and can be constructed efficiently with an adjoint-state approach. Synthetic W-VSP isotropic-elastic FWI experiments in the time domain verify our conclusions about interparameter tradeoffs for various model parameterizations. Density profiles are most strongly influenced by the interparameter contaminations; depending on model parameterization, the inverted density

  20. Elastic full-waveform inversion and parametrization analysis applied to walk-away vertical seismic profile data for unconventional (heavy oil) reservoir characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenyong; Innanen, Kristopher A.; Geng, Yu

    2018-06-01

    Seismic full-waveform inversion (FWI) methods hold strong potential to recover multiple subsurface elastic properties for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. Simultaneously updating multiple physical parameters introduces the problem of interparameter trade-off, arising from the simultaneous variations of different physical parameters, which increase the nonlinearity and uncertainty of multiparameter FWI. The coupling effects of different physical parameters are significantly influenced by model parametrization and acquisition arrangement. An appropriate choice of model parametrization is important to successful field data applications of multiparameter FWI. The objective of this paper is to examine the performance of various model parametrizations in isotropic-elastic FWI with walk-away vertical seismic profile (W-VSP) data for unconventional heavy oil reservoir characterization. Six model parametrizations are considered: velocity-density (α, β and ρ΄), modulus-density (κ, μ and ρ), Lamé-density (λ, μ΄ and ρ‴), impedance-density (IP, IS and ρ″), velocity-impedance-I (α΄, β΄ and I_P^' }) and velocity-impedance-II (α″, β″ and I_S^' }). We begin analysing the interparameter trade-off by making use of scattering radiation patterns, which is a common strategy for qualitative parameter resolution analysis. We discuss the advantages and limitations of the scattering radiation patterns and recommend that interparameter trade-offs be evaluated using interparameter contamination kernels, which provide quantitative, second-order measurements of the interparameter contaminations and can be constructed efficiently with an adjoint-state approach. Synthetic W-VSP isotropic-elastic FWI experiments in the time domain verify our conclusions about interparameter trade-offs for various model parametrizations. Density profiles are most strongly influenced by the interparameter contaminations; depending on model parametrization, the inverted density

  1. Wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong; Schuster, Gerard T.; Luo, Yi

    2011-01-01

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion using a gradient optimization method is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated within the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear

  2. Closed form of optimal current waveform for class-F PA up to fourth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PA and its dual, usually referred as inverse class-F PA, current and voltage ... voltage waveforms provides a number of advantages in the process of PA design ... RF PA design approaches with waveform theory and experimental waveform.

  3. Forest Canopy LAI and Vertical FAVD Profile Inversion from Airborne Full-Waveform LiDAR Data Based on a Radiative Transfer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopy leaf area index (LAI is a critical variable for the modeling of climates and ecosystems over both regional and global scales. This paper proposes a physically based method to retrieve LAI and foliage area volume density (FAVD profile directly from full-waveform Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR data using a radiative transfer (RT model. First, a physical interaction model between LiDAR and a forest scene was built on the basis of radiative transfer theories. Next, FAVD profile of each laser shot of full-waveform LiDAR was inverted using the physical model. In addition, the missing LiDAR data, caused by high-density forest and LiDAR system limitations, were filled in based on the inverted FAVD and the ancillary CHM data. Finally, LAI of the study area was retrieved from the inverted FAVD at a 10-m resolution. CHM derived LAI based on the Beer-Lambert law was compared with the LAI derived from full-waveform data. Also, we compared the results with the field measured LAI. The values of correlation coefficient r and RMSE of the estimated LAI were 0.73 and 0.67, respectively. The results indicate that full-waveform LiDAR data is a reliable data source and represent a useful tool for retrieving forest LAI.

  4. Rupture process of the 2016 Mw 7.8 Ecuador earthquake from joint inversion of InSAR data and teleseismic P waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lei; Xu, Caijun; Wen, Yangmao; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Guoyan

    2018-01-01

    The 2016 Ecuador earthquake ruptured the Ecuador-Colombia subduction interface where several historic megathrust earthquakes had occurred. In order to determine a detailed rupture model, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) images and teleseismic data sets were objectively weighted by using a modified Akaika's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) method to jointly invert for the rupture process of the earthquake. In modeling the rupture process, a constrained waveform length method, unlike the traditional subjective selected waveform length method, was used since the lengths of inverted waveforms were strictly constrained by the rupture velocity and rise time (the slip duration time). The optimal rupture velocity and rise time of the earthquake were estimated from grid search, which were determined to be 2.0 km/s and 20 s, respectively. The inverted model shows that the event is dominated by thrust movement and the released moment is 5.75 × 1020 Nm (Mw 7.77). The slip distribution extends southward along the Ecuador coast line in an elongated stripe at a depth between 10 and 25 km. The slip model is composed of two asperities and slipped over 4 m. The source time function is approximate 80 s that separated into two segments corresponding to the two asperities. The small magnitude of the slip occurred in the updip section of the fault plane resulted in small tsunami waves that were verified by observations near the coast. We suggest a possible situation that the rupture zone of the 2016 earthquake is likely not overlapped with that of the 1942 earthquake.

  5. Full-waveform inversion of cross-hole GPR data collected in a strongly heterogeneous chalk reservoir analogue with sharp permittivity and conductivity contrasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Moreau, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Chalk sediments form an important reservoir for groundwater onshore and for hydrocarbons in the Danish sector of the North Sea. Cross-hole Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography is an efficient method to investigate subtle porosity variations in the chalk. Traditional ray-based inversion...

  6. Two collateral problems in the framework of ground-penetrating radar data inversion: influence of the emitted waveform outline and radargram comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui Jorge; Caldeira, Bento; Borges, José Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Obtain three-dimensional models of the physical properties of buried structures in the subsurface by inversion of GPR data is an appeal to Archaeology and a challenge to Geophysics. Along the research of solutions to resolve this issue stand out two major problems that need to be solved: 1) Establishment the basis of the computation that allows assign numerically in the synthetic radargrams, the physical conditions at which the GPR wave were generated; and 2) automatic comparison of the computed synthetic radargrams with the correspondent observed ones. The influence of the pulse shape in GPR data processing was a studied topic. The pulse outline emitted by GPR antennas was experimentally acquired and this information has been used in the deconvolution operation, carried out by iterative process, similarly the approach used in seismology to obtain the receiver functions. In order to establish the comparison between real and synthetic radargrams, were tested automatic image adjustment algorithms, which search the best fit between two radargramas and quantify their differences through the calculation of Normalized Root Mean Square Deviation (NRMSD). After the implementation of the last tests, the NRMSD between the synthetic and real data is about 19% (initially it was 29%). These procedures are essential to be able to perform an inversion of GPR data obtained in the field. Acknowledgment: This work is co-funded by the European Union through the European Regional Development Fund, included in the COMPETE 2020 (Operational Program Competitiveness and Internationalization) through the ICT project (UID/GEO/04683/2013) with the reference POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007690.

  7. A nonlinear inversion for the velocity background and perturbation models

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the single scattered wavefield obtained using an image. However, current RWI methods usually neglect

  8. Harmonic arbitrary waveform generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brock Franklin

    2017-11-28

    High frequency arbitrary waveforms have applications in radar, communications, medical imaging, therapy, electronic warfare, and charged particle acceleration and control. State of the art arbitrary waveform generators are limited in the frequency they can operate by the speed of the Digital to Analog converters that directly create their arbitrary waveforms. The architecture of the Harmonic Arbitrary Waveform Generator allows the phase and amplitude of the high frequency content of waveforms to be controlled without taxing the Digital to Analog converters that control them. The Harmonic Arbitrary Waveform Generator converts a high frequency input, into a precision, adjustable, high frequency arbitrary waveform.

  9. Programmable waveform controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1979-01-01

    A programmable waveform controller (PWC) was developed for voltage waveform generation in the laboratory. It is based on the Intel 8080 family of chips. The hardware uses the modular board approach, sharing a common 44-pin bus. The software contains two separate programs: the first generates a single connected linear ramp waveform and is capable of bipolar operation, linear interpolation between input data points, extended time range, and cycling; the second generates four independent square waveforms with variable duration and amplitude

  10. 3-D waveform tomography sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    The complications in anisotropic multi-parameter inversion lie in the trade-off between the different anisotropy parameters. We compute the tomographic waveform sensitivity kernels for a VTI acoustic medium perturbation as a tool to investigate

  11. An Iterative Travel Time Inversion and Waveform Modeling Method to Determine the Crust Structure and Focal Mechanism: Case Study of 2015 Alxa Left Banner Ms5.8 Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, C.; Ge, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The boundary region between Alxa Block and Ordos Block is an area of stress concentration with strong seismicity and frequent small earthquakes. However, the knowledge of this area is limited since only a few seismic stations were deployed in this area. The 2015 Ms5.8 Alxa Left Banner Earthquake on April 15 is the largest one occurred in the surroundings since the 1976 Ms6.2 Bayinmuren Earthquake. Abundant stations built in the northern part of Chinese North-South Seismic Belt recorded this event sequence well within short distance, which provides us a great opportunity to carry out studies. We use these data to obtain a mean 1-D layered velocity structure via iterative inversion based on both travel time and waveform misfits. Then we use the travel time difference between data and synthetic seismograms to relocate the epicenter. Finally we invert the best double-couple focal mechanism and centroid depths of the source. As the result, the source is located at (39.7027° N, 106.4207° E) with a depth of 18 km and Mw 5.28. Nodal plane Ⅰ has strike 86°, dip angle 90° and slip angle -3°, while plane Ⅱ has strike 176°, dip angle 87° and slip angle 180°. Considering the dynamic structure of regional fault zone, we believe this earthquake is caused by a nearly pure left-lateral strike-slip fault with nodal plane Ⅰ being the fault plane. The seismogenic structure is likely to be an E-W striking buried fault nearby. There develops several groups of NE, NEE and E-W striking faults in Jilantai tectonic zone, parts of which have been verified by geophysical investigations. But we still know little about the dynamic nature of them. From our study, the corresponding fault of this event may indicate all groups of faults with same E-W strike has the common character of large-dip left-lateral strike-slip. Moreover, there may be some buried faults being newly born or not found yet. These results could be an important supplement to the future research of seismicity and

  12. Coding Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Burderi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the study of decipherability conditions for codes weaker than Unique Decipherability (UD, we introduce the notion of coding partition. Such a notion generalizes that of UD code and, for codes that are not UD, allows to recover the ``unique decipherability" at the level of the classes of the partition. By tacking into account the natural order between the partitions, we define the characteristic partition of a code X as the finest coding partition of X. This leads to introduce the canonical decomposition of a code in at most one unambiguouscomponent and other (if any totally ambiguouscomponents. In the case the code is finite, we give an algorithm for computing its canonical partition. This, in particular, allows to decide whether a given partition of a finite code X is a coding partition. This last problem is then approached in the case the code is a rational set. We prove its decidability under the hypothesis that the partition contains a finite number of classes and each class is a rational set. Moreover we conjecture that the canonical partition satisfies such a hypothesis. Finally we consider also some relationships between coding partitions and varieties of codes.

  13. Surrogate waveform models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott; Galley, Chad; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    With the advanced detector era just around the corner, there is a strong need for fast and accurate models of gravitational waveforms from compact binary coalescence. Fast surrogate models can be built out of an accurate but slow waveform model with minimal to no loss in accuracy, but may require a large number of evaluations of the underlying model. This may be prohibitively expensive if the underlying is extremely slow, for example if we wish to build a surrogate for numerical relativity. We examine alternate choices to building surrogate models which allow for a more sparse set of input waveforms. Research supported in part by NSERC.

  14. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  15. Multiscattering inversion for low-model wavenumbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Wu, Zedong

    2016-01-01

    A successful full-waveform inversion implementation updates the low-wavenumber model components first for a proper description of the wavefield propagation and slowly adds the high wavenumber potentially scattering parts of the model. The low

  16. Multichannel waveform display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolvankar, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    For any multichannel data acquisition system, a multichannel paper chart recorder undoubtedly forms an essential part of the system. When deployed on-line, it instantaneously provides, for visual inspection, hard copies of the signal waveforms on common time base at any desired sensitivity and time resolution. Within the country, only a small range of these strip chart recorder s is available, and under stringent specifications imported recorders are often procured. The cost of such recorders may range from 1 to 5 lakhs of rupees in foreign exchange. A system to provide on the oscilloscope a steady display of multichannel waveforms, refreshed from the digital data stored in the memory is developed. The merits and demerits of the display system are compared with that built around a conventional paper chart recorder. Various illustrations of multichannel seismic event data acquired at Gauribidanur seismic array station are also presented. (author). 2 figs

  17. Lane marking detection based on waveform analysis and CNN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yang Yang; Chen, Hou Jin; Hao, Xiao Li

    2017-06-01

    Lane markings detection is a very important part of the ADAS to avoid traffic accidents. In order to obtain accurate lane markings, in this work, a novel and efficient algorithm is proposed, which analyses the waveform generated from the road image after inverse perspective mapping (IPM). The algorithm includes two main stages: the first stage uses an image preprocessing including a CNN to reduce the background and enhance the lane markings. The second stage obtains the waveform of the road image and analyzes the waveform to get lanes. The contribution of this work is that we introduce local and global features of the waveform to detect the lane markings. The results indicate the proposed method is robust in detecting and fitting the lane markings.

  18. Born reflection kernel analysis and wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion in elastic media

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Tengfei; Cheng, Jiubing

    2017-01-01

    Elastic reflection waveform inversion (ERWI) utilize the reflections to update the low and intermediate wavenumbers in the deeper part of model. However, ERWI suffers from the cycle-skipping problem due to the objective function of waveform residual

  19. Electronics via waveform analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Edwin C

    1993-01-01

    The author believes that a good basic understanding of electronics can be achieved by detailed visual analyses of the actual voltage waveforms present in selected circuits. The voltage waveforms included in this text were photographed using a 35-rrun camera in an attempt to make the book more attractive. This book is intended for the use of students with a variety of backgrounds. For this reason considerable material has been placed in the Appendix for those students who find it useful. The Appendix includes many basic electricity and electronic concepts as well as mathematical derivations that are not vital to the understanding of the circuit being discussed in the text at that time. Also some derivations might be so long that, if included in the text, it could affect the concentration of the student on the circuit being studied. The author has tried to make the book comprehensive enough so that a student could use it as a self-study course, providing one has access to adequate laboratory equipment.

  20. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  1. Waveform Sampler CAMAC Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, D.R.; Haller, G.M.; Kang, H.; Wang, J.

    1985-09-01

    A Waveform Sampler Module (WSM) for the measurement of signal shapes coming from the multi-hit drift chambers of the SLAC SLC detector is described. The module uses a high speed, high resolution analog storage device (AMU) developed in collaboration between SLAC and Stanford University. The AMU devices together with high speed TTL clocking circuitry are packaged in a hybrid which is also suitable for mounting on the detector. The module is in CAMAC format and provides eight signal channels, each recording signal amplitude versus time in 512 cells at a sampling rate of up to 360 MHz. Data are digitized by a 12-bit ADC with a 1 μs conversion time and stored in an on-board memory accessible through CAMAC

  2. Joint Inversion of Earthquake Source Parameters with local and teleseismic body waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Ni, S.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    In the classical source parameter inversion algorithm of CAP (Cut and Paste method, by Zhao and Helmberger), waveform data at near distances (typically less than 500km) are partitioned into Pnl and surface waves to account for uncertainties in the crustal models and different amplitude weight of body and surface waves. The classical CAP algorithms have proven effective for resolving source parameters (focal mechanisms, depth and moment) for earthquakes well recorded on relatively dense seismic network. However for regions covered with sparse stations, it is challenging to achieve precise source parameters . In this case, a moderate earthquake of ~M6 is usually recorded on only one or two local stations with epicentral distances less than 500 km. Fortunately, an earthquake of ~M6 can be well recorded on global seismic networks. Since the ray paths for teleseismic and local body waves sample different portions of the focal sphere, combination of teleseismic and local body wave data helps constrain source parameters better. Here we present a new CAP mothod (CAPjoint), which emploits both teleseismic body waveforms (P and SH waves) and local waveforms (Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves) to determine source parameters. For an earthquake in Nevada that is well recorded with dense local network (USArray stations), we compare the results from CAPjoint with those from the traditional CAP method involving only of local waveforms , and explore the efficiency with bootstraping statistics to prove the results derived by CAPjoint are stable and reliable. Even with one local station included in joint inversion, accuracy of source parameters such as moment and strike can be much better improved.

  3. Third Harmonic Imaging using a Pulse Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The pulse inversion (PI) technique can be utilized to separate and enhance harmonic components of a waveform for tissue harmonic imaging. While most ultrasound systems can perform pulse inversion, only few image the 3rd harmonic component. PI pulse subtraction can isolate and enhance the 3rd...

  4. Waveform Catalog, Extreme Mass Ratio Binary (Capture)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerically-generated gravitational waveforms for circular inspiral into Kerr black holes. These waveforms were developed using Scott Hughes' black hole perturbation...

  5. Generating Milton Babbitt's all-partition arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Bemman, Brian; Meredith, David

    2016-01-01

    In most of Milton Babbitt's (1916–2011) works written since the early 1960s, both the pitch and rhythmic content is organized according to a highly constrained structure known as the all-partition array. The all-partition array provides a framework that ensures that as many different forms of a tone row as possible (generated by any combination of transposition, inversion or reversal) are expressed 'horizontally' and that each integer partition of 12 whose cardinality is no greater than the n...

  6. Evaluation of surface-wave waveform modeling for lithosphere velocity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tao-Ming

    Surface-waveform modeling methods will become standard tools for studying the lithosphere structures because they can place greater constraints on earth structure and because of interest in the three-dimensional earth. The purpose of this study is to begin to learn the applicabilities and limitations of these methods. A surface-waveform inversion method is implemented using generalized seismological data functional theory. The method has been tested using synthetic and real seismic data and show that this method is well suited for teleseismic and regional seismograms. Like other linear inversion problems, this method also requires a good starting model. To ease reliance on good starting models, a global search technique, the genetic algorithm, has been applied to surface waveform modeling. This method can rapidly find good models for explaining surface-wave waveform at regional distance. However, this implementation also reveals that criteria which are widely used in seismological studies are not good enough to indicate the goodness of waveform fit. These two methods with the linear waveform inversion method, and traditional surface wave dispersion inversion method have been applied to a western Texas earthquake to test their abilities. The focal mechanism of the Texas event has been reestimated using a grid search for surface wave spectral amplitudes. A comparison of these four algorithms shows some interesting seismic evidences for lithosphere structure.

  7. A study of doppler waveform using pulsatile flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hye Won; Chung, Myung Jin; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Min, Byoung Goo

    1997-01-01

    Through the construction of a pulsatile flow model using an artificial heart pump and stenosis to demonstrate triphasic Doppler waveform, which simulates in vivo conditions, and to evaluate the relationship between Doppler waveform and vascular compliance. The flow model was constructed using a flowmeter, rubber tube, glass tube with stenosis, and artificial heart pump. Doppler study was carried out at the prestenotic, poststenotic, and distal segments;compliance was changed by changing the length of the rubber tube. With increasing proximal compliance, Doppler waveforms show decreasing peak velocity of the first phase and slightly delayed acceleration time, but the waveform itself did not change significantly. Distal compliance influenced the second phase, and was important for the formation of pulsus tardus and parvus, which without poststenotic vascular compliance, did not develop. The peak velocity of the first phase was inversely proportional to proximal compliance, and those of the second and third phases were directly proportional to distal compliance. After constructing this pulsatile flow model, we were able to explain the relationship between vascular compliance and Doppler waveform, and also better understand the formation of pulsus tardus and parvus

  8. Propagation compensation by waveform predistortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Thomas F.; Urkowitz, Harry; Maron, David E.

    Certain modifications of the Cobra Dane radar are considered, particularly modernization of the waveform generator. For wideband waveforms, the dispersive effects of the ionosphere become increasingly significant. The technique of predistorting the transmitted waveform so that a linear chirp is received after two-way passage is one way to overcome that dispersion. This approach is maintained for the modified system, but with a specific predistortion waveform well suited to the modification. The appropriate form of predistortion was derived in an implicit form of time as a function of frequency. The exact form was approximated by Taylor series and pseudo-Chebyshev approximation. The latter proved better, as demonstrated by the resulting smaller loss in detection sensitivity, less coarsening of range resolution, and a lower peak sidelobe. The effects of error in determining the plasma delay constant were determined and are given in graphical form. A suggestion for in-place determination of the plasma delay constant is given.

  9. Unique Path Partitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessenrodt, Christine; Olsson, Jørn Børling; Sellers, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions.......We give a complete classification of the unique path partitions and study congruence properties of the function which enumerates such partitions....

  10. Elastic Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion Using Dynamic Warping and Wave Mode Decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, T.; Cheng, J.B.; Guo, Qiang; Wang, C.L.

    2017-01-01

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) provides high-resolution parameter estimation of the subsurface but requires good initial guess of the true model. The traveltime inversion only minimizes traveltime misfits which are more sensitive

  11. Multiscale Seismic Inversion in the Data and Image Domains

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2015-01-01

    I present a general methodology for inverting seismic data in either the data or image domains. It partially overcomes one of the most serious problems with current waveform inversion methods, which is the tendency to converge to models far from

  12. Multi-parameter full waveform inversion using Poisson

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Min, Dong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    on the two conventional parameterisations (one uses Lame constants and density; the other employs P- and S-wave velocities and density) have low resolution of gradients for P-wave velocities (or ). Limitations occur because the virtual sources for P

  13. Early arrival waveform inversion of shallow seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; Yu, Han

    2013-01-01

    , compared to traveltime tomography, EWI can generate a highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data. The more accurate EWI tomogram can make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi; in this case we

  14. Monte Carlo waveform inversion and deep continental structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijzert, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of the three dimensional structure of the earth is limited by the uneven distribution of earthquake sources and seismic stations. The distribution of the earthquakes is fixed as most earthquakes occur along the plate boundaries. The use of artificial sources can improve the distribution

  15. Monte Carlo waveform inversion and deep continental structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijzert, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of the three dimensional structure of the earth is limited by the uneven distribution of earthquake sources and seismic stations. The distribution of the earthquakes is fixed as most earthquakes occur along the plate boundaries. The use of artificial sources can improve the distribution of

  16. Full-waveform inversion using a nonlinearly smoothed wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuanyuan; Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Li, Zhenchun; Zhang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    width applied to the nonlinear wavefield to naturally adopt the multiscale strategy. Using examples on the Marmousi 2 model, we determine that the proposed FWI helps to generate convergent results without the need for low-frequency information.

  17. Full-waveform inversion: From near surface to deep

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Symes, William W.

    2013-01-01

    need for improved understanding of algorithms and applicability. Along with fundamental research issues of worldwide importance, the meeting provided an opportunity to showcase implications of the Middle East's particular exploration challenges

  18. A recipe for practical full waveform inversion in anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-03-28

    In representing the most common (first-order influence, and gravity induced) acoustic anisotropy, transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry direction (VTI) medium, with the P-wave normal moveout velocity, delta, and eta, we obtain a perturbation radiation pattern that has limited tradeoff between the parameters. Since delta is weakly resolvable from the kinematics of wave propagation, we can use it to play the role that density plays in improving the data fit for an imperfect physical model that ignores the elastic nature of the Earth. An FWI scheme that starts from diving waves would benefit from representing the acoustic VTI model with the P-wave horizontal velocity, eta, and epsilon. In this representation, the diving waves will help us first resolve the horizontal velocity, and then reflections, if the nonlinearity is properly handled, could help us resolve eta, while epsilon comes at the end to improve the amplitude fit (instead of the density). The model update wavelength for acoustic anisotropic FWI is very much similar to that experienced for the isotropic case. Copyright © 2014 by the European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimation of fracture parameters using elastic full-waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Oh, Juwon; Tsvankin, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    regularization term is added to the objective function to improve the estimation of the fracture azimuth, which is otherwise poorly constrained. The cracks are assumed to be penny-shaped to reduce the nonuniqueness in the inverted fracture weaknesses and achieve

  20. A recipe for practical full waveform inversion in anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Plessix, René É douard

    2014-01-01

    In representing the most common (first-order influence, and gravity induced) acoustic anisotropy, transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry direction (VTI) medium, with the P-wave normal moveout velocity, delta, and eta, we obtain a perturbation radiation pattern that has limited tradeoff between the parameters. Since delta is weakly resolvable from the kinematics of wave propagation, we can use it to play the role that density plays in improving the data fit for an imperfect physical model that ignores the elastic nature of the Earth. An FWI scheme that starts from diving waves would benefit from representing the acoustic VTI model with the P-wave horizontal velocity, eta, and epsilon. In this representation, the diving waves will help us first resolve the horizontal velocity, and then reflections, if the nonlinearity is properly handled, could help us resolve eta, while epsilon comes at the end to improve the amplitude fit (instead of the density). The model update wavelength for acoustic anisotropic FWI is very much similar to that experienced for the isotropic case. Copyright © 2014 by the European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers. All rights reserved.

  1. Arbitrary waveform modulated pulse EPR at 200 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Barnes, Ryan; Han, Songi

    2017-06-01

    We report here on the implementation of arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities at ∼200 GHz into an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) instrument platform operating at 7 T. This is achieved with the integration of a 1 GHz, 2 channel, digital to analog converter (DAC) board that enables the generation of coherent arbitrary waveforms at Ku-band frequencies with 1 ns resolution into an existing architecture of a solid state amplifier multiplier chain (AMC). This allows for the generation of arbitrary phase- and amplitude-modulated waveforms at 200 GHz with >150 mW power. We find that the non-linearity of the AMC poses significant difficulties in generating amplitude-modulated pulses at 200 GHz. We demonstrate that in the power-limited regime of ω1 10 MHz) spin manipulation in incoherent (inversion), as well as coherent (echo formation) experiments. Highlights include the improvement by one order of magnitude in inversion bandwidth compared to that of conventional rectangular pulses, as well as a factor of two in improvement in the refocused echo intensity at 200 GHz.

  2. Unwrapped phase inversion with an exponential damping

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the phase wrapping (cycle skipping) problem when the frequency of data is not low enough. Unless we obtain a good initial velocity model, the phase wrapping problem in FWI causes a result corresponding to a

  3. Efficient scattering-angle enrichment for a nonlinear inversion of the background and perturbations components of a velocity model

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Reflection-waveform inversion (RWI) can help us reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full-waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the background velocity model using the wave-path of a single scattered wavefield to an image. However, current

  4. Unwrapped phase inversion for near surface seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2012-01-01

    The Phase-wrapping is one of the main obstacles of waveform inversion. We use an inversion algorithm based on the instantaneous-traveltime that overcomes the phase-wrapping problem. With a high damping factor, the frequency-dependent instantaneous

  5. Bayesian ISOLA: new tool for automated centroid moment tensor inversion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vackář, J.; Burjánek, Jan; Gallovič, F.; Zahradník, J.; Clinton, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 210, č. 2 (2017), s. 693-705 ISSN 0956-540X Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : inverse theory * waveform inversion * computational seismology * earthquake source observations * seismic noise Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure OBOR OECD: Volcanology Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2016

  6. 3D Frequency-Domain Seismic Inversion with Controlled Sloppiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, F.; van Leeuwen, T.

    2014-01-01

    Seismic waveform inversion aims at obtaining detailed estimates of subsurface medium parameters, such as the spatial distribution of soundspeed, from multiexperiment seismic data. A formulation of this inverse problem in the frequency domain leads to an optimization problem constrained by a

  7. 3D Frequency-Domain Seismic Inversion with Controlled Sloppiness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van Leeuwen (Tristan); F.J. Herrmann

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractSeismic waveform inversion aims at obtaining detailed estimates of subsurface medium parameters, such as the spatial distribution of soundspeed, from multiexperiment seismic data. A formulation of this inverse problem in the frequency domain leads to an optimization problem constrained

  8. Electrochemically driven emulsion inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyösti

    2007-09-01

    It is shown that emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants can be inverted by controlling the electrical potential across the oil-water interface. The potential dependent partitioning of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by cyclic voltammetry at the 1,2-dichlorobenzene|water interface. In the emulsion the potential control was achieved by using a potential-determining salt. The inversion of a 1,2-dichlorobenzene-in-water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by SDS was followed by conductometry as a function of added tetrapropylammonium chloride. A sudden drop in conductivity was observed, indicating the change of the continuous phase from water to 1,2-dichlorobenzene, i.e. a water-in-1,2-dichlorobenzene emulsion was formed. The inversion potential is well in accordance with that predicted by the hydrophilic-lipophilic deviation if the interfacial potential is appropriately accounted for.

  9. The Euler–Riemann gases, and partition identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chair, Noureddine

    2013-01-01

    The Euler theorem in partition theory and its generalization are derived from a non-interacting quantum field theory in which each bosonic mode with a given frequency is equivalent to a sum of bosonic mode whose frequency is twice (s-times) as much, and a fermionic (parafermionic) mode with the same frequency. Explicit formulas for the graded parafermionic partition functions are obtained, and the inverse of the graded partition function (IGPPF), turns out to be bosonic (fermionic) partition function depending on the parity of the order s of the parafermions. It is also shown that these partition functions are generating functions of partitions of integers with restrictions, the Euler generating function is identified with the inverse of the graded parafermionic partition function of order 2. As a result we obtain new sequences of partitions of integers with given restrictions. If the parity of the order s is even, then mixing a system of parafermions with a system whose partition function is (IGPPF), results in a system of fermions and bosons. On the other hand, if the parity of s is odd, then, the system we obtain is still a mixture of fermions and bosons but the corresponding Fock space of states is truncated. It turns out that these partition functions are given in terms of the Jacobi theta function θ 4 , and generate sequences in partition theory. Our partition functions coincide with the overpartitions of Corteel and Lovejoy, and jagged partitions in conformal field theory. Also, the partition functions obtained are related to the Ramond characters of the superconformal minimal models, and in the counting of the Moore–Read edge spectra that appear in the fractional quantum Hall effect. The different partition functions for the Riemann gas that are the counter parts of the Euler gas are obtained by a simple change of variables. In particular the counter part of the Jacobi theta function is (ζ(2t))/(ζ(t) 2 ) . Finally, we propose two formulas which brings

  10. Wavelet-based multiscale adjoint waveform-difference tomography using body and surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y. O.; Simons, F. J.; Bozdag, E.

    2014-12-01

    We present a multi-scale scheme for full elastic waveform-difference inversion. Using a wavelet transform proves to be a key factor to mitigate cycle-skipping effects. We start with coarse representations of the seismogram to correct a large-scale background model, and subsequently explain the residuals in the fine scales of the seismogram to map the heterogeneities with great complexity. We have previously applied the multi-scale approach successfully to body waves generated in a standard model from the exploration industry: a modified two-dimensional elastic Marmousi model. With this model we explored the optimal choice of wavelet family, number of vanishing moments and decomposition depth. For this presentation we explore the sensitivity of surface waves in waveform-difference tomography. The incorporation of surface waves is rife with cycle-skipping problems compared to the inversions considering body waves only. We implemented an envelope-based objective function probed via a multi-scale wavelet analysis to measure the distance between predicted and target surface-wave waveforms in a synthetic model of heterogeneous near-surface structure. Our proposed method successfully purges the local minima present in the waveform-difference misfit surface. An elastic shallow model with 100~m in depth is used to test the surface-wave inversion scheme. We also analyzed the sensitivities of surface waves and body waves in full waveform inversions, as well as the effects of incorrect density information on elastic parameter inversions. Based on those numerical experiments, we ultimately formalized a flexible scheme to consider both body and surface waves in adjoint tomography. While our early examples are constructed from exploration-style settings, our procedure will be very valuable for the study of global network data.

  11. Inverse photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    1994-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is regarded as the most powerful means since it can measure almost perfectly the occupied electron state. On the other hand, inverse photoelectron spectroscopy is the technique for measuring unoccupied electron state by using the inverse process of photoelectron spectroscopy, and in principle, the similar experiment to photoelectron spectroscopy becomes feasible. The development of the experimental technology for inverse photoelectron spectroscopy has been carried out energetically by many research groups so far. At present, the heightening of resolution of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, the development of inverse photoelectron spectroscope in which light energy is variable and so on are carried out. But the inverse photoelectron spectroscope for vacuum ultraviolet region is not on the market. In this report, the principle of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy and the present state of the spectroscope are described, and the direction of the development hereafter is groped. As the experimental equipment, electron guns, light detectors and so on are explained. As the examples of the experiment, the inverse photoelectron spectroscopy of semimagnetic semiconductors and resonance inverse photoelectron spectroscopy are reported. (K.I.)

  12. 3-D waveform tomography sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2014-01-01

    The complications in anisotropic multi-parameter inversion lie in the trade-off between the different anisotropy parameters. We compute the tomographic waveform sensitivity kernels for a VTI acoustic medium perturbation as a tool to investigate this ambiguity between the different parameters. We use dynamic ray tracing to efficiently handle the expensive computational cost for 3-D anisotropic models. Ray tracing provides also the ray direction information necessary for conditioning the sensitivity kernels to handle anisotropy. The NMO velocity and η parameter kernels showed a maximum sensitivity for diving waves which results in a relevant choice of those parameters in wave equation tomography. The δ parameter kernel showed zero sensitivity; therefore it can serve as a secondary parameter to fit the amplitude in the acoustic anisotropic inversion. Considering the limited penetration depth of diving waves, migration velocity analysis based kernels are introduced to fix the depth ambiguity with reflections and compute sensitivity maps in the deeper parts of the model.

  13. A long source area of the 1906 Colombia-Ecuador earthquake estimated from observed tsunami waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yusuke; Tanioka, Yuichiro; Shiina, Takahiro

    2017-12-01

    The 1906 Colombia-Ecuador earthquake induced both strong seismic motions and a tsunami, the most destructive earthquake in the history of the Colombia-Ecuador subduction zone. The tsunami propagated across the Pacific Ocean, and its waveforms were observed at tide gauge stations in countries including Panama, Japan, and the USA. This study conducted slip inverse analysis for the 1906 earthquake using these waveforms. A digital dataset of observed tsunami waveforms at the Naos Island (Panama) and Honolulu (USA) tide gauge stations, where the tsunami was clearly observed, was first produced by consulting documents. Next, the two waveforms were applied in an inverse analysis as the target waveform. The results of this analysis indicated that the moment magnitude of the 1906 earthquake ranged from 8.3 to 8.6. Moreover, the dominant slip occurred in the northern part of the assumed source region near the coast of Colombia, where little significant seismicity has occurred, rather than in the southern part. The results also indicated that the source area, with significant slip, covered a long distance, including the southern, central, and northern parts of the region.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Seismic waveform modeling over cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    With the fast growing computational technologies, numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation achieved huge successes. Obtaining the synthetic waveforms through numerical simulation receives an increasing amount of attention from seismologists. However, computational seismology is a data-intensive research field, and the numerical packages usually come with a steep learning curve. Users are expected to master considerable amount of computer knowledge and data processing skills. Training users to use the numerical packages, correctly access and utilize the computational resources is a troubled task. In addition to that, accessing to HPC is also a common difficulty for many users. To solve these problems, a cloud based solution dedicated on shallow seismic waveform modeling has been developed with the state-of-the-art web technologies. It is a web platform integrating both software and hardware with multilayer architecture: a well designed SQL database serves as the data layer, HPC and dedicated pipeline for it is the business layer. Through this platform, users will no longer need to compile and manipulate various packages on the local machine within local network to perform a simulation. By providing users professional access to the computational code through its interfaces and delivering our computational resources to the users over cloud, users can customize the simulation at expert-level, submit and run the job through it.

  15. PBX-M waveform generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, H.; Frank, K.T.; Kaye, S.

    1987-01-01

    The PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment) is an unique Tokamak experiment designed to run with a highly indented plasma. The shaping control will be accomplished through a closed-loop power supply control system. The system will make use of sixteen pre-programmed reference signals and twenty signals taken from direct measurements as input to an analog computer. Through a matrix conversion in the analog computer, these input signals will be used to generate eight control signals to control the eight power supplies. The pre-programmed reference signals will be created using a Macintosh personal computer interfaced to CAMAC (Comptuer Automated Measurement And Control) hardware for down-loading waveforms. The reference signals will be created on the Macintosh by the physics operators, utilizing the full graphics capability of the system. These waveforms are transferred to CAMAC memory, which are then strobed in real time through digital-to-analog converters and fed into the analog computer. The overall system (both hardware and software) is designed to be fail-safe. Specific features of the system, such as load inhibit and discharge inhibit, are discussed

  16. Expanding the frontiers of waveform imaging with Salvus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, M.; Boehm, C.; van Driel, M.; Krischer, L.; Fichtner, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical waves are natural harbingers of information. From medical ultrasound to the normal modes of Sun, wave motion is often our best window into the character of some underlying continuum. For over a century, geophysicists have been using this window to peer deep into the Earth, developing techniques that have gone on to underlie much of world's energy economy. As computers and numerical techniques have become more powerful over the last several decades, seismologists have begun to scale back classical simplifying approximations of wave propagation physics. As a result, we are now approaching the ideal of `full-waveform inversion'; maximizing the aperture of our window by taking the full complexity of wave motion into account.Salvus is a modern high-performance software suite which aims to bring recent developments in geophysical waveform inversion to new and exciting domains. In this short presentation we will look at the connections between these applications, with examples from non-destructive testing, medical imaging, seismic exploration, and (extra-) planetary seismology.

  17. Bayesian approach to inverse statistical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inverse statistical mechanics aims to determine particle interactions from ensemble properties. This article looks at this inverse problem from a Bayesian perspective and discusses several statistical estimators to solve it. In addition, a sequential Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed that draws the interaction parameters from their posterior probability distribution. The posterior probability involves an intractable partition function that is estimated along with the interactions. The method is illustrated for inverse problems of varying complexity, including the estimation of a temperature, the inverse Ising problem, maximum entropy fitting, and the reconstruction of molecular interaction potentials.

  18. Individual Biometric Identification Using Multi-Cycle Electrocardiographic Waveform Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonki Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiogram (ECG waveform conveys information regarding the electrical property of the heart. The patterns vary depending on the individual heart characteristics. ECG features can be potentially used for biometric recognition. This study presents a new method using the entire ECG waveform pattern for matching and demonstrates that the approach can potentially be employed for individual biometric identification. Multi-cycle ECG signals were assessed using an ECG measuring circuit, and three electrodes can be patched on the wrists or fingers for considering various measurements. For biometric identification, our-fold cross validation was used in the experiments for assessing how the results of a statistical analysis will generalize to an independent data set. Four different pattern matching algorithms, i.e., cosine similarity, cross correlation, city block distance, and Euclidean distances, were tested to compare the individual identification performances with a single channel of ECG signal (3-wire ECG. To evaluate the pattern matching for biometric identification, the ECG recordings for each subject were partitioned into training and test set. The suggested method obtained a maximum performance of 89.9% accuracy with two heartbeats of ECG signals measured on the wrist and 93.3% accuracy with three heartbeats for 55 subjects. The performance rate with ECG signals measured on the fingers improved up to 99.3% with two heartbeats and 100% with three heartbeats of signals for 20 subjects.

  19. Individual Biometric Identification Using Multi-Cycle Electrocardiographic Waveform Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonki; Kim, Seulgee; Kim, Daeeun

    2018-03-28

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform conveys information regarding the electrical property of the heart. The patterns vary depending on the individual heart characteristics. ECG features can be potentially used for biometric recognition. This study presents a new method using the entire ECG waveform pattern for matching and demonstrates that the approach can potentially be employed for individual biometric identification. Multi-cycle ECG signals were assessed using an ECG measuring circuit, and three electrodes can be patched on the wrists or fingers for considering various measurements. For biometric identification, our-fold cross validation was used in the experiments for assessing how the results of a statistical analysis will generalize to an independent data set. Four different pattern matching algorithms, i.e., cosine similarity, cross correlation, city block distance, and Euclidean distances, were tested to compare the individual identification performances with a single channel of ECG signal (3-wire ECG). To evaluate the pattern matching for biometric identification, the ECG recordings for each subject were partitioned into training and test set. The suggested method obtained a maximum performance of 89.9% accuracy with two heartbeats of ECG signals measured on the wrist and 93.3% accuracy with three heartbeats for 55 subjects. The performance rate with ECG signals measured on the fingers improved up to 99.3% with two heartbeats and 100% with three heartbeats of signals for 20 subjects.

  20. Pulsatile pipe flow transition: Flow waveform effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindise, Melissa C.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2018-01-01

    Although transition is known to exist in various hemodynamic environments, the mechanisms that govern this flow regime and their subsequent effects on biological parameters are not well understood. Previous studies have investigated transition in pulsatile pipe flow using non-physiological sinusoidal waveforms at various Womersley numbers but have produced conflicting results, and multiple input waveform shapes have yet to be explored. In this work, we investigate the effect of the input pulsatile waveform shape on the mechanisms that drive the onset and development of transition using particle image velocimetry, three pulsatile waveforms, and six mean Reynolds numbers. The turbulent kinetic energy budget including dissipation rate, production, and pressure diffusion was computed. The results show that the waveform with a longer deceleration phase duration induced the earliest onset of transition, while the waveform with a longer acceleration period delayed the onset of transition. In accord with the findings of prior studies, for all test cases, turbulence was observed to be produced at the wall and either dissipated or redistributed into the core flow by pressure waves, depending on the mean Reynolds number. Turbulent production increased with increasing temporal velocity gradients until an asymptotic limit was reached. The turbulence dissipation rate was shown to be independent of mean Reynolds number, but a relationship between the temporal gradients of the input velocity waveform and the rate of turbulence dissipation was found. In general, these results demonstrated that the shape of the input pulsatile waveform directly affected the onset and development of transition.

  1. Waveform digitizing at 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiya, M.; Ito, M.; Haggerty, J.; Ng, C.; Sippach, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiment E787 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is designed to study the decay K + → π + ν/bar /nu// to a sensitivity of 2 /times/ 10 -10 . To achieve acceptable muon rejection it is necessary to couple traditional methods (range/energy/momentum correlation) with observation of the (π + → μ + ν, μ + → e + ν/bar /nu//) decay sequence in scintillator. We report on the design and construction of 200 channels of relatively low cost solid state waveform digitizers. The distinguishing features are: 8 bits dynamic range, 500 MHz sampling, zero suppression on the fly, deep memory (up to .5 msec), and fast readout time (100 μsec for the entire system). We report on data obtained during the February-May 1988 run showing performance of the system for the observation of the above decay. 8 figs

  2. Waveform digitizing at 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiya, M.; Ito, M.; Haggerty, J.; Ng, C.; Sippach, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiment E787 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is designed to study the decay K + → π + ν/bar /nu// to a sensitivity of 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/10/. To achieve acceptable muon rejection it is necessary to couple traditional methods (range/energy/momentum correlation) with observation of the π + → μ + → e + ν/bar /nu// decay sequence in scintillator. We report on the design and construction of over 200 channels of relatively low cost solid state waveform digitizers. The distinguishing features are: 8 bits dynamic range, 500 MHz sampling, zero suppression on the fly, deep memory (up to .5 msec), and fast readout time (100 μsec for the entire system). We report on data obtained during the February--May 1988 run showing performance of the system for the observation of the above decay. 9 figs

  3. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  4. Identification of complex stiffness tensor from waveform reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leymarie, N.; Aristégui, C.; Audoin, B.; Baste, S.

    2002-03-01

    An inverse method is proposed in order to determine the viscoelastic properties of composite-material plates from the plane-wave transmitted acoustic field. Analytical formulations of both the plate transmission coefficient and its first and second derivatives are established, and included in a two-step inversion scheme. Two objective functions to be minimized are then designed by considering the well-known maximum-likelihood principle and by using an analytic signal formulation. Through these innovative objective functions, the robustness of the inversion process against high level of noise in waveforms is improved and the method can be applied to a very thin specimen. The suitability of the inversion process for viscoelastic property identification is demonstrated using simulated data for composite materials with different anisotropy and damping degrees. A study of the effect of the rheologic model choice on the elastic property identification emphasizes the relevance of using a phenomenological description considering viscosity. Experimental characterizations show then the good reliability of the proposed approach. Difficulties arise experimentally for particular anisotropic media.

  5. Evidence of shallow gas in the Queen Charlotte Basin from waveform tomography of seismic reflection data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takam Takougang, Eric M.; Calvert, Andrew J. [Simon Fraser University (Canada)], email: eta9@sfu.ca

    2011-07-01

    The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) collected eight seismic reflection lines in 1988 across the Queen Charlotte sedimentary basin of western Canada, which is the largest tertiary basin on the west coast. This work furthers the study of the upper part of the basin by using quantitative imaging of its structure through application of 2-D waveform tomography to the limited offset seismic reflection data. With the help of waveform tomography, seismic reflection data has allowed the identification of pockmark structures and pipe-like gas chimney in the recovered velocity and attenuation models. Overall, there is an excellent match between field data and predicted data. and a good match between the sonic log and a 1-D velocity function derived from the 2-D velocity model. This shows that specific preconditioning of the data and a good inversion strategy make it possible to use waveform tomography of relatively short offset reflection data for the imaging of shallow geological features.

  6. Multifunction waveform generator for EM receiver testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Jin, Sheng; Deng, Ming

    2018-01-01

    In many electromagnetic (EM) methods - such as magnetotelluric, spectral-induced polarization (SIP), time-domain-induced polarization (TDIP), and controlled-source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) methods - it is important to evaluate and test the EM receivers during their development stage. To assess the performance of the developed EM receivers, controlled synthetic data that simulate the observed signals in different modes are required. In CSAMT and SIP mode testing, the waveform generator should use the GPS time as the reference for repeating schedule. Based on our testing, the frequency range, frequency precision, and time synchronization of the currently available function waveform generators on the market are deficient. This paper presents a multifunction waveform generator with three waveforms: (1) a wideband, low-noise electromagnetic field signal to be used for magnetotelluric, audio-magnetotelluric, and long-period magnetotelluric studies; (2) a repeating frequency sweep square waveform for CSAMT and SIP studies; and (3) a positive-zero-negative-zero signal that contains primary and secondary fields for TDIP studies. In this paper, we provide the principles of the above three waveforms along with a hardware design for the generator. Furthermore, testing of the EM receiver was conducted with the waveform generator, and the results of the experiment were compared with those calculated from the simulation and theory in the frequency band of interest.

  7. Skeletonized Wave Equation Inversion in VTI Media without too much Math

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Shihang

    2017-05-17

    We present a tutorial for skeletonized inversion of pseudo-acoustic anisotropic VTI data. We first invert for the anisotropic models using wave equation traveltime inversion. Here, the skeletonized data are the traveltimes of transmitted and/or reflected arrivals that lead to simpler misfit functions and more robust convergence compared to full waveform inversion. This provides a good starting model for waveform inversion. The effectiveness of this procedure is illustrated with synthetic data examples and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Skeletonized Wave Equation Inversion in VTI Media without too much Math

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Shihang; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    We present a tutorial for skeletonized inversion of pseudo-acoustic anisotropic VTI data. We first invert for the anisotropic models using wave equation traveltime inversion. Here, the skeletonized data are the traveltimes of transmitted and/or reflected arrivals that lead to simpler misfit functions and more robust convergence compared to full waveform inversion. This provides a good starting model for waveform inversion. The effectiveness of this procedure is illustrated with synthetic data examples and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Developed vibration waveform monitoring unit for CBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, T.; Hotsuta, K.; Hirose, I.; Morita, E.

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, many rotating machines such as pumps and fans are in use. Shikoku Research Institute Inc. has recently developed easy-to-use tools to facilitate the maintenance of such equipment. They include a battery-operated vibration waveform monitoring unit which allows unmanned vibration monitoring on a regular basis and data collection even from intermittently operating equipment, a waveform data collector which can be used for easy collection, storage, control, and analysis of raw vibration waveform data during normal operation, and vibration analysis and evaluation tools. A combination of these tools has a high potential for optimization of rotating equipment maintenance. (author)

  10. Flow pumping system for physiological waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, William; Savaş, Omer

    2010-02-01

    A pulsatile flow pumping system is developed to replicate flow waveforms with reasonable accuracy for experiments simulating physiological blood flows at numerous points in the body. The system divides the task of flow waveform generation between two pumps: a gear pump generates the mean component and a piston pump generates the oscillatory component. The system is driven by two programmable servo controllers. The frequency response of the system is used to characterize its operation. The system has been successfully tested in vascular flow experiments where sinusoidal, carotid, and coronary flow waveforms are replicated.

  11. Magnetotelluric inversion via reverse time migration algorithm of seismic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Taeyoung; Shin, Changsoo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm for two-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. Our algorithm is an MT inversion based on the steepest descent method, borrowed from the backpropagation technique of seismic inversion or reverse time migration, introduced in the middle 1980s by Lailly and Tarantola. The steepest descent direction can be calculated efficiently by using the symmetry of numerical Green's function derived from a mixed finite element method proposed by Nedelec for Maxwell's equation, without calculating the Jacobian matrix explicitly. We construct three different objective functions by taking the logarithm of the complex apparent resistivity as introduced in the recent waveform inversion algorithm by Shin and Min. These objective functions can be naturally separated into amplitude inversion, phase inversion and simultaneous inversion. We demonstrate our algorithm by showing three inversion results for synthetic data

  12. Source partitioning of methane emissions and its seasonality in the U.S. Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zichong Chen; Timothy J. Griffis; John M. Baker; Dylan B. Millet; Jeffrey D. Wood; Edward J. Dlugokencky; Arlyn E. Andrews; Colm Sweeney; Cheng Hu; Randall K. Kolka

    2018-01-01

    The methane (CH4) budget and its source partitioning are poorly constrained in the Midwestern United States. We used tall tower (185 m) aerodynamic flux measurements and atmospheric scale factor Bayesian inversions to constrain the monthly budget and to partition the total budget into natural (e.g., wetlands) and anthropogenic (e.g., livestock,...

  13. A plasma aerodynamic actuator supplied by a multilevel generator operating with different voltage waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, Carlo A; Cristofolini, Andrea; Grandi, Gabriele; Neretti, Gabriele; Seri, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In this work a high voltage—high frequency generator for the power supply of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator for the aerodynamic control obtained by the electro-hydro-dynamic (EHD) interaction is described and tested. The generator can produce different voltage waveforms. The operating frequency is independent of the load characteristics and does not require impedance matching. The peak-to-peak voltage is 30 kV at a frequency up to 20 kHz and time variation rates up to 60 kV μs −1 . The performance of the actuator when supplied by several voltage waveforms is investigated. The tests have been performed in still air at atmospheric pressure. Voltage and current time behaviors have been measured. The evaluation of the energy delivered to the actuator allowed the estimation of the periods in which the plasma was ignited. Vibrational and rotational temperatures of the plasma have been estimated through spectroscopic acquisitions. The flow field induced in the region above the surface of the DBD actuator has been studied and the EHD conversion efficiency has been evaluated for the voltage waveforms investigated. The nearly sinusoidal multilevel voltage of the proposed generator and the sinusoidal voltage waveform of a conventional ac generator obtain comparable plasma features, EHD effects, and efficiencies. Inverse saw tooth waveform presents the highest effects and efficiency. The rectangular waveform generates suitable EHD effects but with the lowest efficiency. The voltage waveforms that induce plasmas with higher rotational temperatures are less efficient for the conversion of the electric into kinetic energy. (paper)

  14. Plane partition vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensburg, E J Janse van; Ma, J

    2006-01-01

    We examine partitions and their natural three-dimensional generalizations, plane partitions, as models of vesicles undergoing an inflation-deflation transition. The phase diagrams of these models include a critical point corresponding to an inflation-deflation transition, and exhibits multicritical scaling in the vicinity of a multicritical point located elsewhere on the critical curve. We determine the locations of the multicritical points by analysing the generating functions using analytic and numerical means. In addition, we determine the numerical values of the multicritical scaling exponents associated with the multicritical scaling regimes in these models

  15. Matrix string partition function

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Ivan K; Kostov, Ivan K.; Vanhove, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate quasiclassically the Ramond partition function of Euclidean D=10 U(N) super Yang-Mills theory reduced to a two-dimensional torus. The result can be interpreted in terms of free strings wrapping the space-time torus, as expected from the point of view of Matrix string theory. We demonstrate that, when extrapolated to the ultraviolet limit (small area of the torus), the quasiclassical expressions reproduce exactly the recently obtained expression for the partition of the completely reduced SYM theory, including the overall numerical factor. This is an evidence that our quasiclassical calculation might be exact.

  16. Time-reversal and Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debski, Wojciech

    2017-04-01

    Probabilistic inversion technique is superior to the classical optimization-based approach in all but one aspects. It requires quite exhaustive computations which prohibit its use in huge size inverse problems like global seismic tomography or waveform inversion to name a few. The advantages of the approach are, however, so appealing that there is an ongoing continuous afford to make the large inverse task as mentioned above manageable with the probabilistic inverse approach. One of the perspective possibility to achieve this goal relays on exploring the internal symmetry of the seismological modeling problems in hand - a time reversal and reciprocity invariance. This two basic properties of the elastic wave equation when incorporating into the probabilistic inversion schemata open a new horizons for Bayesian inversion. In this presentation we discuss the time reversal symmetry property, its mathematical aspects and propose how to combine it with the probabilistic inverse theory into a compact, fast inversion algorithm. We illustrate the proposed idea with the newly developed location algorithm TRMLOC and discuss its efficiency when applied to mining induced seismic data.

  17. Doppler waveforms of the hepatic veins in children with diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzun, Hakan; Yazici, Burhan; Erdogmus, Besir; Kocabay, Kenan; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Buyukkaya, Ayla; Yazgan, Omer

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fatty infiltration of the liver (FIL) on the Doppler waveform pattern in the hepatic veins of obese children. Methods: In this prospective study, 59 patients with diffuse FIL and 45 normal healthy children who served as control group underwent hepatic vein B-mod and duplex Doppler sonography. The Doppler sonography spectrum of the right hepatic vein was classified into three groups: triphasic waveform, biphasic waveform, and monophasic or flat waveform. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the phasicity of hepatic venous flow between patients and control subjects (p < 0.001). The Doppler flow pattern in the right hepatic vein was triphasic in 28 (47.5%), biphasic in 28 (47.5%), and monophasic in 3 (5%) children with fatty liver, while it was triphasic in 43 (95.6%) and biphasic in 2 (4.4%) control subjects. There was an inverse correlation between the sonographic grade of fatty infiltration of the liver and the phasicity of hepatic venous flow (r = -0.479, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Abnormal right hepatic vein Doppler waveform, biphasic as well as monophasic, can be seen in healthy obese children with diffuse FIL.

  18. Compression and decompression of digital seismic waveform data for storage and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadauria, Y.S.; Kumar, Vijai

    1991-01-01

    Two different classes of data compression schemes, namely physical data compression schemes and logical data compression schemes are examined for their use in storage and communication of digital seismic waveform data. In physical data compression schemes, the physical size of the waveform is reduced. One, therefore, gets only a broad picture of the original waveform, when the data are retrieved and the waveform is reconstituted. Coerrelation between original and decompressed waveform varies inversely with the data compresion ratio. In the logical data compression schemes, the data are stored in a logically encoded form. Storage of unnecessary characters like blank space is avoided. On decompression original data are retrieved and compression error is nil. Three algorithms of logical data compression schemes have been developed and studied. These are : 1) optimum formatting schemes, 2) differential bit reduction scheme, and 3) six bit compression scheme. Results of the above three algorithms of logical compression class are compared with those of physical compression schemes reported in literature. It is found that for all types of data, six bit compression scheme gives the highest value of data compression ratio. (author). 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 appendix, 2 tabs

  19. Determine Earthquake Rupture Directivity Using Taiwan TSMIP Strong Motion Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kaiwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lai, Ying-Ju; Gung, YuanCheng

    2013-04-01

    Inverting seismic waveforms for the finite fault source parameters is important for studying the physics of earthquake rupture processes. It is also significant to image seismogenic structures in urban areas. Here we analyze the finite-source process and test for the causative fault plane using the accelerograms recorded by the Taiwan Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (TSMIP) stations. The point source parameters for the mainshock and aftershocks were first obtained by complete waveform moment tensor inversions. We then use the seismograms generated by the aftershocks as empirical Green's functions (EGFs) to retrieve the apparent source time functions (ASTFs) of near-field stations using projected Landweber deconvolution approach. The method for identifying the fault plane relies on the spatial patterns of the apparent source time function durations which depend on the angle between rupture direction and the take-off angle and azimuth of the ray. These derived duration patterns then are compared with the theoretical patterns, which are functions of the following parameters, including focal depth, epicentral distance, average crustal 1D velocity, fault plane attitude, and rupture direction on the fault plane. As a result, the ASTFs derived from EGFs can be used to infer the ruptured fault plane and the rupture direction. Finally we used part of the catalogs to study important seismogenic structures in the area near Chiayi, Taiwan, where a damaging earthquake has occurred about a century ago. The preliminary results show a strike-slip earthquake on 22 October 1999 (Mw 5.6) has ruptured unilaterally toward SSW on a sub-vertical fault. The procedure developed from this study can be applied to other strong motion waveforms recorded from other earthquakes to better understand their kinematic source parameters.

  20. Seismic waveform classification using deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    MyShake is a global smartphone seismic network that harnesses the power of crowdsourcing. It has an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithm running on the phone to distinguish earthquake motion from human activities recorded by the accelerometer on board. Once the ANN detects earthquake-like motion, it sends a 5-min chunk of acceleration data back to the server for further analysis. The time-series data collected contains both earthquake data and human activity data that the ANN confused. In this presentation, we will show the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) we built under the umbrella of supervised learning to find out the earthquake waveform. The waveforms of the recorded motion could treat easily as images, and by taking the advantage of the power of CNN processing the images, we achieved very high successful rate to select the earthquake waveforms out. Since there are many non-earthquake waveforms than the earthquake waveforms, we also built an anomaly detection algorithm using the CNN. Both these two methods can be easily extended to other waveform classification problems.

  1. Unwrapped phase inversion with an exponential damping

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2015-07-28

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the phase wrapping (cycle skipping) problem when the frequency of data is not low enough. Unless we obtain a good initial velocity model, the phase wrapping problem in FWI causes a result corresponding to a local minimum, usually far away from the true solution, especially at depth. Thus, we have developed an inversion algorithm based on a space-domain unwrapped phase, and we also used exponential damping to mitigate the nonlinearity associated with the reflections. We construct the 2D phase residual map, which usually contains the wrapping discontinuities, especially if the model is complex and the frequency is high. We then unwrap the phase map and remove these cycle-based jumps. However, if the phase map has several residues, the unwrapping process becomes very complicated. We apply a strong exponential damping to the wavefield to eliminate much of the residues in the phase map, thus making the unwrapping process simple. We finally invert the unwrapped phases using the back-propagation algorithm to calculate the gradient. We progressively reduce the damping factor to obtain a high-resolution image. Numerical examples determined that the unwrapped phase inversion with a strong exponential damping generated convergent long-wavelength updates without low-frequency information. This model can be used as a good starting model for a subsequent inversion with a reduced damping, eventually leading to conventional waveform inversion.

  2. Full traveltime inversion in source domain

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a new method of source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI). The objective of this study is automatically building near-surface velocity using the early arrivals of seismic data. This method can generate the inverted velocity that can kinetically best match the reconstructed plane-wave source of early arrivals with true source in source domain. It does not require picking first arrivals for tomography, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based tomographic inversion. Besides, this method does not need estimate the source wavelet, which is a necessity for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. Furthermore, we applied our method on one synthetic dataset; the results show our method could generate a reasonable background velocity even when shingling first arrivals exist and could provide a good initial velocity for the conventional full waveform inversion (FWI).

  3. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  4. Characterizing Geological Facies using Seismic Waveform Classification in Sarawak Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahraa, Afiqah; Zailani, Ahmad; Prasad Ghosh, Deva

    2017-10-01

    Numerous effort have been made to build relationship between geology and geophysics using different techniques throughout the years. The integration of these two most important data in oil and gas industry can be used to reduce uncertainty in exploration and production especially for reservoir productivity enhancement and stratigraphic identification. This paper is focusing on seismic waveform classification to different classes using neural network and to link them according to the geological facies which are established using the knowledge on lithology and log motif of well data. Seismic inversion is used as the input for the neural network to act as the direct lithology indicator reducing dependency on well calibration. The interpretation of seismic facies classification map provides a better understanding towards the lithology distribution, depositional environment and help to identify significant reservoir rock

  5. Point-source inversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Charles A.; Barker, Jeffrey S.; Pavlin, Gregory B.

    1982-11-01

    A variety of approaches for obtaining source parameters from waveform data using moment-tensor or dislocation point source models have been investigated and applied to long-period body and surface waves from several earthquakes. Generalized inversion techniques have been applied to data for long-period teleseismic body waves to obtain the orientation, time function and depth of the 1978 Thessaloniki, Greece, event, of the 1971 San Fernando event, and of several events associated with the 1963 induced seismicity sequence at Kariba, Africa. The generalized inversion technique and a systematic grid testing technique have also been used to place meaningful constraints on mechanisms determined from very sparse data sets; a single station with high-quality three-component waveform data is often sufficient to discriminate faulting type (e.g., strike-slip, etc.). Sparse data sets for several recent California earthquakes, for a small regional event associated with the Koyna, India, reservoir, and for several events at the Kariba reservoir have been investigated in this way. Although linearized inversion techniques using the moment-tensor model are often robust, even for sparse data sets, there are instances where the simplifying assumption of a single point source is inadequate to model the data successfully. Numerical experiments utilizing synthetic data and actual data for the 1971 San Fernando earthquake graphically demonstrate that severe problems may be encountered if source finiteness effects are ignored. These techniques are generally applicable to on-line processing of high-quality digital data, but source complexity and inadequacy of the assumed Green's functions are major problems which are yet to be fully addressed.

  6. Inverse Kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Sereno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse kinematics is the process of converting a Cartesian point in space into a set of joint angles to more efficiently move the end effector of a robot to a desired orientation. This project investigates the inverse kinematics of a robotic hand with fingers under various scenarios. Assuming the parameters of a provided robot, a general equation for the end effector point was calculated and used to plot the region of space that it can reach. Further, the benefits obtained from the addition of a prismatic joint versus an extra variable angle joint were considered. The results confirmed that having more movable parts, such as prismatic points and changing angles, increases the effective reach of a robotic hand.

  7. Multidimensional inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desesquelles, P.

    1997-01-01

    Computer Monte Carlo simulations occupy an increasingly important place between theory and experiment. This paper introduces a global protocol for the comparison of model simulations with experimental results. The correlated distributions of the model parameters are determined using an original recursive inversion procedure. Multivariate analysis techniques are used in order to optimally synthesize the experimental information with a minimum number of variables. This protocol is relevant in all fields if physics dealing with event generators and multi-parametric experiments. (authors)

  8. Design of pulse waveform for waveform division multiple access UWB wireless communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhendong; Wang, Zhirui; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhilu

    2014-01-01

    A new multiple access scheme, Waveform Division Multiple Access (WDMA) based on the orthogonal wavelet function, is presented. After studying the correlation properties of different categories of single wavelet functions, the one with the best correlation property will be chosen as the foundation for combined waveform. In the communication system, each user is assigned to different combined orthogonal waveform. Demonstrated by simulation, combined waveform is more suitable than single wavelet function to be a communication medium in WDMA system. Due to the excellent orthogonality, the bit error rate (BER) of multiuser with combined waveforms is so close to that of single user in a synchronous system. That is to say, the multiple access interference (MAI) is almost eliminated. Furthermore, even in an asynchronous system without multiuser detection after matched filters, the result is still pretty ideal and satisfactory by using the third combination mode that will be mentioned in the study.

  9. High resolution tsunami inversion for 2010 Chile earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-R. Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the feasibility of inverting high-resolution vertical seafloor displacement from tsunami waveforms. An inversion method named "SUTIM" (small unit tsunami inversion method is developed to meet this goal. In addition to utilizing the conventional least-square inversion, this paper also enhances the inversion resolution by Grid-Shifting method. A smooth constraint is adopted to gain stability. After a series of validation and performance tests, SUTIM is used to study the 2010 Chile earthquake. Based upon data quality and azimuthal distribution, we select tsunami waveforms from 6 GLOSS stations and 1 DART buoy record. In total, 157 sub-faults are utilized for the high-resolution inversion. The resolution reaches 10 sub-faults per wavelength. The result is compared with the distribution of the aftershocks and waveforms at each gauge location with very good agreement. The inversion result shows that the source profile features a non-uniform distribution of the seafloor displacement. The highly elevated vertical seafloor is mainly concentrated in two areas: one is located in the northern part of the epicentre, between 34° S and 36° S; the other is in the southern part, between 37° S and 38° S.

  10. High resolution tsunami inversion for 2010 Chile earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-R.; Ho, T.-C.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the feasibility of inverting high-resolution vertical seafloor displacement from tsunami waveforms. An inversion method named "SUTIM" (small unit tsunami inversion method) is developed to meet this goal. In addition to utilizing the conventional least-square inversion, this paper also enhances the inversion resolution by Grid-Shifting method. A smooth constraint is adopted to gain stability. After a series of validation and performance tests, SUTIM is used to study the 2010 Chile earthquake. Based upon data quality and azimuthal distribution, we select tsunami waveforms from 6 GLOSS stations and 1 DART buoy record. In total, 157 sub-faults are utilized for the high-resolution inversion. The resolution reaches 10 sub-faults per wavelength. The result is compared with the distribution of the aftershocks and waveforms at each gauge location with very good agreement. The inversion result shows that the source profile features a non-uniform distribution of the seafloor displacement. The highly elevated vertical seafloor is mainly concentrated in two areas: one is located in the northern part of the epicentre, between 34° S and 36° S; the other is in the southern part, between 37° S and 38° S.

  11. SCA Waveform Development for Space Telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Kifle, Multi; Hall, C. Steve; Quinn, Todd M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating and developing suitable reconfigurable radio architectures for future NASA missions. This effort is examining software-based open-architectures for space based transceivers, as well as common hardware platform architectures. The Joint Tactical Radio System's (JTRS) Software Communications Architecture (SCA) is a candidate for the software approach, but may need modifications or adaptations for use in space. An in-house SCA compliant waveform development focuses on increasing understanding of software defined radio architectures and more specifically the JTRS SCA. Space requirements put a premium on size, mass, and power. This waveform development effort is key to evaluating tradeoffs with the SCA for space applications. Existing NASA telemetry links, as well as Space Exploration Initiative scenarios, are the basis for defining the waveform requirements. Modeling and simulations are being developed to determine signal processing requirements associated with a waveform and a mission-specific computational burden. Implementation of the waveform on a laboratory software defined radio platform is proceeding in an iterative fashion. Parallel top-down and bottom-up design approaches are employed.

  12. WFCatalog: A catalogue for seismological waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Luca; Koymans, Mathijs; Atkinson, Malcolm; Sleeman, Reinoud; Filgueira, Rosa

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports advances in seismic waveform description and discovery leading to a new seismological service and presents the key steps in its design, implementation and adoption. This service, named WFCatalog, which stands for waveform catalogue, accommodates features of seismological waveform data. Therefore, it meets the need for seismologists to be able to select waveform data based on seismic waveform features as well as sensor geolocations and temporal specifications. We describe the collaborative design methods and the technical solution showing the central role of seismic feature catalogues in framing the technical and operational delivery of the new service. Also, we provide an overview of the complex environment wherein this endeavour is scoped and the related challenges discussed. As multi-disciplinary, multi-organisational and global collaboration is necessary to address today's challenges, canonical representations can provide a focus for collaboration and conceptual tools for agreeing directions. Such collaborations can be fostered and formalised by rallying intellectual effort into the design of novel scientific catalogues and the services that support them. This work offers an example of the benefits generated by involving cross-disciplinary skills (e.g. data and domain expertise) from the early stages of design, and by sustaining the engagement with the target community throughout the delivery and deployment process.

  13. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  14. Why partition nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    A cursory review of literature dealing with various separatory processes involved in the handling of high-level liquid nuclear waste discloses that, for the most part, discussion centers on separation procedures and methodology for handling the resulting fractions, particularly the actinide wastes. There appears to be relatively little discussion on the incentives or motivations for performing these separations in the first place. Discussion is often limited to the assumption that we must separate out ''long-term'' from our ''short-term'' management problems. This paper deals with that assumption and devotes primary attention to the question of ''why partition waste'' rather than the question of ''how to partition waste'' or ''what to do with the segregated waste.''

  15. BKP plane partitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, Omar; Wheeler, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another

  16. BKP plane partitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, Omar; Wheeler, Michael [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2007-01-15

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another.

  17. Generalised twisted partition functions

    CERN Document Server

    Petkova, V B

    2001-01-01

    We consider the set of partition functions that result from the insertion of twist operators compatible with conformal invariance in a given 2D Conformal Field Theory (CFT). A consistency equation, which gives a classification of twists, is written and solved in particular cases. This generalises old results on twisted torus boundary conditions, gives a physical interpretation of Ocneanu's algebraic construction, and might offer a new route to the study of properties of CFT.

  18. Photonic arbitrary waveform generator based on Taylor synthesis method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shasha; Ding, Yunhong; Dong, Jianji

    2016-01-01

    Arbitrary waveform generation has been widely used in optical communication, radar system and many other applications. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) on chip optical arbitrary waveform generator, which is based on Taylor synthesis method. In our scheme......, a Gaussian pulse is launched to some cascaded microrings to obtain first-, second- and third-order differentiations. By controlling amplitude and phase of the initial pulse and successive differentiations, we can realize an arbitrary waveform generator according to Taylor expansion. We obtain several typical...... waveforms such as square waveform, triangular waveform, flat-top waveform, sawtooth waveform, Gaussian waveform and so on. Unlike other schemes based on Fourier synthesis or frequency-to-time mapping, our scheme is based on Taylor synthesis method. Our scheme does not require any spectral disperser or large...

  19. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  20. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podtaev, S; Stepanov, R; Dumler, A; Chugainov, S; Tziberkin, K

    2012-01-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt) max ) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  1. Krylov subspace acceleration of waveform relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, A.; Wu, Deyun [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Standard solution methods for numerically solving time-dependent problems typically begin by discretizing the problem on a uniform time grid and then sequentially solving for successive time points. The initial time discretization imposes a serialization to the solution process and limits parallel speedup to the speedup available from parallelizing the problem at any given time point. This bottleneck can be circumvented by the use of waveform methods in which multiple time-points of the different components of the solution are computed independently. With the waveform approach, a problem is first spatially decomposed and distributed among the processors of a parallel machine. Each processor then solves its own time-dependent subsystem over the entire interval of interest using previous iterates from other processors as inputs. Synchronization and communication between processors take place infrequently, and communication consists of large packets of information - discretized functions of time (i.e., waveforms).

  2. Waveform Design for Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerckx, Bruno; Bayguzina, Ekaterina

    2016-12-01

    Far-field Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) has attracted significant attention in recent years. Despite the rapid progress, the emphasis of the research community in the last decade has remained largely concentrated on improving the design of energy harvester (so-called rectenna) and has left aside the effect of transmitter design. In this paper, we study the design of transmit waveform so as to enhance the DC power at the output of the rectenna. We derive a tractable model of the non-linearity of the rectenna and compare with a linear model conventionally used in the literature. We then use those models to design novel multisine waveforms that are adaptive to the channel state information (CSI). Interestingly, while the linear model favours narrowband transmission with all the power allocated to a single frequency, the non-linear model favours a power allocation over multiple frequencies. Through realistic simulations, waveforms designed based on the non-linear model are shown to provide significant gains (in terms of harvested DC power) over those designed based on the linear model and over non-adaptive waveforms. We also compute analytically the theoretical scaling laws of the harvested energy for various waveforms as a function of the number of sinewaves and transmit antennas. Those scaling laws highlight the benefits of CSI knowledge at the transmitter in WPT and of a WPT design based on a non-linear rectenna model over a linear model. Results also motivate the study of a promising architecture relying on large-scale multisine multi-antenna waveforms for WPT. As a final note, results stress the importance of modeling and accounting for the non-linearity of the rectenna in any system design involving wireless power.

  3. Principles of waveform diversity and design

    CERN Document Server

    Wicks, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This is the first book to discuss current and future applications of waveform diversity and design in subjects such as radar and sonar, communications systems, passive sensing, and many other technologies. Waveform diversity allows researchers and system designers to optimize electromagnetic and acoustic systems for sensing, communications, electronic warfare or combinations thereof. This book enables solutions to problems, explaining how each system performs its own particular function, as well as how it is affected by other systems and how those other systems may likewise be affected. It is

  4. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  5. Wave-equation reflection traveltime inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2011-01-01

    The main difficulty with iterative waveform inversion using a gradient optimization method is that it tends to get stuck in local minima associated within the waveform misfit function. This is because the waveform misfit function is highly nonlinear with respect to changes in the velocity model. To reduce this nonlinearity, we present a reflection traveltime tomography method based on the wave equation which enjoys a more quasi-linear relationship between the model and the data. A local crosscorrelation of the windowed downgoing direct wave and the upgoing reflection wave at the image point yields the lag time that maximizes the correlation. This lag time represents the reflection traveltime residual that is back-projected into the earth model to update the velocity in the same way as wave-equation transmission traveltime inversion. No travel-time picking is needed and no high-frequency approximation is assumed. The mathematical derivation and the numerical examples are presented to partly demonstrate its efficiency and robustness. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  6. Application of digital waveform processing to position-sensitive proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Yasuto; Uritani, Akira; Mori, Chizuo

    1995-01-01

    In a charge-division type position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) with an anode wire of small resistance, a reflected component from an opposite end and thermal noise involved in signals deteriorate the position resolution of the PSPC. A digital waveform processing method was applied to the reduction of these undesirable effects by skillfully utilizing their signal characteristics that can be observed as inversely correlative signals between two-output signals from both sides of the PSPC. The digital waveform processing could improve the position resolution compared to a conventional pulse height processing method with analog filters. When the digital waveform processing was applied to signals of an equivalent circuit simulating the PSPC, the position resolutions defined by the full width at half maximum were improved to about 30% of those of conventional analog pulse processing. In the case of an actual PSPC, the position resolutions by the digital waveform processing were improved by 4-10% as compared with those of conventional pulse height processing. (author)

  7. Unwrapped phase inversion for near surface seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-11-04

    The Phase-wrapping is one of the main obstacles of waveform inversion. We use an inversion algorithm based on the instantaneous-traveltime that overcomes the phase-wrapping problem. With a high damping factor, the frequency-dependent instantaneous-traveltime inversion provides the stability of refraction tomography, with higher resolution results, and no arrival picking involved. We apply the instantaneous-traveltime inversion to the synthetic data generated by the elastic time-domain modeling. The synthetic data is a representative of the near surface seismic data. Although the inversion algorithm is based on the acoustic wave equation, the numerical examples show that the instantaneous-traveltime inversion generates a convergent velocity model, very similar to what we see from traveltime tomography.

  8. Inferring global upper-mantle shear attenuation structure by waveform tomography using the spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoǧlu, Haydar; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2018-06-01

    We present a global upper-mantle shear wave attenuation model that is built through a hybrid full-waveform inversion algorithm applied to long-period waveforms, using the spectral element method for wavefield computations. Our inversion strategy is based on an iterative approach that involves the inversion for successive updates in the attenuation parameter (δ Q^{-1}_μ) and elastic parameters (isotropic velocity VS, and radial anisotropy parameter ξ) through a Gauss-Newton-type optimization scheme that employs envelope- and waveform-type misfit functionals for the two steps, respectively. We also include source and receiver terms in the inversion steps for attenuation structure. We conducted a total of eight iterations (six for attenuation and two for elastic structure), and one inversion for updates to source parameters. The starting model included the elastic part of the relatively high-resolution 3-D whole mantle seismic velocity model, SEMUCB-WM1, which served to account for elastic focusing effects. The data set is a subset of the three-component surface waveform data set, filtered between 400 and 60 s, that contributed to the construction of the whole-mantle tomographic model SEMUCB-WM1. We applied strict selection criteria to this data set for the attenuation iteration steps, and investigated the effect of attenuation crustal structure on the retrieved mantle attenuation structure. While a constant 1-D Qμ model with a constant value of 165 throughout the upper mantle was used as starting model for attenuation inversion, we were able to recover, in depth extent and strength, the high-attenuation zone present in the depth range 80-200 km. The final 3-D model, SEMUCB-UMQ, shows strong correlation with tectonic features down to 200-250 km depth, with low attenuation beneath the cratons, stable parts of continents and regions of old oceanic crust, and high attenuation along mid-ocean ridges and backarcs. Below 250 km, we observe strong attenuation in the

  9. Waveform relaxation methods for implicit differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Houwen; W.A. van der Veen

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe apply a Runge-Kutta-based waveform relaxation method to initial-value problems for implicit differential equations. In the implementation of such methods, a sequence of nonlinear systems has to be solved iteratively in each step of the integration process. The size of these systems

  10. A multi-channel waveform digitizer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieser, F.; Muller, W.F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on the design and performance of a multichannel waveform digitizer system for use with the Multiple Sample Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) Detector at the Bevalac. 128 channels of 20 MHz Flash ADC plus 256 word deep memory are housed in a single crate. Digital thresholds and hit pattern logic facilitate zero suppression during readout which is performed over a standard VME bus

  11. Classification of morphologic changes in photoplethysmographic waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigges Timo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An ever increasing number of research is examining the question to what extent physiological information beyond the blood oxygen saturation could be drawn from the photoplethysmogram. One important approach to elicit that information from the photoplethysmogram is the analysis of its waveform. One prominent example for the value of photoplethysmographic waveform analysis in cardiovascular monitoring that has emerged is hemodynamic compensation assessment in the peri-operative setting or trauma situations, as digital pulse waveform dynamically changes with alterations in vascular tone or pulse wave velocity. In this work, we present an algorithm based on modern machine learning techniques that automatically finds individual digital volume pulses in photoplethysmographic signals and sorts them into one of the pulse classes defined by Dawber et al. We evaluate our approach based on two major datasets – a measurement study that we conducted ourselves as well as data from the PhysioNet MIMIC II database. As the results are satisfying we could demonstrate the capabilities of classification algorithms in the automated assessment of the digital volume pulse waveform measured by photoplethysmographic devices.

  12. Generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using gaussian random variables

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah; Ahmed, Sajid; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2014-01-01

    , the proposed scheme is general, the main focus of this paper is to generate finite alphabet waveforms for multiple-input multiple-output radar, where correlated waveforms are used to achieve desired beampatterns. © 2014 IEEE.

  13. High resolution aquifer characterization using crosshole GPR full-waveform tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueting, N.; Vienken, T.; Klotzsche, A.; Van Der Kruk, J.; Vanderborght, J.; Caers, J.; Vereecken, H.; Englert, A.

    2016-12-01

    Limited knowledge about the spatial distribution of aquifer properties typically constrains our ability to predict subsurface flow and transport. Here, we investigate the value of using high resolution full-waveform inversion of cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (GPR) data for aquifer characterization. By stitching together GPR tomograms from multiple adjacent crosshole planes, we are able to image, with a decimeter scale resolution, the dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of an alluvial aquifer along cross-sections of 50 m length and 10 m depth. A logistic regression model is employed to predict the spatial distribution of lithological facies on the basis of the GPR results. Vertical profiles of porosity and hydraulic conductivity from direct-push, flowmeter and grain size data suggest that the GPR predicted facies classification is meaningful with regard to porosity and hydraulic conductivity, even though the distributions of individual facies show some overlap and the absolute hydraulic conductivities from the different methods (direct-push, flowmeter, grain size) differ up to approximately one order of magnitude. Comparison of the GPR predicted facies architecture with tracer test data suggests that the plume splitting observed in a tracer experiment was caused by a hydraulically low-conductive sand layer with a thickness of only a few decimeters. Because this sand layer is identified by GPR full-waveform inversion but not by conventional GPR ray-based inversion we conclude that the improvement in spatial resolution due to full-waveform inversion is crucial to detect small-scale aquifer structures that are highly relevant for solute transport.

  14. Gentile statistics and restricted partitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The partition function of Gentile statistics also has the property that it nicely interpolates between the ... We now construct the partition function for such a system which also incorporates the property of interpolation ... As in [4], we however keep s arbitrary even though for s > 2 there are no quadratic. Hamiltonian systems.

  15. Full Waveform Adjoint Seismic Tomography of the Antarctic Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A. J.; Wiens, D.; Zhu, H.; Tromp, J.; Nyblade, A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Winberry, J. P.; Wilson, T. J.; Dalziel, I. W. D.; Hansen, S. E.; Shore, P.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies investigating the response and influence of the solid Earth on the evolution of the cryosphere demonstrate the need to account for 3D rheological structure to better predict ice sheet dynamics, stability, and future sea level impact, as well as to improve glacial isostatic adjustment models and more accurately measure ice mass loss. Critical rheological properties like mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness may be estimated from shear wave velocity models that, for Antarctica, would ideally possess regional-scale resolution extending down to at least the base of the transition zone (i.e. 670 km depth). However, current global- and continental-scale seismic velocity models are unable to obtain both the resolution and spatial coverage necessary, do not take advantage of the full set of available Antarctic data, and, in most instance, employ traditional seismic imaging techniques that utilize limited seismogram information. We utilize 3-component earthquake waveforms from almost 300 Antarctic broadband seismic stations and 26 southern mid-latitude stations from 270 earthquakes (5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0) between 2001-2003 and 2007-2016 to conduct a full-waveform adjoint inversion for Antarctica and surrounding regions of the Antarctic plate. Necessary forward and adjoint wavefield simulations are performed utilizing SPECFEM3D_GLOBE with the aid of the Texas Advanced Computing Center. We utilize phase observations from seismogram segments containing P, S, Rayleigh, and Love waves, including reflections and overtones, which are autonomously identified using FLEXWIN. The FLEXWIN analysis is carried out over a short (15-50 s) and long (initially 50-150 s) period band that target body waves, or body and surface waves, respectively. As our model is iteratively refined, the short-period corner of the long period band is gradually reduced to 25 s as the model converges over 20 linearized inversion iterations. We will briefly present this new high

  16. Prototype of a transient waveform recording ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J.; Zhao, L.; Cheng, B.; Chen, H.; Guo, Y.; Liu, S.; An, Q.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the design and measurement results of a transient waveform recording ASIC based on the Switched Capacitor Array (SCA) architecture. This 0.18 μm CMOS prototype device contains two channels and each channel employs a SCA of 128 samples deep, a 12-bit Wilkinson ADC and a serial data readout. A series of tests have been conducted and the results indicate that: a full 1 V signal voltage range is available, the input analog bandwidth is approximately 450 MHz and the sampling speed is adjustable from 0.076 to 3.2 Gsps (Gigabit Samples Per Second). For precision waveform timing extraction, careful calibration of timing intervals between samples is conducted to improve the timing resolution of such chips, and the timing precision of this ASIC is proved to be better than 15 ps RMS.

  17. Digitizing and analysis of neutron generator waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, T.C.

    1977-11-01

    All neutron generator waveforms from units tested at the SLA neutron generator test site are digitized and the digitized data stored in the CDC 6600 tape library for display and analysis using the CDC 6600 computer. The digitizing equipment consists mainly of seven Biomation Model 8100 transient recorders, Digital Equipment Corporation PDP 11/20 computer, RK05 disk, seven-track magnetic tape transport, and appropriate DEC and SLA controllers and interfaces. The PDP 11/20 computer is programmed in BASIC with assembly language drivers. In addition to digitizing waveforms, this equipment is used for other functions such as the automated testing of multiple-operation electronic neutron generators. Although other types of analysis have been done, the largest use of the digitized data has been for various types of graphical displays using the CDC 6600 and either the SD4020 or DX4460 plotters

  18. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  19. Induced waveform transitions of dissipative solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetov, Bogdan A.; Tuz, Vladimir R.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of an externally applied force upon the dynamics of dissipative solitons is analyzed in the framework of the one-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation supplemented by a potential term with an explicit coordinate dependence. The potential accounts for the external force manipulations and consists of three symmetrically arranged potential wells whose depth varies along the longitudinal coordinate. It is found out that under an influence of such potential a transition between different soliton waveforms coexisting under the same physical conditions can be achieved. A low-dimensional phase-space analysis is applied in order to demonstrate that by only changing the potential profile, transitions between different soliton waveforms can be performed in a controllable way. In particular, it is shown that by means of a selected potential, stationary dissipative soliton can be transformed into another stationary soliton as well as into periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic spatiotemporal dissipative structures.

  20. Advanced Waveform Simulation for Seismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    velocity model. The method separates the main arrivals of the regional waveform into 5 windows: Pnl (vertical and radial components), Rayleigh (vertical and...ranges out to 10°, including extensive observations of crustal thinning and thickening and various Pnl complexities. Broadband modeling in 1D, 2D...existing models perform in predicting the various regional phases, Rayleigh waves, Love waves, and Pnl waves. Previous events from this Basin-and-Range

  1. Integration and interpolation of sampled waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stearns, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for integrating, interpolating, and improving the signal-to-noise ratio of digitized waveforms are discussed with regard to seismic data from underground tests. The frequency-domain integration method and the digital interpolation method of Schafer and Rabiner are described and demonstrated using test data. The use of bandpass filtering for noise reduction is also demonstrated. With these methods, a backlog of seismic test data has been successfully processed

  2. Time-dependent phase error correction using digital waveform synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Buskirk, Stephen

    2017-10-10

    The various technologies presented herein relate to correcting a time-dependent phase error generated as part of the formation of a radar waveform. A waveform can be pre-distorted to facilitate correction of an error induced into the waveform by a downstream operation/component in a radar system. For example, amplifier power droop effect can engender a time-dependent phase error in a waveform as part of a radar signal generating operation. The error can be quantified and an according complimentary distortion can be applied to the waveform to facilitate negation of the error during the subsequent processing of the waveform. A time domain correction can be applied by a phase error correction look up table incorporated into a waveform phase generator.

  3. Sparse Frequency Waveform Design for Radar-Embedded Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyun Mai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Tag application with function of covert communication, a method for sparse frequency waveform design based on radar-embedded communication is proposed. Firstly, sparse frequency waveforms are designed based on power spectral density fitting and quasi-Newton method. Secondly, the eigenvalue decomposition of the sparse frequency waveform sequence is used to get the dominant space. Finally the communication waveforms are designed through the projection of orthogonal pseudorandom vectors in the vertical subspace. Compared with the linear frequency modulation waveform, the sparse frequency waveform can further improve the bandwidth occupation of communication signals, thus achieving higher communication rate. A certain correlation exists between the reciprocally orthogonal communication signals samples and the sparse frequency waveform, which guarantees the low SER (signal error rate and LPI (low probability of intercept. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this method.

  4. Broadband optical frequency comb generator based on driving N-cascaded modulators by Gaussian-shaped waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmood, Jassim K.; Harun, Sulaiman W.

    2018-05-01

    A new approach for realizing a wideband optical frequency comb (OFC) generator based on driving cascaded modulators by a Gaussian-shaped waveform, is proposed and numerically demonstrated. The setup includes N-cascaded MZMs, a single Gaussian-shaped waveform generator, and N-1 electrical time delayer. The first MZM is driven directly by a Gaussian-shaped waveform, while delayed replicas of the Gaussian-shaped waveform drive the other MZMs. An analytical model that describes the proposed OFC generator is provided to study the effect of number and chirp factor of cascaded MZM as well as pulse width on output spectrum. Optical frequency combs at frequency spacing of 1 GHz are generated by applying Gaussian-shaped waveform at pulse widths ranging from 200 to 400 ps. Our results reveal that, the number of comb lines is inversely proportional to the pulse width and directly proportional to both number and chirp factor of cascaded MZMs. At pulse width of 200 ps and chirp factor of 4, 67 frequency lines can be measured at output spectrum of two-cascaded MZMs setup. Whereas, increasing the number of cascaded stages to 3, 4, and 5, the optical spectra counts 89, 109 and 123 frequency lines; respectively. When the delay time is optimized, 61 comb lines can be achieved with power fluctuations of less than 1 dB for five-cascaded MZMs setup.

  5. Virtual Seismic Observation (VSO) with Sparsity-Promotion Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiezhao, B.; Ning, J.; Jianwei, M.

    2017-12-01

    Large station interval leads to low resolution images, sometimes prevents people from obtaining images in concerned regions. Sparsity-promotion inversion, a useful method to recover missing data in industrial field acquisition, can be lent to interpolate seismic data on none-sampled sites, forming Virtual Seismic Observation (VSO). Traditional sparsity-promotion inversion suffers when coming up with large time difference in adjacent sites, which we concern most and use shift method to improve it. The procedure of the interpolation is that we first employ low-pass filter to get long wavelength waveform data and shift the waveforms of the same wave in different seismograms to nearly same arrival time. Then we use wavelet-transform-based sparsity-promotion inversion to interpolate waveform data on none-sampled sites and filling a phase in each missing trace. Finally, we shift back the waveforms to their original arrival times. We call our method FSIS (Filtering, Shift, Interpolation, Shift) interpolation. By this way, we can insert different virtually observed seismic phases into none-sampled sites and get dense seismic observation data. For testing our method, we randomly hide the real data in a site and use the rest to interpolate the observation on that site, using direct interpolation or FSIS method. Compared with directly interpolated data, interpolated data with FSIS can keep amplitude better. Results also show that the arrival times and waveforms of those VSOs well express the real data, which convince us that our method to form VSOs are applicable. In this way, we can provide needed data for some advanced seismic technique like RTM to illuminate shallow structures.

  6. Multiscattering inversion for low-model wavenumbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-09-21

    A successful full-waveform inversion implementation updates the low-wavenumber model components first for a proper description of the wavefield propagation and slowly adds the high wavenumber potentially scattering parts of the model. The low-wavenumber components can be extracted from the transmission parts of the recorded wavefield emanating directly from the source or the transmission parts from the single- or double-scattered wavefield computed from a predicted scatter field acting as secondary sources.We use a combined inversion of data modeled from the source and those corresponding to single and double scattering to update the velocity model and the component of the velocity (perturbation) responsible for the single and double scattering. The combined inversion helps us access most of the potential model wavenumber information that may be embedded in the data. A scattering-angle filter is used to divide the gradient of the combined inversion, so initially the high-wavenumber (low-scattering-angle) components of the gradient are directed to the perturbation model and the low-wavenumber (highscattering- angle) components are directed to the velocity model. As our background velocity matures, the scatteringangle divide is slowly lowered to allow for more of the higher wavenumbers to contribute the velocity model. Synthetic examples including the Marmousi model are used to demonstrate the additional illumination and improved velocity inversion obtained when including multiscattered energy. © 2016 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Incentives for partitioning, revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloninger, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    The incentives for separating and eliminating various elements from radioactive waste prior to final geologic disposal were investigated. Exposure pathways to humans were defined, and potential radiation doses to an individual living within the region of influence of the underground storage site were calculated. The assumed radionuclide source was 1/5 of the accumulated high-level waste from the US nuclear power economy through the year 2000. The repository containing the waste was assumed to be located in a reference salt site geology. The study required numerous assumptions concerning the transport of radioactivity from the geologic storage site to man. The assumptions used maximized the estimated potential radiation doses, particularly in the case of the intrusion water well scenario, where hydrologic flow field dispersion effects were ignored. Thus, incentives for removing elements from the waste tended to be maximized. Incentives were also maximized by assuming that elements removed from the waste could be eliminated from the earth without risk. The results of the study indicate that for reasonable disposal conditions, incentives for partitioning any elements from the waste in order to minimize the risk to humans are marginal at best

  8. Partitioning ecosystems for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Martyn G

    2016-03-01

    Decline in the abundance of renewable natural resources (RNRs) coupled with increasing demands of an expanding human population will greatly intensify competition for Earth's natural resources during this century, yet curiously, analytical approaches to the management of productive ecosystems (ecological theory of wildlife harvesting, tragedy of the commons, green economics, and bioeconomics) give only peripheral attention to the driving influence of competition on resource exploitation. Here, I apply resource competition theory (RCT) to the exploitation of RNRs and derive four general policies in support of their sustainable and equitable use: (1) regulate resource extraction technology to avoid damage to the resource base; (2) increase efficiency of resource use and reduce waste at every step in the resource supply chain and distribution network; (3) partition ecosystems with the harvesting niche as the basic organizing principle for sustainable management of natural resources by multiple users; and (4) increase negative feedback between consumer and resource to bring about long-term sustainable use. A simple policy framework demonstrates how RCT integrates with other elements of sustainability science to better manage productive ecosystems. Several problem areas of RNR management are discussed in the light of RCT, including tragedy of the commons, overharvesting, resource collapse, bycatch, single species quotas, and simplification of ecosystems.

  9. Present status of partitioning developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Haruto; Kubota, Masumitsu; Tachimori, Shoichi

    1978-09-01

    Evolution and development of the concept of partitioning of high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) in nuclear fuel reprocessing are reviewed historically from the early phase of separating useful radioisotopes from HLLW to the recent phase of eliminating hazardous nuclides such as transuranium elements for safe waste disposal. Since the criteria in determining the nuclides for elimination and the respective decontamination factors are important in the strategy of partitioning, current views on the criteria are summarized. As elimination of the transuranium is most significant in the partitioning, various methods available of separating them from fission products are evaluated. (auth.)

  10. Consensus-Based Sorting of Neuronal Spike Waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Julien; Mueller, Christian M; Shein-Idelson, Mark; Hemberger, Mike; Laurent, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing spike-sorting algorithms is difficult because sorted clusters can rarely be checked against independently obtained "ground truth" data. In most spike-sorting algorithms in use today, the optimality of a clustering solution is assessed relative to some assumption on the distribution of the spike shapes associated with a particular single unit (e.g., Gaussianity) and by visual inspection of the clustering solution followed by manual validation. When the spatiotemporal waveforms of spikes from different cells overlap, the decision as to whether two spikes should be assigned to the same source can be quite subjective, if it is not based on reliable quantitative measures. We propose a new approach, whereby spike clusters are identified from the most consensual partition across an ensemble of clustering solutions. Using the variability of the clustering solutions across successive iterations of the same clustering algorithm (template matching based on K-means clusters), we estimate the probability of spikes being clustered together and identify groups of spikes that are not statistically distinguishable from one another. Thus, we identify spikes that are most likely to be clustered together and therefore correspond to consistent spike clusters. This method has the potential advantage that it does not rely on any model of the spike shapes. It also provides estimates of the proportion of misclassified spikes for each of the identified clusters. We tested our algorithm on several datasets for which there exists a ground truth (simultaneous intracellular data), and show that it performs close to the optimum reached by a support vector machine trained on the ground truth. We also show that the estimated rate of misclassification matches the proportion of misclassified spikes measured from the ground truth data.

  11. Anatomy of the six-part all-partition array as used by Milton Babbitt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bemman, Brian; Meredith, David

    permutations of 12-tone rows under the common class of musical equivalence relations, transposition, inversion, retrograde and retrograde inversion, and then organized into pairs of hexachordally combinatorial rows. The resultant pitch-class space is then partitioned into segment lengths of 12 integers...... or fewer distributed into a specified number of parts. Both its organization and number of parts are determined in part by the unique mathematical properties of all-combinatorial hexachords. Through analyses of two works representative of two types of six-part arrays, initial ground work is established...... for the automatic generation of the all-partition array structure. Preliminary concerns in the computational process are also addressed....

  12. Best waveform score for diagnosing keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Luz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test whether corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF can discriminate between keratoconus and normal eyes and to evaluate whether the averages of two consecutive measurements perform differently from the one with the best waveform score (WS for diagnosing keratoconus. METHODS: ORA measurements for one eye per individual were selected randomly from 53 normal patients and from 27 patients with keratoconus. Two groups were considered the average (CH-Avg, CRF-Avg and best waveform score (CH-WS, CRF-WS groups. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate whether the variables had similar distributions in the Normal and Keratoconus groups. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves were calculated for each parameter to assess the efficacy for diagnosing keratoconus and the same obtained for each variable were compared pairwise using the Hanley-McNeil test. RESULTS: The CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS and CRF-WS differed significantly between the normal and keratoconus groups (p<0.001. The areas under the ROC curve (AUROC for CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS, and CRF-WS were 0.824, 0.873, 0.891, and 0.931, respectively. CH-WS and CRF-WS had significantly better AUROCs than CH-Avg and CRF-Avg, respectively (p=0.001 and 0.002. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the biomechanical properties of the cornea through the ORA method has proved to be an important aid in the diagnosis of keratoconus, regardless of the method used. The best waveform score (WS measurements were superior to the average of consecutive ORA measurements for diagnosing keratoconus.

  13. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Glad, Aslaug Clemmensen; Pedersen, Gunver Krarup

    2017-01-01

    -preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal....... During this period, wave-formed shoreline sediments (the Vik Member, Hardeberga Formation) were deposited on Bornholm and are presently exposed at Strøby quarry. The sediments consist of fine- and medium-grained quartz-cemented arenites in association with a few silt-rich mudstones. The presence of well...

  14. Waveform design for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Clerckx, B; Bayguzina, E

    2016-01-01

    Far-field Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) has attracted significant attention in recent years. Despite the rapid progress, the emphasis of the research community in the last decade has remained largely concentrated on improving the design of energy harvester (so-called rectenna) and has left aside the effect of transmitter design. In this paper, we study the design of transmit waveform so as to enhance the DC power at the output of the rectenna. We derive a tractable model of the non-linearity ...

  15. Inverse problems of geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovskaya, T.B.

    2003-07-01

    This report gives an overview and the mathematical formulation of geophysical inverse problems. General principles of statistical estimation are explained. The maximum likelihood and least square fit methods, the Backus-Gilbert method and general approaches for solving inverse problems are discussed. General formulations of linearized inverse problems, singular value decomposition and properties of pseudo-inverse solutions are given

  16. Performance Prediction of Constrained Waveform Design for Adaptive Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    the famous Woodward quote, having a ubiquitous feeling for all radar waveform design (and performance prediction) researchers , that is found at the end...discuss research that develops performance prediction models to quantify the impact on SINR when an amplitude constraint is placed on a radar waveform...optimize the radar perfor- mance for the particular scenario and tasks. There have also been several survey papers on various topics in waveform design for

  17. On the accuracy and precision of numerical waveforms: effect of waveform extraction methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tony; Fong, Heather; Kumar, Prayush; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel A.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2016-08-01

    We present a new set of 95 numerical relativity simulations of non-precessing binary black holes (BBHs). The simulations sample comprehensively both black-hole spins up to spin magnitude of 0.9, and cover mass ratios 1-3. The simulations cover on average 24 inspiral orbits, plus merger and ringdown, with low initial orbital eccentricities e\\lt {10}-4. A subset of the simulations extends the coverage of non-spinning BBHs up to mass ratio q = 10. Gravitational waveforms at asymptotic infinity are computed with two independent techniques: extrapolation and Cauchy characteristic extraction. An error analysis based on noise-weighted inner products is performed. We find that numerical truncation error, error due to gravitational wave extraction, and errors due to the Fourier transformation of signals with finite length of the numerical waveforms are of similar magnitude, with gravitational wave extraction errors dominating at noise-weighted mismatches of ˜ 3× {10}-4. This set of waveforms will serve to validate and improve aligned-spin waveform models for gravitational wave science.

  18. Hawk: A Runtime System for Partitioned Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben Hassen, S.; Bal, H.E.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Hawk is a language-independent runtime system for writing data-parallel programs using partitioned objects. A partitioned object is a multidimensional array of elements that can be partitioned and distributed by the programmer. The Hawk runtime system uses the user-defined partitioning of objects

  19. Viscoelastic property identification from waveform reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leymarie, N.; Aristégui, C.; Audoin, B.; Baste, S.

    2002-05-01

    An inverse method is proposed for the determination of the viscoelastic properties of material plates from the plane-wave transmitted acoustic field. Innovations lie in a two-step inversion scheme based on the well-known maximum-likelihood principle with an analytic signal formulation. In addition, establishing the analytical formulations of the plate transmission coefficient we implement an efficient and slightly noise-sensitive process suited to both very thin plates and strongly dispersive media.

  20. Advances in waveform-agile sensing for tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Sira, Sandeep Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology and information processing afford a new flexibility in the design of waveforms for agile sensing. Sensors are now developed with the ability to dynamically choose their transmit or receive waveforms in order to optimize an objective cost function. This has exposed a new paradigm of significant performance improvements in active sensing: dynamic waveform adaptation to environment conditions, target structures, or information features. The manuscript provides a review of recent advances in waveform-agile sensing for target tracking applications. A dynamic wav

  1. Wavelet-Based Signal Processing of Electromagnetic Pulse Generated Waveforms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ardolino, Richard S

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigated and compared alternative signal processing techniques that used wavelet-based methods instead of traditional frequency domain methods for processing measured electromagnetic pulse (EMP) waveforms...

  2. A sheath model for arbitrary radiofrequency waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    The sheath is often the most important region of a rf plasma, because discharge impedance, power absorption and ion acceleration are critically affected by the behaviour of the sheath. Consequently, models of the sheath are central to any understanding of the physics of rf plasmas. Lieberman has supplied an analytical model for a radio-frequency sheath driven by a single frequency, but in recent years interest has been increasing in radio-frequency discharges excited by increasingly complex wave forms. There has been limited success in generalizing the Lieberman model in this direction, because of mathematical complexities. So there is essentially no sheath model available to describe many modern experiments. In this paper we present a new analytical sheath model, based on a simpler mathematical framework than that of Lieberman. For the single frequency case, this model yields scaling laws that are identical in form to those of Lieberman, differing only by numerical coefficients close to one. However, the new model may be straightforwardly solved for arbitrary current waveforms, and may be used to derive scaling laws for such complex waveforms. In this paper, we will describe the model and present some illustrative examples.

  3. Numerical results for near surface time domain electromagnetic exploration: a full waveform approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H.; Li, K.; Li, X., Sr.; Liu, Y., Sr.; Wen, J., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Time domain or Transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey including types with airborne, semi-airborne and ground play important roles in applicants such as geological surveys, ground water/aquifer assess [Meju et al., 2000; Cox et al., 2010], metal ore exploration [Yang and Oldenburg, 2012], prediction of water bearing structures in tunnels [Xue et al., 2007; Sun et al., 2012], UXO exploration [Pasion et al., 2007; Gasperikova et al., 2009] etc. The common practice is introducing a current into a transmitting (Tx) loop and acquire the induced electromagnetic field after the current is cut off [Zhdanov and Keller, 1994]. The current waveforms are different depending on instruments. Rectangle is the most widely used excitation current source especially in ground TEM. Triangle and half sine are commonly used in airborne and semi-airborne TEM investigation. In most instruments, only the off time responses are acquired and used in later analysis and data inversion. Very few airborne instruments acquire the on time and off time responses together. Although these systems acquire the on time data, they usually do not use them in the interpretation.This abstract shows a novel full waveform time domain electromagnetic method and our recent modeling results. The benefits comes from our new algorithm in modeling full waveform time domain electromagnetic problems. We introduced the current density into the Maxwell's equation as the transmitting source. This approach allows arbitrary waveforms, such as triangle, half-sine, trapezoidal waves or scatter record from equipment, being used in modeling. Here, we simulate the establishing and induced diffusion process of the electromagnetic field in the earth. The traditional time domain electromagnetic with pure secondary fields can also be extracted from our modeling results. The real time responses excited by a loop source can be calculated using the algorithm. We analyze the full time gates responses of homogeneous half space and two

  4. Accurate calibration of waveform data measured by the Plasma Wave Experiment on board the ARASE satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.; Hikishima, M.; Kasahara, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Kojima, H.; Ozaki, M.; Yagitani, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) is installed on board the ARASE satellite to measure the electric field in the frequency range from DC to 10 MHz, and the magnetic field in the frequency range from a few Hz to 100 kHz using two dipole wire-probe antennas (WPT) and three magnetic search coils (MSC), respectively. In particular, the Waveform Capture (WFC), one of the receivers of the PWE, can detect electromagnetic field waveform in the frequency range from a few Hz to 20 kHz. The Software-type Wave Particle Interaction Analyzer (S-WPIA) is installed on the ARASE satellite to measure the energy exchange between plasma waves and particles. Since S-WPIA uses the waveform data measured by WFC to calculate the relative phase angle between the wave magnetic field and velocity of energetic electrons, the high-accuracy is required to calibration of both amplitude and phase of the waveform data. Generally, the calibration procedure of the signal passed through a receiver consists of three steps; the transformation into spectra, the calibration by the transfer function of a receiver, and the inverse transformation of the calibrated spectra into the time domain. Practically, in order to reduce the side robe effect, a raw data is filtered by a window function in the time domain before applying Fourier transform. However, for the case that a first order differential coefficient of the phase transfer function of the system is not negligible, the phase of the window function convoluted into the calibrated spectra is shifted differently at each frequency, resulting in a discontinuity in the time domain of the calibrated waveform data. To eliminate the effect of the phase shift of a window function, we suggest several methods to calibrate a waveform data accurately and carry out simulations assuming simple sinusoidal waves as an input signal and using transfer functions of WPT, MSC, and WFC obtained in pre-flight tests. In consequence, we conclude that the following two methods can

  5. Tutorial for Wave Equation Inversion of Skeletonized Data

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai

    2017-04-25

    Full waveform inversion of seismic data is often plagued by cycle skipping problems so that an iterative optimization method often gets stuck in a local minimum. To avoid this problem we simplify the objective function so that the iterative solution can quickly converge to a solution in the vicinity of the global minimum. The objective function is simplified by only using parsimonious and important portions of the data, which are defined as skeletonized data. We now present a mostly non-mathematical tutorial that explains the theory of skeletonized inversion. We also show its effectiveness with examples.

  6. Lithospheric layering in the North American craton revealed by including Short Period Constraints in Full Waveform Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, C.; Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent receiver function studies of the North American craton suggest the presence of significant layering within the cratonic lithosphere, with significant lateral variations in the depth of the velocity discontinuities. These structural boundaries have been confirmed recently using a transdimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach (TMCMC), inverting surface wave dispersion data and converted phases simultaneously (Calò et al., 2016; Roy and Romanowicz 2017). The lateral resolution of upper mantle structure can be improved with a high density of broadband seismic stations, or with a sparse network using full waveform inversion based on numerical wavefield computation methods such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM). However, inverting for discontinuities with strong topography such as MLDS's or LAB, presents challenges in an inversion framework, both computationally, due to the short periods required, and from the point of view of stability of the inversion. To overcome these limitations, and to improve resolution of layering in the upper mantle, we are developing a methodology that combines full waveform inversion tomography and information provided by short period seismic observables. We have extended the 30 1D radially anisotropic shear velocity profiles of Calò et al. 2016 to several other stations, for which we used a recent shear velocity model (Clouzet et al., 2017) as constraint in the modeling. These 1D profiles, including both isotropic and anisotropic discontinuities in the upper mantle (above 300 km depth) are then used to build a 3D starting model for the full waveform tomographic inversion. This model is built after 1) homogenization of the layered 1D models and 2) interpolation between the 1D smooth profiles and the model of Clouzet et al. 2017, resulting in a smooth 3D starting model. Waveforms used in the inversion are filtered at periods longer than 30s. We use the SEM code "RegSEM" for forward computations and a quasi-Newton inversion

  7. Identification of polymorphic inversions from genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cáceres Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic inversions are a source of genetic variability with a direct impact on recombination frequencies. Given the difficulty of their experimental study, computational methods have been developed to infer their existence in a large number of individuals using genome-wide data of nucleotide variation. Methods based on haplotype tagging of known inversions attempt to classify individuals as having a normal or inverted allele. Other methods that measure differences between linkage disequilibrium attempt to identify regions with inversions but unable to classify subjects accurately, an essential requirement for association studies. Results We present a novel method to both identify polymorphic inversions from genome-wide genotype data and classify individuals as containing a normal or inverted allele. Our method, a generalization of a published method for haplotype data 1, utilizes linkage between groups of SNPs to partition a set of individuals into normal and inverted subpopulations. We employ a sliding window scan to identify regions likely to have an inversion, and accumulation of evidence from neighboring SNPs is used to accurately determine the inversion status of each subject. Further, our approach detects inversions directly from genotype data, thus increasing its usability to current genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Conclusions We demonstrate the accuracy of our method to detect inversions and classify individuals on principled-simulated genotypes, produced by the evolution of an inversion event within a coalescent model 2. We applied our method to real genotype data from HapMap Phase III to characterize the inversion status of two known inversions within the regions 17q21 and 8p23 across 1184 individuals. Finally, we scan the full genomes of the European Origin (CEU and Yoruba (YRI HapMap samples. We find population-based evidence for 9 out of 15 well-established autosomic inversions, and for 52 regions

  8. Skeletonized wave equation of surface wave dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-09-06

    We present the theory for wave equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. Similar to wave-equation travel-time inversion, the complicated surface-wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the (kx,ω) domain. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2D or 3D velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is less prone to the cycle skipping problems of full waveform inversion (FWI). The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can accurately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distribution in laterally heterogeneous media.

  9. Stratigraphic imaging of sub-basalt sediments using waveform tomography of wide-angle seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, K.; Gao, F.; Pratt, G.; Zelt, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    The oil industry is interested in imaging the fine structures of sedimentary formations masked below basalt flows for commercial exploration of hydrocarbons. Seismic exploration of sediments hidden below high-velocity basalt cover is a difficult problem because near-vertical reflection data are contaminated with multiples, converted waves and scattering noise generated by interbeds, breccia and vesicles within the basalt. The noise becomes less prominent as the source-receiver offset increases, and the signals carrying sub-surface information stand out at the wide-angle range. The tomography of first arrival traveltime data can provide little information about the underlying low-velocity sediments. Traveltime inversion of wide-angle seismic data including both first arrivals and identifiable wide-angle reflected phases has been an important tool in the delineation of the large-scale velocity structure of sub-basalt sediments, although it lacks the small-scale velocity details. Here we apply 2-D full-waveform inversion ("waveform tomography") to wide-angle seismic data with a view to extracting the small-scale stratigraphic features of sedimentary formations. Results from both synthetic data, generated for a realistic earth model, and field dataset from the basalt covered Saurashtra peninsula, India, will be presented. This approach has potential to delineate thin sedimentary layers hidden below thick basalt cover also, and may serve as a powerful tool to image sedimentary basins, where they are covered by high-velocity materials like basalts, salts, carbonates, etc. in various parts of the world.

  10. Multiscale Phase Inversion of Seismic Data

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-12-02

    We present a scheme for multiscale phase inversion (MPI) of seismic data that is less sensitive to the unmodeled physics of wave propagation and a poor starting model than standard full waveform inversion (FWI). To avoid cycle-skipping, the multiscale strategy temporally integrates the traces several times, i.e. high-order integration, to produce low-boost seismograms that are used as input data for the initial iterations of MPI. As the iterations proceed, higher frequencies in the data are boosted by using integrated traces of lower order as the input data. The input data are also filtered into different narrow frequency bands for the MPI implementation. At low frequencies, we show that MPI with windowed reflections approximates wave equation inversion of the reflection traveltimes, except no traveltime picking is needed. Numerical results with synthetic acoustic data show that MPI is more robust than conventional multiscale FWI when the initial model is far from the true model. Results from synthetic viscoacoustic and elastic data show that MPI is less sensitive than FWI to some of the unmodeled physics. Inversion of marine data shows that MPI is more robust and produces modestly more accurate results than FWI for this data set.

  11. Classification algorithms using adaptive partitioning

    KAUST Repository

    Binev, Peter; Cohen, Albert; Dahmen, Wolfgang; DeVore, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Institute of Mathematical Statistics. Algorithms for binary classification based on adaptive tree partitioning are formulated and analyzed for both their risk performance and their friendliness to numerical implementation. The algorithms can be viewed as generating a set approximation to the Bayes set and thus fall into the general category of set estimators. In contrast with the most studied tree-based algorithms, which utilize piecewise constant approximation on the generated partition [IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory 52 (2006) 1335.1353; Mach. Learn. 66 (2007) 209.242], we consider decorated trees, which allow us to derive higher order methods. Convergence rates for these methods are derived in terms the parameter - of margin conditions and a rate s of best approximation of the Bayes set by decorated adaptive partitions. They can also be expressed in terms of the Besov smoothness β of the regression function that governs its approximability by piecewise polynomials on adaptive partition. The execution of the algorithms does not require knowledge of the smoothness or margin conditions. Besov smoothness conditions are weaker than the commonly used Holder conditions, which govern approximation by nonadaptive partitions, and therefore for a given regression function can result in a higher rate of convergence. This in turn mitigates the compatibility conflict between smoothness and margin parameters.

  12. Classification algorithms using adaptive partitioning

    KAUST Repository

    Binev, Peter

    2014-12-01

    © 2014 Institute of Mathematical Statistics. Algorithms for binary classification based on adaptive tree partitioning are formulated and analyzed for both their risk performance and their friendliness to numerical implementation. The algorithms can be viewed as generating a set approximation to the Bayes set and thus fall into the general category of set estimators. In contrast with the most studied tree-based algorithms, which utilize piecewise constant approximation on the generated partition [IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory 52 (2006) 1335.1353; Mach. Learn. 66 (2007) 209.242], we consider decorated trees, which allow us to derive higher order methods. Convergence rates for these methods are derived in terms the parameter - of margin conditions and a rate s of best approximation of the Bayes set by decorated adaptive partitions. They can also be expressed in terms of the Besov smoothness β of the regression function that governs its approximability by piecewise polynomials on adaptive partition. The execution of the algorithms does not require knowledge of the smoothness or margin conditions. Besov smoothness conditions are weaker than the commonly used Holder conditions, which govern approximation by nonadaptive partitions, and therefore for a given regression function can result in a higher rate of convergence. This in turn mitigates the compatibility conflict between smoothness and margin parameters.

  13. Method and apparatus for resonant frequency waveform modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Matthew S [Richland, WA

    2011-06-07

    A resonant modulator device and process are described that provide enhanced resonant frequency waveforms to electrical devices including, e.g., laser devices. Faster, larger, and more complex modulation waveforms are obtained than can be obtained by use of conventional current controllers alone.

  14. An Overview of Radar Waveform Optimization for Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lulu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An optimal waveform design method that fully employs the knowledge of the target and the environment can further improve target detection performance, thus is of vital importance to research. In this paper, methods of radar waveform optimization for target detection are reviewed and summarized and provide the basis for the research.

  15. Using measured octanol-air partition coefficients to explain environmental partitioning of organochlorine pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeib, Mahiba; Harner, Tom

    2002-05-01

    Octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) were measured directly for 19 organochlorine (OC) pesticides over the temperature range of 5 to 35 degrees C. Values of log Koa at 25 degrees C ranged over three orders of magnitude, from 7.4 for hexachlorobenzene to 10.1 for 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane. Measured values were compared to values calculated as KowRT/H (where R is the ideal gas constant [8.314 J mol(-1) K(-1)], T is absolute temperature, and H is Henry's law constant) were, in general, larger. Discrepancies of up to three orders of magnitude were observed, highlighting the need for direct measurements of Koa. Plots of Koa versus inverse absolute temperature exhibited a log-linear correlation. Enthalpies of phase transition between octanol and air (deltaHoa) were determined from the temperature slopes and were in the range of 56 to 105 kJ mol(-1) K(-1). Activity coefficients in octanol (gamma(o)) were determined from Koa and reported supercooled liquid vapor pressures (pL(o)), and these were in the range of 0.3 to 12, indicating near-ideal solution behavior. Differences in Koa values for structural isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane were also explored. A Koa-based model was described for predicting the partitioning of OC pesticides to aerosols and used to calculate particulate fractions at 25 and -10 degrees C. The model also agreed well with experimental results for several OC pesticides that were equilibrated with urban aerosols in the laboratory. A log-log regression of the particle-gas partition coefficient versus Koa had a slope near unity, indicating that octanol is a good surrogate for the aerosol organic matter.

  16. A pulse generator of arbitrary shaped waveform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jiayou; Chen Zhihao

    2011-01-01

    The three bump magnets in the booster extraction system of SSRF are driven by a signal generator with an external trigger. The signal generator must have three independent and controllable outputs, and both amplitude and make-and-break should be controllable, with current state information being readable. In this paper, we describe a signal generator based on FPGA and DAC boards. It makes use of characteristics of both FPGA flex programmable and rich reconfigurable IO resources. The system has a 16-bit DAC with four outputs, using Matlab to write a GUI based on RS232 protocol for control. It was simulated in Modelsim and tested on board. The results indicate that the system is well designed and all the requirements are met. The arbitrary waveform is writable, and the pulse width and period can be controlled. (authors)

  17. Rectangular waveform linear transformer driver module design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yue; Xie Weiping; Zhou Liangji; Chen Lin

    2014-01-01

    Linear Transformer Driver is a novel pulsed power technology, its main merits include a parallel LC discharge array and Inductive Voltage Adder. The parallel LC discharge array lowers the whole circuit equivalent inductance and the Inductive Voltage Adder unites the modules in series in order to create a high electric field grads, meanwhile, restricts the high voltage in a small space. The lower inductance in favor of LTD output a fast waveform and IVA confine high voltage in secondary cavity. In recently, some LTD-based pulsed power system has been development yet. The usual LTD architecture provides damped sine shaped output pulses that may not be suitable in flash radiography, high power microwave production, z-pinch drivers, and certain other applications. A more suitable driver output pulse would have a flat or inclined top (slightly rising or falling). In this paper, we present the design of an LTD cavity that generates this type of the output pulse by including within its circular array some number of the harmonic bricks in addition to the standard bricks according to Fourier progression theory. The parallel LC discharge array circuit formula is introduced by Kirchhoff Law, and the sum of harmonic is proofed as an analytic result, meanwhile, rationality of design is proved by simulation. Varying gas spark discharge dynamic resistance with harmonic order and switches jitter are analyzed. The results are as following: The more harmonic order is an approach to the ideal rectangular waveform, but lead to more system complexity. The capacity decreases as harmonic order increase, and gas spark discharge dynamic resistance rises with the capacity. The rising time protracts and flat is decay or even vanishes and the shot to shot reproducibility is degenerate as the switches jitter is high. (authors)

  18. Synthetic tsunami waveform catalogs with kinematic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Jorge Miguel; Matias, Luis; Omira, Rachid

    2017-07-01

    In this study we present a comprehensive methodology to produce a synthetic tsunami waveform catalogue in the northeast Atlantic, east of the Azores islands. The method uses a synthetic earthquake catalogue compatible with plate kinematic constraints of the area. We use it to assess the tsunami hazard from the transcurrent boundary located between Iberia and the Azores, whose western part is known as the Gloria Fault. This study focuses only on earthquake-generated tsunamis. Moreover, we assume that the time and space distribution of the seismic events is known. To do this, we compute a synthetic earthquake catalogue including all fault parameters needed to characterize the seafloor deformation covering the time span of 20 000 years, which we consider long enough to ensure the representability of earthquake generation on this segment of the plate boundary. The computed time and space rupture distributions are made compatible with global kinematic plate models. We use the tsunami empirical Green's functions to efficiently compute the synthetic tsunami waveforms for the dataset of coastal locations, thus providing the basis for tsunami impact characterization. We present the results in the form of offshore wave heights for all coastal points in the dataset. Our results focus on the northeast Atlantic basin, showing that earthquake-induced tsunamis in the transcurrent segment of the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary pose a minor threat to coastal areas north of Portugal and beyond the Strait of Gibraltar. However, in Morocco, the Azores, and the Madeira islands, we can expect wave heights between 0.6 and 0.8 m, leading to precautionary evacuation of coastal areas. The advantages of the method are its easy application to other regions and the low computation effort needed.

  19. Seismic Full Waveform Modeling & Imaging in Attenuating Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng

    Seismic attenuation strongly affects seismic waveforms by amplitude loss and velocity dispersion. Without proper inclusion of Q parameters, errors can be introduced for seismic full waveform modeling and imaging. Three different (Carcione's, Robertsson's, and the generalized Robertsson's) isotropic viscoelastic wave equations based on the generalized standard linear solid (GSLS) are evaluated. The second-order displacement equations are derived, and used to demonstrate that, with the same stress relaxation times, these viscoelastic formulations are equivalent. By introducing separate memory variables for P and S relaxation functions, Robertsson's formulation is generalized to allow different P and S wave stress relaxation times, which improves the physical consistency of the Qp and Qs modelled in the seismograms.The three formulations have comparable computational cost. 3D seismic finite-difference forward modeling is applied to anisotropic viscoelastic media. The viscoelastic T-matrix (a dynamic effective medium theory) relates frequency-dependent anisotropic attenuation and velocity to reservoir properties in fractured HTI media, based on the meso-scale fluid flow attenuation mechanism. The seismic signatures resulting from changing viscoelastic reservoir properties are easily visible. Analysis of 3D viscoelastic seismograms suggests that anisotropic attenuation is a potential tool for reservoir characterization. To compensate the Q effects during reverse-time migration (RTM) in viscoacoustic and viscoelastic media, amplitudes need to be compensated during wave propagation; the propagation velocity of the Q-compensated wavefield needs to be the same as in the attenuating wavefield, to restore the phase information. Both amplitude and phase can be compensated when the velocity dispersion and the amplitude loss are decoupled. For wave equations based on the GSLS, because Q effects are coupled in the memory variables, Q-compensated wavefield propagates faster than

  20. Design of a 9-loop quasi-exponential waveform generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Partha; Shukla, Rohit; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-12-01

    We know in an under-damped L-C-R series circuit, current follows a damped sinusoidal waveform. But if a number of sinusoidal waveforms of decreasing time period, generated in an L-C-R circuit, be combined in first quarter cycle of time period, then a quasi-exponential nature of output current waveform can be achieved. In an L-C-R series circuit, quasi-exponential current waveform shows a rising current derivative and thereby finds many applications in pulsed power. Here, we have described design and experiment details of a 9-loop quasi-exponential waveform generator. In that, design details of magnetic switches have also been described. In the experiment, output current of 26 kA has been achieved. It has been shown that how well the experimentally obtained output current profile matches with the numerically computed output.

  1. Analysis of load balance in hybrid partitioning | Talib | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In information retrieval systems, there are three types of index partitioning schemes - term partitioning, document partitioning, and hybrid partitioning. The hybrid-partitioning scheme combines both term and document partitioning schemes. Term partitioning provides high concurrency, which means that queries can be ...

  2. The source parameters of 2013 Mw6.6 Lushan earthquake constrained with the restored local clipped seismic waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Yao, Z. X.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a method to restore the clipped seismic waveforms near epicenter using projection onto convex sets method (Zhang et al, 2016). This method was applied to rescue the local clipped waveforms of 2013 Mw 6.6 Lushan earthquake. We restored 88 out of 93 clipped waveforms of 38 broadband seismic stations of China Earthquake Networks (CEN). The epicenter distance of the nearest station to the epicenter that we can faithfully restore is only about 32 km. In order to investigate if the source parameters of earthquake could be determined exactly with the restored data, restored waveforms are utilized to get the mechanism of Lushan earthquake. We apply the generalized reflection-transmission coefficient matrix method to calculate the synthetic seismic records and simulated annealing method in inversion (Yao and Harkrider, 1983; Hao et al., 2012). We select 5 stations of CEN with the epicenter distance about 200km whose records aren't clipped and three-component velocity records are used. The result shows the strike, dip and rake angles of Lushan earthquake are 200o, 51o and 87o respectively, hereinafter "standard result". Then the clipped and restored seismic waveforms are applied respectively. The strike, dip and rake angles of clipped seismic waveforms are 184o, 53o and 72o respectively. The largest misfit of angle is 16o. In contrast, the strike, dip and rake angles of restored seismic waveforms are 198o, 51o and 87o respectively. It is very close to the "standard result". We also study the rupture history of Lushan earthquake constrained with the restored local broadband and teleseismic waves based on finite fault method (Hao et al., 2013). The result consists with that constrained with the strong motion and teleseismic waves (Hao et al., 2013), especially the location of the patch with larger slip. In real-time seismology, determining the source parameters as soon as possible is important. This method will help us to determine the mechanism of earthquake

  3. Layering of Structure in the North American Upper Mantle: Combining Short Period Constraints and Full Waveform Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, C.; Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent receiver function (RF) studies of the north American craton suggest the presence of layering within the cratonic lithosphere with significant lateral variations in the depth. However, the location and character of these discontinuities depends on assumptions made on a background 3D velocity model. On the other hand, the implementation of the Spectral Element Method (SEM) for the computation of the seismic wavefield in 3D structures is allowing improved resolution of volumetric structure in full waveform tomography. The corresponding computations are however very heavy and limit our ability to attain short enough periods to resolve short scale features such as the existence and lateral variations of discontinuities. In order to overcome these limitations, we have developed a methodology that combines full waveform inversion tomography and information provided by short period seismic observables. In a first step we constructed a 3D discontinuous radially anisotropic starting model combining 1D models calculated using RF and L and R wave dispersion data in a Bayesian framework using trans-dimensional MCMC inversion at a collection of 30 stations across the north American continent (Calò et al., 2016). This model was then interpolated and smoothed using a procedure based on residual homogenization (Capdeville et al. 2013) and serves as input model for full waveform tomography using a three-component waveform dataset previously collected (Yuan et al., 2014). The homogenization is necessary to avoid meshing problems and heavy SEM computations. In a second step, several iterations of the full waveform inversion are performed until convergence, using a regional SEM code for forward computations (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012). Results of the inversion are volumetric velocity perturbations around the homogenized starting model, which are then added to the discontinuous 3D starting model. The final result is a multiscale discontinuous model containing both short and

  4. Waveform tomography in geophysics and helioseismology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobden, L.J.; Fichtner, A.; Tong, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Seismic tomography – in which we construct images of a body's interior using seismic waves – is an inverse problem; that is, our goal is to find a model that fits a set of existing data observations. This is much less straightforward than the reverse, forward problem (i.e., generating synthetic data

  5. High resolution aquifer characterization using crosshole GPR full-waveform tomography: Comparison with direct-push and tracer test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueting, Nils; Vienken, Thomas; Klotzsche, Anja; van der Kruk, Jan; Vanderborght, Jan; Caers, Jef; Vereecken, Harry; Englert, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Limited knowledge about the spatial distribution of aquifer properties typically constrains our ability to predict subsurface flow and transport. Here we investigate the value of using high resolution full-waveform inversion of cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (GPR) data for aquifer characterization. By stitching together GPR tomograms from multiple adjacent crosshole planes, we are able to image, with a decimeter scale resolution, the dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of an alluvial aquifer along cross sections of 50 m length and 10 m depth. A logistic regression model is employed to predict the spatial distribution of lithological facies on the basis of the GPR results. Vertical profiles of porosity and hydraulic conductivity from direct-push, flowmeter and grain size data suggest that the GPR predicted facies classification is meaningful with regard to porosity and hydraulic conductivity, even though the distributions of individual facies show some overlap and the absolute hydraulic conductivities from the different methods (direct-push, flowmeter, grain size) differ up to approximately one order of magnitude. Comparison of the GPR predicted facies architecture with tracer test data suggests that the plume splitting observed in a tracer experiment was caused by a hydraulically low-conductive sand layer with a thickness of only a few decimeters. Because this sand layer is identified by GPR full-waveform inversion but not by conventional GPR ray-based inversion we conclude that the improvement in spatial resolution due to full-waveform inversion is crucial to detect small-scale aquifer structures that are highly relevant for solute transport.

  6. S-wave velocity below Europe from delay-time and waveform inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielhuis, A.

    1992-01-01

    The upper mantle of Europe has been the subject of many tomographic studies of variations in P-wave velocity (e.g., Romanowicz 1980; Hovland et al., 1981; Spakman, 1988, 1991; and Spakman et aI., in preparation). In particular the studies of Spakman (1988, 1991) and Spakman et aI. (in preparation)

  7. S-wave velocity below Europe from delay-time and waveform inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielhuis, A.

    1992-01-01

    The upper mantle of Europe has been the subject of many tomographic studies of variations in P-wave velocity (e.g., Romanowicz 1980; Hovland et al., 1981; Spakman, 1988, 1991; and Spakman et aI., in preparation). In particular the studies of Spakman (1988, 1991) and Spakman et aI. (in

  8. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-06-13

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  9. Research Note: Full-waveform inversion of the unwrapped phase of a model

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    , convergence to a solution becomes difficult. As a result, we tend to invert for refracted events and damp reflections in data. Reflection induced non-linearity stems from cycle skipping between the imprint of the true model in observed data and the predicted

  10. Full waveform inversion based on the optimized gradient and its spectral implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    for the convergence are available, the high number of iterations required to approach a solution renders FWI as very expensive (especially in 3D). A spectral implementation in which the wavefields are extrapolated and gradients are calculated in the wavenumber domain

  11. Moment tensor inversion of waveforms: a two-step time-frequency approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavryčuk, Václav; Kühn, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 190, č. 3 (2012), s. 1761-1776 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120801; GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/12/1491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : earthquake source observations * computational seismology * wave propagation * dynamics and mechanics of faulting Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.853, year: 2012

  12. Optimal Full Waveform Inversion Strategy in Azimuthally Rotated Elastic Orthorhombic Media

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Juwon; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    The elastic orthorhombic assumption is one of the most practical Earth models that takes into account the horizontal anisotropic layering and vertical fracture network. In this model, the rotation angle of the vertical planes of symmetry is a

  13. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Xie, Zhinan; Bozdağ, Ebru; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Peter, Daniel; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  14. Antarctic ice sheet thickness estimation based on P-receiver function and waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, P.; Li, F.; LI, Z.; Li, J.; Yang, Y.; Hao, W.

    2016-12-01

    Antarctic ice sheet thickness is key parameter and boundary condition for ice sheet model construction, which has great significance for glacial isostatic adjustment, ice sheet mass balance and global change study. Ice thickness acquired utilizing seismological receiver function method can complement and verify with results obtained by radar echo sounding method. In this paper, P-receiver functions(PRFs) are extracted for stations deployed on Antarctic ice sheet, then Vp/Vs ratio and ice thickness are obtained using H-Kappa stacking. Comparisons are made between Bedmap2 dataset and the ice thickness from PRFs, most of the absolute value of the differences are less than 200 meters, only a few reach 600 meters. Taking into account of the intensity of Bedmap2 dataset survey lines and the uncertainty of radio echo sounding, as well as the inherit complexity of the internal ice structure beneath some stations, the ice thickness obtained from receiver function method is reliable. However limitation exists when using H-Kappa stacking method for stations where sediment squeezed between the ice and the bed rock layer. For better verifying the PRF result, a global optimizing method-Neighbourhood algotithm(NA) and spline interpolation are used to modeling PRFs assuming an isotropic layered ice sheet with depth varied densities and velocities beneath the stations. Then the velocity structure and ice sheet thickness are obtained through nonlinear searching by optimally fitting the real and the theoretical PRFs. The obtained ice sheet thickness beneath the stations agree well with the former H-Kappa method, but further detailed study are needed to constrain the inner ice velocity structure.

  15. INVERSION OF SOURCE TIME FUNCTION USING BOREHOLE ARRAY SONIC WAVEFORMS. (R825225)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  16. Looking ahead of a tunnel boring machine with 2-D SH full waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisupati, P.B.; Mulder, W.A.; Drijkoningen, G.G.; Reijnen, R.

    2015-01-01

    In the near-surface with unconsolidated soils, shear properties can be well imaged, sometimes better than P-wave properties. To facilitate ground prediction ahead of a tunnel boring machine (TBM), active ‘surveys’ with shear-wave vibrators are carried out during boring. In such surveys, only a few

  17. Seismic Waveform Inversion : Bump functional, parameterization analysis and imaging ahead of a tunnel-boring machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisupati, P.B.

    2017-01-01

    During a seismic experiment, mechanical waves are usually generated by various manmade sources. These waves propagate in the subsurface and are recorded at receivers. Modern seismic exploration methods analyze them to infer the mechanical properties of the subsurface; this is commonly referred as

  18. Practical waveform inversion in anisotropic media: The natural combination of the data and image objectives

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Wu, Zedong

    2016-01-01

    scales, with information accessed from the data fitting (FWI) and the image focusing (RWI) objectives. With this parametrization, the RWI role is to obtain a smooth ηmodel, as well as velocity, while FWI focusses on the scattering potential

  19. Least-squares Migration and Full Waveform Inversion with Multisource Frequency Selection

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yunsong

    2013-01-01

    , with the same advantages of computational efficiency and storage savings. In the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, to mitigate spectral leakage due to delayed onsets of sine waves detected at receivers, I double the simulation time and retain only

  20. Anelastic sensitivity kernels with parsimonious storage for adjoint tomography and full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Xie, Zhinan; Bozdaǧ, Ebru; Sales de Andrade, Elliott; Peter, Daniel; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a technique to compute exact anelastic sensitivity kernels in the time domain using parsimonious disk storage. The method is based on a reordering of the time loop of time-domain forward/adjoint wave propagation solvers combined with the use of a memory buffer. It avoids instabilities that occur when time-reversing dissipative wave propagation simulations. The total number of required time steps is unchanged compared to usual acoustic or elastic approaches. The cost is reduced by a factor of 4/3 compared to the case in which anelasticity is partially accounted for by accommodating the effects of physical dispersion. We validate our technique by performing a test in which we compare the Kα sensitivity kernel to the exact kernel obtained by saving the entire forward calculation. This benchmark confirms that our approach is also exact. We illustrate the importance of including full attenuation in the calculation of sensitivity kernels by showing significant differences with physical-dispersion-only kernels.

  1. From tomography to full-waveform inversion with a single objective function

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali; Choi, Yun Seok

    2014-01-01

    compared to conventional phase representation. With a strong Laplace damping of the modeled, potentially low-frequency, data along the time axis, this attribute admitted a first-arrival traveltime that could be compared with picked ones from the observed

  2. Fast Prediction and Evaluation of Gravitational Waveforms Using Surrogate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Scott E.; Galley, Chad R.; Hesthaven, Jan S.; Kaye, Jason; Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    We propose a solution to the problem of quickly and accurately predicting gravitational waveforms within any given physical model. The method is relevant for both real-time applications and more traditional scenarios where the generation of waveforms using standard methods can be prohibitively expensive. Our approach is based on three offline steps resulting in an accurate reduced order model in both parameter and physical dimensions that can be used as a surrogate for the true or fiducial waveform family. First, a set of m parameter values is determined using a greedy algorithm from which a reduced basis representation is constructed. Second, these m parameters induce the selection of m time values for interpolating a waveform time series using an empirical interpolant that is built for the fiducial waveform family. Third, a fit in the parameter dimension is performed for the waveform's value at each of these m times. The cost of predicting L waveform time samples for a generic parameter choice is of order O(mL+mcfit) online operations, where cfit denotes the fitting function operation count and, typically, m ≪L. The result is a compact, computationally efficient, and accurate surrogate model that retains the original physics of the fiducial waveform family while also being fast to evaluate. We generate accurate surrogate models for effective-one-body waveforms of nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with durations as long as 105M, mass ratios from 1 to 10, and for multiple spherical harmonic modes. We find that these surrogates are more than 3 orders of magnitude faster to evaluate as compared to the cost of generating effective-one-body waveforms in standard ways. Surrogate model building for other waveform families and models follows the same steps and has the same low computational online scaling cost. For expensive numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescences, we thus anticipate extremely large speedups in generating new waveforms with a

  3. Gentile statistics and restricted partitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a recent paper (Tran et al, Ann. Phys. 311, 204 (2004)), some asymptotic number theoretical results on the partitioning of an integer were derived exploiting its connection to the quantum density of states of a many-particle system. We generalise these results to obtain an asymptotic formula for the restricted or coloured ...

  4. Monomial Crystals and Partition Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingley, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Recently Fayers introduced a large family of combinatorial realizations of the fundamental crystal B(Λ0) for ^sln, where the vertices are indexed by certain partitions. He showed that special cases of this construction agree with the Misra-Miwa realization and with Berg's ladder crystal. Here we show that another special case is naturally isomorphic to a realization using Nakajima's monomial crystal.

  5. Hemisphere partition function and monodromy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkinger, David; Knapp, Johanna [Institute for Theoretical Physics, TU Wien,Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-29

    We discuss D-brane monodromies from the point of view of the gauged linear sigma model. We give a prescription on how to extract monodromy matrices directly from the hemisphere partition function. We illustrate this procedure by recomputing the monodromy matrices associated to one-parameter Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces in weighted projected space.

  6. Rapid kinematic finite source inversion for Tsunamic Early Warning using high rate GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Liu, Z.; Song, Y. T.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has been used for rapid earthquake source inversion towards tsunami early warning. In practice, two approaches, i.e., static finite source inversion based on permanent co-seismic offsets and kinematic finite source inversion using high-rate (>= 1 Hz) co-seismic displacement waveforms, are often employed to fulfill the task. The static inversion is relatively easy to be implemented and does not require additional constraints on rupture velocity, duration, and temporal variation. However, since most GNSS receivers are deployed onshore locating on one side of the subduction fault, there is very limited resolution on near-trench fault slip using GNSS in static finite source inversion. On the other hand, the high-rate GNSS displacement waveforms, which contain the timing information of earthquake rupture explicitly and static offsets implicitly, have the potential to improve near-trench resolution by reconciling with the depth-dependent megathrust rupture behaviors. In this contribution, we assess the performance of rapid kinematic finite source inversion using high-rate GNSS by three selected historical tsunamigenic cases: the 2010 Mentawai, 2011 Tohoku and 2015 Illapel events. With respect to the 2010 Mentawai case, it is a typical tsunami earthquake with most slip concentrating near the trench. The static inversion has little resolution there and incorrectly puts slip at greater depth (>10km). In contrast, the recorded GNSS displacement waveforms are deficit in high-frequency energy, the kinematic source inversion recovers a shallow slip patch (depth less than 6 km) and tsunami runups are predicted quite reasonably. For the other two events, slip from kinematic and static inversion show similar characteristics and comparable tsunami scenarios, which may be related to dense GNSS network and behavior of the rupture. Acknowledging the complexity of kinematic source inversion in real-time, we adopt the back

  7. Electrochemical sensing using comparison of voltage-current time differential values during waveform generation and detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Leta Yar-Li; Glass, Robert Scott; Fitzpatrick, Joseph Jay; Wang, Gangqiang; Henderson, Brett Tamatea; Lourdhusamy, Anthoniraj; Steppan, James John; Allmendinger, Klaus Karl

    2018-01-02

    A device for signal processing. The device includes a signal generator, a signal detector, and a processor. The signal generator generates an original waveform. The signal detector detects an affected waveform. The processor is coupled to the signal detector. The processor receives the affected waveform from the signal detector. The processor also compares at least one portion of the affected waveform with the original waveform. The processor also determines a difference between the affected waveform and the original waveform. The processor also determines a value corresponding to a unique portion of the determined difference between the original and affected waveforms. The processor also outputs the determined value.

  8. Generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using gaussian random variables

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2014-09-01

    Correlated waveforms have a number of applications in different fields, such as radar and communication. It is very easy to generate correlated waveforms using infinite alphabets, but for some of the applications, it is very challenging to use them in practice. Moreover, to generate infinite alphabet constant envelope correlated waveforms, the available research uses iterative algorithms, which are computationally very expensive. In this work, we propose simple novel methods to generate correlated waveforms using finite alphabet constant and non-constant-envelope symbols. To generate finite alphabet waveforms, the proposed method map the Gaussian random variables onto the phase-shift-keying, pulse-amplitude, and quadrature-amplitude modulation schemes. For such mapping, the probability-density-function of Gaussian random variables is divided into M regions, where M is the number of alphabets in the corresponding modulation scheme. By exploiting the mapping function, the relationship between the cross-correlation of Gaussian and finite alphabet symbols is derived. To generate equiprobable symbols, the area of each region is kept same. If the requirement is to have each symbol with its own unique probability, the proposed scheme allows us that as well. Although, the proposed scheme is general, the main focus of this paper is to generate finite alphabet waveforms for multiple-input multiple-output radar, where correlated waveforms are used to achieve desired beampatterns. © 2014 IEEE.

  9. Waveform LiDAR across forest biomass gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, P. M.; Nelson, R. F.; Dubayah, R.; Sun, G.; Ranson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Detailed information on the quantity and distribution of aboveground biomass (AGB) is needed to understand how it varies across space and changes over time. Waveform LiDAR data is routinely used to derive the heights of scattering elements in each illuminated footprint, and the vertical structure of vegetation is related to AGB. Changes in LiDAR waveforms across vegetation structure gradients can demonstrate instrument sensitivity to land cover transitions. A close examination of LiDAR waveforms in footprints across a forest gradient can provide new insight into the relationship of vegetation structure and forest AGB. In this study we use field measurements of individual trees within Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) footprints along transects crossing forest to non-forest gradients to examine changes in LVIS waveform characteristics at sites with low (field AGB measurements to original and adjusted LVIS waveforms to detect the forest AGB interval along a forest - non-forest transition in which the LVIS waveform lose the ability to discern differences in AGB. Our results help identify the lower end the forest biomass range that a ~20m footprint waveform LiDAR can detect, which can help infer accumulation of biomass after disturbances and during forest expansion, and which can guide the use of LiDAR within a multi-sensor fusion biomass mapping approach.

  10. SURFACE FITTING FILTERING OF LIDAR POINT CLOUD WITH WAVEFORM INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Xing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Full-waveform LiDAR is an active technology of photogrammetry and remote sensing. It provides more detailed information about objects along the path of a laser pulse than discrete-return topographic LiDAR. The point cloud and waveform information with high quality can be obtained by waveform decomposition, which could make contributions to accurate filtering. The surface fitting filtering method with waveform information is proposed to present such advantage. Firstly, discrete point cloud and waveform parameters are resolved by global convergent Levenberg Marquardt decomposition. Secondly, the ground seed points are selected, of which the abnormal ones are detected by waveform parameters and robust estimation. Thirdly, the terrain surface is fitted and the height difference threshold is determined in consideration of window size and mean square error. Finally, the points are classified gradually with the rising of window size. The filtering process is finished until window size is larger than threshold. The waveform data in urban, farmland and mountain areas from “WATER (Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research” are selected for experiments. Results prove that compared with traditional method, the accuracy of point cloud filtering is further improved and the proposed method has highly practical value.

  11. EXTENSION OF FORMULAS FOR PARTITION FUNCTIONS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ladan et al.

    2Department of Mathematics, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. ... 2 + 1 + 1. = 1 + 1 + 1 + 1. Partition function ( ). Andrew and Erikson (2004) stated that the ..... Andrews, G.E., 1984, The Theory of Partitions, Cambridge ... Pure Appl. Math.

  12. A spatio-temporal index for aerial full waveform laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laefer, Debra F.; Vo, Anh-Vu; Bertolotto, Michela

    2018-04-01

    Aerial laser scanning is increasingly available in the full waveform version of the raw signal, which can provide greater insight into and control over the data and, thus, richer information about the scanned scenes. However, when compared to conventional discrete point storage, preserving raw waveforms leads to vastly larger and more complex data volumes. To begin addressing these challenges, this paper introduces a novel bi-level approach for storing and indexing full waveform (FWF) laser scanning data in a relational database environment, while considering both the spatial and the temporal dimensions of that data. In the storage scheme's upper level, the full waveform datasets are partitioned into spatial and temporal coherent groups that are indexed by a two-dimensional R∗-tree. To further accelerate intra-block data retrieval, at the lower level a three-dimensional local octree is created for each pulse block. The local octrees are implemented in-memory and can be efficiently written to a database for reuse. The indexing solution enables scalable and efficient three-dimensional (3D) spatial and spatio-temporal queries on the actual pulse data - functionalities not available in other systems. The proposed FWF laser scanning data solution is capable of managing multiple FWF datasets derived from large flight missions. The flight structure is embedded into the data storage model and can be used for querying predicates. Such functionality is important to FWF data exploration since aircraft locations and orientations are frequently required for FWF data analyses. Empirical tests on real datasets of up to 1 billion pulses from Dublin, Ireland prove the almost perfect scalability of the system. The use of the local 3D octree in the indexing structure accelerated pulse clipping by 1.2-3.5 times for non-axis-aligned (NAA) polyhedron shaped clipping windows, while axis-aligned (AA) polyhedron clipping was better served using only the top indexing layer. The distinct

  13. Statistical gravitational waveform models: What to simulate next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Zoheyr; Farr, Ben; Holz, Daniel E.; Pürrer, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Models of gravitational waveforms play a critical role in detecting and characterizing the gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary coalescences. Waveforms from numerical relativity (NR), while highly accurate, are too computationally expensive to produce to be directly used with Bayesian parameter estimation tools like Markov-chain-Monte-Carlo and nested sampling. We propose a Gaussian process regression (GPR) method to generate reduced-order-model waveforms based only on existing accurate (e.g. NR) simulations. Using a training set of simulated waveforms, our GPR approach produces interpolated waveforms along with uncertainties across the parameter space. As a proof of concept, we use a training set of IMRPhenomD waveforms to build a GPR model in the 2-d parameter space of mass ratio q and equal-and-aligned spin χ1=χ2. Using a regular, equally-spaced grid of 120 IMRPhenomD training waveforms in q ∈[1 ,3 ] and χ1∈[-0.5 ,0.5 ], the GPR mean approximates IMRPhenomD in this space to mismatches below 4.3 ×10-5. Our approach could in principle use training waveforms directly from numerical relativity. Beyond interpolation of waveforms, we also present a greedy algorithm that utilizes the errors provided by our GPR model to optimize the placement of future simulations. In a fiducial test case we find that using the greedy algorithm to iteratively add simulations achieves GPR errors that are ˜1 order of magnitude lower than the errors from using Latin-hypercube or square training grids.

  14. Fast Prediction and Evaluation of Gravitational Waveforms Using Surrogate Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E. Field

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a solution to the problem of quickly and accurately predicting gravitational waveforms within any given physical model. The method is relevant for both real-time applications and more traditional scenarios where the generation of waveforms using standard methods can be prohibitively expensive. Our approach is based on three offline steps resulting in an accurate reduced order model in both parameter and physical dimensions that can be used as a surrogate for the true or fiducial waveform family. First, a set of m parameter values is determined using a greedy algorithm from which a reduced basis representation is constructed. Second, these m parameters induce the selection of m time values for interpolating a waveform time series using an empirical interpolant that is built for the fiducial waveform family. Third, a fit in the parameter dimension is performed for the waveform’s value at each of these m times. The cost of predicting L waveform time samples for a generic parameter choice is of order O(mL+mc_{fit} online operations, where c_{fit} denotes the fitting function operation count and, typically, m≪L. The result is a compact, computationally efficient, and accurate surrogate model that retains the original physics of the fiducial waveform family while also being fast to evaluate. We generate accurate surrogate models for effective-one-body waveforms of nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with durations as long as 10^{5}M, mass ratios from 1 to 10, and for multiple spherical harmonic modes. We find that these surrogates are more than 3 orders of magnitude faster to evaluate as compared to the cost of generating effective-one-body waveforms in standard ways. Surrogate model building for other waveform families and models follows the same steps and has the same low computational online scaling cost. For expensive numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescences, we thus anticipate extremely large speedups in

  15. Partitioning in P-T concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peilu; Qi Zhanshun; Zhu Zhixuan

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of dry- and water-method for partitioning fission products and minor actinides from the spent fuels, and description of advance of dry-method were done. Partitioning process, some typical concept and some results of dry-method were described. The problems fond in dry-method up to now were pointed out. The partitioning study program was suggested

  16. Femtosecond Nanofocusing with Full Optical Waveform Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berweger, Samuel; Atkin, Joanna M.; Xu, Xiaoji G.; Olmon, Robert L.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The simultaneous nanometer spatial confinement and femtosecond temporal control of an optical excitation has been a long-standing challenge in optics. Previous approaches using surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonant nanostructures or SPP waveguides have suffered from, for example, mode mismatch, or possible dependence on the phase of the driving laser field to achieve spatial localization. Here we take advantage of the intrinsic phase- and amplitude-independent nanofocusing ability of a conical noble metal tip with weak wavelength dependence over a broad bandwidth to achieve a 10 nm spatially and few-femtosecond temporally confined excitation. In combination with spectral pulse shaping and feedback on the second-harmonic response of the tip apex, we demonstrate deterministic arbitrary optical waveform control. In addition, the high efficiency of the nanofocusing tip provided by the continuous micro- to nanoscale mode transformation opens the door for spectroscopy of elementary optical excitations in matter on their natural length and time scales and enables applications from ultrafast nano-opto-electronics to single molecule quantum coherent control.

  17. A Novel wave-form command shaper for overhead cranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHALED ALHAZZA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a novel command shaping control strategy for oscillation reduction of simple harmonic oscillators is proposed, and validated experimentally. A wave-form acceleration command shaper is derived analytically. The performance of the proposed shaper is simulated numerically, and validated experimentally on a scaled model of an overhead crane. Amplitude modulation is used to enhance the shaper performance, which results in a modulated wave-form command shaper. It is determined that the proposed wave-form and modulated wave-form command shaper profiles are capable of eliminating travel and residual oscillations. Furthermore, unlike traditional impulse and step command shapers, the proposed command shaper has piecewise smoother acceleration, velocity, and displacement profiles. Experimental results using continuous and discrete commands are presented. Experiments with discrete commands involved embedding a saturation model-based feedback in the algorithm of the command shaper.

  18. Generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using gaussian random variables

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Sajid

    2016-01-13

    Various examples of methods and systems are provided for generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using Gaussian random variables in, e.g., radar and communication applications. In one example, a method includes mapping an input signal comprising Gaussian random variables (RVs) onto finite-alphabet non-constant-envelope (FANCE) symbols using a predetermined mapping function, and transmitting FANCE waveforms through a uniform linear array of antenna elements to obtain a corresponding beampattern. The FANCE waveforms can be based upon the mapping of the Gaussian RVs onto the FANCE symbols. In another example, a system includes a memory unit that can store a plurality of digital bit streams corresponding to FANCE symbols and a front end unit that can transmit FANCE waveforms through a uniform linear array of antenna elements to obtain a corresponding beampattern. The system can include a processing unit that can encode the input signal and/or determine the mapping function.

  19. Maass waveforms arising from sigma and related indefinite theta functions

    OpenAIRE

    Zwegers, Sander

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider an example of a Maass waveform which was constructed by Cohen from a function $\\sigma$, studied by Andrews, Dyson and Hickerson, and it's companion $\\sigma^*$. We put this example in a more general framework.

  20. Efficient data retrieval method for similar plasma waveforms in EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying, E-mail: liuying-ipp@szu.edu.cn [SZU-CASIPP Joint Laboratory for Applied Plasma, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Huang, Jianjun; Zhou, Huasheng; Wang, Fan [SZU-CASIPP Joint Laboratory for Applied Plasma, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Wang, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The proposed method is carried out by means of bounding envelope and angle distance. • It allows retrieving for whole similar waveforms of any time length. • In addition, the proposed method is also possible to retrieve subsequences. - Abstract: Fusion research relies highly on data analysis due to its massive-sized database. In the present work, we propose an efficient method for searching and retrieving similar plasma waveforms in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Based on Piecewise Linear Aggregate Approximation (PLAA) for extracting feature values, the searching process is accomplished in two steps. The first one is coarse searching to narrow down the search space, which is carried out by means of bounding envelope. The second step is fine searching to retrieval similar waveforms, which is implemented by the angle distance. The proposed method is tested in EAST databases and turns out to have good performance in retrieving similar waveforms.

  1. Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-01-01

    One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

  2. Generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using gaussian random variables

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Sajid; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Jardak, Seifallah

    2016-01-01

    Various examples of methods and systems are provided for generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using Gaussian random variables in, e.g., radar and communication applications. In one example, a method includes mapping an input signal comprising Gaussian random variables (RVs) onto finite-alphabet non-constant-envelope (FANCE) symbols using a predetermined mapping function, and transmitting FANCE waveforms through a uniform linear array of antenna elements to obtain a corresponding beampattern. The FANCE waveforms can be based upon the mapping of the Gaussian RVs onto the FANCE symbols. In another example, a system includes a memory unit that can store a plurality of digital bit streams corresponding to FANCE symbols and a front end unit that can transmit FANCE waveforms through a uniform linear array of antenna elements to obtain a corresponding beampattern. The system can include a processing unit that can encode the input signal and/or determine the mapping function.

  3. Partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolda, T.G.

    1998-05-01

    The authors are interested in partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing. The partitioning problem has been well-studied in the square symmetric case, but the rectangular problem has received very little attention. They will formalize the rectangular matrix partitioning problem and discuss several methods for solving it. They will extend the spectral partitioning method for symmetric matrices to the rectangular case and compare this method to three new methods -- the alternating partitioning method and two hybrid methods. The hybrid methods will be shown to be best.

  4. PAQ: Partition Analysis of Quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccam, P; Thompson, R J; Fedrigo, O; Carpenter, S; Cornette, J L

    2001-01-01

    The complexities of genetic data may not be accurately described by any single analytical tool. Phylogenetic analysis is often used to study the genetic relationship among different sequences. Evolutionary models and assumptions are invoked to reconstruct trees that describe the phylogenetic relationship among sequences. Genetic databases are rapidly accumulating large amounts of sequences. Newly acquired sequences, which have not yet been characterized, may require preliminary genetic exploration in order to build models describing the evolutionary relationship among sequences. There are clustering techniques that rely less on models of evolution, and thus may provide nice exploratory tools for identifying genetic similarities. Some of the more commonly used clustering methods perform better when data can be grouped into mutually exclusive groups. Genetic data from viral quasispecies, which consist of closely related variants that differ by small changes, however, may best be partitioned by overlapping groups. We have developed an intuitive exploratory program, Partition Analysis of Quasispecies (PAQ), which utilizes a non-hierarchical technique to partition sequences that are genetically similar. PAQ was used to analyze a data set of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope sequences isolated from different regions of the brain and another data set consisting of the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) regulatory gene rev. Analysis of the HIV-1 data set by PAQ was consistent with phylogenetic analysis of the same data, and the EIAV rev variants were partitioned into two overlapping groups. PAQ provides an additional tool which can be used to glean information from genetic data and can be used in conjunction with other tools to study genetic similarities and genetic evolution of viral quasispecies.

  5. SGRAPH (SeismoGRAPHer): Seismic waveform analysis and integrated tools in seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-03-01

    Although numerous seismological programs are currently available, most of them suffer from the inability to manipulate different data formats and the lack of embedded seismological tools. SeismoGRAPHer, or simply SGRAPH, is a new system for maintaining and analyzing seismic waveform data in a stand-alone, Windows-based application that manipulates a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was intended to be a tool sufficient for performing basic waveform analysis and solving advanced seismological problems. The graphical user interface (GUI) utilities and the Windows functionalities, such as dialog boxes, menus, and toolbars, simplify the user interaction with the data. SGRAPH supports common data formats, such as SAC, SEED, GSE, ASCII, and Nanometrics Y-format, and provides the ability to solve many seismological problems with built-in inversion tools. Loaded traces are maintained, processed, plotted, and saved as SAC, ASCII, or PS (post script) file formats. SGRAPH includes Generalized Ray Theory (GRT), genetic algorithm (GA), least-square fitting, auto-picking, fast Fourier transforms (FFT), and many additional tools. This program provides rapid estimation of earthquake source parameters, location, attenuation, and focal mechanisms. Advanced waveform modeling techniques are provided for crustal structure and focal mechanism estimation. SGRAPH has been employed in the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) as a tool assisting with routine work and data analysis. More than 30 users have been using previous versions of SGRAPH in their research for more than 3 years. The main features of this application are ease of use, speed, small disk space requirements, and the absence of third-party developed components. Because of its architectural structure, SGRAPH can be interfaced with newly developed methods or applications in seismology. A complete setup file, including the SGRAPH package with the online user guide, is available.

  6. A microcomputer-based waveform generator for Moessbauer spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jianping; Chen Xiaomei

    1995-01-01

    A waveform generator for Moessbauer spectrometers based on 8751 single chip microcomputer is described. The reference wave form with high linearity is generated with a 12 bit DAC, and its amplitude is controlled with a 8 bit DAC. Because the channel advance and synchronous signals can be delayed arbitrarily, excellent folded spectra can be acquired. This waveform generator can be controlled with DIP switches on faceplate or series interface of the IBM-PC microcomputer

  7. Acute puerperal uterine inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.; Liaquat, N.; Noorani, K.; Bhutta, S.Z; Jabeen, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency, causes, clinical presentations, management and maternal mortality associated with acute puerperal inversion of the uterus. Materials and Methods: All the patients who developed acute puerperal inversion of the uterus either in or outside the JPMC were included in the study. Patients of chronic uterine inversion were not included in the present study. Abdominal and vaginal examination was done to confirm and classify inversion into first, second or third degrees. Results: 57036 deliveries and 36 acute uterine inversions occurred during the study period, so the frequency of uterine inversion was 1 in 1584 deliveries. Mismanagement of third stage of labour was responsible for uterine inversion in 75% of patients. Majority of the patients presented with shock, either hypovolemic (69%) or neurogenic (13%) in origin. Manual replacement of the uterus under general anaesthesia with 2% halothane was successfully done in 35 patients (97.5%). Abdominal hysterectomy was done in only one patient. There were three maternal deaths due to inversion. Conclusion: Proper education and training regarding placental delivery, diagnosis and management of uterine inversion must be imparted to the maternity care providers especially to traditional birth attendants and family physicians to prevent this potentially life-threatening condition. (author)

  8. A Time Domain Waveform for Testing General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huwyler, Cédric; Jetzer, Philippe; Porter, Edward K

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational-wave parameter estimation is only as good as the theory the waveform generation models are based upon. It is therefore crucial to test General Relativity (GR) once data becomes available. Many previous works, such as studies connected with the ppE framework by Yunes and Pretorius, rely on the stationary phase approximation (SPA) to model deviations from GR in the frequency domain. As Fast Fourier Transform algorithms have become considerably faster and in order to circumvent possible problems with the SPA, we test GR with corrected time domain waveforms instead of SPA waveforms. Since a considerable amount of work has been done already in the field using SPA waveforms, we establish a connection between leading-order-corrected waveforms in time and frequency domain, concentrating on phase-only corrected terms. In a Markov Chain Monte Carlo study, whose results are preliminary and will only be available later, we will assess the ability of the eLISA detector to measure deviations from GR for signals coming from supermassive black hole inspirals using these corrected waveforms. (paper)

  9. Phase-space topography characterization of nonlinear ultrasound waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan-Niri, Ehsan; Al-Beer, Helem

    2018-03-01

    Fundamental understanding of ultrasound interaction with material discontinuities having closed interfaces has many engineering applications such as nondestructive evaluation of defects like kissing bonds and cracks in critical structural and mechanical components. In this paper, to analyze the acoustic field nonlinearities due to defects with closed interfaces, the use of a common technique in nonlinear physics, based on a phase-space topography construction of ultrasound waveform, is proposed. The central idea is to complement the "time" and "frequency" domain analyses with the "phase-space" domain analysis of nonlinear ultrasound waveforms. A nonlinear time series method known as pseudo phase-space topography construction is used to construct equivalent phase-space portrait of measured ultrasound waveforms. Several nonlinear models are considered to numerically simulate nonlinear ultrasound waveforms. The phase-space response of the simulated waveforms is shown to provide different topographic information, while the frequency domain shows similar spectral behavior. Thus, model classification can be substantially enhanced in the phase-space domain. Experimental results on high strength aluminum samples show that the phase-space transformation provides a unique detection and classification capabilities. The Poincaré map of the phase-space domain is also used to better understand the nonlinear behavior of ultrasound waveforms. It is shown that the analysis of ultrasound nonlinearities is more convenient and informative in the phase-space domain than in the frequency domain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptive Waveform Design for Cognitive Radar in Multiple Targets Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of cognitive radar (CR waveform optimization design for target detection and estimation in multiple extended targets situations is investigated. This problem is analyzed in signal-dependent interference, as well as additive channel noise for extended targets with unknown target impulse response (TIR. To address this problem, an improved algorithm is employed for target detection by maximizing the detection probability of the received echo on the promise of ensuring the TIR estimation precision. In this algorithm, an additional weight vector is introduced to achieve a trade-off among different targets. Both the estimate of TIR and transmit waveform can be updated at each step based on the previous step. Under the same constraint on waveform energy and bandwidth, the information theoretical approach is also considered. In addition, the relationship between the waveforms that are designed based on the two criteria is discussed. Unlike most existing works that only consider single target with temporally correlated characteristics, waveform design for multiple extended targets is considered in this method. Simulation results demonstrate that compared with linear frequency modulated (LFM signal, waveforms designed based on maximum detection probability and maximum mutual information (MI criteria can make radar echoes contain more multiple-target information and improve radar performance as a result.

  11. Adaptive phase k-means algorithm for waveform classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chengyun; Liu, Zhining; Wang, Yaojun; Xu, Feng; Li, Xingming; Hu, Guangmin

    2018-01-01

    Waveform classification is a powerful technique for seismic facies analysis that describes the heterogeneity and compartments within a reservoir. Horizon interpretation is a critical step in waveform classification. However, the horizon often produces inconsistent waveform phase, and thus results in an unsatisfied classification. To alleviate this problem, an adaptive phase waveform classification method called the adaptive phase k-means is introduced in this paper. Our method improves the traditional k-means algorithm using an adaptive phase distance for waveform similarity measure. The proposed distance is a measure with variable phases as it moves from sample to sample along the traces. Model traces are also updated with the best phase interference in the iterative process. Therefore, our method is robust to phase variations caused by the interpretation horizon. We tested the effectiveness of our algorithm by applying it to synthetic and real data. The satisfactory results reveal that the proposed method tolerates certain waveform phase variation and is a good tool for seismic facies analysis.

  12. Optimal current waveforms for brushless permanent magnet motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehle, Nicholas; Boyd, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we give energy-optimal current waveforms for a permanent magnet synchronous motor that result in a desired average torque. Our formulation generalises previous work by including a general back-electromotive force (EMF) wave shape, voltage and current limits, an arbitrary phase winding connection, a simple eddy current loss model, and a trade-off between power loss and torque ripple. Determining the optimal current waveforms requires solving a small convex optimisation problem. We show how to use the alternating direction method of multipliers to find the optimal current in milliseconds or hundreds of microseconds, depending on the processor used, which allows the possibility of generating optimal waveforms in real time. This allows us to adapt in real time to changes in the operating requirements or in the model, such as a change in resistance with winding temperature, or even gross changes like the failure of one winding. Suboptimal waveforms are available in tens or hundreds of microseconds, allowing for quick response after abrupt changes in the desired torque. We demonstrate our approach on a simple numerical example, in which we give the optimal waveforms for a motor with a sinusoidal back-EMF, and for a motor with a more complicated, nonsinusoidal waveform, in both the constant-torque region and constant-power region.

  13. 3D Electric Waveforms of Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.

    2018-01-01

    Electric fields provide the major coupling between the turbulence of the solar wind and particles. A large part of the turbulent spectrum of fluctuations in the solar wind is thought to be kinetic Alfvén waves; however, whistlers have recently been found to be important. In this article, we attempt to determine the mode identification of individual waveforms using the three-dimensional antenna system of the SWaves experiments on the STEREO spacecraft. Samples are chosen using waveforms with an apparent periodic structure, selected visually. The short antennas of STEREO respond to density fluctuations and to electric fields. Measurement of four quantities using only three antennas presents a problem. Methods to overcome or to ignore this difficulty are presented. We attempt to decide whether the waveforms correspond to the whistler mode or the Alfvén mode by using the direction of rotation of the signal. Most of the waveforms are so oblique—nearly linearly polarized—that the direction cannot be determined. However, about one third of the waveforms can be identified, and whistlers and Alfvén waves are present in roughly equal numbers. The selected waveforms are very intense but intermittent and are orders of magnitude stronger than the average, yet their accumulated signal accounts for a large fraction of the average. The average, however, is supposed to be the result of a turbulent mixture of many waves, not short coherent events. This presents a puzzle for future work.

  14. Intracardiac impedance response during acute AF internal cardioversion using novel rectilinear and capacitor-discharge waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rababah, A S; Walsh, S J; Manoharan, G; Walsh, P R; Escalona, O J

    2016-07-01

    Intracardiac impedance (ICI) is a major determinant of success during internal cardioversion of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there have been few studies that have examined the dynamic behaviour of atrial impedance during internal cardioversion in relation to clinical outcome. In this study, voltage and current waveforms captured during internal cardioversion of acute AF in ovine models using novel radiofrequency (RF) generated low-tilt rectilinear and conventional capacitor-discharge based shock waveforms were retrospectively analysed using a digital signal processing algorithm to investigate the dynamic behaviour of atrial impedance during cardioversion. The algorithm was specifically designed to facilitate the simultaneous analysis of multiple impedance parameters, including: mean intracardiac impedance (Z M), intracardiac impedance variance (ICIV) and impedance amplitude spectrum area (IAMSA) for each cardioversion event. A significant reduction in ICI was observed when comparing two successive shocks of increasing energy where cardioversion outcome was successful. In addition, ICIV and IAMSA variables were found to inversely correlate to the magnitude of energy delivered; with a stronger correlation found to the former parameter. In conclusion, ICIV and IAMSA have been evidenced as two key dynamic intracardiac impedance variables that may prove useful in better understanding of the cardioversion process and that could potentially act as prognostic markers with respect to clinical outcome.

  15. Triplicated P-wave measurements for waveform tomography of the mantle transition zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Stähler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Triplicated body waves sample the mantle transition zone more extensively than any other wave type, and interact strongly with the discontinuities at 410 km and 660 km. Since the seismograms bear a strong imprint of these geodynamically interesting features, it is highly desirable to invert them for structure of the transition zone. This has rarely been attempted, due to a mismatch between the complex and band-limited data and the (ray-theoretical modelling methods. Here we present a data processing and modelling strategy to harness such broadband seismograms for finite-frequency tomography. We include triplicated P-waves (epicentral distance range between 14 and 30° across their entire broadband frequency range, for both deep and shallow sources. We show that is it possible to predict the complex sequence of arrivals in these seismograms, but only after a careful effort to estimate source time functions and other source parameters from data, variables that strongly influence the waveforms. Modelled and observed waveforms then yield decent cross-correlation fits, from which we measure finite-frequency traveltime anomalies. We discuss two such data sets, for North America and Europe, and conclude that their signal quality and azimuthal coverage should be adequate for tomographic inversion. In order to compute sensitivity kernels at the pertinent high body wave frequencies, we use fully numerical forward modelling of the seismic wavefield through a spherically symmetric Earth.

  16. System and Method for Generating a Frequency Modulated Linear Laser Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor); Petway, Larry B. (Inventor); Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Barnes, Bruce W. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor); Hines, Glenn D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system for generating a frequency modulated linear laser waveform includes a single frequency laser generator to produce a laser output signal. An electro-optical modulator modulates the frequency of the laser output signal to define a linear triangular waveform. An optical circulator passes the linear triangular waveform to a band-pass optical filter to filter out harmonic frequencies created in the waveform during modulation of the laser output signal, to define a pure filtered modulated waveform having a very narrow bandwidth. The optical circulator receives the pure filtered modulated laser waveform and transmits the modulated laser waveform to a target.

  17. Inversion of seismic data: how to take the correlated nature of noise into account; Inversion de donnees sismiques: prise en compte de la nature correlee du bruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard, F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of seismic inversion is to recover an Earth model that best fits some observed data. To reach that goal, we have to minimize an objective function that measures the amplitude of the misfits according to a norm to be chosen in data space. In general, the used norm is the L2 norm. Unfortunately, such a norm is not adapted to data corrupted by correlated noise: the noise is in that case inverted as signal and the inversion results are unacceptable. The goal of this thesis is to obtain satisfactory results to the inverse problem in that situation. For this purpose, we study two inverse problems: reflection tomography and waveform inversion. In reflection tomography, we propose a new formulation of the continuum inverse problem which relies on a H1 norm in data space. This allows us to account for the correlated nature of the noise that corrupts the kinematic information. However, this norm does not give more satisfactory results than the ones obtained with the classical formalism. This is why, for sake of simplicity, we recommend to use this classical formalism. Then we try to understand how to properly sample the kinematic information so as to obtain an accurate approximation of the continuum inverse problem. In waveform inversion, we propose to directly invert data corrupted by some correlated noise. A first idea consists in rejecting the noise in the residues. In that goal, we can use a semi-norm to formulate the inverse problem. This technique gives very good results, except when the data are corrupted by random noise. Thus we propose a second method which consists in retrieving, by solving an inverse problem, the signal and the noise whose sum best fits the data. This technique gives very satisfactory results, even if some random noise pollutes the data, and is moreover solved, thanks to an original algorithm, in a very efficient way. (author)

  18. Extension of frequency-based dissimilarity for retrieving similar plasma waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochin, Teruhisa; Koyama, Katsumasa; Nakanishi, Hideya; Kojima, Mamoru

    2008-01-01

    Some computer-aided assistance in finding the waveforms similar to a waveform has become indispensable for accelerating data analysis in the plasma experiments. For the slowly-varying waveforms and those having time-sectional oscillation patterns, the methods using the Fourier series coefficients of waveforms in calculating the dissimilarity have successfully improved the performance in retrieving similar waveforms. This paper treats severely-varying waveforms, and proposes two extensions to the dissimilarity of waveforms. The first extension is to capture the difference of the importance of the Fourier series coefficients of waveforms against frequency. The second extension is to consider the outlines of waveforms. The correctness of the extended dissimilarity is experimentally evaluated by using the metrics used in evaluating that of the information retrieval, i.e. precision and recall. The experimental results show that the extended dissimilarity could improve the correctness of the similarity retrieval of plasma waveforms

  19. Pseudo LRM waveforms from CryoSat SARin acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scagliola, Michele; Fornari, Marco; Bouffard, Jerome; Parrinello, Tommaso; Féménias, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    CryoSat was launched on the 8th April 2010 and is the first European ice mission dedicated to the monitoring of precise changes in the thickness of polar ice sheets and floating sea ice. The main payload of CryoSat is a Ku-band pulsewidth limited radar altimeter, called SIRAL (Synthetic interferometric radar altimeter). When commanded in SARIn (synthetic aperture radar interferometry) mode, through coherent along-track processing of the returns received from two antennas, the interferometric phase related to the first arrival of the echo is used to retrieve the angle of arrival of the scattering in the across-track direction. When SIRAL operates in SAR or SARin mode, the obtained waveforms have an along-track resolution and a speckle reduction which is increased with respect to the pulse-limited waveforms. Anyway, in order to analyze the continuity of the geophysical retrieved parameters among different acquisition modes, techniques to transform SARin mode data to pseudo-LRM mode data are welcome. The transformation process is known as SAR reduction and it is worth recalling here that only approximate pseudo-LRM waveforms can be obtained in case of closed burst acquisitions, as SIRAL operates. A SAR reduction processing scheme has been developed to obtain pseudo-LRM waveforms from CryoSat SARin acquisition. As a trade-off between the along-track length on Earth surface contributing to one SARin pseudo-LRM waveform and the noisiness of the waveform itself, it has been chosen a SAR reduction approach based on the averaging of all the SARin echoes received each 20Hz, resulting in one pseudo-LRM waveform for each SARin burst given the SARin burst repetition period. SARin pseudo-LRM waveforms have been produced for CryoSat acquisition both on ice and sea surfaces, aiming at verifying the continuity of the retracked surface height over the ellipsoid between genuine LRM products and pseudo-LRM products. Moreover, the retracked height from the SARin pseudo-LRM has been

  20. Inverse logarithmic potential problem

    CERN Document Server

    Cherednichenko, V G

    1996-01-01

    The Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems Series is a series of monographs publishing postgraduate level information on inverse and ill-posed problems for an international readership of professional scientists and researchers. The series aims to publish works which involve both theory and applications in, e.g., physics, medicine, geophysics, acoustics, electrodynamics, tomography, and ecology.