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Sample records for particle mediated cellular

  1. Environmentally persistent free radicals amplify ultrafine particle mediated cellular oxidative stress and cytotoxicity

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    Balakrishna Shrilatha

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combustion generated particulate matter is deposited in the respiratory tract and pose a hazard to the lungs through their potential to cause oxidative stress and inflammation. We have previously shown that combustion of fuels and chlorinated hydrocarbons produce semiquinone-type radicals that are stabilized on particle surfaces (i.e. environmentally persistent free radicals; EPFRs. Because the composition and properties of actual combustion-generated particles are complex, heterogeneous in origin, and vary from day-to-day, we have chosen to use surrogate particle systems. In particular, we have chosen to use the radical of 2-monochlorophenol (MCP230 as the EPFR because we have previously shown that it forms a EPFR on Cu(IIO surfaces and catalyzes formation of PCDD/F. To understand the physicochemical properties responsible for the adverse pulmonary effects of combustion by-products, we have exposed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B to MCP230 or the CuO/silica substrate. Our general hypothesis was that the EPFR-containing particle would have greater toxicity than the substrate species. Results Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to our combustion generated particle systems significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and decreased cellular antioxidants resulting in cell death. Resveratrol treatment reversed the decline in cellular glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and superoxide dismutase (SOD levels for both types of combustion-generated particle systems. Conclusion The enhanced cytotoxicity upon exposure to MCP230 correlated with its ability to generate more cellular oxidative stress and concurrently reduce the antioxidant defenses of the epithelial cells (i.e. reduced GSH, SOD activity, and GPx. The EPFRs in MCP230 also seem to be of greater biological concern due to their ability to induce lipid peroxidation. These results are consistent with the oxidizing nature of the CuO/silica ultrafine

  2. Diselenolane-mediated cellular uptake.

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    Chuard, Nicolas; Poblador-Bahamonde, Amalia I; Zong, Lili; Bartolami, Eline; Hildebrandt, Jana; Weigand, Wolfgang; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2018-02-21

    The emerging power of thiol-mediated uptake with strained disulfides called for a move from sulfur to selenium. We report that according to results with fluorescent model substrates, cellular uptake with 1,2-diselenolanes exceeds uptake with 1,2-dithiolanes and epidithiodiketopiperazines with regard to efficiency as well as intracellular localization. The diselenide analog of lipoic acid performs best. This 1,2-diselenolane delivers fluorophores efficiently to the cytosol of HeLa Kyoto cells, without detectable endosomal capture as with 1,2-dithiolanes or dominant escape into the nucleus as with epidithiodiketopiperazines. Diselenolane-mediated cytosolic delivery is non-toxic (MTT assay), sensitive to temperature but insensitive to inhibitors of endocytosis (chlorpromazine, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, wortmannin, cytochalasin B) and conventional thiol-mediated uptake (Ellman's reagent), and to serum. Selenophilicity, the extreme CSeSeC dihedral angle of 0° and the high but different acidity of primary and secondary selenols might all contribute to uptake. Thiol-exchange affinity chromatography is introduced as operational mimic of thiol-mediated uptake that provides, in combination with rate enhancement of DTT oxidation, direct experimental evidence for existence and nature of the involved selenosulfides.

  3. CELLULAR INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY GLYCONECTIDS

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    O.Popescu

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions involve many types of cell surface molecules and operate via homophilic and/or heterophilic protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate binding. Our investigations in different model-systems (marine invertebrates and mammals have provided direct evidence that a novel class of primordial proteoglycans, named by us gliconectins, can mediate cell adhesion via a new alternative molecular mechanism of polyvalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate binding. Biochemical characterization of isolated and purified glyconectins revealed the presence of specific carbohydrate structures, acidic glycans, different from classical glycosaminoglycans. Such acidic glycans of high molecular weight containing fucose, glucuronic or galacturonic acids, and sulfate groups, originally found in sponges and sea urchin embryos, may represent a new class of carbohydrate carcino-embryonal antigens in mice and humans. Such interactions between biological macromolecules are usually investigated by kinetic binding studies, calorimetric methods, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and other spectroscopic analyses. However, these methods do not supply a direct estimation of the intermolecular binding forces that are fundamental for the function of the ligand-receptor association. Recently, we have introduced atomic force microscopy to quantify the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans. Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to cell adhesion proteoglycans is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. As a model, we selected the glyconectin 1, a cell adhesion proteoglycan isolated from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera. This glyconectin mediates in vivo cell recognition and aggregation via homophilic, species-specific, polyvalent, and calcium ion-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Under physiological conditions, an adhesive force of up to 400 piconewtons

  4. Cellular structures in a system of interacting particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, B.I.

    2009-01-01

    The general description of the formation of a cellular structure in the system of interacting particles is proposed. The analytical results for possible cellular structures in the usual colloidal systems, systems of particles immersed in a liquid crystal, and gravitational systems have been presented. It is shown that the formation of a cellular structure in all systems of interacting particles at different temperatures and concentrations of particles has the same physical nature

  5. Particles and Patterns in Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, E.; Das, R.; Beasley, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objective has been to develop tools for studying particle interactions in a class of dynamical systems characterized by discreteness, determinism, local interaction, and an inherently parallel form of evolution. These systems can be described by cellular automata (CA) and the behavior we studied has improved our understanding of the nature of patterns generated by CAs, their ability to perform global computations, and their relationship to continuous dynamical systems. We have also developed a rule-table mathematics that enables one to custom-design CA rule tables to generate patterns of specified types, or to perform specified computational tasks

  6. Extended Cellular Automata Models of Particles and Space-Time

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    Beedle, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Models of particles and space-time are explored through simulations and theoretical models that use Extended Cellular Automata models. The expanded Cellular Automata Models consist go beyond simple scalar binary cell-fields, into discrete multi-level group representations like S0(2), SU(2), SU(3), SPIN(3,1). The propagation and evolution of these expanded cellular automatas are then compared to quantum field theories based on the "harmonic paradigm" i.e. built by an infinite number of harmonic oscillators, and with gravitational models.

  7. ROS and ROS-Mediated Cellular Signaling

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    Jixiang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognized that an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS can modify the cell-signaling proteins and have functional consequences, which successively mediate pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, unchecked growth, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and aging. While numerous articles have demonstrated the impacts of ROS on various signaling pathways and clarify the mechanism of action of cell-signaling proteins, their influence on the level of intracellular ROS, and their complex interactions among multiple ROS associated signaling pathways, the systemic summary is necessary. In this review paper, we particularly focus on the pattern of the generation and homeostasis of intracellular ROS, the mechanisms and targets of ROS impacting on cell-signaling proteins (NF-κB, MAPKs, Keap1-Nrf2-ARE, and PI3K-Akt, ion channels and transporters (Ca2+ and mPTP, and modifying protein kinase and Ubiquitination/Proteasome System.

  8. Cellular Particle Dynamics simulation of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems

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    McCune, Matthew; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is a theoretical-computational-experimental framework for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems, such as fusion, sorting and compression. In CPD, cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through numerical integration of their equations of motion. Here we present CPD simulation results for the fusion of both spherical and cylindrical multi-cellular aggregates. First, we calibrate the relevant CPD model parameters for a given cell type by comparing the CPD simulation results for the fusion of two spherical aggregates to the corresponding experimental results. Next, CPD simulations are used to predict the time evolution of the fusion of cylindrical aggregates. The latter is relevant for the formation of tubular multi-cellular structures (i.e., primitive blood vessels) created by the novel bioprinting technology. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  9. Structure of Energetic Particle Mediated Shocks Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of collisionless shock waves is often modified by the presence of energetic particles that are not equilibrated with the thermal plasma (such as pickup ions [PUIs] and solar energetic particles [SEPs]). This is relevant to the inner and outer heliosphere and the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM), where observations of shock waves (e.g., in the inner heliosphere) show that both the magnetic field and thermal gas pressure are less than the energetic particle component pressures. Voyager 2 observations revealed that the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) is very broad and mediated by energetic particles. PUIs and SEPs contribute both a collisionless heat flux and a higher-order viscosity. We show that the incorporation of both effects can completely determine the structure of collisionless shocks mediated by energetic ions. Since the reduced form of the PUI-mediated plasma model is structurally identical to the classical cosmic ray two-fluid model, we note that the presence of viscosity, at least formally, eliminates the need for a gas sub-shock in the classical two-fluid model, including in that regime where three are possible. By considering parameters upstream of the HTS, we show that the thermal gas remains relatively cold and the shock is mediated by PUIs. We determine the structure of the weak interstellar shock observed by Voyager 1 . We consider the inclusion of the thermal heat flux and viscosity to address the most general form of an energetic particle-thermal plasma two-fluid model.

  10. Structure of Energetic Particle Mediated Shocks Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Webb, G. M. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    The structure of collisionless shock waves is often modified by the presence of energetic particles that are not equilibrated with the thermal plasma (such as pickup ions [PUIs] and solar energetic particles [SEPs]). This is relevant to the inner and outer heliosphere and the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM), where observations of shock waves (e.g., in the inner heliosphere) show that both the magnetic field and thermal gas pressure are less than the energetic particle component pressures. Voyager 2 observations revealed that the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) is very broad and mediated by energetic particles. PUIs and SEPs contribute both a collisionless heat flux and a higher-order viscosity. We show that the incorporation of both effects can completely determine the structure of collisionless shocks mediated by energetic ions. Since the reduced form of the PUI-mediated plasma model is structurally identical to the classical cosmic ray two-fluid model, we note that the presence of viscosity, at least formally, eliminates the need for a gas sub-shock in the classical two-fluid model, including in that regime where three are possible. By considering parameters upstream of the HTS, we show that the thermal gas remains relatively cold and the shock is mediated by PUIs. We determine the structure of the weak interstellar shock observed by Voyager 1 . We consider the inclusion of the thermal heat flux and viscosity to address the most general form of an energetic particle-thermal plasma two-fluid model.

  11. Membrane cholesterol mediates the cellular effects of monolayer graphene substrates.

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    Kitko, Kristina E; Hong, Tu; Lazarenko, Roman M; Ying, Da; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Zhang, Qi

    2018-02-23

    Graphene possesses extraordinary properties that promise great potential in biomedicine. However, fully leveraging these properties requires close contact with the cell surface, raising the concern of unexpected biological consequences. Computational models have demonstrated that graphene preferentially interacts with cholesterol, a multifunctional lipid unique to eukaryotic membranes. Here we demonstrate an interaction between graphene and cholesterol. We find that graphene increases cell membrane cholesterol and potentiates neurotransmission, which is mediated by increases in the number, release probability, and recycling rate of synaptic vesicles. In fibroblasts grown on graphene, we also find an increase in cholesterol, which promotes the activation of P2Y receptors, a family of receptor regulated by cholesterol. In both cases, direct manipulation of cholesterol levels elucidates that a graphene-induced cholesterol increase underlies the observed potentiation of each cell signaling pathway. These findings identify cholesterol as a mediator of graphene's cellular effects, providing insight into the biological impact of graphene.

  12. Cellular Antiviral Factors that Target Particle Infectivity of HIV-1.

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    Goffinet, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the identification and characterization of antiviral genes with the ability to interfere with virus replication has established cell-intrinsic innate immunity as a third line of antiviral defense in addition to adaptive and classical innate immunity. Understanding how cellular factors have evolved to inhibit HIV-1 reveals particularly vulnerable points of the viral replication cycle. Many, but not all, antiviral proteins share type I interferon-upregulated expression and sensitivity to viral counteraction or evasion measures. Whereas well-established restriction factors interfere with early post-entry steps and release of HIV-1, recent research has revealed a diverse set of proteins that reduce the infectious quality of released particles using individual, to date poorly understood modes of action. These include induction of paucity of mature glycoproteins in nascent virions or self-incorporation into the virus particle, resulting in poor infectiousness of the virion and impaired spread of the infection. A better understanding of these newly discovered antiviral factors may open new avenues towards the design of drugs that repress the spread of viruses whose genomes have already integrated.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation-mediated damage to cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, Jean; Sage, Evelyne; Douki, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Emphasis is placed in this review article on recent aspects of the photochemistry of cellular DNA in which both the UVB and UVA components of solar radiation are implicated individually or synergistically. Interestingly, further mechanistic insights into the UV-induced formation of DNA photoproducts were gained from the application of new accurate and sensitive chromatographic and enzymic assays aimed at measuring base damage. Thus, each of the twelve possible dimeric photoproducts that are produced at the four main bipyrimidine sites can now be singled out as dinucleoside monophosphates that are enzymatically released from UV-irradiated DNA. This was achieved using a recently developed high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay (HPLC-MS/MS) assay after DNA extraction and appropriate enzymic digestion. Interestingly, a similar photoproduct distribution pattern is observed in both isolated and cellular DNA upon exposure to low doses of either UVC or UVB radiation. This applies more specifically to the DNA of rodent and human cells, the cis-syn cyclobutadithymine being predominant over the two other main photolesions, namely thymine-cytosine pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adduct and the related cyclobutyl dimer. UVA-irradiation was found to generate cyclobutane dimers at TT and to a lower extent at TC sites as a likely result of energy transfer mechanism involving still unknown photoexcited chromophore(s). Oxidative damage to DNA is also induced although less efficiently by UVA-mediated photosensitization processes that mostly involved 1 O 2 together with a smaller contribution of hydroxyl radical-mediated reactions through initially generated superoxide radicals

  14. ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation regulates cellular radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boohaker, Rebecca J.; Cui, Xiaoli; Stackhouse, Murray; Xu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Activation of the DNA damage responsive protein kinase ATM is a critical step for cellular survival in response to ionizing irradiation (IR). Direct targets of ATM regulating radiosensitivity remain to be fully investigated. We have recently reported that ATM phosphorylates the transcriptional repressor Snail on Serine 100. We aimed to further study the functional significance of ATM-mediated Snail phosphorylation in response to IR. Material and methods: We transfected vector-only, wild-type, the Serine 100 to alanine (S100A) or to glutamic acid (S100E) substitution of Snail into various cell lines. We assessed colony formation, γ-H2AX focus formation and the invasion index in the cells treated with or without IR. Results: We found that over-expression of the S100A mutant Snail in HeLa cells significantly increased radiosensitivity. Meanwhile the expression of S100E, a phospho-mimicking mutation, resulted in enhanced radio-resistance. Interestingly, S100E could rescue the radiosensitive phenotype in ATM-deficient cells. We also found that expression of S100E increased γ-H2AX focus formation and compromised inhibition of invasion in response to IR independent of cell survival. Conclusion: ATM-mediated Snail Serine 100 phosphorylation in response to IR plays an important part in the regulation of radiosensitivity

  15. Silver Nanoparticle-Mediated Cellular Responses in Various Cell Lines: An in Vitro Model

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    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have attracted increased interest and are currently used in various industries including medicine, cosmetics, textiles, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, particularly as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Recently, several studies have reported both beneficial and toxic effects of AgNPs on various prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. To develop nanoparticles for mediated therapy, several laboratories have used a variety of cell lines under in vitro conditions to evaluate the properties, mode of action, differential responses, and mechanisms of action of AgNPs. In vitro models are simple, cost-effective, rapid, and can be used to easily assess efficacy and performance. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and biocompatibility of AgNPs depend on many factors such as size, shape, surface charge, surface coating, solubility, concentration, surface functionalization, distribution of particles, mode of entry, mode of action, growth media, exposure time, and cell type. Cellular responses to AgNPs are different in each cell type and depend on the physical and chemical nature of AgNPs. This review evaluates significant contributions to the literature on biological applications of AgNPs. It begins with an introduction to AgNPs, with particular attention to their overall impact on cellular effects. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the reasons for different cell types exhibiting differential responses to nanoparticles even when they possess similar size, shape, and other parameters. Firstly, we discuss the cellular effects of AgNPs on a variety of cell lines; Secondly, we discuss the mechanisms of action of AgNPs in various cellular systems, and try to elucidate how AgNPs interact with different mammalian cell lines and produce significant effects; Finally, we discuss the cellular activation of various signaling molecules in response to AgNPs, and conclude with

  16. Quantum Dots Encapsulated with Canine Parvovirus-Like Particles Improving the Cellular Targeted Labeling.

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    Dan Yan

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have a promising prospect in live-cell imaging and sensing because of unique fluorescence features. QDs aroused significant interest in the bio-imaging field through integrating the fluorescence properties of QDs and the delivery function of biomaterial. The natural tropism of Canine Parvovirus (CPV to the transferrin receptor can target specific cells to increase the targeting ability of QDs in cell imaging. CPV virus-like particles (VLPs from the expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a prokaryotic expression system were examined to encapsulate the QDs and deliver to cells with an expressed transferrin receptor. CPV-VLPs were used to encapsulate QDs that were modified using 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Gel electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrum, particle size, and transmission electron microscopy verified the conformation of a complex, in which QDs were encapsulated in CPV-VLPs (CPV-VLPs-QDs. When incubated with different cell lines, CPV-VLPs-QDs significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of QDs and selectively labeled the cells with high-level transferrin receptors. Cell-targeted labeling was achieved by utilizing the specific binding between the CPV capsid protein VP2 of VLPs and cellular receptors. CPV-VLPs-QDs, which can mimic the native CPV infection, can recognize and attach to the transferrin receptors on cellular membrane. Therefore, CPV-VLPs can be used as carriers to facilitate the targeted delivery of encapsulated nanomaterials into cells via receptor-mediated pathways. This study confirmed that CPV-VLPs can significantly promote the biocompatibility of nanomaterials and could expand the application of CPV-VLPs in biological medicine.

  17. Kinetics of cellular uptake of viruses and nanoparticles via clathrin-mediated endocytosis

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    Banerjee, Anand; Berezhkovskii, Alexander; Nossal, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Several viruses exploit clathrin-mediated endocytosis to gain entry into host cells. This process is also used extensively in biomedical applications to deliver nanoparticles (NPs) to diseased cells. The internalization of these nano-objects is controlled by the assembly of a clathrin-containing protein coat on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, which drives the invagination of the membrane and the formation of a cargo-containing endocytic vesicle. Current theoretical models of receptor-mediated endocytosis of viruses and NPs do not explicitly take coat assembly into consideration. In this paper we study cellular uptake of viruses and NPs with a focus on coat assembly. We characterize the internalization process by the mean time between the binding of a particle to the membrane and its entry into the cell. Using a coarse-grained model which maps the stochastic dynamics of coat formation onto a one-dimensional random walk, we derive an analytical formula for this quantity. A study of the dependence of the mean internalization time on NP size shows that there is an upper bound above which this time becomes extremely large, and an optimal size at which it attains a minimum. Our estimates of these sizes compare well with experimental data. We also study the sensitivity of the obtained results on coat parameters to identify factors which significantly affect the internalization kinetics.

  18. Self-organisation in Cellular Automata with Coalescent Particles: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches

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    Hellouin de Menibus, Benjamin; Sablik, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    This article introduces new tools to study self-organisation in a family of simple cellular automata which contain some particle-like objects with good collision properties (coalescence) in their time evolution. We draw an initial configuration at random according to some initial shift-ergodic measure, and use the limit measure to describe the asymptotic behaviour of the automata. We first take a qualitative approach, i.e. we obtain information on the limit measure(s). We prove that only particles moving in one particular direction can persist asymptotically. This provides some previously unknown information on the limit measures of various deterministic and probabilistic cellular automata: 3 and 4-cyclic cellular automata [introduced by Fisch (J Theor Probab 3(2):311-338, 1990; Phys D 45(1-3):19-25, 1990)], one-sided captive cellular automata [introduced by Theyssier (Captive Cellular Automata, 2004)], the majority-traffic cellular automaton, a self stabilisation process towards a discrete line [introduced by Regnault and Rémila (in: Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science 2015—40th International Symposium, MFCS 2015, Milan, Italy, Proceedings, Part I, 2015)]. In a second time we restrict our study to a subclass, the gliders cellular automata. For this class we show quantitative results, consisting in the asymptotic law of some parameters: the entry times [generalising K ůrka et al. (in: Proceedings of AUTOMATA, 2011)], the density of particles and the rate of convergence to the limit measure.

  19. Cellular dosimetry for radon progeny alpha particles in bronchial tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.; Hofmann, W.; Balashazy, I.

    1996-01-01

    Inhaled radon progeny are deposited in different regions of the human bronchial tree as functions of particle size and flow rate. Following deposition and mucociliary clearance, the sensitive bronchial basal and secretory cells are irradiated by two different alpha particle sources: (i) radon progeny in the sol and/or gel phase of the mucous layer, and (ii) radon progeny within the bronchial epithelium. In the case of internally deposited radionuclides, direct measurement of the energy absorbed from the ionizing radiation emitted by the decaying radionuclides is rarely, if ever, possible. Therefore, one must rely on dosimetric models to obtain estimates of the spatial and temporal patterns of energy deposition in tissues and organs of the body. When the radionuclide is uniformly distributed throughout the volume of a tissue of homogeneous composition and when the size of the tissue is large compared to the range of the particulate emissions of the radionuclide, then the dose rate within the tissue is also uniform and the calculation of absorbed dose can proceed without complication. However, if non-uniformities in the spatial and temporal distributions of the radionuclide are coupled with heterogeneous tissue composition, then the calculation of absorbed dose becomes complex and uncertain. Such is the case with the dosimetry of inhaled radon and radon progeny in the respiratory tract. There are increasing demands to obtain a definitive explanation of the role of alpha particles emitted from radon daughters in the induction of lung cancer. Various authors have attempted to evaluate the dose to the bronchial region of the respiratory tract due to the inhalation of radon daughters

  20. Multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins mediate cellular transport of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hong; Guo, Dong; Obianom, Obinna N.; Su, Tong; Polli, James E.; Shu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmentally prevalent toxicant posing increasing risk to human health worldwide. As compared to the extensive research in Cd tissue accumulation, little was known about the elimination of Cd, particularly its toxic form, Cd ion (Cd 2+ ). In this study, we aimed to examine whether Cd 2+ is a substrate of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) that are important in renal xenobiotic elimination. HEK-293 cells overexpressing the human MATE1 (HEK-hMATE1), human MATE2-K (HEK-hMATE2-K) and mouse Mate1 (HEK-mMate1) were used to study the cellular transport and toxicity of Cd 2+ . The cells overexpressing MATEs showed a 2–4 fold increase of Cd 2+ uptake that could be blocked by the MATE inhibitor cimetidine. A saturable transport profile was observed with the Michaelis-Menten constant (K m ) of 130 ± 15.8 μM for HEK-hMATE1; 139 ± 21.3 μM for HEK-hMATE2-K; and 88.7 ± 13.5 μM for HEK-mMate1, respectively. Cd 2+ could inhibit the uptake of metformin, a substrate of MATE transporters, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of 97.5 ± 6.0 μM, 20.2 ± 2.6 μM, and 49.9 ± 6.9 μM in HEK-hMATE1, HEK-hMATE2-K, and HEK-mMate1 cells, respectively. In addition, hMATE1 could transport preloaded Cd 2+ out of the HEK-hMATE1 cells, thus resulting in a significant decrease of Cd 2+ -induced cytotoxicity. The present study has provided the first evidence supporting that MATEs transport Cd 2+ and may function as cellular elimination machinery in Cd intoxication. - Highlights: • Cadmium is an environmentally prevalent toxicant. • Little was known regarding the elimination and detoxification of cadmium. • Cadmium ion is here demonstrated as a substrate of MATE transporters. • MATEs may function as cellular elimination machinery in cadmium detoxification.

  1. Multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins mediate cellular transport of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hong; Guo, Dong; Obianom, Obinna N. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Su, Tong [Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Xiangya Medical School, Central South University, Hunan 410007 (China); Polli, James E. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Shu, Yan, E-mail: yshu@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmentally prevalent toxicant posing increasing risk to human health worldwide. As compared to the extensive research in Cd tissue accumulation, little was known about the elimination of Cd, particularly its toxic form, Cd ion (Cd{sup 2+}). In this study, we aimed to examine whether Cd{sup 2+} is a substrate of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) that are important in renal xenobiotic elimination. HEK-293 cells overexpressing the human MATE1 (HEK-hMATE1), human MATE2-K (HEK-hMATE2-K) and mouse Mate1 (HEK-mMate1) were used to study the cellular transport and toxicity of Cd{sup 2+}. The cells overexpressing MATEs showed a 2–4 fold increase of Cd{sup 2+} uptake that could be blocked by the MATE inhibitor cimetidine. A saturable transport profile was observed with the Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) of 130 ± 15.8 μM for HEK-hMATE1; 139 ± 21.3 μM for HEK-hMATE2-K; and 88.7 ± 13.5 μM for HEK-mMate1, respectively. Cd{sup 2+} could inhibit the uptake of metformin, a substrate of MATE transporters, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) of 97.5 ± 6.0 μM, 20.2 ± 2.6 μM, and 49.9 ± 6.9 μM in HEK-hMATE1, HEK-hMATE2-K, and HEK-mMate1 cells, respectively. In addition, hMATE1 could transport preloaded Cd{sup 2+} out of the HEK-hMATE1 cells, thus resulting in a significant decrease of Cd{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity. The present study has provided the first evidence supporting that MATEs transport Cd{sup 2+} and may function as cellular elimination machinery in Cd intoxication. - Highlights: • Cadmium is an environmentally prevalent toxicant. • Little was known regarding the elimination and detoxification of cadmium. • Cadmium ion is here demonstrated as a substrate of MATE transporters. • MATEs may function as cellular elimination machinery in cadmium detoxification.

  2. Gold Nanocluster-Mediated Cellular Death under Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Rius, Anna; Ivask, Angela; Das, Shreya; Penya-Auladell, Nuria; Fabregas, Laura; Fletcher, Nicholas L; Houston, Zachary H; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2017-11-29

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have become a promising nanomaterial for cancer therapy because of their biocompatibility and fluorescent properties. In this study, the effect of ultrasmall protein-stabilized 2 nm Au NCs on six types of mammalian cells (fibroblasts, B-lymphocytes, glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, and two types of prostate cancer cells) under electromagnetic radiation is investigated. Cellular association of Au NCs in vitro is concentration-dependent, and Au NCs have low intrinsic toxicity. However, when Au NC-incubated cells are exposed to a 1 GHz electromagnetic field (microwave radiation), cell viability significantly decreases, thus demonstrating that Au NCs exhibit specific microwave-dependent cytotoxicity, likely resulting from localized heating. Upon i.v. injection in mice, Au NCs are still present at 24 h post administration. Considering the specific microwave-dependent cytotoxicity and low intrinsic toxicity, our work suggests the potential of Au NCs as effective and safe nanomedicines for cancer therapy.

  3. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...

  4. Targeting Cellular Calcium Homeostasis to Prevent Cytokine-Mediated Beta Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amy L; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Lavagnino, Zeno; Spears, Larry D; Abreu, Damien; Mahadevan, Jana; Yagi, Takuya; Semenkovich, Clay F; Piston, David W; Urano, Fumihiko

    2017-07-17

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of islet inflammation, leading to beta cell death in type 1 diabetes. Although alterations in both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosolic free calcium levels are known to play a role in cytokine-mediated beta cell death, there are currently no treatments targeting cellular calcium homeostasis to combat type 1 diabetes. Here we show that modulation of cellular calcium homeostasis can mitigate cytokine- and ER stress-mediated beta cell death. The calcium modulating compounds, dantrolene and sitagliptin, both prevent cytokine and ER stress-induced activation of the pro-apoptotic calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, and partly suppress beta cell death in INS1E cells and human primary islets. These agents are also able to restore cytokine-mediated suppression of functional ER calcium release. In addition, sitagliptin preserves function of the ER calcium pump, sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA), and decreases levels of the pro-apoptotic protein thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Supporting the role of TXNIP in cytokine-mediated cell death, knock down of TXNIP in INS1-E cells prevents cytokine-mediated beta cell death. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of dynamic cellular calcium homeostasis and TXNIP suppression present viable pharmacologic targets to prevent cytokine-mediated beta cell loss in diabetes.

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Enhances Cellular Uptake of Polystyrene Nanoparticles by Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuc, Le Thi Minh; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2017-06-19

    The interaction between nanoparticles and cells has been studied extensively, but most research has focused on the effect of various nanoparticle characteristics, such as size, morphology, and surface charge, on the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. In contrast, there have been very few studies to assess the influence of cellular factors, such as growth factor responses, on the cellular uptake efficiency of nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the uptake efficiency of polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NPs) by A431 cells, a human carcinoma epithelial cell line. The results showed that EGF enhanced the uptake efficiency of A431 cells for PS NPs. In addition, inhibition and localization studies of PS NPs and EGF receptors (EGFRs) indicated that cellular uptake of PS NPs is related to the binding of EGF-EGFR complex and PS NPs. Different pathways are used to enter the cells depending on the presence or absence of EGF. In the presence of EGF, cellular uptake of PS NPs is via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, whereas, in the absence of EGF, uptake of PS NPs does not involve clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Our findings indicate that EGF enhances cellular uptake of PS NPs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This result could be important for developing safe nanoparticles and their safe use in medical applications.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor Enhances Cellular Uptake of Polystyrene Nanoparticles by Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thi Minh Phuc

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between nanoparticles and cells has been studied extensively, but most research has focused on the effect of various nanoparticle characteristics, such as size, morphology, and surface charge, on the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. In contrast, there have been very few studies to assess the influence of cellular factors, such as growth factor responses, on the cellular uptake efficiency of nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF on the uptake efficiency of polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NPs by A431 cells, a human carcinoma epithelial cell line. The results showed that EGF enhanced the uptake efficiency of A431 cells for PS NPs. In addition, inhibition and localization studies of PS NPs and EGF receptors (EGFRs indicated that cellular uptake of PS NPs is related to the binding of EGF–EGFR complex and PS NPs. Different pathways are used to enter the cells depending on the presence or absence of EGF. In the presence of EGF, cellular uptake of PS NPs is via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, whereas, in the absence of EGF, uptake of PS NPs does not involve clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Our findings indicate that EGF enhances cellular uptake of PS NPs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This result could be important for developing safe nanoparticles and their safe use in medical applications.

  7. Targeting Neutrophilic Inflammation Using Polymersome-Mediated Cellular Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James D; Ward, Jon R; Avila-Olias, Milagros; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Renshaw, Stephen A

    2017-05-01

    Neutrophils are key effector cells in inflammation and play an important role in neutralizing invading pathogens. During inflammation resolution, neutrophils undergo apoptosis before they are removed by macrophages, but if apoptosis is delayed, neutrophils can cause extensive tissue damage and chronic disease. Promotion of neutrophil apoptosis is a potential therapeutic approach for treating persistent inflammation, yet neutrophils have proven difficult cells to manipulate experimentally. In this study, we deliver therapeutic compounds to neutrophils using biocompatible, nanometer-sized synthetic vesicles, or polymersomes, which are internalized by binding to scavenger receptors and subsequently escape the early endosome through a pH-triggered disassembly mechanism. This allows polymersomes to deliver molecules into the cell cytosol of neutrophils without causing cellular activation. After optimizing polymersome size, we show that polymersomes can deliver the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (R)-roscovitine into human neutrophils to promote apoptosis in vitro. Finally, using a transgenic zebrafish model, we show that encapsulated (R)-roscovitine can speed up inflammation resolution in vivo more efficiently than the free drug. These results show that polymersomes are effective intracellular carriers for drug delivery into neutrophils. This has important consequences for the study of neutrophil biology and the development of neutrophil-targeted therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Siderocalin-mediated recognition, sensitization, and cellular uptake of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Benjamin E; Rupert, Peter B; Gauny, Stacey S; An, Dahlia D; Ralston, Corie Y; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Strong, Roland K; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic radionuclides, such as the transuranic actinides plutonium, americium, and curium, present severe health threats as contaminants, and understanding the scope of the biochemical interactions involved in actinide transport is instrumental in managing human contamination. Here we show that siderocalin, a mammalian siderophore-binding protein from the lipocalin family, specifically binds lanthanide and actinide complexes through molecular recognition of the ligands chelating the metal ions. Using crystallography, we structurally characterized the resulting siderocalin-transuranic actinide complexes, providing unprecedented insights into the biological coordination of heavy radioelements. In controlled in vitro assays, we found that intracellular plutonium uptake can occur through siderocalin-mediated endocytosis. We also demonstrated that siderocalin can act as a synergistic antenna to sensitize the luminescence of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions in ternary protein-ligand complexes, dramatically increasing the brightness and efficiency of intramolecular energy transfer processes that give rise to metal luminescence. Our results identify siderocalin as a potential player in the biological trafficking of f elements, but through a secondary ligand-based metal sequestration mechanism. Beyond elucidating contamination pathways, this work is a starting point for the design of two-stage biomimetic platforms for photoluminescence, separation, and transport applications.

  9. Nanorod mediated collagen scaffolds as extra cellular matrix mimics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Mohan, Ranganathan

    2015-01-01

    Creating collagen scaffolds that mimic extracellular matrices without using toxic exogenous materials remains a big challenge. A new strategy to create scaffolds through end-to-end crosslinking through functionalized nanorods leading to well-designed architecture is presented here. Self-assembled scaffolds with a denaturation temperature of 110 °C, porosity of 70%, pore size of 0.32 μm and Young’s modulus of 231 MPa were developed largely driven by imine bonding between 3-mercapto-1-propanal (MPA) functionalized ZnO nanorods and collagen. The mechanical properties obtained were much higher than that of native collagen, collagen—MPA, collagen—3-mercapto-1-propanol (3MPOH) or collagen- 3-MPOH-ZnO, clearly bringing out the relevance of nanorod mediated assembly of fibrous networks. This new strategy has led to scaffolds with mechanical properties much higher than earlier reports and can provide support for cell growth and facilitation of cell attachment. (paper)

  10. Prediction of lung cells oncogenic transformation for induced radon progeny alpha particles using sugarscape cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradaran, Samaneh; Maleknasr, Niaz; Setayeshi, Saeed; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Alpha particle irradiation from radon progeny is one of the major natural sources of effective dose in the public population. Oncogenic transformation is a biological effectiveness of radon progeny alpha particle hits. The biological effects which has caused by exposure to radon, were the main result of a complex series of physical, chemical, biological and physiological interactions. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for radon-induced carcinogenesis have not been clear yet. Various biological models, including cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenesis effects of radon progeny alpha particles. In this paper, sugars cape cellular automata have been presented for computational study of complex biological effect of radon progeny alpha particles in lung bronchial airways. The model has included mechanism of DNA damage, which has been induced alpha particles hits, and then formation of transformation in the lung cells. Biomarkers were an objective measure or evaluation of normal or abnormal biological processes. In the model, the metabolism rate of infected cell has been induced alpha particles traversals, as a biomarker, has been followed to reach oncogenic transformation. The model results have successfully validated in comparison with "in vitro oncogenic transformation data" for C3H 10T1/2 cells. This model has provided an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular changes, at the various stages in radiation carcinogenesis, involving human cells. It has become well known that simulation could be used to investigate complex biomedical systems, in situations where traditional methodologies were difficult or too costly to employ.

  11. Semiconductor particle mediated photoelectron transfers in bilayer lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendler, J.H.; Baral, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses semiconductor particles in situ generated on the cis surface of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs), that have been used to mediate photoelectric effects. The presence of semiconductors on the BLM surface is addressed. The observed photoelectric effects are rationalized and presented

  12. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  13. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  14. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation-Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  15. Study on cellular genotoxicities induced by alpha particles irradiation in combination with NNK treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Cao Zhenshan; Mi Na; Chen Zhongmin; Liu Gang; Wei Han; Li Huiying; Zhu Maoxiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate cellular genotoxicities of aplha particles irradiation in combination with NNK treatment. Methods: Exponentially growing immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells were divided into the normal control group (NC), alpha particles irradiation (α), NNK administration group (NNK), NNK administration (100 μg/ml) followed by alpha particles irradiation group (NNK + α), and alpha particles irradiation followed by NNK administration (100 μg/ml) group (μ + NNK). DNA damage were detected by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE); multinuclear cell assay was used to detect the frequency of the HPRT gene mutation; cell micronucleus frequency were detected by cytogenetic methods. Results: In the group exposed to both alpha particles irradiation and NNK, DNA damage, HPRT gene mutation frequency, and cell micronucleus frequency were significantly higher than those in the same dose groups irradiated with alpha particles or NNK administration alone. Subtracted the NNK effect, DNA damage, HPRT gene mutation frequency and cell micronucleus frequency in the group irradiated by alpha particles in combination with NNK administration were significantly higher than those of alpha particles irradiation alone. Conclusion: The genotoxicity of alpha particles irradiation in combination with NNK administration had synergistic effect. (authors)

  16. A study on the effects of relativistic heavy charged particles on the cellular microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Sylvain Vincent

    This study was done under the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) effort to assess the effect of cosmic radiation on astronauts during a 3 year mission to Mars. Carcinogenesis is known to be induced more efficiently by cosmic radiation. Our attention was turned towards one of the most efficient cosmic particles in inducing cancer, relativistic Fe, and focused in assessing its effect on the cellular microenvironment (ECM). Previous observations on mammary glands were showing irregularities in the immunoreactivity of the ECM protein laminin one hour after whole body irradiation with 1GeV/amu Fe ions for a dose of 0.8 Gy. This effect was not observed after 5 Gy γ-rays exposure. The rapidity of such a change suggested that the effect might be due to a physical event specific to relativistic charged particles (HZE), rather than a biological event. Our study showed that this effect is actually a complex and rapid response of the microenvironment to highly ionizing radiation. It involves a fast disruption of the basement membrane of the ECM induced by the highly localized ionization and reactive oxygen formation around the track of the Fe ion. This disruption triggers further chemical and biological responses involved in the remodeling of the laminin network in the basement membrane. A metalloproteinase is suspected to be the intermediate protease affecting laminin. The HZE effect on the microenvironment was seen in both mouse mammary glands and skin, but the laminin isoforms sensitive to Fe ions were different for each organ, with a clear disruption of laminin-1 network in skin and of laminin-5 in mammary glands. In addition, the laminin receptor integrins seem to be involved in this mechanism, but its contribution is unclear at this point. Finally, such studies suggest a shift from the concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) used in classical radiation biology since the effect is only seen with HZE at viable whole body doses. In addition, this

  17. The effect of particle shape on cellular interaction and drug delivery applications of micro- and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Anil B

    2017-10-30

    Encapsulation of therapeutic agents in nanoparticles offers several benefits including improved bioavailability, site specific delivery, reduced toxicity and in vivo stability of proteins and nucleotides over conventional delivery options. These benefits are consequence of distinct in vivo pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profile of nanoparticles, which is dictated by the complex interplay of size, surface charge and surface hydrophobicity. Recently, particle shape has been identified as a new physical parameter which has exerted tremendous impact on cellular uptake and biodistribution, thereby in vivo performance of nanoparticles. Improved therapeutic efficacy of anticancer agents using non-spherical particles is the recent development in the field. Additionally, immunological response of nanoparticles was also altered when antigens were loaded in non-spherical nanovehicles. The apparent impact of particle shape inspired the new research in the field of drug delivery. The present review therefore details the research in this field. The review focuses on methods of fabrication of particles of non-spherical geometries and impact of particle shape on cellular uptake, biodistribution, tumor targeting and production of immunological responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cellular mechanisms of estradiol-mediated sexual differentiation of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher L; Schwarz, Jaclyn S; Dean, Shannon L; McCarthy, Margaret M

    2010-09-01

    Gonadal steroids organize the developing brain during a perinatal sensitive period and have enduring consequences for adult behavior. In male rodents testicular androgens are aromatized in neurons to estrogens and initiate multiple distinct cellular processes that ultimately determine the masculine phenotype. Within specific brain regions, overall cell number and dendritic morphology are the principal targets for hormonal organization. Recent advances have been made in elucidating the cellular mechanisms by which the neurological underpinnings of sexually dimorphic physiology and behavior are determined. These include estradiol-mediated prostaglandin synthesis, presynaptic release of glutamate, postsynaptic changes in glutamate receptors and changes in cell adhesion molecules. Sex differences in cell death are mediated by hormonal modulation of survival and death factors such as TNFalpha and Bcl-2/BAX. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of the cellular response triggered by gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Stefan; Keil, Sebastian; Sender, Sina; Hammer, Susanne C; Antonopoulos, Georgios C; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Meyer, Heiko; Heinemann, Dag

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based transfection techniques have proven high applicability in several cell biologic applications. The delivery of different molecules using these techniques has been extensively investigated. In particular, new high-throughput approaches such as gold nanoparticle–mediated laser transfection allow efficient delivery of antisense molecules or proteins into cells preserving high cell viabilities. However, the cellular response to the perforation procedure is not well understood. We herein analyzed the perforation kinetics of single cells during resonant gold nanoparticle–mediated laser manipulation with an 850-ps laser system at a wavelength of 532 nm. Inflow velocity of propidium iodide into manipulated cells reached a maximum within a few seconds. Experiments based on the inflow of FM4-64 indicated that the membrane remains permeable for a few minutes for small molecules. To further characterize the cellular response postmanipulation, we analyzed levels of oxidative heat or general stress. Although we observed an increased formation of reactive oxygen species by an increase of dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, heat shock protein 70 was not upregulated in laser-treated cells. Additionally, no evidence of stress granule formation was visible by immunofluorescence staining. The data provided in this study help to identify the cellular reactions to gold nanoparticle–mediated laser manipulation.

  20. Live Imaging of Cellular Internalization of Single Colloidal Particle by Combined Label-Free and Fluorescence Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Gerard D; Vllasaliu, Driton; Falcone, Franco H; Somekh, Michael G; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2015-11-02

    In this work we utilize the combination of label-free total internal reflection microscopy and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRM/TIRF) microscopy to achieve a simultaneous, live imaging of single, label-free colloidal particle endocytosis by individual cells. The TIRM arm of the microscope enables label free imaging of the colloid and cell membrane features, while the TIRF arm images the dynamics of fluorescent-labeled clathrin (protein involved in endocytosis via clathrin pathway), expressed in transfected 3T3 fibroblasts cells. Using a model polymeric colloid and cells with a fluorescently tagged clathrin endocytosis pathway, we demonstrate that wide field TIRM/TIRF coimaging enables live visualization of the process of colloidal particle interaction with the labeled cell structure, which is valuable for discerning the membrane events and route of colloid internalization by the cell. We further show that 500 nm in diameter model polystyrene colloid associates with clathrin, prior to and during its cellular internalization. This association is not apparent with larger, 1 μm in diameter colloids, indicating an upper particle size limit for clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  1. Searches for hadronically decaying Dark Matter mediator particles at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Nindhito, Herjuno Rah

    2016-01-01

    Searches for hadronic resonances of the Dark Matter (DM) particles in the sub-TeV mass re- gion remain as a viable target at ATLAS. However, due to the bandwidth limitation, the events that available for performing an analysis were statistically limited. Reducing the event size by recording a fraction of the full event information overcomes this limitation. An analysis that is performed on those events is called Trigger-Level Analysis(TLA). This poster highlights the TLA strategy used to search for low-mass dijet resonances. No significant excesses are found in a region between 450 and 950 GeV. As an addition, limits are set on a simplified leptophobic Z’ model of DM mediator with axial coupling to quarks and DM particles as well as on Gaussian resonances.

  2. Degradation-mediated cellular traction directs stem cell fate in covalently crosslinked three-dimensional hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetan, Sudhir; Guvendiren, Murat; Legant, Wesley R.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2013-05-01

    Although cell-matrix adhesive interactions are known to regulate stem cell differentiation, the underlying mechanisms, in particular for direct three-dimensional encapsulation within hydrogels, are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that in covalently crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is directed by the generation of degradation-mediated cellular traction, independently of cell morphology or matrix mechanics. hMSCs within HA hydrogels of equivalent elastic moduli that permit (restrict) cell-mediated degradation exhibited high (low) degrees of cell spreading and high (low) tractions, and favoured osteogenesis (adipogenesis). Moreover, switching the permissive hydrogel to a restrictive state through delayed secondary crosslinking reduced further hydrogel degradation, suppressed traction, and caused a switch from osteogenesis to adipogenesis in the absence of changes to the extended cellular morphology. Furthermore, inhibiting tension-mediated signalling in the permissive environment mirrored the effects of delayed secondary crosslinking, whereas upregulating tension induced osteogenesis even in the restrictive environment.

  3. [Evaluation of Cellular Effects Caused by Lunar Regolith Simulant Including Fine Particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanori; Miki, Takeo; Honma, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Shigeru; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced a plan to establish a manned colony on the surface of the moon, and our country, Japan, has declared its participation. The surface of the moon is covered with soil called lunar regolith, which includes fine particles. It is possible that humans will inhale lunar regolith if it is brought into the spaceship. Therefore, an evaluation of the pulmonary effects caused by lunar regolith is important for exploration of the moon. In the present study, we examine the cellular effects of lunar regolith simulant, whose components are similar to those of lunar regolith. We focused on the chemical component and particle size in particular. The regolith simulant was fractionated to lunar regolith simulant such as cell membrane damage, induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory effect.

  4. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    those of wild-type controls. Comparison of profiles of phospho-antibody array data indicated that the deletion of SirT1 was accompanied by constitutive activation of the pro-inflammatory NF-¿B pathway, which is key for STAT3 induction and increased cellular respiration in Sirt1-KO cells. Thus, SIRT1...... cells exhibited higher mitochondrial respiration as compared with wild-type MEFs. Two independent approaches, including ectopic expression of SIRT1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of STAT3, led to reduction in intracellular ATP levels and increased lactate production in Sirt1-KO cells that were approaching...

  5. Use of radioactive double labelling technique in the chemical analysis of the mediators of cellular immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorg, C.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive double labelling was adapted for the analysis of mediators of cellular immunity. Two identical lymphocyte cultures were simultaneously labelled with [ 3 H]- or [ 14 C] leucine. Each of the cultures was stimulated with antigen or mitogen. The combined supernatants were then subjected to various fractionation procedures. By determining the isotope ratio in each fraction it is possible to identify those products of activated lymphocytes that have been produced either de novo or in increased amounts. The method proved sensitive enough to detect lymphocyte activation products in supernatants of activated lymphocyte cultures from guinea pig, mouse, and man

  6. Alterations in cellular metabolism modulate CD1d-mediated NKT-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tonya J; Carey, Gregory B; East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Bollino, Dominique R; Kimball, Amy S; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a critical role in the host's innate immune response. CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipid antigens to NKT cells has been established; however, the mechanisms by which NKT cells recognize infected or cancerous cells remain unclear. 5(')-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of lipogenic pathways. We hypothesized that activation of AMPK during infection and malignancy could alter the repertoire of antigens presented by CD1d and serve as a danger signal to NKT cells. In this study, we examined the effect of alterations in metabolism on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells and found that an infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus rapidly increased CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) enhance T-cell effector functions during infection, therefore antigen presenting cells pretreated with pharmacological agents that inhibit glycolysis, induce HIF and activate AMPK were assessed for their ability to induce NKT-cell responses. Pretreatment with 2-deoxyglucose, cobalt chloride, AICAR and metformin significantly enhanced CD1d-mediated NKT-cell activation. In addition, NKT cells preferentially respond to malignant B cells and B-cell lymphomas express HIF-1α. These data suggest that targeting cellular metabolism may serve as a novel means of inducing innate immune responses. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Enhanced transfection by antioxidative polymeric gene carrier that reduces polyplex-mediated cellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Sang; Kim, Nak Won; Lee, Kyuri; Kim, Hongtae; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2013-06-01

    To test the hypothesis in which polyplex-induced oxidative stress may affect overall transfection efficiency, an antioxidative transfection system minimizing cellular oxidative stress was designed for enhanced transfection. An amphiphilic copolymer (PEI-PLGA) was synthesized and used as a micelle-type gene carrier containing hydrophobic antioxidant, α-tocopherol. Cellular oxidative stress and the change of mitochondrial membrane potential after transfection was measured by using a fluorescent probe (H₂DCFDA) and lipophilic cationic probe (JC-1), respectively. Transfection efficiency was determined by measuring a reporter gene (luciferase) expression level. The initial transfection study with conventional PEI/plasmid DNA polyplex showed significant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PEI-PLGA copolymer successfully carried out the simultaneous delivery of α-tocopherol and plasmid DNA (PEI-PLGA/Toco/pDNA polyplex) into cells, resulting in a significant reduction in cellular ROS generation after transfection and helped to maintain the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ). In addition, the transfection efficiency was dramatically increased using the antioxidative transfection system. This work showed that oxidative stress would be one of the important factors that should be considered in designing non-viral gene carriers and suggested a possible way to reduce the carrier-mediated oxidative stress, which consequently leads to enhanced transfection.

  8. Receptor-mediated endocytosis generates nanomechanical force reflective of ligand identity and cellular property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Ren, Juan; Wang, Jingren; Li, Shixie; Zou, Qingze; Gao, Nan

    2018-08-01

    Whether environmental (thermal, chemical, and nutrient) signals generate quantifiable, nanoscale, mechanophysical changes in the cellular plasma membrane has not been well elucidated. Assessment of such mechanophysical properties of plasma membrane may shed lights on fundamental cellular process. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement of the mechanical properties of live cells was hampered by the difficulty in accounting for the effects of the cantilever motion and the associated hydrodynamic force on the mechanical measurement. These challenges have been addressed in our recently developed control-based AFM nanomechanical measurement protocol, which enables a fast, noninvasive, broadband measurement of the real-time changes in plasma membrane elasticity in live cells. Here we show using this newly developed AFM platform that the plasma membrane of live mammalian cells exhibits a constant and quantifiable nanomechanical property, the membrane elasticity. This mechanical property sensitively changes in response to environmental factors, such as the thermal, chemical, and growth factor stimuli. We demonstrate that different chemical inhibitors of endocytosis elicit distinct changes in plasma membrane elastic modulus reflecting their specific molecular actions on the lipid configuration or the endocytic machinery. Interestingly, two different growth factors, EGF and Wnt3a, elicited distinct elastic force profiles revealed by AFM at the plasma membrane during receptor-mediated endocytosis. By applying this platform to genetically modified cells, we uncovered a previously unknown contribution of Cdc42, a key component of the cellular trafficking network, to EGF-stimulated endocytosis at plasma membrane. Together, this nanomechanical AFM study establishes an important foundation that is expandable and adaptable for investigation of cellular membrane evolution in response to various key extracellular signals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. E3Net: a system for exploring E3-mediated regulatory networks of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngwoong; Lee, Hodong; Park, Jong C; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) is a key enzyme targeting specific substrates in diverse cellular processes for ubiquitination and degradation. The existing findings of substrate specificity of E3 are, however, scattered over a number of resources, making it difficult to study them together with an integrative view. Here we present E3Net, a web-based system that provides a comprehensive collection of available E3-substrate specificities and a systematic framework for the analysis of E3-mediated regulatory networks of diverse cellular functions. Currently, E3Net contains 2201 E3s and 4896 substrates in 427 organisms and 1671 E3-substrate specific relations between 493 E3s and 1277 substrates in 42 organisms, extracted mainly from MEDLINE abstracts and UniProt comments with an automatic text mining method and additional manual inspection and partly from high throughput experiment data and public ubiquitination databases. The significant functions and pathways of the extracted E3-specific substrate groups were identified from a functional enrichment analysis with 12 functional category resources for molecular functions, protein families, protein complexes, pathways, cellular processes, cellular localization, and diseases. E3Net includes interactive analysis and navigation tools that make it possible to build an integrative view of E3-substrate networks and their correlated functions with graphical illustrations and summarized descriptions. As a result, E3Net provides a comprehensive resource of E3s, substrates, and their functional implications summarized from the regulatory network structures of E3-specific substrate groups and their correlated functions. This resource will facilitate further in-depth investigation of ubiquitination-dependent regulatory mechanisms. E3Net is freely available online at http://pnet.kaist.ac.kr/e3net.

  10. Cellular sources and targets of IFN-γ-mediated protection against viral demyelination and neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Paul D.; McGavern, Dorian B.; Pease, Larry R.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2017-01-01

    IFN-γ is an anti-viral and immunomodulatory cytokine critical for resistance to multiple pathogens. Using mice with targeted disruption of the gene for IFN-γ, we previously demonstrated that this cytokine is critical for resistance to viral persistence and demyelination in the Theiler’s virus model of multiple sclerosis. During viral infections, IFN-γ is produced by natural killer (NK) cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; however, the proportions of lymphocyte subsets responding to virus infection influences the contributions to IFN-γ-mediated protection. To determine the lymphocyte subsets that produce IFN-γ to maintain resistance, we used adoptive transfer strategies to generate mice with lymphocyte-specific deficiencies in IFN-γ-production. We demonstrate that IFN-γ production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets is critical for resistance to Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelination and neurological disease, and that CD4+ T cells make a greater contribution to IFN-γ-mediated protection. To determine the cellular targets of IFN-γ-mediated responses, we used adoptive transfer studies and bone marrow chimerism to generate mice in which either hematopoietic or somatic cells lacked the ability to express IFN-γ receptor. We demonstrate that IFN-γ receptor must be present on central nervous system glia, but not bone marrow-derived lymphocytes, in order to maintain resistance to TMEV-induced demyelination. PMID:11857334

  11. Max–min-plus expressions for one-dimensional particle cellular automata obtained from a fundamental diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Takazumi; Matsukidaira, Junta; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    We study one-dimensional neighborhood-five conservative cellular automata (CA), referred to as particle cellular automata five (particle CA5). We show that evolution equations for particle CA5s that belong to certain types can be obtained in the form of max–min-plus expressions from a fundamental diagram. The obtained equations are transformed into other max–min-plus expressions by ultradiscrete Cole–Hopf transformations, which enable us to analyze the asymptotic behaviors of general solutions. The equations in the Lagrange representation, which describe particle motion, are also presented, which can also be obtained from a fundamental diagram. Finally, we discuss the generalization to a one-dimensional conservative neighborhood-n CA, i.e., particle CAn. (paper)

  12. Structure-based analysis of CysZ-mediated cellular uptake of sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assur Sanghai, Zahra; Liu, Qun; Clarke, Oliver B; Belcher-Dufrisne, Meagan; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Giese, M Hunter; Leal-Pinto, Edgar; Kloss, Brian; Tabuso, Shantelle; Love, James; Punta, Marco; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Rost, Burkhard; Logothetis, Diomedes; Quick, Matthias; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2018-01-01

    Sulfur, most abundantly found in the environment as sulfate (SO42-), is an essential element in metabolites required by all living cells, including amino acids, co-factors and vitamins. However, current understanding of the cellular delivery of SO42- at the molecular level is limited. CysZ has been described as a SO42- permease, but its sequence family is without known structural precedent. Based on crystallographic structure information, SO42- binding and flux experiments, we provide insight into the molecular mechanism of CysZ-mediated translocation of SO42- across membranes. CysZ structures from three different bacterial species display a hitherto unknown fold and have subunits organized with inverted transmembrane topology. CysZ from Pseudomonas denitrificans assembles as a trimer of antiparallel dimers and the CysZ structures from two other species recapitulate dimers from this assembly. Mutational studies highlight the functional relevance of conserved CysZ residues. PMID:29792261

  13. Intracellular localisation of proteins to specific cellular areas by nanocapsule mediated delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huabin; Chen, Ligang; Sun, Xianchao; Fu, Ailing

    2017-09-01

    Nanocapsules are promising carriers with great potential for intracellular protein transport. Although many studies have intended to improve cell uptake efficacy, there is an increasing interest in understanding of subcellular distribution of cargoes inside cells, which is essential for purposeful delivery of biomolecules into specific sites within cells. Herein, we interrogate the intracellular localisation of exogenous proteins, including fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and green fluorescent protein (GFP), mediated by specially designed nanocapsules. The results show that the designed nanocapsules can deliver the two types of fluorescent proteins into different cellular destinations (cytosol, nucleus or the whole cell), depending on the composition of nanocapsules. Meanwhile, several impact factors that influence the distribution of proteins in cells have also been investigated, and the results suggest that the localisation of capsule-mediated proteins in cells is strongly affected by the surface properties of nanocapsules, the types of stabilisers and proteins, and environmental temperatures. The rational control of intracellular localised delivery of exogenous proteins as we demonstrated in this study might open new avenues to obtain desired magnitude of drug effects for modulating cell activity.

  14. Cellular and exosome mediated molecular defense mechanism in bovine granulosa cells exposed to oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Saeed-Zidane

    Full Text Available Various environmental insults including diseases, heat and oxidative stress could lead to abnormal growth, functions and apoptosis in granulosa cells during ovarian follicle growth and oocyte maturation. Despite the fact that cells exposed to oxidative stress are responding transcriptionally, the potential release of transcripts associated with oxidative stress response into extracellular space through exosomes is not yet determined. Therefore, here we aimed to investigate the effect of oxidative stress in bovine granulosa cells in vitro on the cellular and exosome mediated defense mechanisms. Bovine granulosa cells were aspirated from ovarian follicles and cultured in DMEM/F-12 Ham culture medium supplemented with 10% exosome-depleted fetal bovine serum. In the first experiment sub-confluent cells were treated with 5 μM H2O2 for 40 min to induce oxidative stress. Thereafter, cells were subjected to ROS and mitochondrial staining, cell proliferation and cell cycle assays. Furthermore, gene and protein expression analysis were performed in H2O2-challenged versus control group 24 hr post-treatment using qRT-PCR and immune blotting or immunocytochemistry assay, respectively. Moreover, exosomes were isolated from spent media using ultracentrifugation procedure, and subsequently used for RNA isolation and qRT-PCR. In the second experiment, exosomes released by granulosa cells under oxidative stress (StressExo or those released by granulosa cells without oxidative stress (NormalExo were co-incubated with bovine granulosa cells in vitro to proof the potential horizontal transfer of defense molecules from exosomes to granulosa cells and investigate any phenotype changes. Exposure of bovine granulosa cells to H2O2 induced the accumulation of ROS, reduced mitochondrial activity, increased expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant genes (both mRNA and protein, altered the cell cycle transitions and induced cellular apoptosis. Granulosa cells

  15. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

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    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  16. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic potential of respirable bentonite particles with different quartz contents and chemical modifications in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geh, Stefan; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Dopp, Elke [University Hospital, Institute of Hygiene and Occupational Medicine, Essen (Germany); Yuecel, Raif [University Hospital, Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research), Essen (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Edinburgh, ELEGI COLT Lab, Scotland (United Kingdom); Albrecht, Catrin; Borm, Paul J.A. [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); Armbruster, Lorenz [Verein fuer Technische Sicherheit und Umweltschutz e.V., Gotha (Germany); Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bruening, Thomas [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Institutions for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Hoffmann, Eik [University of Rostock, Institute of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biosystems Technology, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Considering the biological reactivity of pure quartz in lung cells, there is a strong interest to clarify the cellular effects of respirable siliceous dusts, like bentonites. In the present study, we investigated the cellular uptake and the cytotoxic potential of bentonite particles (Oe< 10 {mu}m) with an {alpha}-quartz content of up to 6% and different chemical modifications (activation: alkaline, acidic, organic) in human lung fibroblasts (IMR90). Additionally, the ability of the particles to induce apoptosis in IMR90-cells and the hemolytic activity was tested. All bentonite samples were tested for endotoxins with the in vitro-Pyrogen test and were found to be negative. Cellular uptake of particles by IMR90-cells was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity was analyzed in IMR90-cells by determination of viable cells using flow cytometry and by measuring of the cell respiratory activity. Induced apoptotic cells were detected by AnnexinV/Propidiumiodide-staining and gel electrophoresis. Our results demonstrate that activated bentonite particles are better taken up by IMR90-cells than untreated (native) bentonite particles. Also, activated bentonite particles with a quartz content of 5-6% were more cytotoxic than untreated bentonites or bentonites with a quartz content lower than 4%. The bentonite samples induced necrotic as well as apoptotic cell death. In general, bentonites showed a high membrane-damaging potential shown as hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. We conclude that cellular effects of bentonite particles in human lung cells are enhanced after chemical treatment of the particles. The cytotoxic potential of the different bentonites is primarily characterized by a strong lysis of the cell membrane. (orig.)

  17. The Measles Virus Receptor SLAMF1 Can Mediate Particle Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Carneiro, Daniel; McKeating, Jane A; Bailey, Dalan

    2017-04-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule F1 (SLAMF1) is both a microbial sensor and entry receptor for measles virus (MeV). Herein, we describe a new role for SLAMF1 to mediate MeV endocytosis that is in contrast with the alternative, and generally accepted, model that MeV genome enters cells only after fusion at the cell surface. We demonstrated that MeV engagement of SLAMF1 induces dramatic but transient morphological changes, most prominently in the formation of membrane blebs, which were shown to colocalize with incoming viral particles, and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton in infected cells. MeV infection was dependent on these dynamic cytoskeletal changes as well as fluid uptake through a macropinocytosis-like pathway as chemical inhibition of these processes inhibited entry. Moreover, we identified a role for the RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling axis in this MeV internalization process, highlighting a novel role for this recently characterized pathway in virus entry. Our study shows that MeV can hijack a microbial sensor normally involved in bacterial phagocytosis to drive endocytosis using a complex pathway that shares features with canonical viral macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and mechanotransduction. This uptake pathway is specific to SLAMF1-positive cells and occurs within 60 min of viral attachment. Measles virus remains a significant cause of mortality in human populations, and this research sheds new light on the very first steps of infection of this important pathogen. IMPORTANCE Measles is a significant disease in humans and is estimated to have killed over 200 million people since records began. According to current World Health Organization statistics, it still kills over 100,000 people a year, mostly children in the developing world. The causative agent, measles virus, is a small enveloped RNA virus that infects a broad range of cells during infection. In particular, immune cells are infected via interactions between glycoproteins found

  18. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  19. Vibrio campbellii hmgA-mediated pyomelanization impairs quorum sensing, virulence and cellular fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eWang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Melanization due to the inactivation of the homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase gene (hmgA has been demonstrated to increase stress resistance, persistence and virulence in some bacterial species but such pigmented mutants have not been observed in pathogenic members of the Vibrio Harveyi clade. In this study, we used Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 as model organism to understand how melanization affected cellular phenotype, metabolism and virulence. An in-frame deletion of the hmgA gene resulted in the overproduction of a pigment in cell culture supernatants and cellular membranes that was identified as pyomelanin. Unlike previous demonstrations in Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the pigmented V. campbellii mutant did not show increased UV resistance and was found to be ~2.7 times less virulent than the wild type strain in Penaeus monodon shrimp virulence assays. However, the extracted pyomelanin pigment did confer a higher resistance to oxidative stress when incubated with wild type cells. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses revealed that the hmgA gene deletion and subsequent pyomelanin production negatively effected the expression of 129 genes primarily involved in energy production, amino acid and lipid metabolism, and protein translation and turnover. This transcriptional response was mediated in part by an impairment of the quorum sensing regulon as transcripts of the quorum sensing high cell density master regulator LuxR and other operonic members of this regulon were significantly repressed in the hmgA mutant. Taken together, the results suggest that the pyomelanization of V. campbellii sufficiently impairs the metabolic activities of this organism and renders it less fit and virulent than its isogenic wild type strain.

  20. Vibrio campbellii hmgA-mediated pyomelanization impairs quorum sensing, virulence, and cellular fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Lin, Baochuan; Mostaghim, Anahita; Rubin, Robert A; Glaser, Evan R; Mittraparp-Arthorn, Pimonsri; Thompson, Janelle R; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Vora, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Melanization due to the inactivation of the homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase gene (hmgA) has been demonstrated to increase stress resistance, persistence, and virulence in some bacterial species but such pigmented mutants have not been observed in pathogenic members of the Vibrio Harveyi clade. In this study, we used Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 as model organism to understand how melanization affected cellular phenotype, metabolism, and virulence. An in-frame deletion of the hmgA gene resulted in the overproduction of a pigment in cell culture supernatants and cellular membranes that was identified as pyomelanin. Unlike previous demonstrations in Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia cepacia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the pigmented V. campbellii mutant did not show increased UV resistance and was found to be ~2.7 times less virulent than the wild type strain in Penaeus monodon shrimp virulence assays. However, the extracted pyomelanin pigment did confer a higher resistance to oxidative stress when incubated with wild type cells. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses revealed that the hmgA gene deletion and subsequent pyomelanin production negatively effected the expression of 129 genes primarily involved in energy production, amino acid, and lipid metabolism, and protein translation and turnover. This transcriptional response was mediated in part by an impairment of the quorum sensing regulon as transcripts of the quorum sensing high cell density master regulator LuxR and other operonic members of this regulon were significantly less abundant in the hmgA mutant. Taken together, the results suggest that the pyomelanization of V. campbellii sufficiently impairs the metabolic activities of this organism and renders it less fit and virulent than its isogenic wild type strain.

  1. Lognormal Distribution of Cellular Uptake of Radioactivity: Statistical Analysis of α-Particle Track Autoradiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neti, Prasad V.S.V.; Howell, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the distribution of radioactivity among a population of cells labeled with 210Po was shown to be well described by a log-normal (LN) distribution function (J Nucl Med. 2006;47:1049–1058) with the aid of autoradiography. To ascertain the influence of Poisson statistics on the interpretation of the autoradiographic data, the present work reports on a detailed statistical analysis of these earlier data. Methods The measured distributions of α-particle tracks per cell were subjected to statistical tests with Poisson, LN, and Poisson-lognormal (P-LN) models. Results The LN distribution function best describes the distribution of radioactivity among cell populations exposed to 0.52 and 3.8 kBq/mL of 210Po-citrate. When cells were exposed to 67 kBq/mL, the P-LN distribution function gave a better fit; however, the underlying activity distribution remained log-normal. Conclusion The present analysis generally provides further support for the use of LN distributions to describe the cellular uptake of radioactivity. Care should be exercised when analyzing autoradiographic data on activity distributions to ensure that Poisson processes do not distort the underlying LN distribution. PMID:18483086

  2. Vaccination with dengue virus-like particles induces humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

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    Zhang Quanfu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of dengue, an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV, has dramatically increased around the world in recent decades and is becoming a severe public health threat. However, there is currently no specific treatment for dengue fever, and licensed vaccine against dengue is not available. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs has shown considerable promise for many viral diseases, but the effect of DENV VLPs to induce specific immune responses has not been adequately investigated. Results By optimizing the expression plasmids, recombinant VLPs of four antigenically different DENV serotypes DENV1-4 were successfully produced in 293T cells. The vaccination effect of dengue VLPs in mice showed that monovalent VLPs of each serotype stimulated specific IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibodies against homotypic virus. Tetravalent VLPs efficiently enhanced specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of DENV. Moreover, vaccination with monovalent or tetravalent VLPs resulted in the induction of specific cytotoxic T cell responses. Conclusions Mammalian cell expressed dengue VLPs are capable to induce VLP-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and being a promising subunit vaccine candidate for prevention of dengue virus infection.

  3. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jian

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20 into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL cells (L428 into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2 in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  4. Spatial distribution patterns of energy deposition and cellular radiation effects in lung tissue following simulated exposure to alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, W.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Randomly oriented sections of rat tissue have been digitised to provide the contours of tissue-air interfaces and the locations of individual cell nuclei in the alveolated region of the lung. Sources of alpha particles with varying irradiation geometries and densities are simulated to compute the resulting random pattern of cellular irradiation, i.e. spatial coordinates, frequency, track length, and energy of traversals by the emitted alpha particles. Probabilities per unit track lengths, derived from experimental data on in vitro cellular inactivation and transformation, are then applied to the results of the alpha exposure simulations to yield an estimate of the number of both dead and viable transformed cells and their spatial distributions. If lung cancer risk is linearly related to the number of transformed cells, the carcinogenic risk for hot particles is always smaller than that for a uniform nuclide distribution of the same activity. (author)

  5. Intracellular Bacterial Infections: A Challenge for Developing Cellular Mediated Immunity Vaccines for Farmed Fish

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    Hetron Mweemba Munang’andu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture is one of the most rapidly expanding farming systems in the world. Its rapid expansion has brought with it several pathogens infecting different fish species. As a result, there has been a corresponding expansion in vaccine development to cope with the increasing number of infectious diseases in aquaculture. The success of vaccine development for bacterial diseases in aquaculture is largely attributed to empirical vaccine designs based on inactivation of whole cell (WCI bacteria vaccines. However, an upcoming challenge in vaccine design is the increase of intracellular bacterial pathogens that are not responsive to WCI vaccines. Intracellular bacterial vaccines evoke cellular mediated immune (CMI responses that “kill” and eliminate infected cells, unlike WCI vaccines that induce humoral immune responses whose protective mechanism is neutralization of extracellular replicating pathogens by antibodies. In this synopsis, I provide an overview of the intracellular bacterial pathogens infecting different fish species in aquaculture, outlining their mechanisms of invasion, replication, and survival intracellularly based on existing data. I also bring into perspective the current state of CMI understanding in fish together with its potential application in vaccine development. Further, I highlight the immunological pitfalls that have derailed our ability to produce protective vaccines against intracellular pathogens for finfish. Overall, the synopsis put forth herein advocates for a shift in vaccine design to include CMI-based vaccines against intracellular pathogens currently adversely affecting the aquaculture industry.

  6. Cellular uptake of nanoparticles as determined by particle properties, experimental conditions, and cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Katja; Veltman, Karin; van de Meent, Dik; van Wezel, Annemarie; Hendriks, A Jan

    2014-03-01

    The increased application of nanoparticles (NPs) is increasing the risk of their release into the environment. Although many toxicity studies have been conducted, the environmental risk is difficult to estimate, because uptake mechanisms are often not determined in toxicity studies. In the present study, the authors review dominant uptake mechanisms of NPs in cells, as well as the effect of NP properties, experimental conditions, and cell type on NP uptake. Knowledge of NP uptake is crucial for risk assessment and is essential to predict the behavior of NPs based on their physical-chemical properties. Important uptake mechanisms for eukaryotic cells are macropinocytosis, receptor-mediated endocytosis, and phagocytosis in specialized mammalian cells. The studies reviewed demonstrate that uptake into nonphagocytic cells depends strongly on NP size, with an uptake optimum at an NP diameter of approximately 50 nm. Increasing surface charges, either positive or negative, have been shown to increase particle uptake in comparison with uncharged NPs. Another important factor is the degree of (homo-) aggregation. Results regarding shape have been ambiguous. Difficulties in the production of NPs, with 1 property changed at a time, call for a full characterization of NP properties. Only then will it be possible to draw conclusions as to which property affected the uptake. © 2013 SETAC.

  7. Expression of the Major Vault Protein (MVP) and Cellular Vault Particles in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margiotta, Alyssa L; Bain, Lisa J; Rice, Charles D

    2017-11-01

    Cellular vaults are ubiquitous 13 mega Da multi-subunit ribonuceloprotein particles that may have a role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Seventy percent of the vault's mass consists of a ≈100 kDa protein, the major vault protein (MVP). In humans, a drug resistance-associated protein, originally identified as lung resistance protein in metastatic lung cancer, was ultimately shown to be the previously described MVP. In this study, a partial MVP sequence was cloned from channel catfish. Recombinant MVP (rMVP) was used to generate a monoclonal antibody that recognizes full length protein in distantly related fish species, as well as mice. MVP is expressed in fish spleen, liver, anterior kidney, renal kidney, and gills, with a consistent expression in epithelial cells, macrophages, or endothelium at the interface of the tissue and environment or vasculature. We show that vaults are distributed throughout cells of fish lymphoid cells, with nuclear and plasma membrane aggregations in some cells. Protein expression studies were extended to liver neoplastic lesions in Atlantic killifish collected in situ at the Atlantic Wood USA-EPA superfund site on the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA. MVP is highly expressed in these lesions, with intense staining at the nuclear membrane, similar to what is known about MVP expression in human liver neoplasia. Additionally, MVP mRNA expression was quantified in channel catfish ovarian cell line following treatment with different classes of pharmacological agents. Notably, mRNA expression is induced by ethidium bromide, which damages DNA. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:1981-1992, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron regulatory proteins: implication for cellular iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) that are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(.), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels and a decrease in ferritin synthesis. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in ferritin synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  9. Effect of lycopene and β-carotene on peroxynitrite-mediated cellular modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzandu, Kaampwe; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q.; Shaban, Zein; El Bohi, Khlood; Kazusaka, Akio; Fujita, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Peroxynitrite formed by the reaction of superoxide and nitric oxide is a highly reactive species with a role in various pathological processes such as cancer, chronic inflammation, and cardiovascular and neurological diseases. In the present study, the effect of the carotenoids, lycopene and β-carotene, on peroxynitrite-mediated modifications in plasmid DNA as well as cellular DNA and proteins were investigated. In pUC18 plasmid DNA, these carotenoids strongly inhibited DNA strand breaks caused by peroxynitrite generated from 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1). SIN-1 was also used to determine effects on DNA damage and protein tyrosine nitration in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. SIN-1 dose-dependently increased nitration of proteins in cells above basal levels as determined by Western blotting. This nitration was inhibited in the presence of the uric acid as well as lycopene. Physiological concentrations (0.31-10 μM) of lycopene and β-carotene also had protective effects on DNA damage, as measured by the comet assay. Lycopene significantly reduced DNA damage particularly, in the median range of concentrations (2.5 μM). The protective effects of lycopene and β-carotene could be due to their scavenging of reactive oxygen (ROS) and/or nitrogen species (RNS) as they reduce the amount of intracellular ROS/RNS produced following treatment with SIN-1 by as much as 47.5% and 42.4%, respectively. The results obtained in this study suggest that carotenoids may alleviate some of the deleterious effects of peroxynitrite and possibly other reactive nitrogen species as well in vivo

  10. Microtubule self-organisation by reaction-diffusion processes causes collective transport and organisation of cellular particles

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    Demongeot Jacques

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transport of intra-cellular particles by microtubules is a major biological function. Under appropriate in vitro conditions, microtubule preparations behave as a 'complex' system and show 'emergent' phenomena. In particular, they form dissipative structures that self-organise over macroscopic distances by a combination of reaction and diffusion. Results Here, we show that self-organisation also gives rise to a collective transport of colloidal particles along a specific direction. Particles, such as polystyrene beads, chromosomes, nuclei, and vesicles are carried at speeds of several microns per minute. The process also results in the macroscopic self-organisation of these particles. After self-organisation is completed, they show the same pattern of organisation as the microtubules. Numerical simulations of a population of growing and shrinking microtubules, incorporating experimentally realistic reaction dynamics, predict self-organisation. They forecast that during self-organisation, macroscopic parallel arrays of oriented microtubules form which cross the reaction space in successive waves. Such travelling waves are capable of transporting colloidal particles. The fact that in the simulations, the aligned arrays move along the same direction and at the same speed as the particles move, suggest that this process forms the underlying mechanism for the observed transport properties. Conclusions This process constitutes a novel physical chemical mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into collective transport of colloidal particles along a given direction. Self-organisation of this type provides a new mechanism by which intra cellular particles such as chromosomes and vesicles can be displaced and simultaneously organised by microtubules. It is plausible that processes of this type occur in vivo.

  11. Microtubule self-organisation by reaction-diffusion processes causes collective transport and organisation of cellular particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, Nicolas; Demongeot, Jacques; Tabony, James

    2004-01-01

    Background The transport of intra-cellular particles by microtubules is a major biological function. Under appropriate in vitro conditions, microtubule preparations behave as a 'complex' system and show 'emergent' phenomena. In particular, they form dissipative structures that self-organise over macroscopic distances by a combination of reaction and diffusion. Results Here, we show that self-organisation also gives rise to a collective transport of colloidal particles along a specific direction. Particles, such as polystyrene beads, chromosomes, nuclei, and vesicles are carried at speeds of several microns per minute. The process also results in the macroscopic self-organisation of these particles. After self-organisation is completed, they show the same pattern of organisation as the microtubules. Numerical simulations of a population of growing and shrinking microtubules, incorporating experimentally realistic reaction dynamics, predict self-organisation. They forecast that during self-organisation, macroscopic parallel arrays of oriented microtubules form which cross the reaction space in successive waves. Such travelling waves are capable of transporting colloidal particles. The fact that in the simulations, the aligned arrays move along the same direction and at the same speed as the particles move, suggest that this process forms the underlying mechanism for the observed transport properties. Conclusions This process constitutes a novel physical chemical mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into collective transport of colloidal particles along a given direction. Self-organisation of this type provides a new mechanism by which intra cellular particles such as chromosomes and vesicles can be displaced and simultaneously organised by microtubules. It is plausible that processes of this type occur in vivo. PMID:15176973

  12. Nitric oxide mediates insect cellular immunity via phospholipase A2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    After infection or invasion is recognized, biochemical mediators act in signaling insect immune functions. These include biogenic amines, insect cytokines, eicosanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Treating insects or isolated hemocyte populations with different mediators often leads to similar results. Se...

  13. Cellular gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. Gruau; J.T. Tromp (John)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe consider the problem of establishing gravity in cellular automata. In particular, when cellular automata states can be partitioned into empty, particle, and wall types, with the latter enclosing rectangular areas, we desire rules that will make the particles fall down and pile up on

  14. Cellular adhesion molecules on endothelial cells participate in radiation-mediated inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallahan, Dennis; Clark, Elizabeth T.; Kuchibhotla, Jaya; Gewertz, Bruce L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The acute and subacute clinical manifestations of ionizing radiation mimic the inflammatory response to a number of stimuli. During the early stages of the inflammatory response, endothelial cells rapidly and transiently express a number of glycoproteins such as E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 which influence leucocyte adhesion. We quantified the expression of these cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in irradiated endothelial cells in order to determine whether these glycoproteins participate in radiation-mediated inflammation. Methods: Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and HMEC cells were grown to 90% confluence and irradiated with a GE Maxitron x-ray generator. The cells were incubated with primary IgG1 antibody (mouse anti-human ICAM-1, VCAM-1, P-selectin and E-selectin and incubated with FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (goat anti-mouse IgG1). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis was utilized for quantitation of receptor expression of each CAM on irradiated endothelial cells. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays of nuclear protein extracts from irradiated HUVEC cells were performed using the E-selectin NFkB binding sequence (5'AGCTTAGAGGGGATTTCCGAGAGGA-3'). The E-selectin promoter was ligated to the growth hormone reporter. Plasmids pE-sel(-587 +35)GH or pE-sel(-587 +35)GH Δ NFκB (5 μg) was transfected into HMEC or HUVEC cells by use of lipofection. Transfectants were incubated for 16 h after transfection followed by treatment with 10 Gy (1 Gy/min, GE Maxitron) of ionizing radiation, and or with TNF or IL-1. Leukocyte adhesion to irradiated endothelial cells was quantified by HL-60 binding. Results: The log fluorescence of cells incubated with the antibody to E-selectin shifted by 32% at 4 h after irradiation. In comparison, a shift of 35% occurred 20 h after irradiation for cells incubated with the antibody to ICAM. However, there was no significant increase in P-selectin or VCAM

  15. Antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of breast cancer cells mediated by bispecific antibody, MDX-210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M; Wallace, P K; Keler, T; Deo, Y M; Akewanlop, C; Hayes, D F

    1999-02-01

    MDX-210 is a bispecific antibody (BsAb) with specificity for both the proto-oncogene product of HER-2/neu (c-erbB-2) and FcgammaRI (CD64). HER-2/neu is overexpressed in malignant tissue of approximately 30% of patients with breast cancer, and FcgammaRI is expressed on human monocytes, macrophages, and IFN-gamma activated granulocytes. We investigated phagocytosis and cytolysis of cultured human breast cancer cells by human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) mediated by BsAb MDX-210, its partially humanized derivative (MDX-H210), and its parent MoAb 520C9 (anti-HER-2/neu) under various conditions. Purified monocytes were cultured with GM-CSF, M-CSF, or no cytokine for five or six days. Antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and cytolysis (ADCC) assays were performed with the MDM and HER-2/neu positive target cells (SK-BR-3). ADCP was measured by two-color fluorescence flow cytometry using PKH2 (green fluorescent dye) and phycoerythrin-conjugated (red) monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against human CD14 and CD11b. ADCC was measured with a non-radioactive LDH detection kit. Both BsAb MDX-210 (via FcgammaRI) and MoAb 520C9 (mouse IgG1, via FcgammaRII) mediated similar levels of ADCP and ADCC. ADCP mediated by BsAb MDX-H210 was identical to that mediated by BsAb MDX-210. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that dual-labeled cells represented true phagocytosis. Both ADCP and ADCC were higher when MDM were pre-incubated with GM-CSF than when incubated with M-CSF. BsAb MDX-210 is as active in vitro as the parent MoAb 520C9 in inducing both phagocytosis and cytolysis of MDM. MDX-210 and its partially humanized derivative, MDX-H210, mediated similar levels of ADCP. GM-CSF appears to superior to M-CSF in inducing MDM-mediated ADCC and ADCP. These studies support the ongoing clinical investigations of BsAb MDX-210 and its partially humanized derivative.

  16. Cellular Morphology-Mediated Proliferation and Drug Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Domura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of the local microenvironment of the extracellular matrix for malignant tumor cells is in intimate relation with metastatic spread of cancer cells involving the associated issues of cellular proliferation and drug responsiveness. This study was aimed to assess the combination of both surface topographies (fiber alignments and different stiffness of the polymeric substrates (poly(l-lactic acid and poly(ε-caprolactone, PLLA and PCL, respectively as well as collagen substrates (coat and gel to elucidate the effect of the cellular morphology on cellular proliferation and drug sensitivities of two different types of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The morphological spreading parameter (nucleus/cytoplasm area ratio induced by the anthropogenic substrates has correlated intimately with the cellular proliferation and the drug sensitivity the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of cancer cells. This study demonstrated the promising results of the parameter for the evaluation of cancer cell malignancy.

  17. Cellular Morphology-Mediated Proliferation and Drug Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domura, Ryota; Sasaki, Rie; Ishikawa, Yuma; Okamoto, Masami

    2017-06-06

    The interpretation of the local microenvironment of the extracellular matrix for malignant tumor cells is in intimate relation with metastatic spread of cancer cells involving the associated issues of cellular proliferation and drug responsiveness. This study was aimed to assess the combination of both surface topographies (fiber alignments) and different stiffness of the polymeric substrates (poly(l-lactic acid) and poly(ε-caprolactone), PLLA and PCL, respectively) as well as collagen substrates (coat and gel) to elucidate the effect of the cellular morphology on cellular proliferation and drug sensitivities of two different types of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7). The morphological spreading parameter (nucleus/cytoplasm area ratio) induced by the anthropogenic substrates has correlated intimately with the cellular proliferation and the drug sensitivity the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of cancer cells. This study demonstrated the promising results of the parameter for the evaluation of cancer cell malignancy.

  18. Electrostatically mediated adsorption by nanodiamond and nanocarbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, Natalie M.; Luo, Tzy-Jiun Mark; Shenderova, Olga; Koscheev, Alexey P.; Brenner, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) and other nanocarbon particles are popular platforms for the immobilization of molecular species. In the present research, factors affecting adsorption and desorption of propidium iodide (PI) dye, chosen as a charged molecule model, on ND and sp 2 carbon nanoparticles were studied, with a size ranging from 75 to 4,305 nm. It was found that adsorption of PI molecules, as characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, on ND particles is strongly influenced by sorbent-sorbate electrostatic interactions. Different types of NDs with a negative zeta potential were found to adsorb positively charged PI molecules, while no PI adsorption was observed for NDs with a positive zeta potential. The type and density of surface groups of negatively charged NDs greatly influenced the degree and capacity of the PI adsorbed. Ozone-purified NDs had the highest capacity for PI adsorption, due to its greater density of oxygen containing groups, i.e., acid anhydrides and carboxyls, as assessed by TDMS and TOF–SIMS. Single wall nanohorns and carbon onion particles were found to adsorb PI regardless of their zeta potential; this is likely due to π bonding between the aromatic rings of PI and the graphitic surface of the materials and the internal cavity of the horns.

  19. Electrostatically mediated adsorption by nanodiamond and nanocarbon particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Natalie M.; Luo, Tzy-Jiun Mark, E-mail: tluo@ncsu.edu; Shenderova, Olga [North Carolina State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Koscheev, Alexey P. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, State Scientific Center of Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Brenner, Donald W. [North Carolina State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Nanodiamond (ND) and other nanocarbon particles are popular platforms for the immobilization of molecular species. In the present research, factors affecting adsorption and desorption of propidium iodide (PI) dye, chosen as a charged molecule model, on ND and sp{sup 2} carbon nanoparticles were studied, with a size ranging from 75 to 4,305 nm. It was found that adsorption of PI molecules, as characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, on ND particles is strongly influenced by sorbent-sorbate electrostatic interactions. Different types of NDs with a negative zeta potential were found to adsorb positively charged PI molecules, while no PI adsorption was observed for NDs with a positive zeta potential. The type and density of surface groups of negatively charged NDs greatly influenced the degree and capacity of the PI adsorbed. Ozone-purified NDs had the highest capacity for PI adsorption, due to its greater density of oxygen containing groups, i.e., acid anhydrides and carboxyls, as assessed by TDMS and TOF-SIMS. Single wall nanohorns and carbon onion particles were found to adsorb PI regardless of their zeta potential; this is likely due to {pi} bonding between the aromatic rings of PI and the graphitic surface of the materials and the internal cavity of the horns.

  20. Platinum nanozymes recover cellular ROS homeostasis in an oxidative stress-mediated disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglianetti, Mauro; de Luca, Elisa; Pedone, Deborah; Marotta, Roberto; Catelani, Tiziano; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase enzymes, with similar or even superior performance than natural enzymes, along with higher adaptability to the changes in environmental conditions. We then exploited their potent activity as radical scavenging materials in a cellular model of an oxidative stress-related disorder, namely human Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) disease, which is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Noteworthily, we found that Pt nanozymes can efficiently reduce ROS levels, completely restoring the cellular physiological homeostasis.In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide

  1. Onset of lipoprotein-supported steroidogenesis in differentiating granulosa cells of rats: cellular events involved in mediating FSH-enhanced uptake of low-density lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Luteal cells use lipoproteins as the main source of cholesterol in steroidogenesis. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying hormonal control of lipoprotein uptake. Thus, the authors tested the hypothesis that FSH and androgens regulate low density lipoprotein (LDL)-supported steroidogenesis in maturing granulosa cells by affecting receptor-mediated endocytosis of LDL at a cellular level. For this, immature ovarian granulosa cells were cultured with or without hormones, compactin (de novo synthesis inhibitor), or unlabeled or labeled ( 125 I or gold particles) LDL. Nonhormone-treated cultures produced little progestin; FSH and FSH/androstenedione stimulated steroid secretion. Progestin production by hormone-, but not nonhormone-, treated cultures was decreased by compactin, suggesting that de novo synthesis provided sterol for steroidogenesis. EM quantitation of cells exposed to gold-LDL at 37 0 C revealed that, compared to nonhormone-treated cells, FSH-treated cells (1) bound and internalized more gold-LDL, (2) had a smaller percentage of gold-LDL at their surfaces, (3) displayed a faster apparent rate of LDL internalization and delivery to lysosomes, and (4) contained more gold-labeled lysosomes. Data from biochemical studies in which 125 I-LDL was used supported the morphological findings. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that FSH has important effects at the cellular level on LDL uptake, which seem to underlie the striking increase in progestin production accompanying granulosa cell differentiation

  2. HAVCR1 (CD365) and Its Mouse Ortholog Are Functional Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Cellular Receptors That Mediate HAV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costafreda, Maria Isabel; Kaplan, Gerardo

    2018-05-01

    The hepatitis A virus (HAV) cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), classified as CD365, was initially discovered as an HAV cellular receptor using an expression cloning strategy. Due to the lack of HAV receptor-negative replication-competent cells, it was not possible to fully prove that HAVCR1 was a functional HAV receptor. However, biochemistry, classical virology, and epidemiology studies further supported the functional role of HAVCR1 as an HAV receptor. Here, we show that an anti-HAVCR1 monoclonal antibody that protected African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells against HAV infection only partially protected monkey Vero E6 cells and human hepatoma Huh7 cells, indicating that these two cell lines express alternative yet unidentified HAV receptors. Therefore, we focused our work on AGMK cells to further characterize the function of HAVCR1 as an HAV receptor. Advances in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 technology allowed us to knock out the monkey ortholog of HAVCR1 in AGMK cells. The resulting AGMK HAVCR1 knockout (KO) cells lost susceptibility to HAV infection, including HAV-free viral particles (vpHAV) and exosomes purified from HAV-infected cells (exo-HAV). Transfection of HAVCR1 cDNA into AGMK HAVCR1 KO cells restored susceptibility to vpHAV and exo-HAV infection. Furthermore, transfection of the mouse ortholog of HAVCR1, mHavcr1, also restored the susceptibility of AGMK HAVCR1 KO cells to HAV infection. Taken together, our data clearly show that HAVCR1 and mHavcr1 are functional HAV receptors that mediate HAV infection. This work paves the way for the identification of alternative HAV receptors to gain a complete understanding of their interplay with HAVCR1 in the cell entry and pathogenic processes of HAV. IMPORTANCE HAVCR1, an HAV receptor, is expressed in different cell types, including regulatory immune cells and antigen-presenting cells. How HAV evades the immune response during a long incubation period of up to 4 weeks and the

  3. Acoustically mediated long-range interaction among multiple spherical particles exposed to a plane standing wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shenwei; Qiu, Chunyin; Wang, Mudi; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the acoustically mediated interaction forces among multiple well-separated spherical particles trapped in the same node or antinode plane of a standing wave. An analytical expression of the acoustic interaction force is derived, which is accurate even for the particles beyond the Rayleigh limit. Interestingly, the multi-particle system can be decomposed into a series of independent two-particle systems described by pairwise interactions. Each pairwise interaction is a long-range interaction, as characterized by a soft oscillatory attenuation (at the power exponent of n  = −1 or −2). The vector additivity of the acoustic interaction force, which is not well expected considering the nonlinear nature of the acoustic radiation force, is greatly useful for exploring a system consisting of a large number of particles. The capability of self-organizing a big particle cluster can be anticipated through such acoustically controllable long-range interaction. (paper)

  4. N6-methyladenosine mediates the cellular proliferation and apoptosis via microRNAs in arsenite-transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shiyan; Sun, Donglei; Dai, Huangmei; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2018-04-20

    N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) modification is implicated to play an important role in cellular biological processes, but its regulatory mechanisms in arsenite-induced carcinogenesis are largely unknown. Here, human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells were chronically treated with 2.5 μM arsenite sodium (NaAsO 2 ) for about 13 weeks and these cells were identified with malignant phenotype which was demonstrated by increased levels of cellular proliferation, percentages of plate colony formation and soft agar clone formation, and high potential of resistance to apoptotic induction. Our results firstly demonstrated that m 6 A modification on RNA was significantly increased in arsenite-transformed cells and this modification may be synergistically regulated by methyltransferase-like 3 (METTL3), methyltransferase-like 14 (METTL14), Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) and Fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO). In addition, knocking down of METTL3 in arsenite-transformed cells can dramatically reverse the malignant phenotype, which was manifested by lower percentages of clone and colony formation as well as higher rates of apoptotic induction. Given the critical roles of miRNAs in cellular proliferation and apoptosis, miRNAs regulated by m 6 A in arsenite-transformed cells were analyzed by Venn diagram and KEGG pathway in this study. The results showed that these m 6 A-mediated miRNAs can regulate pathways which are closely associated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis, implicating that these miRNAs may be the critical bridge by which m 6 A mediates dysregulation of cell survival and apoptosis in arsenite-transformed cells. Taken together, our results firstly demonstrated the significant role of m 6 A in the prevention of tumor occurrence and progression induced by arsenite. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative cellular uptake of double fluorescent core-shelled model submicronic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclerc, Lara, E-mail: leclerc@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Boudard, Delphine [LINA (France); Pourchez, Jeremie; Forest, Valerie [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Marmuse, Laurence; Louis, Cedric [NANO-H S.A.S (France); Bin, Valerie [LINA (France); Palle, Sabine [Universite Jean Monnet, Centre de Microscopie Confocale Multiphotonique (France); Grosseau, Philippe; Bernache-Assollant, Didier [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, LINA (France); Cottier, Michele [LINA (France)

    2012-11-15

    The relationship between particles' physicochemical parameters, their uptake by cells and their degree of biological toxicity represent a crucial issue, especially for the development of new technologies such as fabrication of micro- and nanoparticles in the promising field of drug delivery systems. This work was aimed at developing a proof-of-concept for a novel model of double fluorescence submicronic particles that could be spotted inside phagolysosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) particles were synthesized and then conjugated with a fluorescent pHrodo Trade-Mark-Sign probe, red fluorescence of which increases in acidic conditions such as within lysosomes. After validation in acellular conditions by spectral analysis with confocal microscopy and dynamic light scattering, quantification of phagocytosis was conducted on a macrophage cell line in vitro. The biological impact of pHrodo functionalization (cytotoxicity, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress) was also investigated. Results validate the proof-of-concept of double fluorescent particles (FITC + pHrodo), allowing detection of entirely engulfed pHrodo particles (green and red labeling). Moreover incorporation of pHrodo had no major effects on cytotoxicity compared to particles without pHrodo, making them a powerful tool for micro- and nanotechnologies.

  6. High resolution respirometry analysis of polyethylenimine-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis and cellular stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Larsen, Anna Karina; Parhamifar, Ladan

    2013-01-01

    and spectrophotometry analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activity we were able to identify complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) as a likely specific site of PEI mediated inhibition within the electron transport system. Unraveling the mechanisms of PEI-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis is central for combinatorial design...... of PEI-mediated plasma membrane damage and subsequent ATP leakage to the extracellular medium. Studies with freshly isolated mouse liver mitochondria corroborated with bioenergetic findings and demonstrated parallel polycation concentration- and time-dependent changes in state 2 and state 4o oxygen flux...... as well as lowered ADP phosphorylation (state 3) and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Polycation-mediated reduction of electron transport system activity was further demonstrated in 'broken mitochondria' (freeze-thawed mitochondrial preparations). Moreover, by using both high-resolution respirometry...

  7. Two conserved modules of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mediator regulate distinct cellular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linder, Tomas; Rasmussen, Nina; Samuelsen, Camilla O

    2008-01-01

    Mediator is an evolutionary conserved coregulator complex required for transcription of almost all RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mediator consists of two dissociable components-a core complex organized into a head and middle domain as well as the Cdk8 regulatory...... subcomplex. In this work we describe a functional characterization of the S. pombe Mediator. We report the identification of the S. pombe Med20 head subunit and the isolation of ts alleles of the core head subunit encoding med17+. Biochemical analysis of med8(ts), med17(ts), Deltamed18, Deltamed20...... and Deltamed27 alleles revealed a stepwise head domain molecular architecture. Phenotypical analysis of Cdk8 and head module alleles including expression profiling classified the Mediator mutant alleles into one of two groups. Cdk8 module mutants flocculate due to overexpression of adhesive cell...

  8. Defining the sizes of airborne particles that mediate influenza transmission in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Wei, Jianjian; Choy, Ka-Tim; Sia, Sin Fun; Rowlands, Dewi K; Yu, Dan; Wu, Chung-Yi; Lindsley, William G; Cowling, Benjamin J; McDevitt, James; Peiris, Malik; Li, Yuguo; Yen, Hui-Ling

    2018-03-06

    Epidemics and pandemics of influenza are characterized by rapid global spread mediated by non-mutually exclusive transmission modes. The relative significance between contact, droplet, and airborne transmission is yet to be defined, a knowledge gap for implementing evidence-based infection control measures. We devised a transmission chamber that separates virus-laden particles by size and determined the particle sizes mediating transmission of influenza among ferrets through the air. Ferret-to-ferret transmission was mediated by airborne particles larger than 1.5 µm, consistent with the quantity and size of virus-laden particles released by the donors. Onward transmission by donors was most efficient before fever onset and may continue for 5 days after inoculation. Multiple virus gene segments enhanced the transmissibility of a swine influenza virus among ferrets by increasing the release of virus-laden particles into the air. We provide direct experimental evidence of influenza transmission via droplets and fine droplet nuclei, albeit at different efficiency. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  9. Hanging on for the ride: adhesion to the extracellular matrix mediates cellular responses in skeletal muscle morphogenesis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sher, Roger B; Henry, Clarissa A

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle specification and morphogenesis during early development are critical for normal physiology. In addition to mediating locomotion, skeletal muscle is a secretory organ that contributes to metabolic homeostasis. Muscle is a highly adaptable tissue, as evidenced by the ability to increase muscle cell size and/or number in response to weight bearing exercise. Conversely, muscle wasting can occur during aging (sarcopenia), cancer (cancer cachexia), extended hospital stays (disuse atrophy), and in many genetic diseases collectively known as the muscular dystrophies and myopathies. It is therefore of great interest to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate skeletal muscle development and adaptation. Muscle morphogenesis transforms short muscle precursor cells into long, multinucleate myotubes that anchor to tendons via the myotendinous junction. This process requires carefully orchestrated interactions between cells and their extracellular matrix microenvironment. These interactions are dynamic, allowing muscle cells to sense biophysical, structural, organizational, and/or signaling changes within their microenvironment and respond appropriately. In many musculoskeletal diseases, these cell adhesion interactions are disrupted to such a degree that normal cellular adaptive responses are not sufficient to compensate for accumulating damage. Thus, one major focus of current research is to identify the cell adhesion mechanisms that drive muscle morphogenesis, with the hope that understanding how muscle cell adhesion promotes the intrinsic adaptability of muscle tissue during development may provide insight into potential therapeutic approaches for muscle diseases. Our objectives in this review are to highlight recent studies suggesting conserved roles for cell-extracellular matrix adhesion in vertebrate muscle morphogenesis and cellular adaptive responses in animal models of muscle diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. In vitro cellular transformation induced by charged particles of defined LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, T.K.; Hall, E.J.; Komatsu, K.; Goldhagen, P.

    1985-01-01

    Cytotoxicity and neoplastic transformation were scored in the C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cell system following irradiation with protons, deuterons and helium-3 ions of defined LET in the track segment mode. The charged particles were accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University and provided a range of LET values from 10 to 175 keV/μm. Exponential phase cultures of C3H 10T1/2 cells, growing on a thin mylar surface were irradiated with charged particles of various LET values and subsequently replated onto commercial plastic petri dishes. The cultures were incubated for six weeks at which time they were fixed, stained and type II and III scored as transformants. Over the range of LET values studied thus far, it was found that as the LET of the charged particles increased, the shoulder of the survival curves decreased and approached an exponential function of dose at LET values of 100 keV/μm and above. The transformation incidence, likewise, showed a direct correlation with LET over the dose ranges examined

  11. Distinguishing anomaly mediation from gauge mediation with a W-ino next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kribs, Graham D.

    2000-01-01

    A striking consequence of supersymmetry breaking communicated purely via the superconformal anomaly is that the gaugino masses are proportional to the gauge β functions. This result, however, is not unique to anomaly mediation. We present examples of ''generalized'' gauge-mediated models with messengers in standard model representations that give nearly identical predictions for the gaugino masses, but positive (mass) 2 for all sleptons. There are remarkable similarities between an anomaly-mediated model with a small additional universal mass added to all scalars and the gauge-mediated models with a long-lived W-ino next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle, leading to only a small set of observables that provide robust distinguishing criteria. These include ratios of the heaviest to lightest selectrons, smuons, and top squarks. The sign of the gluino soft mass is an unambiguous distinction, but requires measuring a difficult class of one-loop radiative corrections to sparticle interactions. A high precision measurement of the Higgs-boson-b-b(bar sign) coupling is probably the most promising interaction from which this sign might be extracted. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. Human transbodies to VP40 inhibit cellular egress of Ebola virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teimoori, Salma; Seesuay, Watee; Jittavisutthikul, Surasak; Chaisri, Urai; Sookrung, Nitat; Densumite, Jaslan; Saelim, Nawannaporn; Chulanetra, Monrat; Maneewatch, Santi; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2016-01-01

    A direct acting anti-Ebola agent is needed. VP40, a conserved protein across Ebolavirus (EBOV) species has several pivotal roles in the virus life cycle. Inhibition of VP40 functions would lessen the virion integrity and interfere with the viral assembly, budding, and spread. In this study, cell penetrable human scFvs (HuscFvs) that bound to EBOV VP40 were produced by phage display technology. Gene sequences coding for VP40-bound-HuscFvs were subcloned from phagemids into protein expression plasmids downstream to a gene of cell penetrating peptide, i.e., nonaarginine (R9). By electron microscopy, transbodies from three clones effectively inhibited egress of the Ebola virus-like particles from human hepatic cells transduced with pseudo-typed-Lentivirus particles carrying EBOV VP40 and GP genes. Computerized simulation indicated that the effective HuscFvs bound to multiple basic residues in the cationic patch of VP40 C-terminal domain which are important in membrane-binding for viral matrix assembly and virus budding. The transbodies bound also to VP40 N-terminal domain and L domain peptide encompassed the PTAPPEY (WW binding) motif, suggesting that they might confer VP40 function inhibition through additional mechanism(s). The generated transbodies are worthwhile tested with authentic EBOV before developing to direct acting anti-Ebola agent for preclinical and clinical trials. - Highlights: • Cell penetrable human scFvs (transbodies) to Ebolavirus (EBOV) VP40 were produced. • The transbodies inhibited egress of EBOV-like particles (VLPs) from human hepatocytes. • They interacted with VP40 CTD basic residues important for plasma membrane binding. • And hence interfere with viral matrix assembly and viral progeny budding. • This is the first report on human antibodies that target intracellular EBOV VP40.

  13. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mediates cellular responses to DNA damage and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitanovic, Ana; Woelfl, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Response to DNA damage, lack of nutrients and other stress conditions is an essential property of living systems. The coordinate response includes DNA damage repair, activation of alternate biochemical pathways, adjustment of cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression as well as drastic measures like cellular suicide which prevents proliferation of severely damaged cells. Investigating the transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low doses of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) we observed induction of genes involved in glucose metabolism. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the key enzyme in gluconeogenesis fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) was clearly up-regulated by MMS in glucose-rich medium. Interestingly, deletion of FBP1 led to reduced sensitivity to MMS, but not to other DNA-damaging agents, such as 4-NQO or phleomycin. Reintroduction of FBP1 in the knockout restored the wild-type phenotype while overexpression increased MMS sensitivity of wild-type, shortened life span and increased induction of RNR2 after treatment with MMS. Deletion of FBP1 reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to MMS treatment and in untreated aged cells, and increased the amount of cells able to propagate and to form colonies, but had no influence on the genotoxic effect of MMS. Our results indicate that FBP1 influences the connection between DNA damage, aging and oxidative stress through either direct signalling or an intricate adaptation in energy metabolism

  14. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mediates cellular responses to DNA damage and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovic, Ana [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Woelfl, Stefan [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wolfl@uni-hd.de

    2006-02-22

    Response to DNA damage, lack of nutrients and other stress conditions is an essential property of living systems. The coordinate response includes DNA damage repair, activation of alternate biochemical pathways, adjustment of cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression as well as drastic measures like cellular suicide which prevents proliferation of severely damaged cells. Investigating the transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low doses of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) we observed induction of genes involved in glucose metabolism. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the key enzyme in gluconeogenesis fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) was clearly up-regulated by MMS in glucose-rich medium. Interestingly, deletion of FBP1 led to reduced sensitivity to MMS, but not to other DNA-damaging agents, such as 4-NQO or phleomycin. Reintroduction of FBP1 in the knockout restored the wild-type phenotype while overexpression increased MMS sensitivity of wild-type, shortened life span and increased induction of RNR2 after treatment with MMS. Deletion of FBP1 reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to MMS treatment and in untreated aged cells, and increased the amount of cells able to propagate and to form colonies, but had no influence on the genotoxic effect of MMS. Our results indicate that FBP1 influences the connection between DNA damage, aging and oxidative stress through either direct signalling or an intricate adaptation in energy metabolism.0.

  15. Optimization of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer: structure-function, physico-chemical, and cellular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Marie; Tranchant, Isabelle; Niore, Pierre-Antoine; Byk, Gerardo; Mignet, Nathalie; Escriou, Virginie; Scherman, Daniel; Herscovici, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The rationale design aimed at the enhancement of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer is discussed. These improvements are based on the straight evaluation of the structure-activity relationship and on the introduction of new structures. Much attention have been given to the supramolecular structures of the lipid/DNA complexes, to the effect of serum on gene transfer and to the intracellular trafficking of the lipoplexes. Finally new avenue using reducible cationic lipids has been discussed.

  16. Amorphous Silica Particles Relevant in Food Industry Influence Cellular Growth and Associated Signaling Pathways in Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Anja; Gehrke, Helge; Del Favero, Giorgia; Fritz, Eva-Maria; Al-Rawi, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Sami, Haider; Ogris, Manfred; Marko, Doris

    2017-01-13

    Nanostructured silica particles are commonly used in biomedical and biotechnical fields, as well as, in cosmetics and food industry. Thus, their environmental and health impacts are of great interest and effects after oral uptake are only rarely investigated. In the present study, the toxicological effects of commercially available nano-scaled silica with a nominal primary diameter of 12 nm were investigated on the human gastric carcinoma cell line GXF251L. Besides the analysis of cytotoxic and proliferative effects and the comparison with effects of particles with a nominal primary diameter of 200 nm, emphasis was also given to their influence on the cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways-both of them deeply involved in the regulation of cellular processes like cell cycle progression, differentiation or proliferation. The investigated silica nanoparticles (NPs) were found to stimulate cell proliferation as measured by microscopy and the sulforhodamine B assay. In accordance, the nuclear level of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner. At high particle concentrations also necrosis was induced. Finally, silica NPs affected the EGFR and MAPK pathways at various levels dependent on concentration and time. However, classical activation of the EGFR, to be reflected by enhanced levels of phosphorylation, could be excluded as major trigger of the proliferative stimulus. After 45 min of incubation the level of phosphorylated EGFR did not increase, whereas enhanced levels of total EGFR protein were observed. These results indicate interference with the complex homeostasis of the EGFR protein, whereby up to 24 h no impact on the transcription level was detected. In addition, downstream on the level of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 short term incubation appeared to affect total protein levels without clear increase in phosphorylation. Depending on the concentration

  17. Amorphous Silica Particles Relevant in Food Industry Influence Cellular Growth and Associated Signaling Pathways in Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Wittig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured silica particles are commonly used in biomedical and biotechnical fields, as well as, in cosmetics and food industry. Thus, their environmental and health impacts are of great interest and effects after oral uptake are only rarely investigated. In the present study, the toxicological effects of commercially available nano-scaled silica with a nominal primary diameter of 12 nm were investigated on the human gastric carcinoma cell line GXF251L. Besides the analysis of cytotoxic and proliferative effects and the comparison with effects of particles with a nominal primary diameter of 200 nm, emphasis was also given to their influence on the cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling pathways—both of them deeply involved in the regulation of cellular processes like cell cycle progression, differentiation or proliferation. The investigated silica nanoparticles (NPs were found to stimulate cell proliferation as measured by microscopy and the sulforhodamine B assay. In accordance, the nuclear level of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner. At high particle concentrations also necrosis was induced. Finally, silica NPs affected the EGFR and MAPK pathways at various levels dependent on concentration and time. However, classical activation of the EGFR, to be reflected by enhanced levels of phosphorylation, could be excluded as major trigger of the proliferative stimulus. After 45 min of incubation the level of phosphorylated EGFR did not increase, whereas enhanced levels of total EGFR protein were observed. These results indicate interference with the complex homeostasis of the EGFR protein, whereby up to 24 h no impact on the transcription level was detected. In addition, downstream on the level of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 short term incubation appeared to affect total protein levels without clear increase in phosphorylation. Depending on the

  18. Drug-mediated toxicity: illuminating the 'bad' in the test tube by means of cellular assays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Health problems are rising worldwide, be it as a consequence of lifestyle and longevity in increasingly affluent societies or due to a sharp rise in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The pharmaceutical industry is caught between high rates of attrition and the rather slow pace of a historically large regulatory system for pharmacological safety. Meanwhile, the past decade has seen a tremendous evolution of the biological toolbox, most notably of cellular assays, stem-cell differentiation and organ-mimicking systems. These systems were readily adapted for lead-compound identification. However, their use as toxicological test systems is lagging behind, not least because of a lack of regulatory acceptance. This review tries to elucidate the scale of the problem and discusses the applicability of the assays currently available, with particular regard to the use of stem cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G., E-mail: bipin@amrita.edu

    2016-08-15

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  20. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G.

    2016-01-01

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  1. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin; Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes

  2. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin, E-mail: tanmja@gis.a-star.edu.sg; Parrish, Colin R., E-mail: crp3@cornell.edu

    2014-05-15

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  3. Detection and Analysis of Cell Cycle-Associated APC/C-Mediated Cellular Ubiquitylation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedeño, Cesyen; La Monaca, Esther; Esposito, Mara; Gutierrez, Gustavo J

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is one of the major orchestrators of the cell division cycle in mammalian cells. The APC/C acts as a ubiquitin ligase that triggers sequential ubiquitylation of a significant number of substrates which will be eventually degraded by proteasomes during major transitions of the cell cycle. In this chapter, we present accessible methodologies to assess both in in vitro conditions and in cellular systems ubiquitylation reactions mediated by the APC/C. In addition, we also describe techniques to evidence the changes in protein stability provoked by modulation of the activity of the APC/C. Finally, specific methods to analyze interactors or posttranslational modifications of particular APC/C subunits are also discussed. Given the crucial role played by the APC/C in the regulation of the cell cycle, this review only focuses on its action and effects in actively proliferating cells.

  4. HDAC4 preserves skeletal muscle structure following long-term denervation by mediating distinct cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigna, Eva; Renzini, Alessandra; Greco, Emanuela; Simonazzi, Elena; Fulle, Stefania; Mancinelli, Rosa; Moresi, Viviana; Adamo, Sergio

    2018-02-24

    Denervation triggers numerous molecular responses in skeletal muscle, including the activation of catabolic pathways and oxidative stress, leading to progressive muscle atrophy. Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) mediates skeletal muscle response to denervation, suggesting the use of HDAC inhibitors as a therapeutic approach to neurogenic muscle atrophy. However, the effects of HDAC4 inhibition in skeletal muscle in response to long-term denervation have not been described yet. To further study HDAC4 functions in response to denervation, we analyzed mutant mice in which HDAC4 is specifically deleted in skeletal muscle. After an initial phase of resistance to neurogenic muscle atrophy, skeletal muscle with a deletion of HDAC4 lost structural integrity after 4 weeks of denervation. Deletion of HDAC4 impaired the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, delayed the autophagic response, and dampened the OS response in skeletal muscle. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system or the autophagic response, if on the one hand, conferred resistance to neurogenic muscle atrophy; on the other hand, induced loss of muscle integrity and inflammation in mice lacking HDAC4 in skeletal muscle. Moreover, treatment with the antioxidant drug Trolox prevented loss of muscle integrity and inflammation in in mice lacking HDAC4 in skeletal muscle, despite the resistance to neurogenic muscle atrophy. These results reveal new functions of HDAC4 in mediating skeletal muscle response to denervation and lead us to propose the combined use of HDAC inhibitors and antioxidant drugs to treat neurogenic muscle atrophy.

  5. Circulating histones are major mediators of systemic inflammation and cellular injury in patients with acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zongmei; Lei, Zhen; Yao, Lu; Jiang, Ping; Gu, Tao; Ren, Feng; Liu, Yan; Gou, Chunyan; Li, Xiuhui; Wen, Tao

    2016-09-29

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening systemic disorder. Here we investigated the impact of circulating histones, recently identified inflammatory mediators, on systemic inflammation and liver injury in murine models and patients with ALF. We analyzed histone levels in blood samples from 62 patients with ALF, 60 patients with chronic liver disease, and 30 healthy volunteers. We incubated patients' sera with human L02 hepatocytes and monocytic U937 cells to assess cellular damage and cytokine production. d-galactosamine plus lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), concanavalin A (ConA), and acetaminophen (APAP) were given to C57BL/6N mice to induce liver injury, respectively, and the pathogenic role of circulating histones was studied. Besides, the protective effect of nonanticoagulant heparin, which can bind histones, was evaluated with in vivo and ex vivo investigations. We observed that circulating histones were significantly increased in patients with ALF, and correlated with disease severity and mortality. Significant systemic inflammation was also pronounced in ALF patients, which were associated with histone levels. ALF patients' sera induced significant L02 cell death and stimulated U937 cells to produce cytokines, which were abrogated by nonanticoagulant heparin. Furthermore, circulating histones were all released remarkably in GalN/LPS, ConA, and APAP-treated mice, and associated with high levels of inflammatory cytokines. Heparin reduced systemic inflammation and liver damage in mice, suggesting that it could interfere with histone-associated liver injury. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that circulating histones are critical mediators of systemic inflammation and cellular damage in ALF, which may be potentially translatable for clinical use.

  6. Characterisation of the p53-mediated cellular responses evoked in primary mouse cells following exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian D McFeat

    Full Text Available Exposure to ultraviolet (UV light can cause significant damage to mammalian cells and, although the spectrum of damage produced varies with the wavelength of UV, all parts of the UV spectrum are recognised as being detrimental to human health. Characterising the cellular response to different wavelengths of UV therefore remains an important aim so that risks and their moderation can be evaluated, in particular in relation to the initiation of skin cancer. The p53 tumour suppressor protein is central to the cellular response that protects the genome from damage by external agents such as UV, thus reducing the risk of tumorigenesis. In response to a variety of DNA damaging agents including UV light, wild-type p53 plays a role in mediating cell-cycle arrest, facilitating apoptosis and stimulating repair processes, all of which prevent the propagation of potentially mutagenic defects. In this study we examined the induction of p53 protein and its influence on the survival of primary mouse fibroblasts exposed to different wavelengths of UV light. UVC was found to elevate p53 protein and its sequence specific DNA binding capacity. Unexpectedly, UVA treatment failed to induce p53 protein accumulation or sequence specific DNA binding. Despite this, UVA exposure of wild-type cells induced a p53 dependent G1 cell cycle arrest followed by a wave of p53 dependent apoptosis, peaking 12 hours post-insult. Thus, it is demonstrated that the elements of the p53 cellular response evoked by exposure to UV radiation are wavelength dependent. Furthermore, the interrelationship between various endpoints is complex and not easily predictable. This has important implications not only for understanding the mode of action of p53 but also for the use of molecular endpoints in quantifying exposure to different wavelengths of UV in the context of human health protection.

  7. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  8. Multiple repair pathways mediate cellular tolerance to resveratrol-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Xiaohua; Hu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Ziyuan; Liu, Hao; Takeda, Shunichi; Qing, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) has been reported to exert health benefits for the prevention and treatment of many diseases, including cancer. The anticancer mechanisms of RSV seem to be complex and may be associated with genotoxic potential. To better understand the genotoxic mechanisms, we used wild-type (WT) and a panel of isogenic DNA-repair deficient DT40 cell lines to identify the DNA damage effects and molecular mechanisms of cellular tolerance to RSV. Our results showed that RSV induced significant formation of γ-H2AX foci and chromosome aberrations (CAs) in WT cells, suggesting direct DNA damage effects. Comparing the survival of WT with isogenic DNA-repair deficient DT40 cell lines demonstrated that single strand break repair (SSBR) deficient cell lines of Parp1 -/- , base excision repair (BER) deficient cell lines of Polβ -/- , homologous recombination (HR) mutants of Brca1 -/- and Brca2 -/- and translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) mutants of Rev3 -/- and Rad18 -/- were more sensitive to RSV. The sensitivities of cells were associated with enhanced DNA damage comparing the accumulation of γ-H2AX foci and number of CAs of isogenic DNA-repair deficient DT40 cell lines with WT cells. These results clearly demonstrated that RSV-induced DNA damage in DT40 cells, and multiple repair pathways including BER, SSBR, HR and TLS, play critical roles in response to RSV- induced genotoxicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Purine receptor P2Y_6 mediates cellular response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Shunta; Nishimaki, Naoko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Kojima, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that nucleotide P2 receptor agonists such as ATP and UTP amplify γ-ray-induced focus formation of phosphorylated histone H2A variant H2AX (γH2AX), which is considered to be an indicator of DNA damage so far, by activating purine P2Y_6 and P2Y_1_2 receptors. Therefore, we hypothesized that these P2 receptors play a role in inducing the repair response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage. In the present study, we tested this idea by using human lung cancer A549 cells. First, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that P2Y_6 receptor is highly expressed in A549 cells, but P2Y_1_2 receptor is only weakly expressed. Next, colony formation assay revealed that P2Y_6 receptor antagonist MRS2578 markedly reduced the survival rate of γ-ray-exposed A549 cells. The survival rate was also significantly reduced in P2Y_6-knock-down cells, compared with scramble siRNA-transfected cells. Since it has reported that phosphorylation of ERK1/2 after activation of EGFR via P2Y_6 and P2Y_1_2 receptors is involved in the repair response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage, we next examined whether γ-ray-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was also inhibited by MRS2578 in A549 cells. We found that it was. Taken together, these findings indicate that purinergic signaling through P2Y_6 receptor, followed by ERK1/2 activation, promotes the cellular repair response to γ-ray-induced DNA damage. (author)

  10. Cellular Response to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells is Dependent on Endocytosis-Associated Structures and Mediated by EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Kristin; Schrader, Katrin; Klempt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most applied nanomaterials and widely used in food and non-food industries as an additive or coating material (E171). It has been shown that E171 contains up to 37% particles which are smaller than 100 nm and that TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) induce cytotoxicity and inflammation. Using a nuclear factor Kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) reporter cell line (Caco-2nfkb-RE), Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and inhibition of dynamin and clathrin, it was shown that cellular responses induced by 5 nm and 10 nm TiO2 NPs (nominal size) depends on endocytic processes. As endocytosis is often dependent on the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), further investigations focused on the involvement of EGFR in the uptake of TiO2 NPs: (1) inhibition of EGFR reduced inflammatory markers of the cell (i.e., nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity, mRNA of IL8, CCL20, and CXCL10); and (2) exposure of Caco-2 cells to TiO2 NPs activated the intracellular EGFR cascade beginning with EGFR-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, and including transcription factor ELK1. This was followed by the expression of ERK1/2 target genes CCL2 and CXCL3. We concluded that TiO2 NPs enter the cell via EGFR-associated endocytosis, followed by activation of the EGFR/ERK/ELK signaling pathway, which finally induces NF-κB. No changes in inflammatory response are observed in Caco-2 cells exposed to 32 nm and 490 nm TiO2 particles. PMID:28387727

  11. Cellular Response to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells is Dependent on Endocytosis-Associated Structures and Mediated by EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Kristin; Schrader, Katrin; Klempt, Martin

    2017-04-07

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is one of the most applied nanomaterials and widely used in food and non-food industries as an additive or coating material (E171). It has been shown that E171 contains up to 37% particles which are smaller than 100 nm and that TiO₂ nanoparticles (NPs) induce cytotoxicity and inflammation. Using a nuclear factor Kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) reporter cell line (Caco-2 nfkb-RE ), Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and inhibition of dynamin and clathrin, it was shown that cellular responses induced by 5 nm and 10 nm TiO₂ NPs (nominal size) depends on endocytic processes. As endocytosis is often dependent on the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), further investigations focused on the involvement of EGFR in the uptake of TiO₂ NPs: (1) inhibition of EGFR reduced inflammatory markers of the cell (i.e., nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity, mRNA of IL8, CCL20, and CXCL10); and (2) exposure of Caco-2 cells to TiO₂ NPs activated the intracellular EGFR cascade beginning with EGFR-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, and including transcription factor ELK1. This was followed by the expression of ERK1/2 target genes CCL2 and CXCL3. We concluded that TiO₂ NPs enter the cell via EGFR-associated endocytosis, followed by activation of the EGFR/ERK/ELK signaling pathway, which finally induces NF-κB. No changes in inflammatory response are observed in Caco-2 cells exposed to 32 nm and 490 nm TiO₂ particles.

  12. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS

  13. Atorvastatin Downregulates In Vitro Methyl Methanesulfonate and Cyclophosphamide Alkylation-Mediated Cellular and DNA Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Araujo-Lima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, and this class of drugs has been studied as protective agents against DNA damages. Alkylating agents (AAs are able to induce alkylation in macromolecules, causing DNA damage, as DNA methylation. Our objective was to evaluate atorvastatin (AVA antimutagenic, cytoprotective, and antigenotoxic potentials against DNA lesions caused by AA. AVA chemopreventive ability was evaluated using antimutagenicity assays (Salmonella/microsome assay, cytotoxicity, cell cycle, and genotoxicity assays in HepG2 cells. The cells were cotreated with AVA and the AA methyl methanesulfonate (MMS or cyclophosphamide (CPA. Our datum showed that AVA reduces the alkylation-mediated DNA damage in different in vitro experimental models. Cytoprotection of AVA at low doses (0.1–1.0 μM was observed after 24 h of cotreatment with MMS or CPA at their LC50, causing an increase in HepG2 survival rates. After all, AVA at 10 μM and 25 μM had decreased effect in micronucleus formation in HepG2 cells and restored cell cycle alterations induced by MMS and CPA. This study supports the hypothesis that statins can be chemopreventive agents, acting as antimutagenic, antigenotoxic, and cytoprotective components, specifically against alkylating agents of DNA.

  14. Cellular Immune Response Against Firefly Luciferase After Sleeping Beauty–Mediated Gene Transfer In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M.; Vezys, Vaiva; Somia, Nikunj V.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been shown to mediate new gene sequence integration resulting in long-term expression. Here the effectiveness of hyperactive SB100X transposase was tested, and we found that hydrodynamic co-delivery of a firefly luciferase transposon (pT2/CaL) along with SB100X transposase (pCMV-SB100X) resulted in remarkably sustained, high levels of luciferase expression. However, after 4 weeks there was a rapid, animal-by-animal loss of luciferase expression that was not observed in immunodeficient mice. We hypothesized that this sustained, high-level luciferase expression achieved using the SB100X transposase elicits an immune response in pT2/CaL co-administered mice, which was supported by the rapid loss of luciferase expression upon challenge of previously treated animals and in naive animals adoptively transferred with splenocytes from previously treated animals. Specificity of the immune response to luciferase was demonstrated by increased cytokine expression in splenocytes after exposure to luciferase peptide in parallel with MHC I–luciferase peptide tetramer binding. This anti-luciferase immune response observed following continuous, high-level luciferase expression in vivo clearly impacts its use as an in vivo reporter. As both an immunogen and an extremely sensitive reporter, luciferase is also a useful model system for the study of immune responses following in vivo gene transfer and expression. PMID:25093708

  15. Cholecystokinin receptor-1 mediates the inhibitory effects of exogenous cholecystokinin octapeptide on cellular morphine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Di

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8, the most potent endogenous anti-opioid peptide, has been shown to regulate the processes of morphine dependence. In our previous study, we found that exogenous CCK-8 attenuated naloxone induced withdrawal symptoms. To investigate the precise effect of exogenous CCK-8 and the role of cholecystokinin (CCK 1 and/or 2 receptors in morphine dependence, a SH-SY5Y cell model was employed, in which the μ-opioid receptor, CCK1/2 receptors, and endogenous CCK are co-expressed. Results Forty-eight hours after treating SH-SY5Y cells with morphine (10 μM, naloxone (10 μM induced a cAMP overshoot, indicating that cellular morphine dependence had been induced. The CCK receptor and endogenous CCK were up-regulated after chronic morphine exposure. The CCK2 receptor antagonist (LY-288,513 at 1–10 μM inhibited the naloxone-precipitated cAMP overshoot, but the CCK1 receptor antagonist (L-364,718 did not. Interestingly, CCK-8 (0.1-1 μM, a strong CCK receptor agonist, dose-dependently inhibited the naloxone-precipitated cAMP overshoot in SH-SY5Y cells when co-pretreated with morphine. The L-364,718 significantly blocked the inhibitory effect of exogenous CCK-8 on the cAMP overshoot at 1–10 μM, while the LY-288,513 did not. Therefore, the CCK2 receptor appears to be necessary for low concentrations of endogenous CCK to potentiate morphine dependence in SH-SY5Y cells. An additional inhibitory effect of CCK-8 at higher concentrations appears to involve the CCK1 receptor. Conclusions This study reveals the difference between exogenous CCK-8 and endogenous CCK effects on the development of morphine dependence, and provides the first evidence for the participation of the CCK1 receptor in the inhibitory effects of exogenous CCK-8 on morphine dependence.

  16. Multiscale modeling of bacterial colonies: how pili mediate the dynamics of single cells and cellular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pönisch, Wolfram; Weber, Christoph A.; Juckeland, Guido; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, gonorrhea. Over the past two decades there has been an alarming increase of reported gonorrhea cases where the bacteria were resistant to the most commonly used antibiotics thus prompting for alternative antimicrobial treatment strategies. The crucial step in this and many other bacterial infections is the formation of microcolonies, agglomerates consisting of up to several thousands of cells. The attachment and motility of cells on solid substrates as well as the cell-cell interactions are primarily mediated by type IV pili, long polymeric filaments protruding from the surface of cells. While the crucial role of pili in the assembly of microcolonies has been well recognized, the exact mechanisms of how they govern the formation and dynamics of microcolonies are still poorly understood. Here, we present a computational model of individual cells with explicit pili dynamics, force generation and pili-pili interactions. We employ the model to study a wide range of biological processes, such as the motility of individual cells on a surface, the heterogeneous cell motility within the large cell aggregates, and the merging dynamics and the self-assembly of microcolonies. The results of numerical simulations highlight the central role of pili generated forces in the formation of bacterial colonies and are in agreement with the available experimental observations. The model can quantify the behavior of multicellular bacterial colonies on biologically relevant temporal and spatial scales and can be easily adjusted to include the geometry and pili characteristics of various bacterial species. Ultimately, the combination of the microbiological experimental approach with the in silico model of bacterial colonies might provide new qualitative and quantitative insights on the development of bacterial infections and thus pave the way to new antimicrobial treatments.

  17. Correlation of particle properties with cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xinhui [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liang, Tong [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Changsheng [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yuan, Yuan, E-mail: yyuan@ecust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Qian, Jiangchao, E-mail: jiangchaoqian@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Three types of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAPNs) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method by changing microwave power (from 200 to 300 W) or using calcination treatment: L200 (200 W, lyophilization), L300 (300 W, lyophilization) and C200 (200 W, lyophilization & calcination). Their physiochemical properties were characterized and correlated with cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer cells (MGC80-3). The major differences among these HAPN preparations were their size and specific surface area, with the L200 showing a smaller size and higher specific surface area. Although all HAPNs inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of cancer cells, L200 exhibited the greatest toxicity. All types of HAPNs were internalized through energy-dependent pathways, but the L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells. Inhibitor studies with dynasore and methyl-β-cyclodextrin suggested that caveolae-mediated endocytosis and, to a much lesser extent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, were involved in cellular uptake of the various preparations, whereas the inhibition of endocytosis was more obvious for L200. Using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HAPNs and laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we found that all forms of nanoparticles were present in the cytoplasm, and some L200 HAPNs were even found within nuclei. Treatment with all HAPN preparations led to the increase in the intracellular calcium level with the highest level detected for L200. - Highlights: • Three types of HAPNs (L200, L300 and C200) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method. • L200 exhibited the greatest cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer (MGC80-3) cells. • L200 showed a smaller size and higher specific surface area. • The L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells through energy-dependent pathways. • L200 caused the most significant increase in the intracellular calcium level.

  18. Clustering and cellular distribution characteristics of virus particles of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Tomato zonate spot virus in different plant hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongkai; Zheng, Kuanyu; Dong, Jiahong; Fang, Qi; Hong, Jian; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-19

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Tomato zonate spot virus (TZSV) are the two dominant species of thrip-transmitted tospoviruses, cause significant losses in crop yield in Yunnan and its neighboring provinces in China. TSWV and TZSV belong to different serogroup of tospoviruses but induce similar symptoms in the same host plant species, which makes diagnostic difficult. We used different electron microscopy preparing methods to investigate clustering and cellular distribution of TSWV and TZSV in the host plant species. Negative staining of samples infected with TSWV and TZSV revealed that particles usually clustered in the vesicles, including single particle (SP), double particles clustering (DPC), triple particles clustering (TPC). In the immunogold labeling negative staining against proteins of TZSV, the antibodies against Gn protein were stained more strongly than the N protein. Ultrathin section and high pressure freeze (HPF)-electron microscopy preparations revealed that TSWV particles were distributed in the cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), filamentous inclusions (FI) and Golgi bodies in the mesophyll cells. The TSWV particles clustered as multiple particles clustering (MPC) and distributed in globular viroplasm or cisternae of ER in the top leaf cell. TZSV particles were distributed more abundantly in the swollen membrane of ER in the mesophyll cell than those in the phloem parenchyma cells and were not observed in the top leaf cell. However, TZSV virions were mainly present as single particle in the cytoplasm, with few clustering as MPC. In this study, we identified TSWV and TZSV particles had the distinct cellular distribution patterns in the cytoplasm from different tissues and host plants. This is the first report of specific clustering characteristics of tospoviruses particles as well as the cellular distribution of TSWV particles in the FI and globular viroplasm where as TZSV particles inside the membrane of ER. These results indicated that

  19. Caveolae-Mediated Endocytosis Is Critical for Albumin Cellular Uptake and Response to Albumin-Bound Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Moumita; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Robb, Ryan; Vedaie, Marall; Seum, Star; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Palanichamy, Kamalakannan; Harbrecht, Matthew; Chakravarti, Arnab; Williams, Terence M

    2017-11-01

    Nab-paclitaxel, a nanoparticle conjugate of paclitaxel to human albumin, exhibits efficacy in pancreatic cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer. However, there is a lack of predictive biomarkers to identify patients who might benefit most from its administration. This study addresses this gap in knowledge by identifying that caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a candidate mechanism-based biomarker. Caveolae are small membrane invaginations important for transendothelial albumin uptake. Cav-1, the principal structural component of caveolae, is overexpressed in the cancers noted above that respond to nab-paclitaxel. Thus, we hypothesized that Cav-1 may be critical for albumin uptake in tumors and perhaps determine their response to this drug. Cav-1 protein levels correlated positively with nab-paclitaxel sensitivity. RNAi-mediated attenuation of Cav-1 expression reduced uptake of albumin and nab-paclitaxel in cancer cells and rendered them resistant to nab-paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Conversely, Cav-1 overexpression enhanced sensitivity to nab-paclitaxel. Selection for cellular resistance to nab-paclitaxel in cell culture correlated with a loss of Cav-1 expression. In mouse xenograft models, cancer cells, where Cav-1 was attenuated, exhibited resistance to the antitumor effects of nab-paclitaxel therapy. Overall, our findings suggest Cav-1 as a predictive biomarker for the response to nab-paclitaxel and other albumin-based cancer therapeutic drugs. Cancer Res; 77(21); 5925-37. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Novel chimeric virus-like particles vaccine displaying MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain induce specific humoral and cellular immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Zheng, Xuexing; Gai, Weiwei; Wong, Gary; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zhang, Weijiao; Li, Nan; Zhao, Guoxing; Li, Junfu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, Yuwei; Hu, Guixue; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-04-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has continued spreading since its emergence in 2012 with a mortality rate of 35.6%, and is a potential pandemic threat. Prophylactics and therapies are urgently needed to address this public health problem. We report here the efficacy of a vaccine consisting of chimeric virus-like particles (VLP) expressing the receptor binding domain (RBD) of MERS-CoV. In this study, a fusion of the canine parvovirus (CPV) VP2 structural protein gene with the RBD of MERS-CoV can self-assemble into chimeric, spherical VLP (sVLP). sVLP retained certain parvovirus characteristics, such as the ability to agglutinate pig erythrocytes, and structural morphology similar to CPV virions. Immunization with sVLP induced RBD-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. sVLP-specific antisera from these animals were able to prevent pseudotyped MERS-CoV entry into susceptible cells, with neutralizing antibody titers reaching 1: 320. IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-2 secreting cells induced by the RBD were detected in the splenocytes of vaccinated mice by ELISpot. Furthermore, mice inoculated with sVLP or an adjuvanted sVLP vaccine elicited T-helper 1 (Th1) and T-helper 2 (Th2) cell-mediated immunity. Our study demonstrates that sVLP displaying the RBD of MERS-CoV are promising prophylactic candidates against MERS-CoV in a potential outbreak situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovery of Transition Rules for Cellular Automata Using Artificial Bee Colony and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithms in Urban Growth Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoun Naghibi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an advanced method in urban growth modeling to discover transition rules of cellular automata (CA using the artificial bee colony (ABC optimization algorithm. Also, comparisons between the simulation results of CA models optimized by the ABC algorithm and the particle swarm optimization algorithms (PSO as intelligent approaches were performed to evaluate the potential of the proposed methods. According to previous studies, swarm intelligence algorithms for solving optimization problems such as discovering transition rules of CA in land use change/urban growth modeling can produce reasonable results. Modeling of urban growth as a dynamic process is not straightforward because of the existence of nonlinearity and heterogeneity among effective involved variables which can cause a number of challenges for traditional CA. ABC algorithm, the new powerful swarm based optimization algorithms, can be used to capture optimized transition rules of CA. This paper has proposed a methodology based on remote sensing data for modeling urban growth with CA calibrated by the ABC algorithm. The performance of ABC-CA, PSO-CA, and CA-logistic models in land use change detection is tested for the city of Urmia, Iran, between 2004 and 2014. Validations of the models based on statistical measures such as overall accuracy, figure of merit, and total operating characteristic were made. We showed that the overall accuracy of the ABC-CA model was 89%, which was 1.5% and 6.2% higher than those of the PSO-CA and CA-logistic model, respectively. Moreover, the allocation disagreement (simulation error of the simulation results for the ABC-CA, PSO-CA, and CA-logistic models are 11%, 12.5%, and 17.2%, respectively. Finally, for all evaluation indices including running time, convergence capability, flexibility, statistical measurements, and the produced spatial patterns, the ABC-CA model performance showed relative improvement and therefore its superiority was

  2. Cellular toxicity following application of adeno-associated viral vector-mediated RNA interference in the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaagen Joost

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a spinal cord lesion, axon regeneration is inhibited by the presence of a diversity of inhibitory molecules in the lesion environment. At and around the lesion site myelin-associated inhibitors, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs and several axon guidance molecules, including all members of the secreted (class 3 Semaphorins, are expressed. Interfering with multiple inhibitory signals could potentially enhance the previously reported beneficial effects of blocking single molecules. RNA interference (RNAi is a tool that can be used to simultaneously silence expression of multiple genes. In this study we aimed to employ adeno-associated virus (AAV mediated expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs to target all Semaphorin class 3 signaling by knocking down its receptors, Neuropilin 1 (Npn-1 and Neuropilin 2 (Npn-2. Results We have successfully generated shRNAs that knock down Npn-1 and Npn-2 in a neuronal cell line. We detected substantial knockdown of Npn-2 mRNA when AAV5 viral vector particles expressing Npn-2 specific shRNAs were injected in dorsal root ganglia (DRG of the rat. Unexpectedly however, AAV1-mediated expression of Npn-2 shRNAs and a control shRNA in the red nucleus resulted in an adverse tissue response and neuronal degeneration. The observed toxicity was dose dependent and was not seen with control GFP expressing AAV vectors, implicating the shRNAs as the causative toxic agents. Conclusions RNAi is a powerful tool to knock down Semaphorin receptor expression in neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo. However, when shRNAs are expressed at high levels in CNS neurons, they trigger an adverse tissue response leading to neuronal degradation.

  3. Phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers based on dual vegetable actives involved in the prevention of cellular damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istrati, D.; Lacatusu, I.; Bordei, N.; Badea, G.; Oprea, O.; Stefan, L.M.; Stan, R.; Badea, N.; Meghea, A.

    2016-01-01

    The growing scientific interest in exploitation of vegetable bioactives has raised a number of questions regarding their imminent presence in pharmaceutical formulations. This study intends to demonstrate that a dual combination between vegetable oil (e.g. thistle oil, safflower oil, sea buckthorn oil) and a carrot extract represents an optimal approach to formulate safe carrier systems that manifest cell regeneration effect and promising antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Inclusion of both natural actives into lipid carriers imparted a strong negative charge on the nanocarrier surface (up to − 45 mV) and displayed average sizes of 70 nm to 140 nm. The entrapment efficiency of carrot extract into nanostructured carriers ranged between 78.3 and 88.3%. The in vitro release study has demonstrated that the entrapment of the extract represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. Besides the excellent antioxidant properties (e.g. scavenging up to 98% of the free oxygen radicals), the results of cellular integrity (e.g. cell viability of 133%) recommend these nanocarriers based on dual carrot extract–bioactive oil as a promising trend for the treatment of certain disorders in which oxidative stress plays a prominent role. In addition, the lipid nanocarriers based on safflower oil and sea buckthorn oil demonstrated an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS induced THP-1 macrophages, by inhibiting the secretion of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Highlights: • Safety phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers (NLC) based on two kinds of bioactives • Carrot extract incorporation into nanostructured carriers ranged from 78 to 88.3%. • High antioxidant activity of NLC by scavenging up to 98% free oxygen radicals • Extract entrapment represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. • Remarkable regenerative effect of L929 cell, with a proliferation of 133.4%

  4. GADS is required for TCR-mediated calcium influx and cytokine release, but not cellular adhesion, in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Zhang, Elizabeth Y; Dinkel, Brittney; Hardy, Daimon; Yankee, Thomas M; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-04-01

    GRB2 related adaptor protein downstream of Shc (GADS) is a member of the GRB2 family of adaptors and is critical for TCR-induced signaling. The current model is that GADS recruits SLP-76 to the LAT complex, which facilitates the phosphorylation of SLP-76, the activation of PLC-γ1, T cell adhesion and cytokine production. However, this model is largely based on studies of disruption of the GADS/SLP-76 interaction and murine T cell differentiation in GADS deficient mice. The role of GADS in mediating TCR-induced signals in human CD4+ T cells has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have suppressed the expression of GADS in human CD4+ HuT78 T cells. GADS deficient HuT78 T cells displayed similar levels of TCR-induced SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 phosphorylation but exhibited substantial decrease in TCR-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ release. The defect in cytokine production occurred because of impaired calcium mobilization due to reduced recruitment of SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 to the LAT complex. Surprisingly, both GADS deficient HuT78 and GADS deficient primary murine CD8+ T cells had similar TCR-induced adhesion when compared to control T cells. Overall, our results show that GADS is required for calcium influx and cytokine production, but not cellular adhesion, in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the current model for T cell regulation by GADS is incomplete. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers based on dual vegetable actives involved in the prevention of cellular damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istrati, D.; Lacatusu, I.; Bordei, N.; Badea, G.; Oprea, O. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Stefan, L.M. [National Institute of Research and Development for Biological Sciences, Splaiul Independentei Street No. 296, 060031 Bucharest (Romania); Stan, R. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Badea, N., E-mail: nicoleta.badea@gmail.com [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Meghea, A. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-07-01

    The growing scientific interest in exploitation of vegetable bioactives has raised a number of questions regarding their imminent presence in pharmaceutical formulations. This study intends to demonstrate that a dual combination between vegetable oil (e.g. thistle oil, safflower oil, sea buckthorn oil) and a carrot extract represents an optimal approach to formulate safe carrier systems that manifest cell regeneration effect and promising antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Inclusion of both natural actives into lipid carriers imparted a strong negative charge on the nanocarrier surface (up to − 45 mV) and displayed average sizes of 70 nm to 140 nm. The entrapment efficiency of carrot extract into nanostructured carriers ranged between 78.3 and 88.3%. The in vitro release study has demonstrated that the entrapment of the extract represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. Besides the excellent antioxidant properties (e.g. scavenging up to 98% of the free oxygen radicals), the results of cellular integrity (e.g. cell viability of 133%) recommend these nanocarriers based on dual carrot extract–bioactive oil as a promising trend for the treatment of certain disorders in which oxidative stress plays a prominent role. In addition, the lipid nanocarriers based on safflower oil and sea buckthorn oil demonstrated an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS induced THP-1 macrophages, by inhibiting the secretion of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Highlights: • Safety phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers (NLC) based on two kinds of bioactives • Carrot extract incorporation into nanostructured carriers ranged from 78 to 88.3%. • High antioxidant activity of NLC by scavenging up to 98% free oxygen radicals • Extract entrapment represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. • Remarkable regenerative effect of L929 cell, with a proliferation of 133.4%.

  6. T-helper cell-mediated proliferation and cytokine responses against recombinant Merkel cell polyomavirus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    Full Text Available The newly discovered Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV resides in approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC. Causal role of MCPyV for this rare and aggressive skin cancer is suggested by monoclonal integration and truncation of large T (LT viral antigen in MCC cells. The mutated MCPyV has recently been found in highly purified leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, suggesting a pathogenic role also in CLL. About 50-80% of adults display MCPyV-specific antibodies. The humoral immunity does not protect against the development of MCC, as neutralizing MCPyV antibodies occur in higher levels among MCC patients than healthy controls. Impaired T-cell immunity has been linked with aggressive MCC behavior. Therefore, cellular immunity appears to be important in MCPyV infection surveillance. In order to elucidate the role of MCPyV-specific Th-cell immunity, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of healthy adults were stimulated with MCPyV VP1 virus-like particles (VLPs, using human bocavirus (HBoV VLPs and Candida albicans antigen as positive controls. Proliferation, IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10 responses were examined in 15 MCPyV-seropositive and 15 seronegative volunteers. With the MCPyV antigen, significantly stronger Th-cell responses were found in MCPyV-seropositive than MCPyV-seronegative subjects, whereas with the control antigens, the responses were statistically similar. The most readily detectable cytokine was IFN-γ. The MCPyV antigen tended to induce stronger IFN-γ responses than HBoV VLP antigen. Taken together, MCPyV-specific Th-cells elicit vigorous IFN-γ responses. IFN-γ being a cytokine with major antiviral and tumor suppressing functions, Th-cells are suggested to be important mediators of MCPyV-specific immune surveillance.

  7. Bacterial magnetic particles improve testes-mediated transgene efficiency in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Sun, Guanghong; Wang, Ye; Kong, Nana; Chi, Yafei; Yang, Leilei; Xin, Qiliang; Teng, Zhen; Wang, Xu; Wen, Yujun; Li, Ying; Xia, Guoliang

    2017-11-01

    Nano-scaled materials have been proved to be ideal DNA carriers for transgene. Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) help to reduce the toxicity of polyethylenimine (PEI), an efficient gene-transferring agent, and assist tissue transgene ex vivo. Here, the effectiveness of the BMP-PEI complex-conjugated foreign DNAs (BPDs) in promoting testes-mediated gene transfer (TMGT) in mouse was compared with that of liposome-conjugated foreign DNAs. The results proved that through testes injection, the clusters of BPDs successfully reached the cytoplasm and the nuclear of spermatogenesis cell, and expressed in testes of transgene founder mice. Additionally, the ratio of founder mice obtained from BPDs (88%) is about 3 times higher than the control (25%) (p mice from BPD group were significantly improved, as compared with the control (p mice within the first filial was significantly higher in BPDs compared with the control (73.8% versus 11.6%, p mice in vivo.

  8. Cryogenic phonon-mediated particle detectors for dark matter searches and neutrino physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.T.J.

    1993-01-01

    This work describes the development of cryogenic phonon-mediated particle detectors for dark matter searches and neutrino detection. The detectors described in this work employ transition-edge sensors, which consist of a meander pattern of thin-film superconductor on a silicon substrate. When phonons from a particle interaction in the crystal impinge on the sensor in sufficient density, sections of the line are driven normal and provide a measurable resistance. A large fraction of the thesis describes work to fully characterize the phonon flux from particle interactions. In one set of experiments, ∼25% of the phonon energy from 59.54 keV gamma-ray events was found to propagate open-quotes ballisticallyclose quotes (i.e., with little or no scattering) across a 300 μm thick crystal of silicon. Gamma-rays produce electron recoils in silicon whereas with dark matter and neutrino experiments nuclear recoils are also of interest. Two experiments were done to measure the ballistic component that arises from neutron events, which interact via nuclear recoil. Measurements indicate that the fraction of energy that is ballistic is ∼50% greater for nuclear recoils than for electron recoils. Two novel detectors were fabricated and tested in an attempt to improve the sensitivity of the detectors. In the first detector, relatively large Al pads were linked by 2 μm wide Ti lines in a meander pattern. Phonons impinging on the Al pads create quasiparticles which diffuse in the Al pad until they are trapped in the lower gap Tl links. The sensitivity of the detector was found to be increased by this open-quotes funnelingclose quotes action. A second detector was built that incorporates 0.25 μm wide lines defined by direct electron-beam exposure of the photoresist. If the superconducting line is sufficiently narrow, single phonons are capable of driving sections normal which should improve the sensitivity and linearity of the detector

  9. ATM Is Required for the Prolactin-Induced HSP90-Mediated Increase in Cellular Viability and Clonogenic Growth After DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayazi Atici, Ödül; Urbanska, Anna; Gopinathan, Sesha Gopal; Boutillon, Florence; Goffin, Vincent; Shemanko, Carrie S

    2018-02-01

    Prolactin (PRL) acts as a survival factor for breast cancer cells, but the PRL signaling pathway and the mechanism are unknown. Previously, we identified the master chaperone, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) α, as a prolactin-Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) target gene involved in survival, and here we investigated the role of HSP90 in the mechanism of PRL-induced viability in response to DNA damage. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) protein plays a critical role in the cellular response to double-strand DNA damage. We observed that PRL increased viability of breast cancer cells treated with doxorubicin or etoposide. The increase in cellular resistance is specific to the PRL receptor, because the PRL receptor antagonist, Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL, prevented the increase in viability. Two different HSP90 inhibitors, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin and BIIB021, reduced the PRL-mediated increase in cell viability of doxorubicin-treated cells and led to a decrease in JAK2, ATM, and phosphorylated ATM protein levels. Inhibitors of JAK2 (G6) and ATM (KU55933) abolished the PRL-mediated increase in cell viability of DNA-damaged cells, supporting the involvement of each, as well as the crosstalk of ATM with the PRL pathway in the context of DNA damage. Drug synergism was detected between the ATM inhibitor (KU55933) and doxorubicin and between the HSP90 inhibitor (BIIB021) and doxorubicin. Short interfering RNA directed against ATM prevented the PRL-mediated increase in cell survival in two-dimensional cell culture, three-dimensional collagen gel cultures, and clonogenic cell survival, after doxorubicin treatment. Our results indicate that ATM contributes to the PRL-JAK2-STAT5-HSP90 pathway in mediating cellular resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  10. Formation of cellular films consisting of wurtzite-type zinc oxide nanosheets by mediation of phosphate anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamabi, Satoshi; Yahiro, Junko; Iwai, Satoko; Imai, Hiroaki

    2005-01-01

    We successfully prepared a wide variety of wurtzite-type zinc oxide films exhibiting columnar, cellular and densely packed morphologies in a simple aqueous solution system containing phosphate anions. As the phosphate concentration increased, the shape of crystalline units composing the films varied from hexagonal needles into seaweed-like sheets. A novel type of open cellular structures was obtained by assembly of nanoscale zinc oxide sheets covered with phosphate. Specific adsorption of phosphate anions on (001) of the wurtzite-type crystal flattened the crystal grains, and then induced the structural evolution into a cellular form. A blue shift of the absorption edge suggested that the quantum size effect occurred in the nanoscale platy crystals composing the cellular films

  11. The limits of testing particle-mediated oxidative stress in vitro in predicting diverse pathologies; relevance for testing of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulumian Mary

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In vitro studies with particles are a major staple of particle toxicology, generally used to investigate mechanisms and better understand the molecular events underlying cellular effects. However, there is ethical and financial pressure in nanotoxicology, the new sub-specialty of particle toxicology, to avoid using animals. Therefore an increasing amount of studies are being published using in vitro approaches and such studies require careful interpretation. We point out here that 3 different conventional pathogenic particle types, PM10, asbestos and quartz, which cause diverse pathological effects, have been reported to cause very similar oxidative stress effects in cells in culture. We discuss the likely explanation and implications of this apparent paradox, and its relevance for testing in nanotoxicology.

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation by diesel particles is mediated by tyrosine phosphatase inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal, Tamara L.; Bromberg, Philip A.; Kim, Yumee; Samet, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major component of ambient PM and may contribute to PM-induced pulmonary inflammation. Proinflammatory signaling is mediated by phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways whose activation is opposed by the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) which thereby function to maintain signaling quiescence. PTPases contain an invariant catalytic cysteine that is susceptible to electrophilic attack. DEP contain electrophilic oxy-organic compounds that may contribute to the oxidant effects of PM. Therefore, we hypothesized that exposure to DEP impairs PTPase activity allowing for unopposed basal kinase activity. Here we report that exposure to 30 μg/cm 2 DEP for 4 h induces differential activation of signaling in primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells (HAEC), a primary target cell in PM inhalation. In-gel kinase activity assay of HAEC exposed to DEPs of low (L-DEP), intermediate (I-DEP) or high (H-DEP) organic content showed differential activation of intracellular kinases. Exposure to these DEP also induced varying levels of phosphorylation of the receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR in a manner that requires EGFR kinase activity but does not involve receptor dimerization. We demonstrate that treatment with DEP results in an impairment of total and EGFR-directed PTPase activity in HAEC with a potency that is independent of the organic content of these particles. These data show that DEP-induced EGFR phosphorylation in HAEC is the result of a loss of PTPase activities which normally function to dephosphorylate EGFR in opposition to baseline EGFR kinase activity

  13. Development of a Massive, Highly Multiplexible, Phonon-Mediated Particle Detector Using Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y.-Y.; Cornell, B.; Aralis, T.; Bumble, B.; Golwala, S. R.

    2018-04-01

    We present a status update on the development of a phonon-mediated particle detector using kinetic inductance detector (KID). The design is intended for O(1) kg substrate, using O(102) KIDs on a single readout line, to image the athermal phonon distribution at energy resolution. The design specification is set by the need to improve position reconstruction fidelity while maintaining low energy threshold for future rare-event searches such as for low-mass dark matter. We report on the design, which shows negligible crosstalk and > 95% inductor current uniformity, using the coplanar waveguide feedline, ground shield, and a new class of KIDs with symmetric coplanar stripline (sCPS) inductor. The multiplexing is designed upon the frequency-geometry relation we develop for the sCPS KIDs. We introduce the fabrications of the Nb RF assessment prototypes and the high phonon collection efficiency Al-Nb devices. We achieve ≲ 0.07% frequency displacement on a 80-KID RF assessment prototype, and the result indicates that we may place more than 180 resonances in our 0.4 GHz readout band with minimal frequency misordering. The coupling quality factors are ˜ 105 as designed. Finally, we update our work in progress in fabricating the O(102) KID, bi-material, O(1) kg detectors, and the expected position and energy resolutions.

  14. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Vá clav; Baker, Ruth E.; Headon, Denis; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2011-01-01

    formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework

  15. Surface modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles as an augmentation of gold nanoparticle mediated laser perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Stefan; Gentemann, Lara; Schomaker, Markus; Heinemann, Dag; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser transfection/perforation fulfills the demands of a reliable transfection technique. It provides efficient delivery and has a negligible impact on cell viability. Furthermore, it reaches high-throughput applicability. However, currently only large gold particles (> 80 nm) allow successful GNOME laser perforation, probably due to insufficient sedimentation of smaller gold nanoparticles. The objective of this study is to determine whether this aspect can be addressed by a modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles. Throughout the analysis, we show that after the attachment of gold nanoparticles to silica particles, comparable or better efficiencies to GNOME laser perforation are reached. In combination with 1 µm silica particles, we report laser perforation with gold nanoparticles with sizes down to 4 nm. Therefore, our investigations have great importance for the future research in and the fields of laser transfection combined with plasmonics. PMID:25136494

  16. Comparative Effects of Ingested PVC Micro Particles With and Without Adsorbed Benzo(apyrene vs. Spiked Sediments on the Cellular and Sub Cellular Processes of the Benthic Organism Hediste diversicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Gomiero

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Plastic micro litter represents an emerging contaminant as well as a multiple stress agent in aquatic environments. Microplastics are found even in the remote areas of the world. Together with their occurrence in all environmental compartments, there is a growing concern about their potential to adsorb pollutants co-occurring in the environment. At present, little is known about this source of exposure for aquatic organisms in the benthic environment. Exposure conditions were set up to mimick the contribution of microplastics through different exposure routes. Potential biological effects resulting from these exposures were investigated in the model organism Hediste diversicolor, an annelid worm. Cellular effects including alterations of immunological responses, lysosomal compartment changes, mitochondrial activity, oxyradical production and onset of genotoxicity were assessed in coelomocytes while temporary and permanent effects of oxidative stress were also performed at tissue level. In this study polyvinylchloride (PVC microparticles were shown to adsorb benzo(apyrene with a time and dose-dependent relationship. The elevated bioavailability of the model pollutant after ingestion induced a clear pattern of biological responses. Toxicity mainly targeted impairment of cellular functioning and genotoxicity in H. diversicolor coelomocytes, while permanent effects of oxidative stress were observed at tissue level. Coelomocytes responded fast and with a higher degree of sensitivity to the adverse stimuli. The results showed that microplastic particles in sediments may play a significant role as vectors for organic pollutants. The highest adverse responses were observed in those H. diversicolor exposed to sediments spiked with PVC particles pre-incubated with B[a]P when compared against sediments spiked with B[a]P and plastic microparticles separately.

  17. Relative Contribution of Cellular Complement Inhibitors CD59, CD46, and CD55 to Parainfluenza Virus 5 Inhibition of Complement-Mediated Neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujia Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a part of the innate immune system that viruses need to face during infections. Many viruses incorporate cellular regulators of complement activation (RCA to block complement pathways and our prior work has shown that Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5 incorporates CD55 and CD46 to delay complement-mediated neutralization. In this paper, we tested the role of a third individual RCA inhibitor CD59 in PIV5 interactions with complement pathways. Using a cell line engineered to express CD59, we show that small levels of functional CD59 are associated with progeny PIV5, which is capable of blocking assembly of the C5b-C9 membrane attack complex (MAC. PIV5 containing CD59 (PIV5-CD59 showed increased resistance to complement-mediated neutralization in vitro comparing to PIV5 lacking regulators. Infection of A549 cells with PIV5 and RSV upregulated CD59 expression. TGF-beta treatment of PIV5-infected cells also increased cell surface CD59 expression and progeny virions were more resistant to complement-mediated neutralization. A comparison of individual viruses containing only CD55, CD46, or CD59 showed a potency of inhibiting complement-mediated neutralization, which followed a pattern of CD55 > CD46 > CD59.

  18. ReaDDy--a software for particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics in crowded cellular environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Schöneberg

    Full Text Available We introduce the software package ReaDDy for simulation of detailed spatiotemporal mechanisms of dynamical processes in the cell, based on reaction-diffusion dynamics with particle resolution. In contrast to other particle-based reaction kinetics programs, ReaDDy supports particle interaction potentials. This permits effects such as space exclusion, molecular crowding and aggregation to be modeled. The biomolecules simulated can be represented as a sphere, or as a more complex geometry such as a domain structure or polymer chain. ReaDDy bridges the gap between small-scale but highly detailed molecular dynamics or Brownian dynamics simulations and large-scale but little-detailed reaction kinetics simulations. ReaDDy has a modular design that enables the exchange of the computing core by efficient platform-specific implementations or dynamical models that are different from Brownian dynamics.

  19. The motion of a cloud of solid spherical particles falling in a cellular flow field at low Stokes number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Benjamin; Bergougnoux, Laurence; Guazzelli, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    We present a jointed experimental and numerical study examining the influence of vortical structures on the settling of a cloud of solid spherical particles under the action of gravity at low Stokes numbers. The two-dimensional model experiment uses electro-convection to generate a two-dimensional array of controlled vortices which mimics a simplified vortical flow. Particle image-velocimetry and tracking are used to examine the motion of the cloud within this vortical flow. The cloud motion is compared to the predictions of a two-way-coupling numerical simulation.

  20. Disturbance from Am-241 Photons of the Cellular Dose by Am-241 Alpha Emissions: Am-241 as an alternative source of alpha particles to radon daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki-Man; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Bioengineering Laboratory (RadBio Lab) at Seoul National University (SNU) has built an Am-241 alpha particle irradiator for study of cellular responses to radiation from radon daughters. The radon daughters of concern that cause internal exposure from inhalation of radon-contaminated air are Po-218, Po-214 and Po-210. In their alpha decay schemes, the yields of photon emissions are negligible. Unfortunately, Am-241, the source of alpha irradiator in RadBio Lab, emits photons at every alpha decay while transforming to Np-237 of long half-life. Employing Am-241 as the source simulating radon daughters, therefore, requires that photon emissions from Am-241 be specified in term of dose contribution. In this study, Monte Carlo calculations have been made to characterize dose contributions of Am-241 photon emissions. This study confirms that disturbance from Am-241 photon emissions of the cellular dose by Am-241 alpha emissions is negligible. Dose contamination fraction from photon emissions was 8.02 .. 10 -6 at 25 mm SSD at maximum. Also, note that LET in tissue-equivalent medium varies within about 20% for alpha particles at energies over 5 MeV

  1. Curcumin exhibits anti-tumor effect and attenuates cellular migration via Slit-2 mediated down-regulation of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Vijay Kumar; Popli, Pooja; Sankhwar, Pushplata; Kaushal, Jyoti Bala; Gupta, Kanchan; Manohar, Murli; Dwivedi, Anila

    2017-06-01

    Although curcumin shows anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities in various cancers, the effect of curcumin on cellular migration in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells remains to be understood. The current investigation was aimed to explore the anti-proliferative and anti-migratory effects of curcumin and its mechanism of action in endometrial cancer cells. Our in-vitro and in-vivo experimental studies showed that curcumin inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells and suppressed the tumor growth in Ishikawa xenograft mouse model. Curcumin induced ROS-mediated apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Curcumin suppressed the migration rate of Ishikawa and Hec-1B cells as analyzed by scratch wound assay. In transwell migration studies, knock down of Slit-2 reversed the anti-migratory effect of curcumin in these cell lines. Curcumin significantly up-regulated the expression of Slit-2 in Ishikawa, Hec-1B and primary endometrial cancer cells while it down-regulated the expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and CXCR4 which in turn, suppressed the expression of matrix metallopeptidases (MMP) 2 and 9, thus attenuating the migration of endometrial cancer cells. In summary, we have demonstrated that curcumin has inhibitory effect on cellular migration via Slit-2 mediated down-regulation of CXCR4, SDF-1, and MMP2/MMP9 in endometrial carcinoma cells. These findings helped explore the role of Slit-2 in endometrial cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cellular uptake of beta-carotene from protein stabilized solid lipid nano-particles prepared by homogenization-evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using a homogenization-evaporation method, beta-carotene (BC) loaded nano-particles were prepared with different ratios of food-grade sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), or soy protein isolate (SPI) to BC and evaluated for their physiochemical stability, in vitro cytotoxicity, and cel...

  3. Focal adhesion kinase, a downstream mediator of Raf-1 signaling, suppresses cellular adhesion, migration, and neuroendocrine markers in BON carcinoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Li; Chen, Herbert; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2010-05-01

    We have recently reported that activation of the Raf-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2)/ERK1/2 signaling cascade in gastrointestinal carcinoid cell line (BON) alters cellular morphology and neuroendocrine phenotype. The mechanisms by which Raf-1 mediates these changes in carcinoid cells are unclear. Here, we report that activation of the Raf-1 signaling cascade in BON cells induced the expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) protein, suppressed the production of neuroendocrine markers, and resulted in significant decreases in cellular adhesion and migration. Importantly, inactivation of MEK1/2 by 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis[2-aminophenylthio]butadiene or abolition of FAK induction in Raf-1-activated BON cells by targeted siRNA led to reversal of the Raf-1-mediated reduction in neuroendocrine markers and cellular adhesion and migration. Phosphorylation site-specific antibodies detected the phosphorylated FAK(Tyr407), but not FAK(Tyr397), in these Raf-1-activated cells, indicating that FAK(Tyr407) may be associated with changes in the neuroendocrine phenotype. Overexpression of constitutively active FAK plasmids (wild-type FAK or FAK(Tyr397) mutant) into BON cells reduced neuroendocrine markers, whereas the FAK(Tyr407) mutant plasmid did not show any decrease in the levels of neuroendocrine markers, indicating that phosphorylation of FAK at the Tyr(407) residue may be important for these effects. Our results showed for the first time that FAK is an essential downstream effector of the Raf-1/MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling cascade and negatively regulated the neuroendocrine and metastatic phenotype in BON cells. (c)2010 AACR.

  4. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Baker, R. E.; Headon, D.; Gaffney, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2012), s. 935-957 ISSN 0092-8240 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : reaction-diffusion * receptor-mediated patterning * turing models Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.023, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/9713544x6871w4n6/?MUD=MP

  5. Proteomic analysis of HIV-1 Nef cellular binding partners reveals a role for exocyst complex proteins in mediating enhancement of intercellular nanotube formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerji Joya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef protein contributes to pathogenesis via multiple functions that include enhancement of viral replication and infectivity, alteration of intracellular trafficking, and modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Nef stimulates formation of tunneling nanotubes and virological synapses, and is transferred to bystander cells via these intercellular contacts and secreted microvesicles. Nef associates with and activates Pak2, a kinase that regulates T-cell signaling and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, but how Nef promotes nanotube formation is unknown. Results To identify Nef binding partners involved in Pak2-association dependent Nef functions, we employed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Nef immunocomplexes from Jurkat cells expressing wild-type Nef or Nef mutants defective for the ability to associate with Pak2 (F85L, F89H, H191F and A72P, A75P in NL4-3. We report that wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was associated with 5 components of the exocyst complex (EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, EXOC4, and EXOC6, an octameric complex that tethers vesicles at the plasma membrane, regulates polarized exocytosis, and recruits membranes and proteins required for nanotube formation. Additionally, Pak2 kinase was associated exclusively with wild-type Nef. Association of EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, and EXOC4 with wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays in Jurkat cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of EXOC2 in Jurkat cells abrogated Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation. Using bioinformatic tools, we visualized protein interaction networks that reveal functional linkages between Nef, the exocyst complex, and the cellular endocytic and exocytic trafficking machinery. Conclusions Exocyst complex proteins are likely a key effector of Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation, and possibly microvesicle secretion. Linkages revealed between Nef and the exocyst complex suggest a new paradigm of

  6. I-domain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 mediates rolling of polystyrene particles on ICAM-1 under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eniola, A Omolola; Krasik, Ellen F; Smith, Lee A; Song, Gang; Hammer, Daniel A

    2005-11-01

    In their active state, beta(2)-integrins, such as LFA-1, mediate the firm arrest of leukocytes by binding intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) expressed on endothelium. Although the primary function of LFA-1 is assumed to be the ability to mediate firm adhesion, recent work has shown that LFA-1 can contribute to cell tethering and rolling under hydrodynamic flow, a role previously largely attributed to the selectins. The inserted (I) domain of LFA-1 has recently been crystallized in the wild-type (wt) and locked-open conformations and has been shown to, respectively, support rolling and firm adhesion under flow when expressed in alpha(L)beta(2) heterodimers or as isolated domains on cells. Here, we report results from cell-free adhesion assays where wt I-domain-coated polystyrene particles were allowed to interact with ICAM-1-coated surfaces in shear flow. We show that wt I-domain can independently mediate the capture of particles from flow and support their rolling on ICAM-1 surfaces in a manner similar to how carbohydrate-selectin interactions mediate rolling. Adhesion is specific and blocked by appropriate antibodies. We also show that the rolling velocity of I-domain-coated particles depends on the wall shear stress in flow chamber, I-domain site density on microsphere surfaces, and ICAM-1 site density on substrate surfaces. Furthermore, we show that rolling is less sensitive to wall shear stress and ICAM-1 substrate density at high density of I-domain on the microsphere surface. Computer simulations using adhesive dynamics can recreate bead rolling dynamics and show that the mechanochemical properties of ICAM-1-I-domain interactions are similar to those of carbohydrate-selectin interactions. Understanding the biophysics of adhesion mediated by the I-domain of LFA-1 can elucidate the complex roles this integrin plays in leukocyte adhesion in inflammation.

  7. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patheja, Pooja; Sahu, Khageswar

    2017-01-01

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  8. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patheja, Pooja, E-mail: pooja.patheja8@gmail.com [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094, Maharashtra (India); Sahu, Khageswar [Laser Biomedical Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MφCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MφCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation.

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  10. Cellular ATP synthesis mediated by type III sodium-dependent phosphate transporter Pit-1 is critical to chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Atsushi; Kawai, Shinji; Hayashibara, Tetsuyuki; Amano, Atsuo; Ooshima, Takashi; Michigami, Toshimi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-28

    Disturbed endochondral ossification in X-linked hypophosphatemia indicates an involvement of P(i) in chondrogenesis. We studied the role of the sodium-dependent P(i) cotransporters (NPT), which are a widely recognized regulator of cellular P(i) homeostasis, and the downstream events in chondrogenesis using Hyp mice, the murine homolog of human X-linked hypophosphatemia. Hyp mice showed reduced apoptosis and mineralization in hypertrophic cartilage. Hyp chondrocytes in culture displayed decreased apoptosis and mineralization compared with WT chondrocytes, whereas glycosaminoglycan synthesis, an early event in chondrogenesis, was not altered. Expression of the type III NPT Pit-1 and P(i) uptake were diminished, and intracellular ATP levels were also reduced in parallel with decreased caspase-9 and caspase-3 activity in Hyp chondrocytes. The competitive NPT inhibitor phosphonoformic acid and ATP synthesis inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate disturbed endochondral ossification with reduced apoptosis in vivo and suppressed apoptosis and mineralization in conjunction with reduced P(i) uptake and ATP synthesis in WT chondrocytes. Overexpression of Pit-1 in Hyp chondrocytes reversed P(i) uptake and ATP synthesis and restored apoptosis and mineralization. Our results suggest that cellular ATP synthesis consequent to P(i) uptake via Pit-1 plays an important role in chondrocyte apoptosis and mineralization, and that chondrogenesis is ATP-dependent.

  11. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone at the ER-mitochondrion interface mediates the mitochondrion-ER-nucleus signaling for cellular survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Mori

    Full Text Available The membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of a cell forms contacts directly with mitochondria whereby the contact is referred to as the mitochondrion-associated ER membrane or the MAM. Here we found that the MAM regulates cellular survival via an MAM-residing ER chaperone the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R in that the Sig-1R chaperones the ER stress sensor IRE1 to facilitate inter-organelle signaling for survival. IRE1 is found in this study to be enriched at the MAM in CHO cells. We found that IRE1 is stabilized at the MAM by Sig-1Rs when cells are under ER stress. Sig-1Rs stabilize IRE1 and thus allow for conformationally correct IRE1 to dimerize into the long-lasting, activated endonuclease. The IRE1 at the MAM also responds to reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria. Therefore, the ER-mitochondrion interface serves as an important subcellular entity in the regulation of cellular survival by enhancing the stress-responding signaling between mitochondria, ER, and nucleus.

  12. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone at the ER-mitochondrion interface mediates the mitochondrion-ER-nucleus signaling for cellular survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Teruo; Hayashi, Eri; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a cell forms contacts directly with mitochondria whereby the contact is referred to as the mitochondrion-associated ER membrane or the MAM. Here we found that the MAM regulates cellular survival via an MAM-residing ER chaperone the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) in that the Sig-1R chaperones the ER stress sensor IRE1 to facilitate inter-organelle signaling for survival. IRE1 is found in this study to be enriched at the MAM in CHO cells. We found that IRE1 is stabilized at the MAM by Sig-1Rs when cells are under ER stress. Sig-1Rs stabilize IRE1 and thus allow for conformationally correct IRE1 to dimerize into the long-lasting, activated endonuclease. The IRE1 at the MAM also responds to reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria. Therefore, the ER-mitochondrion interface serves as an important subcellular entity in the regulation of cellular survival by enhancing the stress-responding signaling between mitochondria, ER, and nucleus.

  13. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16 mm s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens

  14. Dysfunctional lipoproteins from young smokers exacerbate cellular senescence and atherogenesis with smaller particle size and severe oxidation and glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Hoon; Shin, Dong-Gu; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    Until now, there has been limited information on the effects of smoking on atherogenesis and senescence in the context of lipoprotein parameters, particularly in young smokers who have smoked fewer than 10 cigarettes per day for 3 years. In this study, lipoprotein profiles and functions were compared between smoker (n = 21) and control groups (n = 20). In the smoking group, ferric ion reduction abilities of serum and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) fractions were significantly reduced, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was severely oxidized. All lipoprotein particles from the smoker group showed higher advanced glycated end products with more triglyceride (TG) content compared with the control group. Lipoproteins from smokers showed faster agarose gel electromobility as well as greater smear band intensity in SDS-PAGE due to oxidation and glycation. LDL from smokers was more sensitive to oxidation and promoted foam cell forma-tion in macrophages. Gel filtration column chromatography revealed that the protein and cholesterol peaks of VLDL and LDL were elevated in the smoker group, whereas those of HDL were reduced. Human dermal fibroblast cells from the smoker group showed severe senescence following treatment with HDL2 and HDL3. Although HDL from young smokers showed impaired antioxidant ability, smaller particle size, and increased TG content, cholesteryl ester transfer protein activities were greatly enhanced in the serum and HDL fractions of the smoker group. In conclusion, smoking can cause production of dysfunctional lipoproteins having a smaller particle size that exacerbate senescence and atherogenic progress due to oxidation and glycation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Ex-vivo expanded human NK cells express activating receptors that mediate cytotoxicity of allogeneic and autologous cancer cell lines by direct recognition and antibody directed cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campana Dario

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibility that autologous NK cells could serve as an effective treatment modality for solid tumors has long been considered. However, implementation is hampered by (i the small number of NK cells in peripheral blood, (ii the difficulties associated with large-scale production of GMP compliant cytolytic NK cells, (iii the need to activate the NK cells in order to induce NK cell mediated killing and (iv the constraints imposed by autologous inhibitory receptor-ligand interactions. To address these issues, we determined (i if large numbers of NK cells could be expanded from PBMC and GMP compliant cell fractions derived by elutriation, (ii their ability to kill allogeneic and autologous tumor targets by direct cytotoxitiy and by antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity and (iii defined NK cell specific receptor-ligand interactions that mediate tumor target cell killing. Methods Human NK cells were expanded during 14 days. Expansion efficiency, NK receptor repertoire before and after expansion, expression of NK specific ligands, cytolytic activity against allogeneic and autologous tumor targets, with and without the addition of chimeric EGFR monoclonal antibody, were investigated. Results Cell expansion shifted the NK cell receptor repertoire towards activation and resulted in cytotoxicity against various allogeneic tumor cell lines and autologous gastric cancer cells, while sparing normal PBMC. Blocking studies confirmed that autologous cytotoxicity is established through multiple activating receptor-ligand interactions. Importantly, expanded NK cells also mediated ADCC in an autologous and allogeneic setting by antibodies that are currently being used to treat patients with select solid tumors. Conclusion These data demonstrate that large numbers of cytolytic NK cells can be generated from PBMC and lymphocyte-enriched fractions obtained by GMP compliant counter current elutriation from PBMC, establishing the preclinical

  16. Cellular immune responses to HPV-18, -31, and -53 in healthy volunteers immunized with recombinant HPV-16 L1 virus-like particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Viscidi, Raphael; Harro, Clayton D.; Kemp, Troy J.; Garcia-Pineres, Alfonso J.; Trivett, Matthew; Demuth, Franklin; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Hildesheim, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Human papillomavirus-like particles (HPV VLP) are candidate vaccines that have shown to be efficacious in reducing infection and inducing robust antiviral immunity. Neutralizing antibodies generated by vaccination are largely type-specific, but little is known about the type-specificity of cellular immune responses to VLP vaccination. To determine whether vaccination with HPV-16 L1VLP induces cellular immunity to heterologous HPV types (HPV-18, HPV-31, and HPV-53), we examined proliferative and cytokine responses in vaccine (n = 11) and placebo (n = 5) recipients. Increased proliferative and cytokine responses to heterologous types were observed postvaccination in some individuals. The proportion of women responding to heterologous types postvaccination (36%-55%) was lower than that observed in response to HPV-16 (73%). Response to HPV-16 VLP predicted response to other types. The strongest correlations in response were observed between HPV-16 and HPV-31, consistent with their phylogenetic relatedness. In summary, PBMC from HPV-16 VLP vaccine recipients can respond to L1VLP from heterologous HPV types, suggesting the presence of conserved T cell epitopes

  17. Down-regulation of viral replication by adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNA against cellular cofactors for hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iwai, Takahiro; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Shimamura, Hideo; Araki, Hiromasa; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2004-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently being evaluated not only as a powerful tool for functional genomics, but also as a potentially promising therapeutic agent for cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory effect of siRNA on viral replication has been demonstrated in multiple pathogenic viruses. However, because of the high sequence specificity of siRNA-mediated RNA degradation, antiviral efficacy of siRNA directed to viral genome will be largely limited by emergence of escape variants resistant to siRNA due to high mutation rates of virus, especially RNA viruses such as poliovirus and hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the therapeutic feasibility of siRNAs specific for the putative cellular cofactors for HCV, we constructed adenovirus vectors expressing siRNAs against La, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), subunit gamma of human eukaryotic initiation factors 2B (eIF2Bγ), and human VAMP-associated protein of 33 kDa (hVAP-33). Adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNAs markedly diminished expression of the endogenous genes, and silencing of La, PTB, and hVAP-33 by siRNAs substantially blocked HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Thus, our studies demonstrate the feasibility and potential of adenoviral-delivered siRNAs specific for cellular cofactors in combating HCV infection, which can be used either alone or in combination with siRNA against viral genome to prevent the escape of mutant variants and provide additive or synergistic anti-HCV effects

  18. Mediating Effects of Patients' Stigma and Self-Efficacy on Relationships Between Doctors' Empathy Abilities and Patients' Cellular Immunity in Male Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ningxi; Cao, Yingnan; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Shiyue; Yan, Hong; Geng, Qingshan

    2018-06-12

    BACKGROUND Doctors' empathy is closely related to patients' health. This study aimed to examine whether patients' stigma and self-efficacy play a mediating role in the relationship between doctors' empathy abilities and patients' cellular immunity in male patients with breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS Doctors' empathy scores and patients' demographic data, disease condition, stigma, and self-efficacy were measured. Patient T cell subset was tested at admission and 3 months after the operation and was compared by paired t test. The multivariate linear regression model was applied to analyze the factors influencing the immune index. Pearson correlation analysis and structural equation modeling were applied to explore the relationships among patients' stigma, self-efficacy, and cellular immunity and doctors' empathy abilities. RESULTS At the 2 time points, only the change in NK subset was statistically significant, while the changes in percentage of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and B cells were not statistically significant. The doctors' empathy abilities were negatively correlated with patients' stigma and were positively related to patients' self-efficacy. Patients' stigma was negatively related to NK subset, while self-efficacy was positively associated with NK subset. Patients' stigma and self-efficacy played a mediating role in the relationship between doctors' empathy abilities and patients' NK subset, and stigma had a stronger effect than self-efficacy. CONCLUSIONS Doctors' empathy abilities affected breast cancer patients' NK subset through their stigma and self-efficacy. The mental health of male breast cancer patients need more attention and empathy education needs to be improved.

  19. siRNA - Mediated LRP/LR knock-down reduces cellular viability of malignant melanoma cells through the activation of apoptotic caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Thalia M; Vania, Leila; Ferreira, Eloise; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2018-07-01

    The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is over-expressed in tumor cells and has been implicated in several tumourigenic processes such as metastasis and telomerase activation, however, more importantly the focus of the present study is on the maintenance of cellular viability and the evasion of apoptosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of LRP/LR on the cellular viability of early (A375) and late stage (A375SM) malignant melanoma cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis revealed that A375SM cells contain more cell-surface and total LRP/LR levels in comparison to the A375 cells, respectively. In order to determine the effect of LRP/LR on cell viability and apoptosis, LRP was down-regulated via siRNA technology. MTT assays revealed that LRP knock-down led to significant reductions in the viability of A375 and A375SM cells. Confocal microscopy indicated nuclear morphological changes suggestive of apoptotic induction in both cell lines and Annexin-V FITC/PI assays confirmed this observation. Additionally, caspase-3 activity assays revealed that apoptosis was induced in both cell lines after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of LRP. Caspase-8 and -9 activity assays suggested that post LRP knock-down; A375 cells undergo apoptosis solely via the extrinsic pathway, while A375SM cells undergo apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway. siRNAs mediated LRP knock-down might represent a powerful alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant melanoma through the induction of apoptosis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  1. Decreased Fc receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody-mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-07-05

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Decreased Fc-Receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-01-01

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. PMID:21565376

  3. The Cellular Distribution of RanGAP1 Is Regulated by CRM1-Mediated Nuclear Export in Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Cha

    Full Text Available The Ran GTPase activating protein RanGAP1 plays an essential role in nuclear transport by stimulating RanGTP hydrolysis in the cytoplasmic compartment. In mammalian cells, unmodified RanGAP1 is predominantly cytoplasmic, whereas modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier protein (SUMO targets RanGAP1 to the cytoplasmic filaments of nuclear pore complex (NPC. Although RanGAP1 contains nine putative nuclear export signals and a nuclear localization signal, little is known if RanGAP1 shuttles between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments and how its primary localization in the cytoplasm and at the NPC is regulated. Here we show that inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export using RNAi-knockdown of CRM1 and inactivation of CRM1 by leptomycin B (LMB results in nuclear accumulation of RanGAP1. LMB treatment induced a more robust redistribution of RanGAP1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleoplasm compared to CRM1 RNAi and also uniquely triggered a decrease or loss of RanGAP1 localization at the NPC, suggesting that LMB treatment is more effective in inhibiting CRM1-mediated nuclear export of RanGAP1. Our time-course analysis of LMB treatment reveals that the NPC-associated RanGAP1 is much more slowly redistributed to the nucleoplasm than the cytoplasmic RanGAP1. Furthermore, LMB-induced nuclear accumulation of RanGAP1 is positively correlated with an increase in levels of SUMO-modified RanGAP1, suggesting that SUMOylation of RanGAP1 may mainly take place in the nucleoplasm. Lastly, we demonstrate that the nuclear localization signal at the C-terminus of RanGAP1 is required for its nuclear accumulation in cells treated with LMB. Taken together, our results elucidate that RanGAP1 is actively transported between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, and that the cytoplasmic and NPC localization of RanGAP1 is dependent on CRM1-mediated nuclear export.

  4. Phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers based on dual vegetable actives involved in the prevention of cellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrati, D; Lacatusu, I; Bordei, N; Badea, G; Oprea, O; Stefan, L M; Stan, R; Badea, N; Meghea, A

    2016-07-01

    The growing scientific interest in exploitation of vegetable bioactives has raised a number of questions regarding their imminent presence in pharmaceutical formulations. This study intends to demonstrate that a dual combination between vegetable oil (e.g. thistle oil, safflower oil, sea buckthorn oil) and a carrot extract represents an optimal approach to formulate safe carrier systems that manifest cell regeneration effect and promising antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Inclusion of both natural actives into lipid carriers imparted a strong negative charge on the nanocarrier surface (up to -45mV) and displayed average sizes of 70nm to 140nm. The entrapment efficiency of carrot extract into nanostructured carriers ranged between 78.3 and 88.3%. The in vitro release study has demonstrated that the entrapment of the extract represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. Besides the excellent antioxidant properties (e.g. scavenging up to 98% of the free oxygen radicals), the results of cellular integrity (e.g. cell viability of 133%) recommend these nanocarriers based on dual carrot extract-bioactive oil as a promising trend for the treatment of certain disorders in which oxidative stress plays a prominent role. In addition, the lipid nanocarriers based on safflower oil and sea buckthorn oil demonstrated an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS induced THP-1 macrophages, by inhibiting the secretion of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Study on the enhanced cellular uptake effect of daunorubicin on leukemia cells mediated via functionalized nickel nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Dadong; Wu Chunhui; Hu Hongli; Wang Xuemei [State Key Lab of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Li Xiaomao [Department of Physics, University of Saarland, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Chen Baoan, E-mail: xuewang@seu.edu.c [Zhongda Hospital, School of Clinical Medical, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2009-04-15

    The success of cancer chemotherapy is largely dependent on the efficient anticancer drug accumulation in target tumor tissues and cells so as to inhibit the proliferation of the cancer cells. Recently, some biocompatible nanomaterials have been utilized as drug target delivery systems and have shown the great potential to effectively afford the sustained drug delivery for the target cancer cells. In this study, we have explored the possibility for the bio-application of the functionalized nickel (Ni) nanoparticles and the efficiency of the functionalized Ni nanoparticles on drug permeability, and cellular uptake of leukemia K562 cells in vitro has been probed via atomic force microscopy, inverted fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy, electrochemical study and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay. It is observed that the presence of relevant Ni nanoparticles could induce the membrane structure change of target cells and efficiently improve the permeability of the cell membrane so that the combination of these Ni nanoparticles with anticancer drug daunorubicin could have a synergistic effect on the efficient cytotoxicity suppression in leukemia cancer cells. These observations indicate the great potential of Ni nanoparticles in the future biomedical application including target cancer diagnosis and chemotherapy.

  6. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu-Yuan Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4, a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment.

  7. Loss of Progesterone Receptor-Mediated Actions Induce Preterm Cellular and Structural Remodeling of the Cervix and Premature Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellon, Steven M.; Dobyns, Abigail E.; Beck, Hailey L.; Kurtzman, James T.; Garfield, Robert E.; Kirby, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone), or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term. PMID:24339918

  8. The group A streptococcal collagen-like protein 1, Scl1, mediates biofilm formation by targeting the EDA-containing variant of cellular fibronectin expressed in wounded tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Kozup, Heaven; Martin, Karen H.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Green, Brett J.; Betts, Courtney; Shinde, Arti V.; Van De Water, Livingston; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Wounds are known to serve as portals of entry for group A Streptococcus (GAS). Subsequent tissue colonization is mediated by interactions between GAS surface proteins and host extracellular matrix components. We recently reported that the streptococcal collagen-like protein-1, Scl1, selectively binds the cellular form of fibronectin (cFn) and also contributes to GAS biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. One structural feature of cFn, which is predominantly expressed in response to tissue injury, is the presence of a spliced variant containing extra domain A (EDA/EIIIA). We now report that GAS biofilm formation is mediated by the Scl1 interaction with EDA-containing cFn. Recombinant Scl1 proteins that bound cFn also bound recombinant EDA within the C-C′ loop region recognized by the α9β1 integrin. The extracellular 2-D matrix derived from human dermal fibroblasts supports GAS adherence and biofilm formation. Altogether, this work identifies and characterizes a novel molecular mechanism by which GAS utilizes Scl1 to specifically target an extracellular matrix component that is predominantly expressed at the site of injury in order to secure host tissue colonization. PMID:23217101

  9. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  10. Hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 2 (HAVCR2) is decreased with viral infection and regulates pro-labour mediators OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liong, Stella; Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2017-07-01

    Intrauterine infection caused by viral infection has been implicated to contribute to preterm birth. Hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 2 (HAVCR2) regulates inflammation in non-gestational tissues in response to viral infection. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of: (i) viral dsRNA analogue polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) on HAVCR2 expression; and (ii) HAVCR2 silencing by siRNA (siHAVCR2) in primary amnion and myometrial cells on poly(I:C)-induced inflammation. In human foetal membranes and myometrium, HAVCR2 mRNA and protein expression was decreased when exposed to poly(I:C). Treatment of primary amnion and myometrial cells with poly(I:C) significantly increased the expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF, IL1A, IL1B and IL6; the expression of chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2; the expression and secretion of adhesion molecules ICAM1 and VCAM1; and PTGS2 and PTGFR mRNA expression and the release of prostaglandin PGF 2α . This increase was significantly augmented in cells transfected with siHAVCR2. Furthermore, mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 and IL10 was significantly decreased. Collectively, our data suggest that HAVCR2 regulates cytokines, chemokines, prostaglandins and cell adhesion molecules in the presence of viral infection. This suggests a potential for HAVCR2 activators as therapeutics for the management of preterm birth associated with viral infections. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. RNase H2 Loss in Murine Astrocytes Results in Cellular Defects Reminiscent of Nucleic Acid-Mediated Autoinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareen Bartsch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aicardi–Goutières syndrome (AGS is a rare early onset childhood encephalopathy caused by persistent neuroinflammation of autoimmune origin. AGS is a genetic disorder and >50% of affected individuals bear hypomorphic mutations in ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2. All available RNase H2 mouse models so far fail to mimic the prominent CNS involvement seen in AGS. To establish a mouse model recapitulating the human disease, we deleted RNase H2 specifically in the brain, the most severely affected organ in AGS. Although RNase H2ΔGFAP mice lacked the nuclease in astrocytes and a majority of neurons, no disease signs were apparent in these animals. We additionally confirmed these results in a second, neuron-specific RNase H2 knockout mouse line. However, when astrocytes were isolated from brains of RNase H2ΔGFAP mice and cultured under mitogenic conditions, they showed signs of DNA damage and premature senescence. Enhanced expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs represents the most reliable AGS biomarker. Importantly, primary RNase H2ΔGFAP astrocytes displayed significantly increased ISG transcript levels, which we failed to detect in in vivo in brains of RNase H2ΔGFAP mice. Isolated astrocytes primed by DNA damage, including RNase H2-deficiency, exhibited a heightened innate immune response when exposed to bacterial or viral antigens. Taken together, we established a valid cellular AGS model that utilizes the very cell type responsible for disease pathology, the astrocyte, and phenocopies major molecular defects observed in AGS patient cells.

  12. Macrophage conditioned medium induced cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells through enhanced tunneling nanotube formation and tunneling nanotube mediated release of viable cytoplasmic fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patheja, Pooja; Sahu, Khageswar

    2017-06-15

    Infiltrating macrophages in tumor microenvironment, through their secreted cytokines and growth factors, regulate several processes of cancer progression such as cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Recently, intercellular cytoplasmic bridges between cancer cells referred as tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been recognized as novel mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of inflammatory mediators present in conditioned medium derived from macrophages on the formation of TNTs in breast adenocarcinoma cells MCF-7. Results show that treatment with macrophage conditioned medium (MɸCM) not only enhanced TNT formation between cells but also stimulated the release of independently migrating viable cytoplasmic fragments, referred to as microplasts, from MCF-7 cells. Time lapse microscopy revealed that microplasts were released from parent cancer cells in extracellular space through formation of TNT-like structures. Mitochondria, vesicles and cytoplasm could be transferred from parent cell body to microplasts through connecting TNTs. The microplasts could also be resorbed into the parent cell body by retraction of the connecting TNTs. Microplast formation inhibited in presence cell migration inhibitor, cytochalasin-B. Notably by utilizing migratory machinery within microplasts, distantly located MCF-7 cells formed several TNT based intercellular connections, leading to formation of physically connected network of cells. Together, these results demonstrate novel role of TNTs in microplast formation, novel modes of TNT formation mediated by microplasts and stimulatory effect of MɸCM on cellular network formation in MCF-7 cells mediated through enhanced TNT and microplast formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Influence of Receptor-Mediated Interactions on Reaction-Diffusion Mechanisms of Cellular Self-organisation

    KAUST Repository

    Klika, Václav

    2011-11-10

    Understanding the mechanisms governing and regulating self-organisation in the developing embryo is a key challenge that has puzzled and fascinated scientists for decades. Since its conception in 1952 the Turing model has been a paradigm for pattern formation, motivating numerous theoretical and experimental studies, though its verification at the molecular level in biological systems has remained elusive. In this work, we consider the influence of receptor-mediated dynamics within the framework of Turing models, showing how non-diffusing species impact the conditions for the emergence of self-organisation. We illustrate our results within the framework of hair follicle pre-patterning, showing how receptor interaction structures can be constrained by the requirement for patterning, without the need for detailed knowledge of the network dynamics. Finally, in the light of our results, we discuss the ability of such systems to pattern outside the classical limits of the Turing model, and the inherent dangers involved in model reduction. © 2011 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  14. Rutin as a Mediator of Lipid Metabolism and Cellular Signaling Pathways Interactions in Fibroblasts Altered by UVA and UVB Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gęgotek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rutin is a natural nutraceutical that is a promising compound for the prevention of UV-induced metabolic changes in skin cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of rutin on redox and endocannabinoid systems, as well as proinflammatory and proapoptotic processes, in UV-irradiated fibroblasts. Methods. Fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB radiation were treated with rutin. The activities and levels of oxidants/antioxidants and endocannabinoid system components, as well as lipid, DNA, and protein oxidation products, and the proinflammatory and pro/antiapoptotic proteins expression were measured. Results. Rutin reduced UV-induced proinflammatory response and ROS generation and enhanced the activity/levels of antioxidants (SOD, GSH-Px, vitamin E, GSH, and Trx. Rutin also normalized UV-induced Nrf2 expression. Its biological activity prevented changes in the levels of the lipid mediators: MDA, 4-HNE, and endocannabinoids, as well as the endocannabinoid receptors CB1/2, VR1, and GPR55 expression. Furthermore, rutin prevented the protein modifications (tyrosine derivatives formation in particular and decreased the levels of the proapoptotic markers—caspase-3 and cytochrome c. Conclusion. Rutin prevents UV-induced inflammation and redox imbalance at protein and transcriptional level which favors lipid, protein, and DNA protection. In consequence rutin regulates endocannabinoid system and apoptotic balance.

  15. CD36 mediates both cellular uptake of very long chain fatty acids and their intestinal absorption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drover, Victor A; Nguyen, David V; Bastie, Claire C; Darlington, Yolanda F; Abumrad, Nada A; Pessin, Jeffrey E; London, Erwin; Sahoo, Daisy; Phillips, Michael C

    2008-05-09

    The intestine has an extraordinary capacity for fatty acid (FA) absorption. Numerous candidates for a protein-mediated mechanism of dietary FA absorption have been proposed, but firm evidence for this process has remained elusive. Here we show that the scavenger receptor CD36 is required both for the uptake of very long chain FAs (VLCFAs) in cultured cells and the absorption of dietary VLCFAs in mice. We found that the fraction of CD36-dependent saturated fatty acid association/absorption in these model systems is proportional to the FA chain length and specific for fatty acids and fatty alcohols containing very long saturated acyl chains. Moreover, intestinal VLCFA absorption is completely abolished in CD36-null mice fed a high fat diet, illustrating that the predominant mechanism for VLCFA absorption is CD36-dependent. Together, these findings represent the first direct evidence for protein-facilitated FA absorption in the intestine and identify a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases characterized by elevated VLCFA levels.

  16. Silica-Polystyrene Nanocomposite Particles Synthesized by Nitroxide-Mediated Polymerization and Their Encapsulation through Miniemulsion Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérangère Bailly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene (PS chains with molecular weights comprised between 8000 and 64000 g⋅mol-1 and narrow polydispersities were grown from the surface of silica nanoparticles (Aerosil A200 fumed silica and Stöber silica, resp. through nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP. Alkoxyamine initiators based on N-tert-butyl-1-diethylphosphono-2,2-dimethylpropyl nitroxide (DEPN and carrying a terminal functional group have been synthesized in situ and grafted to the silica surface. The resulting grafted alkoxyamines have been employed to initiate the growth of polystyrene chains from the inorganic surface. The maximum grafting density of the surface-tethered PS chains was estimated and seemed to be limited by initiator confinement at the interface. Then, the PS-grafted Stöber silica nanoparticles were entrapped inside latex particles via miniemulsion polymerization. Transmission electron microscopy indicated the successful formation of silica-polystyrene core-shell particles.

  17. Morphological control of strontium oxalate particles by PSMA-mediated precipitation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Jiaguo [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)]. E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com; Tang Hua [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Cheng Bei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2005-05-15

    In this paper, strontium oxalate particles with different morphologies could be easily obtained by a precipitation reaction of sodium oxalate with strontium chloride in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA). The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effects of pH, aging time and concentration of PSMA on the phase structures and morphologies of the as-prepared strontium oxalate particles were investigated and discussed. The results showed that strontium oxalate particles with various morphologies, such as, bi-pyramids, rods, peanuts, and spherical particles, etc., could be obtained by varying the experimental conditions. PSMA promoted the formation of strontium oxalate dihydrate (SOD) phase. Suitable pH values (pH 7 and 8) favor the formation of the peanut-shaped SrC{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles. This research may provide new insight into the control of morphologies and phase structures of strontium oxalate particles and the biomimetic synthesis of novel inorganic materials.

  18. TGF-β1-mediated differentiation of fibroblasts is associated with increased mitochondrial content and cellular respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulugbek Negmadjanov

    Full Text Available Cytokine-dependent activation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, a key event in fibrosis, is accompanied by phenotypic changes with increased secretory and contractile properties dependent on increased energy utilization, yet changes in the energetic profile of these cells are not fully described. We hypothesize that the TGF-β1-mediated transformation of myofibroblasts is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and function when compared to naive fibroblasts.Cultured NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, a profibrotic cytokine, or vehicle were assessed for transformation to myofibroblasts (appearance of α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA] stress fibers and associated changes in mitochondrial content and functions using laser confocal microscopy, Seahorse respirometry, multi-well plate reader and biochemical protocols. Expression of mitochondrial-specific proteins was determined using western blotting, and the mitochondrial DNA quantified using Mitochondrial DNA isolation kit.Treatment with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL induced transformation of naive fibroblasts into myofibroblasts with a threefold increase in the expression of α-SMA (6.85 ± 0.27 RU compared to cells not treated with TGF-β1 (2.52 ± 0.11 RU. TGF-β1 exposure increased the number of mitochondria in the cells, as monitored by membrane potential sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine, and expression of mitochondria-specific proteins; voltage-dependent anion channels (0.54 ± 0.05 vs. 0.23 ± 0.05 RU and adenine nucleotide transporter (0.61 ± 0.11 vs. 0.22 ± 0.05 RU, as well as mitochondrial DNA content (530 ± 12 μg DNA/106 cells vs. 307 ± 9 μg DNA/106 cells in control. TGF-β1 treatment was associated with an increase in mitochondrial function with a twofold increase in baseline oxygen consumption rate (2.25 ± 0.03 vs. 1.13 ± 0.1 nmol O2/min/106 cells and FCCP-induced mitochondrial respiration (2.87 ± 0.03 vs. 1.46 ± 0.15 nmol O2/min/106 cells.TGF-β1 induced

  19. Ripk3 regulates cardiac microvascular reperfusion injury: The role of IP3R-dependent calcium overload, XO-mediated oxidative stress and F-action/filopodia-based cellular migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Pingjun; Hu, Shunying; Ren, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ripk3-mediated cellular apoptosis is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury. However, the mechanisms by which Ripk3 influences microvascular homeostasis and endothelial apoptosis are not completely understood. In this study, loss of Ripk3 inhibited endothelial apoptosis, alleviated luminal swelling, maintained microvasculature patency, reduced the expression of adhesion molecules and limited the myocardial inflammatory response. In vitro, Ripk3 deficiency protected endothelial cells from apoptosis and migratory arrest induced by HR injury. Mechanistically, Ripk3 had the ability to migrate onto the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), leading to ER damage, as evidenced by increased IP3R and XO expression. The higher IP3R content was associated with cellular calcium overload, and increased XO expression was involved in cellular oxidative injury. Furthermore, IP3R-mediated calcium overload and XO-dependent oxidative damage were able to initiate cellular apoptosis. More importantly, IP3R and XO also caused F-actin degradation into G-actin via post-transcriptional modification of cofilin, impairing the formation of the filopodia and limiting the migratory response of endothelial cells. Altogether, our data confirmed that Ripk3 was involved in microvascular IR injury via regulation of IP3R-mediated calcium overload, XO-dependent oxidative damage and filopodia-related cellular migration, ultimately leading to endothelial apoptosis and migratory inhibition. These findings provide a potential target for treating cardiac microcirculatory IR injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Seeds mediated synthesis of giant gold particles on the glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, A. A.; Borodinova, T. I.; Marchenko, O. A.; Snegir, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Herein, we present the protocols of synthesis of two types of gold particles which are in the great interest for the purpose of molecular electronics. The first type is the flat prisms with a triangular/hexagonal shape and a lateral size up to 80 µm. They were synthesized directly on a glass surface pretreated with (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane molecules. The second type of particles was synthesized with using gold seeds with diameter of 18 nm. These seeds were deposited on a glass surface coated with APTES. The resulted three-dimensional structures with a form close to spherical increase in size up to 0.5-0.08 µm. Moreover, these particles grew up separately and did not merge during 48 h of synthesis.

  1. Drift-Alfven wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfven waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28x0.24 ion sound-gyroradii ρ s =c s /ω ci . The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k perpendicular ρ s ∼0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles

  2. Drift-Alfvén wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-06-01

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfvén waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28ρs=cs/ωci. The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k ⊥ρs˜0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  3. Receptor-independent, vacuolar ATPase-mediated cellular uptake of histamine receptor-1 ligands: Possible origin of pharmacological distortions and side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morissette, Guillaume; Lodge, Robert; Bouthillier, Johanne; Marceau, Francois

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether several histamine receptor agonists and antagonists are subjected to receptor-independent ion trapping into acidic organelles, and whether this sequestration influences their pharmacological or toxicological properties. Vacuolar (V)-ATPase-dependent intracellular sequestration of agonists was recognized as morphological alterations (large fluid-filled vacuoles for betahistine and 1-methylhistamine, granular uptake for fluorescent BODIPY FL histamine) prevented by the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 in rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells. Lipophilicity was the major determinant of these cellular effects (order of potency: BODIPY FL histamine > betahistine > 1-methylhistamine > histamine) that occurred at high concentrations. This ranking was dissociable from the potency order for H 1 receptor-mediated contraction of the rabbit aorta, a response uninfluenced by bafilomycin. Antihistamines are inherently more lipophilic and caused vacuolization of a proportion of cells at 5-500 μM. Agonist or antagonist-induced vacuoles were of macroautophagic nature (labeled with GFP-conjugated LC3, Rab7 and CD63; detection of LC3 II). Further, the 2 most lipophilic antihistamines tested, astemizole and terfenadine, were potentiated by V-ATPase blockade in the aortic contractility assay (13- and 3.6-fold more potent, respectively, pA 2 scale), suggesting that V-ATPase-mediated cation trapping sequesters these antagonists from the vicinity of H 1 receptors in the therapeutic concentration range. This potentiation did not apply to less lipophilic antagonists (pyrilamine, diphenhydramine). While some agonists and all tested antagonists of the histamine H 1 receptors induce the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology, sequestration affects the pharmacology of only the most lipophilic antagonists, the ones prone to off-target arrhythmogenic side effects

  4. Rigidity of a spherical capsule switches the localization of encapsulated particles between inner and peripheral regions under crowding condition: Simple model on cellular architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang, E-mail: chwenyang.shew@csi.cuny.edu; Kondo, Kenta [Department of Chemistry, College of Staten Island, City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, New York 10314 (United States); Yoshikawa, Kenichi [Faculty of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)

    2014-01-14

    We have investigated the inhomogeneous interior of confined spherical cavities as capsules containing encapsulated binary hard sphere mixtures for different compositions and cavity wall rigidity. Such a greatly simplified model manifests the effects of macromolecular crowding arising from excluded volume interactions in a tiny cell or a cellular nucleus. By fixing the number of large particles, the level of crowding is adjusted by changing the amount of small hard spheres in the cavity. For a rigid cavity, large spheres tend to pack in liquid-like order apart from the surface to the center of the cavity as the crowding level is increased. Whereas, for a soft cavity, larger spheres tend to blend with small spheres in the peripheral region at near the boundary of the cavity, and are susceptible to be depleted from the interior of the cavity as the cavity becomes more crowded. These results may help future elucidation of the thermodynamic pathways to stabilize the inhomogeneous structure of mixtures confined in cavities, such as the derepression of genome materials around the interior rim of the nucleus in a cancerous cell.

  5. Rigidity of a spherical capsule switches the localization of encapsulated particles between inner and peripheral regions under crowding condition: Simple model on cellular architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang; Kondo, Kenta; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the inhomogeneous interior of confined spherical cavities as capsules containing encapsulated binary hard sphere mixtures for different compositions and cavity wall rigidity. Such a greatly simplified model manifests the effects of macromolecular crowding arising from excluded volume interactions in a tiny cell or a cellular nucleus. By fixing the number of large particles, the level of crowding is adjusted by changing the amount of small hard spheres in the cavity. For a rigid cavity, large spheres tend to pack in liquid-like order apart from the surface to the center of the cavity as the crowding level is increased. Whereas, for a soft cavity, larger spheres tend to blend with small spheres in the peripheral region at near the boundary of the cavity, and are susceptible to be depleted from the interior of the cavity as the cavity becomes more crowded. These results may help future elucidation of the thermodynamic pathways to stabilize the inhomogeneous structure of mixtures confined in cavities, such as the derepression of genome materials around the interior rim of the nucleus in a cancerous cell

  6. LiZIP3 is a cellular zinc transporter that mediates the tightly regulated import of zinc in Leishmania infantum parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sandra; da Silva, Rosa Barreira; Shawki, Ali; Castro, Helena; Lamy, Márcia; Eide, David; Costa, Vítor; Mackenzie, Bryan; Tomás, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cellular zinc homeostasis ensures that the intracellular concentration of this element is kept within limits that enable its participation in critical physiological processes without exerting toxic effects. We report here the identification and characterization of the first mediator of zinc homeostasis in Leishmania infantum, LiZIP3, a member of the ZIP family of divalent metal-ion transporters. The zinc transporter activity of LiZIP3 was first disclosed by its capacity to rescue the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in zinc acquisition. Subsequent expression of LiZIP3 in Xenopus laevis oocytes was shown to stimulate the uptake of a broad range of metal ions, among which Zn2+ was the preferred LiZIP3 substrate (K0.5 ≈ 0.1 μM). Evidence that LiZIP3 functions as a zinc importer in L. infantum came from the observations that the protein locates to the cell membrane and that its overexpression leads to augmented zinc internalization. Importantly, expression and cell-surface location of LiZIP3 are lost when parasites face high zinc bioavailability. LiZIP3 decline in response to zinc is regulated at the mRNA level in a process involving (a) short-lived protein(s). Collectively, our data reveal that LiZIP3 enables L. infantum to acquire zinc in a highly regulated manner, hence contributing to zinc homeostasis. PMID:25644708

  7. Cell wall biochemical alterations during Agrobacterium-mediated expression of haemagglutinin-based influenza virus-like vaccine particles in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mauff, François; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Bardor, Muriel; Berard, Caroline; Doucet, Alain; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Vezina, Louis-Philippe; Driouich, Azeddine; Couture, Manon M-J; Lerouge, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    Influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) have been shown to induce a safe and potent immune response through both humoral and cellular responses. They represent promising novel influenza vaccines. Plant-based biotechnology allows for the large-scale production of VLPs of biopharmaceutical interest using different model organisms, including Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Through this platform, influenza VLPs bud from the plasma membrane and accumulate between the membrane and the plant cell wall. To design and optimize efficient production processes, a better understanding of the plant cell wall composition of infiltrated tobacco leaves is a major interest for the plant biotechnology industry. In this study, we have investigated the alteration of the biochemical composition of the cell walls of N. benthamiana leaves subjected to abiotic and biotic stresses induced by the Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation and the resulting high expression levels of influenza VLPs. Results show that abiotic stress due to vacuum infiltration without Agrobacterium did not induce any detectable modification of the leaf cell wall when compared to non infiltrated leaves. In contrast, various chemical changes of the leaf cell wall were observed post-Agrobacterium infiltration. Indeed, Agrobacterium infection induced deposition of callose and lignin, modified the pectin methylesterification and increased both arabinosylation of RG-I side chains and the expression of arabinogalactan proteins. Moreover, these modifications were slightly greater in plants expressing haemagglutinin-based VLP than in plants infiltrated with the Agrobacterium strain containing only the p19 suppressor of silencing. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Basophil mediated pro-allergic inflammation in vehicle-emitted particles exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharenko, Alexander M.; Engin, Ayse Basak; Chernyshev, Valery V.; Chaika, Vladimir V.; Ugay, Sergey M.; Rezaee, Ramin; Karimi, Gholamreza; Drozd, Vladimir A.; Nikitina, Anna V.; Solomennik, Sergey F.; Kudryavkina, Olga R.; Xin, Liu; Wenpeng, Yuan; Tzatzarakis, Manolis; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M.; Golokhvast, Kirill S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite of the fact that engine manufacturers develop a new technology to reduce exhaust emissions, insufficient attention given to particulate emissions. However, diesel exhaust particles are a major source of air-borne pollution, contain vast amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and may have deleterious effects on the immune system, resulting in the induction and enhancement of pro-allergic processes. In the current study, vehicle emitted particles (VEP) from 2 different types of cars (diesel - D and gasoline - G) and locomotive (L) were collected. Overall, 129 four-week-old, male SPF-class Kunming mice were subcutaneously instilled with either low dose 100, 250 or high dose, 500 mg/kg VEP and 15 mice were assigned as control group. The systemic toxicity was evaluated and alterations in the percentages of the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD25 expressing cells, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were determined. Basophil percentages were inversely associated with the PAH content of the VEPs, however basophil sensitization was more important than cell count in VEP exposure. Thus, the effects of VEP-PAHs emerge with the activation of basophils in an allergen independent fashion. Despite the increased percentage of CD4+ T cells, a sharp decrease in basophil counts at 500 mg/kg of VEP indicates a decreased inhibitory effect of CD16+ monocytes on the proliferation of CD4+ T cell and suppressed polarization into a Th2 phenotype. Therefore, although the restrictions for vehicles emissions differ between countries, follow up studies and strict regulations are needed. - Highlights: • Basophil sensitization is more important than cell count in VEP exposure. • CD16+ cells are more effective than basophils on CD4+ T cell proliferation. • CD16+ and CD16- monocytes respond to VEP exposure in opposite directions. • CD8+ T cell proliferation is inhibited by all doses of VEPs. • Globally, more stringent standards are needed for vehicle particle emissions.

  9. Basophil mediated pro-allergic inflammation in vehicle-emitted particles exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharenko, Alexander M. [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Engin, Ayse Basak [Gazi University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Toxicology, 06330, Hipodrom, Ankara (Turkey); Chernyshev, Valery V.; Chaika, Vladimir V.; Ugay, Sergey M. [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Rezaee, Ramin [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Bojnurd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, Gholamreza [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Drozd, Vladimir A.; Nikitina, Anna V.; Solomennik, Sergey F.; Kudryavkina, Olga R. [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Xin, Liu; Wenpeng, Yuan [Biology Institute Shandong Academy of Science, Jinan 250014 (China); Tzatzarakis, Manolis [Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Tsatsakis, Aristidis M., E-mail: aris@med.uoc.gr [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Golokhvast, Kirill S., E-mail: droopy@mail.ru [Far Eastern Federal University, Engineering School, Scientific Educational Centre of Nanotechnology, 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Despite of the fact that engine manufacturers develop a new technology to reduce exhaust emissions, insufficient attention given to particulate emissions. However, diesel exhaust particles are a major source of air-borne pollution, contain vast amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and may have deleterious effects on the immune system, resulting in the induction and enhancement of pro-allergic processes. In the current study, vehicle emitted particles (VEP) from 2 different types of cars (diesel - D and gasoline - G) and locomotive (L) were collected. Overall, 129 four-week-old, male SPF-class Kunming mice were subcutaneously instilled with either low dose 100, 250 or high dose, 500 mg/kg VEP and 15 mice were assigned as control group. The systemic toxicity was evaluated and alterations in the percentages of the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD25 expressing cells, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were determined. Basophil percentages were inversely associated with the PAH content of the VEPs, however basophil sensitization was more important than cell count in VEP exposure. Thus, the effects of VEP-PAHs emerge with the activation of basophils in an allergen independent fashion. Despite the increased percentage of CD4+ T cells, a sharp decrease in basophil counts at 500 mg/kg of VEP indicates a decreased inhibitory effect of CD16+ monocytes on the proliferation of CD4+ T cell and suppressed polarization into a Th2 phenotype. Therefore, although the restrictions for vehicles emissions differ between countries, follow up studies and strict regulations are needed. - Highlights: • Basophil sensitization is more important than cell count in VEP exposure. • CD16+ cells are more effective than basophils on CD4+ T cell proliferation. • CD16+ and CD16- monocytes respond to VEP exposure in opposite directions. • CD8+ T cell proliferation is inhibited by all doses of VEPs. • Globally, more stringent standards are needed for vehicle particle emissions.

  10. Selective alpha-particle mediated depletion of tumor vasculature with vascular normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh Jaggi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature.Actinium-225 ((225Ac-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, (225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in (225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following (225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following (225Ac-E4G10 therapy.The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy.

  11. Development of phonon-mediated cryogenic particle detectors with electron and nuclear recoil discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sae Woo

    1999-10-01

    Observations have shown that galaxies, including our own, are surrounded by halos of ``dark matter''. One possibility is that this may be an undiscovered form of matter, weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). This thesis describes the development of silicon based cryogenic particle detectors designed to directly detect interactions with these WIMPs. These detectors are part of a new class of detectors which are able to reject background events by simultaneously measuring energy deposited into phonons versus electron hole pairs. By using the phonon sensors with the ionization sensors to compare the partitioning of energy between phonons and ionizations we can discriminate between electron recoil events (background radiation) and nuclear recoil events (dark matter events). These detectors with built-in background rejection are a major advance in background rejection over previous searches. Much of this thesis will describe work in scaling the detectors from / g prototype devices to a fully functional prototype 100g dark matter detector. In particular, many sensors were fabricated and tested to understand the behavior of our phonon sensors, Quasipartice trapping assisted Electrothermal feedback Transition edge sensors (QETs). The QET sensors utilize aluminum quasiparticle traps attached to tungsten superconducting transition edge sensors patterned on a silicon substrate. The tungsten lines are voltage biased and self-regulate in the transition region. Phonons from particle interactions within the silicon propogate to the surface where they are absorbed by the aluminum generating quasiparticles in the aluminum. The quasiparticles diffuse into the tungsten and couple energy into the tungsten electron system. Consequently, the tungsten increases in resistance and causes a current pulse which is measured with a high bandwidth SQUID system. With this advanced sensor technology, we were able to demonstrate detectors with xy position sensitivity with electron and

  12. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  13. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after α-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Chen Shaopeng; Yu, K.N.; Wu Lijun

    2010-01-01

    Low-dose α-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose α-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-β1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  14. Promising MS2 mediated virus-like particle vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan-mei; Zhang, Guo-guang; Huang, Xiao-jun; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hao-tai

    2015-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has caused severe economic losses to millions of farmers worldwide. In this work, the coding genes of 141-160 epitope peptide (EP141-160) of VP1 were inserted into the coat protein (CP) genes of MS2 in prokaryotic expression vector, and the recombinant protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLP). Results showed that the CP-EP141-160 VLP had a strong immunoreaction with the FMD virus (FMDV) antigen in vitro, and also had an effective immune response in mice. Further virus challenge tests were carried out on guinea pigs and swine, high-titer neutralizing antibodies were produced and the CP-EP141-160 VLP vaccine could protect most of the animals against FMDV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Basophil mediated pro-allergic inflammation in vehicle-emitted particles exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, Alexander M; Engin, Ayse Basak; Chernyshev, Valery V; Chaika, Vladimir V; Ugay, Sergey M; Rezaee, Ramin; Karimi, Gholamreza; Drozd, Vladimir A; Nikitina, Anna V; Solomennik, Sergey F; Kudryavkina, Olga R; Xin, Liu; Wenpeng, Yuan; Tzatzarakis, Manolis; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Golokhvast, Kirill S

    2017-01-01

    Despite of the fact that engine manufacturers develop a new technology to reduce exhaust emissions, insufficient attention given to particulate emissions. However, diesel exhaust particles are a major source of air-borne pollution, contain vast amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and may have deleterious effects on the immune system, resulting in the induction and enhancement of pro-allergic processes. In the current study, vehicle emitted particles (VEP) from 2 different types of cars (diesel - D and gasoline - G) and locomotive (L) were collected. Overall, 129 four-week-old, male SPF-class Kunming mice were subcutaneously instilled with either low dose 100, 250 or high dose, 500mg/kg VEP and 15 mice were assigned as control group. The systemic toxicity was evaluated and alterations in the percentages of the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD25 expressing cells, basophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were determined. Basophil percentages were inversely associated with the PAH content of the VEPs, however basophil sensitization was more important than cell count in VEP exposure. Thus, the effects of VEP-PAHs emerge with the activation of basophils in an allergen independent fashion. Despite the increased percentage of CD4+ T cells, a sharp decrease in basophil counts at 500mg/kg of VEP indicates a decreased inhibitory effect of CD16+ monocytes on the proliferation of CD4+ T cell and suppressed polarization into a Th2 phenotype. Therefore, although the restrictions for vehicles emissions differ between countries, follow up studies and strict regulations are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy: a comparative study of heating for different particle types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattani, Varun P; Tunnell, James W

    2012-10-01

    particle efficiency, but also the in vivo particle targeting ability under study. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Immunization with Clinical HIV-1 Env Proteins Induces Broad Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in a Rabbit Vaccination Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov; Heyndrickx, Leo; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2017-11-17

    The induction of both neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies with effector functions, for example, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is desired in the search for effective vaccines against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel immunogens capable of inducing an efficient antibody response, rabbits were immunized with selected antigens using different prime-boost strategies. We immunized 35 different groups of rabbits with Env antigens from clinical HIV-1 subtypes A and B, including immunization with DNA alone, protein alone, and DNA prime with protein boost. The rabbit sera were screened for ADCC activity using a GranToxiLux-based assay with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as effector cells and CEM.NKR CCR5 cells coated with HIV-1 envelope as target cells. The groups with the highest ADCC activity were further characterized for cross-reactivity between HIV-1 subtypes. The immunogen inducing the most potent and broadest ADCC response was a trimeric gp140. The ADCC activity was highest against the HIV-1 subtype corresponding to the immunogen. The ADCC activity did not necessarily reflect neutralizing activity in the pseudovirus-TZMbl assay, but there was an overall correlation between the two antiviral activities. We present a rabbit vaccination model and an assay suitable for screening HIV-1 vaccine candidates for the induction of ADCC-mediating antibodies in addition to neutralizing antibodies. The antigens and/or immunization strategies capable of inducing antibodies with ADCC activity did not necessarily induce neutralizing activity and vice versa. Nevertheless, we identified vaccine candidates that were able to concurrently induce both types of responses and that had ADCC activity that was cross-reactive between different subtypes. When searching for an effective vaccine candidate, it is important to evaluate the antibody response using a model and an assay measuring the desired function.

  18. Cellular corepressor TLE2 inhibits replication-and-transcription- activator-mediated transactivation and lytic reactivation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiheng; Liu, Yunhua; Liang, Deguang; Wang, Zhuo; Robertson, Erle S; Lan, Ke

    2010-02-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is essential and sufficient to initiate lytic reactivation. RTA activates its target genes through direct binding with high affinity to its responsive elements or by interaction with cellular factors, such as RBP-Jkappa, Ap-1, C/EBP-alpha, and Oct-1. In this study, we identified transducin-like enhancer of split 2 (TLE2) as a novel RTA binding protein by using yeast two-hybrid screening of a human spleen cDNA library. The interaction between TLE2 and RTA was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) binding and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that TLE2 and RTA were colocalized in the same nuclear compartment in KSHV-infected cells. This interaction recruited TLE2 to RTA bound to its recognition sites on DNA and repressed RTA auto-activation and transactivation activity. Moreover, TLE2 also inhibited the induction of lytic replication and virion production driven by RTA. We further showed that the Q (Gln-rich), SP (Ser-Pro-rich), and WDR (Trp-Asp repeat) domains of TLE2 and the Pro-rich domain of RTA were essential for this interaction. RBP-Jkappa has been shown previously to bind to the same Pro-rich domain of RTA, and this binding can be subject to competition by TLE2. In addition, TLE2 can form a complex with RTA to access the cognate DNA sequence of the RTA-responsive element at different promoters. Intriguingly, the transcription level of TLE2 could be upregulated by RTA during the lytic reactivation process. In conclusion, we identified a new RTA binding protein, TLE2, and demonstrated that TLE2 inhibited replication and transactivation mediated by RTA. This provides another potentially important mechanism for maintenance of KSHV viral latency through interaction with a host protein.

  19. Induction of Nrf2-mediated cellular defenses and alteration of phase I activities as mechanisms of chemoprotective effects of coffee in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin, C; Marin-Kuan, M; Langouët, S; Bezençon, C; Guignard, G; Verguet, C; Piguet, D; Holzhäuser, D; Cornaz, R; Schilter, B

    2008-04-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with a significant decrease in the risk of developing chronic diseases such as Parkinson disease, diabetes type-2 and several types of cancers (e.g. colon, liver). In the present study, a coffee-dependent induction of enzymes involved in xenobiotic detoxification processes was observed in rat liver and primary hepatocytes. In addition, coffee was found to induce the mRNA and protein expression of enzymes involved in cellular antioxidant defenses. These inductions were correlated with the activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor as shown using an ARE-reporter luciferase assay. The induction of detoxifying enzymes GSTs and AKR is compatible with a protection against both genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). This hypothesis was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo test systems, where coffee reduced both AFB1-DNA and protein adducts. Interestingly, coffee was also found to inhibit cytochrome CYP1A1/2, indicating that other mechanisms different from a stimulation of detoxification may also play a significant role in the chemoprotective effects of coffee. Further investigations in either human liver cell line and primary hepatocytes indicated that the chemoprotective effects of coffee against AFB1 genotoxicity are likely to be of relevance for humans. These data strongly suggest that coffee may protect against the adverse effects of AFB1. In addition, the coffee-mediated stimulation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway resulting in increased endogenous defense mechanisms against electrophilic but also oxidative insults further support that coffee may be associated with a protection against various types of chemical stresses.

  20. Hyperthermia enhances mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death through ubiquitin-mediated degradation of cellular FLIP(long) in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X; Kim, S-Y; Zhou, Z; Lagasse, E; Kwon, Y T; Lee, Y J

    2013-04-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; the main cause of death of colorectal cancer is hepatic metastases, which can be treated with hyperthermia using isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP). In this study, we report that mild hyperthermia potently reduced cellular FLIP(long), (c-FLIP(L)), a major regulator of the death receptor (DR) pathway of apoptosis, thereby enhancing humanized anti-DR4 antibody mapatumumab (Mapa)-mediated mitochondria-independent apoptosis. We observed that overexpression of c-FLIP(L) in CX-1 cells abrogated the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia, whereas silencing of c-FLIP in CX-1 cells enhanced Mapa-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia altered c-FLIP(L) protein stability without concomitant reductions in FLIP mRNA. Ubiquitination of c-FLIP(L) was increased by hyperthermia, and proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented heat-induced downregulation of c-FLIP(L). These results suggest the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in this process. We also found lysine residue 195 (K195) to be essential for c-FLIP(L) ubiquitination and proteolysis, as mutant c-FLIP(L) lysine 195 arginine (arginine replacing lysine) was left virtually un-ubiquitinated and was refractory to hyperthermia-triggered degradation, and thus partially blocked the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia. Our observations reveal that hyperthermia transiently reduced c-FLIP(L) by proteolysis linked to K195 ubiquitination, which contributed to the synergistic effect between Mapa and hyperthermia. This study supports the application of hyperthermia combined with other regimens to treat colorectal hepatic metastases.

  1. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Modeling of the Cellular Dosimetry of 64Cu: Comparison with MIRDcell S Values and Implications for Studies of Its Cytotoxic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhongli; Kwon, Yongkyu Luke; Reilly, Raymond M

    2017-02-01

    64 Cu emits positrons as well as β - particles and Auger and internal conversion electrons useful for radiotherapy. Our objective was to model the cellular dosimetry of 64 Cu under different geometries commonly used to study the cytotoxic effects of 64 Cu. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) was used to simulate the transport of all particles emitted by 64 Cu from the cell surface (CS), cytoplasm (Cy), or nucleus (N) of a single cell; monolayer in a well (radius = 0.32-1.74 cm); or a sphere (radius = 50-6,000 μm) of cells to calculate S values. The radius of the cell and N ranged from 5 to 12 μm and 2 to 11 μm, respectively. S values were obtained by MIRDcell for comparison. MCF7/HER2-18 cells were exposed in vitro to 64 Cu-labeled trastuzumab. The subcellular distribution of 64 Cu was measured by cell fractionation. The surviving fraction was determined in a clonogenic assay. The relative differences of MCNP versus MIRDcell self-dose S values (S self ) for 64 Cu ranged from -0.2% to 3.6% for N to N (S N←N ), 2.3% to 8.6% for Cy to N (S N←Cy ), and -12.0% to 7.3% for CS to N (S N←CS ). The relative differences of MCNP versus MIRDcell cross-dose S values were 25.8%-30.6% for a monolayer and 30%-34% for a sphere, respectively. The ratios of S N←N versus S N←Cy and S N←Cy versus S N←CS decreased with increasing ratio of the N of the cell versus radius of the cell and the size of the monolayer or sphere. The surviving fraction of MCF7 /: HER2-18 cells treated with 64 Cu-labeled trastuzumab (0.016-0.368 MBq/μg, 67 nM) for 18 h versus the absorbed dose followed a linear survival curve with α = 0.51 ± 0.05 Gy -1 and R 2 = 0.8838. This is significantly different from the linear quadratic survival curve of MCF7 /: HER2-18 cells exposed to γ-rays. MCNP- and MIRDcell-calculated S values agreed well. 64 Cu in the N increases the dose to the N in isolated single cells but has less effect in a cell monolayer or small cluster of cells simulating a micrometastasis

  2. Toll-like receptor agonist augments virus-like particle-mediated protection from Ebola virus with transient immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A O Martins

    Full Text Available Identifying safe and effective adjuvants is critical for the advanced development of protein-based vaccines. Pattern recognition receptor (PRR agonists are increasingly being explored as potential adjuvants, but there is concern that the efficacy of these molecules may be dependent on potentially dangerous levels of non-specific immune activation. The filovirus virus-like particle (VLP vaccine protects mice, guinea pigs, and nonhuman primates from viral challenge. In this study, we explored the impact of a stabilized dsRNA mimic, polyICLC, on VLP vaccination of C57BL/6 mice and Hartley guinea pigs. We show that at dose levels as low as 100 ng, the adjuvant increased the efficacy of the vaccine in mice. Antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and antibody responses increased significantly upon inclusion of adjuvant. To determine whether the efficacy of polyICLC correlated with systemic immune activation, we examined serum cytokine levels and cellular activation in the draining lymph node. PolyICLC administration was associated with increases in TNFα, IL6, MCP1, MIP1α, KC, and MIP1β levels in the periphery and with the activation of dendritic cells (DCs, NK cells, and B cells. However, this activation resolved within 24 to 72 hours at efficacious adjuvant dose levels. These studies are the first to examine the polyICLC-induced enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses in the context of non-specific immune activation, and they provide a framework from which to consider adjuvant dose levels.

  3. Iodine-mediated coastal particle formation: an overview of the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe Roscoff coastal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McFiggans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the measurements made during the heavily-instrumented Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe coastal study in Roscoff on the North West coast of France throughout September 2006. It was clearly demonstrated that iodine-mediated coastal particle formation occurs, driven by daytime low tide emission of molecular iodine, I2, by macroalgal species fully or partially exposed by the receding waterline. Ultrafine particle concentrations strongly correlate with the rapidly recycled reactive iodine species, IO, produced at high concentrations following photolysis of I2. The heterogeneous macroalgal I2 sources lead to variable relative concentrations of iodine species observed by path-integrated and in situ measurement techniques.

    Apparent particle emission fluxes were associated with an enhanced apparent depositional flux of ozone, consistent with both a direct O3 deposition to macroalgae and involvement of O3 in iodine photochemistry and subsequent particle formation below the measurement height. The magnitude of the particle formation events was observed to be greatest at the lowest tides with the highest concentrations of ultrafine particles growing to the largest sizes, probably by the condensation of anthropogenically-formed condensable material. At such sizes the particles should be able to act as cloud condensation nuclei at reasonable atmospheric supersaturations.

  4. On the spatial dynamics and oscillatory behavior of a predator-prey model based on cellular automata and local particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Mario Martínez; Moreno-Armendáriz, Marco A; Carlos Seck Tuoh Mora, Juan

    2013-11-07

    A two-dimensional lattice model based on Cellular Automata theory and swarm intelligence is used to study the spatial and population dynamics of a theoretical ecosystem. It is found that the social interactions among predators provoke the formation of clusters, and that by increasing the mobility of predators the model enters into an oscillatory behavior. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 56Fe particle exposure results in a long-lasting increase in a cellular index of genomic instability and transiently suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal R.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24 h), intermediate (7 d), and/or long time points (2-3 mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  6. Cellular MR Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Modo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular MR imaging is a young field that aims to visualize targeted cells in living organisms. In order to provide a different signal intensity of the targeted cell, they are either labeled with MR contrast agents in vivo or prelabeled in vitro. Either (ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide [(USPIO] particles or (polymeric paramagnetic chelates can be used for this purpose. For in vivo cellular labeling, Gd3+- and Mn2+- chelates have mainly been used for targeted hepatobiliary imaging, and (USPIO-based cellular imaging has been focused on imaging of macrophage activity. Several of these magneto-pharmaceuticals have been FDA-approved or are in late-phase clinical trials. As for prelabeling of cells in vitro, a challenge has been to induce a sufficient uptake of contrast agents into nonphagocytic cells, without affecting normal cellular function. It appears that this issue has now largely been resolved, leading to an active research on monitoring the cellular biodistribution in vivo following transplantation or transfusion of these cells, including cell migration and trafficking. New applications of cellular MR imaging will be directed, for instance, towards our understanding of hematopoietic (immune cell trafficking and of novel guided (stem cell-based therapies aimed to be translated to the clinic in the future.

  7. Immunization with Clinical HIV-1 Env Proteins Induces Broad Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in a Rabbit Vaccination Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov

    2018-01-01

    The induction of both neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies with effector functions, for example, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is desired in the search for effective vaccines against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel immunogens capable of inducing an efficient a...

  8. p16(INK4a suppression by glucose restriction contributes to human cellular lifespan extension through SIRT1-mediated epigenetic and genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Although caloric restriction (CR has been shown to increase lifespan in various animal models, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been revealed. We developed an in vitro system to mimic CR by reducing glucose concentration in cell growth medium which excludes metabolic factors and allows assessment of the effects of CR at the cellular and molecular level. We monitored cellular proliferation of normal WI-38, IMR-90 and MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts and found that glucose restriction (GR can inhibit cellular senescence and significantly extend cellular lifespan compared with cells receiving normal glucose (NG in the culture medium. Moreover, GR decreased expression of p16(INK4a (p16, a well-known senescence-related gene, in all of the tested cell lines. Over-expressed p16 resulted in early replicative senescence in glucose-restricted cells suggesting a crucial role of p16 regulation in GR-induced cellular lifespan extension. The decreased expression of p16 was partly due to GR-induced chromatin remodeling through effects on histone acetylation and methylation of the p16 promoter. GR resulted in an increased expression of SIRT1, a NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, which has positive correlation with CR-induced longevity. The elevated SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of the Akt/p70S6K1 signaling pathway in response to GR. Furthermore, knockdown of SIRT1 abolished GR-induced p16 repression as well as Akt/p70S6K1 activation implying that SIRT1 may affect p16 repression through direct deacetylation effects and indirect regulation of Akt/p70S6K1 signaling. Collectively, these results provide new insights into interactions between epigenetic and genetic mechanisms on CR-induced longevity that may contribute to anti-aging approaches and also provide a general molecular model for studying CR in vitro in mammalian systems.

  9. Diselenolane-mediated cellular uptake† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed procedures and results for all reported experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc05151d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuard, Nicolas; Poblador-Bahamonde, Amalia I.; Zong, Lili; Bartolami, Eline; Hildebrandt, Jana; Weigand, Wolfgang; Sakai, Naomi

    2018-01-01

    The emerging power of thiol-mediated uptake with strained disulfides called for a move from sulfur to selenium. We report that according to results with fluorescent model substrates, cellular uptake with 1,2-diselenolanes exceeds uptake with 1,2-dithiolanes and epidithiodiketopiperazines with regard to efficiency as well as intracellular localization. The diselenide analog of lipoic acid performs best. This 1,2-diselenolane delivers fluorophores efficiently to the cytosol of HeLa Kyoto cells, without detectable endosomal capture as with 1,2-dithiolanes or dominant escape into the nucleus as with epidithiodiketopiperazines. Diselenolane-mediated cytosolic delivery is non-toxic (MTT assay), sensitive to temperature but insensitive to inhibitors of endocytosis (chlorpromazine, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, wortmannin, cytochalasin B) and conventional thiol-mediated uptake (Ellman's reagent), and to serum. Selenophilicity, the extreme CSeSeC dihedral angle of 0° and the high but different acidity of primary and secondary selenols might all contribute to uptake. Thiol-exchange affinity chromatography is introduced as operational mimic of thiol-mediated uptake that provides, in combination with rate enhancement of DTT oxidation, direct experimental evidence for existence and nature of the involved selenosulfides. PMID:29675232

  10. HTLV-1 Tax protects against CD95-mediated apoptosis by induction of the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Andreas; Fas, Stefanie C; Giaisi, Marco; Bleumink, Marc; Merling, Anette; Stumpf, Christine; Baumann, Sven; Holtkotte, Denise; Bosch, Valerie; Krammer, Peter H; Li-Weber, Min

    2006-05-15

    The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax is essential for malignant transformation of CD4 T cells, ultimately leading to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Malignant transformation may involve development of apoptosis resistance. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which HTLV-1 Tax confers resistance toward CD95-mediated apoptosis. We show that Tax-expressing T-cell lines derived from HTLV-1-infected patients express elevated levels of c-FLIP(L) and c-FLIP(S). The levels of c-FLIP correlated with resistance toward CD95-mediated apoptosis. Using an inducible system we demonstrated that both resistance toward CD95-mediated apoptosis and induction of c-FLIP are dependent on Tax. In addition, analysis of early cleavage of the BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid, a direct caspase-8 substrate, revealed that apoptosis is inhibited at a CD95 death receptor proximal level in Tax-expressing cells. Finally, using siRNA we directly showed that c-FLIP confers Tax-mediated resistance toward CD95-mediated apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggest an important mechanism by which expression of HTLV-1 Tax may lead to immune escape of infected T cells and, thus, to persistent infection and transformation.

  11. The ROS-mediated activation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway is involved in the 27-hydroxycholesterol-induced cellular senescence in nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Liu, Yun; Chen, Juan; Hu, Chunyan; Teng, Mengying; Jiao, Kailin; Shen, Zhaoxia; Zhu, Dongmei; Yue, Jia; Li, Zhong; Li, Yuan

    2017-12-01

    The oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC) is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERMs), which like endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) induces the proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells in vitro. Interestingly, the observation that 27HC induces adverse effects in neural system, distinguishing it from E 2 . It has been suggested that high levels of circulating cholesterol increase the entry of 27HC into the brain, which may induce learning and memory impairment. Based on this evidence, 27HC may be associated with neurodegenerative processes and interrupted cholesterol homeostasis in the brain. However, the biological events that participate in this process remain largely elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated that 27HC induced apparent cellular senescence in nerve cells. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) assay revealed that 27HC induced senescence in both BV2 cells and PC12 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that 27HC promoted the accumulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nerve cells and subsequently activation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. Notably, treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) markedly blocked 27HC-induced ROS production and activation of IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. Either blocking the generation of ROS or inhibition of IL-6/STAT3 both attenuated 27HC-induced cellular senescence. In sum, these findings not only suggested a mechanism whereby 27HC induced cellular senescence in nerve cells, but also helped to recognize the 27HC as a novel harmful factor in neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Cotransporting Ion is a Trigger for Cellular Endocytosis of Transporter-Targeting Nanoparticles: A Case Study of High-Efficiency SLC22A5 (OCTN2)-Mediated Carnitine-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Oral Delivery of Therapeutic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Longfa; Yao, Qing; Sun, Mengchi; Wu, Chunnuan; Wang, Jia; Luo, Qiuhua; Wang, Gang; Du, Yuqian; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Jian; He, Zhonggui; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Sun, Jin

    2017-09-01

    OCTN2 (SLC22A5) is a Na + -coupled absorption transporter for l-carnitine in small intestine. This study tests the potential of this transporter for oral delivery of therapeutic drugs encapsulated in l-carnitine-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (LC-PLGA NPs) and discloses the molecular mechanism for cellular endocytosis of transporter-targeting nanoparticles. Conjugation of l-carnitine to a surface of PLGA-NPs enhances the cellular uptake and intestinal absorption of encapsulated drug. In both cases, the uptake process is dependent on cotransporting ion Na + . Computational OCTN2 docking analysis shows that the presence of Na + is important for the formation of the energetically stable intermediate complex of transporter-Na + -LC-PLGA NPs, which is also the first step in cellular endocytosis of nanoparticles. The transporter-mediated intestinal absorption of LC-PLGA NPs occurs via endocytosis/transcytosis rather than via the traditional transmembrane transport. The portal blood versus the lymphatic route is evaluated by the plasma appearance of the drug in the control and lymph duct-ligated rats. Absorption via the lymphatic system is the predominant route in the oral delivery of the NPs. In summary, LC-PLGA NPs can effectively target OCTN2 on the enterocytes for enhancing oral delivery of drugs and the critical role of cotransporting ions should be noticed in designing transporter-targeting nanoparticles. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Downregulation of miR-130b~301b cluster is mediated by aberrant promoter methylation and impairs cellular senescence in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ramalho-Carvalho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous DNA-damaging cellular stresses, including oncogene activation and DNA-damage response (DDR, may lead to cellular senescence. Previous observations linked microRNA deregulation with altered senescent patterns, prompting us to investigate whether epigenetic repression of microRNAs expression might disrupt senescence in prostate cancer (PCa cells. Methods Differential methylation mapping in prostate tissues was carried using Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. After validation of methylation and expression analyses in a larger series of prostate tissues, the functional role of the cluster miR-130b~301b was explored using in vitro studies testing cell viability, apoptosis, invasion and DNA damage in prostate cancer cell lines. Western blot and RT-qPCR were performed to support those observations. Results We found that the miR-130b~301b cluster directs epigenetic activation of cell cycle inhibitors required for DDR activation, thus stimulating the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-130b~301b cluster markedly reduced the malignant phenotype of PCa cells. Conclusions Altogether, these data demonstrate that miR-130b~301b cluster overexpression might effectively induce PCa cell growth arrest through epigenetic regulation of proliferation-blocking genes and activation of cellular senescence.

  14. Metallic nickel nano- and fine particles induce JB6 cell apoptosis through a caspase-8/AIF mediated cytochrome c-independent pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vincent

    2009-04-01

    induced by metallic nickel particles in JB6 cells is through a caspase-8/AIF mediated cytochrome c-independent pathway. Lamin A and beta-actin are involved in the process of apoptosis. Activation of Akt and Bcl-2 may play an important role in preventing cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and may also be important in the carcinogenicity of metallic nickel particles. In addition, the results may be useful as an important reference when comparing the toxicities of different nickel compounds.

  15. In vivo relevance of two critical levels for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated cellular protection against electrophile toxicity found in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de L.H.J.; Pot, G.K.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Alink, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated detoxification of quinones is suggested to be involved in cancer prevention. In the present study, using transfected CHO cells, it was demonstrated that the relation between NQO1 activity and the resulting protection against the cytotoxicity of

  16. Search for a photophilic scalar mediator between standard model and dark sector particles in di-photon final states

    CERN Document Server

    Belfkir, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The strong CP violation and Dark matter are two important and theoretically compelling issues in modern particle physics and cosmology and the concept of axion-like particle (ALPs) is an elegant solution to both. To solve the CP violation problem we introduce a scalar field. The quanta associated to this field is the ALP.

  17. Size-dependent internalization of particles via the pathways of clathrin-and caveolae-mediated endocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rejman, J; Oberle, [No Value; Zuhorn, IS; Hoekstra, D

    2004-01-01

    Non-phagocytic eukaryotic cells can internalize particles <1 mum in size, encompassing pathogens, liposomes for drug delivery or lipoplexes applied in gene delivery. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of particle size on the pathway of entry and subsequent intracellular fate in

  18. Alveolar macrophage-epithelial cell interaction following exposure to atmospheric particles induces the release of mediators involved in monocyte mobilization and recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukae Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies from our laboratory have shown that human alveolar macrophages (AM and bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC exposed to ambient particles (PM10 in vitro increase their production of inflammatory mediators and that supernatants from PM10-exposed cells shorten the transit time of monocytes through the bone marrow and promote their release into the circulation. Methods The present study concerns co-culture of AM and HBEC exposed to PM10 (EHC-93 and the production of mediators involved in monocyte kinetics measured at both the mRNA and protein levels. The experiments were also designed to determine the role of the adhesive interaction between these cells via the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 in the production of these mediators. Results AM/HBEC co-cultures exposed to 100 μg/ml of PM10 for 2 or 24 h increased their levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, M-CSF, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1β, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, interleukin (IL-6 and ICAM-1 mRNA, compared to exposed AM or HBEC mono-cultures, or control non-exposed co-cultures. The levels of GM-CSF, M-CSF, MIP-1β and IL-6 increased in co-cultured supernatants collected after 24 h exposure compared to control cells (p 10-induced increase in co-culture mRNA expression. Conclusion We conclude that an ICAM-1 independent interaction between AM and HBEC, lung cells that process inhaled particles, increases the production and release of mediators that enhance bone marrow turnover of monocytes and their recruitment into tissues. We speculate that this interaction amplifies PM10-induced lung inflammation and contributes to both the pulmonary and systemic morbidity associated with exposure to air pollution.

  19. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A.; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D.; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D.; Udagama, Preethi V.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~ 5 ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~ 9360 pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (P < 0.05) was evident in heavy metal exposed frogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P < 0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco

  20. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A.; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D.; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D.; Udagama, Preethi V., E-mail: dappvr@yahoo.com

    2016-10-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~ 5 ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~ 9360 pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (P < 0.05) was evident in heavy metal exposed frogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P < 0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco

  1. Cellular metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Walters, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: chromatin structure; the use of circular synthetic polydeoxynucleotides as substrates for the study of DNA repair enzymes; human cellular kinetic response following exposure to DNA-interactive compounds; histone phosphorylation and chromatin structure in cell proliferation; photoaddition products induced in chromatin by uv light; pollutants and genetic information transfer; altered RNA metabolism as a function of cadmium accumulation and intracellular distribution in cultured cells; and thymidylate chromophore destruction by water free radicals

  2. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antioxidant-Rich Fraction of Urtica dioica Mediated Rescue of Striatal Mito-Oxidative Damage in MPTP-Induced Behavioral, Cellular, and Neurochemical Alterations in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Rohit; Joshi, Bhuwan Chandra; Kalia, Ajudhiya Nath; Prakash, Atish

    2017-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) having a complex and multi-factorial neuropathology includes mainly the degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway, which is a cumulative effect of depleted endogenous antioxidant enzymes, increased oxidative DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, and neuroinflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of a potent antioxidant from Urtica dioica in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. MPTP was administered intranigrally for the induction of PD in male Wistar rats. Behavioral alterations were assessed in between the study period. Animals were sacrificed immediately after behavioral session, and different biochemical, cellular, and neurochemical parameters were measured. Intranigrally repeated administration of MPTP showed significant impairment of motor co-ordination and marked increase of mito-oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in rats. Intranigral MPTP significantly decreases the dopamine and its metabolites with impairment of dopaminergic cell density in rat brain. However, post-treatment with the potent antioxidant fraction of Urtica dioica Linn. (UD) (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) improved the motor function, mito-oxidative defense alteration significantly and dose dependently in MPTP-treated rats. In addition, the potent antioxidant fraction of UD attenuated the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-β) and restored the level of dopamine and its metabolites in MPTP-induced PD in rats. Moreover, minocycline (30 mg/kg) with lower dose of UD (20 mg/kg) had significantly potentiated the protective effect of minocycline as compared to its effect with other individual drug-treated groups. In conclusion, Urtica dioica protected the dopaminergic neurons probably by reducing mito-oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and cellular alteration along with enhanced neurotrophic potential. The above results revealed that the antioxidant rich

  4. Inhibition of microtubules and dynein rescues human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from owl monkey TRIMCyp-mediated restriction in a cellular context-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlica, Paulina; Dufour, Caroline; Berthoux, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    IFN-induced restriction factors can significantly affect the replicative capacity of retroviruses in mammals. TRIM5α (tripartite motif protein 5, isoform α) is a restriction factor that acts at early stages of the virus life cycle by intercepting and destabilizing incoming retroviral cores. Sensitivity to TRIM5α maps to the N-terminal domain of the retroviral capsid proteins. In several New World and Old World monkey species, independent events of retrotransposon-mediated insertion of the cyclophilin A (CypA)-coding sequence in the trim5 gene have given rise to TRIMCyp (also called TRIM5-CypA), a hybrid protein that is active against some lentiviruses in a species-specific fashion. In particular, TRIMCyp from the owl monkey (omkTRIMCyp) very efficiently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Previously, we showed that disrupting the integrity of microtubules (MTs) and of cytoplasmic dynein complexes partially rescued replication of retroviruses, including HIV-1, from restriction mediated by TRIM5α. Here, we showed that efficient restriction of HIV-1 by omkTRIMCyp was similarly dependent on the MT network and on dynein complexes, but in a context-dependent fashion. When omkTRIMCyp was expressed in human HeLa cells, restriction was partially counteracted by pharmacological agents targeting MTs or by small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of dynein. The same drugs (nocodazole and paclitaxel) also rescued HIV-1 from restriction in cat CRFK cells, although to a lesser extent. Strikingly, neither nocodazole, paclitaxel nor depletion of the dynein heavy chain had a significant effect on the restriction of HIV-1 in an owl monkey cell line. These results suggested the existence of cell-specific functional interactions between MTs/dynein and TRIMCyp. © 2015 The Authors.

  5. Enzastaurin inhibits ABCB1-mediated drug efflux independently of effects on protein kinase C signalling and the cellular p53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Löschmann, Nadine; Sharifi, Mohsen; Ghafourian, Taravat; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2015-07-10

    The PKCβ inhibitor enzastaurin was tested in parental neuroblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, their vincristine-resistant sub-lines, primary neuroblastoma cells, ABCB1-transduced, ABCG2-transduced, and p53-depleted cells. Enzastaurin IC50s ranged from 3.3 to 9.5 μM in cell lines and primary cells independently of the ABCB1, ABCG2, or p53 status. Enzastaurin 0.3125 μM interfered with ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PKCα and PKCβ may phosphorylate and activate ABCB1 under the control of p53. However, enzastaurin exerted similar effects on ABCB1 in the presence or absence of functional p53. Also, enzastaurin inhibited PKC signalling only in concentrations ≥ 1.25 μM. The investigated cell lines did not express PKCβ. PKCα depletion reduced PKC signalling but did not affect ABCB1 activity. Intracellular levels of the fluorescent ABCB1 substrate rhodamine 123 rapidly decreased after wash-out of extracellular enzastaurin, and enzastaurin induced ABCB1 ATPase activity resembling the ABCB1 substrate verapamil. Computational docking experiments detected a direct interaction of enzastaurin and ABCB1. These data suggest that enzastaurin directly interferes with ABCB1 function. Enzastaurin further inhibited ABCG2-mediated drug transport but by a different mechanism since it reduced ABCG2 ATPase activity. These findings are important for the further development of therapies combining enzastaurin with ABC transporter substrates.

  6. Simultaneous exposure to concentrated ambient particles and acrolein causes cardiac effects mediated by parasympathetic modulation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study shows that exposure to CAPs and acrolein causes an increase in HRV that is mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system. Numerous studies show that short-term air pollution exposure modulates heart rate variability (HRV), which is an indicator of autonomic influence...

  7. Assembly of spikes into coronavirus particles is mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of the spike protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godeke, G J; de Haan, Cornelis A M; Rossen, J W; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    The type I glycoprotein S of coronavirus, trimers of which constitute the typical viral spikes, is assembled into virions through noncovalent interactions with the M protein. Here we demonstrate that incorporation is mediated by the short carboxy-terminal segment comprising the transmembrane and

  8. Assessment of cellular estrogenic activity based on estrogen receptor-mediated reduction of soluble-form catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT expression in an ELISA-based system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Wing-Lok Ho

    Full Text Available Xenoestrogens are either natural or synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of endogenous estrogen. These compounds, such as bisphenol-A (BPA, and phthalates, are commonly found in plastic wares. Exposure to these compounds poses major risk to human health because of the potential to cause endocrine disruption. There is huge demand for a wide range of chemicals to be assessed for such potential for the sake of public health. Classical in vivo assays for endocrine disruption are comprehensive but time-consuming and require sacrifice of experimental animals. Simple preliminary in vitro screening assays can reduce the time and expense involved. We previously demonstrated that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER. Therefore, detecting corresponding changes of COMT expression in estrogen-responsive cells may be a useful method to estimate estrogenic effects of various compounds. We developed a novel cell-based ELISA to evaluate cellular response to estrogenicity by reduction of soluble-COMT expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells exposed to estrogenic compounds. In contrast to various existing methods that only detect bioactivity, this method elucidates direct physiological effect in a living cell in response to a compound. We validated our assay using three well-characterized estrogenic plasticizers - BPA, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP, and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP. Cells were exposed to either these plasticizers or 17β-estradiol (E2 in estrogen-depleted medium with or without an ER-antagonist, ICI 182,780, and COMT expression assayed. Exposure to each of these plasticizers (10(-9-10(-7M dose-dependently reduced COMT expression (p<0.05, which was blocked by ICI 182,780. Reduction of COMT expression was readily detectable in cells exposed to picomolar level of E2, comparable to other in vitro assays of similar sensitivity. To satisfy the demand for in vitro assays targeting different

  9. Synthesis, characterization and applications of carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolated bifunctionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots in cellular internalization mediated by cell-penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty R; Winiarz, Jeffrey G; Moon, Jong-Sik; Lo, Shih-Yen; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots (QDs), are widely used in biomedical imaging studies and pharmaceutical research. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of small peptides that are able to traverse cell membrane and deliver a variety of cargoes into living cells. CPPs deliver QDs into cells with minimal nonspecific absorption and toxic effect. In this study, water-soluble, monodisperse, carboxyl-functionalized indium phosphide (InP)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) QDs coated with polyethylene glycol lipids (designated QInP) were synthesized for the first time. The physicochemical properties (optical absorption, fluorescence and charging state) and cellular internalization of QInP and CPP/QInP complexes were characterized. CPPs noncovalently interact with QInP in vitro to form stable CPP/QInP complexes, which can then efficiently deliver QInP into human A549 cells. The introduction of 500nM of CPP/QInP complexes and QInP at concentrations of less than 1μM did not reduce cell viability. These results indicate that carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolylated (PEGylated) bifunctionalized QInP are biocompatible nanoparticles with potential for use in biomedical imaging studies and drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport pathway is not involved in avian metapneumovirus budding in a virus-like-particle expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yuejin; Lu, Wuxun; Harmon, Aaron; Xiang, Xiaoxiao; Deng, Qiji; Song, Minxun; Wang, Dan; Yu, Qingzhong; Li, Feng

    2011-05-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) is a paramyxovirus that principally causes respiratory disease and egg production drops in turkeys and chickens. Together with its closely related human metapneumovirus (HMPV), they comprise the genus Metapneumovirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. Little is currently known about the mechanisms involved in the budding of metapneumovirus. By using AMPV as a model system, we showed that the matrix (M) protein by itself was insufficient to form virus-like-particles (VLPs). The incorporation of M into VLPs was shown to occur only when both the viral nucleoprotein (N) and the fusion (F) proteins were co-expressed. Furthermore, we provided evidence indicating that two YSKL and YAGL segments encoded within the M protein were not a functional late domain, and the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery was not involved in metapneumovirus budding, consistent with a recent observation that human respiratory syncytial virus, closely related to HMPV, uses an ESCRT-independent budding mechanism. Taken together, these results suggest that metapneumovirus budding is independent of the ESCRT pathway and the minimal budding machinery described here will aid our future understanding of metapneumovirus assembly and egress.

  11. Particle size, morphology and color tunable ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphors via plant latex mediated green combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrasekhar, M. [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Department of Physics, Acharya Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 107 (India); Nagabhushana, H., E-mail: bhushanvlc@gmail.com [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Sharma, S.C. [B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Sudheer kumar, K.H. [Department of Environmental Science, Kuvempu University, Shankarghatta, Shimoga 577 451 (India); Department of Chemistry, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Dhananjaya, N. [Department of Physics, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Yelahanka, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Sunitha, D.V. [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Shivakumara, C. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Nagabhushana, B.M. [Department of Chemistry, M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 054 (India)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared by green synthesis route. • Morphology and particle size was tuned by varying the concentration of plant latex. • The phosphor show excellent chromaticity coordinates in the white region. -- Abstract: Efficient ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} (1–11 mol%) nanophosphors were prepared for the first time by green synthesis route using Euphorbia tirucalli plant latex. The final products were well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), etc. The average particle size of ZnO:Eu{sup 3+} (7 mol%) was found to be in the range 27–47 nm. With increase of plant latex, the particle size was reduced and porous structure was converted to spherical shaped particles. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that the peaks situated at ∼590, 615, 648 and 702 nm were attributed to the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub j(j=1,2,3,4)} transitions of Eu{sup 3+} ions. The highest PL intensity was recorded for 7 mol% with Eu{sup 3+} ions and 26 ml plant latex concentration. The PL intensity increases with increase of plant latex concentration up to 30 ml and there after it decreases. The phosphor prepared by this method show spherical shaped particles, excellent chromaticity co-ordinates in the white light region which was highly useful for WLED’s. Further, present method was reliable, environmentally friendly and alternative to economical routes.

  12. Morphogenes bolA and mreB mediate the photoregulation of cellular morphology during complementary chromatic acclimation in Fremyella diplosiphon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailendra P; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-07-01

    Photoregulation of pigmentation during complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA) is well studied in Fremyella diplosiphon; however, mechanistic insights into the CCA-associated morphological changes are still emerging. F. diplosiphon cells are rectangular under green light (GL), whereas cells are smaller and spherical under red light (RL). Here, we investigate the role of morphogenes bolA and mreB during CCA using gene expression and gene function analyses. The F. diplosiphon bolA gene is essential as its complete removal from the genome was unsuccessful. Depletion of bolA resulted in slow growth, morphological defects and the accumulation of high levels of reactive oxygen species in a partially segregated ΔbolA strain. Higher expression of bolA was observed under RL and was correlated with lower expression of mreB and mreC genes in wild type. In a ΔrcaE strain that lacks the red-/green-responsive RcaE photoreceptor, the expression of bolA and mre genes was altered under both RL and GL. Observed gene expression relationships suggest that mreB and mreC expression is controlled by RcaE-dependent photoregulation of bolA expression. Expression of F. diplosiphon bolA and mreB homologues in Escherichia coli demonstrated functional conservation of the encoded proteins. Together, these studies establish roles for bolA and mreB in RcaE-dependent regulation of cellular morphology. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. FcγRII-binding Centyrins mediate agonism and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis when fused to an anti-OX40 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Whitaker, Brian; Derebe, Mehabaw G; Chiu, Mark L

    2018-04-01

    Immunostimulatory antibodies against the tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) are emerging as promising cancer immunotherapies. The agonism activity of such antibodies depends on crosslinking to Fc gamma RIIB receptor (FcγRIIB) to enable the antibody multimerization that drives TNFR activation. Previously, Fc engineering was used to enhance the binding of such antibodies to Fcγ receptors. Here, we report the identification of Centyrins as alternative scaffold proteins with binding affinities to homologous FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but not to other types of Fcγ receptors. One Centyrin, S29, was engineered at distinct positions of an anti-OX40 SF2 antibody to generate bispecific and tetravalent molecules named as mAbtyrins. Regardless of the position of S29 on the SF2 antibody, SF2-S29 mAbtyrins could bind FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA specifically while maintaining binding to OX40 receptors. In a NFκB reporter assay, attachment of S29 Centyrin molecules at the C-termini, but not the N-termini, resulted in SF2 antibodies with increased agonism owing to FcγRIIB crosslinking. The mAbtyrins also showed agonism in T-cell activation assays with immobilized FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but this activity was confined to mAbtyrins with S29 specifically at the C-termini of antibody heavy chains. Furthermore, regardless of the position of the molecule, S29 Centyrin could equip an otherwise Fc-silent antibody with antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity without affecting the antibody's intrinsic antibody-dependent cell-meditated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. In summary, the appropriate adoption FcγRII-binding Centyrins as functional modules represents a novel strategy to engineer therapeutic antibodies with improved functionalities.

  14. Effective delivery of sonication energy to fast settling and agglomerating nanomaterial suspensions for cellular studies: Implications for stability, particle kinetics, dosimetry and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel M; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip

    2018-04-01

    Typical in vitro assays used for high throughput toxicological screening and measuring nano-bio interactions are conducted by pipetting suspensions of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) dispersed in nutrient-rich culture media directly onto cells. In order to achieve fairly monodisperse and stable suspensions of small agglomerates, ultrasonic energy is usually applied to break apart large agglomerates that can form upon suspension in liquid. Lack of standardized protocols and methods for delivering sonication energy can introduce variability in the ENM suspension properties ( e.g . agglomerate size, polydispersity, suspension stability over time), and holds significant implications for in vitro dosimetry, toxicity, and other nano-bio interactions. Careful assessment of particle transformations during dispersion preparation and sonication is therefore critical for accurate interpretation of in vitro toxicity studies. In this short communication, the difficulties of preparing stable suspensions of rapidly settling ENMs are presented. Furthermore, methods to optimize the delivery of the critical sonication energy required to break large agglomerates and prepare stable, fairly monodispersed suspensions of fast settling ENMs are presented. A methodology for the efficient delivery of sonication energy in a discrete manner is presented and validated using various rapidly agglomerating and settling ENMs. The implications of continuous vs. discrete sonication on average hydrodynamic diameter, and polydispersity was also assessed for both fast and slow settling ENMs. For the rapidly agglomerating and settling ENMs (Ag15%/SiO 2 , Ag and CeO 2 ), the proposed discrete sonication achieved a significant reduction in the agglomerate diameter and polydispersity. In contrast, the relatively slow agglomerating and settling Fe 2 O 3 suspension did not exhibit statistically significant differences in average hydrodynamic diameter or polydispersity between the continuous and discrete

  15. In vivo relevance of two critical levels for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated cellular protection against electrophile toxicity found in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Laura H J; Pot, Gerda K; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Alink, Gerrit M

    2006-08-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated detoxification of quinones is suggested to be involved in cancer prevention. In the present study, using transfected CHO cells, it was demonstrated that the relation between NQO1 activity and the resulting protection against the cytotoxicity of menadione shows a steep dose-response curve revealing a 'lower protection threshold' of 0.5mumol DCPIP/min/mg protein and an 'upper protection threshold' at 1mumol DCPIP/min/mg protein. In an additional in vivo experiment it was investigated how both in vitro critical activity levels of NQO1, relate to NQO1 activities in mice and man, either without or upon induction of the enzyme by butylated hydroxyanisol (BHA) or indole-3-carbinol (I(3)C). Data from an experiment with CD1 mice revealed that base-line NQO1 levels in liver, kidney, small intestine, colon and lung are generally below the observed 'lower protection threshold' in vitro, this also holds for most human tissue S-9 samples. To achieve NQO1 levels above this 'lower protection threshold' will require 5-20 fold NQO1 induction. Discussion focuses on the relevance of the in vitro NQO1 activity thresholds for the in vivo situation. We conclude that increased protection against menadione toxicity can probably not be achieved by NQO1 induction but should be achieved by other mechanisms. Whether this conclusion also holds for other electrophiles and the in vivo situation awaits further definition of their NQO1 protection thresholds.

  16. NFκB-mediated activation of the cellular FUT3, 5 and 6 gene cluster by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordén, Rickard; Samuelsson, Ebba; Nyström, Kristina

    2017-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 has the ability to induce expression of a human gene cluster located on chromosome 19 upon infection. This gene cluster contains three fucosyltransferases (encoded by FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6) with the ability to add a fucose to an N-acetylglucosamine residue. Little is known regarding the transcriptional activation of these three genes in human cells. Intriguingly, herpes simplex virus type 1 activates all three genes simultaneously during infection, a situation not observed in uninfected tissue, pointing towards a virus specific mechanism for transcriptional activation. The aim of this study was to define the underlying mechanism for the herpes simplex virus type 1 activation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcription. The transcriptional activation of the FUT-gene cluster on chromosome 19 in fibroblasts was specific, not involving adjacent genes. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB signaling through panepoxydone treatment significantly decreased the induction of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation, as did siRNA targeting of p65, in herpes simplex virus type 1 infected fibroblasts. NFκB and p65 signaling appears to play an important role in the regulation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation by herpes simplex virus type 1 although additional, unidentified, viral factors might account for part of the mechanism as direct interferon mediated stimulation of NFκB was not sufficient to induce the fucosyltransferase encoding gene cluster in uninfected cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Perez, M.R. Del; Michelin, S.C.; Gisone, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  18. Strong interferon-gamma mediated cellular immunity to scrub typhus demonstrated using a novel whole cell antigen ELISpot assay in rhesus macaques and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manutsanun Sumonwiriya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a febrile infection caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi, which causes significant morbidity and mortality across the Asia-Pacific region. The control of this vector-borne disease is challenging due to humans being dead-end hosts, vertical maintenance of the pathogen in the vector itself, and a potentially large rodent reservoir of unclear significance, coupled with a lack of accurate diagnostic tests. Development of an effective vaccine is highly desirable. This however requires better characterization of the natural immune response of this neglected but important disease. Here we implement a novel IFN-γ ELISpot assay as a tool for studying O. tsutsugamushi induced cellular immune responses in an experimental scrub typhus rhesus macaque model and human populations. Whole cell antigen for O. tsutsugamushi (OT-WCA was prepared by heat inactivation of Karp-strain bacteria. Rhesus macaques were infected intradermally with O. tsutsugamushi. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from infected (n = 10 and uninfected animals (n = 5 were stimulated with OT-WCA, and IFN-γ secreting cells quantitated by ELISpot assay at five time points over 28 days. PBMC were then assayed from people in a scrub typhus-endemic region of Thailand (n = 105 and responses compared to those from a partially exposed population in a non-endemic region (n = 14, and to a naïve population in UK (n = 12. Mean results at Day 0 prior to O. tsutsugamushi infection were 12 (95% CI 0-25 and 15 (2-27 spot-forming cells (SFC/106 PBMC for infected and control macaques respectively. Strong O. tsutsugamushi-specific IFN-γ responses were seen post infection, with ELISpot responses 20-fold higher than baseline at Day 7 (mean 235, 95% CI 200-270 SFC/106 PBMC, 105-fold higher at Day 14 (mean 1261, 95% CI 1,097-1,425 SFC/106 PBMC, 125-fold higher at Day 21 (mean 1,498, 95% CI 1,496-1,500 SFC/106 PBMC and 118-fold higher at

  19. Strong interferon-gamma mediated cellular immunity to scrub typhus demonstrated using a novel whole cell antigen ELISpot assay in rhesus macaques and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumonwiriya, Manutsanun; Paris, Daniel H; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Anantatat, Tippawan; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Chumseng, Suchintana; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Jintaworn, Suthatip; Blacksell, Stuart D; Chowdhury, Fazle R; Kronsteiner, Barbara; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Burke, Robin L; Lombardini, Eric D; Richards, Allen L; Mason, Carl J; Jones, James W; Day, Nicholas P J; Dunachie, Susanna J

    2017-09-01

    Scrub typhus is a febrile infection caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi, which causes significant morbidity and mortality across the Asia-Pacific region. The control of this vector-borne disease is challenging due to humans being dead-end hosts, vertical maintenance of the pathogen in the vector itself, and a potentially large rodent reservoir of unclear significance, coupled with a lack of accurate diagnostic tests. Development of an effective vaccine is highly desirable. This however requires better characterization of the natural immune response of this neglected but important disease. Here we implement a novel IFN-γ ELISpot assay as a tool for studying O. tsutsugamushi induced cellular immune responses in an experimental scrub typhus rhesus macaque model and human populations. Whole cell antigen for O. tsutsugamushi (OT-WCA) was prepared by heat inactivation of Karp-strain bacteria. Rhesus macaques were infected intradermally with O. tsutsugamushi. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected (n = 10) and uninfected animals (n = 5) were stimulated with OT-WCA, and IFN-γ secreting cells quantitated by ELISpot assay at five time points over 28 days. PBMC were then assayed from people in a scrub typhus-endemic region of Thailand (n = 105) and responses compared to those from a partially exposed population in a non-endemic region (n = 14), and to a naïve population in UK (n = 12). Mean results at Day 0 prior to O. tsutsugamushi infection were 12 (95% CI 0-25) and 15 (2-27) spot-forming cells (SFC)/106 PBMC for infected and control macaques respectively. Strong O. tsutsugamushi-specific IFN-γ responses were seen post infection, with ELISpot responses 20-fold higher than baseline at Day 7 (mean 235, 95% CI 200-270 SFC/106 PBMC), 105-fold higher at Day 14 (mean 1261, 95% CI 1,097-1,425 SFC/106 PBMC), 125-fold higher at Day 21 (mean 1,498, 95% CI 1,496-1,500 SFC/106 PBMC) and 118-fold higher at Day 28

  20. E2F1-mediated upregulation of p19INK4d determines its periodic expression during cell cycle and regulates cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcagno, Abel L; Marazita, Mariela C; Ogara, María F; Ceruti, Julieta M; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Scassa, María E; Giono, Luciana E; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2011-01-01

    A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell cycle and provides an additional mechanism to limit E2F activity.

  1. E2F1-mediated upregulation of p19INK4d determines its periodic expression during cell cycle and regulates cellular proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel L Carcagno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell

  2. Role of surfactant-mediated electrodeposited titanium oxide substrate in improving electrocatalytic features of supported platinum particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spătaru, Tanţa; Preda, Loredana; Osiceanu, Petre; Munteanu, Cornel; Anastasescu, Mihai; Marcu, Maria; Spătaru, Nicolae, E-mail: nspataru@icf.ro

    2014-01-01

    A new hybrid system with improved photocatalytic and electrocatalytic performances was obtained by two-step potentiostatic deposition on highly boron-doped diamond (BDD) substrate. First, hydrated TiO{sub 2} was anodically deposited from a TiCl{sub 3} aqueous solution, both in the presence and in the absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The study of the UV irradiation effect evidenced that titanium oxide coatings obtained by surfactant-assisted electrodeposition (TiO{sub 2}:SDS) exhibit enhanced photocurrent, due to its very rough texonsture and presumably to better efficiency of charge carrier separation. Electrochemical deposition of platinum on the oxide-coated BDD was carried out in a second step and AFM, SEM and XPS measurements have shown that, on the TiO{sub 2}:SDS substrate, Pt particles are smaller, more uniformly distributed, and tend to form clusters, leading to a specific surface area of the electrocatalyst of ca. 6.55 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. Carbon monoxide stripping experiments demonstrated that, when deposited on TiO{sub 2}:SDS, Pt particles are also less sensitive to CO-poisoning during methanol anodic oxidation.

  3. Cellular dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Chin, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dose is a useful predictive parameter for describing radiation toxicity in conventional radiotherapy. Traditionally, in vitro radiation biology dose-effect relations are expressed in the form of cell survival curves, a semilog plot of cell survival versus dose. However, the characteristic linear or linear quadratic survival curve shape, for high- and low-LET radiations respectively, is only strictly valid when the radiation dose is uniform across the entire target population. With an external beam of 60 Co gamma rays or x-rays, a uniform field may be readily achievable. When radionuclides are incorporated into a cell milieu, several new problems emerge which can result in a departure from uniformity in energy deposition throughout a cell population. This nonuniformity can have very important consequences for the shape of the survival curve. Cases in which perturbations of source uniformity may arise include: 1. Elemental sources may equilibrate in the cell medium with partition coefficients between the extracellular, cytosol, and nuclear compartments. The effect of preferential cell internalization or binding to cell membrane of some radionuclides can increase or decrease the slope of the survival curve. 2. Radionuclides bound to antibodies, hormones, metabolite precursors, etc., may result in a source localization pattern characteristic of the carrier agent, i.e., the sources may bind to cell surface receptors or antigens, be internalized, bind to secreted antigen concentrated around a fraction of the cell population, or become directly incorporated into the cell DNA. We propose to relate the distribution of energy deposition in cell nuclei to biological correlates of cellular inactivation. The probability of each cell's survival is weighted by its individual radiation burden, and the summation of these probabilities for the cell population can be used to predict the number or fraction of cell survivors

  4. Real-time single-molecule tethered particle motion experiments reveal the kinetics and mechanisms of Cre-mediated site-specific recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine family recombinases (YRs) are widely utilized in genome engineering systems because they can easily direct DNA rearrangement. Cre recombinases, one of the most commonly used types of YRs, catalyze site-specific recombination between two loxP sites without the need for high-energy cofactors, other accessory proteins or a specific DNA target sequence between the loxP sites. Previous structural, analytical ultracentrifuge and electrophoretic analyses have provided details of the reaction kinetics and mechanisms of Cre recombinase activity; whether there are reaction intermediates or side pathways involved has been left unaddressed. Using tethered particle motion (TPM), the Cre-mediated site-specific recombination process has been delineated, from beginning to end, at the single-molecule level, including the formation of abortive complexes and wayward complexes blocking inactive nucleoprotein complexes from entering the recombination process. Reversibility in the strand-cleavage/-ligation process and the formation of a thermally stable Holliday junction intermediate were observed within the Cre-mediated site-specific recombination process. Rate constants for each elementary step, which explain the overall reaction outcomes under various conditions, were determined. Taking the findings of this study together, they demonstrate the potential of single-molecule methodology as an alternative approach for exploring reaction mechanisms in detail. PMID:22467208

  5. Ultrasound-mediated method for rapid delivery of nano-particles into cells for intracellular surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and cancer cell screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Guannan; Huang, Shaohua; Huang, Zufang; Li, Yongzeng; Lin, Juqiang; Chen, Rong; Lin, Duo; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful technology for providing finger-printing information of cells. A big challenge has been the long time duration and inefficient uptake of metal nano-particles into living cells as substrate for SERS analysis. Herein, a simple method (based on ultrasound) for the rapid transfer of silver nanoparticles (NPs) into living cells for intracellular SERS spectroscopy was presented. In this study, the ultrasound-mediated method for NP delivery overcame the shortcoming of ‘passive uptake’, and achieved quick acquisition of reproducible SERS spectra from living human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines (C666 and CNE1) and normal nasopharyngeal cell line (NP69). Tentative assignment of the Raman bands in the measured SERS spectra showed cancer cell specific biomolecular differences, including significantly lower DNA concentrations and higher protein concentrations in cancerous nasopharyngeal cells as compared to those of normal cells. Combined with PCA–LDA multivariate analysis, ultrasound-mediated cell SERS spectroscopy differentiated the cancerous cells from the normal nasopharyngeal cells with high diagnostic accuracy (98.7%), demonstrating great potential for high-throughput cancer cell screening applications. (paper)

  6. Protein Adsorption and Layer Formation at the Stainless Steel-Solution Interface Mediates Shear-Induced Particle Formation for an IgG1 Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Cavan K; Heinrich, Frank; Curtis, Joseph E; Raman, Sid; Miller, Maria A; Hudson, Steven D

    2018-03-05

    Passage of specific protein solutions through certain pumps, tubing, and/or filling nozzles can result in the production of unwanted subvisible protein particles (SVPs). In this work, surface-mediated SVP formation was investigated. Specifically, the effects of different solid interface materials, interfacial shear rates, and protein concentrations on SVP formation were measured for the National Institute of Standards and Technology monoclonal antibody (NISTmAb), a reference IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). A stainless steel rotary piston pump was used to identify formulation and process parameters that affect aggregation, and a flow cell (alumina or stainless steel interface) was used to further investigate the effect of different interface materials and/or interfacial shear rates. SVP particles produced were monitored using flow microscopy or flow cytometry. Neutron reflectometry and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring were used to characterize adsorption and properties of NISTmAb at the stainless steel interface. Pump/shear cell experiments showed that the NISTmAb concentration and interface material had a significant effect on SVP formation, while the effects of interfacial shear rate and passage number were less important. At the higher NISTmAb concentrations, the adsorbed protein became structurally altered at the stainless steel interface. The primary adsorbed layer remained largely undisturbed during flow, suggesting that SVP formation at high NISTmAb concentration was caused by the disruption of patches and/or secondary interactions.

  7. Improved Limits on Axionlike-Particle-Mediated P , T -Violating Interactions between Electrons and Nucleons from Electric Dipole Moments of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    In the presence of P , T -violating interactions, the exchange of axionlike particles between electrons and nucleons in atoms and molecules induces electric dipole moments (EDMs) of atoms and molecules. We perform calculations of such axion-exchange-induced atomic EDMs using the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Dirac method including electron core polarization corrections. We present analytical estimates to explain the dependence of these induced atomic EDMs on the axion mass and atomic parameters. From the experimental bounds on the EDMs of atoms and molecules, including Cs 133 , Tl 205 , Xe 129 , Hg 199 , Yb 171 F 19 , Hf 180 F+ 19 , and Th 232 O 16 , we constrain the P , T -violating scalar-pseudoscalar nucleon-electron and electron-electron interactions mediated by a generic axionlike particle of arbitrary mass. Our limits improve on existing laboratory bounds from other experiments by many orders of magnitude for ma≳10-2 eV . We also place constraints on C P violation in certain types of relaxion models.

  8. THE VERY UNUSUAL INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTION OF 2012 JULY 23: A BLAST WAVE MEDIATED BY SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C. T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mason, G. M. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gomez-Herrero, R. [University of Alcala, E-28871 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Klassen, A. [Kiel University, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C., E-mail: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The giant, superfast, interplanetary coronal mass ejection, detected by STEREO A on 2012 July 23, well away from Earth, appears to have reached 1 AU with an unusual set of leading bow waves resembling in some ways a subsonic interaction, possibly due to the high pressures present in the very energetic particles produced in this event. Eventually, a front of record high-speed flow reached STEREO. The unusual behavior of this event is illustrated using the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic ion observations obtained by STEREO. Had the Earth been at the location of STEREO, the large southward-oriented magnetic field component in the event, combined with its high speed, would have produced a record storm.

  9. Submicron and nano formulations of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide stimulate unique cellular toxicological responses in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, Cindy, E-mail: c.gunawan@unsw.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Sirimanoonphan, Aunchisa [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Teoh, Wey Yang [Clean Energy and Nanotechnology (CLEAN) Laboratory, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Marquis, Christopher P., E-mail: c.marquis@unsw.edu.au [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Amal, Rose [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Uptake of TiO{sub 2} solids by C. reinhardtii generates ROS as an early stress response. • Submicron and nanoTiO{sub 2} exhibit benign effect on cell proliferation. • Uptake of ZnO solids and leached zinc by C. reinhardtii inhibit the alga growth. • No cellular oxidative stress is detected with submicron and nano ZnO exposure. • The toxicity of particles is not necessarily mediated by cellular oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The work investigates the eco-cytoxicity of submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} and ZnO, arising from the unique interactions of freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to soluble and undissolved components of the metal oxides. In a freshwater medium, submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} exist as suspended aggregates with no-observable leaching. Submicron and nano ZnO undergo comparable concentration-dependent fractional leaching, and exist as dissolved zinc and aggregates of undissolved ZnO. Cellular internalisation of solid TiO{sub 2} stimulates cellular ROS generation as an early stress response. The cellular redox imbalance was observed for both submicron and nano TiO{sub 2} exposure, despite exhibiting benign effects on the alga proliferation (8-day EC50 > 100 mg TiO{sub 2}/L). Parallel exposure of C. reinhardtii to submicron and nano ZnO saw cellular uptake of both the leached zinc and solid ZnO and resulting in inhibition of the alga growth (8-day EC50 ≥ 0.01 mg ZnO/L). Despite the sensitivity, no zinc-induced cellular ROS generation was detected, even at 100 mg ZnO/L exposure. Taken together, the observations confront the generally accepted paradigm of cellular oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity of particles. The knowledge of speciation of particles and the corresponding stimulation of unique cellular responses and cytotoxicity is vital for assessment of the environmental implications of these materials.

  10. Submicron and nano formulations of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide stimulate unique cellular toxicological responses in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunawan, Cindy; Sirimanoonphan, Aunchisa; Teoh, Wey Yang; Marquis, Christopher P.; Amal, Rose

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Uptake of TiO 2 solids by C. reinhardtii generates ROS as an early stress response. • Submicron and nanoTiO 2 exhibit benign effect on cell proliferation. • Uptake of ZnO solids and leached zinc by C. reinhardtii inhibit the alga growth. • No cellular oxidative stress is detected with submicron and nano ZnO exposure. • The toxicity of particles is not necessarily mediated by cellular oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The work investigates the eco-cytoxicity of submicron and nano TiO 2 and ZnO, arising from the unique interactions of freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to soluble and undissolved components of the metal oxides. In a freshwater medium, submicron and nano TiO 2 exist as suspended aggregates with no-observable leaching. Submicron and nano ZnO undergo comparable concentration-dependent fractional leaching, and exist as dissolved zinc and aggregates of undissolved ZnO. Cellular internalisation of solid TiO 2 stimulates cellular ROS generation as an early stress response. The cellular redox imbalance was observed for both submicron and nano TiO 2 exposure, despite exhibiting benign effects on the alga proliferation (8-day EC50 > 100 mg TiO 2 /L). Parallel exposure of C. reinhardtii to submicron and nano ZnO saw cellular uptake of both the leached zinc and solid ZnO and resulting in inhibition of the alga growth (8-day EC50 ≥ 0.01 mg ZnO/L). Despite the sensitivity, no zinc-induced cellular ROS generation was detected, even at 100 mg ZnO/L exposure. Taken together, the observations confront the generally accepted paradigm of cellular oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity of particles. The knowledge of speciation of particles and the corresponding stimulation of unique cellular responses and cytotoxicity is vital for assessment of the environmental implications of these materials

  11. Cellular uptake of folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Kyoungja; Moon, Jihyung; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Seong, Tae-Yeon; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2009-01-01

    We prepared five folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (F 5 -Liposuperparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles(SPIONs), 5.5 and 11 nm) and investigated their cellular uptake with KB cells, which is one of the representative folate-receptor over-expressing human epidermoid carcinoma cells, using MRI. The cellular uptake tests with the respective 5.5 and 11 nm F 5 -LipoSPIONs at a fixed particle concentration showed appreciable amount of receptor-mediated uptakes and the specificity was higher in 5.5 nm SPIONs, due to its higher folic acid (FA) density, without inhibition. However, the numbers of the particles taken up under FA inhibition were similar, irrespective of their sizes.

  12. Cellular uptake of folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Kyoungja [Nano-Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kjwoo@kist.re.kr; Moon, Jihyung [Nano-Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-Dong, Sungbook-Ku, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu-Sil [Division of Molecular Imaging, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Tae-Yeon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1, Anam-Dong, Sungbook-Ku, Seoul, 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kwon-Ha [Institute for Radiological Imaging Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, 344-2, Shinyong, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    We prepared five folate-conjugated lipophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (F{sub 5}-Liposuperparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles(SPIONs), 5.5 and 11 nm) and investigated their cellular uptake with KB cells, which is one of the representative folate-receptor over-expressing human epidermoid carcinoma cells, using MRI. The cellular uptake tests with the respective 5.5 and 11 nm F{sub 5}-LipoSPIONs at a fixed particle concentration showed appreciable amount of receptor-mediated uptakes and the specificity was higher in 5.5 nm SPIONs, due to its higher folic acid (FA) density, without inhibition. However, the numbers of the particles taken up under FA inhibition were similar, irrespective of their sizes.

  13. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiaoyan; Jin Tingting; Jin Yachao; Wu Leihong; Hu Bin; Tian Yu; Fan Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury. (paper)

  14. Diesel exhaust particles increase IL-1β-induced human β-defensin expression via NF-κB-mediated pathway in human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chun

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-defensin (hBD-2, antimicrobial peptide primarily induced in epithelial cells, is a key factor in the innate immune response of the respiratory tract. Several studies showed increased defensin levels in both inflammatory lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and infectious diseases. Recently, epidemiologic studies have demonstrated acute and serious adverse effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory health, especially in people with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease. To elucidate the effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on pulmonary innate immune response, we investigated the hBD-2 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 expression to DEP exposure in interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β-stimulated A549 cells. Results IL-1β markedly up-regulated the hBD-2 promoter activity, and the subsequent DEP exposure increased dose-dependently the expression of hBD-2 and inflammatory cytokine IL-8 at the transcriptional level. In addition, DEP further induced the NF-κB activation in IL-1β-stimulated A549 cells more rapidly than in unstimulated control cells, which was showed by nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB and degradation of IκB-α. The experiment using two NF-κB inhibitors, PDTC and MG132, confirmed that this increase of hBD-2 expression following DEP exposure was regulated through NF-κB-mediated pathway. Conclusion These results demonstrated that DEP exposure increases the expression of antimicrobial peptide and inflammatory cytokine at the transcriptional level in IL-1β-primed A549 epithelial cells and suggested that the increase is mediated at least partially through NF-κB activation. Therefore, DEP exposure may contribute to enhance the airway-responsiveness especially on the patients suffering from chronic respiratory disease.

  15. Anti-Glycoprotein G Antibodies of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Contribute to Complete Protection after Vaccination in Mice and Induce Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Görander

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2 of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  16. Effects of alpha particles on zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, E.H.W.; Choi, V.W.Y.; Yu, K.N.; Li, V.W.T.; Cheng, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Ionizing radiation such as X-ray and alpha particles can damage cellular macromolecules, which can lead to DNA single- and double-strand breaks. In the present work, we studied the effects of alpha particles on dechorionated zebrafish embryos. Thin polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films with a thickness of 16 μm were prepared from commercially available PADC films (with thickness of 100 μm) by chemical etching and used as support substrates for holding zebrafish embryos for alpha-particle irradiation. These films recorded alpha-particle hit positions, quantified the number and energy of alpha particles actually incident on the embryo cells, and thus enabled the calculation of the dose absorbed by the embryo cells. Irradiation was made at 1.25 hours post fertilization (hpf) with various absorbed dose. TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed on the embryos at different time stages after irradiation. Marked apoptosis was detected only in embryos at earlier time stages. The results showed that DNA double-strand break during zebrafish embryogenesis can be induced by alpha-particle irradiation, which suggests that zebrafish is a potential model for assessing the effects of alpha-particle radiation

  17. Iron oxide-mediated semiconductor photocatalysis vs. heterogeneous photo-Fenton treatment of viruses in wastewater. Impact of the oxide particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Liu, Siting; Carratalà, Anna; Rtimi, Sami; Talebi Amiri, Masoud; Bensimon, Michaël; Pulgarin, César

    2017-10-05

    The photo-Fenton process is recognized as a promising technique towards microorganism disinfection in wastewater, but its efficiency is hampered at near-neutral pH operating values. In this work, we overcome these obstacles by using the heterogeneous photo-Fenton process as the default disinfecting technique, targeting MS2 coliphage in wastewater. The use of low concentrations of iron oxides in wastewater without H 2 O 2 (wüstite, maghemite, magnetite) has demonstrated limited semiconductor-mediated MS2 inactivation. Changing the operational pH and the size of the oxide particles indicated that the isoelectric point of the iron oxides and the active surface area are crucial in the success of the process, and the possible underlying mechanisms are investigated. Furthermore, the addition of low amounts of Fe-oxides (1mgL -1 ) and H 2 O 2 in the system (1, 5 and 10mgL -1 ) greatly enhanced the inactivation process, leading to heterogeneous photo-Fenton processes on the surface of the magnetically separable oxides used. Additionally, photo-dissolution of iron in the bulk, lead to homogeneous photo-Fenton, further aided by the complexation by the dissolved organic matter in the solution. Finally, we assess the impact of the presence of the bacterial host and the difference caused by the different iron sources (salts, oxides) and the Fe-oxide size (normal, nano-sized). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased cellular uptake of peptide-modified PEGylated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Yang, Dan; Qin, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xueqing; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Hua; Yin, Changcheng

    2017-12-09

    Gold nanoparticles are promising drug delivery vehicles for nucleic acids, small molecules, and proteins, allowing various modifications on the particle surface. However, the instability and low bioavailability of gold nanoparticles compromise their clinical application. Here, we functionalized gold nanoparticles with CPP fragments (CALNNPFVYLI, CALRRRRRRRR) through sulfhydryl PEG to increase their stability and bioavailability. The resulting gold nanoparticles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the stability in biological solutions was evaluated. Comparing to PEGylated gold nanoparticles, CPP (CALNNPFVYLI, CALRRRRRRRR)-modified gold nanoparticles showed 46 folds increase in cellular uptake in A549 and B16 cell lines, as evidenced by the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The interactions between gold nanoparticles and liposomes indicated CPP-modified gold nanoparticles bind to cell membrane more effectively than PEGylated gold nanoparticles. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure interactions between nanoparticles and the membrane. TEM and uptake inhibitor experiments indicated that the cellular entry of gold nanoparticles was mediated by clathrin and macropinocytosis. Other energy independent endocytosis pathways were also identified. Our work revealed a new strategy to modify gold nanoparticles with CPP and illustrated the cellular uptake pathway of CPP-modified gold nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  20. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  1. A search for low-mass dark matter with the cryogenic dark matter search and the development of highly multiplexed phonon-mediated particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Craig [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    maintaining the nearly background-free operation of the existing experiment. We describe the development of athermal phonon mediated particle detectors using Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs), which could provide a simpler path to extending the CDMS detector technology to the ton scale. Results from prototype devices have demonstrated energy resolutions as good as σ = 0.55 keV at 30 keV, comparable to existing CDMS II detectors. Such designs can be scaled to kg-scale detector elements, while reducing the complexity of the detector fabrication and cryogenic readout electronics relative to existing designs. Since MKIDs are naturally multiplexed in the frequency domain, MKID-based designs also allow much finer pixelization of the phonon sensor, which is expected to enhance background rejection for large detectors while simultaneously reducing the number of wires needed to read out the detectors.

  2. Virus-like particles as nanovaccine candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen, G; Aguilar, J C; Dueñas, S; Hermida, L; Iglesias, E; Penton, E; Lobaina, Y; Lopez, M; Mussachio, A; Falcon, V; Alvarez, L; Martinez, G; Gil, L; Valdes, I; Izquierdo, A; Lazo, L; Marcos, E; Guzman, G; Muzio, V; Herrera, L

    2013-01-01

    The existing vaccines are mainly limited to the microorganisms we are able to culture and produce and/or to those whose killing is mediated by humoral response (antibody mediated). It has been more difficult to develop vaccines capable of inducing a functional cellular response needed to prevent or cure chronic diseases. New strategies should be taken into account in the improvement of cell-based immune responses in order to prevent and control the infections and eventually clear the virus. Preclinical and clinical results with vaccine candidates developed as a vaccine platform based on virus-like particles (VLPs) evidenced their ability to stimulate mucosal as well as systemic immunity. Particles based on envelope, membrane or nucleocapsid microbial proteins induce a strong immune response after nasal or parenteral administration in mice, non-human primates and humans. In addition, the immune response obtained was modulated in a Th1 sense. The VLPs were also able to immunoenhance the humoral and cellular immune responses against several viral pathogens. Studies in animals and humans with nasal and systemic formulations evidenced that it is possible to induce functional immune response against HBV, HCV, HIV and dengue virus. (paper)

  3. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA–gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie; Mohr, Anne; Görtz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie; Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Simon, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP–DNA) were hybridized with complementary di-N-acetyllactosamine-(di-LacNAc, [3Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP–DNA–di-LacNAc. While AuNP–DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered

  4. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA-gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Mohr, Anne; Goertz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar [RWTH Aachen University, Laboratory for Biomaterials, Institute of Biotechnology and Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering (Germany); Mueller-Newen, Gerhard [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Simon, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.simon@ac.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP-DNA) were hybridized with complementary di-N-acetyllactosamine-(di-LacNAc, [3Gal({beta}1-4)GlcNAc({beta}1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP-DNA-di-LacNAc. While AuNP-DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered.

  5. Random packing of digitized particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The random packing of regularly and irregularly shaped particles has been studied extensively. Within this paper, packing is studied from the perspective of digitized particles. These digitized particles are developed for and used in cellular automata systems, which are employed for the simple

  6. Random packing of digitized particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos

    2012-01-01

    The random packing of regularly and irregularly shaped particles has been studied extensively. Within this paper, packing is studied from the perspective of digitized particles. These digitized particles are developed for and used in cellular automata systems, which are employed for the simple

  7. The multitalented Mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Jonas O P; Zhu, Xuefeng; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2013-11-01

    The Mediator complex is needed for regulated transcription of RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent genes. Initially, Mediator was only seen as a protein bridge that conveyed regulatory information from enhancers to the promoter. Later studies have added many other functions to the Mediator repertoire. Indeed, recent findings show that Mediator influences nearly all stages of transcription and coordinates these events with concomitant changes in chromatin organization. We review the multitude of activities associated with Mediator and discuss how this complex coordinates transcription with other cellular events. We also discuss the inherent difficulties associated with in vivo characterization of a coactivator complex that can indirectly affect diverse cellular processes via changes in gene transcription. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Their function on angiogenesis and cellular signalling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studieshave reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate coppertrafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in ...

  9. On two integrable cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobenko, A [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik; Bordemann, M [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Gunn, C [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik; Pinkall, U [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Mathematik

    1993-11-01

    We describe two simple cellular automata (CA) models which exhibit the essential attributes of soliton systems. The first one is an invertible, 2-state, 1-dimensional CA or, in other words, a nonlinear Z[sub 2]-valued dynamical system with discrete space and time. Against a vacuum state of 0, the system exhibits light cone particles in both spatial directions, which interact in a soliton-like fashion. A complete solution of this system is obtained. We also consider another CA, which is described by the Hirota equation over a finite field, and present a Lax representation for it. (orig.)

  10. Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Cellular Migration and Invasion in Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fathers, Kelly E

    2007-01-01

    The Crk adaptor proteins (CrkI, CrkII and CrkL) play an important role during cellular signalling by mediating the formation of protein-protein complexes and are involved in cellular migration, invasion, and adhesion...

  11. Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Cellular Migration and Invasion in Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fathers, Kelly E

    2008-01-01

    The Crk adaptor proteins (CrkI, CrkII and CrkL) play an important role during cellular signalling by mediating the formation of protein-protein complexes and are involved in cellular migration, invasion, and adhesion...

  12. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting TNF-α and overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 promotes early osteoblast differentiation on a cell model of Ti particle-induced inflammatory response in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, H.H.; Yu, C.C.; Sun, S.X. [Affiliated Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yinchuan (China); Ma, X.J. [Ningxia Medical Autonomous Region of the First People' s Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yinchuan (China); Yang, X.C.; Sun, K.N.; Jin, Q.H. [Affiliated Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yinchuan (China)

    2013-10-02

    Wear particles are phagocytosed by macrophages and other inflammatory cells, resulting in cellular activation and release of proinflammatory factors, which cause periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening, the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty failure. During this pathological process, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in wear-particle-induced osteolysis. In this study, recombination adenovirus (Ad) vectors carrying both target genes [TNF-α small interfering RNA (TNF-α-siRNA) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)] were synthesized and transfected into RAW264.7 macrophages and pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, respectively. The target gene BMP-2, expressed on pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and silenced by the TNF-α gene on cells, was treated with titanium (Ti) particles that were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We showed that recombinant adenovirus (Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2) can induce osteoblast differentiation when treated with conditioned medium (CM) containing RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with a combination of Ti particles and Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 (Ti-ad CM) assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand was downregulated in pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells treated with Ti-ad CM in comparison with conditioned medium of RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with Ti particles (Ti CM). We suggest that Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 induced osteoblast differentiation and inhibited osteoclastogenesis on a cell model of a Ti particle-induced inflammatory response, which may provide a novel approach for the treatment of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  13. Wear Particles Promote Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Inflammation via the Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase Pathway in Macrophages Surrounding Loosened Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishen Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Prosthesis loosening is closely associated with chronic inflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages, which are activated by wear particles or inflammatory stimulants such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are critical regulators of inflammation, but their enzymatic sources in response to wear particles and their effects on peri-implant LPS-tolerance remain unclear. Methods: Three ROS-related enzymes—nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX-1 and -2 and catalase—were investigated in interface membrane tissues and in titanium (Ti particle-stimulated macrophages in vitro. The generation of ROS and downstream inflammatory effects were measured with or without pre-incubation with apocynin, an NOX inhibitor. Results: Pre-exposure to Ti particles attenuated NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated macrophages, indicating that wear particles suppress immune response, which may lead to chronic inflammation. NOX-1 and -2 were highly expressed in aseptically loosened interface membranes and in macrophages stimulated with Ti particles; the particles induced a moderate amount of ROS generation, NF-κB activation, and TNF-a secretion in macrophages, and these effects were suppressed by apocynin. Conclusion: Wear particles induce ROS generation through the NOX signaling pathway, resulting in persistent inflammation and delayed loosening. Thus, the suppression of NOX activity may be a useful strategy for preventing prosthesis loosening.

  14. Particles from wood smoke and road traffic differently affect the innate immune system of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Mari; Cecilie Nygaard, Unni; Løvik, Martinus

    2009-09-01

    The effect of particles from road traffic and wood smoke on the innate immune response in the lung was studied in a lung challenge model with the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Female Balb/cA mice were instilled intratracheally with wood smoke particles, particles from road traffic collected during winter (studded tires used; St+), and during autumn (no studded tires; St-), or diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Simultaneously with, and 1 or 7 days after particle instillation, 10(5) bacteria were inoculated intratracheally. Bacterial numbers in the lungs and spleen 1 day after Listeria challenge were determined, as an indicator of cellular activation. In separate experiments, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected 4 h and 24 h after particle instillation. All particles tested reduced the numbers of bacteria in the lung 24 h after bacterial inoculation. When particles were given simultaneously with Listeria, the reduction was greatest for DEP, followed by St+ and St-, and least for wood smoke particles. Particle effects were no longer apparent after 7 days. Neutrophil numbers in BAL fluid were increased for all particle exposed groups. St+ and St- induced the highest levels of IL-1beta, MIP-2, MCP-1, and TNF-alpha, followed by DEP, which induced no TNF-alpha. In contrast, wood smoke particles only increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, indicating a cytotoxic effect of these particles. In conclusion, all particles tested activated the innate immune system as determined with Listeria. However, differences in kinetics of anti-Listeria activity and levels of proinflammatory mediators point to cellular activation by different mechanisms.

  15. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Zalud, V.

    2002-01-01

    In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellular mobile communications, examined the progress in current second generation (2G) cellular standards and discussed their migration to the third generation (3G). The European 2G cellular standard GSM and its evolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. The third generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network and equipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of code division multiple ac...

  16. Biomechanics of cellular solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lorna J

    2005-03-01

    Materials with a cellular structure are widespread in nature and include wood, cork, plant parenchyma and trabecular bone. Natural cellular materials are often mechanically efficient: the honeycomb-like microstructure of wood, for instance, gives it an exceptionally high performance index for resisting bending and buckling. Here we review the mechanics of a wide range of natural cellular materials and examine their role in lightweight natural sandwich structures (e.g. iris leaves) and natural tubular structures (e.g. plant stems or animal quills). We also describe two examples of engineered biomaterials with a cellular structure, designed to replace or regenerate tissue in the body.

  17. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular processes span a huge range of length and time scales from the molecular to the near-macroscopic. Understanding how effects on one scale influence, and are themselves influenced by, those on lower and higher scales is a critical issue for the construction of models in Systems Biology....... Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes...

  18. Gluthathione-S-transferase M1 regulation of diesel exhaust particle-induced pro-inflammatory mediator expression in normal human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) contribute substantially to ambient particulate matter (PM) air pollution in urban areas. Inhalation of PM has been associated with increased incidence of lung disease in susceptible populations. We have demonstrated that the glutathione-S-transfera...

  19. Linearizable cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobe, Atsushi; Yura, Fumitaka

    2007-01-01

    The initial value problem for a class of reversible elementary cellular automata with periodic boundaries is reduced to an initial-boundary value problem for a class of linear systems on a finite commutative ring Z 2 . Moreover, a family of such linearizable cellular automata is given

  20. Gold nanoparticles cellular toxicity and recovery: adipose Derived Stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironava, Tatsiana; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are currently used in numerous medical applications. Herein, we describe their in vitro impact on human adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) using 13 nm and 45 nm citrate-coated AuNPs. In their non-differentiated state, ADSCs were penetrated by the AuNPs and stored in vacuoles. The presence of the AuNPs in ADSCs resulted in increased population doubling times, decreased cell motility and cell-mediated collagen contraction. The degree to which the cells were impacted was a function of particle concentration, where the smaller particles required a sevenfold higher concentration to have the same effect as the larger ones. Furthermore, AuNPs reduced adipogenesis as measured by lipid droplet accumulation and adiponectin secretion. These effects correlated with transient increases in DLK1 and with relative reductions in fibronectin. Upon removal of exogenous AuNPs, cellular NP levels decreased and normal ADSC functions were restored. As adiponectin helps regulate energy metabolism, local fluctuations triggered by AuNPs can lead to systemic changes. Hence, careful choice of size, concentration and clinical application duration of AuNPs is warranted.

  1. Mechanism of cellular uptake and impact of ferucarbotran on macrophage physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles are contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging. Ferucarbotran is a clinically approved SPIO-coated carboxydextran with a diameter of about 45-60 nm. We investigated the mechanism of cellular uptake of Ferucarbotran with a cell model using the murine macrophage cell line Raw 264.7. We observed a dose-dependent uptake of these SPIO particles by spectrophotometer analysis and also a dose-dependent increase in the granularity of the macrophages as determined by flow cytometry. There was a linear correlation between the side scattering mean value and iron content (P<0.001, R(2 = 0. 8048. For evaluation of the endocytotic pathway of these ingested SPIO particles, different inhibitors of the endocytotic pathways were employed. There was a significant decrease of side scattering counts in the cells and a less significant change in signal intensity based on magnetic resonance in the phenylarsine oxide-treated macrophages. After labeling with SPIO particles, the macrophages showed an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species at 2, 24, and 48 h; a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential at 24 h; and an increase in cell proliferation at 24 h. We concluded that Ferucarbotran was internalized into macrophages via the clathrin-mediated pathway and can change the cellular behavior of these cells after labeling.

  2. Selective enzymatic degradation of self-assembled particles from amphiphilic block copolymers obtained by the combination of N-carboxyanhydride and nitroxide-mediated polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habraken, G.J.M.; Peeters, M.; Thornton, P.D.; Koning, C.E.; Heise, A.

    2011-01-01

    Combining controlled radical polymerizations and a controlled polypeptide synthetic technique, such as N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) ring-opening polymerization, enables the generation of well-defined block copolymers to be easily accessible. Here we combine NCA polymerization with the nitroxide-mediated

  3. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  4. Cellular decomposition in vikalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyatskaya, I.S.; Vintajkin, E.Z.; Georgieva, I.Ya.; Golikov, V.A.; Udovenko, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Austenite decomposition in Fe-Co-V and Fe-Co-V-Ni alloys at 475-600 deg C is investigated. The cellular decomposition in ternary alloys results in the formation of bcc (ordered) and fcc structures, and in quaternary alloys - bcc (ordered) and 12R structures. The cellular 12R structure results from the emergence of stacking faults in the fcc lattice with irregular spacing in four layers. The cellular decomposition results in a high-dispersion structure and magnetic properties approaching the level of well-known vikalloys [ru

  5. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  6. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  7. Cellular automata in cytoskeletal lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S A; Watt, R C; Hameroff, S R

    1984-01-01

    Cellular automata (CA) activities could mediate biological regulation and information processing via nonlinear electrodynamic effects in cytoskeletal lattice arrays. Frohlich coherent oscillations and other nonlinear mechanisms may effect discrete 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -11/ s interval events which result in dynamic patterns in biolattices such as cylindrical protein polymers: microtubules (MT). Structural geometry and electrostatic forces of MT subunit dipole oscillations suggest neighbor rules among the hexagonally packed protein subunits. Computer simulations using these suggested rules and MT structural geometry demonstrate CA activities including dynamical and stable self-organizing patterns, oscillators, and traveling gliders. CA activities in MT and other cytoskeletal lattices may have important biological regulatory functions. 23 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  8. Binding of human papilloma virus L1 virus-like particles to dendritic cells is mediated through heparan sulfates and induces immune activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, Lot; Zoughlami, Younes; Aengeneyndt, Birgit; David, Guido; van Kooyk, Yvette; Gissmann, Lutz; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2007-01-01

    Immunization using human papilloma virus (HPV)-L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) induces a robust and effective immune response, which has recently resulted in the implementation of the HPV-L1 VLP vaccination in health programs. However, during infection, HPV can escape immune surveillance leading to

  9. African biomass burning plumes over the Atlantic: aircraft based measurements and implications for H2SO4 and HNO3 mediated smoke particle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dörnbrack

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of trace gases and aerosol particles have been made in two aged biomass burning (BB plumes over the East Atlantic (Gulf of Guinea. The plumes originated from BB in the Southern-Hemisphere African savanna belt. On the day of our measurements (13 August 2006, the plumes had ages of about 10 days and were respectively located in the middle troposphere (MT at 3900–5500 m altitude and in the upper troposphere (UT at 10 800–11 200 m. Probably, the MT plume was lifted by dry convection and the UT plume was lifted by wet convection. In the more polluted MT-plume, numerous measured trace species had markedly elevated abundances, particularly SO2 (up to 1400 pmol mol−1, HNO3 (5000–8000 pmol mol−1 and smoke particles with diameters larger than 270 nm (up to 2000 cm−3. Our MT-plume measurements indicate that SO2 released by BB had not experienced significant loss by deposition and cloud processes but rather had experienced OH-induced conversion to gas-phase sulfuric acid. By contrast, a significant fraction of the released NOy had experienced loss, most likely as HNO3 by deposition. In the UT-plume, loss of NOy and SO2 was more pronounced compared to the MT-plume, probably due to cloud processes. Building on our measurements and accompanying model simulations, we have investigated trace gas transformations in the ageing and diluting plumes and their role in smoke particle processing and activation. Emphasis was placed upon the formation of sulfuric acid and ammonium nitrate, and their influence on the activation potential of smoke particles. Our model simulations reveal that, after 13 August, the lower plume traveled across the Atlantic and descended to 1300 m and hereafter ascended again. During the travel across the Atlantic, the soluble mass fraction of smoke particles and their mean diameter increased sufficiently to allow the processed smoke particles to act as water vapor condensation nuclei already at very low water

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu.

    1990-02-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author)

  11. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Wenyi Xu; Fengzhong Wang; Zhongsheng Yu; Fengjiao Xin

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the proce...

  12. Modeling cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matthäus, Franziska; Pahle, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume comprises research articles and reviews on topics connected to the mathematical modeling of cellular systems. These contributions cover signaling pathways, stochastic effects, cell motility and mechanics, pattern formation processes, as well as multi-scale approaches. All authors attended the workshop on "Modeling Cellular Systems" which took place in Heidelberg in October 2014. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1990-03-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author).

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu

    1990-01-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author)

  15. Theories of higher spin particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akshay, Y.S.; Sudarshan, Ananth

    2015-01-01

    One of the aims of theoretical physics is to understand the fundamental constituents of Nature and the interactions between them. The Standard Model of particle physics is currently our best description of Nature. It has been phenomenally successful in describing physics upto energy scales of a few hundred GeV. The SM contains matter particles (fermions), force carriers or mediators and the Higgs (bosons). The fermionic particles that make up all the visible matter around us are the leptons (electron, muon, tau, their respective neutrinos) and quarks (up, down, top, bottom, charm and strange). The force carriers of the SM mediate three of the four fundamental forces in Nature. The photon (γ) mediates the electromagnetic force, the W+,W-,Z mediate the weak force and the gluons (g) mediate the strong force. The Higgs boson plays an important role in the generation of masses for various particles

  16. CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated GFP Knock-in at the MAP1LC3B Locus in 293FT Cells Is Better for Bona Fide Monitoring Cellular Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Jinlin; Qiu, Minghan; Mi, Zeyun; Meng, Maobin; Guo, Yu; Wang, Hui; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2018-04-19

    Accurately identifying and quantifying cellular autophagy is very important as the significance of autophagy in physiological and pathological processes becomes increasingly evident. Ectopically expressed fluorescent-tagged microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (MAP1LC3B, LC3) is the most widely used reporter for monitoring autophagy activity thus far. However, this approach ignores the influence of constitutively overexpressed LC3 on autophagy itself and autophagy-related processes and its accuracy in indicating autophagy is questionable. Here, we generated a knock-in GFP-LC3 reporter via the CRISPR/Cas9 system in 293FT cells to add GFP to the N-terminal of and in frame with endogenous LC3. We proved that this knock-in GFP-LC3 was expressed at biological level driven by the endogenous transcriptional regulatory elements as the wild type alleles. Compared with the ectopically expressed GFP-LC3, the endogenous knock-in reporter exhibited much higher sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio of GFP-LC3 puncta upon the induction or inhibition of autophagy at certain step for monitoring autophagy activity. Thus, according to the previous reported concerning and the results presented here, we suggest that this knock-in GFP-LC3 reporter is better for bona fide monitoring cellular autophagy and should be employed for further study of autophagy in vitro and in vivo. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Glass formation and unusual hygroscopic growth of iodic acid solution droplets with relevance for iodine mediated particle formation in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Iodine oxide particles are known to nucleate in the marine boundary layer where gas phase molecular iodine and organoiodine species are produced by macroalgae. These ultra-fine particles may then grow through the condensation of other materials to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. There has been some debate over the chemical identity of the initially nucleated particles. In laboratory simulations, hygroscopic measurements have been used to infer that they are composed of insoluble I2O4, while elemental analysis of laboratory generated particles suggests soluble I2O5 or its hydrated form iodic acid, HIO3 (I2O5·H2O. In this paper we explore the response of super-micron sized aqueous iodic acid solution droplets to varying humidity using both Raman microscopy and single particle electrodynamic traps. These measurements reveal that the propensity of an iodic acid solution droplet to crystallise is negligible on drying to ~0% relative humidity (RH. On applying mechanical pressure to these droplets they shatter in a manner consistent with an ultra-viscous liquid or a brittle glass. Water retention in amorphous material at low RH is important for understanding the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles and uptake of other condensable material. Subsequent water uptake between 10 and 20% RH causes their viscosity to reduce sufficiently that the cracked droplets flow and merge. The persistence of iodic acid solution in an amorphous state, rather than a crystalline state, suggests they will more readily accommodate other condensable material and are therefore more likely to grow to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. On increasing the humidity to ~90% the mass of the droplets only increases by ~20% with a corresponding increase in radius of only 6%, which is remarkably small for a highly soluble material. We suggest that the

  18. Differential effects of IL-2 and IL-21 on expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells with redundant roles in natural killer cell mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Aruna; Ramanunni, Asha; Cheney, Carolyn; Rozewski, Darlene; Kindsvogel, Wayne; Lehman, Amy; Jarjoura, David; Caligiuri, Michael; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells are expanded in solid and hematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Several cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules are required for generation, survival and maintenance of their suppressive effect. We and others have shown direct cytotoxic effect of the novel common gamma chain cytokine interleukin (IL)-21 on primary B cells from CLL patients. Since members of this family of cytokines are known to exhibit their effects on diverse immune cells, we have examined the effects of IL-21 on CLL patient derived regulatory T cell (Treg) induction, expansion and the inhibitory effect on natural killer cells in vitro. We demonstrate here the expression of IL-21 receptor in CD4(+)CD25(High) regulatory cells from CLL patients. In contrast to IL-2, the IL-21 cytokine failed to mediate expansion of regulatory T cells or induced expression of Foxp3 in CD4(+)CD25(Intermediate) or CD4(+)CD25(Dim/-) T cells in whole blood derived from CLL patients. Interestingly, in contrast to their differential effects on expansion of the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T cells, IL-2 and IL-21 exhibited a redundant role in Treg mediated suppression of NK cell mediated antibody dependent cytotoxicity function. Given the infusion related toxicities and pro-survival effect of IL-2 in CLL, these studies provide a rationale to explore IL-21 as an alternate gamma chain cytokine in CLL therapy.

  19. In Vivo Protective Effects of Nootkatone against Particles-Induced Lung Injury Caused by Diesel Exhaust Is Mediated via the NF-κB Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Abderrahim Nemmar; Suhail Al-Salam; Sumaya Beegam; Priya Yuvaraju; Naserddine Hamadi; Badreldin H. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that acute particulate air pollution exposure is linked with pulmonary adverse effects, including alterations of pulmonary function, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Nootkatone, a constituent of grapefruit, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effect of nootkatone on lung toxicity has not been reported so far. In this study we evaluated the possible protective effects of nootkatone on diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced lung toxicity, a...

  20. Differential polymer structure tunes mechanism of cellular uptake and transfection routes of poly(β-amino ester) polyplexes in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayoung; Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-15

    Successful gene delivery with nonviral particles has several barriers, including cellular uptake, endosomal escape, and nuclear transport. Understanding the mechanisms behind these steps is critical to enhancing the effectiveness of gene delivery. Polyplexes formed with poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs) have been shown to effectively transfer DNA to various cell types, but the mechanism of their cellular uptake has not been identified. This is the first study to evaluate the uptake mechanism of PBAE polyplexes and the dependence of cellular uptake on the end group and molecular weight of the polymer. We synthesized three different analogues of PBAEs with the same base polymer poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol) (B4S4) but with small changes in the end group or molecular weight. We quantified the uptake and transfection efficiencies of the pDNA polyplexes formulated from these polymers in hard-to-transfect triple negative human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231). All polymers formed positively charged (10-17 mV) nanoparticles of ∼200 nm in size. Cellular internalization of all three formulations was inhibited the most (60-90% decrease in cellular uptake) by blocking caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Greater inhibition was shown with polymers that had a 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end group (E7) than the others with a 2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethanol end group (E6) or higher molecular weight. However, caveolae-mediated endocytosis was generally not as efficient as clathrin-mediated endocytosis in leading to transfection. These findings indicate that PBAE polyplexes can be used to transfect triple negative human breast cancer cells and that small changes to the same base polymer can modulate their cellular uptake and transfection routes.

  1. Cellularized Cellular Solids via Freeze-Casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Sarah; Kwiatoszynski, Julien; Coradin, Thibaud; Fernandes, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    The elaboration of metabolically active cell-containing materials is a decisive step toward the successful application of cell based technologies. The present work unveils a new process allowing to simultaneously encapsulate living cells and shaping cell-containing materials into solid-state macroporous foams with precisely controlled morphology. Our strategy is based on freeze casting, an ice templating materials processing technique that has recently emerged for the structuration of colloids into macroporous materials. Our results indicate that it is possible to combine the precise structuration of the materials with cellular metabolic activity for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  3. Wireless Cellular Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zalud

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is briefly reviewed the history of wireless cellularmobile communications, examined the progress in current secondgeneration (2G cellular standards and discussed their migration to thethird generation (3G. The European 2G cellular standard GSM and itsevolution phases GPRS and EDGE are described somewhat in detail. Thethird generation standard UMTS taking up on GSM/GPRS core network andequipped with a new advanced access network on the basis of codedivision multiple access (CDMA is investigated too. A sketch of theperspective of mobile communication beyond 3G concludes this article.

  4. Plant Nucleolar Stress Response, a New Face in the NAC-Dependent Cellular Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Iwai; Sugiyama, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear domain, where the core processes of ribosome biogenesis occur vigorously. All these processes are finely orchestrated by many nucleolar factors to build precisely ribosome particles. In animal cells, perturbations of ribosome biogenesis, mostly accompanied by structural disorders of the nucleolus, cause a kind of cellular stress to induce cell cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis, which is called nucleolar stress response. The best-characterized pathway of this stress response involves p53 and MDM2 as key players. p53 is a crucial transcription factor that functions in response to not only nucleolar stress but also other cellular stresses such as DNA damage stress. These cellular stresses release p53 from the inhibition by MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase targeting p53, in various ways, which leads to p53-dependent activation of a set of genes. In plants, genetic impairments of ribosome biogenesis factors or ribosome components have been shown to cause characteristic phenotypes, including a narrow and pointed leaf shape, implying a common signaling pathway connecting ribosomal perturbations and certain aspects of growth and development. Unlike animals, however, plants have neither p53 nor MDM2 family proteins. Then the question arises whether plant cells have a nucleolar stress response pathway. In recent years, it has been reported that several members of the plant-specific transcription factor family NAC play critical roles in the pathways responsive to various cellular stresses. In this mini review, we outline the plant cellular stress response pathways involving NAC transcription factors with reference to the p53-MDM2-dependent pathways of animal cells, and discuss the possible involvement of a plant-unique, NAC-mediated pathway in the nucleolar stress response in plants.

  5. Plant Nucleolar Stress Response, a New Face in the NAC-Dependent Cellular Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwai Ohbayashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear domain, where the core processes of ribosome biogenesis occur vigorously. All these processes are finely orchestrated by many nucleolar factors to build precisely ribosome particles. In animal cells, perturbations of ribosome biogenesis, mostly accompanied by structural disorders of the nucleolus, cause a kind of cellular stress to induce cell cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis, which is called nucleolar stress response. The best-characterized pathway of this stress response involves p53 and MDM2 as key players. p53 is a crucial transcription factor that functions in response to not only nucleolar stress but also other cellular stresses such as DNA damage stress. These cellular stresses release p53 from the inhibition by MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase targeting p53, in various ways, which leads to p53-dependent activation of a set of genes. In plants, genetic impairments of ribosome biogenesis factors or ribosome components have been shown to cause characteristic phenotypes, including a narrow and pointed leaf shape, implying a common signaling pathway connecting ribosomal perturbations and certain aspects of growth and development. Unlike animals, however, plants have neither p53 nor MDM2 family proteins. Then the question arises whether plant cells have a nucleolar stress response pathway. In recent years, it has been reported that several members of the plant-specific transcription factor family NAC play critical roles in the pathways responsive to various cellular stresses. In this mini review, we outline the plant cellular stress response pathways involving NAC transcription factors with reference to the p53-MDM2-dependent pathways of animal cells, and discuss the possible involvement of a plant-unique, NAC-mediated pathway in the nucleolar stress response in plants.

  6. The anti-fibrotic effects of CCN1/CYR61 in primary portal myofibroblasts are mediated through induction of reactive oxygen species resulting in cellular senescence, apoptosis and attenuated TGF-β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Schaffrath, Christian; Van de Leur, Eddy; Haas, Ute; Tihaa, Lidia; Meurer, Steffen K; Nevzorova, Yulia A; Liedtke, Christian; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1/CYR61) is a CCN (CYR61, CTGF (connective tissue growth factor), and NOV (Nephroblastoma overexpressed gene)) family matricellular protein comprising six secreted CCN proteins in mammals. CCN1/CYR61 expression is associated with inflammation and injury repair. Recent studies show that CCN1/CYR61 limits fibrosis in models of cutaneous wound healing by inducing cellular senescence in myofibroblasts of the granulation tissue which thereby transforms into an extracellular matrix-degrading phenotype. We here investigate CCN1/CYR61 expression in primary profibrogenic liver cells (i.e., hepatic stellate cells and periportal myofibroblasts) and found an increase of CCN1/CYR61 expression during early activation of hepatic stellate cells that declines in fully transdifferentiated myofibroblasts. By contrast, CCN1/CYR61 levels found in primary parenchymal liver cells (i.e., hepatocytes) were relatively low compared to the levels exhibited in hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. In models of ongoing liver fibrogenesis, elevated levels of CCN1/CYR61 were particularly noticed during early periods of insult, while expression declined during prolonged phases of fibrogenesis. We generated an adenovirus type 5 encoding CCN1/CYR61 (i.e., Ad5-CMV-CCN1/CYR61) and overexpressed CCN1/CYR61 in primary portal myofibroblasts. Interestingly, overexpressed CCN1/CYR61 significantly inhibited production of collagen type I at both mRNA and protein levels as evidenced by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. CCN1/CYR61 further induces production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to dose-dependent cellular senescence and apoptosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that CCN1/CYR61 attenuates TGF-β signaling by scavenging TGF-β thereby mitigating in vivo liver fibrogenesis in a bile duct ligation model. In line with dermal fibrosis and scar formation, CCN1/CYR61 is involved in liver injury repair and

  7. Radiolabelled cellular blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinzinger, H.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on radiolabelled cellular blood elements, covering new advances made during the past several years, in particular the use of Tc-99 as a tracer for blood elements. Coverage extends to several radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies that are specific for blood components and may label blood elements in vivo

  8. Building synthetic cellular organization

    OpenAIRE

    Polka, Jessica K.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    The elaborate spatial organization of cells enhances, restricts, and regulates protein–protein interactions. However, the biological significance of this organization has been difficult to study without ways of directly perturbing it. We highlight synthetic biology tools for engineering novel cellular organization, describing how they have been, and can be, used to advance cell biology.

  9. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  10. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  11. Polyelectrolyte mediated nano hybrid particle as a nano-sensor with outstandingly amplified specificity and sensitivity for enzyme free estimation of cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebl, Mazhar; Moussa, Zeinab; Peurla, Markus; Patra, Digambara

    2017-07-01

    As a proof of concept, here it is established that curcumin integrated chitosan oligosaccharide lactate (COL) self-assembles on silica nanoparticle surface to form nano hybrid particles (NHPs). These NHPs have size in the ranges of 25-35nm with silica nanoparticle as its core and curcumin-COL as outer layer having thickness of 4-8nm. The fluorescence intensity of these NHPs are found to be quenched and emission maximum is ~50nm red shifted compared to free curcumin implying inner filter effect and/or homo-FRET between curcumin molecules present on the surface of individual nano hybrid particle. Although fluorescence of free curcumin is remarkably quenched by Hg 2+ /Cu 2+ ions due to chelation through keto-enol form, the fluorescence of NHPs is unaffected by Hg 2+ /Cu 2+ ion that boosts analytical selectivity. The fluorescence intensity is outstandingly enhanced in the presence of cholesterol but is not influenced by ascorbic acid, uric acid, glucose, albumin, lipid and other potential interfering substances that either obstruct during enzymatic reaction or affect fluorescence of free curcumin. Thus, NHPs outstandingly improve analytical specificity, selectivity and sensitivity during cholesterol estimation compared to free curcumin. The interaction between cholesterol and NHPs is found to be a combination of ground state electrostatic interaction through the free hydroxyl group of cholesterol along with hydrophobic interaction between NHPs and cholesterol and excited state interaction. The proposed cholesterol biosensor illustrates a wider linear dynamic range, 0.002-10mmolL -1 , (upper limit is due to lack of solubility of cholesterol) needed for biomedical application and better than reported values during enzymatic reaction. In addition, the NHPs are found to be photo-stable potentially making it suitable for simple, quick and cost-effective cholesterol estimation and opening an alternative approach other than enzymatic reaction using nano hybrid structure to

  12. Role of cellular FKBP52 protein in intracellular trafficking of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Weihong; Zhong Li; Wu Jianqing; Chen Linyuan; Qing Keyun; Weigel-Kelley, Kirsten A.; Larsen, Steven H.; Shou Weinian; Warrington, Kenneth H.; Srivastava, Arun

    2006-01-01

    We have reported that tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of a cellular protein, FKBP52, inhibit the second-strand DNA synthesis of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), leading to inefficient transgene expression from recombinant AAV vectors. To further explore the role of FKBP52 in AAV-mediated transduction, we established murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cultures from FKBP52 wild-type (WT), heterozygous (HE), and knockout (KO) mice. Conventional AAV vectors failed to transduce WT MEFs efficiently, and the transduction efficiency was not significantly increased in HE or KO MEFs. AAV vectors failed to traffic efficiently to the nucleus in these cells. Treatment with hydroxyurea (HU) increased the transduction efficiency of conventional AAV vectors by ∼25-fold in WT MEFs, but only by ∼4-fold in KO MEFs. The use of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors, which bypass the requirement of viral second-strand DNA synthesis, revealed that HU treatment increased the transduction efficiency ∼23-fold in WT MEFs, but only ∼4-fold in KO MEFs, indicating that the lack of HU treatment-mediated increase in KO MEFs was not due to failure of AAV to undergo viral second-strand DNA synthesis. Following HU treatment, ∼59% of AAV genomes were present in the nuclear fraction from WT MEFs, but only ∼28% in KO MEFs, indicating that the pathway by which HU treatment mediates nuclear transport of AAV was impaired in KO MEFs. When KO MEFs were stably transfected with an FKBP52 expression plasmid, HU treatment-mediated increase in the transduction efficiency was restored in these cells, which correlated directly with improved intracellular trafficking. Intact AAV particles were also shown to interact with FKBP52 as well as with dynein, a known cellular protein involved in AAV trafficking. These studies suggest that FKBP52, being a cellular chaperone protein, facilitates intracellular trafficking of AAV, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene

  13. Inter-cellular transport of ran GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Khuperkar

    Full Text Available Ran, a member of the Ras-GTPase superfamily, has a well-established role in regulating the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope (NE. Ran has also been implicated in mitosis, cell cycle progression, and NE formation. Over-expression of Ran is associated with various cancers, although the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unclear. Serendipitously, we found that Ran possesses the ability to move from cell-to-cell when transiently expressed in mammalian cells. Moreover, we show that the inter-cellular transport of Ran is GTP-dependent. Importantly, Ran displays a similar distribution pattern in the recipient cells as that in the donor cell and co-localizes with the Ran binding protein Nup358 (also called RanBP2. Interestingly, leptomycin B, an inhibitor of CRM1-mediated export, or siRNA mediated depletion of CRM1, significantly impaired the inter-cellular transport of Ran, suggesting a function for CRM1 in this process. These novel findings indicate a possible role for Ran beyond nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, with potential implications in inter-cellular communication and cancers.

  14. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  15. Nested cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasthoff, U.

    1985-07-01

    Cellular automata by definition consist of a finite or infinite number of cells, say of unit length, with each cell having the same transition function. These cells are usually considered as the smallest elements and so the space filled with these cells becomes discrete. Nevertheless, large pictures created by such cellular automata look very fractal. So we try to replace each cell by a couple of smaller cells, which have the same transition functions as the large ones. There are automata where this replacement does not destroy the macroscopic structure. In these cases this nesting process can be iterated. The paper contains large classes of automata with the above properties. In the case of one dimensional automata with two states and next neighbour interaction and a nesting function of the same type a complete classification is given. (author)

  16. Plant-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles using parsley ( Petroselinum crispum) leaf extract: spectral analysis of the particles and antibacterial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kaushik; Sarkar, C. K.; Ghosh, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of nanomaterials may involve various routes including physical, chemical and biological approaches. Here, the biological green route was chosen to prepare silver nanoparticles from silver salts to avoid the requirement of costly instruments and involvement of hazardous chemicals as well. To make the process clean and green, leaf extract of parsley ( Petroselinum crispum) was used to synthesize Ag nanoparticles at room temperature. The formation of Ag-nanoparticles was monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The presence of silver in the sample and its crystalline nature were verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The size distribution profile and particle size in the suspension were manipulated from dynamic light scattering (DLS) pattern. The shape, size and morphology of the biogenic nanoparticles were studied using high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM). Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy was used to detect the biomolecules responsible for reduction of silver ions. These biogenic Ag-nanoparticles showed appreciable antibacterial efficacy against three bacteria— Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  17. Predictability in cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case.

  18. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata.

  19. Wavefront cellular learning automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Behnaz; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a new cellular learning automaton, called a wavefront cellular learning automaton (WCLA). The proposed WCLA has a set of learning automata mapped to a connected structure and uses this structure to propagate the state changes of the learning automata over the structure using waves. In the WCLA, after one learning automaton chooses its action, if this chosen action is different from the previous action, it can send a wave to its neighbors and activate them. Each neighbor receiving the wave is activated and must choose a new action. This structure for the WCLA is necessary in many dynamic areas such as social networks, computer networks, grid computing, and web mining. In this paper, we introduce the WCLA framework as an optimization tool with diffusion capability, study its behavior over time using ordinary differential equation solutions, and present its accuracy using expediency analysis. To show the superiority of the proposed WCLA, we compare the proposed method with some other types of cellular learning automata using two benchmark problems.

  20. Algorithm for cellular reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquist, Scott; Patterson, Geoff; Muir, Lindsey A; Lindsly, Stephen; Chen, Haiming; Brown, Markus; Wicha, Max S; Bloch, Anthony; Brockett, Roger; Rajapakse, Indika

    2017-11-07

    The day we understand the time evolution of subcellular events at a level of detail comparable to physical systems governed by Newton's laws of motion seems far away. Even so, quantitative approaches to cellular dynamics add to our understanding of cell biology. With data-guided frameworks we can develop better predictions about, and methods for, control over specific biological processes and system-wide cell behavior. Here we describe an approach for optimizing the use of transcription factors (TFs) in cellular reprogramming, based on a device commonly used in optimal control. We construct an approximate model for the natural evolution of a cell-cycle-synchronized population of human fibroblasts, based on data obtained by sampling the expression of 22,083 genes at several time points during the cell cycle. To arrive at a model of moderate complexity, we cluster gene expression based on division of the genome into topologically associating domains (TADs) and then model the dynamics of TAD expression levels. Based on this dynamical model and additional data, such as known TF binding sites and activity, we develop a methodology for identifying the top TF candidates for a specific cellular reprogramming task. Our data-guided methodology identifies a number of TFs previously validated for reprogramming and/or natural differentiation and predicts some potentially useful combinations of TFs. Our findings highlight the immense potential of dynamical models, mathematics, and data-guided methodologies for improving strategies for control over biological processes. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  1. Wavefront cellular learning automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Behnaz; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a new cellular learning automaton, called a wavefront cellular learning automaton (WCLA). The proposed WCLA has a set of learning automata mapped to a connected structure and uses this structure to propagate the state changes of the learning automata over the structure using waves. In the WCLA, after one learning automaton chooses its action, if this chosen action is different from the previous action, it can send a wave to its neighbors and activate them. Each neighbor receiving the wave is activated and must choose a new action. This structure for the WCLA is necessary in many dynamic areas such as social networks, computer networks, grid computing, and web mining. In this paper, we introduce the WCLA framework as an optimization tool with diffusion capability, study its behavior over time using ordinary differential equation solutions, and present its accuracy using expediency analysis. To show the superiority of the proposed WCLA, we compare the proposed method with some other types of cellular learning automata using two benchmark problems.

  2. The Effects Radiation on Cellular Components of the Immune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubaidah-Alatas

    2001-01-01

    The immune system describes the body's ability to defend itself against various foreign intruders named as antigens by calling on an immune mechanism. Antigens penetration into body activate the body's immune system that may be humoral response, cellular response, or both. The immune response is primarily mediated by two cell types, lymphocyte and macrophage. This paper will discuss the cellular component of immune system and the radiation effects on various cells involved in system. Moreover, the effects of radiation on humoral and cellular responses and the relation among immunity, cancer and radiotherapy are also described. (author)

  3. Cellular Senescence in Postmitotic Cells: Beyond Growth Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Mallette, Frédérick A

    2018-04-25

    In mitotic cells, cellular senescence is a permanent state of G1 arrest, that may have evolved in parallel to apoptosis, to limit proliferation of damaged cells and oncogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that postmitotic cells are also capable of entering a state of senescence, although the repercussions of postmitotic cellular senescence (PoMiCS) on tissue health and function are currently ill-defined. In tissues made largely of post-mitotic cells, it is evolutionary advantageous to preserve cellular integrity and cellular senescence of post-mitotic cells may prevent stressor-induced tissue degeneration and promote tissue repair. Paradoxically, PoMiCS may also contribute to disease progression through the generation of inflammatory mediators, termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Here, we discuss the potential roles of PoMiCS and propose to enlarge the current definition of cellular senescence to postmitotic terminally differentiated cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  5. In Vivo Protective Effects of Nootkatone against Particles-Induced Lung Injury Caused by Diesel Exhaust Is Mediated via the NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim Nemmar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown that acute particulate air pollution exposure is linked with pulmonary adverse effects, including alterations of pulmonary function, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Nootkatone, a constituent of grapefruit, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effect of nootkatone on lung toxicity has not been reported so far. In this study we evaluated the possible protective effects of nootkatone on diesel exhaust particles (DEP-induced lung toxicity, and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects. Mice were intratracheally (i.t. instilled with either DEP (30 µg/mouse or saline (control. Nootkatone was given to mice by gavage, 1 h before i.t. instillation, with either DEP or saline. Twenty-four hours following DEP exposure, several physiological and biochemical endpoints were assessed. Nootkatone pretreatment significantly prevented the DEP-induced increase in airway resistance in vivo, decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and abated macrophage and neutrophil infiltration in the lung interstitium, assessed by histolopathology. Moreover, DEP caused a significant increase in lung concentrations of 8-isoprostane and tumor necrosis factor α, and decreased the reduced glutathione concentration and total nitric oxide activity. These actions were all significantly alleviated by nootkatone pretreatment. Similarly, nootkatone prevented DEP-induced DNA damage and prevented the proteolytic cleavage of caspase-3. Moreover, nootkatone inhibited nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB induced by DEP. We conclude that nootkatone prevented the DEP-induced increase in airway resistance, lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and the subsequent DNA damage and apoptosis through a mechanism involving inhibition of NF-κB activation. Nootkatone could possibly be considered a beneficial protective agent against air pollution-induced respiratory adverse effects.

  6. Development and drought tolerance assay of marker-free transgenic rice with OsAPX2 using biolistic particle-mediated co-transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Feng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, and low temperature cause–losses in rice production worldwide. The emergence of transgenic technology has enabled improvements in the drought resistance of rice plants and helped avert crop damage due to drought stress. Selectable marker genes conferring resistance to antibiotics or herbicides have been widely used to identify genetically modified plants. However, the use of such markers has limited the public acceptance of genetically modified organisms. Marker-free materials (i.e., those containing a single foreign gene may be more easily accepted by the public and more likely to find common use. In the present study, we created marker-free drought-tolerant transgenic rice plants using particle bombardment. Overall, 842 T0 plants overexpressing the rice ascorbate peroxidase-coding gene OsAPX2 were generated. Eight independent marker-free lines were identified from T1 seedlings using the polymerase chain reaction. The molecular characteristics of these lines were examined, including the expression level, copy number, and flanking sequences of OsAPX2, in the T2 progeny. A simulated drought test using polyethylene glycol and a drought-tolerance test of seedlings confirmed that the marker-free lines carrying OsAPX2 showed significantly improved drought tolerance in seedlings. In the field, the yield of the wild-type plant decreased by 60% under drought conditions compared with normal conditions. However, the transgenic line showed a yield loss of approximately 26%. The results demonstrated that marker-free transgenic lines significantly improved grain yield under drought-stressed conditions.

  7. In Vivo Protective Effects of Nootkatone against Particles-Induced Lung Injury Caused by Diesel Exhaust Is Mediated via the NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Al-Salam, Suhail; Beegam, Sumaya; Yuvaraju, Priya; Hamadi, Naserddine; Ali, Badreldin H

    2018-02-26

    Numerous studies have shown that acute particulate air pollution exposure is linked with pulmonary adverse effects, including alterations of pulmonary function, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Nootkatone, a constituent of grapefruit, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effect of nootkatone on lung toxicity has not been reported so far. In this study we evaluated the possible protective effects of nootkatone on diesel exhaust particles (DEP)-induced lung toxicity, and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects. Mice were intratracheally (i.t.) instilled with either DEP (30 µg/mouse) or saline (control). Nootkatone was given to mice by gavage, 1 h before i.t. instillation, with either DEP or saline. Twenty-four hours following DEP exposure, several physiological and biochemical endpoints were assessed. Nootkatone pretreatment significantly prevented the DEP-induced increase in airway resistance in vivo, decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and abated macrophage and neutrophil infiltration in the lung interstitium, assessed by histolopathology. Moreover, DEP caused a significant increase in lung concentrations of 8-isoprostane and tumor necrosis factor α, and decreased the reduced glutathione concentration and total nitric oxide activity. These actions were all significantly alleviated by nootkatone pretreatment. Similarly, nootkatone prevented DEP-induced DNA damage and prevented the proteolytic cleavage of caspase-3. Moreover, nootkatone inhibited nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) induced by DEP. We conclude that nootkatone prevented the DEP-induced increase in airway resistance, lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and the subsequent DNA damage and apoptosis through a mechanism involving inhibition of NF-κB activation. Nootkatone could possibly be considered a beneficial protective agent against air pollution-induced respiratory adverse effects.

  8. Phosphoinositide-3 kinase-Akt pathway controls cellular entry of Ebola virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F Saeed

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K pathway regulates diverse cellular activities related to cell growth, migration, survival, and vesicular trafficking. It is known that Ebola virus requires endocytosis to establish an infection. However, the cellular signals that mediate this uptake were unknown for Ebola virus as well as many other viruses. Here, the involvement of PI3K in Ebola virus entry was studied. A novel and critical role of the PI3K signaling pathway was demonstrated in cell entry of Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV. Inhibitors of PI3K and Akt significantly reduced infection by ZEBOV at an early step during the replication cycle. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Akt-1 was induced shortly after exposure of cells to radiation-inactivated ZEBOV, indicating that the virus actively induces the PI3K pathway and that replication was not required for this induction. Subsequent use of pseudotyped Ebola virus and/or Ebola virus-like particles, in a novel virus entry assay, provided evidence that activity of PI3K/Akt is required at the virus entry step. Class 1A PI3Ks appear to play a predominant role in regulating ZEBOV entry, and Rac1 is a key downstream effector in this regulatory cascade. Confocal imaging of fluorescently labeled ZEBOV indicated that inhibition of PI3K, Akt, or Rac1 disrupted normal uptake of virus particles into cells and resulted in aberrant accumulation of virus into a cytosolic compartment that was non-permissive for membrane fusion. We conclude that PI3K-mediated signaling plays an important role in regulating vesicular trafficking of ZEBOV necessary for cell entry. Disruption of this signaling leads to inappropriate trafficking within the cell and a block in steps leading to membrane fusion. These findings extend our current understanding of Ebola virus entry mechanism and may help in devising useful new strategies for treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  9. Benzophenone-1 stimulated the growth of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells by cell cycle regulation via an estrogen receptor alpha-mediated signaling pathway in cellular and xenograft mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min-Ah; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Hye-Rim; Yi, Bo-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► BP-1 induced cell growth was reversed by an ER antagonist in BG-1 cells. ► BP-1 up-regulated the mRNA expression of cyclin D1. ► Up-regulation of cyclin D1 by BP-1 was reversed by an ER antagonist. ► BP-1 is a potential endocrine disruptor that exerts estrogenic effects. - Abstract: 2,4-Dihydroxybenzophenone (benzophenone-1; BP-1) is an UV stabilizer primarily used to prevent polymer degradation and deterioration in quality due to UV irradiation. Recently, BP-1 has been reported to bioaccumulate in human bodies by absorption through the skin and has the potential to induce health problems including endocrine disruption. In the present study, we examined the xenoestrogenic effect of BP-1 on BG-1 human ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs) and relevant xenografted animal models in comparison with 17-β estradiol (E2). In in vitro cell viability assay, BP-1 (10 −8 –10 −5 M) significantly increased BG-1 cell growth the way E2 did. The mechanism underlying the BG-1 cell proliferation was proved to be related with the up-regulation of cyclin D1, a cell cycle progressor, by E2 or BP-1. Both BP-1 and E2 induced cell growth and up-regulation of cyclin D1 were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, suggesting that BP-1 may mediate the cancer cell proliferation via an ER-dependent pathway like E2. On the other hand, the expression of p21, a regulator of cell cycle progression at G 1 phase, was not altered by BP-1 though it was down-regulated by E2. In xenograft mouse models transplanted with BG-1 cells, BP-1 or E2 treatment significantly increased the tumor mass formation compared to a vehicle (corn oil) within 8 weeks. In histopathological analysis, the tumor sections of E2 or BP-1 group displayed extensive cell formations with high density and disordered arrangement, which were supported by the increased number of BrdUrd positive nuclei and the over-expression of cyclin D1 protein. Taken together, these

  10. Behaviour of cellular structures with fluid fillers under impact loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Vesenjak

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the behaviour of closed- and open-cell cellular structures under uniaxial impact loading by means of computational simulations using the explicit nonlinear finite element code LS-DYNA. Simulations also consider the influence of pore fillers and the base material strain rate sensitivity. The behaviour of closed-cell cellular structure has been evaluated with use of the representative volume element, where the influence of residual gas inside the closed pores has been studied. Open- cell cellular structure was modelled as a whole to properly account for considered fluid flow through the cells, which significantly influences macroscopic behaviour of the cellular structure. The fluid has been modelled by applying a meshless Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH method. Parametric computational simulations provide grounds for optimization of cellular structures to satisfy different requirements, which makes them very attractive for use in general engineering applications.

  11. Cosserat modeling of cellular solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.

    Cellular solids inherit their macroscopic mechanical properties directly from the cellular microstructure. However, the characteristic material length scale is often not small compared to macroscopic dimensions, which limits the applicability of classical continuum-type constitutive models. Cosserat

  12. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  13. Neuronal Orphan G-Protein Coupled Receptor Proteins Mediate Plasmalogens-Induced Activation of ERK and Akt Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shamim Hossain

    Full Text Available The special glycerophospholipids plasmalogens (Pls are enriched in the brain and reported to prevent neuronal cell death by enhancing phosphorylation of Akt and ERK signaling in neuronal cells. Though the activation of Akt and ERK was found to be necessary for the neuronal cells survival, it was not known how Pls enhanced cellular signaling. To answer this question, we searched for neuronal specific orphan GPCR (G-protein coupled receptor proteins, since these proteins were believed to play a role in cellular signal transduction through the lipid rafts, where both Pls and some GPCRs were found to be enriched. In the present study, pan GPCR inhibitor significantly reduced Pls-induced ERK signaling in neuronal cells, suggesting that Pls could activate GPCRs to induce signaling. We then checked mRNA expression of 19 orphan GPCRs and 10 of them were found to be highly expressed in neuronal cells. The knockdown of these 10 neuronal specific GPCRs by short hairpin (sh-RNA lentiviral particles revealed that the Pls-mediated phosphorylation of ERK was inhibited in GPR1, GPR19, GPR21, GPR27 and GPR61 knockdown cells. We further found that the overexpression of these GPCRs enhanced Pls-mediated phosphorylation of ERK and Akt in cells. Most interestingly, the GPCRs-mediated cellular signaling was reduced significantly when the endogenous Pls were reduced. Our cumulative data, for the first time, suggest a possible mechanism for Pls-induced cellular signaling in the nervous system.

  14. Cellular communication through light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fels

    Full Text Available Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  15. Intercultural Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Marian Radulescu; Denisa Mitrut

    2012-01-01

    The Intercultural Mediator facilitates exchanges between people of different socio-cultural backgrounds and acts as a bridge between immigrants and national and local associations, health organizations, services and offices in order to foster integration of every single individual. As the use mediation increases, mediators are more likely to be involved in cross-cultural mediation, but only the best mediators have the opportunity to mediate cross border business disputes or international poli...

  16. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  17. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  18. Cellular mechanisms within the juxtaglomerular apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briggs, J P; Skøtt, O; Schnermann, J

    1990-01-01

    Cl concentration at the macular densa. This change also results in inhibition of secretion of renin. The macula densa has a unique location near the terminal end of the thick ascending limb, where NaCl concentration is highly flow dependent. The cellular mechanisms by which changes in tubular fluid NaCl produce...... vasoconstriction and inhibition of renin secretion are unknown, but the anatomy of the juxtaglomerular apparatus strongly suggests that such responses may be mediated by the extraglomerular mesangial cells located in the polar cushion underlying the macula densa. Recent evidence suggests that interstitial chloride...

  19. Gemcitabine resistance in breast cancer cells regulated by PI3K/AKT-mediated cellular proliferation exerts negative feedback via the MEK/MAPK and mTOR pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang XL

    2014-06-01

    ability of 231/Gem cells. Western blot analysis showed that treatment with a PI3K/AKT inhibitor decreased the expression levels of p-AKT, p-MEK, p-mTOR, and p-P70S6K; however, treatments with either MEK/MAPK or mTOR inhibitor significantly increased p-AKT expression. Thus, our data suggest that gemcitabine resistance in breast cancer cells is mainly mediated by activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. This occurs through elevated expression of p-AKT protein to promote cell proliferation and is negatively regulated by the MEK/MAPK and mTOR pathways. Keywords: chemoresistance, gemcitabine, breast cancer

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  1. Matter and Interactions: a particle physics perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics matter and fields are completely separated. Matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case. Both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this paper we explain why particle physicists believe in such a picture, introducing the technique of Feynman diagrams starting from very basic and popular analogies with classical mechanics, making the physics ...

  2. Cellular and Molecular Targets of Menthol Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Oz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Menthol belongs to monoterpene class of a structurally diverse group of phytochemicals found in plant-derived essential oils. Menthol is widely used in pharmaceuticals, confectionary, oral hygiene products, pesticides, cosmetics, and as a flavoring agent. In addition, menthol is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. Recently, there has been renewed awareness in comprehending the biological and pharmacological effects of menthol. TRP channels have been demonstrated to mediate the cooling actions of menthol. There has been new evidence demonstrating that menthol can significantly influence the functional characteristics of a number of different kinds of ligand and voltage-gated ion channels, indicating that at least some of the biological and pharmacological effects of menthol can be mediated by alterations in cellular excitability. In this article, we examine the results of earlier studies on the actions of menthol with voltage and ligand-gated ion channels.

  3. Multifunctional non-viral gene vectors with enhanced stability, improved cellular and nuclear uptake capability, and increased transfection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Di; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell for nanoparticle stabilization, poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) and mTAT (a cell-penetrating peptide) for accelerated cellular uptake, and a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS) for enhanced intracellular transport of DNA to the nucleus. In vitro study showed that coating of the binary PPMS/DNA polyplex with γ-PGA promotes cellular uptake of the polyplex particles, particularly by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive cells through the GGT-mediated endocytosis pathway. Conjugating PEG to the γ-PGA led to the formation of a ternary PPMS/DNA/PGA-g-PEG polyplex with decreased positive charges on the surface of the polyplex particles and substantially higher stability in serum-containing aqueous medium. The cellular uptake rate was further improved by incorporating mTAT into the ternary polyplex system. Addition of the NLS peptide was designed to facilitate intracellular delivery of the plasmid to the nucleus--a rate-limiting step in the gene transfection process. As a result, compared with the binary PPMS/LucDNA polyplex, the new mTAT-quaternary PPMS/LucDNA/NLS/PGA-g-PEG-mTAT system exhibited reduced cytotoxicity, remarkably faster cellular uptake rate, and enhanced transport of DNA to the nucleus. All these advantageous functionalities contribute to the remarkable gene transfection efficiency of the mTAT-quaternary polyplex both in vitro and in vivo, which exceeds that of the binary polyplex and commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000/DNA lipoplex. The multifunctional mTAT-quaternary polyplex system with improved efficiency and reduced cytotoxicity represents a new type of promising non-viral vectors for the delivery of therapeutic genes to treat tumors.We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell

  4. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl Cysteine against Diesel Exhaust Particles-Induced Intracellular ROS Generates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines to Mediate the Vascular Permeability of Capillary-Like Endothelial Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chia-Yi; Chang, Jing-Fen; Wang, Jhih-Syuan; Chang, Yu-Jung; Gordon, Marion K.; Chao, Ming-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) is associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies using in vitro endothelial tubes as a simplified model of capillaries have found that DEP-induced ROS increase vascular permeability with rearrangement or internalization of adherens junctional VE-cadherin away from the plasma membrane. This allows DEPs to penetrate into the cell and capillary lumen. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines are up-regulated and mediate vascular permeability in response to DEP. However, the mechanisms through which these DEP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines increase vascular permeability remain unknown. Hence, we examined the ability of DEP to induce permeability of human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube cells to investigate these mechanisms. Furthermore, supplementation with NAC reduces ROS production following exposure to DEP. HUVEC tube cells contributed to a pro-inflammatory response to DEP-induced intracellular ROS generation. Endothelial oxidative stress induced the release of TNF-α and IL-6 from tube cells, subsequently stimulating the secretion of VEGF-A independent of HO-1. Our data suggests that DEP-induced intracellular ROS and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF- α and IL-6, which would contribute to VEGF-A secretion and disrupt cell-cell borders and increase vasculature permeability. Addition of NAC suppresses DEP-induced ROS efficiently and reduces subsequent damages by increasing endogenous glutathione. PMID:26148005

  5. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl Cysteine against Diesel Exhaust Particles-Induced Intracellular ROS Generates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines to Mediate the Vascular Permeability of Capillary-Like Endothelial Tubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yi Tseng

    Full Text Available Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP is associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies using in vitro endothelial tubes as a simplified model of capillaries have found that DEP-induced ROS increase vascular permeability with rearrangement or internalization of adherens junctional VE-cadherin away from the plasma membrane. This allows DEPs to penetrate into the cell and capillary lumen. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines are up-regulated and mediate vascular permeability in response to DEP. However, the mechanisms through which these DEP-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines increase vascular permeability remain unknown. Hence, we examined the ability of DEP to induce permeability of human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube cells to investigate these mechanisms. Furthermore, supplementation with NAC reduces ROS production following exposure to DEP. HUVEC tube cells contributed to a pro-inflammatory response to DEP-induced intracellular ROS generation. Endothelial oxidative stress induced the release of TNF-α and IL-6 from tube cells, subsequently stimulating the secretion of VEGF-A independent of HO-1. Our data suggests that DEP-induced intracellular ROS and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF- α and IL-6, which would contribute to VEGF-A secretion and disrupt cell-cell borders and increase vasculature permeability. Addition of NAC suppresses DEP-induced ROS efficiently and reduces subsequent damages by increasing endogenous glutathione.

  6. Ligandless surfactant mediated solid phase extraction combined with Fe₃O₄ nano-particle for the preconcentration and determination of cadmium and lead in water and soil samples followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: multivariate strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, N; Soylak, M

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, a microextraction technique combining Fe3O4 nano-particle with surfactant mediated solid phase extraction ((SM-SPE)) was successfully developed for the preconcentration/separation of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. The analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effective variables such as the amount of adsorbent (NPs), the pH, concentration of non-ionic (TX-114) and centrifugation time (min) were investigated by Plackett-Burman (PBD) design. The important variables were further optimized by central composite design (CCD). Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (LODs) of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 0.15 and 0.74 µg/L, respectively. The validation of the proposed procedure was checked by the analysis of certified reference materials of TMDA 53.3 fortified water and GBW07425 soil. The method was successfully applied for the determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water and soil samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The cellular receptors for infectious bursal disease virus | Zhu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Virus receptors are simplistically defined as cell surface molecules that mediate binding (attachment, adsorption) and/or trigger membrane fusion or entry through other processes. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) entry into host cells occurs by recognition of specific cellular receptor(s) with viral envelope glycoprotein, ...

  8. Rare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of 14 C from 223 Ra. 35 references

  9. Fractionation and characterization of particles simulating wear of total joint replacement (TJR) following ASTM standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subrata; Musib, Mrinal

    2011-01-01

    Reactions of bone cells to orthopedic wear debris produced by the articulating motion of total joint replacements (TJRs) are largely responsible for the long-term failure of such replacements. Metal and polyethylene (PE) wear particles isolated from fluids from total joint simulators, as well as particles that are fabricated by other methods, are widely used to study such in vitro cellular response. Prior investigations have revealed that cellular response to wear debris depends on the size, shape, and dose of the particles. Hence, to have a better understanding of the wear-mediated osteolytic process it is important that these particles are well characterized and clinically relevant, both qualitatively, and quantitatively. In this study we have fractionated both ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and Ti particles, into micron (1.0-10.0 μm), submicron (0.2-1.0 μm), and nanoparticle (0.01-0.2 μm) fractions, and characterized them based on the following size-shape descriptors as put forth in ASTM F1877: i) equivalent circle diameter (ECD), ii) aspect ratio (AR), iii) elongation (E), iv) roundness (R), and v) form factor (FF). The mean (± SD) ECDs (in μm) for micron, submicron, and nanoparticles of UHMWPE were 1.652 ± 0.553, 0.270 ± 0.180, and 0.061 ± 0.035, respectively, and for Ti were 1.894 ± 0.667, 0.278 ± 0.180, and 0.055 ± 0.029, respectively. The values for other descriptors were similar (no statistically significant difference). The nanofraction particles were found to be more sphere-like (higher R and FF values, and lower E and AR values) as compared to larger particles. Future experiments will involve use of these well characterized particles for in vitro studies.

  10. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  11. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  12. Cellular image classification

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiang; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces new techniques for cellular image feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification. The authors use the antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patient serum as the subjects and the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) technique as the imaging protocol to illustrate the applications of the described methods. Throughout the book, the authors provide evaluations for the proposed methods on two publicly available human epithelial (HEp-2) cell datasets: ICPR2012 dataset from the ICPR'12 HEp-2 cell classification contest and ICIP2013 training dataset from the ICIP'13 Competition on cells classification by fluorescent image analysis. First, the reading of imaging results is significantly influenced by one’s qualification and reading systems, causing high intra- and inter-laboratory variance. The authors present a low-order LP21 fiber mode for optical single cell manipulation and imaging staining patterns of HEp-2 cells. A focused four-lobed mode distribution is stable and effective in optical...

  13. Modeling and cellular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Testing the applicability of mathematical models with carefully designed experiments is a powerful tool in the investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation on cells. The modeling and cellular studies complement each other, for modeling provides guidance for designing critical experiments which must provide definitive results, while the experiments themselves provide new input to the model. Based on previous experimental results the model for the accumulation of damage in Chlamydomonas reinhardi has been extended to include various multiple two-event combinations. Split dose survival experiments have shown that models tested to date predict most but not all the observed behavior. Stationary-phase mammalian cells, required for tests of other aspects of the model, have been shown to be at different points in the cell cycle depending on how they were forced to stop proliferating. These cultures also demonstrate different capacities for repair of sublethal radiation damage

  14. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Met, Ö; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... to transiently affect in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  15. Lipopolysaccharide recognition, internalisation, signalling and other cellular effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diks, S. H.; van Deventer, S. J.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the importance of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in infection and inflammation, many aspects of LPS action remain poorly understood. Especially, the mechanisms by which cells recognise and react to endotoxins or endotoxin-containing particles and how cellular responses are translated

  16. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waisberg, Michael; Joseph, Pius; Hale, Beverley; Beyersmann, Detmar

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal, which is widely used in industry, affecting human health through occupational and environmental exposure. In mammals, it exerts multiple toxic effects and has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Cd 2+ does not catalyze Fenton-type reactions because it does not accept or donate electrons under physiological conditions, and it is only weakly genotoxic. Hence, indirect mechanisms are implicated in the carcinogenicity of cadmium. In this review multiple mechanisms are discussed, such as modulation of gene expression and signal transduction, interference with enzymes of the cellular antioxidant system and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibition of DNA repair and DNA methylation, role in apoptosis and disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cadmium affects both gene transcription and translation. The major mechanisms of gene induction by cadmium known so far are modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways by enhancement of protein phosphorylation and activation of transcription and translation factors. Cadmium interferes with antioxidant defense mechanisms and stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species, which may act as signaling molecules in the induction of gene expression and apoptosis. The inhibition of DNA repair processes by cadmium represents a mechanism by which cadmium enhances the genotoxicity of other agents and may contribute to the tumor initiation by this metal. The disruption of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by cadmium probably further stimulates the development of tumors. It becomes clear that there exist multiple mechanisms which contribute to the carcinogenicity of cadmium, although the relative weights of these contributions are difficult to estimate

  17. Statistical mechanics of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, S.

    1983-01-01

    Cellular automata are used as simple mathematical models to investigate self-organization in statistical mechanics. A detailed analysis is given of ''elementary'' cellular automata consisting of a sequence of sites with values 0 or 1 on a line, with each site evolving deterministically in discrete time steps according to p definite rules involving the values of its nearest neighbors. With simple initial configurations, the cellular automata either tend to homogeneous states, or generate self-similar patterns with fractal dimensions approx. =1.59 or approx. =1.69. With ''random'' initial configurations, the irreversible character of the cellular automaton evolution leads to several self-organization phenomena. Statistical properties of the structures generated are found to lie in two universality classes, independent of the details of the initial state or the cellular automaton rules. More complicated cellular automata are briefly considered, and connections with dynamical systems theory and the formal theory of computation are discussed

  18. Biomedical applications of magnetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mefford, Thompson

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic particles are increasingly being used in a wide variety of biomedical applications. Written by a team of internationally respected experts, this book provides an up-to-date authoritative reference for scientists and engineers. The first section presents the fundamentals of the field by explaining the theory of magnetism, describing techniques to synthesize magnetic particles, and detailing methods to characterize magnetic particles. The second section describes biomedical applications, including chemical sensors and cellular actuators, and diagnostic applications such as drug delivery, hyperthermia cancer treatment, and magnetic resonance imaging contrast.

  19. SU-E-T-231: Measurements of Gold Nanoparticle-Mediated Proton Dose Enhancement Due to Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission and Activation Products Using Radiochromic Films and CdTe Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J; Cho, S; Manohar, N; Krishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There have been several reports of enhanced cell-killing and tumor regression when tumor cells and mouse tumors were loaded with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) prior to proton irradiation. While particle-induced xray emission (PIXE), Auger electrons, secondary electrons, free radicals, and biological effects have been suggested as potential mechanisms responsible for the observed GNP-mediated dose enhancement/radiosensitization, there is a lack of quantitative analysis regarding the contribution from each mechanism. Here, we report our experimental effort to quantify some of these effects. Methods: 5-cm-long cylindrical plastic vials were filled with 1.8 mL of either water or water mixed with cylindrical GNPs at the same gold concentration (0.3 mg Au/g) as used in previous animal studies. A piece of EBT2 radiochromic film (30-µm active-layer sandwiched between 80/175-µm outer-layers) was inserted along the long axis of each vial and used to measure dose enhancement due to PIXE from GNPs. Vials were placed at center-of-modulation (COM) and 3-cm up-/down-stream from COM and irradiated with 5 different doses (2–10 Gy) using 10-cm-SOBP 160-MeV protons. After irradiation, films were cleaned and read to determine the delivered dose. A vial containing spherical GNPs (20 mg Au/g) was also irradiated, and gamma-rays from activation products were measured using a cadmium-telluride (CdTe) detector. Results: Film measurements showed no significant dose enhancement beyond the experimental uncertainty (∼2%). There was a detectable activation product from GNPs, but it appeared to contribute to dose enhancement minimally (<0.01%). Conclusion: Considering the composition of EBT2 film, it can be inferred that gold characteristic x-rays from PIXE and their secondary electrons make insignificant contribution to dose enhancement. The current investigation also suggests negligible dose enhancement due to activation products. Thus, previously-reported GNP-mediated proton dose

  20. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWeele, T J; Vansteelandt, S

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects through other pathways. The approaches proposed here accommodate exposure-mediator interactions and, to a certain extent, mediator-mediator interactions as well. The methods handle binary or continuous mediators and binary, continuous or count outcomes. When the mediators affect one another, the strategy of trying to assess direct and indirect effects one mediator at a time will in general fail; the approach given in this paper can still be used. A characterization is moreover given as to when the sum of the mediated effects for multiple mediators considered separately will be equal to the mediated effect of all of the mediators considered jointly. The approach proposed in this paper is robust to unmeasured common causes of two or more mediators.

  1. Cellular vs. organ approaches to dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.; Sastry, K.S.R.

    1986-01-01

    The cellular distribution of tissue-incorporated radionuclides has generally been neglected in the dosimetry of internal emitters. Traditional dosimetry assumes homogeneous distribution of radionuclides in organs of interest, while presuming that the ranges of particulate radiations are large relative to typical cell diameters. The macroscopic distribution of dose thus calculated has generally served as a sufficient approximation for the energy deposited within radiosensitive sites. However, with the increasing utilization of intracellular agents, such as thallium-201, it has become necessary to examine the microscopic distribution of energy at the cellular level. This is particularly important in the instance of radionuclides that decay by electron capture or by internal conversion with the release of Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons. In many instances, these electrons are released as a dense shower of low-energy particles with ranges of subcellular dimensions. The high electron density in the immediate vicinity of the decaying atom produces a focal deposition of energy that far exceeds the average dose taken over several cell diameters. These studies point out the increasing need to take into account the microscopic distribution of dose on the cellular level as radionuclides distributed in cells become more commonplace, especially if the decay involves electron capture or internal conversion. As radiotracers are developed for the measurement of intracellular functions these factors should be given greater consideration. 16 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  2. Particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    2000-01-01

    In this article G.Charpak presents the principles on which particle detection is based. Particle accelerators are becoming more and more powerful and require new detectors able to track the right particle in a huge flux of particles. The gigantic size of detectors in high energy physics is often due to the necessity of getting a long enough trajectory in a magnetic field in order to deduce from the curvature an accurate account of impulses in the reaction. (A.C.)

  3. Strange particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.

    1989-01-01

    Work done in the mid 1950s at Brookhaven National Laboratory on strange particles is described. Experiments were done on the Cosmotron. The author describes his own and others' work on neutral kaons, lambda and theta particles and points out the theoretical gap between predictions and experimental findings. By the end of the decade, the theory of strange particles was better understood. (UK)

  4. Carbohydrate self-recognition mediates marine sponge cellular adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Haseley, S.R.; Vermeer, H.J.; Kamerling, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera), the simplest and earliest multicellular organisms, are thought to have evolved from their unicellular ancestors about 1 billion years ago by developing cell-recognition and adhesion mechanisms to discriminate against 'non-self.' Consequently, they are used as models for

  5. Targeting Neutrophilic Inflammation using Polymersome-Mediated Cellular Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, J.D.; Ward, J.R.; Avila-Olias, M.; Battaglia, G.; Renshaw, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are key effector cells in inflammation and play an important role in neutralizing invading pathogens. During inflammation resolution, neutrophils undergo apoptosis before they are removed by macrophages, but if apoptosis is delayed, neutrophils can cause extensive tissue damage and chronic disease. Promotion of neutrophil apoptosis is a potential therapeutic approach for treating persistent inflammation, yet neutrophils have proven difficult cells to manipulate experimentally. In ...

  6. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular markets. 22.909 Section 22.909... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets...

  7. Tumor necrosis factor is not required for particle-induced genotoxicity and pulmonary inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber, Anne T.; Bornholdt, Jette; Dybdahl, Marianne; Sharma, Anoop K.; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Haakan [National Institute of Occupational Health, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Steffen [Copenhagen University, Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2005-03-01

    Particle-induced carcinogenicity is not well understood, but might involve inflammation. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is considered to be an important mediator in inflammation. We investigated its role in particle-induced inflammation and DNA damage in mice with and without TNF signaling. TNF-/- mice and TNF+/+ mice were exposed by inhalation to 20 mg m{sup -3} carbon black (CB), 20 mg m{sup -3} diesel exhaust particles (DEP), or filtered air for 90 min on each of four consecutive days. DEP, but not CB particles, induced infiltration of neutrophilic granulocutes into the lung lining fluid (by the cellular fraction in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid), and both particle types induced interleukin-6 mRNA in the lung tissue. Surprisingly, TNF-/- mice were intact in these inflammatory responses. There were more DNA strand breaks in the BAL cells of DEP-exposed TNF-/- mice and CB-exposed mice compared with the air-exposed mice. Thus, the CB-induced DNA damage in BAL-cells was independent of neutrophil infiltration. The data indicate that an inflammatory response was not a prerequisite for DNA damage, and TNF was not required for the induction of inflammation by DEP and CB particles. (orig.)

  8. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  9. Cellular automata analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hadeler, Karl-Peter

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on a coherent representation of the main approaches to analyze the dynamics of cellular automata. Cellular automata are an inevitable tool in mathematical modeling. In contrast to classical modeling approaches as partial differential equations, cellular automata are straightforward to simulate but hard to analyze. In this book we present a review of approaches and theories that allow the reader to understand the behavior of cellular automata beyond simulations. The first part consists of an introduction of cellular automata on Cayley graphs, and their characterization via the fundamental Cutis-Hedlund-Lyndon theorems in the context of different topological concepts (Cantor, Besicovitch and Weyl topology). The second part focuses on classification results: What classification follows from topological concepts (Hurley classification), Lyapunov stability (Gilman classification), and the theory of formal languages and grammars (Kůrka classification). These classifications suggest to cluster cel...

  10. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Howard; Venkatesan, Sivarama

    2012-01-01

    As the theoretical foundations of multiple-antenna techniques evolve and as these multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques become essential for providing high data rates in wireless systems, there is a growing need to understand the performance limits of MIMO in practical networks. To address this need, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks presents a systematic description of MIMO technology classes and a framework for MIMO system design that takes into account the essential physical-layer features of practical cellular networks. In contrast to works that focus on the theoretical performance of abstract MIMO channels, MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks emphasizes the practical performance of realistic MIMO systems. A unified set of system simulation results highlights relative performance gains of different MIMO techniques and provides insights into how best to use multiple antennas in cellular networks under various conditions. MIMO Communication for Cellular Networks describes single-user,...

  11. Insights into the physiological function of cellular prion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins V.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions have been extensively studied since they represent a new class of infectious agents in which a protein, PrPsc (prion scrapie, appears to be the sole component of the infectious particle. They are responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which affect both humans and animals. The mechanism of disease propagation is well understood and involves the interaction of PrPsc with its cellular isoform (PrPc and subsequently abnormal structural conversion of the latter. PrPc is a glycoprotein anchored on the cell surface by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol moiety and expressed in most cell types but mainly in neurons. Prion diseases have been associated with the accumulation of the abnormally folded protein and its neurotoxic effects; however, it is not known if PrPc loss of function is an important component. New efforts are addressing this question and trying to characterize the physiological function of PrPc. At least four different mouse strains in which the PrP gene was ablated were generated and the results regarding their phenotype are controversial. Localization of PrPc on the cell membrane makes it a potential candidate for a ligand uptake, cell adhesion and recognition molecule or a membrane signaling molecule. Recent data have shown a potential role for PrPc in the metabolism of copper and moreover that this metal stimulates PrPc endocytosis. Our group has recently demonstrated that PrPc is a high affinity laminin ligand and that this interaction mediates neuronal cell adhesion and neurite extension and maintenance. Moreover, PrPc-caveolin-1 dependent coupling seems to trigger the tyrosine kinase Fyn activation. These data provide the first evidence for PrPc involvement in signal transduction.

  12. Parameter space of general gauge mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaraman, Arvind; Shirman, Yuri; Smidt, Joseph; Yu, Felix

    2009-01-01

    We study a subspace of General Gauge Mediation (GGM) models which generalize models of gauge mediation. We find superpartner spectra that are markedly different from those of typical gauge and gaugino mediation scenarios. While typical gauge mediation predictions of either a neutralino or stau next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP) are easily reproducible with the GGM parameters, chargino and sneutrino NLSPs are generic for many reasonable choices of GGM parameters.

  13. Programmable cellular arrays. Faults testing and correcting in cellular arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cercel, L.

    1978-03-01

    A review of some recent researches about programmable cellular arrays in computing and digital processing of information systems is presented, and includes both combinational and sequential arrays, with full arbitrary behaviour, or which can realize better implementations of specialized blocks as: arithmetic units, counters, comparators, control systems, memory blocks, etc. Also, the paper presents applications of cellular arrays in microprogramming, in implementing of a specialized computer for matrix operations, in modeling of universal computing systems. The last section deals with problems of fault testing and correcting in cellular arrays. (author)

  14. Piezo proteins: regulators of mechanosensation and other cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2014-11-14

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Piezo Proteins: Regulators of Mechanosensation and Other Cellular Processes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature. PMID:25305018

  16. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    VanderWeele, T.J.; Vansteelandt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects throu...

  17. Activation Mechanism of LRRK2 and Its Cellular Functions in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenbusch, Katharina E.; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Human LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) has been associated with both familial and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several LRRK2 mediated pathways and interaction partners have been identified, the cellular functions of LRRK2 and LRRK2 mediated progression of PD are still only

  18. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  19. Particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics

  20. Cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of tri-block copolymer nanoparticles with different size and surface characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Sourav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymer nanoparticles (PNP are becoming increasingly important in nanomedicine and food-based applications. Size and surface characteristics are often considered to be important factors in the cellular interactions of these PNP, although systematic investigations on the role of surface properties on cellular interactions and toxicity of PNP are scarce. Results Fluorescent, monodisperse tri-block copolymer nanoparticles with different sizes (45 and 90 nm and surface charges (positive and negative were synthesized, characterized and studied for uptake and cytotoxicity in NR8383 and Caco-2 cells. All types of PNP were taken up by the cells. The positive smaller PNP45 (45 nm showed a higher cytotoxicity compared to the positive bigger PNP90 (90 nm particles including reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, ATP depletion and TNF-α release. The negative PNP did not show any cytotoxic effect. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, uncoupling of the electron transfer chain in mitochondria and the resulting ATP depletion, induction of ROS and oxidative stress may all play a role in the possible mode of action for the cytotoxicity of these PNP. The role of receptor-mediated endocytosis in the intracellular uptake of different PNP was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Involvement of size and charge in the cellular uptake of PNP by clathrin (for positive PNP, caveolin (for negative PNP and mannose receptors (for hydroxylated PNP were found with smaller PNP45 showing stronger interactions with the receptors than bigger PNP90. Conclusions The size and surface characteristics of polymer nanoparticles (PNP; 45 and 90 nm with different surface charges play a crucial role in cellular uptake. Specific interactions with cell membrane-bound receptors (clathrin, caveolin and mannose leading to cellular internalization were observed to depend on

  1. Particle cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the Universe at the largest and smallest scales traditionally has been the subject of cosmology and particle physics, respectively. Studying the evolution of the Universe connects today's large scales with the tiny scales in the very early Universe and provides the link between the physics of particles and of the cosmos. This series of five lectures aims at a modern and critical presentation of the basic ideas, methods, models and observations in today's particle cosmology.

  2. Particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook teaches particle physics very didactically. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams lead to a better understanding of the explanations. The content of the book covers all important topics of particle physics: Elementary particles are classified from the point of view of the four fundamental interactions. The nomenclature used in particle physics is explained. The discoveries and properties of known elementary particles and resonances are given. The particles considered are positrons, muon, pions, anti-protons, strange particles, neutrino and hadrons. The conservation laws governing the interactions of elementary particles are given. The concepts of parity, spin, charge conjugation, time reversal and gauge invariance are explained. The quark theory is introduced to explain the hadron structure and strong interactions. The solar neutrino problem is considered. Weak interactions are classified into various types, and the selection rules are stated. Non-conservation of parity and the universality of the weak interactions are discussed. Neutral and charged currents, discovery of W and Z bosons and the early universe form important topics of the electroweak interactions. The principles of high energy accelerators including colliders are elaborately explained. Additionally, in the book detectors used in nuclear and particle physics are described. This book is on the upper undergraduate level.

  3. Magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  4. Top-down cellular pyramids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A Y; Rosenfeld, A

    1983-10-01

    A cellular pyramid is an exponentially tapering stack of arrays of processors (cells), where each cell is connected to its neighbors (siblings) on its own level, to a parent on the level above, and to its children on the level below. It is shown that in some situations, if information flows top-down only, from fathers to sons, then a cellular pyramid may be no faster than a one-level cellular array; but it may be possible to use simpler cells in the pyramid case. 23 references.

  5. Physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles

    KAUST Repository

    Longhin, Eleonora

    2016-05-15

    © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Diesel combustion and solid biomass burning are the major sources of ultrafine particles (UFP) in urbanized areas. Cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, are possible outcomes of combustion particles exposure, but differences in particles properties seem to influence their biological effects.Here the physico-chemical properties and biological effects of diesel and biomass particles, produced under controlled laboratory conditions, have been characterized. Diesel UFP were sampled from a Euro 4 light duty vehicle without DPF fuelled by commercial diesel and run over a chassis dyno. Biomass UFP were collected from a modern automatic 25 kW boiler propelled by prime quality spruce pellet. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both diesel and biomass samples showed aggregates of soot particles, but in biomass samples ash particles were also present. Chemical characterization showed that metals and PAHs total content was higher in diesel samples compared to biomass ones.Human bronchial epithelial (HBEC3) cells were exposed to particles for up to 2 weeks. Changes in the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism were observed after exposure to both UFP already after 24 h. However, only diesel particles modulated the expression of genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), increased the release of inflammatory mediators and caused phenotypical alterations, mostly after two weeks of exposure.These results show that diesel UFP affected cellular processes involved in lung and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Biomass particles exerted low biological activity compared to diesel UFP. This evidence emphasizes that the study of different emission sources contribution to ambient PM toxicity may have a fundamental role in the development of more effective strategies for air quality improvement.

  6. Dimensional reduction in anomaly mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyda, Ed; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierce, Aaron

    2002-01-01

    We offer a guide to dimensional reduction in theories with anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking. Evanescent operators proportional to ε arise in the bare Lagrangian when it is reduced from d=4 to d=4-2ε dimensions. In the course of a detailed diagrammatic calculation, we show that inclusion of these operators is crucial. The evanescent operators conspire to drive the supersymmetry-breaking parameters along anomaly-mediation trajectories across heavy particle thresholds, guaranteeing the ultraviolet insensitivity

  7. Cellular senescence and organismal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyapalan, Jessie C; Sedivy, John M

    2008-01-01

    Cellular senescence, first observed and defined using in vitro cell culture studies, is an irreversible cell cycle arrest which can be triggered by a variety of factors. Emerging evidence suggests that cellular senescence acts as an in vivo tumor suppression mechanism by limiting aberrant proliferation. It has also been postulated that cellular senescence can occur independently of cancer and contribute to the physiological processes of normal organismal aging. Recent data have demonstrated the in vivo accumulation of senescent cells with advancing age. Some characteristics of senescent cells, such as the ability to modify their extracellular environment, could play a role in aging and age-related pathology. In this review, we examine current evidence that links cellular senescence and organismal aging.

  8. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-01-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  9. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kenneth C.; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-09-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis.

  10. Cellular Angiofibroma of the Nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Zülküf Burak; Yener, Haydar Murat; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Karaaltin, Ayşegül Batioğlu; Inan, Hakki Caner; Alaskarov, Elvin; Gozen, Emine Deniz

    2017-11-01

    Angiofibroma is a common tumor of the nasopharynx region but cellular type is extremely rare in head and neck. A 13-year-old boy presented with frequent epistaxis and nasal obstruction persisting for 6 months. According to the clinical symptoms and imaging studies juvenile angiofibroma was suspected. Following angiographic embolization total excision of the lesion by midfacial degloving approach was performed. Histological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of staghorn blood vessels and irregular fibrous stroma. Stellate fibroblasts with small pyknotic to large vesicular nuclei were seen in a highly cellular stroma. These findings identified cellular angiofibroma mimicking juvenile angiofibroma. This article is about a very rare patient of cellular angiofibroma of nasopharynx.

  11. Discrete dynamic modeling of cellular signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Understanding signal transduction in cellular systems is a central issue in systems biology. Numerous experiments from different laboratories generate an abundance of individual components and causal interactions mediating environmental and developmental signals. However, for many signal transduction systems there is insufficient information on the overall structure and the molecular mechanisms involved in the signaling network. Moreover, lack of kinetic and temporal information makes it difficult to construct quantitative models of signal transduction pathways. Discrete dynamic modeling, combined with network analysis, provides an effective way to integrate fragmentary knowledge of regulatory interactions into a predictive mathematical model which is able to describe the time evolution of the system without the requirement for kinetic parameters. This chapter introduces the fundamental concepts of discrete dynamic modeling, particularly focusing on Boolean dynamic models. We describe this method step-by-step in the context of cellular signaling networks. Several variants of Boolean dynamic models including threshold Boolean networks and piecewise linear systems are also covered, followed by two examples of successful application of discrete dynamic modeling in cell biology.

  12. Particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, R.I.

    1976-01-01

    Charged particles are entrained in a predetermined direction, independent of their polarity, in a circular orbit by a magnetic field rotating at high speed about an axis in a closed cylindrical or toroidal vessel. The field may be generated by a cylindrical laser structure, whose beam is polygonally reflected from the walls of an excited cavity centered on the axis, or by high-frequency energization of a set of electromagnets perpendicular to the axis. In the latter case, a separate magnetostatic axial field limits the orbital radius of the particles. These rotating and stationary magnetic fields may be generated centrally or by individual magnets peripherally spaced along its circular orbit. Chemical or nuclear reactions can be induced by collisions between the orbiting particles and an injected reactant, or by diverting high-speed particles from one doughnut into the path of counterrotating particles in an adjoining doughnut

  13. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A; Bedford, Mark T; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying; Harty, Ronald N

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles.

  14. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola (EBOV and Marburg (MARV viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3, a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs, as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA. Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles.

  15. Cellular Response to Ionizing Radiation: A MicroRNA Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Mohammad; Asghari, S. Mohsen; Sariri, Reyhaneh; Moslemi, Dariush; Parsian, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. They play a crucial role in diverse cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) is one of the most important treatment protocols for patients that suffer from cancer and affects directly or indirectly cellular integration. Recently it has been discovered that microRNA-mediated gene regulation interferes with radio-related pathways in ionizing radiation. Here, we review the recent discoveries about miRNAs in cellular response to IR. Thoroughly understanding the mechanism of miRNAs in radiation response, it will be possible to design new strategies for improving radiotherapy efficiency and ultimately cancer treatment. PMID:24551775

  16. Cellular roles of ADAM12 in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Couchman, John R

    2008-01-01

    and it is a potential biomarker for breast cancer. It is therefore important to understand ADAM12's functions. Many cellular roles for ADAM12 have been suggested. It is an active metalloprotease, and has been implicated in insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor signaling, through cleavage of IGF-binding proteins......, and in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways, via ectodomain shedding of membrane-tethered EGFR ligands. These proteolytic events may regulate diverse cellular responses, such as altered cell differentiation, proliferation, migration, and invasion. ADAM12 may also regulate cell-cell and cell...... to or from the cell interior. These ADAM12-mediated cellular effects appear to be critical events in both biological and pathological processes. This review presents current knowledge on ADAM12 functions gained from in vitro and in vivo observations, describes ADAM12's role in both normal physiology...

  17. Piezo Proteins: Regulators of Mechanosensation and Other Cellular Processes*

    OpenAIRE

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular deve...

  18. Cellular Basis for Learning Impairment in Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    GABA Receptors 6 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS A) Major goals of the project. 1) Use molecular tools to study the cellular basis for neurogenesis deficits in...throughout training. This schedule reduced and sustained the subjects’ body weight at 80% of the ad libitum levels . Behavioral experimentation was...containing 120 mM CsCl. In artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) containing CNQX to block excitatory synaptic transmission, GABA -mediate chloride currents in

  19. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation

  20. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin, Ertan; Waltenberger, Johannes

    2009-06-12

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common cause of aortic valve replacement in developed countries, and this condition increases in prevalence with advancing age. The fibrotic thickening and calcification are common eventual endpoint in both non-rheumatic calcific and rheumatic aortic stenoses. New observations in human aortic valves support the hypothesis that degenerative valvular aortic stenosis is the result of active bone formation in the aortic valve, which may be mediated through a process of osteoblast-like differentiation in these tissues. Additionally histopathologic evidence suggests that early lesions in aortic valves are not just a disease process secondary to aging, but an active cellular process that follows the classical "response to injury hypothesis" similar to the situation in atherosclerosis. Although there are similarities with the risk factor and as well as with the process of atherogenesis, not all the patients with coronary artery disease or atherosclerosis have calcific aortic stenosis. This review mainly focuses on the potential vascular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis. Namely extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, inflammation, and eventually osteoblast-like differentiation resulting in bone formation have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. Several mediators related to underlying mechanisms, including growth factors especially transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factors, angiogenesis, cathepsin enzymes, adhesion molecules, bone regulatory proteins and matrix metalloproteinases have been demonstrated, however the target to be attacked is not defined yet.

  1. Comparison of cellular toxicity between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seunghyon [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Eun [Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Center for NanoSafety Metrology, Division of Convergence Technology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Daegyu [LG Electronics (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Chang Gyu [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Environmental and Energy Systems Research Division (Korea, Republic of); Pikhitsa, Peter V. [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing, E-mail: mchotox@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mansoo, E-mail: mchoi@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The cellular toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles (SCNPs) was investigated by analyzing the comparative cell viability. For the reasonable comparison, physicochemical characteristics were controlled thoroughly such as crystallinity, carbon bonding characteristic, hydrodynamic diameter, and metal contents of the particles. To understand relation between cellular toxicity of the particles and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we measured unpaired singlet electrons of the particles and intracellular ROS, and analyzed cellular toxicity with/without the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Regardless of the presence of NAC, the cellular toxicity of SCNPs was found to be lower than that of MWCNTs. Since both particles show similar crystallinity, hydrodynamic size, and Raman signal with negligible contribution of remnant metal particles, the difference in cell viability would be ascribed to the difference in morphology, i.e., spherical shape (aspect ratio of one) for SCNP and elongated shape (high aspect ratio) for MWCNT.

  2. Comparison of cellular toxicity between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seunghyon; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Daegyu; Woo, Chang Gyu; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Mansoo

    2015-01-01

    The cellular toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and onion-like shell-shaped carbon nanoparticles (SCNPs) was investigated by analyzing the comparative cell viability. For the reasonable comparison, physicochemical characteristics were controlled thoroughly such as crystallinity, carbon bonding characteristic, hydrodynamic diameter, and metal contents of the particles. To understand relation between cellular toxicity of the particles and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we measured unpaired singlet electrons of the particles and intracellular ROS, and analyzed cellular toxicity with/without the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Regardless of the presence of NAC, the cellular toxicity of SCNPs was found to be lower than that of MWCNTs. Since both particles show similar crystallinity, hydrodynamic size, and Raman signal with negligible contribution of remnant metal particles, the difference in cell viability would be ascribed to the difference in morphology, i.e., spherical shape (aspect ratio of one) for SCNP and elongated shape (high aspect ratio) for MWCNT

  3. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  4. Factorization, reduction and embedding in integrable cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuniba, Atsuo; Takagi, Taichiro; Takenouchi, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Factorized dynamics in soliton cellular automata with quantum group symmetry is identified with a motion of particles and anti-particles exhibiting pair creation and annihilation. An embedding scheme is presented showing that the D (1) n -automaton contains, as certain subsectors, the box-ball systems and all the other automata associated with the crystal bases of non-exceptional affine Lie algebras. The results extend the earlier ones to higher representations by a certain reduction and to a wider class of boundary conditions

  5. Developing nano-particles as radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, S.

    2013-01-01

    The wide variety of core materials available, coupled with tunable surface properties, make nanoparticles an excellent platform for a broad range of biological and biomedical applications. The unique properties and utility of nanoparticles arise from a variety of attributes, including the similar size of nanoparticles and biomolecules such as proteins and polynucleic acids. Additionally, nanoparticles can be fashioned with a wide range of metal and semiconductor core materials that impart useful properties such as fluorescence and magnetic behavior. Bio-macromolecule surface recognition by nanoparticles as artificial receptors provides a potential tool for controlling cellular and extracellular processes for numerous biological applications such as transcription regulation, enzymatic inhibition, delivery and sensing. The size of nanoparticle cores can be tuned from 1.5 nm to more than 10 nm depending on the core material, providing a suitable platform for the interaction of nanoparticles with proteins and other biomolecules. The conjugation of nanoparticles with biomolecules such as proteins and DNA can be done by using two different approaches, direct covalent linkage and non-covalent interactions between the particle and bio-molecules.The most direct approach to the creation of integrated biomolecule-nanoparticle conjugates is through covalent attachment.This conjugation can be achieved either through chemisorptions of the biomolecule to the particle surface or through the use of hetero-bi-functional linkers. Chemisorption of proteins onto the surface of nanoparticles (usually containing a core of Au, ZnS, CdS, and CdSe/ZnS) can be done through cysteine residues that are present in the protein surface (e.g., oligo-peptide, serum albumin), or chemically using 2-iminothiolane (Traut's reagent). Bifunctional linkers provide a versatile means of bio-conjugation. Biomolecules are often covalently linked to ligands on the nanoparticle surface via traditional

  6. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen

    1992-01-01

    We shall discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection (including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a few ideas on future developments.

  7. Auroral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries

  8. Elementary particles and particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethge, K.; Schroeder, U.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a textbook for an introductory course of elementary particle physics. After a general introduction the symmetry principles governing the interactions of elementary particles are discussed. Then the phenomenology of the electroweak and strong interactions are described together with a short introduction to the Weinberg-Salam theory respectively to quantum chromodynamics. Finally a short outlook is given to grand unification with special regards to SU(5) and cosmology in the framework of the current understanding of the fundamental principles of nature. In the appendix is a table of particle properties and physical constants. (HSI) [de

  9. Enhancement of plasmid-mediated stable gene expression by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARL

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... production and faithful translation and processing of proteins (Baldi et al., ..... deeper understanding of the interaction of cellular factors and regulatory DNA .... mediated transgene expression in the rat brain. Gene Ther., 7: ...

  10. Investigating the Regulation of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thackray, Varykina

    2002-01-01

    ...-mediated regulation of specific target genes are still lacking. We have developed an estrogen responsive system in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster in order to explore the functional interactions between ER and other cellular proteins...

  11. Investigating the Regulation of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thackray, Varykina

    2001-01-01

    ...-mediated regulation of specific target genes are still lacking. We have developed an estrogen responsive system in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster in order to explore the functional interactions between ER and other cellular proteins...

  12. Cellular-based preemption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  13. Novel Materials for Cellular Nanosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi

    The monitoring of cellular behavior is useful for the advancement of biomedical diagnostics, drug development and the understanding of a cell as the main unit of the human body. Micro- and nanotechnology allow for the creation of functional devices that enhance the study of cellular dynamics...... modifications for electrochemical nanosensors for the detection of analytes released from cells. Two type of materials were investigated, each pertaining to the two different aspects of such devices: peptide nanostructures were studied for the creation of cellular sensing substrates that mimic in vivo surfaces...... and that offer advantages of functionalization, and conducting polymers were used as electrochemical sensor surface modifications for increasing the sensitivity towards relevant analytes, with focus on the detection of dopamine released from cells via exocytosis. Vertical peptide nanowires were synthesized from...

  14. Dynamic cellular uptake of mixed-monolayer protected nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Randy P; Carney, Tamara M; Mueller, Marie; Stellacci, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are gaining increasing attention for potential application in medicine; consequently, studying their interaction with cells is of central importance. We found that both ligand arrangement and composition on gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in their cellular internalization. In our previous investigation, we showed that 66-34OT nanoparticles coated with stripe-like domains of hydrophobic (octanethiol, OT, 34%) and hydrophilic (11-mercaptoundecane sulfonate, MUS, 66%) ligands permeated through the cellular lipid bilayer via passive diffusion, in addition to endo-/pino-cytosis. Here, we show an analysis of NP internalization by DC2.4, 3T3, and HeLa cells at two temperatures and multiple time points. We study four NPs that differ in their surface structures and ligand compositions and report on their cellular internalization by intracellular fluorescence quantification. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy we have found that all three cell types internalize the 66-34OT NPs more than particles coated only with MUS, or particles coated with a very similar coating but lacking any detectable ligand shell structure, or 'striped' particles but with a different composition (34-66OT) at multiple data points.

  15. Global properties of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular automata are discrete mathematical systems that generate diverse, often complicated, behavior using simple deterministic rules. Analysis of the local structure of these rules makes possible a description of the global properties of the associated automata. A class of cellular automata that generate infinitely many aperoidic temporal sequences is defined,a s is the set of rules for which inverses exist. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived characterizing the classes of ''nearest-neighbor'' rules for which arbitrary finite initial conditions (i) evolve to a homogeneous state; (ii) generate at least one constant temporal sequence

  16. Cellular structures with interconnected microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaefer, Robert Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Williams, Brian

    2018-01-30

    A method for fabricating a cellular tritium breeder component includes obtaining a reticulated carbon foam skeleton comprising a network of interconnected ligaments. The foam skeleton is then melt-infiltrated with a tritium breeder material, for example, lithium zirconate or lithium titanate. The foam skeleton is then removed to define a cellular breeder component having a network of interconnected tritium purge channels. In an embodiment the ligaments of the foam skeleton are enlarged by adding carbon using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) prior to melt-infiltration. In an embodiment the foam skeleton is coated with a refractory material, for example, tungsten, prior to melt infiltration.

  17. 20(S-Protopanaxatriol inhibits release of inflammatory mediators in immunoglobulin E-mediated mast cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Yong Kim

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: PPT reduces the release of inflammatory mediators via inhibiting multiple cellular signaling pathways comprising the Ca2+ influx, protein kinase C, and PLA2, which are propagated by Syk activation upon allergic stimulation of mast cells.

  18. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  19. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-01-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN...

  20. Repaglinide at a cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard Thomsen, M; Bokvist, K; Høy, M

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the hormonal and cellular selectivity of the prandial glucose regulators, we have undertaken a series of experiments, in which we characterised the effects of repaglinide and nateglinide on ATP-sensitive potassium ion (KATP) channel activity, membrane potential and exocytosis in ra...

  1. Cellular automaton for surface reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechatnikov, E L [AN SSSR, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation). Otdelenie Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki; Frankowicz, A; Danielak, R [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-06-01

    A new algorithm which overcomes some specific difficulties arising in modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes by cellular automata (CA) technique is proposed. The algorithm was tested with scheme introduced by Ziff, Gulari and Barshad and showed a good agreement with their results. The problem of the physical adequacy and interpretation of the algorithm was discussed. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs.

  2. Cellular Automata and the Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Ernest

    1994-01-01

    The use of cellular automata to analyze several pre-Socratic hypotheses about the evolution of the physical world is discussed. These hypotheses combine characteristics of both rigorous and metaphoric language. Since the computer demands explicit instructions for each step in the evolution of the automaton, such models can reveal conceptual…

  3. Cellular buckling in long structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, G.W.; Peletier, M.A.; Champneys, A.R.; Woods, P.D.; Wadee, M.A.; Budd, C.J.; Lord, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    A long structural system with an unstable (subcritical)post-buckling response that subsequently restabilizes typically deformsin a cellular manner, with localized buckles first forming and thenlocking up in sequence. As buckling continues over a growing number ofcells, the response can be described

  4. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Joram, Christian; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  5. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  6. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ( 211 At) and natural bismuth-212 ( 212 Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ( 223 Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs

  7. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and carefully structured introduction to Particle Physics, including important coverage of the Higgs Boson and recent progress in neutrino physics. Fourth edition of this successful title in the Manchester Physics series. Includes information on recent key discoveries including : An account of the discovery of exotic hadrons, beyond the simple quark model; Expanded treatments of neutrino physics and CP violation in B-decays; An updated account of ‘physics beyond the standard model’, including the interaction of particle physics with cosmology; Additional problems in all chapters, with solutions to selected problems available on the book’s website; Advanced material appears in optional starred sections.

  8. Complex cellular logic computation using ribocomputing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alexander A; Kim, Jongmin; Ma, Duo; Silver, Pamela A; Collins, James J; Yin, Peng

    2017-08-03

    Synthetic biology aims to develop engineering-driven approaches to the programming of cellular functions that could yield transformative technologies. Synthetic gene circuits that combine DNA, protein, and RNA components have demonstrated a range of functions such as bistability, oscillation, feedback, and logic capabilities. However, it remains challenging to scale up these circuits owing to the limited number of designable, orthogonal, high-performance parts, the empirical and often tedious composition rules, and the requirements for substantial resources for encoding and operation. Here, we report a strategy for constructing RNA-only nanodevices to evaluate complex logic in living cells. Our 'ribocomputing' systems are composed of de-novo-designed parts and operate through predictable and designable base-pairing rules, allowing the effective in silico design of computing devices with prescribed configurations and functions in complex cellular environments. These devices operate at the post-transcriptional level and use an extended RNA transcript to co-localize all circuit sensing, computation, signal transduction, and output elements in the same self-assembled molecular complex, which reduces diffusion-mediated signal losses, lowers metabolic cost, and improves circuit reliability. We demonstrate that ribocomputing devices in Escherichia coli can evaluate two-input logic with a dynamic range up to 900-fold and scale them to four-input AND, six-input OR, and a complex 12-input expression (A1 AND A2 AND NOT A1*) OR (B1 AND B2 AND NOT B2*) OR (C1 AND C2) OR (D1 AND D2) OR (E1 AND E2). Successful operation of ribocomputing devices based on programmable RNA interactions suggests that systems employing the same design principles could be implemented in other host organisms or in extracellular settings.

  9. Biodiesel exhaust-induced cytotoxicity and proinflammatory mediator production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Kicic, Anthony; Ling, Kak-Ming; Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Larcombe, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Increasing use of biodiesel has prompted research into the potential health effects of biodiesel exhaust exposure. Few studies directly compare the health consequences of mineral diesel, biodiesel, or blend exhaust exposures. Here, we exposed human epithelial cell cultures to diluted exhaust generated by the combustion of Australian ultralow-sulfur-diesel (ULSD), unprocessed canola oil, 100% canola biodiesel (B100), and a blend of 20% canola biodiesel mixed with 80% ULSD. The physicochemical characteristics of the exhaust were assessed and we compared cellular viability, apoptosis, and levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and Regulated on Activation, Normal T cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) in exposed cultured cells. Different fuel types produced significantly different amounts of exhaust gases and different particle characteristics. All exposures resulted in significant apoptosis and loss of viability when compared with control, with an increasing proportion of biodiesel being correlated with a decrease in viability. In most cases, exposure to exhaust resulted in an increase in mediator production, with the greatest increases most often in response to B100. Exposure to pure canola oil (PCO) exhaust did not increase mediator production, but resulted in a significant decrease in IL-8 and RANTES in some cases. Our results show that canola biodiesel exhaust exposure elicits inflammation and reduces viability of human epithelial cell cultures in vitro when compared with ULSD exhaust exposure. This may be related to an increase in particle surface area and number in B100 exhaust when compared with ULSD exhaust. Exposure to PCO exhaust elicited the greatest loss of cellular viability, but virtually no inflammatory response, likely due to an overall increase in average particle size. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, R.

    1984-01-01

    Two previous monographs report on investigations into the extent to which a unified field theory can satisfactorily describe physical reality. The first, Unified field Theory, showed that the paths within a non-Riemannian space are governed by eigenvalue equations. The second, Fundamental Constants, show that the field tensors satisfy sets of differential equations with solutions which represent the evolution of the fields along the paths of the space. The results from the first two monographs are used in this one to make progress on the theory of elementary particles. The five chapters are as follows - Quantum mechanics, gravitation and electromagnetism are aspects of the Unified theory; the fields inside the particle; the quadratic and linear theories; the calculation of the eigenvalues and elementary particles as stable configurations of interacting fields. It is shown that it is possible to construct an internal structure theory for elementary particles. The theory lies within the framework of Einstein's programme-to identify physical reality with a specified geometrical structure. (U.K.)

  11. Pinpointing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David J.

    1987-01-01

    The Conference on Position-Sensitive Detectors held at London's University College from 7-11 September highlighted the importance and the growing applications of these precision devices in many branches of science, underlining once again the high spinoff potential for techniques developed inside particle physics

  12. Particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mais, H.; Ripken, G.; Wrulich, A.; Schmidt, F.

    1986-02-01

    After a brief description of typical applications of particle tracking in storage rings and after a short discussion of some limitations and problems related with tracking we summarize some concepts and methods developed in the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. We show how these concepts can be applied to the proton ring HERA. (orig.)

  13. Pinpointing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David J.

    1987-10-15

    The Conference on Position-Sensitive Detectors held at London's University College from 7-11 September highlighted the importance and the growing applications of these precision devices in many branches of science, underlining once again the high spinoff potential for techniques developed inside particle physics.

  14. Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    While biomedicine and geoscience use grids to bring together many different sub-disciplines, particle physicists use grid computing to increase computing power and storage resources, and to access and analyze vast amounts of data collected from detectors at the world's most powerful accelerators (1 page)

  15. Metastable and unstable cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Sylvain; Maire, Eric; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Lasalle, Audrey; Bogner, Agnès; Gauthier, Catherine; Leloup, Jérôme; Guizard, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Colloidal particles are often seen as big atoms that can be directly observed in real space. They are therefore becoming increasingly important as model systems to study processes of interest in condensed-matter physics such as melting, freezing and glass transitions. The solidification of colloidal suspensions has long been a puzzling phenomenon with many unexplained features. Here, we demonstrate and rationalize the existence of instability and metastability domains in cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions, by direct in situ high-resolution X-ray radiography and tomography observations. We explain such interface instabilities by a partial Brownian diffusion of the particles leading to constitutional supercooling situations. Processing under unstable conditions leads to localized and global kinetic instabilities of the solid/liquid interface, affecting the crystal morphology and particle redistribution behaviour.

  16. Production and properties of bronze based cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, S.; Danninger, H.

    2001-01-01

    For production of lightweight components, cellular materials offer attractive potential. Here, manufacturing of sintered bodies from bronze hollow spheres is described. The process starts with fabrication of hollow copper particles by cementation of Cu on iron particles. The still fragile Cu shells are consolidated by coating with Sn and subsequent gravity sintering. The resulting specimens exhibit a closed cell bronze structure with rather consistent morphology and cell wall thickness. The apparent density may range between 1.5 and 3.0 gcm -3 and can be controlled by variation of particle size and wall thickness. The mechanical behavior of the structures esp. during compressive loading is described and related to the microstructural parameters. (author)

  17. Sub-cellular distribution and translocation of TRP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Carlos A; Arias, Luis A; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Cellular electrical activity is the result of a highly complex processes that involve the activation of ion channel proteins. Ion channels make pores on cell membranes that rapidly transit between conductive and non-conductive states, allowing different ions to flow down their electrochemical gradients across cell membranes. In the case of neuronal cells, ion channel activity orchestrates action potentials traveling through axons, enabling electrical communication between cells in distant parts of the body. Somatic sensation -our ability to feel touch, temperature and noxious stimuli- require ion channels able to sense and respond to our peripheral environment. Sensory integration involves the summing of various environmental cues and their conversion into electrical signals. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels have emerged as important mediators of both cellular sensing and sensory integration. The regulation of the spatial and temporal distribution of membrane receptors is recognized as an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of the cellular response and the time scale on which cellular signaling occurs. Several studies have shown that this mechanism is also used by TRP channels to modulate cellular response and ultimately fulfill their physiological function as sensors. However, the inner-working of this mode of control for TRP channels remains poorly understood. The question of whether TRPs intrinsically regulate their own vesicular trafficking or weather the dynamic regulation of TRP channel residence on the cell surface is caused by extrinsic changes in the rates of vesicle insertion or retrieval remain open. This review will examine the evidence that sub-cellular redistribution of TRP channels plays an important role in regulating their activity and explore the mechanisms that control the trafficking of vesicles containing TRP channels.

  18. Universal map for cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2012-01-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived. -- Highlights: ► A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CA). ► The map is generalized to 2D for Von Neumann, Moore and hexagonal neighborhoods. ► A map for all Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs is derived. ► A map for Conway's “Game of Life” is obtained.

  19. Simulating physics with cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichniac, G Y

    1984-01-01

    Cellular automata are dynamical systems where space, time, and variables are discrete. They are shown on two-dimensional examples to be capable of non-numerical simulations of physics. They are useful for faithful parallel processing of lattice models. At another level, they exhibit behaviours and illustrate concepts that are unmistakably physical, such as non-ergodicity and order parameters, frustration, relaxation to chaos through period doublings, a conspicuous arrow of time in reversible microscopic dynamics, causality and light-cone, and non-separability. In general, they constitute exactly computable models for complex phenomena and large-scale correlations that result from very simple short-range interactions. The author studies their space, time, and intrinsic symmetries and the corresponding conservation laws, with an emphasis on the conservation of information obeyed by reversible cellular automata. 60 references.

  20. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  1. Cellular automata with voting rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowiec, D.

    1996-01-01

    The chosen local interaction - the voting (majority) rule applied to the square lattice is known to cause the non ergodic cellular automata behaviour. Presented computer simulation results verify two cases of non ergodicity. The first one is implicated by the noise introduced to the local interactions and the second one follows properties of the initial lattice configuration selected at random. For the simplified voting rule - non symmetric voting, the critical behaviour has been explained rigorously. (author)

  2. Monocyte-mediated delivery of polymeric backpacks to inflamed tissues: a generalized strategy to deliver drugs to treat inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Kumar, Sunny; Gupta, Vivek; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-02-10

    Targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents to inflamed tissues, as in the cases of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis, represents one of the major challenges in drug delivery. Monocytes possess a unique ability to target and penetrate into sites of inflammation. Here, we describe a broad approach to take advantage of the natural ability of monocytes to target and deliver flat polymeric particles ("Cellular Backpacks") to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks attach strongly to the surface of monocytes but do not undergo phagocytosis due to backpack's size, disk-like shape and flexibility. Following attachment of backpacks, monocytes retain important cellular functions including transmigration through an endothelial monolayer and differentiation into macrophages. In two separate in vivo inflammation models, backpack-laden monocytes exhibit increased targeting to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks, and their abilities to attach to monocytes without impairing monocyte functions and 'hitchhike' to a variety of inflamed tissues, offer a new platform for both cell-mediated therapies and broad targeting of inflamed tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Axionic mirage mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shuntaro; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Although mirage mediation is one of the most plausible mediation mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking, it suffers from two crucial problems. One is the μ/Bμ problem, and the second is the cosmological one. The former stems from the fact that the B parameter tends to be comparable with the gravitino mass, which is 2 orders of magnitude larger than the other soft masses. The latter problem is caused by the decay of the modulus whose branching ratio into the gravitino pair is sizable. In this paper, we propose a model of mirage mediation, in which Peccei-Quinn symmetry is incorporated. In this axionic mirage mediation, it is shown that the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale is dynamically determined around 10 10 GeV to 10 12 GeV due to the supersymmetry breaking effects, and the μ problem can be solved naturally. Furthermore, in our model, the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is the axino, that is, the superpartner of the axion. The overabundance of the LSPs due to decays of the modulus/gravitino, which is the most serious cosmological difficulty in the mirage mediation, can be avoided if the axino is sufficiently light. The next-LSPs (NLSPs) produced by the gravitino decay eventually decay into the axino LSPs, yielding the dominant component of the axinos remaining today. It is shown that the axino with a mass of O(100) MeV is naturally realized, which can constitute the dark matter of the Universe, with a free-streaming length of the order of 0.1 Mpc. The saxion, the real scalar component of the axion supermultiplet, can also be cosmologically harmless due to the dilution of the modulus decay. The lifetime of the NLSP is relatively long, but much shorter than 1 sec, when the big-bang nucleosynthesis commences. The decay of the NLSP would provide intriguing collider signatures

  4. Mediatized play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    Children’s play must nowadays be understood as a mediatized field in society and culture. Media – understood in a very broad sense - holds severe explanatory power in describing and understanding the practice of play, since play happens both with, through and inspired by media of different sorts........ In this presentation the case of ‘playing soccer’ will be outlined through its different mediated manifestations, including soccer games and programs on TV, computer games, magazines, books, YouTube videos and soccer trading cards....

  5. Mediating Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    "Mediating Business" is a study of the expansion of business journalism. Building on evidence from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, "Mediating Business" is a comparative and multidisciplinary study of one of the major transformations of the mass media and the realm of business - nationally...... and globally. The book explores the history of key innovations and innovators in the business press. It analyzes changes in the discourse of business journalism associated with the growth in business news and the development of new ways of framing business issues and events. Finally, it examines...... the organizational implications of the increased media visibility of business and, in particular, the development of corporate governance and media relations....

  6. Biological Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular and Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Glüer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles (SPIO are used in different ways as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: Particles with high nonspecific uptake are required for unspecific labeling of phagocytic cells whereas those that target specific molecules need to have very low unspecific cellular uptake. We compared iron-oxide particles with different core materials (magnetite, maghemite, different coatings (none, dextran, carboxydextran, polystyrene and different hydrodynamic diameters (20–850 nm for internalization kinetics, release of internalized particles, toxicity, localization of particles and ability to generate contrast in MRI. Particle uptake was investigated with U118 glioma cells und human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, which exhibit different phagocytic properties. In both cell types, the contrast agents Resovist, B102, non-coated Fe3O4 particles and microspheres were better internalized than dextran-coated Nanomag particles. SPIO uptake into the cells increased with particle/iron concentrations. Maximum intracellular accumulation of iron particles was observed between 24 h to 36 h of exposure. Most particles were retained in the cells for at least two weeks, were deeply internalized, and only few remained adsorbed at the cell surface. Internalized particles clustered in the cytosol of the cells. Furthermore, all particles showed a low toxicity. By MRI, monolayers consisting of 5000 Resovist-labeled cells could easily be visualized. Thus, for unspecific cell labeling, Resovist and microspheres show the highest potential, whereas Nanomag particles are promising contrast agents for target-specific labeling.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Jennifer E.; Fewell, Claire; Yin, Qinyan; McBride, Jane; Wang Xia; Lin Zhen

    2008-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers

  8. Cellular communications a comprehensive and practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Even as newer cellular technologies and standards emerge, many of the fundamental principles and the components of the cellular network remain the same. Presenting a simple yet comprehensive view of cellular communications technologies, Cellular Communications provides an end-to-end perspective of cellular operations, ranging from physical layer details to call set-up and from the radio network to the core network. This self-contained source forpractitioners and students represents a comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of cellular communications and the landscape of commercially deployed

  9. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Biomimetic approaches to modulate cellular adhesion in biomaterials: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmany, Maria B; Van Dyke, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Natural extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins possess critical biological characteristics that provide a platform for cellular adhesion and activation of highly regulated signaling pathways. However, ECM-based biomaterials can have several limitations, including poor mechanical properties and risk of immunogenicity. Synthetic biomaterials alleviate the risks associated with natural biomaterials but often lack the robust biological activity necessary to direct cell function beyond initial adhesion. A thorough understanding of receptor-mediated cellular adhesion to the ECM and subsequent signaling activation has facilitated development of techniques that functionalize inert biomaterials to provide a biologically active surface. Here we review a range of approaches used to modify biomaterial surfaces for optimal receptor-mediated cell interactions, as well as provide insights into specific mechanisms of downstream signaling activation. In addition to a brief overview of integrin receptor-mediated cell function, so-called "biomimetic" techniques reviewed here include (i) surface modification of biomaterials with bioadhesive ECM macromolecules or specific binding motifs, (ii) nanoscale patterning of the materials and (iii) the use of "natural-like" biomaterials. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  12. Winding through the WNT pathway during cellular development and demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Chong, Z Z; Maiese, K

    2006-01-01

    In slightly over a period of twenty years, our comprehension of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern the Wnt signaling pathway continue to unfold. The Wnt proteins were initially implicated in viral carcinogenesis experiments associated with mammary tumors, but since this period investigations focusing on the Wnt pathways and their transmembrane receptors termed Frizzled have been advanced to demonstrate the critical nature of Wnt for the development of a variety of cell populations as well as the potential of the Wnt pathway to avert apoptotic injury. In particular, Wnt signaling plays a significant role in both the cardiovascular and nervous systems during embryonic cell patterning, proliferation, differentiation, and orientation. Furthermore, modulation of Wnt signaling under specific cellular influences can either promote or prevent the early and late stages of apoptotic cellular injury in neurons, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes. A number of downstream signal transduction pathways can mediate the biological response of the Wnt proteins that include Dishevelled, beta-catenin, intracellular calcium, protein kinase C, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. Interestingly, these cellular cascades of the Wnt-Frizzled pathways can participate in several neurodegenerative, vascular, and cardiac disorders and may be closely integrated with the function of trophic factors. Identification of the critical elements that modulate the Wnt-Frizzled signaling pathway should continue to unlock the potential of Wnt pathway for the development of new therapeutic options against neurodegenerative and vascular diseases.

  13. Hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees are required to assess the dose to skin from a hot particle contamination event at a depth of skin of7mg/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 and compare the value to the current dose limit for the skin. Although the resulting number is interesting from a comparative standpoint and can be used to predict local skin reactions, comparison of the number to existing limits based on uniform exposures is inappropriate. Most incidents that can be classified as overexposures based on this interpretation of dose actually have no effect on the health of the worker. As a result, resources are expended to reduce the likelihood that an overexposure event will occur when they could be directed toward eliminating the cause of the problem or enhancing existing programs such as contamination control. Furthermore, from a risk standpoint, this practice is not ALARA because some workers receive whole body doses in order to minimize the occurrence of hot particle skin contaminations. In this paper the authors suggest an alternative approach to controlling hot particle exposures

  14. Anticancer agent CHS-828 inhibits cellular synthesis of NAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, U.H.; Christensen, M.K.; Bjorkling, F.

    2008-01-01

    Malignant cells display increased demands for energy production and DNA repair. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is required for both processes and is also continuously degraded by cellular enzymes. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is a crucial factor in the resynthesis of NAD......, and thus in cancer cell survival. Here, we establish the cytotoxic mechanism of action of the small molecule inhibitor CHS-828 to result from impaired synthesis of NAD. Initially, we detected cross-resistance in cells between CHS-828 and a known inhibitor of Nampt, FK866, a compound of a structurally...... different class. We then showed that nicotinamide protects against CHS-828-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, we observed that treatment with CHS-828 depletes cellular NAD levels in sensitive cancer cells. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that, like FK866, CHS-828 kills cancer cells by depleting...

  15. A nucleator arms race: cellular control of actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campellone, Kenneth G; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-04-01

    For over a decade, the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, a handful of nucleation-promoting factors and formins were the only molecules known to directly nucleate actin filament formation de novo. However, the past several years have seen a surge in the discovery of mammalian proteins with roles in actin nucleation and dynamics. Newly recognized nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASP and SCAR homologue (WASH), WASP homologue associated with actin, membranes and microtubules (WHAMM), and junction-mediating regulatory protein (JMY), stimulate ARP2/3 activity at distinct cellular locations. Formin nucleators with additional biochemical and cellular activities have also been uncovered. Finally, the Spire, cordon-bleu and leiomodin nucleators have revealed new ways of overcoming the kinetic barriers to actin polymerization.

  16. Cellular proteostasis: degradation of misfolded proteins by lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteostasis refers to the regulation of the cellular concentration, folding, interactions and localization of each of the proteins that comprise the proteome. One essential element of proteostasis is the disposal of misfolded proteins by the cellular pathways of protein degradation. Lysosomes are an important site for the degradation of misfolded proteins, which are trafficked to this organelle by the pathways of macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy and endocytosis. Conversely, amyloid diseases represent a failure in proteostasis, in which proteins misfold, forming amyloid deposits that are not degraded effectively by cells. Amyloid may then exacerbate this failure by disrupting autophagy and lysosomal proteolysis. However, targeting the pathways that regulate autophagy and the biogenesis of lysosomes may present approaches that can rescue cells from the deleterious effects of amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:27744333

  17. Heat-shock stress activates a novel nuclear import pathway mediated by Hikeshi

    OpenAIRE

    Imamoto, Naoko; Kose, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stresses significantly affect nuclear transport systems. Nuclear transport pathways mediated by importin β-family members, which are active under normal conditions, are downregulated. During thermal stress, a nuclear import pathway mediated by a novel carrier, which we named Hikeshi, becomes active. Hikeshi is not a member of the importin β family and mediates the nuclear import of Hsp70s. Unlike importin β family-mediated nuclear transport, the Hikeshi-mediated nuclear import of Hsp...

  18. The cellular approach to band structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwoerd, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    A short introduction to the cellular approach in band structure calculations is given. The linear cellular approach and its potantial applicability in surface structure calculations is given some consideration in particular

  19. Potential cellular receptors involved in hepatitis C virus entry into cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muellhaupt Beat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects hepatocytes and leads to permanent, severe liver damage. Since the genomic sequence of HCV was determined, progress has been made towards understanding the functions of the HCV-encoded proteins and identifying the cellular receptor(s responsible for adsorption and penetration of the virus particle into the target cells. Several cellular receptors for HCV have been proposed, all of which are associated with lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. This article reviews the cellular receptors for HCV and suggests a general model for HCV entry into cells, in which lipoproteins play a crucial role.

  20. Biological effects of alpha particles in lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, W.; Daschil, F.

    1985-01-01

    Allowing for concomitant cellular inactivation, the tumour incidence function can be written as the product of two probabilities, for malignant transformation and for not being killed. Cell survival of mammalian cells in culture after heavy ion irradiation has been described successfully by the formalism of track structure theory for cellular inactivation. Thus a transformation function is derived by extracting cellular radiosensitivity parameters from experimental data on mutation to thioguanine resistance. For defined conditions of radon daughter inhalation, from the fraction of inhaled radionuclides deposited and retained on bronchial airway surfaces are calculated. The LET distribution in sensitive bronchial stem cells hit by alpha particles depends on initial alpha particle energy, airway diameter, and stem cell depth. Applying the methodology of track structure theory and using cellular radiosensitivity parameters for cell killing and mutation, the radiation risk at a given stem cell depth is expressed by the probabilities for cellular survival, for mutation or transformation, and the joint probability for cancer induction. (author)

  1. Turgor-mediated transport of sugars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daie, J.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane associated processes have been suggested to be modulated by cellular turgor. The nature of this regulation is not, however, clearly understood. Evidence is presented that active but not passive transport of sugars is turgor regulated. Isolated phloem tissue, vascular bundles or storage parenchyma of celery were incubated in buffered solutions adjusted to 100, 200 or 400 m osmolal that contained various concentrations of 14 C-sugars. Cellular turgor was manipulated by using the non-permeating PEG (3350). Saturating carrier-mediated sucrose transport which is present only in phloem-containing tissue was enhanced under low turgor conditions. Sucrose diffusion, the predominant mode of uptake in non-phloem parenchyma tissue was not affected by cellular turgor. Furthermore, GA and IAA seem to interact with cellular turgor to bring about modified rates of sucrose uptake. The data are consistent with observations that sucrose loading is enhanced under mild water deficit conditions

  2. [Cellular subcutaneous tissue. Anatomic observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart-Elbaz, C; Varnaison, E; Sick, H; Grosshans, E; Cribier, B

    2001-11-01

    We showed in a companion paper that the definition of the French "subcutaneous cellular tissue" considerably varied from the 18th to the end of the 20th centuries and has not yet reached a consensus. To address the anatomic reality of this "subcutaneous cellular tissue", we investigated the anatomic structures underlying the fat tissue in normal human skin. Sixty specimens were excised from the surface to the deep structures (bone, muscle, cartilage) on different body sites of 3 cadavers from the Institut d'Anatomie Normale de Strasbourg. Samples were paraffin-embedded, stained and analysed with a binocular microscope taking x 1 photographs. Specimens were also excised and fixed after subcutaneous injection of Indian ink, after mechanic tissue splitting and after performing artificial skin folds. The aspects of the deep parts of the skin greatly varied according to their anatomic localisation. Below the adipose tissue, we often found a lamellar fibrous layer which extended from the interlobular septa and contained horizontally distributed fat cells. No specific tissue below the hypodermis was observed. Artificial skin folds concerned either exclusively the dermis, when they were superficial or included the hypodermis, but no specific structure was apparent in the center of the fold. India ink diffused to the adipose tissue, mainly along the septa, but did not localise in a specific subcutaneous compartment. This study shows that the histologic aspects of the deep part of the skin depend mainly on the anatomic localisation. Skin is composed of epidermis, dermis and hypodermis and thus the hypodermis can not be considered as being "subcutaneous". A difficult to individualise, fibrous lamellar structure in continuity with the interlobular septa is often found under the fat lobules. This structure is a cleavage line, as is always the case with loose connective tissues, but belongs to the hypodermis (i.e. fat tissue). No specific tissue nor any virtual space was

  3. Zeno's paradox in quantum cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groessing, G.; Zeilinger, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Zeno's paradox in quantum theory is demonstrated with the aid of quantum mechanical cellular automata. It is shown that the degree of non-unitarity of the cellular automaton evolution and the frequency of consecutive measurements of cellular automaton states are operationally indistinguishable. (orig.)

  4. Zeno's paradox in quantum cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groessing, G [Atominst. der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria); Zeilinger, A [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik, Univ. Innsbruck (Austria)

    1991-07-01

    The effect of Zeno's paradox in quantum theory is demonstrated with the aid of quantum mechanical cellular automata. It is shown that the degree of non-unitarity of the cellular automaton evolution and the frequency of consecutive measurements of cellular automaton states are operationally indistinguishable. (orig.).

  5. Game of Life Cellular Automata

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1960s, British mathematician John Conway invented a virtual mathematical machine that operates on a two-dimensional array of square cell. Each cell takes two states, live and dead. The cells' states are updated simultaneously and in discrete time. A dead cell comes to life if it has exactly three live neighbours. A live cell remains alive if two or three of its neighbours are alive, otherwise the cell dies. Conway's Game of Life became the most programmed solitary game and the most known cellular automaton. The book brings together results of forty years of study into computational

  6. 'Biomoleculas': cellular metabolism didactic software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menghi, M L; Novella, L P; Siebenlist, M R

    2007-01-01

    'Biomoleculas' is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios

  7. Symmetry analysis of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of B-calculus [V. García-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] a universal map for deterministic cellular automata (CAs) has been derived. The latter is shown here to be invariant upon certain transformations (global complementation, reflection and shift). When constructing CA rules in terms of rules of lower range a new symmetry, “invariance under construction” is uncovered. Modular arithmetic is also reformulated within B-calculus and a new symmetry of certain totalistic CA rules, which calculate the Pascal simplices modulo an integer number p, is then also uncovered.

  8. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  9. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  10. Magnetogenetics: Remote Control of Cellular Signaling with Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Jeremy P.

    Means for temporally regulating gene expression and cellular activity are invaluable for elucidating the underlying physiological processes and have therapeutic implications. Here we report the development of a system for remote regulation of gene expression by low frequency radiowaves (RF) or by a static magnetic field. We accomplished this by first adding iron oxide nanoparticles - either exogenously or as genetically encoded ferritin/ferric oxyhydroxide particle. These particles have been designed with affinity to the plasma membrane ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a conjugated antibody. Application of a magnetic field stimulates the particle to gate the ion channel and this, in turn, initiates calcium-dependent transgene expression. We first demonstrated in vitro that TRPV1 can be actuated to cause calcium flux into the cell by directly applying a localized magnetic field. In mice expressing these genetically encoded components, application of external magnetic field caused remote stimulation of insulin transgene expression and significantly lowered blood glucose. In addition, we are investigating mechanisms by which iron oxide nanoparticles can absorb RF, and transduce this energy to cause channel opening. This robust, repeatable method for remote cellular regulation in vivo may ultimately have applications in basic science, as well as in technology and therapeutics.

  11. Cellular and humoral immunity after vaccination or natural mumps infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kihei; Hagihara, Kimiko; Oishi, Tomohiro; Miyata, Ippei; Akaike, Hiroto; Ogita, Satoko; Ohno, Naoki; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2017-08-01

    This study measured cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and serum antibody to clarify the basis of breakthrough after vaccination and reinfection after mumps. From a pool of 54 college students, 17 seronegative subjects and 14 subjects with intermediate level of antibodies against mumps were vaccinated with a monovalent mumps vaccine, and CMI was assessed using interferon-γ release assay. CMI positivity according to pre-existing antibody level, defined as titer  0.05), respectively. Vaccination or even natural mumps infection did not always induce both cellular and humoral immunity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Introduction of transplantation tolerance after total lymphoid irradiation: cellular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strober, S.; King, D.P.; Gottlieb, M.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    High-dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is a safe, routine regimen used to treat patients with lymphoid malignancies. Although few side effects are associated with the regimen, a profound suppression of cell-mediated immunity is observed for several years after therapy, as judged by both in vivo and in vitro assays. A profound immunosuppression has also been observed in mice and rats given TLI. Recently, we have achieved similar results using TLI in nonmatched bone marrow transplantation in outbred dogs. The experimental work in animals and underlying cellular mechanisms are reviewed here

  13. New particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, A.

    1980-07-01

    Current state of art in the discovery of new elementary particles is reviewed. At present, quarks and mesons are accepted as the basic constituents of matter. The charmonium model (canti-c system), and the 'open charm' are discussed. Explanations are offered for the recent discovery of the heavy lepton tau. Quark states such as the beauty and taste are also dealt with at length. The properties of the tanti-t bound system are speculated. It is concluded that the understanding of canti-c and banti-b families is facilitated by the assumption of the quarkonium model. Implications at the astrophysical level are indicated.

  14. Particle Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Collinson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    * Assumes no prior knowledge* Adopts a modelling approach* Numerous tutorial problems, worked examples and exercises included* Elementary topics augmented by planetary motion and rotating framesThis text provides an invaluable introduction to mechanicsm confining attention to the motion of a particle. It begins with a full discussion of the foundations of the subject within the context of mathematical modelling before covering more advanced topics including the theory of planetary orbits and the use of rotating frames of reference. Truly introductory , the style adoped is perfect for those u

  15. Regulation of the arachidonic acid mobilization in macrophages by combustion-derived particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Carsten

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute exposure to elevated levels of environmental particulate matter (PM is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. These adverse health effects, e.g. culminating in respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, have been demonstrated by a multitude of epidemiological studies. However, the underlying mechanisms relevant for toxicity are not completely understood. Especially the role of particle-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses is of particular interest. In this in vitro study we examined the influence of particle-generated ROS on signalling pathways leading to activation of the arachidonic acid (AA cascade. Incinerator fly ash particles (MAF02 were used as a model for real-life combustion-derived particulate matter. As macrophages, besides epithelial cells, are the major targets of particle actions in the lung murine RAW264.7 macrophages and primary human macrophages were investigated. Results The interaction of fly ash particles with macrophages induced both the generation of ROS and as part of the cellular inflammatory responses a dose- and time-dependent increase of free AA, prostaglandin E2/thromboxane B2 (PGE2/TXB2, and 8-isoprostane, a non-enzymatically formed oxidation product of AA. Additionally, increased phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK JNK1/2, p38 and ERK1/2 was observed, the latter of which was shown to be involved in MAF02-generated AA mobilization and phosphorylation of the cytosolic phospolipase A2. Using specific inhibitors for the different phospolipase A2 isoforms the MAF02-induced AA liberation was shown to be dependent on the cytosolic phospholipase A2, but not on the secretory and calcium-independent phospholipase A2. The initiation of the AA pathway due to MAF02 particle exposure was demonstrated to depend on the formation of ROS since the presence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC prevented the MAF02

  16. Early cysteine-dependent inactivation of 26S proteasomes does not involve particle disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Hugo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Under oxidative stress 26S proteasomes suffer reversible disassembly into its 20S and 19S subunits, a process mediated by HSP70. This inhibits the degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins by the 26S proteasome and allows the degradation of oxidized proteins by a free 20S proteasome. Low fluxes of antimycin A-stimulated ROS production caused dimerization of mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 and cytosolic peroxiredoxin 2, but not peroxiredoxin overoxidation and overall oxidation of cellular protein thiols. This moderate redox imbalance was sufficient to inhibit the ATP stimulation of 26S proteasome activity. This process was dependent on reversible cysteine oxidation. Moreover, our results show that this early inhibition of ATP stimulation occurs previous to particle disassembly, indicating an intermediate step during the redox regulation of the 26S proteasome with special relevance under redox signaling rather than oxidative stress conditions.

  17. Light mediators in dark matter direct detections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tai; Miao, Sen; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In an extended effective operator framework, we investigate in detail the effects of light mediators on the event spectra of dark matter (DM)-nucleus scatterings. The presence of light mediators changes the interpretation of the current experimental data, especially the determination of DM particle mass. We show by analytic and numerical illustrations that in general for all the operators relevant to spin-independent scatterings, the DM particle mass allowed by a given set of experimental data increases significantly when the mediator particle becomes lighter. For instance, in the case of CDMS-II-Si experiment, the allowed DM particle mass can reach ∼50 (100) GeV at 68% (90%) confidence level, which is much larger than ∼10 GeV in the case with contact interactions. The increase of DM particle mass saturates when the mediator mass is below O(10) MeV. The upper limits from other experiments such as SuperCDMS, CDMSlite, CDEX, XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX etc. all tend to be weaker toward high DM mass regions. In a combined analysis, we show that the presence of light mediators can partially relax the tension in the current results of CDMS-II-Si, SuperCDMS and LUX

  18. Melanoma screening with cellular phones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Massone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermatology has recently been shown to be suitable for teledermatology despite limitations in image definition in preliminary studies. The unique aspect of mobile teledermatology is that this system represents a filtering or triage system, allowing a sensitive approach for the management of patients with emergent skin diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we investigated the feasibility of teleconsultation using a new generation of cellular phones in pigmented skin lesions. 18 patients were selected consecutively in the Pigmented Skin Lesions Clinic of the Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria. Clinical and dermoscopic images were acquired using a Sony Ericsson with a built-in two-megapixel camera. Two teleconsultants reviewed the images on a specific web application (http://www.dermahandy.net/default.asp where images had been uploaded in JPEG format. Compared to the face-to-face diagnoses, the two teleconsultants obtained a score of correct telediagnoses of 89% and of 91.5% reporting the clinical and dermoscopic images, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work is the first study performing mobile teledermoscopy using cellular phones. Mobile teledermatology has the potential to become an easy applicable tool for everyone and a new approach for enhanced self-monitoring for skin cancer screening in the spirit of the eHealth program of the European Commission Information for Society and Media.

  19. Simulation of diffusion in a two-dimensional lattice gas cellular automaton: a test of mode-coupling theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.; Ernst, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    We compute the velocity autocorrelation function of a tagged particle in a two-dimensional lattice-gas cellular automaton using a method that is about a million times more efficient than existing techniques. A t-1 algebraic tail in the tagged-particle velocity autocorrelation function is clearly

  20. Human copper transporter 2 is localized in late endosomes and lysosomes and facilitates cellular copper uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghe, van den P.V.E; Folmer, D.E.; Malingré, H.E.M.; Beurden, van E.; Klomp, A.E.M.; Sluis, van de B.; Merkx, M.; Berger, R.J.; Klomp, L.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    High-affinity cellular copper uptake is mediated by the CTR (copper transporter) 1 family of proteins. The highly homologous hCTR (human CTR) 2 protein has been identified, but its function in copper uptake is currently unknown. To characterize the role of hCTR2 in copper homoeostasis,

  1. Cellular fatty acid transport in heart and skeletal muscle as facilitated by proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiken, J. J.; Schaap, F. G.; van Nieuwenhoven, F. A.; van der Vusse, G. J.; Bonen, A.; Glatz, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    Despite the importance of long-chain fatty acids (FA) as fuels for heart and skeletal muscles, the mechanism of their cellular uptake has not yet been clarified. There is dispute as to whether FA are taken up by the muscle cells via passive diffusion and/or carrier-mediated transport. Kinetic

  2. Fermilab | Particle Physics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Science Science Particle Physics Neutrinos Scientific Computing Research & Development Key Discoveries Benefits of Particle Physics Particle Superconducting Test Accelerator LHC and Future Accelerators Accelerators for Science and Society Particle Physics

  3. Systematic identification of cellular signals reactivating Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary effusion lymphoma-derived cells that harbor the latent virus. A group of diverse cellular signaling proteins were identified and validated in their effect of inducing viral lytic gene expression from the latent viral genome. The results suggest that multiple cellular signaling pathways can reactivate the virus in a genetically homogeneous cell population. Further analysis revealed that the Raf/MEK/ERK/Ets-1 pathway mediates Ras-induced reactivation. The same pathway also mediates spontaneous reactivation, which sets the first example to our knowledge of a specific cellular pathway being studied in the spontaneous reactivation process. Our study provides a functional genomic approach to systematically identify the cellular signals regulating the herpesvirus life cycle, thus facilitating better understanding of a fundamental issue in virology and identifying novel therapeutic targets.

  4. Biological effects of particle radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    1988-01-01

    Conventional radiations such as photons, gamma rays or electrons show several physical or biological disadvantages to bring tumors to cure, therefore, more and more attentions is being paid to new modalitie such as fast neutrons, protons, negative pions and heavy ions, which are expected to overcome some of the defects of the conventional radiations. Except for fast neutrons, these particle radiations show excellet physical dose localization in tissue, moreover, in terms of biological effects, they demonstrate several features compared to conventional radiations, namely low oxygen enhancement ratio, high value of relative biological effectiveness, smaller cellular recovery, larger therapeutic gain factor and less cell cycle dependency in radiation sensitivity. In present paper the biological effects of particle radiations are shown comparing to the effects of conventional radiations. (author)

  5. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. 22.970 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.970 Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. (a) Definition...

  6. Molecular, cellular, and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering. Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Engineering, the fourth volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in molecular biology, transport phenomena, physiological modeling, tissue engineering, stem cells, drug delivery systems, artificial organs, and personalized medicine. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including DNA vaccines, biomimetic systems, cardiovascular dynamics, biomaterial scaffolds, cell mechanobiology, synthetic biomaterials, pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, nanobiomaterials for tissue engineering, biomedical imaging of engineered tissues, gene therapy, noninvasive targeted protein and peptide drug deliver...

  7. Pressure-actuated cellular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagitz, M; Hol, J M A M; Lamacchia, E

    2012-01-01

    Shape changing structures will play an important role in future engineering designs since rigid structures are usually only optimal for a small range of service conditions. Hence, a concept for reliable and energy-efficient morphing structures that possess a large strength to self-weight ratio would be widely applicable. We propose a novel concept for morphing structures that is inspired by the nastic movement of plants. The idea is to connect prismatic cells with tailored pentagonal and/or hexagonal cross sections such that the resulting cellular structure morphs into given target shapes for certain cell pressures. An efficient algorithm for computing equilibrium shapes as well as cross-sectional geometries is presented. The potential of this novel concept is demonstrated by several examples that range from a flagellum like propulsion device to a morphing aircraft wing.

  8. Sensing Phosphatidylserine in Cellular Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G. Kay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylserine, a phospholipid with a negatively charged head-group, is an important constituent of eukaryotic cellular membranes. On the plasma membrane, rather than being evenly distributed, phosphatidylserine is found preferentially in the inner leaflet. Disruption of this asymmetry, leading to the appearance of phosphatidylserine on the surface of the cell, is known to play a central role in both apoptosis and blood clotting. Despite its importance, comparatively little is known about phosphatidylserine in cells: its precise subcellular localization, transmembrane topology and intracellular dynamics are poorly characterized. The recent development of new, genetically-encoded probes able to detect phosphatidylserine within live cells, however, is leading to a more in-depth understanding of the biology of this phospholipid. This review aims to give an overview of the current methods for phosphatidylserine detection within cells, and some of the recent realizations derived from their use.

  9. Search for narrow and broad dijet resonances in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV and constraints on dark matter mediators and other new particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Pieters, Maxim; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Bilin, Bugra; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Trocino, Daniele; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Vermassen, Basile; Vit, Martina; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correia Silva, Gilson; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Medina Jaime, Miguel; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Calligaris, Luigi; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Jing; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Wang, Yi; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Khalil, Shaaban; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Kucher, Inna; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lattaud, Hugues; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Zhang, Sijing; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max Philip; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Teroerde, Marius; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Danilov, Vladyslav; De Wit, Adinda; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Damiani, Daniela; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Elwood, Adam; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Knolle, Joscha; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Meyer, Mareike; Missiroli, Marino; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Tholen, Heiner; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Kutzner, Viktor; Lange, Johannes; Marconi, Daniele; Multhaup, Jens; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Reimers, Arne; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Diamantopoulou, Magda; Karasavvas, D; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Papakrivopoulos, Ioannis; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Vámi, Tamás Álmos; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chauhan, Sushil; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Rajat; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Lohan, Manisha; Mehta, Ankita; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Ashok; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Shah, Aashaq; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Bhowmik, Debabrata; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Bipen; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Di Florio, Adriano; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Gelmi, Andrea; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Iemmi, Fabio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Latino, Giuseppe; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Galati, Giuliana; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Voevodina, Elena; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto;