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Sample records for particle irradiated normal

  1. Survival of human osteosarcoma cells and normal human fibroblasts following alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Gemmell, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Cell survival of human osteosarcoma cells in culture following alpha particle irradiation is reported here for the first time. The osteosarcoma cell line (TE-85) is found to be less sensitive to inactivation by 5.6 MeV alpha particles (LET 86 keV/μm) than normal diploid human fibroblasts (NFS). Values for the mean lethal doses were estimated to be 103 rads for the TE-85 cells compared with 68 rads for the NFS cultures irradiated under identical conditions. It is postulated that the aneuploidy of the tumor cells with increased DNA chromosomal material may confer a selective advantage for the survival of tumor cells relative to normal cells with diploid chromosomes

  2. Irradiation behaviors of coated fuel particles, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kashimura, Satoru; Ogawa, Toru; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi

    1981-09-01

    Loose coated fuel particles prepared in confirmity to a preliminary design for the multi-purpose VHTR in fiscal 1972 - 1974 were irradiated by 73F - 12A capsule in JMTR. Main purpose for this irradiation experiment was to examine irradiation stability of the candidate TRISO coated fuel particles for the VHTR. Also the coated particles possessing low-density kernel (90%TD), highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC and ZrC coating layer were loaded with the candidate particles in this capsule. The coated particles were irradiated up to 1.5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 of fast neutron fluence (E > 0.18 MeV) and 3.2% FIMA of burnup. In the post irradiation examination it was observed that among three kinds of TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the normal operating condition of the VHTR ones possessing poor characteristics of the coating layers did not show a good stability. The particles irradiated under abnormally high temperature condition (> 1800 0 C) revealed 6.7% of max. EOL failure fraction (95% confidence limit). Most of these particles were failed by the ameoba effect. Furthermore, among four kinds of the TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the transient condition of the VHTR (--1500 0 C) the two showed a good stability, while the particles possessing highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC or poorly characteristic coating layers were not so good. (author)

  3. Differential superiority of heavy charged-particle irradiation to x-rays: Studies on biological effectivenes and side effect mechanisms in multicellular tumor and normal tissue models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eWalenta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to x-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis.Multicellular spheroids (MCS from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with x-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER were 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, 12C+6 in the plateau region, and 12C+6 in the Bragg peak, respectively. A relative biological effectiveness (RBE of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M, and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy of x-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in 1 integrin expression. Unlike with particles, the photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Comparing the gene toxicity of x-rays with that of particles using the gamma-H2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral mucosa, the superior effectiveness of heavy ions was confirmed by a two-fold higher number of foci per nucleus. Pro-inflammatory signs, however, were similar for both treatment modalities, e. g., the activation of NFkappaB, and the release of IL

  4. Differential Superiority of Heavy Charged-Particle Irradiation to X-Rays: Studies on Biological Effectiveness and Side Effect Mechanisms in Multicellular Tumor and Normal Tissue Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to X-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review, deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis. Multicellular spheroids from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Reliable oxygen enhancement ratios could be derived to be 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, 12C+6 in the plateau region, and 12C+6 in the Bragg peak, respectively. Similarly, a relative biological effectiveness of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. These data clearly show that heavy charged particles are more efficient in sterilizing tumor cells than conventional irradiation even under hypoxic conditions. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy) of X-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in β1 integrin expression. The photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Such a hyperphosphorylation did not occur during 12C+6 irradiation under all conditions registered. Comparing the gene toxicity of X-rays with that of particles using the γH2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral mucosa, the

  5. Differential Superiority of Heavy Charged-Particle Irradiation to X-Rays: Studies on Biological Effectiveness and Side Effect Mechanisms in Multicellular Tumor and Normal Tissue Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to X-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review, deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis. Multicellular spheroids from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Reliable oxygen enhancement ratios could be derived to be 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, (12)C(+6) in the plateau region, and (12)C(+6) in the Bragg peak, respectively. Similarly, a relative biological effectiveness of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. These data clearly show that heavy charged particles are more efficient in sterilizing tumor cells than conventional irradiation even under hypoxic conditions. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy) of X-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in β1 integrin expression. The photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Such a hyperphosphorylation did not occur during (12)C(+6) irradiation under all conditions registered. Comparing the gene toxicity of X-rays with that of particles using the γH2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral

  6. Modeling of coated fuel particles irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Tongxiang; Phelip, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report, PANAMA code was used to estimate the CP performance under normal and accident condition. Under the normal irradiation test (1000 degree C 625 efpd, 10% FIMA), for intact CP fuel, failure fraction is in the level of 10 -7 . As-fabricated SiC failed particles results in the through coatings failed particles much earlier than the intact particles does, OPyC layer does not fail immediately after irradiation starts. The significant failures start at beyond the burnup of about 7% FIMA. Under the accident condition, the calculated results showed that when the heating temperature is much higher than 1850 degree C, the failure fraction of coated particle can reach the level of 1 percent. The CP fuel fails significantly if it has a buffer layer thinner than 65 urn, SiC layer thinner than 30 μm. High burnup CP need to develop small size kernel, thick buffer layer and thick SiC layer. (authors)

  7. Oxygen delivery in irradiated normal tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, M.F.; Ansari, R. [Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States). School of Biomedical Engineering; Gaber, M.W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure significantly alters the structure and function of microvascular networks, which regulate delivery of oxygen to tissue. In this study we use a hamster cremaster muscle model to study changes in microvascular network parameters and use a mathematical model to study the effects of these observed structural and microhemodynamic changes in microvascular networks on oxygen delivery to the tissue. Our experimental observations indicate that in microvascular networks while some parameters are significantly affected by irradiation (e.g. red blood cell (RBC) transit time), others remain at the control level (e.g. RBC path length) up to 180 days post-irradiation. The results from our mathematical model indicate that tissue oxygenation patterns are significantly different in irradiated normal tissue as compared to age-matched controls and the differences are apparent as early as 3 days post irradiation. However, oxygen delivery to irradiated tissue was not found to be significantly different from age matched controls at any time between 7 days to 6 months post-irradiation. These findings indicate that microvascular late effects in irradiated normal tissue may be due to factors other than compromised tissue oxygenation. (author)

  8. Irradiation behaviors of coated fuel particles, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kashimura, Satoru; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1980-07-01

    This report is concerning to the irradiation experiments of the coated fuel particles, which were performed by 72F-6A and 72F-7A capsules in JMTR. The coated particles referred to the preliminary design of VHTR were prepared for the experiments in 1972 and 1973. 72F-6A capsule was irradiated at G-10 hole of JMTR fuel zone for 2 reactor cycles, and 72F-7A capsule had been planned to be irradiated at the same irradiation hole before 72F-6A. However, due to slight leak of the gaseous fission products into the vacuum system controlling irradiation temperature, irradiation of 72F-7A capsule was ceased after 85 hrs since the beginning. In the post irradiation examination, inspection to surface appearance, ceramography, X-ray microradiography and acid leaching for the irradiated particle samples were made, and crushing strength of the two particle samples was measured. (author)

  9. Identification of biomarkers of radioresponse and subsequent progression towards lung cancer in normal human bronchial epithelial cells after HZE particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Park, Seongmi; Minna, John

    Using variants of a non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line HBEC3-KT, we have examined global gene expression patterns after low and high LET irradiation up to 24h post-IR. Using supervised analyses we have identified 427 genes whoes expression can be used to discriminate the cellular response to γ-vs Si or Fe particles even when the biological outcome, cell death, is equivalent. Furthermore, genetic background also determines gene expression response. When HBEC3-KT is compared to the HBEC3-KT cells line where mutant k-RAS is over-expressed and p53 has been knocked down, HBEC-3KTr53, principal component analysis clearly shows that the response of each cell resides in a different 3-D space, that is, basal gene expression patterns as well as the gene expression response are unique to each cell type. Using regression analysis to examine these 427 genes show clusters of genes whose temporal expression patterns are the same and which are unique to a given radiation type. Ultimately, this approach will allow for the interrogation of gene promoters to identify response elements that drive how cells respond to different radiation types. We are extending our examination to O particles and are now examining gene expression as a function of beam quality. We have made substantial progress in the determination of cellular transformation by HZE particles for these cell lines. (Transformation as defined by the ability to grow in soft agar.) For HBEC-3KT, the spontaneous transformation frequency is about 10- 7.ExposuretoeitherF eorSiparticlesinc KT r53celllinedidnotshowanyincreaseintransf ormationf requencyaf terdosesof upto1Gy, however, thesp 3KT.W ehavenowisolatedover160individualf ocithatf ormedinsof tagarf romcellculturesthatwereirradia termcultureandthenre-introducedintosof tagartoassurethattheabilitytogrowinsof tagarisclonal.T odatew 30 With these cell isolates in hand we will begin to determine tumorigenicity by subcutaneous injections in nude

  10. Nanoparticle production by UV irradiation of combustion generated soot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stipe, Christopher B.; Choi, Jong Hyun; Lucas, Donald; Koshland, Catherine P.; Sawyer, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Laser ablation of surfaces normally produce high temperature plasmas that are difficult to control. By irradiating small particles in the gas phase, we can better control the size and concentration of the resulting particles when different materials are photofragmented. Here, we irradiate soot with 193 nm light from an ArF excimer laser. Irradiating the original agglomerated particles at fluences ranging from 0.07 to 0.26 J/cm 2 with repetition rates of 20 and 100 Hz produces a large number of small, unagglomerated particles, and a smaller number of spherical agglomerated particles. Mean particle diameters from 20 to 50 nm are produced from soot originally having a mean electric mobility diameter of 265nm. We use a non-dimensional parameter, called the photon/atom ratio (PAR), to aid in understanding the photofragmentation process. This parameter is the ratio of the number of photons striking the soot particles to the number of the carbon atoms contained in the soot particles, and is a better metric than the laser fluence for analyzing laser-particle interactions. These results suggest that UV photofragmentation can be effective in controlling particle size and morphology, and can be a useful diagnostic for studying elements of the laser ablation process

  11. Irradiation of single cells with individual high-LET particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.M.; Braby, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The dose-limiting normal tissue of concern when irradiating head and neck lesions is often the vascular endothelium within the treatment field. Consequently, the response of capillary endothelial cells exposed to moderate doses of high LET particles is essential for establishing exposure limits for neutron-capture therapy. In an effort to characterize the high-LET radiation biology of cultured endothelial cells, the authors are attempting to measure cellular response to single particles. The single-particle irradiation apparatus, described below, allows them to expose individual cells to known numbers of high-LET particles and follow these cells for extended periods, in order to assess the impact of individual particles on cell growth kinetics. Preliminary cell irradiation experiments have revealed complications related to the smooth and efficient operation of the equipment; these are being resolved. Therefore, the following paragraphs deal primarily with the manner by which high LET particles deposit energy, the requirements for single-cell irradiation, construction and assembly of such apparatus, and testing of experimental procedures, rather than with the radiation biology of endothelial cells

  12. Unstable structure of ribosomal particles synthesized in. gamma. -irradiated Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, H; Morita, K [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-06-01

    Stability of Escherichia coli ribosomes newly synthesized after ..gamma..-irradiation was compared with that of normal ribosomes. The ribosomal particles around 70-S synthesized in irradiated cells were more sensitive to digestion by pancreatic ribonuclease A. A larger number of the salt-unstable '50-S' precursor particles existed in the extract from irradiated cells than in the extract from unirradiated cells. These facts suggest that ribosomal particles, synthesized during an earlier stage in irradiated cells, maintain an incomplete structure even though they are not distinguishable from normal ribosomes by means of sucrose density-gradient centrifugation.

  13. Study on cellular genotoxicities induced by alpha particles irradiation in combination with NNK treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Cao Zhenshan; Mi Na; Chen Zhongmin; Liu Gang; Wei Han; Li Huiying; Zhu Maoxiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate cellular genotoxicities of aplha particles irradiation in combination with NNK treatment. Methods: Exponentially growing immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells were divided into the normal control group (NC), alpha particles irradiation (α), NNK administration group (NNK), NNK administration (100 μg/ml) followed by alpha particles irradiation group (NNK + α), and alpha particles irradiation followed by NNK administration (100 μg/ml) group (μ + NNK). DNA damage were detected by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE); multinuclear cell assay was used to detect the frequency of the HPRT gene mutation; cell micronucleus frequency were detected by cytogenetic methods. Results: In the group exposed to both alpha particles irradiation and NNK, DNA damage, HPRT gene mutation frequency, and cell micronucleus frequency were significantly higher than those in the same dose groups irradiated with alpha particles or NNK administration alone. Subtracted the NNK effect, DNA damage, HPRT gene mutation frequency and cell micronucleus frequency in the group irradiated by alpha particles in combination with NNK administration were significantly higher than those of alpha particles irradiation alone. Conclusion: The genotoxicity of alpha particles irradiation in combination with NNK administration had synergistic effect. (authors)

  14. Study on cytotoxicities induced by alpha particle irradiation combined with NNK treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Cao Zhenshan; Mi Na; Chen Zhongmin; Liu Gang; Wei Han; Li Huiyin; Zhu Maoxiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate cytotoxicities of alpha-particle irradiation combined with NNK treatment. Methods: Exponentially growing immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells were divided into normal control group (NC), alpha particle irradiation group (α), NNK administration group (NNK), NNK administration (100 μg/ml) followed by alpha particle irradiation group (NNK + α), and alphaparticle irradiation followed by NNK administration (100 μg/ml) group (α + NNK). Cell survival fractions were measured by cloning rate of low-density plating cell. Ethidium bromide and 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein, fluorescent products of the membrane-permeable dyes hydroethine and 2', 7'-dichloroflurescindiacetate were used to monitor the inarticulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) . Damage to membrane permeability was evaluated through testing LDH activity in medium. Results: In the groups exposed to both alpha particles and NNK, the survival rates were significantly lower than that of the groups administrated with the same dose of alpha particles or NNK alone. The levels of intracellular ROS and the activity of LDH in medium were significantly higher than that of the groups administrated with the same dose of alpha particles or NNK alone. Subtracted the NNK effect, the survival rates of the groups received both alpha particle irradiation and NNK treatment were significantly lower than that of alpha particle irradiated only group. However, the intracellular ROS level and the activity of LDH in medium were significantly higher than that of alpha-particle irradiated only group. In addition, the survival rates of the cells in groups exposed to alpha particle irradiation followed by NNK administration were significantly lower than that of cells treated with NNK administration followed by alpha particle irradiation. Conclusions: Alpha particle irradiation and NNK administration had synergisticity in cytotoxicity, and furthermore different schedules of the administration resulted in

  15. Antitumor bystander effect induced by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Jin Chufeng; Wu Yican; Ge Shenfang; Wu Lijun; FDS Team

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the bystander effect of the tumor and normal cells surrounding the target region caused by radiation-inducible target gene therapy combined with α-particle irradiation. The receptor tumor cell A549 and normal cell MRC-5 were co-cultured with the donor cells irradiated to 0.5 Gy or the non-irradiated donor cells, and their survival and apoptosis fractions were evaluated. The results showed that the combined treatment of Ad-ET and particle irradiation could induce synergistic antitumor effect on A549 tumor cell, and the survival fraction of receptor cells co-cultured with the irradiated cells decreased by 6%, compared with receptor cells co-cultured with non-irradiated cells, and the apoptosis fraction increased in the same circumstance, but no difference was observed with the normal cells. This study demonstrates that Ad-ET combined with α-particle irradiation can significantly cause the bystander effect on neighboring tumor cells by inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis, without obvious toxicity to normal cells. This suggests that combining radiation-inducible TRAIL gene therapy and irradiation may improve tumor treatment efficacy by specifically targeting tumor cells and even involving the neighboring tumor cells. (authors)

  16. On transient irradiation behavior of HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortenson, S.C.; Okrent, D.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of HTGR TRISO coated fuel particles was made in which the particles' stress-strain histories were determined during both steady-state and transient operating conditions. The basis for the examination was a modified version of a computer code written by Kaae which assumed spherical symmetry, isotropic thermal expansion, isotropic elastic constants, time-temperature-irradiation invariant materials properties, and steady state operation during particle exposure. Additionally, the Kaae code modelled potential separation of layers at the SiC-inner PyC interface and considered that several entrapped fission products could exist in either the gaseous or solid state, dependent upon particle operating conditions. Using the modified code which modelled transient behavior in a quasi-static fashion, a series of both steady-state and transient operating condition computer simulations was made. For the former set of runs, a candidate set of particle dimensions and a nominal set of materials' properties was assumed. Layer thicknesses were assumed to be normally distributed about the nominal thickenesses and a probability distribution of SiC tensile stresses was generated; sensitivity of the stress distribution to assumed standard deviation of the layer thicknesses was acute. Further, this series of steady-state runs demonstrated that for certain combinations of the assumed PyC-SiC bond interface strength and irradiation-induced creep constant, anomalous predicted stresses may be obtained in the PyC layers. The steady-state runs also suggest that transient behavior would most likely not be significant at fast neutron exposures below about 10 21 NVT due to both low fission gas pressure and likely beneficial interface separation

  17. Irradiation Testing of TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Yeo, Sunghwan; Jeong, Kyung-Chai; Eom, Sung-Ho; Kim, Yeon-Ku; Kim, Woong Ki; Lee, Young Woo; Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, Yong Wan

    2014-01-01

    In Korea, coated particle fuel is being developed to support development of a VHTR. At the end of March 2014, the first irradiation test in HANARO at KAERI to demonstrate and qualify TRISO-coated particle fuel for use in a VHTR was terminated. This experiment was conducted in an inert gas atmosphere without on-line temperature monitoring and control, or on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contained two test rods, one has nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact contains about 260 TRISO-coated particles. The duration of irradiation testing at HANARO was about 135 full power days from last August 2013. The maximum average power per particle was about 165 mW/particle. The calculated peak burnup of the TRISO-coated fuel was a little less than 4 atom percent. Post-irradiation examination is being carried out at KAERI’s Irradiated Material Examination Facility beginning in September of 2014. This paper describes characteristics of coated particle fuel, the design of the test rod and irradiation device for this coated particle fuel, and discusses the technical results of irradiation testing at HANARO. (author)

  18. Analytical formulae in fractionated irradiation of normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.

    1982-01-01

    The new conception of the modeling of the cell tissue kinetics after fractionated irradiation is proposed. The formulae given earlier are compared with experimental data on various normal tissues and further adjustments are considered. The tissues are shown to exhibit several general patterns of behaviour. The repopulation, if it takes place, seems to start after some time, independently of fractionation in first approximation and can be treated as simple autogenesis. The results are compared with the commonly used NSD conception and the well-known Cohen cell tissue kinetic model

  19. Single particle irradiation effect of digital signal processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Si'an; Chen Kenan

    2010-01-01

    The single particle irradiation effect of high energy neutron on digital signal processor TMS320P25 in dynamic working condition has been studied. The influence of the single particle on the device has been explored through the acquired waveform and working current of TMS320P25. Analysis results, test data and test methods have also been presented. (authors)

  20. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  1. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. The decrease in the values of the labeling indices 1 week after charged particle irradiation was dose- and ion-dependent. Mitotic indices 1 week after 10 and 25 Gy helium and after 10 Gy neon were the same as those seen in the control mice. Analysis of cell kinetics 1 week after 10 Gy helium and 10 Gy neon irradiation suggests the presence of a progenitor subpopulation that is proliferating with a shorter cell cycle. Comparison of the responses to the different charged particle beams indicates that neon ions are more effective in producing direct cellular damage than the helium ions, but the surviving proliferating cells several divisions later continue to maintain active cell renewal. Based on the 1 week post-irradiation H 3 -TdR labeling indices, a rough estimate of the RBE for neon ions is at least 2.5 when compared to helium ions

  2. Irradiation testing of coated particle fuel at Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo Kim, Bong; Sung Cho, Moo; Kim, Yong Wan

    2014-01-01

    TRISO-coated particle fuel is developing to support development of VHTR in Korea. From August 2013, the first irradiation testing of coated particle fuel was begun to demonstrate and qualify TRISO fuel for use in VHTR in the HANARO at KAERI. This experiment is currently undergoing under the atmosphere of a mixed inert gas without on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contains two test rods, one contains nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact has 263 coated particles. After a peak burn-up of about 4 at% and a peak fast neutron fluence of about 1.7 x 10 21 n/cm 2 , PIE will be carried out at KAERI's Irradiated Material Examination Facility. This paper is described characteristics of coated particle fuel, the design of test rod and irradiation device for coated particle fuel, discusses the technical results for irradiation testing at HANARO. (authors)

  3. Technique for sparing previously irradiated critical normal structures in salvage proton craniospinal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W; Wolanski, Mark R; Simmons, Joseph W; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C

    2013-01-01

    Cranial reirradiation is clinically appropriate in some cases but cumulative radiation dose to critical normal structures remains a practical concern. The authors developed a simple technique in 3D conformal proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) to block organs at risk (OAR) while minimizing underdosing of adjacent target brain tissue. Two clinical cases illustrate the use of proton therapy to provide salvage CSI when a previously irradiated OAR required sparing from additional radiation dose. The prior radiation plan was coregistered to the treatment planning CT to create a planning organ at risk volume (PRV) around the OAR. Right and left lateral cranial whole brain proton apertures were created with a small block over the PRV. Then right and left lateral “inverse apertures” were generated, creating an aperture opening in the shape of the area previously blocked and blocking the area previously open. The inverse aperture opening was made one millimeter smaller than the original block to minimize the risk of dose overlap. The inverse apertures were used to irradiate the target volume lateral to the PRV, selecting a proton beam range to abut the 50% isodose line against either lateral edge of the PRV. Together, the 4 cranial proton fields created a region of complete dose avoidance around the OAR. Comparative photon treatment plans were generated with opposed lateral X-ray fields with custom blocks and coplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy optimized to avoid the PRV. Cumulative dose volume histograms were evaluated. Treatment plans were developed and successfully implemented to provide sparing of previously irradiated critical normal structures while treating target brain lateral to these structures. The absence of dose overlapping during irradiation through the inverse apertures was confirmed by film. Compared to the lateral X-ray and IMRT treatment plans, the proton CSI technique improved coverage of target brain tissue while providing the least

  4. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same...... mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation...... and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity...

  5. Effects of heavy particle irradiation on central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Nakadai, Taeko; Khono, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    Effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to central nervous system were studied using human embryonal carcinoma (Ntera2=NT2) and Human neuroblastoma cell (NB1). They exposed to heavy ions and X ray 80% confluent cells in culture bottles. The cells were different type about growth and differentiation in the neuron. The apoptosis profile was measured by AnnexinV-EGFP, PI stained and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Memory and learning function of adult mice were studied using water maze test after carbon- or iron-ion irradiation. Memory functions were rapidly decreased after irradiation both ions. Iron -ion group were recovered 20 weeks after irradiation C-ion group were recovered 25 weeks after irradiation. Tier memory were still keep at over 100 weeks after irradiation. (author)

  6. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploger, Scott A., E-mail: scott.ploger@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Hunn, John D.; Kehn, Jay S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 × 10{sup 5} total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  7. Temperature of loose coated particles in irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1975-04-01

    An analysis is presented of the temperature of a monolayer bed of loose High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) type fissioning fuel particles in an annular cavity. Both conduction and radiant heat transfer are taken into account, and the effect of particle contact with the annular cavity surfaces is evaluated. Charts are included for the determination of the maximum surface temperature of the particle coating for any size particle or power generation rate in a fuel bed of this type. The charts are intended for the design and evaluation of irradiation experiments on loose beds of coated fuel particles of the type used in HTGRs. Included in an Appendix is a method for estimating the temperature of a particle in circular hole. (U.S.)

  8. Elevated sodium chloride concentrations enhance the bystander effects induced by low dose alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei; Zhu Lingyan; Jiang Erkang; Wang Jun; Chen Shaopeng; Bao Linzhi; Zhao Ye; Xu An; Yu Zengliang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)], E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that high NaCl can be genotoxic, either alone or combined with irradiation. However, little is known about the relationship between environmental NaCl at elevated conditions and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). RIBE, which has been considered as non-targeted bystander responses, has been demonstrated to occur widely in various cell lines. In the present study, RIBE under the elevated NaCl culture condition was assessed in AG 1522 cells by both the induction of {gamma}-H2AX, a reliable marker of DNA double-strand break (DSB) for the early process (<1 h post irradiation), and the generation of micronuclei (MN), a sensitive marker for relative long process of RIBE. Our results showed that in the absence of irradiation, NaCl at elevated concentration such as 8.0, 9.0 and 10.0 g/L did not significantly increase the frequency of {gamma}-H2AX foci-positive cells and the number of foci per positive cell comparing with that NaCl at a normal concentration (6.8 g/L). However, with 0.2 cGy {alpha}-particle irradiation, the induced fraction of {gamma}-H2AX foci-positive cells and the number of induced {gamma}-H2AX foci per positive cell were significantly increased in both irradiated and adjacent non-irradiated regions. Similarly, the induction of MN by 0.2 cGy {alpha}-particle irradiation also increased with the elevated NaCl concentrations. With N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, the induced fraction of foci-positive cells was effectively inhibited both in 0.2 cGy {alpha}-particle irradiated and adjacent non-irradiated regions under either normal or elevated NaCl conditions. These results suggested that the cultures with elevated NaCl medium magnified the damage effects induced by the low dose {alpha}-particle irradiation and nitric oxide generated by irradiation was also very important in this process.

  9. Statistical properties of the normalized ice particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanoë, Julien; Protat, Alain; Testud, Jacques; Bouniol, Dominique; Heymsfield, A. J.; Bansemer, A.; Brown, P. R. A.; Forbes, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Testud et al. (2001) have recently developed a formalism, known as the "normalized particle size distribution (PSD)", which consists in scaling the diameter and concentration axes in such a way that the normalized PSDs are independent of water content and mean volume-weighted diameter. In this paper we investigate the statistical properties of the normalized PSD for the particular case of ice clouds, which are known to play a crucial role in the Earth's radiation balance. To do so, an extensive database of airborne in situ microphysical measurements has been constructed. A remarkable stability in shape of the normalized PSD is obtained. The impact of using a single analytical shape to represent all PSDs in the database is estimated through an error analysis on the instrumental (radar reflectivity and attenuation) and cloud (ice water content, effective radius, terminal fall velocity of ice crystals, visible extinction) properties. This resulted in a roughly unbiased estimate of the instrumental and cloud parameters, with small standard deviations ranging from 5 to 12%. This error is found to be roughly independent of the temperature range. This stability in shape and its single analytical approximation implies that two parameters are now sufficient to describe any normalized PSD in ice clouds: the intercept parameter N*0 and the mean volume-weighted diameter Dm. Statistical relationships (parameterizations) between N*0 and Dm have then been evaluated in order to reduce again the number of unknowns. It has been shown that a parameterization of N*0 and Dm by temperature could not be envisaged to retrieve the cloud parameters. Nevertheless, Dm-T and mean maximum dimension diameter -T parameterizations have been derived and compared to the parameterization of Kristjánsson et al. (2000) currently used to characterize particle size in climate models. The new parameterization generally produces larger particle sizes at any temperature than the Kristjánsson et al. (2000

  10. Microstructural characterization of second phase irradiated Zircaloy-4 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Alejandra V.; Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham D.; Bozzano, Patricia B.; Versaci, Raul A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction diagrams of neutron irradiated Zircaloy-4 were obtained at the LNLS with the aim to obtain bulk information about the amorphization process in which the Zircaloy-4 second phase particles (SPPs) undergoes due to neutron irradiation. Owing to the low concentration of the SPPs in the alloy (∼0.4 V %), no data regarding to the bulk were obtained until now. The synchrotron experiences allowed to detect five of the more intense lines of the phase C 14 (SPPs structure) in unirradiated Zircaloy-4: (110) θ, (103) θ, (112) θ, (201) θ and (004) θ in the 34 degrees ≤ θ2≤45 degrees Bragg angle range and others of minor intensity. The diagrams of the samples irradiated at moderate doses (1020n/cm 2 ) show these lines even in the as received samples. In contrast, none of these lines are observed for high fluence samples (∼1022neutrons/cm 2 ). In addition, in similar high fluence samples annealed 24 h or 72 h at 600 C degrees the intensity rises just at the 2q range where the C 14 lines were observed, showing a wide peak. That peak is interpreted as a result of the superposition of unresolved diffraction lines corresponding to the Zircaloy SPPs which are in a reconstitution process of crystallization. Analytical Electron Microscopy techniques were used, in order to study the effects on the Zircaloy-4 SPPs and compared with samples of the same material without irradiation. Spots in SAD patterns of non irradiated SPPS, evidences the presence of a C 14 structure, but in irradiated SSP SAD patterns evidences the beginning of an amorphization process. Another important feature to point out is the different Fe / Cr ratio presented in both irradiated and non irradiated SSPs. In non irradiated precipitates the Fe / Cr ratio is approximately 1.5, while in irradiated precipitates the Fe / Cr ratio becomes near 1.0. (author) [es

  11. Effect of endotoxin preparations (LPS) with irradiation decreased toxicity on the immune response of normal and irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elekes, E; Bertok, L [Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszsegugyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)

    1979-03-01

    A comparison of the immunostimulating effect of parent and radiodetoxified with 50, 100, 150 and 200 kGy (5, 10, 15 and 20 Mrad) /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays endotoxin preparations in normal and irradiated rats is given. By increasing the dose of irradiation the immunostimulating effect decreased. The preparations detoxified even with the highest (200 kGy) dose is characterized by a pronounced adjuvant effect in irradiated animals.

  12. Microstructure evolution of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 under charged particles irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumé, M.; Onimus, F.; Dupuy, L.; Tissot, O.; Bachelet, C.; Mompiou, F.

    2017-11-01

    Recrystallized zirconium alloys are used as nuclear fuel cladding tubes of Pressurized Water Reactors. During operation, these alloys are submitted to fast neutron irradiation which leads to their in-reactor deformation and to a change of their mechanical properties. These phenomena are directly related to the microstructure evolution under irradiation and especially to the formation of -type dislocation loops. In the present work, the radiation damage evolution in recrystallized Zircaloy-4 has been studied using charged particles irradiation. The loop nucleation and growth kinetics, and also the helical climb of linear dislocations, were observed in-situ using a High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) under 1 MeV electron irradiation at 673 and 723 K. In addition, 600 keV Zr+ ion irradiations were conducted at the same temperature. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) characterizations have been performed after both types of irradiations, and show dislocation loops with a Burgers vector belonging to planes close to { 10 1 bar 0 } first order prismatic planes. The nature of the loops has been characterized. Only interstitial dislocation loops have been observed after ion irradiation at 723 K. However, after electron irradiation conducted at 673 and 723 K, both interstitial and vacancy loops were observed, the proportion of interstitial loops increasing as the temperature is increased. The loop growth kinetics analysis shows that as the temperature increases, the loop number density decreases and the loop growth rate tends to increase. An increase of the flux leads to an increase of the loop number density and a decrease of the loop growth rate. The results are compared to previous works and discussed in the light of point defects diffusion.

  13. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  14. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  15. Particle velocity measurements in laser irradiated foils using ORVIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, S.A.; Fisk, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum foils from 2- to 200-μm thick have been subjected to a Nd:YAG laser pulse of low irradiance (10 9 W/cm 2 , approx. 10 ns pulse) to produce laser-driven shocks in the foils. The particle velocity history of the foil side opposite the laser deposition was monitored with nanosecond resolution by a velocity interferometer system called ORVIS. These histories indicate a shock reverberation process accelerates the foil. Peak foil velocities can be adequately calculated using a ricket propulsion model developed from experiments at much higher irradiances. A velocity of 1 km/s was developed in a 2-μm-thick free foil in a time of 50 ns. Water-confined foils attained peak particle velocities about three times higher than those of free foils

  16. Impact of electron irradiation on particle track etching response in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work, attempts have been made to investigate the modification in particle track etching response of polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) due to impact of 2 MeV electrons. PADC samples pre-irradiated to 1, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 Mrad doses of 2 MeV electrons were further exposed to 140 MeV 28Si beam ...

  17. Elevated sodium chloride concentrations enhance the bystander effects induced by low dose alpha-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Zhu Lingyan; Jiang Erkang; Wang Jun; Chen Shaopeng; Bao Linzhi; Zhao Ye; Xu An; Yu Zengliang; Wu Lijun

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high NaCl can be genotoxic, either alone or combined with irradiation. However, little is known about the relationship between environmental NaCl at elevated conditions and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). RIBE, which has been considered as non-targeted bystander responses, has been demonstrated to occur widely in various cell lines. In the present study, RIBE under the elevated NaCl culture condition was assessed in AG 1522 cells by both the induction of γ-H2AX, a reliable marker of DNA double-strand break (DSB) for the early process ( G -methyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, the induced fraction of foci-positive cells was effectively inhibited both in 0.2 cGy α-particle irradiated and adjacent non-irradiated regions under either normal or elevated NaCl conditions. These results suggested that the cultures with elevated NaCl medium magnified the damage effects induced by the low dose α-particle irradiation and nitric oxide generated by irradiation was also very important in this process

  18. Failure of the capsule for coated particles irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Jikei; Nomura, Yasushi; Nagamatsuya, Takaaki; Yamahara, Takeshi; Sakai, Haruyuki

    1975-10-01

    During operation cycle No. 27 of the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) on May 20, 1974, leakage of the fission product gas occurred from the capsule 72F-7A, which contained coated particles for the irradiation; the coated particles are for the development of a multi-purpose high temperature gas cooled reactor. The capsule was designed for heat 1600 0 C. Three nickel plates as the heat reflector were sandwiched in between the plates of titanium and zirconium, which were adsorbents for the impurity gases in the cladding tube (Nb-1%Zr). Temperatures of the plates were about 1000 0 C under the irradiation, so one metal diffused into the other metal through interfaces, resulting in the formation of an alloy. Its melting point was lower than those of metals in the capsule. The cladding material Nb-1%Zr was melted by the alloy and finally a pin hole developed through the cladding. The process of failure, design of the capsule, post-irradiation test of the capsule and the failure-reproducing experiment with a mock-up capsule are described. (auth.)

  19. Characteristic lesions in mouse retina irradiated with accelerated iron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malachowski, M.J.; Philpott, D.E.; Corbett, R.L.; Tobias, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    A program is underway to determine the radiation hazards of HZE particles using the Bevalac, a heavy-ion accelerator at LBL. Our earlier work with helium, carbon, neon, and argon particles, and exposure to rats to HZE particles in space flight demonstrated some deleterious biological effects. TEM studies have shown that some visual cells were missing and dislocated; these were termed channel lesions. Recently obtained is evidence that a single iron HZE particle may affect a series of cells. Mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.3, 1, 10, or 25 rad of 590 MeV/amu initial kinetic energy iron particles in groups of 10 animals per dose point. Irradiated and control animals were sacrificed at intervals from one week to two years postirradiation. The eye samples were dehydrated, critical points dried with freon, fractured, and Au-Pd coated for SEM, or plastic embedded, sectioned, and stained for TEM. Additionally, dry fractured samples viewed with the SEM were embedded in plastic, sectioned, and stained for the TEM. Characteristic tunnel shaped lesions were observed with the SEM. Stereo pairs showed tunnels of various lengths up to 100 μm. Light microscopy of serially cut sections from the same material had vacuoles (V) extending the same length. TEM of the same specimen and specimens prepared only for TEM exhibited large vacuoles, greater than or equal to 2 μm, in the inner segment (IS) and outer segment (OS) layers. Severe membrane disruption was found bordering the vacuoles and gross nuclear degeneration (ND) and loose tissue (LT) were seen in the outer nuclear layer (ONL). The number of lesions increased with increasing dose. Microscopy of the control retina failed to demonstrate similar lesions

  20. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1994-11-01

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO 2 ) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO 4 ]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X 10 (ZO 4 ) 6 (F,Cl,O) 2 ]; the isometric pyrochlores [A 1-2 B 2 O 6 (O,OH,F) 0-1p H 2 O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi 2 O 7 ]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, α- VI A 2 IV BO 4 , and spinel (ccp), γ- VI A 2 IV BO 4

  1. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén, E-mail: madeleine.lyckesvard@oncology.gu.se [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Lindegren, Sture [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Jensen, Holger [The PET and Cyclotron Unit Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Bäck, Tom [Department of Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Swanpalmer, John [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elmroth, Kecke [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • We study DNA damage response to low-LET photons and high-LET alpha particles. • Cycling primary thyrocytes are more sensitive to radiation than stationary cells. • Influence of radiation quality varies due to cell cycle status of normal cells. • High-LET radiation gives rise to a sustained DNA damage response. - Abstract: Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ({sup 211}At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as {sup 131}I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ({sup 60}Co) and alpha particles from {sup 211}At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24 h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to {sup 211}At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1 Gy {sup 211}At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative

  2. Responses of vibrissa-sensitive cortical neurons in normal and prenatally x-irradiated rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, M.; Kawabata, M.; Shoji, R.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were irradiated by 200 R of x ray on day 17 of gestation through the body wall of the mother. When they underwent the following electrophysiological tests at the age of 3 to 4 month, the somatosensory cortex showed a lack of layers II, III, IV, and Va. Spike responses to quick whisker deflections were recorded from single cells in the somatosenory cortex of normal and prenatally x-irradiated rats. For the irradiated rats the response latency was prolonged when compared to the normal controls. Cortical laminar analysis of field potentials revealed that there was no difference in the latency of these potentials between the two groups, suggesting that vibrissal sensory signals reach the cortical level normally even in the irradiated rats. The prolonged latency of the irradiated cortical neuronal response could thus be ascribed to an abnormal intracortical delay, which was most likely associated with the failure of development of layer IV stellate cells in these preparations

  3. The effects of normal paraffins mobilizers on irradiated polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxiu; Gao Ling

    1995-01-01

    The n-paraffins blended with polypropylene (PP) as mobilizer had been investigated. The effectiveness of mobilizer (n-paraffins) on irradiated polypropylene is dependent on the molecular weight of mobilizer and its content on polypropylene. The n-docosame (n-C 22 ) possesses the best effectiveness of radiation tolerance on PP among the mobilizer paraffins: n-decane (n-C 10 ), n-hexadecane (n-C 16 ), n-docosane (n-C 22 ) and n-hexatriacontane (n-C 36 ). The 2% (w/w) content of a given mobilizer is the most effective at reducing the embrittlement of irradiated PP as evidenced by the elongation at break. The physical properties of polypropylene with mobilizers such as density, Young's modulus, the Fraction of free volume and the weight swelling ratio in p-xylene at room temperature were measured. Above phenomena are related with the constructive of blended PP and demonstrated by its physical properties

  4. SERS study of transformation of phenylalanine to tyrosine under particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Huang, Qing; Yao, Guohua; Ke, Zhigang; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Yilin

    2014-08-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering or spectroscopy (SERS) is a very powerful analytical tool which has been widely applied in many scientific research and application fields. It is therefore also very intriguing for us to introduce SERS technique in the radiobiological research, where in many cases only a very few of biomolecules are subjected to changes which however can lead to significant biological effects. The radiation induced biochemical reactions are normally very sophisticated with different substances produced in the system, so currently it is still a big challenge for SERS to analyze such a mixture system which contains multiple analytes. In this context, this work aimed to establish and consolidate the feasibility of SERS as an effective tool in radiation chemistry, and this purpose, we employed SERS as a sensitive probe to a known process, namely, the oxidation of phenylalanine (Phe) under particle irradiation, where the energetic particles were obtained from either plasma discharge or electron-beam. During the irradiation, three types of tyrosine (Tyr), namely, p-Tyr, m-Tyr and o-Tyr were produced, and all these tyrosine isomers together with Phe could be identified and measured based on the SERS spectral analysis of the corresponding enhanced characteristic signals, namely, 1002 cm-1 for Phe, 1161 cm-1 for p-Tyr, 990 cm-1 for m-Tyr, and 970 cm-1 for o-Tyr, respectively. The estimation of the quantities of different tyrosine isomers were also given and verified by conventional method such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As for comparison of different ways of particle irradiation, our results also indicated that electron-beam irradiation was more efficient for converting Phe into Tyr than plasma discharge treatment, confirming the role of hydroxyl radicals in the Phe-Tyr conformation. Therefore, our work has not only demonstrated that SERS can be successfully applied in the radiobiological study, but also given insights into the

  5. Tissue reactions in lambs and kids vaccinated with irradiated and normal amphistome metacercariae (Cercariae indicae XXVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Md.; Rao, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    The intensity of gross and histopathological changes were inversely related to the dose of irradiation. Severe catarrhal enteritis was noticed with non-irradiated metacercariae while with increased irradiation doses the intensity of changes were in decreasing order, however, with 3 Krad dose no severe change was seen. The severe changes of gastro-enteritic lesions were seen from the challenge dose of normal metacercariae in the lambs and kids previously vaccinated with non-irradiated metacercariae. The moderate catarrhal enteritis, mild necrotic lesions and absence of severe lesions produced by the challenge dose of normal metacercariae in the lambs and kids previously vaccinated with 2, 2.5 and 3 Krad level of irradiated metacercariae suggested that the lesions produced by challenge doses were in order of reduced intensity as the dose of irradiation for initial vaccination increased. The cellular infiltration with round cells, plasma cells and macrophages in the mucosa of the small intestine was more in lambs and kids vaccinated with irradiated metacercariae and the order of increase was in correspondent with the level of irradiation. The present study showed that the optimal dose of irradiation for amphistome metacercariae was 3 Krad, where maximum immunological response could be obtained. This also suggests the possibility of immunizing lambs and kids against intestinal amphistomiasis with 3 Krad irradiated metacercariae. (author)

  6. Effects of heavy particle irradiation on central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Nakadai, Taeko; Khono, Yukio; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2004-01-01

    Effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to central nervous system were studied using mouse neonatal brain cells in culture exposed to heavy ions and X ray at fifth days of the culture. The subsequent biological effects were evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and the survivability of neurons focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains with different genetic types, and linear energy transfer (LET) of the different nucleons. Of the three mouse strains tested, SCID, B6, B6C3F1 and C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive. Radiation sensitivity of these cells ware SCID>B6>B6C3F1>C3H to both X-ray and carbon ion (290 MeV/n) when compared by 10% apoptotic induction. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID cells exposing to different ions, (X, C, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed at higher dose than 1 Gy, an enhancement was observed in the high LET region and at lower dose than 0.5 Gy. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. Memory and learning function of adult mice were studied using water maze test after localized carbon- or iron-ion irradiation to hippocampus area. Memory function were rapidly decrease after irradiation both ions. C-ion group were recovered 20 weeks after irradiation, but Iron group were different. (author)

  7. Experimental central nervous system injury after charged-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of definite paralytic signs, used as an endpoint for the determination of latent periods, which reflect the presence of damage but do not reveal its pathologic characteristics. Paralysis was a nonstochastic effect for which both the probability and severity vary with dose and for which a threshold of dose-response existed. Histologically the primary lesion induced by both charged-particle irradiation and X- or γ-radiation was demyelination and necrosis of the white matter. This has been attributed generally to damage to the oligodendrocytes. The spinal cord tolerance toward fractionated helium radiation was similar to X- or γ-radiation, but the spinal cord was much more sensitive to heavier charged-particle radiation. There was much less sparing and decreased tissue tolerance in the high-LET spread Bragg peak regions of carbon- and neon-ion beams that in the plateau regions. A radiologic model for effects in CNS after charged-particle radiation indicated that the α/β values, a measure of tissue repair capacity, increased with LET as predicted. The α/β values for spinal cord injury with neon range from 2.52 to 12.0 depending on the LET; for helium, the α/β value was 1.52, similar to values for X rays

  8. Distance distribution of bystander effects in alpha-particle irradiated cell populations using a CR-39-based culture dish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, S.; Pusset, D.; Toledo, S.M. de; Azzam, E.I.; Fromm, M.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of induced biological effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells is known to occur in cell cultures exposed to low fluences of charged particles. These bystander effects are currently investigated using microbeam or non-microbeam (broad beams) irradiation techniques. Identification of the targeted and non-targeted bystander cells is critical to our understanding of mechanisms underlying such effects. We developed a novel cell culture dish where the base consists of a thin CR-39 sheet grafted on a thin polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foil. The validity of this device in identifying not only irradiated cells, but also the cellular compartment traversed by the particle track is described. We have optimized track etch parameters that do not interfere with measurement of induced biological endpoints under normal incident irradiation. Thus the culture dishes can be used to determine distance distributions for the propagation of induced biological effects from a hit cell to bystander cells. We describe the computer code developed to determine the distance distributions of propagated biological stress responses in normal human fibroblast cells exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

  9. Human fibroblast strain with normal survival but abnormal postreplication repair after ultraviolet light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniger, J.; Barrett, S.F.; Robbins, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Postreplication repair has been studied in ultraviolet light (UV-irradiated) fibroblast strains derived from eight apparently normal control donors and seven xeroderma pigmentosum patients. One control donor strain had an intermediate defect in postreplication repair similar to that in excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. However, unlike the xeroderma pigmentosum strains, this control donor strain had normal UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis and normal survival after irradiation with UV. This unique fibroblast strain should be useful in studies designed to elucidate the possible role of postreplication repair in UV-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis

  10. Cell survival of human tumor cells compared with normal fibroblasts following 60Co gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Henning, C.B.; Reynolds, S.D.; Holmblad, G.L.; Trier, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Three tumor cell lines, two of which were shown to be HeLa cells, were irradiated with 60 Co gamma irradiation, together with two cell cultures of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Cell survival was studied in three different experiments over a dose range of 2 to 14 gray. All the tumor cell lines showed a very wide shoulder in the dose response curves in contrast to the extremely narrow shoulder of the normal fibroblasts. In addition, the D/sub o/ values for the tumor cell lines were somewhat greater. These two characteristics of the dose response curves resulted in up to 2 orders of magnitude less sensitivity for cell inactivation of HeLa cells when compared with normal cells at high doses (10 gray). Because of these large differences, the extrapolation of results from the irradiation of HeLa cells concerning the mechanisms of normal cell killing should be interpreted with great caution

  11. Comparison of recovery in the rat lens epithelium after x-ray, fission neutron, or /sup 56/Fe particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, E.F.; Lindgren, A.L.; Ainsworth, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are comparing the radiobiological effectiveness of 10 Gy (1000 rads) of 250 kVp X-rays, 2 Gy (200 rads) of fission neutrons, and 1.5 Gy (150 rds) of 600 MeV /sup 56/Fe particles (LET about 180-200 keV/μm). They are evaluating the persistence of latent radiation damage and the very slow recovery (> 1 month) in cells of the central zone of the rat lens epithelium. The central zone is essentially a G/sub o/ population of cells (1 mitotic figure per 2000 cells). These cells normally respond to the mitogenic stimulus of wounding with a ''burst'' of DNA synthesis at 14 hours and a ''burst'' of mitosis at 24 hours after wounding. Irradiation before wounding causes a delay and suppression of the response. With increasing time between irradiation and wounding, the authors note less delay and less suppression of the response. They also note fewer abnormal mitotic figures. For example, at 28 days the X-irradiated, neutron irradiated, and iron irradiated cells developed respectively, 39%, 36%, and 21% fewer abnormal mitotic figures than at 7 days post-irradiation. Slower recovery after /sup 56/Fe particle irradiation is indicated. They are now comparing the amounts of delay and suppression of the responses after exposure to the different radiations

  12. Effects of low dose irradiation on NK activity of normal individuals and patients with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hailin; Su Liaoyuan

    1994-10-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on NK activity of lymphocytes and on K 562 cells were studied. The NK activity was determined by means of 3 H-TdR release assay. While 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to reflect functional changes of K 562 cells after low dose irradiation. 21 patients with cancer and 10 normal individuals were detected. The results indicated that the NK activity of lymphocytes in normal individuals increased significantly after 10 and 50 cGy γ-ray irradiation, while in patients with cancer the NK activity of lymphocytes increased only at the dose of 50 cGy irradiation. The increase of NK activity in normal individuals was higher than that in patients with cancer after same doses of irradiation. When K 562 cells were irradiated by 10 cGy γ-rays, the 3 H-TdR incorporation value increased. After exposed to over 50 cGy the stimulating effect disappeared

  13. Enhanced reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated adenovirus in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.B.; Rainbow, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    UV-enhanced reactivation (UVER) and UV-enhanced mutagenesis (UVEM) for two adenovirus temperature-sensitive mutants were examined following the infection of normal human fibroblasts. UV-irradiation of the virus alone resulted in dose-dependent increase in the UV-induced reversion frequency (RF) of viral progeny and a dose-dependent exponential decrease in progeny survival, when infecting non-irradiated cells. Analysis of the slopes of the UV-induced reversion curves suggested that 2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.4 ± 0.5 'hits' were required to produce a targeted reversion event among the viral progeny of Ad5ts36 and Ad5ts125 respectively. UV-irradiation of cells 24 h prior to infection resulted in a significant increase in progeny survival for UV-irradiated virus (UVER factor = 3.4 ± 0.8) concomitant with a significant increase in RF for UV-irradiated virus (targeted increase = 1.9 ± 0.3). The UV-induced RF per lethal hit to the virus was also significantly greater in UV-irradiated compared with non-irradiated cells. These results are consistent with the existence of a UV-inducible error-prone DNA repair mechanism in normal human cells. (author)

  14. Serum protein concentration in low-dose total body irradiation of normal and malnourished rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, W.C.M.; Lambertz, D.; Borges, E.S.; Neto, A.M.O.; Lambertz, K.M.F.T.; Amaral, A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the radiotherapeutics' modalities, total body irradiation (TBI) is used as treatment for certain hematological, oncological and immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose TBI on plasma concentration of total protein and albumin using prematurely and undernourished rats as animal model. For this, four groups with 9 animals each were formed: Normal nourished (N); Malnourished (M); Irradiated Normal nourished (IN); Irradiated Malnourished (IM). At the age of 28 days, rats of the IN and IM groups underwent total body gamma irradiation with a source of cobalt-60. Total protein and Albumin in the blood serum was quantified by colorimetry. This research indicates that procedures involving low-dose total body irradiation in children have repercussions in the reduction in body-mass as well as in the plasma levels of total protein and albumin. Our findings reinforce the periodic monitoring of total serum protein and albumin levels as an important tool in long-term follow-up of pediatric patients in treatments associated to total body irradiation. - Highlights: • Low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) in children have repercussions in their body-mass. • Long-term total protein and albumin levels are affected by TBI. • The monitoring of total protein and albumin levels are useful in the follow-up of TBI pediatric patients.

  15. Influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, T.P.W.; Law, Y.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Tse, A.K.W.; Fong, W.F. [Research and Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Baptist University Road, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the influence of Magnolol on the bystander effect in alpha-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined. The bystander effect was studied through medium transfer experiments. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was performed to quantify the chromosome damage induced by alpha-particle irradiation. Our results showed that the alpha-particle induced micronuclei (MN) frequencies were suppressed with the presence of Magnolol.

  16. Early radiation changes of normal dog brain following internal and external brain irradiation: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, H.; Maruyama, Y.; Markesbery, W.; Goldstein, S.; Wang, P.; Tibbs, P.; Young, B.; Feola, J.; Beach, L.

    1984-01-01

    To examine radiation-induced changes in the normal brain, internal or external radiation was given to normal dog brain. Seven medium-sized dogs were used in this study. Two dogs were controls and an ice-pick (plastic implant applicator) was placed in the right frontal lobe for about 5 hours but no irradiation. Two dogs underwent Cs-137 brain implantation for 4 and 5 hours, respectively using an ice-pick technique. Two dogs were given internal neutron irradiation using the same technique of intracerebral ice-pick brachytherapy. One dog received an external photon irradiation using 6-Mev Linear Accelerator. Postmortem microscopic examination was made to study the early cerebral changes to irradiation in three dogs: one control with no irradiation; one received intracerebral Cesium implantation; and one external photon irradiation. Vascular change was the most prominent microscopic finding. There were hemorrhage, endothelial proliferation and fibrinoid changes of small vessel wall. Most of the changes were localized in the white matter and the cortex remained intact. Details (CT, NMR and histological studies) are discussed

  17. Effect of 60Co-irradiation on normal and low protein diet fed rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, S.S.; Habibullah, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of whole-body irradiation (Co-60) on the brain tissue in Holtzmann strain adult male rats was studied. Two doses of irradiation (450 R,950 R) were tried on animals which were fed on normal as well as low protein diets over a period of 10 generations. In the normal rats, 450 R initially caused a lowered total protein. DNA and RNA content in the brain. After 7 days a tendency towards normalcy was observed. In the 950 R irradiated normal rats the diminution of protein content appeared irreversible. In malnourished 450 R irradiated rats, the protein content rose less steeply over the 7 days of observation. A higher dose of 950 R enhanced this effect on protein and also lowered the DNA content on day 5. The RNA content in the 950 R group with malnutrition showed a marked increase towards or beyond control perhaps as an expression of uncoupled feedback control. The paper gives evidence that protein deficiency may interfere with cellular regeneration in irradiated brain. (orig.) [de

  18. Effect of /sup 60/Co-irradiation on normal and low protein diet fed rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, S S [Garhwal Univ., Srinagar, Uttar Pradesh (India). Dept. of Zoology; Habibullah, M [Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India). Neurobiology Lab.

    1980-06-01

    The effect of whole-body irradiation (Co-60) on the brain tissue in Holtzmann strain adult male rats was studied. Two doses of irradiation (450 R,950 R) were tried on animals which were fed on normal as well as low protein diets over a period of 10 generations. In the normal rats, 450 R initially caused a lowered total protein. DNA and RNA content in the brain. After 7 days a tendency towards normalcy was observed. In the 950 R irradiated normal rats the diminution of protein content appeared irreversible. In malnourished 450 R irradiated rats, the protein content rose less steeply over the 7 days of observation. A higher dose of 950 R enhanced this effect on protein and also lowered the DNA content on day 5. The RNA content in the 950 R group with malnutrition showed a marked increase towards or beyond control perhaps as an expression of uncoupled feedback control. The paper gives evidence that protein deficiency may interfere with cellular regeneration in irradiated brain.

  19. Irradiation of blood by 238Pu alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Culver, G.G.; Gillis, M.F.; Ragan, H.A.

    1976-01-01

    A developmental 238 Pu blood irradiator produced no evidence of lymphopenia in a dog. Irradiation continued for a year at an estimated rate of about 100 rads/day, but this dosimetry is highly uncertain

  20. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Single-Particle Subcellular Irradiations at the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube

  1. Effects of heavy particle irradiation on central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Kumie; Liu Cuihua; Nagaoka, Shunji

    2003-01-01

    Effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to central nervous system were studied using mouse neonatal brain cells in culture exposed to heavy ions and X ray at fifth days of the culture. The subsequent biological effects were evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and the survivability of neurons focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains with different genetic types, and linear energy transfer (LET) of the different nucleons. Of the three mouse strains tested, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), B6 and C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive and C3H the least sensitive to both X-ray and carbon ion (290 MeV/n) when compared by 10% apoptotic induction. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID cells exposing to different ions, (X, C, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed at higher dose than 1 Gy, an enhancement was observed in the high LET region and at lower dose than 0.5 Gy. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. Memory and learning function of adult mice were studied using water maze test after localized carbon- or iron-ion irradiation to hippocampus area. (author)

  2. Secondary particle tracks generated by ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    The Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is a powerful complementary tool to include the effect of low energy electrons and positrons in medical applications of radiation. In particular, for ion-beam cancer treatments provides a detailed description of the role of the secondary electrons abundantly generated around the Bragg peak as well as the possibility of using transmuted positron emitters (C11, O15) as a complement for ion-beam dosimetry. In this study we present interaction probability data derived from IAM-SCAR corrective factors for liquid environments. Using these data, single electron and positron tracks in liquid water and pyrimidine have been simulated providing information about energy deposition as well as the number and type of interactions taking place in any selected ``nanovolume'' of the irradiated area. In collaboration with Francisco Blanco, Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Antonio Mu noz, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas and Diogo Almeida, Filipe Ferreira da Silva, Paulo Lim ao-Vieira, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Supported by the Spanish and Portuguese governments.

  3. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  4. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin; Ong, Mei Fang; Lipp, Peter; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID -/- homozygous, ATM -/- homozygous, ATM +/- heterozygous, and ATM +/+ wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating γH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID -/- and ATM -/- homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM +/- heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical

  5. Bystander effect of alpha-particle irradiation on mutagenicity and its associated mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ying; Yang Zhihua; Cao Zhenshan; Fan Feiyue; Zhu Maoxiang

    2004-01-01

    The work is to investigate α-particle irradiation-induced bystander effects on the mutagenicity in human chromosome 11 in the human-hamster hybrid (A L cells) and its possible mechanism. A L cells were used for assaying mutation rates of human chromosome 11 through screening mutants in the presence of anti-CD59 surface antigen antibody (S1) and complement. A grid was interposed between α-particle source and the cells being irradiated, so as to fix proportion of the irradiated cells (15%) and the bystander effects on the mutagenicity were detected. Free radical scavenger DMSO and intercellular communication inhibitor Lindane were selected to investigate the potential mechanism of α-particle induced bystander effect. There was clear dose-dependent relationship between mutation rate and the dose of alpha particle radiation. However, the mutant fractions of cell population shielded by the grid in α-particle irradiation system were much higher than the expected levels of irradiated cells. Lindane, but not DMSO, could obviously decrease this bystander effect induced by α-particle irradiation. Alpha-particle irradiation can induce bystander effect on the mutagenicity, in which intercellular communication may play important roles

  6. The semiconductor doping with radiation defects via proton and alpha-particle irradiation. Review

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V A

    2001-01-01

    Paper presents an analytical review devoted to semiconductor doping with radiation defects resulted from irradiation by light ions, in particular, by protons and alpha-particles. One studies formation of radiation defects in silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide under light ion irradiation. One analyzes effect of proton and alpha-particle irradiation on electric conductivity of the above-listed semiconducting materials. Semiconductor doping with radiation defects under light ion irradiation enables to control their electrophysical properties and to design high-speed opto-, micro- and nanoelectronic devices on their basis

  7. SILICON CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARY DISTRIBUTIONS, IRRADIATION CONDITIONS, AND SILVER RETENTION IN IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.; Aguiar, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope was used to map grain orientation and ultimately determine grain boundary misorientation angle distributions, relative fractions of grain boundary types (random high angle, low angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related boundaries) and the distributions of CSL-related grain boundaries in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO-coated fuel particles. Two particles from the AGR-1 experiment exhibiting high Ag-110m retention (>80%) were compared to a particle exhibiting low Ag-110m retention (<19%). Irradiated particles with high Ag-110m retention exhibited a lower fraction of random, high angle grain boundaries compared to the low Ag-110m retention particle. An inverse relationship between the random, high angle grain boundary fraction and Ag-110m retention is found and is consistent with grain boundary percolation theory. Also, comparison of the grain boundary distributions with previously reported unirradiated grain boundary distributions, based on SEM-based EBSD for similarly fabricated particles, showed only small differences, i.e. a greater low angle grain boundary fraction in unirradiated SiC. It was, thus, concluded that SiC layers with grain boundary distributions susceptible to Ag-110m release were present prior to irradiation. Finally, irradiation parameters were found to have little effect on the association of fission product precipitates with specific grain boundary types.

  8. A normalization of the physical tests for external irradiation measuring detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    This report is the result of a normalization work, realized within the Radioprotection Services of the C.E.A., of the physical tests for detectors measuring external irradiation. Among the various tests mentionned are treated more in details, calibration and the establishment of the relative spectral response. As far as calibration is concerned, the normalization refers to: the reference detector, the reference radiation source, the installation and calibration procedure. As for the relative spectral response the normalization refers to: the reference detector, the radiation sources to be used. Finally, a chapter is consecrated to the high flux detectors and to those for pulsed electromagnetic radiations [fr

  9. Expression of UV-irradiated adenovirus in normal and UV-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants UV-20, UV-24, and UV-41 are abnormally sensitive to UV and harbour various defects lin their ability to repair cellular DNA. This study has examined the expression of UV-irradiated AD2 in these cells. HCR of UV-irradiated Ad2, as measured by viral structural antigen (Vag) formation or progeny production, was found to be similar for the normal and the UV-sensitive CHO strains. UV-irradiation of Ad2 (1200 J/m/sup 2/) resulted in a delay of Vag expression of 18 hours in normal human fibroblasts, which is thought to reflect the time required for removal of UV-induced lesions from the DNA before viral DNA synthesis can proceed. However, a similar UV-irradiation of Ad2 did not result in a delay of Vag expression for infection of CHO cells, suggesting that UV-induced lesions in Ad2 DNA do not inhibit its replication in CHO cells. These results indicate a fundamental difference in the processing of UV-irradiated AD2-DNA in CHO as compared to human cells

  10. Studies of treatment for carcinoma by particle irradiation combined with surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunemoto, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    Studies of particle radiation therapy for cancer showed that osteosarcoma, Pancoast carcinoma of the lung, fixed metastatic cervical tumors responded well to fast neutron therapy. Head and neck cancer, esophagus cancer, cancer of the urinary tracts, malignant glioma, malignant melanoma, and soft tissue sarcoma responded to fast neutron therapy as well as conventional radiation therapy. Cancer of the tissues with low sensitivity for low LET beams responded very well to fast neutron therapy. The tolerant dose of fast neutron of the normal tissues, especially the skin, was estimated in order to perform salvage operation safely. No complication due to preoperative fast neutron irradiation was found in the cases of esophagus cancer, which may cause increase in survival rate. Proton beam therapy was promising as a procedure to be substituted partially for surgical operation and as a therapy combined with fast neutron therapy. (Ueda, J.)

  11. ALK1 heterozygosity delays development of late normal tissue damage in the irradiated mouse kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Floot, Ben; Korlaar, Regina; Russell, Nicola S.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor, which is mainly expressed in endothelial cells regulating proliferation and migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Endothelial cells also express the co-receptor endoglin, which modulates ALK1 effects on endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that mice with reduced endoglin levels develop less irradiation-induced vascular damage and fibrosis, caused by an impaired inflammatory response. This study was aimed at investigating the role of ALK1 in late radiation toxicity. Material and Methods: Kidneys of ALK +/+ and ALK1 +/- mice were irradiated with 14 Gy. Mice were sacrificed at 10, 20, and 30 weeks after irradiation and gene expression and protein levels were analyzed. Results: Compared to wild type littermates, ALK1 +/- mice developed less inflammation and fibrosis at 20 weeks after irradiation, but displayed an increase in pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic gene expression at 30 weeks. In addition, ALK1 +/- mice showed superior vascular integrity at 10 and 20 weeks after irradiation which deteriorated at 30 weeks coinciding with changes in the VEGF pathway. Conclusions: ALK1 +/- mice develop a delayed normal tissue response by modulating the inflammatory response and growth factor expression after irradiation.

  12. Superconducting and normal state properties of carbon doped and neutron irradiated MgB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, R.H.T.; Samuely, P.; Szabo, P.; Holanova, Z.; Bud'ko, S.L.; Canfield, P.C.; Finnemore, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    Current research in MgB 2 focuses on the effects various types of perturbations have on the superconducting properties of this novel two-gap superconductor. In this article we summarize the effects of carbon doping and neutron irradiation in bulk MgB 2 . Low levels of carbon doping and light neutron irradiation result in significant enhancements in H c2 . At high fluences, where superconductivity is nearly fully suppressed, superconductivity can be restored through post exposure annealing. However, this results in a change in the interdependencies of the normal state and superconducting properties (ρ 0 , T c , H c2 ), with little or no enhancement in H c2

  13. Expression profiles are different in carbon ion-irradiated normal human fibroblasts and their bystander cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwakawa, Mayumi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Imadome, Kaori; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Testuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Imai, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that ionizing radiation induces biological effects in non-irradiated bystander cells having received signals from directly irradiated cells; however, energetic heavy ion-induced bystander response is incompletely characterized. Here we performed microarray analysis of irradiated and bystander fibroblasts in confluent cultures. To see the effects in bystander cells, each of 1, 5 and 25 sites was targeted with 10 particles of carbon ions (18.3 MeV/u, 103 keV/μm) using microbeams, where particles traversed 0.00026, 0.0013 and 0.0066% of cells, respectively. diated cells, cultures were exposed to 10% survival dose (D), 0.1D and 0.01D of corresponding broadbeams (108 keV/μm). Irrespective of the target numbers (1, 5 or 25 sites) and the time (2 or 6 h postirradiation), similar expression changes were observed in bystander cells. Among 874 probes that showed more than 1.5-fold changes in bystander cells, 25% were upregulated and the remainder downregulated. These included genes related to cell communication (PIK3C2A, GNA13, FN1, ANXA1 and IL1RAP), stress response (RAD23B, ATF4 and EIF2AK4) and cell cycle (MYCN, RBBP4 and NEUROG1). Pathway analysis revealed serial bystander activation of G protein/PI-3 kinase pathways. Instead, genes related to cell cycle or death (CDKN1A, GADD45A, NOTCH1 and BCL2L1), and cell communication (IL1B, TCF7 and ID1) were upregulated in irradiated cells, but not in bystander cells. Our results indicate different expression profiles in irradiated and bystander cells, and imply that intercellular signaling between irradiated and bystander cells activate intracellular signaling, leading to the transcriptional stress response in bystander cells

  14. Standard Practice for Measurement of Mechanical Properties During Charged-Particle Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the performance of mechanical tests on materials being irradiated with charged particles. These tests are designed to simulate or provide understanding of, or both, the mechanical behavior of materials during exposure to neutron irradiation. Practices are described that govern the test material, the particle beam, the experimental technique, and the damage calculations. Reference should be made to other ASTM standards, especially Practice E 521. Procedures are described that are applicable to creep and creep rupture tests made in tension and torsion test modes. 1.2 The word simulation is used here in a broad sense to imply an approximation of the relevant neutron irradiation environment. The degree of conformity can range from poor to nearly exact. The intent is to produce a correspondence between one or more aspects of the neutron and charged particle irradiations such that fundamental relationships are established between irradiation or material parameters and the material respons...

  15. Application of normal form methods to the analysis of resonances in particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The transformation to normal form in a Lie-algebraic framework provides a very powerful method for identifying and analysing non-linear behaviour and resonances in particle accelerators. The basic ideas are presented and illustrated. (author). 4 refs

  16. Scanning of irradiated silicon detectors using $\\alpha$ particles and low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G L; Glaser, M; Kohout, Z; Konícek, J; Lemeilleur, F; Leroy, C; Linhart, V; Mares, J J; Pospísil, S; Roy, P; Sopko, B; Sinor, M; Svejda, J; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    In a spectroscopic study of non-irradiated and proton-irradiated silicon diodes, the detectors were illuminated from the front side and from the rear side by various alpha particle sources (mainly ThC') and by monoenergetic protons with energies from 1.0 to 2.5~MeV. Their response characteristics have been studied as a function of the incoming particle energy and the applied bias voltage. The charge collection efficiency was determined as a function of fluence

  17. Quasi-particle lifetime broadening in normal-superconductor junctions with UPt3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deWilde, Y; Klapwijk, TM; Jansen, AGM; Heil, J; Wyder, P

    For the Andreev-reflection process of quasi-particles at a normal-metal-superconductor interface the influence of lifetime broadening of the quasi-particles on the current-voltage characteristics of NS point contacts is analyzed along the lines of the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk model. The anomalous

  18. Characterization of Ninjurin and TSC22 induction after X-irradiation of normal human skin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Manabu; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Koike, Aki

    2008-01-01

    The skin is an external organ that is most frequently exposed to radiation. It is important to elucidate the influence of radiation exposure on the skin at the molecular level. To identify radiation-responsive genes in human skin cells, we used microarray technology to examine the effects of irradiation on 641 genes in normal human epidermal keratinocytes at 4 h and 8 h postirradiation with a cytotoxic dose of X-ray (10 Gy). We found that 18 genes were upregulated and 35 genes were downregulated in keratinocytes at 4 h and/or 8 h postirradiation. Ninjurin, whose function remains unknown in keratinocytes, was induced most strongly by X-irradiation. Several known apoptosis-related genes, such as TSC22, were also upregulated. We characterized Ninjurin and TSC22 induction after X-irradiation of normal human skin cells. The induction of the expression of Ninjurin and TSC22 mRNA in keratinocytes following high-dose X-irradiation was confirmed by northern blot analysis. In dermal fibroblasts, Ninjurin, but not TSC22, was induced after X-ray irradiation. The dependence of both gene expression on the status of an apoptosis regulator, p53, was found. In addition, the expression of both mRNA was induced upon treatment with an apoptosis inducer, etoposide. On the other hand, TSC22, but not Ninjurin, was induced and accumulated in keratinocytes upon treatment with an apoptosis inducer, anisomycin. However, in transient expression assay, EYFP-TSC22, as well as EYFP-Ninjurin or EYFP alone, did not induce apoptosis in keratinocytes in contrast to EYFP-GADD45. Taken together, these findings have important implications on the understanding of the mechanism underlying the complex response of skin cells following X-irradiation. (author)

  19. A combination of HARMONIE short time direct normal irradiance forecasts and machine learning: The #hashtdim procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastón, Martín; Fernández-Peruchena, Carlos; Körnich, Heiner; Landelius, Tomas

    2017-06-01

    The present work describes the first approach of a new procedure to forecast Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI): the #hashtdim that treats to combine ground information and Numerical Weather Predictions. The system is centered in generate predictions for the very short time. It combines the outputs from the Numerical Weather Prediction Model HARMONIE with an adaptive methodology based on Machine Learning. The DNI predictions are generated with 15-minute and hourly temporal resolutions and presents 3-hourly updates. Each update offers forecasts to the next 12 hours, the first nine hours are generated with 15-minute temporal resolution meanwhile the last three hours present hourly temporal resolution. The system is proved over a Spanish emplacement with BSRN operative station in south of Spain (PSA station). The #hashtdim has been implemented in the framework of the Direct Normal Irradiance Nowcasting methods for optimized operation of concentrating solar technologies (DNICast) project, under the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration framework.

  20. Glycogen accumulation in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, R.K.; Kaul, R.; Malhotra, N.

    1989-01-01

    Alterations induced in glycogen content and phosphorylase activity have been studied in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 30 postgrafting. The changes observed in the glycogen content and phosphorylase activity conform to the degeneration and regeneration phases of muscle repair. An attempt has been made to explain the altered glycogen utilizing capacities of the frog skeletal muscle during its repair and regeneration. (author)

  1. Natural pregnancy and normal delivery after intracapsular irradiation for symptomatic craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Takafumi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko; Miura, Masaki; Takada, Akira

    1986-01-01

    Treatment for craniopharyngioma, particularly in adults and cases of recurrence, is still fraught with problems. One difficulty is that postoperative hormonal function may be abnormal even after successful surgery. We have treated craniopharyngioma primarily with simple evacuation and intracapsular irradiation, using 198 Au-colloid. Only a few cases of natural pregnancy and normal delivery following treatment for craniopharyngioma with hypothalamic extension have been reported. We will describe and discuss a case in which natural pregnancy and normal delivery occurred twice after such treatment. (author)

  2. Palatal shelf epithelium: a morphologic and histochemical study in X-irradiated and normal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartner, L.P.; Hiatt, J.L.; Provenza, D.V.

    1978-01-01

    The palatal shelf epithelium of normal and irradiated mice was examined morphologically and histochemically, utilizing the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) technique for the demonstration of the basement membrane and the Nitro BT method for succinate dehydrogenase activity in order to demonstrate the metabolic competence of its cells. The 'programmed cell death theory' was not supported by the present investigation, since the cells of the medial ridge epithelium retained their structural and metabolic integrity even subsequent to the formation of cell nests. Additionally, the medial ridge epithelium of mice with radiation-induced cleft palates demonstrated normal structural and metabolic integrity long past the prospective time of fusion. (author)

  3. Natural pregnancy and normal delivery after intracapsular irradiation for symptomatic craniopharyngioma. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Takafumi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko; Miura, Masaki; Takada, Akira

    1986-01-01

    Treatment for craniopharyngioma, particularly in adults and cases of recurrence, is still fraught with problems. One difficulty is that postoperative hormonal function may be abnormal even after successful surgery. We have treated craniopharyngioma primarily with simple evacuation and intracapsular irradiation, using /sup 198/Au-colloid. Only a few cases of natural pregnancy and normal delivery following treatment for craniopharyngioma with hypothalamic extension have been reported. We will describe and discuss a case in which natural pregnancy and normal delivery occurred twice after such treatment.

  4. Effect of ion beam irradiation on metal particle doped polymer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and converts polymeric structure into hydrogen depleted carbon network. ... Composite materials; ion beam irradiation; dielectric properties; X-ray diffraction. ..... Coat. Technol. 201 8225. Raja V, Sharma A K and Narasimha V V R 2004 Mater.

  5. The radiobiology of laser-driven particle beams: focus on sub-lethal responses of normal human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manti, L.; Perozziello, F.M.; Romagnani, L.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Candiano, G.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Leanza, R.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Chaudhary, P.; Gwynne, D.; Prise, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated proton beams have become increasingly common for treating cancer. The need for cost and size reduction of particle accelerating machines has led to the pioneering investigation of optical ion acceleration techniques based on laser-plasma interactions as a possible alternative. Laser-matter interaction can produce extremely pulsed particle bursts of ultra-high dose rates (≥ 10 9 Gy/s), largely exceeding those currently used in conventional proton therapy. Since biological effects of ionizing radiation are strongly affected by the spatio-temporal distribution of DNA-damaging events, the unprecedented physical features of such beams may modify cellular and tissue radiosensitivity to unexplored extents. Hence, clinical applications of laser-generated particles need thorough assessment of their radiobiological effectiveness. To date, the majority of studies have either used rodent cell lines or have focussed on cancer cell killing being local tumour control the main objective of radiotherapy. Conversely, very little data exist on sub-lethal cellular effects, of relevance to normal tissue integrity and secondary cancers, such as premature cellular senescence. Here, we discuss ultra-high dose rate radiobiology and present preliminary data obtained in normal human cells following irradiation by laser-accelerated protons at the LULI PICO2000 facility at Laser Lab Europe, France.

  6. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S H; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-29

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  7. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  8. EPR and UV spectrometry investigation of sucrose irradiated with carbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakirova, Yordanka; Yordanov, Nicola D.

    2010-01-01

    Solid state/EPR (SS/EPR) dosimeters of carbon ions irradiated sucrose are studied with EPR, and their water solutions - with UV spectroscopy. Doses between 20 and 200 Gy are used with linear energy transfer (LET) values for carbon ions of 63, 77, 96 and 230 keV μm -1 . After irradiation all samples show typical for irradiated sucrose EPR and UV spectra. The obtained data are compared with those previously reported for nitrogen particles and gamma rays irradiated sucrose. The identical shape of both the EPR and UV spectra of irradiated with various type radiation samples suggests that generated free radicals are not influenced by the nature of radiation. The lack of difference in the line width of the separate lines or the whole EPR spectrum, obtained for gamma and heavy particles irradiation, suggests negligible spin-spin interaction among the radiation-generated free radicals in the samples. The linear dependence of the EPR response on the absorbed dose radiation is found to be higher when generated by gamma rays, than by the same absorbed dose of heavy particles. In addition, the EPR response for carbon ions is higher than that for nitrogen ions. Water solutions of irradiated sucrose exhibit UV spectrum with absorption maximum at 267 nm, attributed to the recombination products of free radicals. The UV band intensity depends on the absorbed dose radiation. The UV spectra obtained for carbon, nitrogen and gamma rays irradiated sucrose are also compared.

  9. Effects of gamma irradiation and silver nano particles on microbiological characteristics of saffron, using hurdle technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid Sales, E; Motamedi Sedeh, F; Rajabifar, S

    2012-03-01

    Saffron, a plant from the Iridaceae family, is the world's most expensive spice. Gamma irradiation and silver nano particles whose uses are gradually increasing worldwide, have positive effects on preventing decay by sterilizing the microorganisms and by improving the safety without compromising the nutritional properties and sensory quality of the foods. In the present study combination effects of gamma irradiation and silver nano particles packaging on the microbial contamination of saffron were considered during storage. A combination of hurdles can ensure stability and microbial safety of foods. For this purpose, saffron samples were packaged by Poly Ethylene films that posses up to 300 ppm nano silver particles as antimicrobial agents and then irradiated in cobalt-60 irradiator (gamma cell PX30, dose rate 0.55 Gry/Sec) to 0, 1, 2,3 and 4 kGy at room temperature. The antimicrobial activities against Total Aerobic Mesophilic Bacteria, Entrobacteriace, Escherichia Coli and Clostridium Perfringines were higher in the irradiated samples, demonstrating the inhibition zone for their growth. Irradiation of the saffron samples packaged by Poly Ethylene films with nano silver particles showed the best results for decreasing microbial contamination at 2 kGy and for Poly Ethylene films without silver nano particles; it was 4 kGy.

  10. Formation of fine solid particles from aqueous solutions of sodium chloropalladate by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, Motoyoshi; Fujita, Iwao; Korekawa, Kei-ichi.

    1994-10-01

    Studies have been carried out on the radiation chemical formation of palladium fine particles in argon saturated aqueous solutions of sodium chloropalladate without organic stabilizer. The solutions were irradiated with gamma-rays from a cobalt gamma-ray source and the irradiated solutions were subjected to the dynamic light scattering analysis for the particle diameter measurements, and to the UV-visible optical absorption spectroscopy for the measurements of turbidity (absorption at 700 nm) and remaining chloropalladate ion concentrations in the solution. In the solution of pH = 1.95 by HCl, the turbidity increased after the irradiation and then decreased with time. The concentration of remaining palladate ion in the solution decreased by the irradiation, but it gradually increased with time after the irradiation. These phenomena were qualitatively explained by the reaction scheme in that a precursor to the solid particles still exists in the solution after the irradiation was terminated, and that intermediates including the precursor reacted with chloride ion to re-form chloropalladate ions. The average diameter of the particles after the irradiation was ca. 20 nm and it increased with time to 40 nm at 2.75 kGy, and to 80 nm at 8.25 kGy absorption of radiation. The solution of pH = 0.65 by HCl was found to give lower yields of particles than those observed for the solution of pH = 1.95, and to give the particles of diameters about 150-200 nm. In the solution containing HClO 4 instead of HCl, palladium particles were also formed by the irradiation, whereas no backward reaction after the irradiation was observed due to the low concentration of chloride ion in the solution. The average diameter of the particles after the irradiation was about 300 nm and increased with time after the irradiation to a final values which was found to depend on pH of the solution and dose. (author)

  11. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  12. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  13. Structural transformations in PbSe films irradiated by α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freik, D.M.; Ostapchuk, A.I.; Ogorodnik, Ya.V.; Shkol'nyj, A.K.; Mezhilovskaya, L.I.

    1990-01-01

    Structural changes in PbSe epitaxial layers irradiated by 5 MeV alpha-particles in integral flux of 2x10 12 cm -2 are investigated. It is ascertained that irradiation by alpha-particles can be successfully used as a technological factor dfor directed change of lead selenide properties. Radiation treatment by alpha-particle of epitaxial layers by the doses of ∼ 10 12 cm -2 results in the dispersion of their structure up to polycrystal phase formation. Irradiation by alpha-particles causes donor effect leading to a decrease in hole concentration and to the growth of electronic constituent of conductivity and to the conductivity inversion from p- for n-type

  14. Radiogenic responses of normal cells induced by fractionated irradiation -a simulation study. Pt. 2. Late responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.; Ulmer, W.; Ginsberg, T.; Kikhounga-N'Got, O.; Saile, C.

    1995-01-01

    Based on controlled theory, a computed simulation model has been constructed which describes the time course of slowly responding normal cells after irradiation exposure. Subsequently, different clinical irradiation schemes are compared in regard to their delayed radiogenic responses referred to as late effects in radiological terminology. A cybernetic model of a paraenchymal tissue consisting of dominantly resting functional cells has been developed and transferred into a computer model. The radiation effects are considered by characteristic cell parameters as well as by the linear-quadratic model. Three kinds of tissue (brain and lung parenchym of the mouse, liver parenchym of rat) have been irradiated in the model according to standard-, super-, hyperfractionation and a single high dose per week. The simulation studies indicate that the late reaction of brain parenchym to hyperfractionation (3 x 1.5 Gy per day) and of lung parenchym tissue with regard to all fractionation schemes applied is particularly severe. The behavior of liver parenchym is not unique. A comparison of the simulation results basing to the survival of cell numbers with clinical experience and practice shows that the clinical reality can qualitatively be represented by the model. This opens the door for connecting side effects to normal tissue with the corresponding tumor efficacy (discussed in previous papers). The model is open to further refinement and to discussions referring to the phenomenon of late effects. (orig.) [de

  15. PIE on Safety-Tested Loose Particles from Irradiated Compact 4-4-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Morris, Robert Noel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baldwin, Charles A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Fred C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed in support of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). This work is sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) through the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Office under the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program. The AGR-1 experiment was the first in a series of TRISO fuel irradiation tests initiated in 2006. The AGR-1 TRISO particles and fuel compacts were fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006 using laboratory-scale equipment and irradiated for 3 years in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate and evaluate fuel performance under HTGR irradiation conditions. Post-irradiation examination was performed at INL and ORNL to study how the fuel behaved during irradiation, and to test fuel performance during exposure to elevated temperatures at or above temperatures that could occur during a depressurized conduction cooldown event. This report summarizes safety testing and post-safety testing PIE conducted at ORNL on loose particles extracted from irradiated AGR-1 Compact 4-4-2.

  16. In vitro radiation response studies on bone marrow fibroblasts (CFU-F) obtained from normal and chronically irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.K.; Stitzel, K.A.; Greenberg, B.; Woo, L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation resistance of bone marrow fibroblasts as measured by their proliferative potential was evaluated in chronically irradiated dogs. Bone marrows were obtained from eight dogs that had been chronically irradiated beginning at 21 days of gestation or after birth and eight age-matched controls. Of these irradiated dogs, four were either preleukemic or exhibited frank acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The other four were clinically normal but demonstrated abnormalities in their marrow that could be attributed to radiation effects and/or other pathologic changes. Fibroblasts from six of the irradiated dogs were significantly more radioresistant than those of their controls. Five of these six dogs subsequently succumbed to hematopathologic disease, while the two irradiated dogs with normal fibroblasts remained clinically normal, suggesting that this observed radioresistance may be linked to the disease process. (author)

  17. Manual for target thickness measurement by alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, J.F.; Martins, M.N.

    1990-04-01

    A system is described for thin-target thickness measurement through the alpha particle energy loss when them traverse the target. It is also described the program used in the analysis of the target thickness. (L.C.) [pt

  18. Impact of electron irradiation on particle track etching response in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    energy by an ionizing particle traversing a material medium. When the ... Their amorphous nature and radiation sensitivity further ... The samples were washed thoroughly in lukewarm soap solution to avoid non-uniformity in etching due to ...

  19. Immunological investigations of antigens released by normal and irradiated schistosomasa mansoni cercariae in vitro. Part of a coordinated programme on preparation of irradiated vaccines against some human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catty, D.

    1982-07-01

    S.mansoni cercariae were γ-irradiated at 1-15 K rads, syringe transformed, and injected into groups of 20 mice (200 dose), with unirradiated controls. Aliquots of 1,500 cercariae irradiated at 1-40 K rads (plus unirradiated controls) were cultured in serum-free medium. It was found that irradiation does not inhibit release of a broad spectrum of antigens in culture over 6 hours until 20 K rads is delivered. Mice used as hosts for the graded cercarial irradiation vaccine were subdivided into groups of 10 and either left unchallenged or challenged at 6 weeks with a normal infection of 200 cercariae. Serum samples were taken from every mouse at regular intervals and antibodies titrated by solid phase radioimmunoassay. Injected parasites, whether irradiated or normal, always gave higher antibody titres to cercarial and egg antigens than the equivalent dose of normal (challenge) parasites infecting by the natural route. Challenge infection depressed anti-cercarial responses in mice exposed to irradiated larvae but boosted the response to normal injected parasites. Antibodies to SEA were in lower titre in all groups but rose from week 7 (1 week post-challenge) in the groups injected with normal and 1 K rad-treated parasites, where adults were previously established in the hosts. At 12 weeks all mice were sacrificed and perfused for adults. Egg yields in liver and intestine were determined. There was no evidence of protective immunity to challenge infection induced by injected unirradiated or 1 K rad-irradiated, transformed, cercariae, even though both sources of parasite gave rise to egg-laying adults. By contrast, the 5, 10 and 15 K rad vaccines gave protection of 36-49%, even though they gave rise to no persistent adults or any deposited eggs. The protective (immunising) properties of irradiation-attenuated vaccines of S.mansoni cercariae can thus be clearly correlated with their capacity to release antigens in the immediate post irradiation period

  20. Effects of α-particle beam irradiation on superconducting properties of thin film MgB2 superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Bum; Duong, Pham van; Ha, Dong Hyup; Oh, Young Hoon; Kang, Won Nam; Chai, Jong Seo [Sungkunkwan Univeversity, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seung Pyo; Kim, Ran Young [Kore Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Superconducting properties of thin film MgB2 superconductors irradiated with 45 MeV α-particle beam were studied. After the irradiation, enhancement of the critical current density and pinning force was observed, scaling close to strong pinning formula. Double logarithmic plots of the maximum pinning force density with irreversible magnetic field show a power law behavior close to carbon-doped MgB2 film or polycrystals. Variation of normalized pinning force density in the reduced magnetic field suggests scaling formulas for strong pinning mechanism like planar defects. We also observed a rapid decay of critical current density as the vortex lattice constant decreases, due to the strong interaction between vortices and increasing magnetic field.

  1. Measurement of kernel swelling and buffer densification in irradiated UCO-TRISO particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, Gordon R., E-mail: bowegr@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Ploger, Scott A.; Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830-6093 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Radiation-induced volume changes in the fuel kernels and buffer layers of UCO-TRISO particles irradiated to an average burnup of 16.1% FIMA have been determined. Measurements of particle dimensions were made on polished cross-sections of 56 irradiated particles at several different polish planes. The data were then analyzed to compute the equivalent spherical diameters of the kernels and the various coating layers, and these were compared to the average as-fabricated values to determine changes due to irradiation. The kernel volume was found to have increased by an average of 26 ± 6%. Buffer volume decreased by an average of 39 ± 2% due to densification.

  2. Proton permeability of membranes of Streptococcus faecalis and submitochondrial particles of rats after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Pinchukova, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown that at a changed, by HCl impulse, pH of Streptococcus faecalis suspension and submitochondrial liver particles (SLP) of rats, H + concentration decreases more rapidly in the irradiated bacteria and SLP than in the controls. The curves of energy dependence of accumulation of the penetrating ions were also displaced toward the alkaline zone depending on pH. These effects are suggested to be connected with an increased proton permeability of irradiated membranes

  3. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  4. Radiosensitivity of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines for Irradiation from Beta Particle-emitting Radionuclide ¹⁷⁷Lu Compared to Alpha Particles and Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Timmermand, Oskar Vilhelmsson; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitivity of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 when irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, and to compare the effect with irradiation using alpha particles or gamma rays. Cells were irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, alpha particles from (241)Am, or gamma rays from (137)Cs. A non-specific polyclonal antibody was labeled with (177)Lu and used to irradiate cells in suspension with beta particles. A previously described in-house developed alpha-particle irradiator based on a (241)Am source was used to irradiate cells with alpha particles. External gamma-ray irradiation was achieved using a standard (137)Cs irradiator. Cells were irradiated to absorbed doses equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated as mean absorbed doses. For evaluation of cell survival, the tetrazolium-based WST-1 assay was used. After irradiation, WST-1 was added to the cell solutions, incubated, and then measured for level of absorbance at 450 nm, indicating the live and viable cells. LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cell lines all had similar patterns of survival for the different radiation types. No significant difference in surviving fractions were observed between cells treated with beta-particle and gamma-ray irradiation, represented for example by the surviving fraction values (mean±SD) at 2, 6, and 10 Gy (SF2, SF6, and SF10) for DU145 after beta-particle irradiation: 0.700±0.090, 0.186±0.050 and 0.056±0.010, respectively. A strong radiosensitivity to alpha particles was observed, with SF2 values of 0.048±0.008, 0.018±0.006 and 0.015±0.005 for LNCaP, DU145, and PC3, respectively. The surviving fractions after irradiation using beta particles or gamma rays did not differ significantly at the absorbed dose levels and dose rates used. Irradiation using alpha particles led to a high level of cell killing. The results show that the beta-particle emitter

  5. Influence of catechins on bystander responses in CHO cells induced by alpha-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Y.L.; Wong, T.P.W. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)], E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2010-04-15

    In this work, we studied alpha-particle induced and medium-mediated bystander effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells through micronucleus (MN) assay. We showed that signal transduction from irradiated cells to bystander cells occur within a short time after irradiation. We then studied the effects of ROS (reactive oxygen species)-scavenging catechins in the medium before irradiation. We observed decreases in the percentage of bystander cells with MN formation and thus proved the protection effect of catechins on bystander cells from radiation.

  6. Mathematical model and computer code for coated particles performance at normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, I.; Kadarmetov, I.; Makarov, V.

    2002-01-01

    Computer modeling of thermo-mechanical behavior of coated particles during operating both at normal and off-normal conditions has a very significant role particularly on a stage of new reactors development. In Russia a big experience has been accumulated on fabrication and reactor tests of CP and fuel elements with UO 2 kernels. However, this experience cannot be using in full volume for development of a new reactor installation GT-MHR. This is due to very deep burn-up of the fuel based on plutonium oxide (up to 70% fima). Therefore the mathematical modeling of CP thermal-mechanical behavior and failure prediction becomes particularly important. The authors have a clean understanding that serviceability of fuel with high burn-ups are defined not only by thermo-mechanics, but also by structured changes in coating materials, thermodynamics of chemical processes, 'amoeba-effect', formation CO etc. In the report the first steps of development of integrate code for numerical modeling of coated particles behavior and some calculating results concerning the influence of various design parameters on fuel coated particles endurance for GT-MHR normal operating conditions are submitted. A failure model is developed to predict the fraction of TRISO-coated particles. In this model it is assumed that the failure of CP depends not only on probability of SiC-layer fracture but also on the PyC-layers damage. The coated particle is considered as a uniform design. (author)

  7. The effect of irradiation on function in self-renewing normal tissues with differing proliferative organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.; Michalowski, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The primary effect of irradiation on self-renewing normal tissues is sterilisation of their proliferative cells, but how this translates into failure of tissue function depends on the mode of organisation of the tissue concerned. It has recently been suggested (Michalowski, 1981) that proliferative normal tissues may be classed as ''hierarchical'' (like haemopoietic tissues) or as ''flexible'' (like liver parenchyma) and that radiation injury to tissue function develops by different pathways in these tissues. Mathematical model studies confirm the different radiation responses of differently organized tissues. Tissues of the ''flexible'' or ''F-type'' category display a variety of novel radiobiological properties, different from those of the more familiar ''hierarchical'' or ''H-type'' tissues. The ''F-type'' responses are strongly influenced by radiation-sterilised (''doomed'') cells, and is is suggested that the role of ''doomed'' cells has been undervalued relative to that of clonogenic survivors. Since ''F-type'' tissues have characteristically low rates of cell renewal, it is possible that these tissues are preferentially responsible for late effects of irradiation in clinical radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Increasing the temporal resolution of direct normal solar irradiance forecasted series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Peruchena, Carlos M.; Gastón, Martin; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion; Marco, Isabel Martínez; Casado-Rubio, José L.; García-Moya, José Antonio

    2017-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of the solar resource is a critical point in the design and control of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants. In particular, accurate forecasting of solar irradiance is essential for the efficient operation of solar thermal power plants, the management of energy markets, and the widespread implementation of this technology. Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are commonly used for solar radiation forecasting. In the ECMWF deterministic forecasting system, all forecast parameters are commercially available worldwide at 3-hourly intervals. Unfortunately, as Direct Normal solar Irradiance (DNI) exhibits a great variability due to the dynamic effects of passing clouds, 3-h time resolution is insufficient for accurate simulations of CSP plants due to their nonlinear response to DNI, governed by various thermal inertias due to their complex response characteristics. DNI series of hourly or sub-hourly frequency resolution are normally used for an accurate modeling and analysis of transient processes in CSP technologies. In this context, the objective of this study is to propose a methodology for generating synthetic DNI time series at 1-h (or higher) temporal resolution from 3-h DNI series. The methodology is based upon patterns as being defined with help of the clear-sky envelope approach together with a forecast of maximum DNI value, and it has been validated with high quality measured DNI data.

  9. Performance evaluation of large U-Mo particle dispersed fuel irradiated in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Oh, Seok Jin; Jang, Se Jung; Yu, Byung Ok; Lee, Choong Seong; Seo, Chul Gyo; Chae, Hee Taek; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2008-01-01

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is being developed as advanced fuel for research reactors. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been studied to evaluate its fuel performance. One of the performance limiting factors is a chemical interaction between the U-Mo particle and the Al matrix because the thermal conductivity of fuel meat is decreased with the interaction layer growth. In order to overcome the interaction problem, large-sized U-Mo particles were fabricated by controlling the centrifugal atomization conditions. The fuel performance behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel was estimated by using empirical models formulated based on the microstructural analyses of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel irradiated in HANARO reactor. Temperature histories of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of an interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of the fuel meat. When the fuel performances of the dispersion fuel rods containing U-Mo particles with various sizes were compared, fuel temperature was decreased as the average U-Mo particle size was increases. It was found that the dispersion of a larger U-Mo particle was effective for mitigating the thermal degradation which is associated with an interaction layer growth. (author)

  10. Cell survival following alpha particle irradiation: critical sites and implications for carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, E.L.; Gemmell, M.A.; Henning, C.B.; Gemmell, D.S.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    In experiments in which mammalian cells were irradiated with 5.6 MeV alpha particles from a Tandem Van de Graaff machine we have confirmed the finding of others that the mean lethal dose (D 0 ) is about 100 rad, but by measurements of the area of the cell nuclei as irradiated we found that this mean lethal dose corresponds not to 1, as expected, but to about 27 alpha particles per cell nucleus. (The exact number appears to change slightly with cell passage number.) This allows for the possibility that the direct action of alpha particles on the nucleus may be the important event in carcinogenesis, a theory which was previously difficult to accept if a single particle hitting the nucleus anywhere was considered to be lethal. Evidence is presented to implicate the nucleolus as a possible critical site for the inhibition of reproductive integrity of the cell

  11. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Sejal; Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Pandey, Badri N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy

  12. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  13. Cell Proliferation during Lymphopoiesis in the Thymus of Normal and Continuously Irradiated Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J. I. [Department of Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1968-08-15

    The patterns of lymphoid cell proliferation in the thymus and spleen in normal and continuously irradiated young C57BL mice have been examined with techniques of flash and repeated labelling with tritiated thymidine and high resolution autoradiography. Changes in percentage labelling indices and labelled mitoses data have provided information on sites and rates of lymphoid cell proliferation in the thymus cortex (reticular cells, large, medium and small lymphocytes) and the spleen white pulp (germinal centre cells, large, medium and small lymphocytes). Labelling rates were fastest in the more primitive cell forms; in both lymphoid organs, the stem-cell labelling - reticular cells and germinal centre cells - reached 100% rapidly, whereas this was not the case for the different lymphocyte populations, and thymic lymphopoiesis was more rapid than splenic lymphopoiesis. Mean cycle times for thymus lymphoid cells were {approx} 12.5 hours for reticular cells, {approx} 9.5 hours for large lymphocytes, and {approx} 10.0 hours for medium and small lymphocytes; in the spleen, representative cycle times were significantly longer. Small lymphocytes were replaced at a greater rate in the thymus than in the spleen. Under continuous {gamma}-irradiation (caesium-137) at 45 rad/day and 75 rad/day for 15 days, there was a progressive depopulation of all lymphoid cell classes, an increase in the relative proportion of the more primitive forms, and a marked decrease in the numbers of small lymphocytes in both tissues. In the thymus and in the spleen, there was an increase in proliferation rates in both stem-cell populations and in all lymphoid cell forms, a decrease in mean cell cycle times to shorter values and a possible reduction in the spread of cell cycle times. In irradiated tissues, there was little evidence for lymphoid cell emigration. Tentative patterns of lymphopoiesis in the normal thymus and spleen based on the autoradiographic data aredescribed and changes in the

  14. Attempts of local irradiation of cells by microbeam. From ultraviolet to heavy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    This review describes the history of attempts of local irradiation of cells by microbeam and present status of the study. Local irradiation of cells was attempted as early as in 1912 with use of short {alpha}-particle range and of focused UV beams. After the war, laser microbeams were then developed for microsurgery in embryology. In addition, microbeams of electron generated from the gun and of X-ray collimated were developed. In 1950s, the electron microbeam was generated from Van de Graaff accelerator in Chicago University and proton, deuteron and He-ion microbeams from the cyclotron, in BNL. In 1980s, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (Germany) used heavy ion microbeams from C to U generated from the linear accelerator and PNL, proton to {sup 4}He-ion microbeams from the tandem-electrostatic accelerator. At present in 2002, the equipments for microbeam for cell irradiation are the Van de Graaff accelerators in Gray Cancer Institute (England) and in Columbia University, and the cyclotron in TIARA in Japan. The purpose of the study in TIARA is to develop a system to generate heavy particle microbeams for cell irradiation for analysis of the biological effect of ultra-low fluence, high LET heavy particles like the galactic cosmic ray. Recently, the CHO-KI cell nucleus is irradiated by {sup 40}Ar and {sup 20}Ne ions. (K.H.)

  15. Attempts of local irradiation of cells by microbeam. From ultraviolet to heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the history of attempts of local irradiation of cells by microbeam and present status of the study. Local irradiation of cells was attempted as early as in 1912 with use of short α-particle range and of focused UV beams. After the war, laser microbeams were then developed for microsurgery in embryology. In addition, microbeams of electron generated from the gun and of X-ray collimated were developed. In 1950s, the electron microbeam was generated from Van de Graaff accelerator in Chicago University and proton, deuteron and He-ion microbeams from the cyclotron, in BNL. In 1980s, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (Germany) used heavy ion microbeams from C to U generated from the linear accelerator and PNL, proton to 4 He-ion microbeams from the tandem-electrostatic accelerator. At present in 2002, the equipments for microbeam for cell irradiation are the Van de Graaff accelerators in Gray Cancer Institute (England) and in Columbia University, and the cyclotron in TIARA in Japan. The purpose of the study in TIARA is to develop a system to generate heavy particle microbeams for cell irradiation for analysis of the biological effect of ultra-low fluence, high LET heavy particles like the galactic cosmic ray. Recently, the CHO-KI cell nucleus is irradiated by 40 Ar and 20 Ne ions. (K.H.)

  16. Size evolution of ultrafine particles: Differential signatures of normal and episodic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Manish; Khan, Arshad; Anand, S.; Sapra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fireworks on the aerosol number characteristics of atmosphere was studied for an urban mega city. Measurements were made at 50 m height to assess the local changes around the festival days. Apart from the increase in total number concentration and characteristic accumulation mode, short-term increase of ultrafine particle concentration was noted. Total number concentration varies an order of magnitude during the measurement period in which peak occurs at a frequency of approximately one per day. On integral scale, it seems not possible to distinguish an episodic (e.g. firework bursting induced aerosol emission) and a normal (ambient atmospheric changes) event. However these events could be differentiated on the basis of size evolution analysis around number concentration peaks. The results are discussed relative to past studies and inferences are drawn towards aerosol signatures of firework bursting. The short-term burst in ultrafine particle concentration can pose an inhalation hazard. - Highlights: • Effect of firework emissions on atmospheric aerosol characteristics was studied. • Significant increase in ultrafine particle concentration was observed during firework bursting. • Size distribution evolution analysis of number concentration peaks has been performed. • Differential signatures of normal and episodic event were noted. - Notable increase in ultrafine particle concentration during firework bursting was seen. Normal and episodic event could be differentiated on the basis of size evolution analysis.

  17. Improvement of Electrical Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nano tube Network Using Particle Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Suntaek; Kim, Gonho

    2010-01-01

    Substitution for Indium Tin Oxide of transparent electrode Applications : Flat panel displays, Touch panel, Solar cell, EM wave shielding... For very low energy of 20 eV and 90 eV, argon ion irradiations, the surface of SWCNT bundles were sputtered and thinned the diameter of the bundle. With increasing the incident ion energy as 7.5 keV, SWCNT bundles were networked by amorphization of cross welded CNTs. → Less damage can be obtained from higher energy of irradiated particle due to less collision cross section. For 10 MeV proton and 800 keV electron irradiations, there are no severe damages. Electron irradiation is more effective on network with less damage than that of ion irradiation. → Network process can be proceeded with the generation of free carbon, the migration of free carbon on CNT and reconstruction of the cross linked CNTs, which processes require the latent energy on CNT body after collision. It can be controlled by the energy and dose of irradiation particle

  18. Role of charged particle irradiations in the study of radiation damage correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, S.; Sekimura, N.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particle irradiations were originally expected to provide means to simulate the effect of neutron irradiations. However, it has been recognized that quantitative and sometimes even qualitative simulation of neutron radiation damage is difficult and the role of the charged particle irradiations has shifted to establishing fission-fusion correlation based on fundamental understanding of the radiation damage phenomena. The authors have been studying radiation effects in fusion materials using energetic ions from the latter standpoint. In this paper, the authors review recent results using a heavy-ion/electron microscope link facility together with sets of small heavy ion and light ion accelerators on cascade damage produced by energetic primary recoils and on the effect of helium on microstructural and microchemical evolution. Some of the other applications of the ion accelerators will also be mentioned. (orig.)

  19. Irradiation performance of HTGR Biso fertile particles in HFIR experiments HT-17, -18, and -19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Beatty, R.L.; Robbins, J.M.; Kania, M.J.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1978-11-01

    A series of Biso-coated fertile particles was irradiated in the target facility of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor. The primary objectives of this experiment were to relate the fast-neutron stability of dense propylene-derived pyrocarbons to preferred orientation and to relate irradiation performance to preirradiation characterization values. Coating characterization included x-ray BAF, optical anisotropy, gaseous permeability, small-angle x-ray scattering, and thickness and density determinations. Other objectives were to test Biso-coated large-diameter ThO 2 kernels and coatings derived from propylene diluted with CO 2 rather than argon. Visual examination of the irradiated particles showed that the majority had failed as a result of fast-neutron damage

  20. Influence of penetration controlled irradiation with charged particles on tobacco pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Research for Environment and Resources; Tanaka, Atsushi; Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Advanced Science Research Center; Inoue, Masayoshi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1997-09-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation on biological systems, an apparatus for penetration controlled irradiation with charged particles was set up. By comparison of ranges of 1.5 MeV/u He{sup 2+} between the theoretically calculated ranges and the practical ranges using RCD dosimeter, it was demonstrated that the range of particles could be controlled linearly by changing the distance from the beam window in the atmosphere to a target. In addition, the penetration controlled irradiation of tobacco pollen increased the frequency of `leaky pollen`. The increased frequency of the leaky pollen suggests that a damage in the pollen envelope would be induced at the range-end. (orig.)

  1. A model of knock-out of oxygen by charged particle irradiation of Bi-2212

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.K.; Sen, Pintu; Barat, P.; Mukherjee, P.; Das, S.K.; Ghosh, B.

    1996-01-01

    A model of knock-out of oxygen by charged particle (α and proton) irradiation of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x (Bi-2212) is proposed on the basis of Monte Carlo TRIM calculations. In Bi-2212, the loosely bound excess oxygen is vulnerable to be displaced by particle irradiation. Binding energy and hence, displacement energy of this loosely bound excess oxygen is less compared to that of stoichiometric lattice bound oxygen and other atoms. The displaced or knocked out oxygen goes to pores or intergranular region and generates large pressure inside the sample. Because of porosity of the material, this displaced oxygen diffuses out and there is a net reduction of oxygen content of the sample. The irradiation induced oxygen knock-out is dominant in the bulk where nonionizing energy loss is maximum. (author). 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  2. Morphology of ductile metals eroded by a jet of spherical particles impinging at normal incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerabhadra Rao, P.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are used, together with surface profile measurements, in the present morphological study of the erosion of an aluminum alloy and copper by the normal impact of spherical glass erodent particles. The morphology of the damage pattern is a manifestation of the flow pattern of erodent particles, and yields insight into the mechanisms that may be active at different stages of erosion. The simultaneous appearance of radial cracks and concentric rings is reported, together with wave crests which contain an accumulation of metallic flakes. A preliminary analysis is advanced to explain the formation of the various damage patterns observed.

  3. Quasi-particle lifetime broadening in normal-superconductor junctions with UPt3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, T. de; Argonne National Lab., IL; Klapwijk, T.M.; Rijksuniversiteit Groningen; Rijksuniversiteit Groningen; Jansen, A.G.M.; Heil, J.; Wyder, P.

    1996-01-01

    For the Andreev-reflection process of quasi-particles at a normal-metal-superconductor interface the influence of lifetime broadening of the quasi-particles on the current-voltage characteristics of NS point contacts is analyzed along the lines of the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk model. The anomalous Andreev-reflection spectra obtained for the heavy-fermion compound UPt 3 cannot be explained by lifetime broadening alone. Instead, an anisotropic superconducting order parameter has to be assumed which, if also lifetime broadening is included, leads to a fairly good agreement with the data. (orig.)

  4. Log-Normal Distribution in a Growing System with Weighted and Multiplicatively Interacting Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Akihiro; Tanimoto, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Toshiya

    2018-03-01

    A growing system with weighted and multiplicatively interacting particles is investigated. Each particle has a quantity that changes multiplicatively after a binary interaction, with its growth rate controlled by a weight parameter in a homogeneous symmetric kernel. We consider the system using moment inequalities and analytically derive the log-normal-type tail in the probability distribution function of quantities when the parameter is negative, which is different from the result for single-body multiplicative processes. We also find that the system approaches a winner-take-all state when the parameter is positive.

  5. Survival of Acholeplasma laidlawii, strain S2 after irradiation with alpha particles of /sup 241/Americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liska, B.; Drasil, V.; Brza, I. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Biofysikalni Ustav)

    1985-05-23

    A thin layer of dry Acholeplasma laidlawii, strain S2 cells was irradiated with /sup 241/Am alpha particles. D/sub 0/ was 2.54 x 10/sup 7/ - 2.63 x 10/sup 7/ alpha particles/mm/sup 2/ (48 - 50 minutes, 409 - 422 Gy). The extrapolation number was 1.05 - 3.1. The effective cross section at D/sub 0/ was 0.038 - 0.039 ..mu..m/sup 2//alpha particle. A method of preparing thin dry layers of Acholeplasma cells was developed.

  6. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/μm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to 137 Cs γ-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/μm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/μm showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among γ-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not

  7. A methodology for the stochastic generation of hourly synthetic direct normal irradiation time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañeta, M.; Moreno-Tejera, S.; Lillo-Bravo, I.; Silva-Pérez, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    Many of the available solar radiation databases only provide global horizontal irradiance (GHI) while there is a growing need of extensive databases of direct normal radiation (DNI) mainly for the development of concentrated solar power and concentrated photovoltaic technologies. In the present work, we propose a methodology for the generation of synthetic DNI hourly data from the hourly average GHI values by dividing the irradiance into a deterministic and stochastic component intending to emulate the dynamics of the solar radiation. The deterministic component is modeled through a simple classical model. The stochastic component is fitted to measured data in order to maintain the consistency of the synthetic data with the state of the sky, generating statistically significant DNI data with a cumulative frequency distribution very similar to the measured data. The adaptation and application of the model to the location of Seville shows significant improvements in terms of frequency distribution over the classical models. The proposed methodology applied to other locations with different climatological characteristics better results than the classical models in terms of frequency distribution reaching a reduction of the 50% in the Finkelstein-Schafer (FS) and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test integral (KSI) statistics.

  8. Radiation damage to the normal monkey brain. Experimental study induced by interstitial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Nobuya; Tamiya, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kengo; Furuta, Tomohisa; Ohmoto, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage to normal brain tissue induced by interstitial irradiation with iridium-192 seeds was sequentially evaluated by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological examination. This study was carried out in 14 mature Japanese monkeys. The experimental area received more than 200-260 Gy of irradiation developed coagulative necrosis. Infiltration of macrophages to the periphery of the necrotic area was seen. In addition, neovascularization, hyalinization of vascular walls, and gliosis were found in the periphery of the area invaded by the macrophages. All sites at which the vascular walls were found to have acute stage fibrinoid necrosis eventually developed coagulative necrosis. The focus of necrosis was detected by MRI starting 1 week after the end of radiation treatment, and the size of the necrotic area did not change for 6 months. The peripheral areas showed clear ring enhancement with contrast material. Edema surrounding the lesions was the most significant 1 week after radiation and was reduced to a minimum level 1 month later. However, the edema then expanded once again and was sustained for as long as 6 months. CT did not provide as clear of a presentation as MRI, but it did reveal similar findings for the most part, and depicted calcification in the necrotic area. This experimental model is considered useful for conducting basic research on brachytherapy, as well as for achieving a better understanding of delayed radiation necrosis. (author)

  9. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on object recognition memory in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Hinchman, Marie; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Joseph, James A.; Foster, Brian C.

    2009-04-01

    On long-duration missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation that are not experienced in low earth orbit. Previous research using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays has shown that exposure to heavy particles, such as 56Fe, disrupts spatial learning and memory measured using the Morris water maze. Maintaining rats on diets containing antioxidant phytochemicals for 2 weeks prior to irradiation ameliorated this deficit. The present experiments were designed to determine: (1) the generality of the particle-induced disruption of memory by examining the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on object recognition memory; and (2) whether maintaining rats on these antioxidant diets for 2 weeks prior to irradiation would also ameliorate any potential deficit. The results showed that exposure to low doses of 56Fe particles does disrupt recognition memory and that maintaining rats on antioxidant diets containing blueberry and strawberry extract for only 2 weeks was effective in ameliorating the disruptive effects of irradiation. The results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms by which exposure to these particles may produce effects on neurocognitive performance.

  10. Fission product Pd-SiC interaction in irradiated coated particle fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1980-04-01

    Silicon carbide is the main barrier to fission product release from coated particle fuels. Consequently, degradation of the SiC must be minimized. Electron microprobe analysis has identified that palladium causes corrosion of the SiC in irradiated coated particles. Further ceramographic and electron microprobe examinations on irradiated particles with kernels ranging in composition from UO 2 to UC 2 , including PuO/sub 2 -x/ and mixed (Th, Pu) oxides, and in enrichment from 0.7 to 93.0% 235 U revealed that temperature is the major factor affecting the penetration rate of SiC by Pd. The effects of kernel composition, Pd concentration, other fission products, and SiC properties are secondary

  11. Growth of normal or irradiated vaginal epithelium in in vivo cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tileva, M.

    1975-01-01

    Growth of normal or irradiated vaginal epithelium was studied by the method of F.M.Lazarenko (1959). Pieces of vaginal mucosa from immature albino rats, normal or exposed to 1000 or 2000 R, were embedded in celloidin and implanted into the abdominal wall of female immature rats. Implants were recovered for histological examinations from day 1 to day 10 after surgery. At day 1 post implantation, vaginal epithelium was found to have dedifferentiated. Cells showed a high mitotic index (MI = 16.2%). Cell proliferation progressed further to attain a peak rate at 3 days (MI = 32.7%). At 5 days, newly formed structures began to differentiate, and concurrently manifested a gradual decrease in cell proliferative activity (at 10 days, MI = 15.6%). Following exposure to 1000 R, vaginal epithelium displayed a similar pattern of growth and differentiation, the only difference from non-irradiated epithelium being that there was a transient mitotic delay over the first 3 days; mitotic rates reached a peak at 5 days (MI = 47.0%), were still high at 7 days (MI = 31.3%), and fell to 19% at 10 days. With this longer proliferation period, newly formed structures appeared ''luxuriant''. After a dose of 2000 R, vaginal epithelium failed to show any signs of growth at all investigated time intervals. These data are in agreement with evidence obtained by K.M.Svetikova (1961) and L.I.Chekulaeva (1969, 1974) for a good restitutional ability of epithelia of epidermal origin following exposure to 1200 R X-rays. By Warren' rule (1944), i.e., that cells should be considered radiosensitive if severely damaged by less than 2500 R, vaginal epithelium cells may be designated as relatively susceptible to radiation. (author)

  12. Digital PIV Measurements of Acoustic Particle Displacements in a Normal Incidence Impedance Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic particle displacements and velocities inside a normal incidence impedance tube have been successfully measured for a variety of pure tone sound fields using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The DPIV system utilized two 600-mj Nd:YAG lasers to generate a double-pulsed light sheet synchronized with the sound field and used to illuminate a portion of the oscillatory flow inside the tube. A high resolution (1320 x 1035 pixel), 8-bit camera was used to capture double-exposed images of 2.7-micron hollow silicon dioxide tracer particles inside the tube. Classical spatial autocorrelation analysis techniques were used to ascertain the acoustic particle displacements and associated velocities for various sound field intensities and frequencies. The results show that particle displacements spanning a range of 1-60 microns can be measured for incident sound pressure levels of 100-130 dB and for frequencies spanning 500-1000 Hz. The ability to resolve 1 micron particle displacements at sound pressure levels in the 100 dB range allows the use of DPIV systems for measurement of sound fields at much lower sound pressure levels than had been previously possible. Representative impedance tube data as well as an uncertainty analysis for the measurements are presented.

  13. Improvement of a method for predicting failure rates of coated particles during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.

    1977-01-01

    A method for calculating the coating stress distribution resulting from the statistical spread of geometrical parameters in irradiated fuel particle batches has been developed by Gulden et al. The existing method utilizing coated particles is extended in two ways: 1. A more realistic treatment of the buffer layer is adopted, taking into account its physical properties. 2. A statistical distribution according to Weibull has been adopted for the silicon carbide layer strength. Calculations with both the new and the old assumptions were performed on one feed particle and one breed particle type. It is shown that the two modifications influence the results of the original method. It was found that the extension of the first assumption has no influence on the stress distribution and the fraction of breaking feed particles, but it changes the stress distribution of the breed particles significantly. The fraction of broken particles at end burnup is increased by a factor of approximately 10. The extension of the second assumption affects the fraction of broken feed as well as that of the breed particles. Depending on the Weibull parameter, m, the number of failed feed particles increases by a factor of 1.3 to 2; the corresponding factor for breed particles is between 3.5 and 60

  14. Patterns of proliferation and differentiation of irradiated haemopoietic stem cells cultured on normal 'stromal' cell colonies in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were designed to elucidate whether or not the irradiated bone marrow cells receive any stimulation for the self-replication and differentiation from normal 'stromal' cell colonies in the bone marrow cell culture in vitro. When irradiated or unirradiated bone marrow cells were overlaid on the normal adherent cell colonies, the proliferation of haemopoietic stem cells was supported, the degree of the stimulation depending on the starting cellular concentration. There was, however, no significant changes in the concentration of either CFUs or CFUc regardless of the dose of irradiation on the bone marrow cells overlaid. This was a great contrast to the dose-dependent decrease of CFUs or CFUc within the culture in which both the stem cells and stromal cells were simultaneously irradiated. These results suggest that the balance of self-replication and differentiation of the haemopoietic stem cells is affected only when haemopoietic microenvironment is perturbed. (author)

  15. Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA): an integrated system for HTGR coated particle fuel performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Valentine, K.H.

    1980-02-01

    The Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) System, designed and built at ORNL, provides the capability of making statistically accurate failure fraction measurements on irradiated HTGR coated particle fuel. The IMGA records the gamma-ray energy spectra from fuel particles and performs quantitative analyses on these spectra; then, using chemical and physical properties of the gamma emitters it makes a failed-nonfailed decision concerning the ability of the coatings to retain fission products. Actual retention characteristics for the coatings are determined by measuring activity ratios for certain gamma emitters such as 137 Cs/ 95 Zr and 144 Ce/ 95 Zr for metallic fission product retention and 134 Cs/ 137 Cs for an indirect measure of gaseous fission product retention. Data from IMGA (which can be put in the form of n failures observed in N examinations) can be accurately described by the binomial probability distribution model. Using this model, a mathematical relationship between IMGA data (n,N), failure fraction, and confidence level was developed. To determine failure fractions of less than or equal to 1% at confidence levels near 95%, this model dictates that from several hundred to several thousand particles must be examined. The automated particle handler of the IMGA system provides this capability. As a demonstration of failure fraction determination, fuel rod C-3-1 from the OF-2 irradiation capsule was analyzed and failure fraction statistics were applied. Results showed that at the 1% failure fraction level, with a 95% confidence level, the fissile particle batch could not meet requirements; however, the fertile particle exceeded these requirements for the given irradiation temperature and burnup

  16. Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with WC particles in a irradiated region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Karatas, C.

    2016-12-01

    Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with tungsten carbide (WC) particles is carried out. Temperature field in the irradiated region is simulated in line with the experimental conditions. In the analysis, a laser pulse parameter is introduced, which defines the laser pulse intensity distribution at the irradiated surface. The influence of the laser parameter on the melt pool size and the maximum temperature increase in the irradiated region is examined. Surface temperature predictions are compared with the experimental data. In addition, the distribution of WC particles and their re-locations in the treated layer, due to combination of the natural convection and Marangoni currents, are predicted. The findings are compared to the experimental data. It is found that surface temperature predictions agree well with the experimental data. The dislocated WC particles form a streamlining in the near region of the melt pool wall, which agree with the experimental findings. The Gaussian distribution of the laser pulse intensity results in the maximum peak temperature and the maximum flow velocity inside the melt pool. In this case, the melt pool depth becomes the largest as compared to those corresponding to other laser pulse intensity distributions at the irradiated surface.

  17. Qualitative dose response of the normal canine head to epithermal neutron irradiation with and without boron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHaan, C.E.; Gavin, P.R.; Kraft, S.L.; Wheeler, F.J.; Atkinson, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is being re-evaluated for the treatment of intracranial tumors. Prior to human clinical trials, determination of normal tissue tolerance is critical. Dogs were chosen as a large animal model for the following reasons. Dogs can be evaluated with advanced imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Dogs are amenable to detailed neurologic examination and subtle behavioral changes are easily detected. Specifically, Labrador retrievers were chosen for their large body and head size. The dogs received varying doses of epithermal neutron irradiation and boron neutron capture irradiation using an epithermal neutron source. The dogs were closely monitored for up to one year post irradiation

  18. Assessment of four shadow band correction models using beam normal irradiance data from the United Kingdom and Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Muneer, T.; Claywell, R.

    2004-01-01

    Diffuse irradiance is a fundamental factor for all solar resource considerations. Diffuse irradiance is accurately determined by calculation from global and beam normal (direct) measurements. However, beam solar measurements and related support can be very expensive, and therefore, shadow bands are often used, along with pyranometers, to block the solar disk. The errors that result from the use of shadow bands are well known and have been studied by many authors. The thrust of this article is to examine four recognized techniques for correcting shadow band based, diffuse irradiance and statistically evaluate their individual performance using data culled from two contrasting sites within the United Kingdom and Israel

  19. Accelerator-Based Irradiation Creep of Pyrolytic Carbon Used in TRISO Fuel Particles for the (VHTR) Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lumin; Was, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the important structural materials in the TRISO fuel particles which will be used in the next generation of gas-cooled very-high-temperature reactors (VHTR). When the TRISO particles are under irradiation at high temperatures, creep of the PyC layers may cause radial cracking leading to catastrophic particle failure. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the creep behavior of PyC during irradiation is required to predict the overall fuel performance.

  20. Histopathological investigation of radiation necrosis. Coagulation necrosis in the irradiated and non-irradiated brain tumors and in the normal brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, N [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst.

    1977-01-01

    Eighty four irradiated tumors (including 59 gliomas) and the surrounding brain tissue were analyzed. In 'normal' brain tissue, typical coagulation necrosis attributable to irradiation was observed in the cerebral white matter, presenting a whitish-yellow color but no remarkable changes in volume. Histologically there was complete desintegration of myelin and axon. Vascular changes included hyalinous thickening, concentric cleavage, fibrinoid degeneration, adventitial fibrosis and edema of small arteries, fibrin thrombi or occlusion of arterioles and capillaries, and telangiectasia of small veins and venules. While other tumors showed hyalinous or fibrous scar tissue and decrease in volume, the gliomas maintained their original volume without residual tumor cells. Massive coagulation necrosis was occasionally found even in full volume, non-irradiated gliomas (controls), although the changes were fewer and not so varied as in typical radiation necrosis. With small dosages, it was difficult to judge whether the necrosis was caused by irradiation or occurred spontaneously. Coagulation necrosis in tumor tissue was found in 25 of 59 cases (42%) of irradiated gliomas, but in only 2 of 49 cases (4%) of the nonirradiated gliomas. In 49 cases no coagulation necrosis of the surrounding tissue was found. Although histopathological judgement is difficult, it is suggested that there is a significant correlation between coagulation necrosis and irradiation. Discussion of the relationship between coagulation necrosis and NSD (nominal standard dose) led to the conclusion that coagulation necrosis will not be caused by irradiation of less than 1400 rets in NSD.

  1. Luminescence yield in irradiating gases by X-rays and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combecher, D.

    1973-01-01

    In this paper, the measurable light emission in the irradiation of gases as modle substances has been quantitatively determined. The gases Ar, H 2 , N 2 , air, and C 3 H 8 were irradiated with X-rays and α-particles at a pressure of 730 torr. The emitted light was measured in the spectral range between the short-wave absorption edge of the gases and 6000 A (spectral resolution: 20 A). The spectral light yield was determined from the efficiency of the apparatus and from the total energy absorbed in the gases. (HK) [de

  2. The PDF of fluid particle acceleration in turbulent flow with underlying normal distribution of velocity fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aringazin, A.K.; Mazhitov, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a formal procedure to obtain and specify the general form of a marginal distribution for the Lagrangian acceleration of fluid particle in developed turbulent flow using Langevin type equation and the assumption that velocity fluctuation u follows a normal distribution with zero mean, in accord to the Heisenberg-Yaglom picture. For a particular representation, β=exp[u], of the fluctuating parameter β, we reproduce the underlying log-normal distribution and the associated marginal distribution, which was found to be in a very good agreement with the new experimental data by Crawford, Mordant, and Bodenschatz on the acceleration statistics. We discuss on arising possibilities to make refinements of the log-normal model

  3. Irradiation test OF-2: high-temperature irradiation behavior of LASL-made fuel rods and LASL-made coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.; Reiswig, R.D.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1977-10-01

    Three LASL-made, substoichiometric ZrC-coated particles with inert kernels, and two high-density molded graphite fuel rods that contained LASL-made, ZrC-coated fissile particles were irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor test OF-2. The severest test conditions were 8.36 x 10 21 nvt (E greater than 0.18 MeV) at 1350 0 C. The graphite matrix showed no effect of the irradiation. There was no interaction between the matrix and any of the particle coats. The loose ZrC coated particles with inert kernels showed no irradiation effects. The graded ZrC-C coats on the fissile particles were cracked. It is postulated that the cracking is associated with the low LTI deposition rate and is not related to the ZrC

  4. The effects of heavy particle irradiation on exploration and response to environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadesus, G.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Cantuti-Castelvetri, I.; Rabin, B.; Joseph, J.

    Free radicals produced by exposure to heavy particles have been found to produce motor and behavioral toxicity effects in rats similar to those found during aging. The present research was designed to investigate the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on the ability to detect novel arrangements in a given environment of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using a test of spatial memory previously demonstrated to be sensitive to aging, open-field activity and reaction to spatial and non-spatial changes were measured in a group that received a dose of 1.5 Gy (n=10) of 56Fe heavy particle radiation or in non- radiated controls. Animals irradiated with 1.5 Gy of56Fe particles exhibited some age-like effects in animals tested, even though they were for the most part, subtle. Animals took longer to enter, visited less and spent significantly less time in the middle and the center portions of the open-field independently of total frequency and duration of activity of both groups. Likewise, irradiated subjects reacted significantly more to novel objects placed in the open-field than did controls. However, irradiated subjects did not vary from controls in their exploration patterns when objects in the open-field were spatially rearranged. Thus, irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy of 56Fe high-energy particle radiation elicited age-like effects in general open-field exploratory behavior, but did not elicit age- like effects during the spatial and non-spatial rearrangement tasks. Supported by N.A.S.A. Grant NAG9-1190.

  5. Size distribution of interstellar particles. III. Peculiar extinctions and normal infrared extinction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.S.; Wallenhorst, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of changing the upper and lower size limits of a distribution of bare graphite and silicate particles with n(a)αa/sup -q/ is investigated. Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck showed that the normal extinction is matched very well by having the small-size cutoff, a/sub -/, roughly-equal0.005 or 0.01 μm, and the large size a/sub +/, about 0.25 μm, and q = 3.5 for both substances. We consider the progressively peculiar extinctions exhibited by the well-observed stars, sigma Sco, rho Oph, and theta 1 Ori C, with values of R/sub v/[equivalentA/sub v//E(B--V)] of 3.4, 4.4, and 5.5 compared to the normal 3.1. Two (sigma Sco, rho Oph) are in a neutral dense cloud; theta 1 Ori C is in the Orion Nebula. We find that sigma Sco has a normal graphite distribution but has had its small silicate particles removed, so that a/sub -/(sil)roughly-equal0.04 μm if q = 3.5, or q(sil) = 2.6 if the size limits are fixed. However, the upper size limit on silicates remains normal. In rho Oph, the graphite is still normal, but both a/sub -/(sil) and a/sub +/(sil) are increased, to about 0.04 μm and 0.4 or 0.5 μm, respectively, if q = 3.5, or q(sil)roughly-equal1.3 if the size limits are fixed. In theta 1 Ori, the small limit on graphite has increased to about 0.04 μm, or q(gra)roughly-equal3, while the silicates are about like those in rho Oph. The calculated lambda2175 bump is broader than the observed, but normal foreground extinction probably contributes appreciably to the observed bump. The absolute amount of extinction per H atom for rho Oph is not explained. The column density of H is so large that systematic effects might be present. Very large graphite particles (a>3 μm) are required to ''hide'' the graphite without overly affecting the visual extinction, but a normal (small) graphite size distribution is required by the lambda2175 bump. We feel that it is unlikely that such a bimodal distribution exists

  6. Irradiation test HT-31: high-temperature irradiation behavior of LASL-made extruded fuel rods and LASL-made coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.; Reiswig, R.D.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1977-04-01

    Three LASL-made extruded graphite and coated particle fuel rods have been irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Fluence Isotope Reactor test HT-31. Test conditions were about 9 x 10 21 nvt(E > .18 MeV) at 1250 0 C. The graphite matrix showed little or no effect of the irradiation. LASL-made ZrC containing coated particles with ZrC coats and ZrC-doped pyrolytic carbon coats showed no observable effects of the irradiation

  7. Specific features of reactor or cyclotron {alpha}-particles irradiated beryllium microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomutov, A M [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Gromov, B F; Karabanov, V N [and others

    1998-01-01

    Studies were carried out into microstructure changes accompanying helium swelling of Be reactor neutron irradiated at 450degC or {alpha}-particles implanted in cyclotron to reach the same volume accumulation of He (6-8 ncm{sup 3} He/cm{sup 3} Be). The microstructures of reactor irradiated and implanted samples were compared after vacuum anneal at 600-800degC up to 50h. The irradiated samples revealed the etchability along the grain boundaries in zones formed by adequately large equilibrium helium pores. The width of the zones increased with the annealing time and after 50h reached 30{mu}. Depleted areas 2-3{mu} dia were observed in some regions of near grain boundary zones. The roles of grain boundaries and manufacturing pores as vacancies` sources and helium sinks are considered. (author)

  8. Changes in the surface electronic states of semiconductor fine particles induced by high energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Asai, Keisuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi

    1997-03-01

    The changes in the surface electronic states of Q-sized semiconductor particles in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, induced by high energy ion irradiation, were examined by observation of ion induced emission and photoluminescence (PL). Various emission bands attributed to different defect sites in the band gap were observed at the initial irradiation stage. As the dose increased, the emissions via the trapping sites decreased in intensity while the band-edge emission developed. This suggests that the ion irradiation would remove almost all the trapping sites in the band gap. The low energy emissions, which show a multiexponential decay, were due to a donor-acceptor recombination between the deeply trapped carriers. It was found that the processes of formation, reaction, and stabilization of the trapping sites would predominantly occur under the photooxidizing conditions. (author)

  9. The effect of fast particles' irradiation on electrooptical properties of GaP LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontaruk, O.; Kovalenko, A.; Malyj, E.; Petrenko, I.; Pinkovska, M.; Polivtcev, L.; Tartachnyk, V.

    2013-01-01

    The electrooptical properties of industrial AL 102 GaP light-emitting diodes (LEDs) irradiated with fast particles have been studied. 2 MeV electrons and fast reactor neutrons were used and devices' microplsma emitting, current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics were measured. It was shown that electron irradiation in the range (2-5)10 16 cm -2 leads to the drop of microplasma emitting intensity, decrease of capacity and reverse currents and increase of reverse bias. The annealing study of current-voltage characteristics after neutron irradiation of diodes confirms the assumption about prevailing radiation influence on diode base due to induce of deep levels. (authors)

  10. Wear behaviour of Armco iron after irradiation with neutrons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szatzschneider, K.

    1977-04-01

    The effects of neutron and alpha particle irradiation on the wear behaviour of Armco iron were studied. For the investigation, a pin-desk test facility was designed and built. From the experiments an influence upon wear of the type of irradiation, and the radiation dose was determined, which, however, cannot be explained - on the basis of existing wear theories - by the change in the macroscopic-mechanical properties of the material. It has again been shown that an indication of the hardness is not sufficient to describe wear. The influence of the history of the material (irradiation, annealing, deformation) is very strong and connot be predicted because of the multiplicity of interdependences. Wear in the low wear area was identified as being due to oxidation, in the high wear area as metallic. (orig./GSC) [de

  11. Assessment of ANN and SVM models for estimating normal direct irradiation (H_b)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Cícero Manoel dos; Escobedo, João Francisco; Teramoto, Érico Tadao; Modenese Gorla da Silva, Silvia Helena

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The performance of SVM and ANN in estimating Normal Direct Irradiation (H_b) was evaluated. • 12 models using different input variables are developed (hourly and daily partitions). • The most relevant input variables for DNI are kt, H_s_c and insolation ratio (r′ = n/N). • Support Vector Machine (SVM) provides accurate estimates and outperforms the Artificial Neural Network (ANN). - Abstract: This study evaluates the estimation of hourly and daily normal direct irradiation (H_b) using machine learning techniques (ML): Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). Time series of different meteorological variables measured over thirteen years in Botucatu were used for training and validating ANN and SVM. Seven different sets of input variables were tested and evaluated, which were chosen based on statistical models reported in the literature. Relative Mean Bias Error (rMBE), Relative Root Mean Square Error (rRMSE), determination coefficient (R"2) and “d” Willmott index were used to evaluate ANN and SVM models. When compared to statistical models which use the same set of input variables (R"2 between 0.22 and 0.78), ANN and SVM show higher values of R"2 (hourly models between 0.52 and 0.88; daily models between 0.42 and 0.91). Considering the input variables, atmospheric transmissivity of global radiation (kt), integrated solar constant (H_s_c) and insolation ratio (n/N, n is sunshine duration and N is photoperiod) were the most relevant in ANN and SVM models. The rMBE and rRMSE values in the two time partitions of SVM models are lower than those obtained with ANN. Hourly ANN and SVM models have higher rRMSE values than daily models. Optimal performance with hourly models was obtained with ANN4"h (rMBE = 12.24%, rRMSE = 23.99% and “d” = 0.96) and SVM4"h (rMBE = 1.75%, rRMSE = 20.10% and “d” = 0.96). Optimal performance with daily models was obtained with ANN2"d (rMBE = −3.09%, rRMSE = 18.95% and “d” = 0

  12. N-type doping of InGaN by high energy particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, 94720 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    This article reviews our extensive studies of the effects of native defects introduced by high energy particles on the electrical and optical properties of InGaN alloys. We show that the electronic properties of irradiated InGaN can be well described by the amphoteric defect model. Because of the extremely low position of the conduction band edge of InN the formation energy of native donor defects is very low in In-rich InGaN alloys. High energy particle irradiation of InN and In-rich InGaN, will therefore produce donor defects and result in more n-type materials. As the irradiation dose increases, the electron concentration increases until the Fermi energy E{sub F} approaches the Fermi stabilization energy E{sub FS}. At this point both donor and acceptor-type defects are formed at similar rates, and compensate each other, leading to stabilization of E{sub F} and a saturation of the electron concentration. Hence a large increase and then saturation in the Burstein-Moss shift of the optical absorption edge is also observed. Furthermore we also found that mobilities in the irradiated films can be well described by scattering from triply charged defects, providing strong evidence that native defects in InN are triple donors. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and predictions based on the ADM suggests that particle irradiation can be an effective and simple method to control the doping (electron concentration) in In-rich In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N via native point defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. N-type doping of InGaN by high energy particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews our extensive studies of the effects of native defects introduced by high energy particles on the electrical and optical properties of InGaN alloys. We show that the electronic properties of irradiated InGaN can be well described by the amphoteric defect model. Because of the extremely low position of the conduction band edge of InN the formation energy of native donor defects is very low in In-rich InGaN alloys. High energy particle irradiation of InN and In-rich InGaN, will therefore produce donor defects and result in more n-type materials. As the irradiation dose increases, the electron concentration increases until the Fermi energy E F approaches the Fermi stabilization energy E FS . At this point both donor and acceptor-type defects are formed at similar rates, and compensate each other, leading to stabilization of E F and a saturation of the electron concentration. Hence a large increase and then saturation in the Burstein-Moss shift of the optical absorption edge is also observed. Furthermore we also found that mobilities in the irradiated films can be well described by scattering from triply charged defects, providing strong evidence that native defects in InN are triple donors. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and predictions based on the ADM suggests that particle irradiation can be an effective and simple method to control the doping (electron concentration) in In-rich In x Ga 1-x N via native point defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Water and sludge treatment device provided with a system for irradiating by accelerated charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azam, Guy; Bensussan, Andre; Levaillant, Claude; Huber, Harry; Mevel, Emile; Tronc, Dominique.

    1977-01-01

    Treatment system for a fluid made up of water and sludge, provided with a system for irradiating the fluid by a beam of accelerated charged particles comprising means for obtaining a constant flow of the fluid to be treated, facilities for monitoring this flow, an irradiation channel located on the path of the beam, in which the fluid to be treated can flow, a portion of this channel having at least one window transparent to the beam of accelerated particles. A safety system associated with the system for monitoring the characteristics of the beam and with the system for monitoring the flow of the fluid to be treated, stops the flow of the fluid and the recycling of the fluid defectively treated [fr

  15. Performance Analysis Review of Thorium TRISO Coated Particles during Manufacture, Irradiation and Accident Condition Heating Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Thorium, in combination with high enriched uranium, was used in all early high temperature reactors (HTRs). Initially, the fuel was contained in a kernel of coated particles. However, particle quality was low in the 1960s and early 1970s. Modern, high quality, tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles with thorium oxide and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) had been manufactured since 1978 and were successfully demonstrated in irradiation and accident tests. In 1980, HTR fuels changed to low enriched uranium UO 2 TRISO fuels. The wide ranging development and demonstration programme was successful, and it established a worldwide standard that is still valid today. During the process, results of the thorium work with high quality TRISO fuel particles had not been fully evaluated or documented. This publication collects and presents the information and demonstrates the performance of thorium TRISO fuels.This publication is an outcome of the technical contract awarded under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy, initiated in 2012. It is based on the compilation and analysis of available results on thorium TRISO coated particle performance in manufacturing and during irradiation and accident condition heating tests

  16. Selective alpha-particle mediated depletion of tumor vasculature with vascular normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh Jaggi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature.Actinium-225 ((225Ac-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, (225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in (225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following (225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following (225Ac-E4G10 therapy.The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy.

  17. Alpha particle spectra in coincidence with normal and superdeformed states in {sup 150}Tb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viesti, G.; Lunardon, M.; Bazzacco, D. [dell`Universita, Padova (Italy)]|[INFN, Padova (Italy)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The study of correlations between particle evaporation from highly excited compound nuclei at large angular momenta and the states in the final evaporation residues (ER) is a field of investigation which has been opened, in the last years, with the advent of the new large {gamma}-ray arrays. It is now possible to correlate the evaporation spectra to various bands with shapes ranging from spherical to superdeformed (SD) in the same final nucleus. It is generally accepted that the particle evaporation from the compound nucleus is chaotic and that only in the near-yrast {gamma} cascade, where the feeding of different classes of states takes place, the ordered motion is restored. The sensitivity of the particle spectra on the feeding of specific states in the residual nuclei can be taken as an indication that additional degrees of freedom might be important in the evaporation process or that particular regions of the phase space open to the decay populate preferentially some selected structures in the final cold nucleus. This latter point is important for the understanding of the feeding mechanism of SD states. Several experiments performed so far did not find a clear dependence of the shapes of the particle spectra on the excited states having different deformations in the ER. For example, the proton spectra in coincidence with transitions in the SD bands of {sup 133}Nd and {sup 152}Dy nuclei were found to be similar to those in coincidence with transitions in the normal deformed (ND) bands. Alpha particles have been proposed since long as a sensitive probe of the deformation of the emitting nucleus. Results are presented here of an experiment in which the authors have measured the energy spectra of alpha particles associated with different classes of states (ND and SD) in the {sup 150}Tb nucleus populated in the reaction {sup 37}Cl({sup 120}Sn, {alpha}3n{gamma}){sup 150}Tb.

  18. Irradiation performance of coated fuel particles with fission product retaining kernel additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerthmann, R.

    1979-10-01

    The four irradiation experiments FRJ2-P17, FRJ2-P18, FRJ2-P19, and FRJ2-P20 for testing the efficiency of fission product-retaining kernel additives in coated fuel particles are described. The evaluation of the obtained experimental data led to the following results: - zirconia and alumina kernel additives are not suitable for an effective fission product retention in oxide fuel kernels, - alumina-silica kernel additives reduce the in-pile release of Sr 90 and Ba 140 from BISO-coated particles at temperatures of about 1200 0 C by two orders of magnitude, and the Cs release from kernels by one order of magnitude, - effective transport coefficients including all parameters which contribute to kernel release are given for (Th,U)O 2 mixed oxide kernels and low enriched UO 2 kernels containing 5 wt.% alumina-silica additives: 10g sub(K)/cm 2 s -1 = - 36 028/T + 6,261 (Sr 90), 10g Dsub(K)/cm 2 c -2 = - 29 646/T + 5,826 (Cs 134/137), alumina-silica kernel additives are ineffective for retaining Ag 110 m in coated particles. However, also an intact SiC-interlayer was found not to be effective at temperatures above 1200 0 C, - the penetration of the buffer layer by fission product containing eutectic additive melt during irradiation can be avoided by using additives which consist of alumina and mullite without an excess of silica, - annealing of LASER-failed irradiated particles and the irradiation test FRJ12-P20 indicate that the efficiency of alumina-silica kernel additives is not altered if the coating becomes defect. (orig.) [de

  19. Anisotropy variation of crystallographic orientation in pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles by annealing and neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizlik, K.

    1973-04-15

    This document is a translation of those parts of the German report Jul-868-RW concerned with changes in anisotropy as determined using an optical technique on pyrocarbon coatings on fuel particles resulting from annealing and neutron irradiations. Two lists of contents are included, one is for the present document and the other is the full contents of the original report and is included for the generl interest of users.

  20. Size evolution of ultrafine particles: Differential signatures of normal and episodic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Manish; Khan, Arshad; Anand, S; Sapra, B K

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fireworks on the aerosol number characteristics of atmosphere was studied for an urban mega city. Measurements were made at 50 m height to assess the local changes around the festival days. Apart from the increase in total number concentration and characteristic accumulation mode, short-term increase of ultrafine particle concentration was noted. Total number concentration varies an order of magnitude during the measurement period in which peak occurs at a frequency of approximately one per day. On integral scale, it seems not possible to distinguish an episodic (e.g. firework bursting induced aerosol emission) and a normal (ambient atmospheric changes) event. However these events could be differentiated on the basis of size evolution analysis around number concentration peaks. The results are discussed relative to past studies and inferences are drawn towards aerosol signatures of firework bursting. The short-term burst in ultrafine particle concentration can pose an inhalation hazard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Post Irradiation TEM Investigation of ZrN Coated U(Mo) Particles Prepared with FIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Renterghem, W.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Miller, B. D.; Gan, J.; Madden, J. W.; Keiser, D. D.; Palancher, H.; Hofman, G. L.; Breitkreuz, H.

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the Selenium project, two dispersion fuel plates were fabricated with Si and ZrN coated fuel particles and irradiated in the Br2 reactor of SCK•CEN to high burn-up. The first analysis of the irradiated plate proved the reduced swelling of the fuel plate and interaction layer growth up to 70% burn-up. The question was raised how the structure of the interaction layer had been affected by the irradiation and how the structure of the fuel particles had evolved. Hereto, samples from the ZrN coated UMo particles were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using focused ion beam milling (FIB) at INL. The FIB technique allowed to precisely select the area of the interaction layer and/or fuel to produce a sample that is TEM transparent over an area of 20 by 20 µm. In this contribution, the first TEM results will be presented from the 66% burn-up sample.

  2. Energetic heavy ions accelerate differentiation in the descendants of irradiated normal human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Hara, Takamitsu; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability has been demonstrated in a variety of endpoints such as delayed reproductive death, chromosome instability and mutations, which occurs in the progeny of survivors many generations after the initial insult. Dependence of these effects on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation is incompletely characterized; however, our previous work has shown that delayed reductions in clonogenicity can be most pronounced at LET of 108 keV/μm. To gain insight into potential cellular mechanisms involved in LET-dependent delayed loss of clonogenicity, we investigated morphological changes in colonies arising from normal human diploid fibroblasts exposed to γ-rays or energetic carbon ions (108 keV/μm). Exposure of confluent cultures to carbon ions was 4-fold more effective at inactivating cellular clonogenic potential and produced more abortive colonies containing reduced number of cells per colony than γ-rays. Second, colonies were assessed for clonal morphotypic heterogeneity. The yield of differentiated cells was elevated in a dose- and LET-dependent fashion in clonogenic colonies, whereas differentiated cells predominated to a comparable extent irrespective of radiation type or dose in abortive colonies. The incidence of giant or multinucleated cells was also increased but much less frequent than that of differentiated cells. Collectively, our results indicate that carbon ions facilitate differentiation more effectively than γ-rays as a major response in the progeny of irradiated fibroblasts. Accelerated differentiation may account, at least in part, for dose- and LET-dependent delayed loss of clonogenicity in normal human diploid cells, and could be a defensive mechanism that minimizes further expansion of aberrant cells

  3. Characteristics and function of bone marrow stromal adherent cells in normal and irradiated mice and guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changyu, Zheng; Ji, Liu; Xiaoying, Bi

    1986-04-01

    It has been shown from cytochemical and other characteristic studies of bone marrow stromal cells in CFU-F that there are seven types of stromal cells in the stromal adherent cell layer of normal and irradiated C/sub 57/ mice whereas there are only six types in guinea pigs. On the other hand, a radioresistant cell subtype appears in adherent layer after irradiation of both C/sub 57/ mice and guinea pig since the supernatant of cultured CFU-F of the normal and irradiated C/sub 57/ mice can stimulate production of CFU-Gm. It is justifiable that the bone marrow stromal adherent cells of the C/sub 57/ mice could produce CSF.

  4. Metabolism of neutral lipids in nuclei and chromatin of thymocytes from normal and γ-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagina, T.P.; Shuruta, S.A.; Kolomijtseva, I.K.

    1993-01-01

    The levels ans specific radioactivities of cholesterol and free fatty acids in nuclei and chromatin of thymocytes from normal and γ-irradiated (10 Gy) rats have been studied. The radioactivity of the total lipid fraction of γ-irradiated cells was decreased significantly in the absence of inhibition of [2- 14 C]acetete incorporation into the total proteil and lipid reactions and the [ 3 H]uracyl incorporation into the acid-insoluble RNA. The concentration of free fatty acids in the nuclei increased significantly after irradiation. The specific radioactivity of cholesterol in chromatin was higher than in the nuclei. The differences in specific radioactivities of free fatty acids were less pronounced. After irradiation the ratio of specific radioactivities of free fatty acids in chromatin to that in the nucleai showed a tendency to increase

  5. Influence of water and salt solutions on UVB irradiation of normal skin and psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.; Schothorst, A.A.; Boom, B.; Suurmond, D.; Hermans, J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of tap-water (TW) and salt solutions on the minimal erythema dose (MED) was investigated for normal human skin and uninvolved skin of psoriasis patients. MED (UVB) determinations on the forearm revealed that: (1) the MED definitely decreases whenever the arm is immersed in TW or NaCl solutions with a low concentration (4%) prior to UVB exposure, whereas almost saturated NaCl solution (26%), as well as locum Dead Sea water (LDSW), do not produce a change in the MED, and (2) the decrease in MED obtained by wetting the skin with TW was no longer present when the skin was allowed to dry for 20 min. A decrease in water uptake by skin (in vivo) and by callus (in vitro) was found as the salt concentration of the external solution increased. It is proposed that water taken up by the skin plays an important role in the sensitivity of the skin to UVB exposure. Bathing in TW or 4% NaCl prior to UVB exposure offered a slight to moderate improvement in psoriasis over UVB irradiation alone. Finally, it was shown that there is no obvious difference in clearance of the psoriatic skin between a bath in TW, 4% NaCl, or LDSW prior to UVB exposure. (orig.)

  6. Dense particles and slow sedimenting particles produced by ultraviolet irradiation of poliovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetz, K.; Zeichhardt, H.; Willingmann, P.; Habermehl, K.-O.

    1983-01-01

    Low doses of u.v. radiation rapidly inactivate poliovirus, the virus progressively converting into dense particles (DPs) of buoyant density 1.44 g/ml in CsCl. The DPs are structurally and antigenically related to standard virus (N-antigen), i.e. indistinguishable from virus in their RNA and protein content and in sedimentation properties. Furthermore, there is no difference in reactivity of the structural proteins of virus and DPs with the monofunctional reagent [ 3 H]N-succinimidyl propionate ( 3 H-NSP). However, DPs differ from virus in that their capsids are permeable to several ions, and they can be degraded by RNase and protease. Increasing the radiation dose causes a successive transformation of DPs into 105S slow-sedimenting particles (SSPs), antigenically related to 76S artificial empty capsids (AECs) or H-antigen, but differing physically and structurally. The SSPs have a higher S value than AECs and contain all the capsid proteins, including VP4, and the RNA, both of these macromolecules being absent from AECs. It is concluded, therefore, that transformation from N- to H- antigenicity by u.v. radiation does not require release of RNA and VP4. Conversion of virus particles to SSPs correlates with altered reactivity of VP2 and to a lesser extent VP1 and VP3, with the monofunctional reagent 3 H-NSP. (author)

  7. Dense particles and slow sedimenting particles produced by ultraviolet irradiation of poliovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetz, K.; Zeichhardt, H.; Willingmann, P.; Habermehl, K.O. (Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-06-01

    Low doses of u.v. radiation rapidly inactivate poliovirus, the virus progressively converting into dense particles (DPs) of buoyant density 1.44 g/ml in CsCl. The DPs are structurally and antigenically related to standard virus (N-antigen), i.e. indistinguishable from virus in their RNA and protein content and in sedimentation properties. Furthermore, there is no difference in reactivity of the structural proteins of virus and DPs with the monofunctional reagent (/sup 3/H)N-succinimidyl propionate (/sup 3/H-NSP). However, DPs differ from virus in that their capsids are permeable to several ions, and they can be degraded by RNase and protease. Increasing the radiation dose causes a successive transformation of DPs into 105S slow-sedimenting particles (SSPs), antigenically related to 76S artificial empty capsids (AECs) or H-antigen, but differing physically and structurally. The SSPs have a higher S value than AECs and contain all the capsid proteins, including VP4, and the RNA, both of these macromolecules being absent from AECs. It is concluded, therefore, that transformation from N- to H- antigenicity by u.v. radiation does not require release of RNA and VP4. Conversion of virus particles to SSPs correlates with altered reactivity of VP2 and to a lesser extent VP1 and VP3, with the monofunctional reagent /sup 3/H-NSP.

  8. Neutron irradiation of bacteria in the presence and absence of secondary charged-particle equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunec, J.; Cramp, W.A.; Hornsey, S.

    1980-01-01

    The survival rate of Shigella flexneri has been measured for irradiation with 7-MeV neutrons in the presence and absence of secondary charged-particle equilibrium. The data were analyzed to assess the separate response of the cells to the knock-on proton and α-particle plus heavy-recoil components. A detailed consideration of the frequency of α-particle and heavy-recoil traversals of the cell has been made to explain our results, and in addition we have applied this approach to analyze the earlier results obtained with mammalian cells. We conclude that of the secondary charged-particles produced by the Hammersmith neutron beam, the highest LET particles, the heavy-recoil nuclei, contribute a minor proportion of damage to bacteria but form a major contribution of damage in mammalian cells. The reduction in oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) with neutrons compared with low LET radiation for mammalian cells is due almost entirely to the influence of the heavy recoils and the contribution of the α-particle and knock-on protons to the reduction of the OER is relatively minor. For Shigella flexneri the α particles and heavy recoils make approximately equal contributions to the reduction in OER

  9. Investigation on the biological effects of pharynx irradiation by single-particle microbeam and C.elegans immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoying; Yang Gen; Chen Lianyun; Wu Lijun; Li Buqing

    2010-01-01

    Using C.elegans- with clear genetic background, easy genetic maneuverability, small individual, transparence, easily penetrated by a variety of particle as a in vivo model organism, irradiation damage at the individual level of the signal transduction and the mechanism research were investigated. In order to radiate accurately, the worms need Immobilize. The results showed that the ether: ethanol = 1:1 mixture, enabled the worms quickly anesthesia, and kept the worms Immobilization in the whole irradiation process, then quickly recovered after irradiation and recovery rate of 100%. On the basis, the laved and the apoptotic cells in the distal gonad would be test when the worm pharynx were irradiated by single-particle microbeam. The primary results showed that the apoptotic cells in distal gonad significantly increased when the worm pharynx were irradiated 5000 particles. (authors)

  10. Differential Effects of Alpha-Particle Radiation and X-Irradiation on Genes Associated with Apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, V.; Howland, M.; Chen, J.; Kutzner, B.; Wilkins, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differential effects of alpha-(α) particle radiation and X-rays on apoptosis and associated changes in gene expression. Human monocytic cells were exposed to a-particle radiation and X-rays from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Four days postexposure, cell death was measured by flow cytometry and 84 genes related to apoptosis were analyzed using real-time PCR. On average, 33% of the cells were apoptotic at 1.5 Gy of a-particle radiation. Transcript profiling showed statistical expression of 15 genes at all three doses tested. Cells exposed to X-rays were <5% apoptotic at ∼1.5 Gy and induced less than a 2-fold expression in 6 apoptotic genes at the higher doses of radiation. Among these 6 genes, Fas and TNF-α were common to the α-irradiated cells. This data suggests that α-particle radiation initiates cell death by TNF-a and Fas activation and through intermediate signalling mediators that are distinct from X-irradiated cells

  11. Electron probe micro-analysis of irradiated Triso-coated UO2 particles, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kosaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1983-11-01

    The Triso-coated low-enriched UO 2 particles were subjected to the post-irradiation electron probe micro-analysis. Observations and analyses on the amoeba effect, inclusions and solutes in the UO 2 matrix were made. In the cooler side of the particle which suffered extensive kernel migration, two significant features were observed: (1) the wake of minute particles, presumably UO 2 , left by the moving kernel in the carbon phase and (2) carbon precipitation in the pores and along the grain boundaries of the UO 2 kernel. Both features could be hardly explained by the gas-phase mechanism of carbon transport and rather suggest the solid state mechanism. Two-types of 4d-transition metal inclusions were observed: the one which was predominantly Mo with a fraction of Tc and another which was enriched with Ru and containing significant amount of Si. The Mo and Si were also found in the UO 2 matrix; the observation led to the discussion of the oxygen potential in the irradiated Triso-coated UO 2 particle. (author)

  12. Effect of irradiation on cell cycle, cell death and expression of its related proteins in normal human oral keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mi Ae; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Oh, Sung Ook; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; Lee, Sul Mi; Jeon, In Seong

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the radiosensitivity of the normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK), and the effect of irradiation on cell cycle and protein expression. To evaluate the radiosensitivity of NHOK, the number of colonies and cells were counted after irradiation and the SF2 (survival fraction as 2 Gy) value, and the cell survival curve fitted on a linear-quadratic model were obtained. LDH analysis was carried out to evaluate the necrosis of NHOK at 1, 2,3, and 4 days after 2, 10, and 20 Gy irradiation. Cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry at 1, 2, 3, and 4 days after 2, 10, and 20 Gy irradiation. Finally, proteins related cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were analysed by Western blot. The number of survival cell was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The cell survival curve showed SF2, α, and β values to be 0.568, 0.209, and 0.020 respectively. At 20 Gy irradiated cells showed higher optical density than the control group. After irradiation, apoptosis was not observed but G2 arrest was observed in the NHOK cells. 1 day after 10 Gy irradiation, the expression of p53 remained unchanged, the p21 WAF1/Cip1 increased and the mdm2 decreased. The expression of bax, bcl-2, cyclin B1, and cyclin D remained unchanged. These results indicate that NHOK responds to irradiation by G2 arrest, which is possibly mediated by the expression of p21 WAF1/Cip1 , and that cell necrosis occurs by high dose irradiation.

  13. The study of creep in stainless steel irradiated with fast neutron and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, D.A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the creep behavior of the 316 type stainless steel 50% cold worked in different conditions of temperature and applied stress, after neutron radiation and Alfa particles implantation. For this experiment, non-irradiated samples, samples irradiated in the research reactor IEA-R1 with fast neutron (E≥ MeV) up to a fluence of 8.6.10 17 n/cm 2 , and samples implanted with Alfa particles in the cyclotron CV-28 with Helium concentrations of 5 and 26 appm, were creep tested with applied stresses of the 200-300 MPa at temperatures between 650 0 C and 700 0 C. The deformation versus time curves were plotted and it was observed tha the second stage is not well defined, with the creep rate increasing continuously until the occurrence of failure of the material. The study of the effect of increase from 200 MPa to 300 MPa at the same temperature was performed. It can be concluded that this increase produces an approximately 70% reductions in the fracture time of the material, with practically no influence in the total deformation. Samples were tested at different temperatures (650, 675 and 700 0 C) at a same applied stress (200 MPa). It has been observed that a temperature of 50 0 C produces 98,9% of reduction in the fracture time and almost doubles the total deformation. On neutron irradiated samples, creep tests were performed at the same temperature and stress of the non irradiated samples. Comparing the results obtained a tendency of embrittlement due to the neutron irradiation can be observed; no remarkable structure changes were detected due to small fast neutron. Microstructural and metalographic observations were performed before and after each creep test. (author) [pt

  14. Normal form of particle motion under the influence of an ac dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tomás

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available ac dipoles in accelerators are used to excite coherent betatron oscillations at a drive frequency close to the tune. These beam oscillations may last arbitrarily long and, in principle, there is no significant emittance growth if the ac dipole is adiabatically turned on and off. Therefore the ac dipole seems to be an adequate tool for nonlinear diagnostics provided the particle motion is well described in the presence of the ac dipole and nonlinearities. Normal forms and Lie algebra are powerful tools to study the nonlinear content of an accelerator lattice. In this article a way to obtain the normal form of the Hamiltonian of an accelerator with an ac dipole is described. The particle motion to first order in the nonlinearities is derived using Lie algebra techniques. The dependence of the Hamiltonian terms on the longitudinal coordinate is studied showing that they vary differently depending on the ac dipole parameters. The relation is given between the lines of the Fourier spectrum of the turn-by-turn motion and the Hamiltonian terms.

  15. Investigation of instability of M23C6 particles in F82H steel under electron and ion irradiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Sho; Yang, Huilong; Shen, Jingjie; Zhao, Zishou; McGrady, John; Hamaguchi, Dai; Ando, Mamami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Abe, Hiroaki

    2018-04-01

    In order to clarify the instability of M23C6 in F82H steel under irradiation, both electron irradiation using a high voltage electron microscope (HVEM) and ion irradiation using an ion accelerator were performed. For the electron irradiation, in-situ observation under 2 MV electron irradiation and ex-situ high resolution electron microscopic (HREM) analysis were utilized to evaluate the response of M23C6 against irradiation. The temperature dependence of the irradiation induced instability of the carbide was first confirmed: 293 K indicating severe loss of crystallinity due to dissolution of the constituent atoms though irradiation-enhanced diffusion under the vacancy diffusion by the focused electron beam irradiation. For the ion irradiation, 10.5 MeV-Fe3+ ion was applied to bombard the F82H steel at 673 K to achieve the displacement damage of ≈20 dpa at the depth of 1.0 μm from surface. Cross-section TEM specimens were prepared by a focused ion beam technique. The shrinkage of carbide particles was observed especially near the irradiation surface. Besides, the lattice fringes at the periphery of carbide were observed in the irradiated M23C6 by the HREM analysis, which is different from that observed in the electron irradiation. It was clarified that the instability of M23C6 is dependent on the irradiation conditions, indicating that the flow rate of vacancy type defects might be the key factor to cause the dissolution of constituent atoms of carbide particles into matrix under irradiation.

  16. Towards the intrahour forecasting of direct normal irradiance using sky-imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nou, Julien; Chauvin, Rémi; Eynard, Julien; Thil, Stéphane; Grieu, Stéphane

    2018-04-01

    Increasing power plant efficiency through improved operation is key in the development of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. To this end, one of the most challenging topics remains accurately forecasting the solar resource at a short-term horizon. Indeed, in CSP plants, production is directly impacted by both the availability and variability of the solar resource and, more specifically, by Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI). The present paper deals with a new approach to the intrahour forecasting (the forecast horizon [Formula: see text] is up to [Formula: see text] ahead) of DNI, taking advantage of the fact that this quantity can be split into two terms, i.e. clear-sky DNI and the clear sky index. Clear-sky DNI is forecasted from DNI measurements, using an empirical model (Ineichen and Perez, 2002) combined with a persistence of atmospheric turbidity. Moreover, in the framework of the CSPIMP (Concentrating Solar Power plant efficiency IMProvement) research project, PROMES-CNRS has developed a sky imager able to provide High Dynamic Range (HDR) images. So, regarding the clear-sky index, it is forecasted from sky-imaging data, using an Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). A hybrid algorithm that takes inspiration from the classification algorithm proposed by Ghonima et al. (2012) when clear-sky anisotropy is known and from the hybrid thresholding algorithm proposed by Li et al. (2011) in the opposite case has been developed to the detection of clouds. Performance is evaluated via a comparative study in which persistence models - either a persistence of DNI or a persistence of the clear-sky index - are included. Preliminary results highlight that the proposed approach has the potential to outperform these models (both persistence models achieve similar performance) in terms of forecasting accuracy: over the test data used, RMSE (the Root Mean Square Error) is reduced of about [Formula: see text], with [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see

  17. Bystander-induced apoptosis and premature differentiation in primary urothelial explants after charged particle microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.; Folkard, M.; Mothersill, C.; Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    The ureter primary explant technique was developed to study bystander effects under in vivo like conditions where stem and differentiated cells are present. Irradiation was performed with a 3 He 2+ charged particle microbeam available at the Gray Cancer Institute, with high (∼2 μm) precision. Tissue sections from porcine ureters were pre-irradiated with the microbeam at a single location with 10 3 He 2+ particles (5 MeV; LET 70 keV.μm -1 ). After irradiation, the tissue section was incubated for 7 days, thus allowing the explant outgrowth to form. Total cellular damage (total fraction of micronucleated and apoptotic cells) was measured according to morphological criteria. Apoptosis was also assessed using a 3'-OH DNA end-labelling technique. Premature differentiation was estimated using antibodies to uroplakin III, a specific marker of terminal urothelial differentiation. Results of our experiments demonstrated a significant bystander-induced differentiation and a less significant increase in apoptotic and micronucleated cells. A hypothesis based on the protective nature of the bystander effect is proposed. (author)

  18. Thermoluminescence of NaF:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors exposed to beta particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Haro, A.R.; Cruz-Vazquez, C.; Orante-Barron, V.R. [Polymers and Materials Research Department, University of Sonora (Mexico); Bernal, R. [Physics Research Department, University of Sonora (Mexico); Kitis, G. [Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Castano, V.M. [Applied Physics and Advanced Technology Center, Physics Institute, Autonomous National University of Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-02-15

    Pellet-shaped NaF:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized by sintering. When a 5 K/s heating rate was used, the char-acteristic glow curves of beta particle irradiated samples exhibited two thermoluminescence (TL) maxima located at 401 K and 498 K, being the higher temperature max-imum the most intense. A peak located between 473 and 523 K is considered to have a position very suitable to assure good thermal stability of the stored TL, so this phosphor is attractive for radiation dosimetry. Beta particle irradiated samples displayed a TL response that increases as the radiation dose increased in the 0.08 to 42.5 Gy dose range, with a linear behavior below 10 Gy followed by a sublinear one for higher doses. Under storage after irradiation, the TL maximum at 498 K displayed a remarkable stability, and the TL fading revealed that the maximum at 401 K is not a single peak. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Semi-empirical models for the estimation of clear sky solar global and direct normal irradiances in the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janjai, S.; Sricharoen, K.; Pattarapanitchai, S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → New semi-empirical models for predicting clear sky irradiance were developed. → The proposed models compare favorably with other empirical models. → Performance of proposed models is comparable with that of widely used physical models. → The proposed models have advantage over the physical models in terms of simplicity. -- Abstract: This paper presents semi-empirical models for estimating global and direct normal solar irradiances under clear sky conditions in the tropics. The models are based on a one-year period of clear sky global and direct normal irradiances data collected at three solar radiation monitoring stations in Thailand: Chiang Mai (18.78 o N, 98.98 o E) located in the North of the country, Nakhon Pathom (13.82 o N, 100.04 o E) in the Centre and Songkhla (7.20 o N, 100.60 o E) in the South. The models describe global and direct normal irradiances as functions of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient, the Angstrom wavelength exponent, precipitable water and total column ozone. The data of Angstrom turbidity coefficient, wavelength exponent and precipitable water were obtained from AERONET sunphotometers, and column ozone was retrieved from the OMI/AURA satellite. Model validation was accomplished using data from these three stations for the data periods which were not included in the model formulation. The models were also validated against an independent data set collected at Ubon Ratchathani (15.25 o N, 104.87 o E) in the Northeast. The global and direct normal irradiances calculated from the models and those obtained from measurements are in good agreement, with the root mean square difference (RMSD) of 7.5% for both global and direct normal irradiances. The performance of the models was also compared with that of other models. The performance of the models compared favorably with that of empirical models. Additionally, the accuracy of irradiances predicted from the proposed model are comparable with that obtained from some

  20. Alpha-particles microbeam irradiation: impact of reactive oxygen species in bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, M.

    2008-11-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects arise in bystander cells that receive signals from directly irradiated cells. To date, free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response, but this is incompletely characterized. To mark temporal and spatial impacts of bystander effect, we employed a precise α-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of sub-confluent osteoblastic cell cultures (MC3T3-E1). We identified the cellular membrane and mitochondria like two distinct places generating reactive oxygen species. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after filipin treatment, evidencing the pivotal role of membrane in MC3T3-E1 cells bystander response. To determine impact of bystander effect at a cell level, cellular consequences of this membrane-dependant bystander effect were then investigated. A variable fraction of the cell population (10 to 100%) was individually targeted. In this case, mitotic death and micronuclei yield both increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells demonstrating a role of bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Our results indicate a complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals that lead to a membrane-dependant amplification of cell responses. (author)

  1. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  2. On the dependance of the ''normalized multiplicity'' of particles produced in proton-nucleus interactions on the primary energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babecki, J.

    1975-01-01

    The mean ''normalized multiplicities'' of particles produced in p-nucleus interactions: with the leading particles (R 1 ) and without them (R 2 ) were calculated from the emulsion data. The independence of R 2 of the primary energy E 0 were stated in very wide interval of E 0 from 6.2 to thousands of GeV. R 2 is approximately equal to the mean number of collisions of the primary particle in the nucleus. (author)

  3. Fabrication of micropillar substrates using replicas of alpha-particle irradiated and chemically etched PADC films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.M.; Chong, E.Y.W.; Roy, V.A.L.; Cheung, K.M.C.; Yeung, K.W.K.; Yu, K.N.

    2012-01-01

    We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. Polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films were irradiated by alpha particles and then chemically etched to form a cast with micron-scale spherical pores. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica of this PADC film gave a micropillar substrate with micron-scale spherical pillars. HeLa cells cultured on such a micropillar substrate had significantly larger percentage of cells entering S-phase, attached cell numbers and cell spreading areas. - Highlights: ► We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. ► Polyallyldiglycol carbonate films were irradiated and etched to form casts. ► Polydimethylsiloxane replica then formed the micropillar substrates. ► Attachment and proliferation of HeLa cells were enhanced on these substrates.

  4. Fabrication of micropillar substrates using replicas of alpha-particle irradiated and chemically etched PADC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.K.M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chong, E.Y.W. [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Roy, V.A.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Cheung, K.M.C.; Yeung, K.W.K. [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: appetery@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2012-07-15

    We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. Polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films were irradiated by alpha particles and then chemically etched to form a cast with micron-scale spherical pores. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica of this PADC film gave a micropillar substrate with micron-scale spherical pillars. HeLa cells cultured on such a micropillar substrate had significantly larger percentage of cells entering S-phase, attached cell numbers and cell spreading areas. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyallyldiglycol carbonate films were irradiated and etched to form casts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polydimethylsiloxane replica then formed the micropillar substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attachment and proliferation of HeLa cells were enhanced on these substrates.

  5. Noise behaviour of semiinsulating GaAs particle detectors at various temperatures before and after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenbusch, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Chu, Z.; Krais, R.; Kubicki, T.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Pandoulas, D.; Rente, C.; Syben, O.; Toporowski, M.; Wittmer, B.; Xiao, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the noise behaviour of surface barrier detectors (double sided Schottky contact) made of semiinsulating GaAs. Two types of measurements were performed: equivalent noise charge (ENC) and noise power density spectra in a frequency range from 10 Hz to 500 kHz. The shape of the density spectra are a powerful tool to examine the physical origin of the noise, before irradiation it is dominated by generation-recombination processes caused by deep levels. Temperature dependent noise measurements reveal the deep level parameters like activation energy and cross section, which are also extracted by analyzing the time transients of the charge pulse from α-particles. After irradiation with protons, neutrons and pions the influence of the deep levels being originally responsible for the noise is found to decrease and a reduction of the noise over the entire frequency range with increasing fluence is observed. (orig.)

  6. Modelling of a general purpose irradiation chamber using a Monte Carlo particle transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhiyauddin Ahmad Fauzi; Sheik, F.O.A.; Nurul Fadzlin Hasbullah

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The aim of this research is to stimulate the effectiveness use of a general purpose irradiation chamber to contain pure neutron particles obtained from a research reactor. The secondary neutron and gamma particles dose discharge from the chamber layers will be used as a platform to estimate the safe dimension of the chamber. The chamber, made up of layers of lead (Pb), shielding, polyethylene (PE), moderator and commercial grade aluminium (Al) cladding is proposed for the use of interacting samples with pure neutron particles in a nuclear reactor environment. The estimation was accomplished through simulation based on general Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code using Los Alamos MCNPX software. Simulations were performed on the model of the chamber subjected to high neutron flux radiation and its gamma radiation product. The model of neutron particle used is based on the neutron source found in PUSPATI TRIGA MARK II research reactor which holds a maximum flux value of 1 x 10 12 neutron/ cm 2 s. The expected outcomes of this research are zero gamma dose in the core of the chamber and neutron dose rate of less than 10 μSv/ day discharge from the chamber system. (author)

  7. Impairments of DNA synthesization and normal tissue after irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ando, Koichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uzawa, Akiko; Koike, Sachiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Monobe, Manami; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate [2- 14 C]thymidine as a tracer, to detect radiation damages in gut. We examined the radiolabeled thymidine accumulation in gut after irradiated with carbon-ion. Mice were given whole body irradiation with carbon-ion (290 MeV/u, 6 cm-spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), 20 keV/μm). Gut [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation significantly decreased 4 hr after irradiated with 9 Gy, and did not recover until 24 hr after irradiation. Furthermore, we investigated the dose dependency of [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation in gut. At 12 hr after irradiation, accumulation of thymidine decreased with an increase of carbon-ion doses (1-9 Gy), whereas that of [6- 3 H]thymidine was independent of radiation dose. These results suggest that the difference of isotope-labeled position causes change of thymidine kinetics. At 84 hr after irradiation, [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation showed no dose dependence. However, a clear dose dependence was obtained when [2- 14 C]thymidine accumulation was corrected by blood flow. Uptake of a regional blood flow marker 14 C-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in gut increased after 9-18 Gy irradiation. These findings demonstrated that the [2- 14 C]thymidine uptake in vivo could be an appropriate marker for investigating gut responses and blood flow should be taken account for the evaluation by [2- 14 C]thymidine. (author)

  8. Neutron activation analysis of several elements in the unicellular alga Cyanidium caldarium irradiated by α particles from neutron captured boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shuho; Oota, Tadachika; Otani, Mayumi; Aso, Sueo

    1984-01-01

    The TRIGA MARK 2 atomic reactor was used not only for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) but also as the irradiation source of α particles derived from the 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reaction for biological samples. The acidophilic and thermophilic unicellular alga (Cyanidium caldarium Geitler) was incubated for 20 hours after irradiation and then its elemental concentrations were analysed by INAA. An increase in the quantities of 56 Mn, 28 Al and 38 Cl, and a decrease of 27 Mg and 42 K were detected in the irradiated cells in contrast to non-irradiated cells. (author)

  9. Cellular proliferation and infiltration following interstitial irradiation of normal dog brain is altered by an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fike, John R.; Gobbel, Glenn T.; Chou, Dean; Wijnhoven, Bas P. L.; Bellinzona, Mattia; Nakagawa, Minoru; Seilhan, Theresa M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantitatively define proliferative and infiltrative cell responses after focal 125 I irradiation of normal brain, and to determine the effects of an intravenous infusion of α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) on those responses. Methods and Materials: Adult beagle dogs were irradiated using high activity 125 I sources. Saline (control) or DFMO (150 mg/kg/day) was infused for 18 days starting 2 days before irradiation. At varying times up to 8 weeks after irradiation, brain tissues were collected and the cell responses in and around the focal lesion were quantified. Immunohistochemical stains were used to label astrocytes (GFAP), vascular endothelial cells (Factor VIII), polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs; MAC 387) and cells synthesizing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (BrdU). Cellular responses were quantified using a histomorphometric analysis. Results: After radiation alone, cellular events included a substantial acute inflammatory response followed by increased BrdU labeling and progressive increases in numbers of capillaries and astrocytes. α-Difluoromethylornithine treatment significantly affected the measured cell responses. As in controls, an early inflammatory response was measured, but after 2 weeks there were more PMNs/unit area than in controls. The onset of measurable BrdU labeling was delayed in DFMO-treated animals, and the magnitude of labeling was significantly reduced. Increases in astrocyte and vessel numbers/mm 2 were observed after a 2-week delay. At the site of implant, astrocytes from DFMO-treated dogs were significantly smaller than those from controls. Conclusions: There is substantial cell proliferation and infiltration in response to interstitial irradiation of normal brain, and these responses are significantly altered by DFMO treatment. Although the precise mechanisms by which DFMO exerts its effects in this model are not known, the results from this study suggest that modification of radiation

  10. Elevation of extracellular adenosine enhances haemopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in normal and gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Netikiva, J.; Hola, J. [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    1997-03-01

    Effects of combined treatment with drugs elevating extracellular adenosine (dipyridamole /DP/, inhibiting the extracellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate /AMP/, an adenosine pro-drug), and G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) on haemopoiesis of normal and gamma-irradiated mice were ascertained. The agents were administered alone or in combination in a 4-day regimen. In normal, unirradiated animals, the haematological endpoints were determined 24 hours after the completion of the treatment. It was shown that the effects of G-CSF, i.e., increases in peripheral blood neutrophils, granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and morphologically recognizable granulocyte cells in femoral marrow and a decrease in the marrow erythroid cells, can be enhanced by the combination of DP plus AMP administrated 30 minutes before G-CSF. Furthermore, it was found that the stimulatory action of DP plus AMP was expressed particularly at lower doses of G-CSF (1.5, 3, and 4.5 {mu}g/d). In experiments with irradiated mice, when the 4-day therapeutic regimen was applied on days 3 to 6 following irradiation with the dose of 4 Gy, analogical stimulation of granulopoiesis was observed in the recovery phase on days 14 and 18 after irradiation. As example, see Fig. 1 for counts of granulocyte cells in femoral bone marrow. (authors)

  11. Elevation of extracellular adenosine enhances haemopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in normal and gamma-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Netikiva, J.; Hola, J.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of combined treatment with drugs elevating extracellular adenosine (dipyridamole /DP/, inhibiting the extracellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate /AMP/, an adenosine pro-drug), and G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) on haemopoiesis of normal and gamma-irradiated mice were ascertained. The agents were administered alone or in combination in a 4-day regimen. In normal, unirradiated animals, the haematological endpoints were determined 24 hours after the completion of the treatment. It was shown that the effects of G-CSF, i.e., increases in peripheral blood neutrophils, granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and morphologically recognizable granulocyte cells in femoral marrow and a decrease in the marrow erythroid cells, can be enhanced by the combination of DP plus AMP administrated 30 minutes before G-CSF. Furthermore, it was found that the stimulatory action of DP plus AMP was expressed particularly at lower doses of G-CSF (1.5, 3, and 4.5 μg/d). In experiments with irradiated mice, when the 4-day therapeutic regimen was applied on days 3 to 6 following irradiation with the dose of 4 Gy, analogical stimulation of granulopoiesis was observed in the recovery phase on days 14 and 18 after irradiation. As example, see Fig. 1 for counts of granulocyte cells in femoral bone marrow. (authors)

  12. Dispersal of normal and irradiated laboratory strains and wild strains of the olive fly Dacus oleae in an olive grove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, B.S.; Economopoulos, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on the dispersal rates of normal and γ-irradiated laboratory-reared as well as wild Dacus oleae (Gmelin) were carried out in an olive grove using protein-baited McPhail traps. No differences were found in the dispersal rates of normal and irradiated laboratory-cultured flies or between males and females. The mean distance travelled by the surviving flies up to 2 weeks after release was 180-190 m, and by that time only ca. 13% of the flies remained alive in the grove. No laboratory-reared flies were trapped outside the olive grove. The limited amount of data obtained with wild flies suggested that they may disperse over greater distances than laboratory-reared flies

  13. Doping of semiconductors using radiation defects produced by irradiation with protons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, V.A.; Kozlovski, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    One of the modern methods for modifying semiconductors using beams of protons and alpha particles is analyzed; this modification is accomplished by the controlled introduction of radiation defects into the semiconductor. It is shown that doping semiconductors with radiation defects produced by irradiation with light ions opens up fresh opportunities for controlling the properties of semiconducting materials and for the development of new devices designed for optoelectronics, microelectronics, and nanoelectronics based on these materials; these devices differ favorably from those obtained by conventional doping methods, i.e., by diffusion, epitaxy, and ion implantation

  14. Two reactions method for accurate analysis by irradiation with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, K.; Sastri, C.S.; Valladon, M.; Borderie, B.; Debrun, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    In the average stopping power method the formula error itself was negligible but systematic errors could be introduced by the stopping power data used in this formula. A method directly derived from the average stopping power method, but based on the use of two nuclear reactions, is described here. This method has a negligible formula error and does not require the use of any stopping power or range data: accurate and 'self-consistent' analysis by irradiation with charged particles is then possible. (Auth.)

  15. Momenta of particles emitted by target at intensive irradiation by low-energy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Beshenkov, V G; Marchenko, V A

    2002-01-01

    One measured the aggregate momenta of the target emitted particles at the intensive sputtering by E sub 0 approx = 0.5 keV energy heavy inert gases. For liquid and being under premelting temperature Ga target the measured values are close to the expected momenta of sputtered metallic atoms and reflection ions, for Cu and Zr targets they are essentially higher. One assumes that sputtering of atoms of gas-diffuser implanted into the target causes the surplus momentum. The estimated average energy of these atoms approx = 20 eV. Under Ga irradiation the implanted atoms diffuse mainly towards the surface and are desorbed

  16. Design practice and operational experience of highly irradiated, high-performance normal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.

    1982-09-01

    The limitations of high performance magnets are discussed in terms of mechanical, temperature, and electrical limits. The limitations of magnets that are highly irradiated by neutrons, gamma radiation, or x radiation are discussed

  17. Effect Of Extensive Use Of Garlic In Feed On Normal And Irradiated Stressed Male Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KASSAB, F.M.A.; ABDEL-KHALEK, L.G.; KAMAL, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty mature male albino rats were used in the present study to evaluate the effect of using crude garlic for one month on general heath condition and to compare between garlic intakes pre and post-irradiated stressed rats.Fresh minced cloves (8-10) of garlic were added to the rat diet twice per day for 30 days in garlic group and for 7 and 15 days prior to and after 4 Gy irradiation in pre and post-irradiated garlic groups, respectively. The results denoted that the extensive use of garlic in food improved the general condition in non-stressed rats while in irradiated stressed rats, the immediate intake of garlic after radiation was more efficient in ameliorating the undesirable radiation effects, where some biochemical and hematological parameters were examined in pre and post-garlic intake such as Hb, RBCs, platelets, T 3 , testosterone and insulin.

  18. Blood biochemical changes in lambs infected with normal and gamma irradiated third stage larvae of Dictyocaulus filaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, T.K.; Dhar, D.N.; Bansal, G.C.; Sharma, R.L. (Indian Veterinary Research Inst., Srinagar (India). Regional Centre)

    1984-09-01

    Primary infections with normal third stage larvae of Dictyocaulus filaria at a dose of 150 1/kg caused significant decrease in the levels of haemoglobin, blood glucose, serum total proteins, serum albumin, albumin/globulin ratio and increase in levels of total globulins and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in lambs. Almost similar changes in the above blood constituents excepting for haemoglobin, blood glucose and LDH activity were noticed in lambs immunised with two doses of gamma irradiation larvae and subsequently challenged with normal larvae of D. filaria at a dose of 150 1/kg. In both the infected groups, serum calcium, inorganic phosphorus, malate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities were, however, not affected.

  19. The inhibition of DNA repair by aphidicolin or cytosine arabinoside in X-irradiated normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.; Crocombe, K.; Mirzayans, R.

    1981-01-01

    Normal and excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts were X-irradiated and the influence on DNA repair of either the repair inhibitor cytosine arabinoside or the specific inhibitor of DNA polymerase α, aphidicolin, investigated. The data indicated that the repair of a certain fraction of X-ray-induced lesions can be inhibited in both cell lines by both compounds. Thus, as aphidicolin blocks the operation of polymerase α, this enzyme must be involved in an excision repair pathway operating in both normal and excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells. (orig.)

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of a superficially porous particle with unique, elongated pore channels normal to the surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ta-Chen; Mack, Anne; Chen, Wu; Liu, Jia; Dittmann, Monika; Wang, Xiaoli; Barber, William E

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, superficially porous particles (SPPs) have drawn great interest because of their special particle characteristics and improvement in separation efficiency. Superficially porous particles are currently manufactured by adding silica nanoparticles onto solid cores using either a multistep multilayer process or one-step coacervation process. The pore size is mainly controlled by the size of the silica nanoparticles and the tortuous pore channel geometry is determined by how those nanoparticles randomly aggregate. Such tortuous pore structure is also similar to that of all totally porous particles used in HPLC today. In this article, we report on the development of a next generation superficially porous particle with a unique pore structure that includes a thinner shell thickness and ordered pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface. The method of making the new superficially porous particles is a process called pseudomorphic transformation (PMT), which is a form of micelle templating. Porosity is no longer controlled by randomly aggregated nanoparticles but rather by micelles that have an ordered liquid crystal structure. The new particle possesses many advantages such as a narrower particle size distribution, thinner porous layer with high surface area and, most importantly, highly ordered, non-tortuous pore channels oriented normal to the particle surface. This PMT process has been applied to make 1.8-5.1μm SPPs with pore size controlled around 75Å and surface area around 100m(2)/g. All particles with different sizes show the same unique pore structure with tunable pore size and shell thickness. The impact of the novel pore structure on the performance of these particles is characterized by measuring van Deemter curves and constructing kinetic plots. Reduced plate heights as low as 1.0 have been achieved on conventional LC instruments. This indicates higher efficiency of such particles compared to conventional totally porous and

  1. Changes in regional blood flow of normal and tumor tissues following hyperthermia and combined X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    1986-01-01

    Hyperthermia and X-ray irradiation were given to Ehrlich tumors, which were induced in the ventrum of the right hind foot of ICR mice, and to the normal tissues. Their effects on regional blood flow were examined using Xe-133 local clearance method. Blood flow of the normal tissues remained unchanged by heating at 41 deg C for 30 minutes, and increased by heating at 43 deg C and 45 deg C for 30 minutes. On the contrary, blood flow of the tumors decreased with an increase in temperature. When hypertermia (43 deg C for 30 minutes) was combined with irradiation of 30 Gy, decrease in blood flow of the tumors was greater than the normal tissues at 24 hours. Blood flow of the tumors depended on tumor size. The decreased amount of blood flow by hyperthermia was more for tumors > 250 mm 3 than tumors 3 . Blood flow ratios of tumor to normal tissues were also smaller in tumors > 250 mm 3 than tumors 3 . In the case of tumors 3 , blood flow tended to return to normal at 3 hr after heating at 43 deg C for 30 min. However, this was not seen in tumors > 250 mm 3 . (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Performance of HTGR fertile particles irradiated in HFIR capsule HT-32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Robbins, J.M.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kania, M.J.

    1980-04-01

    The HT-32 experiment was an uninstrumented capsule irradiated for four cycles in the target position of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The experiment was designed to: provide supplemental simulated fuel rods for thermal transport and expansion measurements; test fertile kernels with Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 additives for improved fission product retention; study the stability and permeability of low-temperature isotropic (LTI) pyrocarbon coatings; test Biso- and Triso-coatings derived in a large (0.24-m-dia) coating furnace with a frit distributor; investigate the performance of particles with an outer layer of SiC both as loose particles and as resin-bonded fuel rods; and evaluate high-density alumina as a potential high-temperature thermometry sheathing material

  3. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term “fate” of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability. PMID:22966418

  4. Rotation of a Spherical Particle with Electrical Dipole Moment Induced by Steady Irradiation in a Static Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    Rotation of a spherical particle in a static electric field and under steady irradiation that induces an electric dipole moment in the particle is studied for the first time. Along with the general treatment of the phenomenon, we analyze possible mechanisms underlying the photoinduction of dipole moment in the particle. Estimations of the angular velocity and the power expended by the rotating particle are provided. The indicated characteristics reach their maximum values if the size of particles is within the range of 10 nm to 10 μm.

  5. Effects of concentrated ambient particles on normal and hypersecretory airways in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkema, Jack R; Keeler, Gerald; Wagner, James; Morishita, Masako; Timm, Edward; Hotchkiss, Jon; Marsik, Frank; Dvonch, Timothy; Kaminski, Norbert; Barr, Edward

    2004-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that elevated levels of particulate air pollution in urban communities are associated with increases in attacks of asthma based on evidence from hospital admissions and emergency department visits. Principal pathologic features of chronic airway diseases, like asthma, are airway inflammation and mucous hypersecretion with excessive amounts of luminal mucus and increased numbers of mucus-secreting cells in regions of the respiratory tract that normally have few or no mucous cells (ie, mucous cell metaplasia). The overall goal of the present project was to understand the adverse effects of urban air fine particulate matter (PM2.5; pollutants in the outdoor air of a local Detroit community with a high incidence of childhood asthma; (2) determine the effects of this community-based PM2.5 on the airway epithelium in normal rats and rats compromised with preexisting hypersecretory airway diseases (ie, animal models of human allergic airway disease--asthma and chronic bronchitis); and (3) identify the chemical or physical components of PM2.5 that are responsible for PM2.5 -induced airway inflammation and epithelial alterations in these animal models. Two animal models of airway disease were used to examine the effects of PM2.5 exposure on preexisting hypersecretory airways: neutrophilic airway inflammation induced by endotoxin challenge in F344 rats and eosinophilic airway inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in BN rats. A mobile air monitoring and exposure laboratory equipped with inhalation exposure chambers for animal toxicology studies, air pollution monitors, and particulate collection devices was used in this investigation. The mobile laboratory was parked in a community in southwestern Detroit during the summer months when particulate air pollution is usually high (July and September 2000). We monitored the outdoor air pollution in this community daily, and exposed normal and compromised rats to concentrated PM2

  6. Temporally distinct response of irradiated normal human fibroblasts and their bystander cells to energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ni, Meinan; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects have been documented for a multitude of endpoints such as mutations, chromosome aberrations and cell death, which arise in nonirradiated bystander cells having received signals from directly irradiated cells; however, energetic heavy ion-induced bystander response is incompletely characterized. To address this, we employed precise microbeams of carbon and neon ions for targeting only a very small fraction of cells in confluent fibroblast cultures. Conventional broadfield irradiation was conducted in parallel to see the effects in irradiated cells. Exposure of 0.00026% of cells led to nearly 10% reductions in the clonogenic survival and twofold rises in the apoptotic incidence regardless of ion species. Whilst apoptotic frequency increased with time up to 72 h postirradiation in irradiated cells, its frequency escalated up to 24 h postirradiation but declined at 48 h postirradiation in bystander cells, indicating that bystander cells exhibit transient commitment to apoptosis. Carbon- and neon-ion microbeam irradiation similarly caused almost twofold increments in the levels of serine 15-phosphorylated p53 proteins, irrespective of whether 0.00026, 0.0013 or 0.0066% of cells were targeted. Whereas the levels of phosphorylated p53 were elevated and remained unchanged at 2 h and 6 h postirradiation in irradiated cells, its levels rose at 6 h postirradiation but not at 2 h postirradiation in bystander cells, suggesting that bystander cells manifest delayed p53 phosphorylation. Collectively, our results indicate that heavy ions inactivate clonogenic potential of bystander cells, and that the time course of the response to heavy ions differs between irradiated and bystander cells. These induced bystander responses could be a defensive mechanism that minimizes further expansion of aberrant cells

  7. Heavy particle irradiation, neurochemistry and behavior: thresholds, dose-response curves and recovery of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particles can affect the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), particularly the dopaminergic system. In turn, the radiation-induced disruption of dopaminergic function affects a variety of behaviors that are dependent upon the integrity of this system, including motor behavior (upper body strength), amphetamine (dopamine)-mediated taste aversion learning, and operant conditioning (fixed-ratio bar pressing). Although the relationships between heavy particle irradiation and the effects of exposure depend, to some extent, upon the specific behavioral or neurochemical endpoint under consideration, a review of the available research leads to the hypothesis that the endpoints mediated by the CNS have certain characteristics in common. These include: (1) a threshold, below which there is no apparent effect; (2) the lack of a dose-response relationship, or an extremely steep dose-response curve, depending on the particular endpoint; and (3) the absence of recovery of function, such that the heavy particle-induced behavioral and neural changes are present when tested up to one year following exposure. The current report reviews the data relevant to the degree to which these characteristics are common to neurochemical and behavioral endpoints that are mediated by the effects of exposure to heavy particles on CNS activity.

  8. A branching process model for the analysis of abortive colony size distributions in carbon ion-irradiated normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kawaguchi, Isao; Hara, Takamitsu; Saito, Kimiaki

    2014-01-01

    A single cell can form a colony, and ionizing irradiation has long been known to reduce such a cellular clonogenic potential. Analysis of abortive colonies unable to continue to grow should provide important information on the reproductive cell death (RCD) following irradiation. Our previous analysis with a branching process model showed that the RCD in normal human fibroblasts can persist over 16 generations following irradiation with low linear energy transfer (LET) γ-rays. Here we further set out to evaluate the RCD persistency in abortive colonies arising from normal human fibroblasts exposed to high-LET carbon ions (18.3 MeV/u, 108 keV/μm). We found that the abortive colony size distribution determined by biological experiments follows a linear relationship on the log–log plot, and that the Monte Carlo simulation using the RCD probability estimated from such a linear relationship well simulates the experimentally determined surviving fraction and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). We identified the short-term phase and long-term phase for the persistent RCD following carbon-ion irradiation, which were similar to those previously identified following γ-irradiation. Taken together, our results suggest that subsequent secondary or tertiary colony formation would be invaluable for understanding the long-lasting RCD. All together, our framework for analysis with a branching process model and a colony formation assay is applicable to determination of cellular responses to low- and high-LET radiation, and suggests that the long-lasting RCD is a pivotal determinant of the surviving fraction and the RBE. (author)

  9. Quantification of 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptors in the cerebellum of normal and x-irradiated rats during postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthiessen, L.; Daval, G.; Bailly, Y.; Gozlan, H.; Hamon, M.; Verge, D.

    1992-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors were studied in rats during the first postnatal month in the normal cerebellum and in the granule cell-deprived cerebellum produced by X-irradiation at postnatal day 5. Quantitative autoradiographic studies on sagittal sections of cerebellar vermis, using [ 125 1]BH-8-MeO-N-PAT as radioligand or specific anti-receptor antibodies, revealed that 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors existed in the molecular/Purkinje cell layer but at variable density from one lobule to another. Thus, in both normal and X-irradiated rats, the posterior lobules were more heavily labelled than the anterior ones, and the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A sites decreased progressively in all the cerebellar folia down to hardly detectable levels at postnatal day 21. However, the intensity of labelling remained higher at postnatal day 8 and postnatal day 12 in X-irradiated rats than in age-paired controls. Measurements of [ 3 H]8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] specific binding to membranes from whole cerebellum confirmed that the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A sites per mg membrane protein (B max ) was higher in X-irradiated animals than in age-paired controls. However, on a ''per cerebellum'' basis, no significant difference could be detected between the total number of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A sites, which progressively increased in both control and X-irradiated animals during the first postnatal month. These results therefore show that 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors are not located on developing granule cells. (author)

  10. Ultrastructural changes following electron irradiation in three-dimensional culture of normal human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chunmao; Ishikura, Naotaka; Tsukada, Sadao

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of electron irradiation on fibroblasts and extracellular matrices electron-microscopically. The three-dimensional dermal fibroblast culture was exposed to one, 4 or 10 Gy of electron beams. One day after irradiation, fibroblasts were vacuolated in all irradiated groups and intercellular spaces were increased in a dose-dependent manner. Seven days later, intercellular spaces became dense in both one and 4 Gy groups, although they were still extremely increased in the 10 Gy group. The remaining fibroblasts were still activated in all groups. Thirty days after irradiation, myofibroblastic cells were scarcely observed, but extracellular fine fibrils and collagen fibrils were observed in all irradiated groups. The other ultrastructural findings were similar to those in the control group. In conclusion, electron beams damaged not only cells but also extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix may be repaired by activated residual fibroblasts, resulting in the mixture of new and old collagen fibrils having different diamters. (N.K.)

  11. Irradiation of pre-packaged sliced cooked meat products with low and normal sodium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekelenburg, F.K.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation experiments were carried out with pre-packaged sliced cooked meat products with different initial counts of Enterobacteriaceae and mesophilic aerobic bacteria. In low-sodium meat products Enterobacteriaceae could effectively be inactivated in refrigerated or frozen products by irradiation with a dose of 1 or 2 kGy respectively, provided the number of these bacteria was below 10(3) to 10(4) per g. The low-sodium meat products involved endured above treatment without being seriously affected as to sensory qualities. Shelf-life of salted cooked meat products could be prolonged by irradiating the frozen product. Irradiation with a dose of 2 kGy enabled uncooled storage of the product for a restricted period (5-7 days). Best results were obtained for meat products with a salt content in the brine phase of greater than 4.0% (w/w) and having a good hygienic quality, i.e. an initial bacterial count below 10(4)/g. Packaging in a gas atmosphere (CO2) slightly enhanced protection as compared to vacuum packaging. Off-flavours as a result of irradiation of salted cooked meat products varied from slight to strong and depended on the type of product

  12. The Elemental Composition of Normal and Irradiated Rice Moth Corcyra Cephalonica (Staint) (Lepidoptera-Pyralidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abassy, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the variation induced in the elemental composition of the total body tissue of corcyra cephalonica Adult males and females wear irradiated as adult with 50,150 and 250 Gy or as, 5 days old egg with 25 Gy and 5 days old pupae with 50 Gy .The result obtained showed that phosphorus was the highest concentrated element in males but in case of female, potassium was the most abundant element. We notice that the arrangement of the ten elements was changed as a result of irradiation. In general, there was a slight difference in elemental composition between sexes in irradiated adults and immature stages. The effect of gamma irradiation was extended from 5 days old eggs to adults. The results indicated that adults emerged from irradiated 5 days old eggs were more sensitive than older one. The difference was always dose dependent. Radiation dis infestations method could be used for the control of insects. It is safer than other means of control and, the minimal required dose does not cause undesirable changes

  13. SU-F-T-150: Comparing Normal Tissue Irradiated Volumes for Proton Vs. Photon Treatment Plans On Lung Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A; Mohan, R; Liao, Z [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to compare the “irradiated volume” (IRV) of normal tissues receiving 5, 20, 50, 80 and 90% or higher of the prescription dose with passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) vs. IMRT of lung cancer patients. The overall goal of this research is to understand the factors affecting outcomes of a randomized PSPT vs. IMRT lung trial. Methods: Thirteen lung cancer patients, selected randomly, were analyzed. Each patient had PSPT and IMRT 74 Gy (RBE) plans meeting the same normal tissue constraints generated. IRVs were created for pairs of IMRT and PSPT plans on each patient. The volume of iGTV, (respiratory motion-incorporated GTV) was subtracted from each IRV to create normal tissue irradiated volume IRVNT. The average of IRVNT DVHs over all patients was also calculated for both modalities and inter-compared as were the selected dose-volume indices. Probability (p value) curves were calculated based on the Wilcoxon matched-paired signed-rank test to determine the dose regions where the statistically significant differences existed. Results: As expected, the average 5, 20 and 50% IRVNT’s for PSPT was found to be significantly smaller than for IMRT (p < 0.001, 0.01, and 0.001 respectively). However, the average 90% IRVNT for PSPT was greater than for IMRT (p = 0.003) presumably due to larger penumbra of protons and the long range of protons in lower density media. The 80% IRVNT for PSPT was also larger but not statistically distinguishable (p = .224). Conclusion: PSPT modality has smaller irradiated volume at lower doses, but larger volume at high doses. A larger cohort of lung patients will be analyzed in the future and IRVNT of patients treated with PSPT and IMRT will be compared to determine if the irradiated volumes (the magnitude of “dose bath”) correlate with outcomes.

  14. Histologic alterations of the normal bladder wall following to variably fractionated irradiation - an experimentation on animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueller, J.; Fritzsche, V.; Kob, D.; Arndt, J.; Kriester, A.; Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena

    1986-01-01

    The histopathologic alterations of the bladder wall were investigated in 180 rabbits irradiated with different fractionations and total focal doses. Animals sacrified one week after the end of irradiation showed alterations of the urothelium (desquamation, increased polymorphism of nuclei vacuolizations) as well as oedematous and hyperemic reactions in submucosa and muscularis. These alterations became stronger when the single and total focal dose and the ret values were increased. Animals sacrified three to six months after the end of irradiation showed dystrophic-sclerotic processes as well as vascular obliterations in the submucosa and muscularis. The alterations were only clearly visible in case of a total focal dose of at least 30 Gy. With regard to a minimization of histopathologic alterations of the bladder wall, a fractionation of 1.5 Gy per day has to be considered as favorable in radiotherapy of the carcinoma of the urinary bladder. (orig.) [de

  15. Histopathological changes in the irradiated normal organs of guinea pigs with conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Taisuke; Itoh, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Nobuaki

    1998-01-01

    Guinea pigs were divided into groups according to four irradiation schedules : 2 Gy/3 Gy x 1/day, five fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (A/C group) and 1.0 Gy/1.5 Gy x 2/day, ten fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (B/D group). The A group and the C group pathologically caused severe damage in the kidney six and three months after irradiation, respectively. In the B group pathological analysis suggested that only slight-to-moderate changes were occurred in the Bowman's capsule. The D group caused slight damage in the kidney six months after irradiation. Hyperfractionation (B/D group) used in this protocol can clearly reduce radiation damage in the kidney of guinea pigs as compared with conventional fractionation (A/C group). (author)

  16. The alpha-particle irradiator set up at the ISS for radiobiological studies on targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, G.; Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Simone, G.; Sorrentino, E.; Tabocchini, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe the alpha-particle irradiator that has been set up at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita (ISS) for controlled exposure of cultured mammalian cells. It can be equipped with two different sources, namely 2'4'4'Cm and 2'4'1'Am, allowing irradiation at different dose-rates (typically 1-100 mGy/min). The irradiator has dimensions small enough to be inserted into a standard cell culture incubator to perform irradiation of cultured cells in physiological conditions. The dose uniformity is such that the variations in the irradiation area are less than ± 12% of the average dose value on different irradiation areas up to ∼ 25 cm'2. Moreover, in the framework of the FP6 Euratom Integrated Project Non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation (NOTE), Petri dishes were realized for housing permeable membrane insert(s) to be used in co-culture experiments. Aluminium shields were also realized for half shield irradiation experiments. The alpha-particle irradiator of the ISS has been successfully used for studying DNA damage, namely double strand breaks (DSB, as measured by the γ-H2AX assay), in directly hit and in bystander primary human fibroblasts [it

  17. Effect of x-irradiation in rats bearing walker-256-carcinosarcoma and normal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehara, Kazuhiko

    1978-01-01

    Serum protein fractions and total proteins were studied with bloods obtained from the rats exposed each to the partial-, whole-bodies and the transplanted tumors (Walker-256-carcinosarcoma transplanted in the right hind leg). The electrophoretic variation induced in the sera of tumor-bearing rats (Group II), and the content of total proteins decreased. Early irradiation to the tumor part of rats less induced the variations of the electrophoretic pattern and the decrease of the amount of serum total proteins. When the distant metastasis appeared during irradiation treatment, the electrophoretic patterns and content of total proteins changed proportionally to the variation in sera of Group II. On the other hand, the γ-globulin (G) fraction increased in the long-term survival rat. The separation of the rat serum β-G into two peaks of β 1 - and β 2 -G was shown only in Group IV (late irradiation to the right hind leg). This finding supposed that some factors involve in the sera of rats with transplanted primary tumor grown up to a fixed size and guessed the appearance of the distant metastasis during x-irradiation. The percentages of the albumin and γ-G decreased slightly and those of the α 1 -, α 2 - and β-G increased slightly in the rats with 300 rad partial-body (the right hind leg) x-irradiation daily for 20 days. The remarkable decrease of the albumin and γ-G, the increase of the α 1 - and β-G, the marked increase of the α 2 -G and the decrease of serum total proteins were demonstrated for the sera of rats with 1,000 rad whole-body x-irradiation at a time. These phenomena seem to be related to the destructive and reticuloendothelial injury by the exposure. (auth.)

  18. Study on electric parameters of wild and cultivated cotton forms being in normal state and irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirov, N.N.; Kamalov, N.; Norbaev, N.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation effect on electric conductivity of tissues in case of alternating current, electrical capacity and cell impedance has been studied. Gamma irradiation of seedlings results in definite changes of electric factors of cells (electric conductivity, electric capacity, impedance). It is shown that especially strong changes have been revealed during gamma irradiation of radiosensitive wild form of cotton plants. The deviation of cell electric factors from the standard depends on the violation of evolutionally composed ion heterogeneity and cell colloid system state, which results in changes in their structure and metabolism in them

  19. Exposure to 56Fe irradiation accelerates normal brain aging and produces deficits in spatial learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Casadesus, Gemma; Carey, Amanda N.; Rabin, Bernard M.; Joseph, James A.

    Previous studies have shown that radiation exposure, particularly to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) such as 56Fe, produces deficits in spatial learning and memory. These adverse behavioral effects are similar to those seen in aged animals. It is possible that these shared effects may be produced by the same mechanism. For example, an increased release of reactive oxygen species, and the subsequent oxidative stress and inflammatory damage caused to the central nervous system, is likely responsible for the deficits seen in aging and following irradiation. Therefore, dietary antioxidants, such as those found in fruits and vegetables, could be used as countermeasures to prevent the behavioral changes seen in these conditions. Both aged and irradiated rats display cognitive impairment in tests of spatial learning and memory such as the Morris water maze and the radial arm maze. These rats have decrements in the ability to build spatial representations of the environment, and they utilize non-spatial strategies to solve tasks. Furthermore, they show a lack of spatial preference, due to a decline in the ability to process or retain place (position of a goal with reference to a “map” provided by the configuration of numerous cues in the environment) information. These declines in spatial memory occur in measures dependent on both reference and working memory, and in the flexibility to reset mental images. These results show that irradiation with 56Fe high-energy particles produces age-like decrements in cognitive behavior that may impair the ability of astronauts, particularly middle-aged ones, to perform critical tasks during long-term space travel beyond the magnetosphere.

  20. A framework for analysis of abortive colony size distributions using a model of branching processes in irradiated normal human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kawaguchi, Isao; Ouchi, Noriyuki B; Hara, Takamitsu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2013-01-01

    Clonogenicity gives important information about the cellular reproductive potential following ionizing irradiation, but an abortive colony that fails to continue to grow remains poorly characterized. It was recently reported that the fraction of abortive colonies increases with increasing dose. Thus, we set out to investigate the production kinetics of abortive colonies using a model of branching processes. We firstly plotted the experimentally determined colony size distribution of abortive colonies in irradiated normal human fibroblasts, and found the linear relationship on the log-linear or log-log plot. By applying the simple model of branching processes to the linear relationship, we found the persistent reproductive cell death (RCD) over several generations following irradiation. To verify the estimated probability of RCD, abortive colony size distribution (≤ 15 cells) and the surviving fraction were simulated by the Monte Carlo computational approach for colony expansion. Parameters estimated from the log-log fit demonstrated the good performance in both simulations than those from the log-linear fit. Radiation-induced RCD, i.e. excess probability, lasted over 16 generations and mainly consisted of two components in the early (probability over 5 generations, whereas abortive colony size distribution was robust against it. These results suggest that, whereas short-term RCD is critical to the abortive colony size distribution, long-lasting RCD is important for the dose response of the surviving fraction. Our present model provides a single framework for understanding the behavior of primary cell colonies in culture following irradiation.

  1. Preparation and pigmented polyester coating of saw dust particle board using ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsono; Sugiarto Danu; Anik Sunarni

    2010-01-01

    Experiments on the preparation and pigmented polyester coating of saw dust particle board have been conducted using ultra-violet (UV) radiation curing. The adhesive used for preparation of particle board was the mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol residue as by product of clover oil distillation. Dry saw dust (20 – 40 mesh) was mixed with adhesive at concentration of 16 % b.w. The mixture then was hot pressed at 160, 170, and 180 kg/cm 2 , temperature of 160 °C for 30 minutes. Particle boards obtained have the density of 0.85 - 92 g/cm 3 , water content of 5.4 – 6.8 % and thickness swelling 45 – 62 % ( 2 hr immersion) and unmeasurable for 24 hr immersion due to brittle condition. It was found that particle boards have properties of modulus of rupture = 64 – 71 kgf/cm 2 , modulus of elasticity = 402 – 447 kgf/ cm 2 , and internal bond of 0.52 – 0.57 kgf/cm 2 . Cured coating made of the mixture of polyester resin, photoinitiator (2 and 3 % b.w) and pigment (1 and 2 % b.w) on particle board and irradiated at 1 – 4 m/min have pendulum hardness = 25.0 – 63.9 sec, pencil hardness = HB – 2H, % remaining = 92 – 100 %, glossy = 42.3 – 58.8 %, and color value of L = 54.3 – 73.9, a = -1.3 – 1.9, and b = 0.4 – 3.3. The cured coatings resist to chemical, solvent and stain, except against 10 % NaOH solution and red permanent marker stain. (author)

  2. The influence of inhalation technique on Technegas particle deposition and image appearance in normal volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J.J.; James, J.M.; Shields, R.A.; Testa, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of inhalation technique on Technegas image quality and on fractional particle deposition. This was investigated in six normal volunteers using three different types of breathing pattern. Fractional deposition was determined by analysis of dynamic gamma camera images acquired during Technegas administration. Static lung images were subsequently acquired and assessed independently by three experienced observers. High-quality images were obtained in all cases although slight differences were noted. The images produced using a slow deep inspiration with a breath hold (i.e. the standard method) were of more uniform texture and also had the least gradient in activity from apex to base. The converse was true for a rapid inhalation technique. The average fractional deposition per breath was 55%, but this varied between individuals and with breathing pattern, being most influenced by the total duration of a breath. We conclude that for patient studies the standard inhalation technique is best, although variation to suit individual patients would be acceptable. (orig./MG)

  3. Determination of haemolymph volume of irradiated and normal males and females of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.Y.Y.; Kloft, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The haemolymph volume of Tenebrio molitor L. adults was determined by a radioisotope dilution technique. Two myl (14)C-inulin were injected into the haemolymph with a micro-syringe. After sufficient time for through mixing, the labelled haemolymph was collected individually under separation of sexes. Total haemolymph was calculated by a conventional formula for radioisotope dilution. The mean haemolymph volume of normal newly emerged males was 61.1+-14.2 myl and remained constant between day 2 (61.2 +-2.1) and day 3 (55.6+-9.2) after emergence. In comparison newly emerged females had a volume of 53.5+-2.3 myl which increased to 69.4+-11.7 myl day 2 resp. 64.0+-16.7 myl by day 3. The haemolymph volume of X-irradiated (5000 R) males remains almost constant. However in case of irradiated females the haemolymph volume also remains constant in contrast to unirradiated individuals

  4. Blood leukocyte responses to extracorporeal circulation. 3. Long term extracorporeal circulation without and with irradiation in normal and splenectomized dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M. (Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie)

    1983-01-01

    Long term (12-48 h) extracorporeal circulation without and with irradiation of the blood was performed in normal and splenectomized dogs in order to observe the effect of these procedures on blood leukocyte counts including CFU-C. A transient granulocytopenia and a decrease of lymphocyte count were observed. The blood CFU-C level diminished to a very low level and remained low for the whole time of the experiments. There was no significant difference between the results of procedures with or without irradiation. The similar effect of a shortened tubing system on the blood leukocyte count is also reported. Heparin infusion alone did not decrease the peripheral CFU-C concentration. The possible explanations for the observed phenomena are discussed.

  5. Semi-conservative deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in unirradiated and ultraviolet-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rude, J.M.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    Rates of semiconservative DNA synthesis have been investigated in asynchronous xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP variant, and normal human skin fibroblasts using the technique of cellular autoradiography. In unirradiated cells, no differences in DNA synthesis rates were detected among the three cell strains. Exposure to UV radiation caused the rate of DNA synthesis to decrease for at least three hours in all three cell strains. In the normal cell strain, recovery of the DNA synthetic rate occurred at later times following a UV fluence of 5 J/m 2 . At this same UV fluence, recovery was absent in classical XP cells during a 24 h post-irradiation period while it was slower than normal in XP variant cells. When the UV fluence to classical XP and XP variant cells was reduced so that survival in all three cell strains was approximately the same (25%), recovery of the DNA synthetic rate was similar in all three cell strains. These results are discussed in terms of current models of DNA replication in UV-irradiated cells and indicate: (1) that pyrimidine dimers are very effective blocks to DNA synthesis and (2) that there is no inherent defect in semiconservative DNA synthesis in either classical XP or XP variant cells which is independent of a defect in DNA repair capacity

  6. Semi-conservative deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in unirradiated and ultraviolet-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rude' e, J.M.; Friedberg, E.C.

    1977-03-01

    Rates of semiconservative DNA synthesis have been investigated in asynchronous xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), XP variant, and normal human skin fibroblasts using the technique of cellular autoradiography. In unirradiated cells, no differences in DNA synthesis rates were detected among the three cell strains. Exposure to uv radiation caused the rate of DNA synthesis to decrease for at least three hours in all three cell strains. In the normal cell strain, recovery of the DNA synthetic rate occurred at later times following a uv fluence of 5 J/m2. At this same uv fluence, recovery was absent in classical XP cells during a 24 h post-irradiation period while it was slower than normal in XP variant cells. When the uv fluence to classical XP and XP variant cells was reduced so that survival in all three cell strains was approximately the same (25%), recovery of the DNA synthetic rate was similar in all three cell strains. These results are discussed in terms of current models of DNA replication in uv-irradiated cells and indicate: (1) that pyrimidine dimers are very effective blocks to DNA synthesis and (2) that there is no inherent defect in semi-conservative DNA synthesis in either classical XP or XP variant cells which is independent of a defect in DNA repair capacity.

  7. Effects of irradiation on the copper normal metal of a composite superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Klabunde, C.E.; Redman, J.K.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Chaplin, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents a new body of magnetoresistance data for copper that were obtained in neutron irradiation experiments at 4K and 330K. These data are combined with previously obtained results on initial damage rates and saturation effects to yield a projection of total resistivity vs neutron dose (expressed in displacements per atom) for copper in service at < 10 K in a magnetic field

  8. Studies with normal and gamma irradiated third stage larvae of Oesophagostomum columbianum in lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.L.; Dhar, D.N.

    1979-01-01

    Results of work on the host-parasite relationship of Oesophagostomum columbianum in sheep, carried out at the Regional Centre, Srinagar, are presented. Primary infections with small numbers of O. columbianum third larvae in lambs caused establishment of more adult worms in the intestine. As the number of larvae administered to lambs in primary infections was increased, a significant decrease in the establishment of adult worms in the intestine was observed. Higher levels of primary infections in lambs resulted in stunting of both male and female adult worms in intestine but this did not affect the resultant egg production by the worms. The severity of the disease in lambs was directly related to the number of larvae administered in primary infections. Attenuation of the third stage larvae of O.columbianum was obtained when they were irradiated at 40 and 50 Krad doses from a gamma source. Whereas it was possible to stimulate only a partial protection in young lambs to O. columbianum with a single dose of 2000, 40 Krad irradiated larvae. Vaccination with the same numbers of larvae, but irradiated at 50 Krad failed to protect the animals. The presence of adult worms of O.columbianum in sites outside the intestine in lambs has been reported for the first time. (auth.)

  9. Performance assessment of the (Th,U)O2 HTI-Biso coated particle under PNP/HHT irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Nickel, H.

    1980-11-01

    The HTI Biso Particle, Variant-I: consisting of a dense 400 μm-diameter (Th,U)O 2 -kernel with a Biso coating using a methane derived pyrocarbon layer (HTI), is a candidate fuel for the advanced PNP/HHT High Temperature Reactor systems. This report presents the results of a comprehensive performance assessment of Variant-I represented by six relevant particle batches irradiated in 12 accelerated irradiation experiments. Fuel performance was judged based upon PNP/HHT qualification requirements with regard to in-reactor operating conditions and end-of-life (EOL) coated particle failure fraction. Fuel operating conditions in each irradiation experiment were obtained from two sources: 1) a thorough review of all available irradiation data on each experiment; and 2) a two-dimensional (R,theta) thermal modeling computer code, R2KTMP, was developed to calculate fuel operating temperature distributions within spherical elements. End-of-life particle failure fractions were determined from: gaseous fission product release, based on in-reactor R/B measurements and postirradiation annealing and room temperature investigations; solid fission product release, from single particle 137 Cs release into fuel element matrix and hot-gaseous chlorine leaching; and visual and ceramographic examinations. Failure fractions determined by solid fission product release yielded values 2-35 times higher than those determined by gaseous fission product release. (orig.) [de

  10. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on the cell cycle in normal and UV-sensitive cell lines with reference to the nature of the defect in xeroderma pigmentosum variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imray, P.; Mangan, T.; Saul, A.; Kidson, C.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of the distribution of cells through the phases of the cell cycle by DNA flow cytofluorimetry has been utilized to investigate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on cell-cycle progression in normal and UV-sensitive lymphoblastoid cell lines. In time-course studies only slight perturbation of DNA distribution was seen in normal cells, or UV-sensitive familial melanoma (FM) lines in the 48 h following irradiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XPA) excision-deficient cells showed a large increase in the proportion of cells in S phase 16-40 h post-irradiation. XP variant (XPV) cells were blocked in G 1 and S phases with the complete absence of cells with G 2 DNA content 16-28 h after irradiation. By 48 h post-irradiation the DNA distribution of XPA and XPV cells had returned to that of an unirradiated control. When colcemid was added to the cultures immediately after irradiation to prevent mitotic cells dividing and re-entering the cell cycle, progression through the first cycle after irradiation was followed. UV irradiation did not affect the rate of movement of cells out of G 1 into S phase in normal, FM or XPA cells. The proportion of cells in S phase was increased in UV-irradiated cultures in these cell types and the number of cells entering the G 2 +M compartment was reduced. (orig./AJ)

  11. Neuroimmune response and sleep studies after whole body irradiation with high-LET particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquette, C.; Mathieu, J.; Bertho, J.-M.; Galonnier, M.; Wysoki, J.; Maubert, C.; Balanzat, E.; Gerbin, R.; Aigueperse, J.; Clarençon, D.

    2009-10-01

    In order to investigate the biological effects of galactic rays on astronaut cerebral functions after space flight, mice were exposed to different heavy ions (HZE) in whole-body conditions at doses comparable to the galactic flux: 12C, 16O and 20Ne (95 MeV/u, at 42-76 mGy). Animals were also exposed to 42 mGy of 60Co radiation for comparison with HZE. The neuroimmune response, evaluated by interleukin-1 (IL-1) measurement, showed that this cytokine was produced 3 h after irradiation by 16O or 60Co. In contrast, neither 12C (56.7 mGy) nor 20Ne (76 mGy) induced IL-1 production. However, immunohistochemical staining of 12C-irradiated mouse brain tissue showed 2 months later a marked inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus and a diffuse response in parenchyma. Sleep studies were realized before and after exposure to 42 mGy of 16O and 76 mGy of 20Ne: only the 20Ne radiation displayed a small effect. A slight decrease in paradoxical sleep, corresponding to a reduction in the number of episodes of paradoxical sleep, was manifested between 8 and 22 days after exposure. Exposure to 12C and 16O induced no changes either in cellularity of spleen or thymus, or in caspase 3 activity (as much as four months after irradiation). Taken together, these data indicate that the CNS could be sensitive to heavy ions and that responses to HZE impact depend on the nature of the particle, the dose threshold and the time delay to develop biological processes. Differences in responses to different HZE highlight the complex biological phenomena to which astronauts are submitted during space flight.

  12. Neuro-immune response and sleep studies after whole body irradiation with high-LET particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquette, C.; Bertho, J.M.; Wysoki, J.; Maubert, C.; Gerbin, R.; Aigueperse, J.; Mathieu, J.; Galonnier, M.; Clarencon, D.; Balanzat, E.

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the biological effects of galactic rays on astronaut cerebral functions after space flight, mice were exposed to different heavy ions (HZE) in whole-body conditions at doses comparable to the galactic flux: 12 C, 16 O and 20 Ne (95 MeV/u, at 42-76 mGy). Animals were also exposed to 42 mGy of 60 Co radiation for comparison with HZE. The neuro-immune response, evaluated by interleukin-I (IL-1) measurement, showed that this cytokine was produced 3 h after irradiation by 16 O or 60 Co. In contrast, neither 12 C (56.7 mGy) nor 20 Ne (76 mGy) induced IL-1 production. However, immunohistochemical staining of 12 C-irradiated mouse brain tissue showed 2 months later a marked inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus and a diffuse response in parenchyma. Sleep studies were realized before and after exposure to 42 mGy of 16 O and 76 mGy of 20 Ne: only the 20 Ne radiation displayed a small effect. A slight decrease in paradoxical sleep, corresponding to a reduction in the number of episodes of paradoxical sleep, was manifested between 8 and 22 days after exposure. Exposure to 12 C and 16 O induced no changes either in cellularity of spleen or thymus, or in caspase 3 activity (as much as four months after irradiation). Taken together, these data indicate that the CNS could be sensitive to heavy ions and that responses to HZE impact depend on the nature of the particle, the dose threshold and the time delay to develop biological processes. Differences in responses to different HZE highlight the complex biological phenomena to which astronauts are submitted during space flight. (authors)

  13. Thermoluminescence of europium-doped zinc oxide exposed to beta particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriqui R, J. L.; Cruz V, C. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Bernal, R. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castano, V. M., E-mail: jorgeiriqui@gimmunison.com [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Apdo. Postal 1-1010, 76000 Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Zn O is a promising material for a range of optoelectronics applications, due to its direct wide band gap (E{sub g} ∼3.3 eV at 300 K) and large exciton binding energy (60 MeV). Its applications include UV light emitters, varistors, surface acoustic wave devices, piezoelectric transducers, and chemical and gas sensing. Rare-earth activation of phosphors has long been seen as an effective process since coupling energy into the rare-earth-ion site, either by ionization, charge exchange or a resonance energy process, results in light production. It is reported that Europium modifies the response thermoluminescence (Tl) for pure zinc oxide, when is irradiated with X-ray, created a peak at 365 degrees C. In this work, Zn O:Eu phosphors were synthesized by a chemical method. Some samples were exposed to beta particle irradiation for doses ranging from 1 up to 100 Gy. Tl response as a function of dose is linear throughout the studied dose range. The glow curve exhibits three maxima, centered at 176, 279 and 340 degrees C. The reusability studies obtained after ten repeated cycles of annealing irradiation readout for the Zn O:Eu shows that the variation in the Tl response is ten percent and tends to stabilization. The results indicate that these new Zn O:Eu phosphors are promising detectors and dosimeters for beta radiation. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. (Author)

  14. Preventive effects of running exercise on bones in heavy ion particle irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Satoshi; Iida, Haruzo; Yan, Xueming

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effects of running exercise on preventing decreases in bone mineral and tissue volume after heavy ion particle irradiation in rats. Male Wistar rats experienced whole-body irradiation by heavy ion particle beam (C-290 MeV) at doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 Gy and were divided into voluntary running groups and control groups. Rats in the running groups ran on the treadmill 15 m/mim, 90 min/day for 35 days after exposure. At the end of the experiment, a tibia was obtained from each rat for measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) and cross-sectional area, strength strain index, and bone histomorphometric analysis. The weights of muscles and concentration of serum calcium were measured. Total BMD and trabecular BMD in the metaphysis and cortical BMD of the diaphysis of tibia in the running groups increased. Bone volume and trabecular thickness increased while trabecular separation decreased in the running groups compared to those in the control groups at respective doses. However, the osteoid surface and eroded surface varied in the running groups compared to those of the respective corresponding groups. The dynamic parameters such as mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate in the running groups were varied, probably due to the differences in radiation-induced sensitivities of bones following radiation exposure. The overall results suggest that running exercise might have a beneficial effect on preventing bone mineral loss and changes in bone structure induced by space radiation, but it is necessary to examine the optimal conditions of running exercise response to doses. (author)

  15. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal α-particle irradiation of kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Sgouros, George; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Scheinberg, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ( 225 Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of α- and β-particle emitting elements. Methods and Materials: The animals were injected with 0.35 μCi of the 225 Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Results: Forty weeks after the 225 Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 ± 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 ± 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 ± 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 ± 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Conclusions: Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal α-particle irradiation

  16. Lethality and the depression on DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, K. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation suppresses the semiconservative DNA replication in mammalian cells. The rate of DNA synthesis is initially depressed and later recovers after low doses of UV radiation in human cells. Such a response is more sensitive to UV radiation in cells derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) than that in normal human cells. The relative rate of DNA synthesis is not always correlated with cell survival because, unlike cell survival, the dose-response curve of the relative rate of DNA synthesis shows the biphasic nature of the sensitivity. In the experiments reported herein, the total amount (not the rate) of DNA synthesized during a long interval of incubation which covers the period of inhibition and recovery (but not longer than one generation time) after irradiation with various doses of UV radiation was examined in normal human and XP cells, and was found to be well correlated with cell survival in all the cells tested.

  17. Estimating functional liver reserve following hepatic irradiation: Adaptive normal tissue response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Jackson, Andrew; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the limit of functional liver reserve for safe application of hepatic irradiation using changes in indocyanine green, an established assay of liver function. Materials and methods: From 2005 to 2011, 60 patients undergoing hepatic irradiation were enrolled in a prospective study assessing the plasma retention fraction of indocyanine green at 15-min (ICG-R15) prior to, during (at 60% of planned dose), and after radiotherapy (RT). The limit of functional liver reserve was estimated from the damage fraction of functional liver (DFL) post-RT [1 − (ICG-R15 pre-RT /ICG-R15 post-RT )] where no toxicity was observed using a beta distribution function. Results: Of 48 evaluable patients, 3 (6%) developed RILD, all within 2.5 months of completing RT. The mean ICG-R15 for non-RILD patients pre-RT, during-RT and 1-month post-RT was 20.3%(SE 2.6), 22.0%(3.0), and 27.5%(2.8), and for RILD patients was 6.3%(4.3), 10.8%(2.7), and 47.6%(8.8). RILD was observed at post-RT damage fractions of ⩾78%. Both DFL assessed by during-RT ICG and MLD predicted for DFL post-RT (p < 0.0001). Limiting the post-RT DFL to 50%, predicted a 99% probability of a true complication rate <15%. Conclusion: The DFL as assessed by changes in ICG during treatment serves as an early indicator of a patient’s tolerance to hepatic irradiation

  18. Effect of histones on hematopoietic stem cells-precursor in normal and irradiated organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semina, O.V.; Semenets, T.N.; Zeppezauer, M.; Cebecauer, L.; Poverenny, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radiotherapeutic activity of histone fractions H 1 and H 2A /H 2B were studied. It was demonstrated that both fractions are able to reduce the damaging effect of ionizing radiation on spleen colony forming unit (CFU-S) population. Histone preparations stimulated colony-forming activity of bone marrow cells exposed to dose of 0.5-3.0 Gy both in the case of incubation with preparations and intravenous or intraperitoneal administration into recipients of irradiated cells. The effect of histones and accessory thymocytes on CFU-S population is compared

  19. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  20. Screen-Space Normal Distribution Function Caching for Consistent Multi-Resolution Rendering of Large Particle Data

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Wickenhauser, Patrick; Rautek, Peter; Reina, Guido; Hadwiger, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are crucial to investigating important processes in physics and thermodynamics. The simulated atoms are usually visualized as hard spheres with Phong shading, where individual particles and their local density can be perceived well in close-up views. However, for large-scale simulations with 10 million particles or more, the visualization of large fields-of-view usually suffers from strong aliasing artifacts, because the mismatch between data size and output resolution leads to severe under-sampling of the geometry. Excessive super-sampling can alleviate this problem, but is prohibitively expensive. This paper presents a novel visualization method for large-scale particle data that addresses aliasing while enabling interactive high-quality rendering. We introduce the novel concept of screen-space normal distribution functions (S-NDFs) for particle data. S-NDFs represent the distribution of surface normals that map to a given pixel in screen space, which enables high-quality re-lighting without re-rendering particles. In order to facilitate interactive zooming, we cache S-NDFs in a screen-space mipmap (S-MIP). Together, these two concepts enable interactive, scale-consistent re-lighting and shading changes, as well as zooming, without having to re-sample the particle data. We show how our method facilitates the interactive exploration of real-world large-scale MD simulation data in different scenarios.

  1. Screen-Space Normal Distribution Function Caching for Consistent Multi-Resolution Rendering of Large Particle Data

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2017-08-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are crucial to investigating important processes in physics and thermodynamics. The simulated atoms are usually visualized as hard spheres with Phong shading, where individual particles and their local density can be perceived well in close-up views. However, for large-scale simulations with 10 million particles or more, the visualization of large fields-of-view usually suffers from strong aliasing artifacts, because the mismatch between data size and output resolution leads to severe under-sampling of the geometry. Excessive super-sampling can alleviate this problem, but is prohibitively expensive. This paper presents a novel visualization method for large-scale particle data that addresses aliasing while enabling interactive high-quality rendering. We introduce the novel concept of screen-space normal distribution functions (S-NDFs) for particle data. S-NDFs represent the distribution of surface normals that map to a given pixel in screen space, which enables high-quality re-lighting without re-rendering particles. In order to facilitate interactive zooming, we cache S-NDFs in a screen-space mipmap (S-MIP). Together, these two concepts enable interactive, scale-consistent re-lighting and shading changes, as well as zooming, without having to re-sample the particle data. We show how our method facilitates the interactive exploration of real-world large-scale MD simulation data in different scenarios.

  2. Thermoluminescent dependence with the particle size of polyminerals in food irradiated of Mexican spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuffer Z, C.; Cruz Z, E.; Calderon, T.; Chernov, V.; Barboza F, M.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of grain size on Tl was analysed in poly minerals extracted from Mexican spices as Origanum vulgare L. (oregano) y Capsicum annun (chile guajillo). The poly minerals size were selected by Zimmerman method up to 10 μm and exposed to 0.5-10 kGy range from 60 Co. The glow curves were centered at 166 C for Capsicum annun and at 126 C for Origanum vulgare l. In both cases was observed at 5 kGy a weak saturation for Tl response. This behaviour is attributed to feldspar and quartz are present in the samples and this results is in agreement with other european spices obtained. For >10 μm particle size the Tl response increased respect to the doses, and it is possible that increase the organic impurities quantities are present in the samples and contributed to the Tl when the samples were thermally excited. The aim of this work is provide more ideas with regard to the behaviour of luminescence emission as dependent of the size particle in the irradiated spices. The methodology might useful for quality control also in radiation processing. (Author)

  3. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takács, S., E-mail: stakacs@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Atomki, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Takács, M.P.; Ditrói, F. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Atomki, 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Aikawa, M. [Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Haba, H.; Komori, Y. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the {sup nat}Ti(α,x){sup 51}Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with E{sub α} = 20.7 and E{sub α} = 51.25 MeV, I{sub α} = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the {sup 72,73,75}Se, {sup 71,72,74,76,78}As, and {sup 69}Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  4. Inheritance of fruit colour in normal and irradiated progenies of brinjal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopimony, R.; George, M.K.; Gopinathan Nair, V.

    1980-01-01

    The inheritance of fruit colour in brinjal (Solanum melongena) was studied by analysing the progeny belonging to the F 1 M 2 , F 1 M 1 and F 2 M 2 generations resulting from a cross between varieties insanum and purple giant followed by gamma irradiation. The F 2 phenotypic frequencies fitted very well with the dihybrid ratio indicating that the fruit colour is governed by two independently inherited genes. Three colour mutants, namely, purple, mottled green and white were induced in the F 1 M 1 generation by the irradiation. The appearance of these mutants is explained as due to independent mutations at either or both of the two goenetic loci. The colour pattern in the F 2 M 2 progenies derived from the F 1 M 1 mutants substantiates the two gene mechanism for the inheritance of fruit colour. The genotypes for the different colour types in the F 1 , F 2 and F 1 M 1 mutants have been indicated and discussed. (author)

  5. Radiation response of ODS ferritic steels with different oxide particles under ion-irradiation at 550 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peng; Morrall, Daniel; Zhang, Zhexian; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Kimura, Akihiko

    2018-04-01

    In order to investigate the effects of oxide particles on radiation response such as hardness change and microstructural evolution, three types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels (named Y-Ti-ODS, Y-Al-ODS and Y-Al-Zr-ODS), mostly strengthened by Y-Ti-O, Y-Al-O and Y-Zr-O dispersoids, respectively, were simultaneously irradiated with iron and helium ions at 550 °C up to a damage of 30 dpa and a corresponding helium (He) concentration of ∼3500 appm to a depth of 1000-1300 nm. A single iron ion beam irradiation was also performed for reference. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that after the dual ion irradiation helium bubbles of 2.8, 6.6 and 4.5 nm in mean diameter with the corresponding number densities of 1.1 × 1023, 2.7 × 1022 and 3.6 × 1022 m-3 were observed in Y-Ti-ODS, Y-Al-ODS and Y-Al-Zr-ODS, respectively, while no such bubbles were observed after single ion irradiation. About 80% of intragranular He bubbles were adjacent to oxide particles in the ODS ferritic steels. Although the high number density He bubbles were observed in the ODS steels, the void swelling in Y-Ti-ODS, Y-Al-ODS and Y-Al-Zr-ODS was still small and estimated to be 0.13%, 0.53% and 0.20%, respectively. The excellent swelling resistance is dominantly attributed to the high sink strength of oxide particles that depends on the morphology of particle dispersion rather than the crystal structure of the particles. In contrast, no dislocation loops were produced in any of the irradiated steels. Nanoindentation measurements showed that no irradiation hardening but softening was found in the ODS ferritic steels, which was probably due to irradiation induced dislocation recovery. The helium bubbles in high number density never contributed to the irradiation hardening of the ODS steels at these irradiation conditions.

  6. Persistence of normal cardiac function and myocardial perfusion in irradiated long-term survivors of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constine, L.S.; Schwartz, R.G.; Savage, D.E.; King, V.; Muhs, A.; Rubin, P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The risk of myocardial infarction and cardiac dysfunction following mantle irradiation (RT) for Hodgkin's disease is controversial. The relative risk of fatal myocardial infarction is 2.8 in our Hodgkin's patients, similar to other reports. Sensitive evaluations of cardiac function and myocardial perfusion might be expected to reveal pre-clinical abnormalities of potential significance. We hypothesized the presence of pre-clinical cardiac toxicity and progressive deterioration of left ventricular performance and myocardial ischemia over time in long-term survivors of Hodgkin's disease. The data reported herein extend our previous study in patient number (n=50) and follow-up duration (mean 16.5 years). Materials and Methods: Equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) was used to quantify left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function with LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and peak filling rate (PFR), respectively. Quantitative myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) and ECG stress testing with exercise or dipyridamole were used to assess myocardial perfusion and electrical function. Patients at least 1.0 year after RT were eligible if ≤ 50 years old at RT and without known Hodgkin's or cardiac disease. Fifty patients, ages 10-46 years (mean 26.0) at RT, were tested 1.1 to 29.1 years (mean 9.1) after RT. Seventeen patients were tested 2 - 3 times separated by 0.5 - 6.5 years (mean 3.3). The mean central cardiac RT dose was 35.1 Gy (range 18.5 - 47.5) in daily 1.5-2.0 Gy fractions. Twelve patients were additionally irradiated to the left ventricle (LVRT), usually through partial transmission left lung shields (range 14.3-21.3 Gy). Results: No patient had symptomatic cardiac disease at the time of evaluation. The mean LVEF (first test, n = 50) was 60 ± 6% (range 42-73%) [normal ≥ 50%], and PFR (first test, n=44) was 3.43 ± 0.83 end diastolic volume per second (range 1.5-5.2 EDV/sec) [normal ≥ 2.54 EDV/sec] with 2 and 7 patients below normal

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on membranes of normal and pathological erythrocytes (beta-thalassemia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, L.; Bonincontro, A.; Cametti, C.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome

    1987-01-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation on the membrane of human normal erythrocytes has extensively been studied and a variety of effects including changes in the cation fluxes or in non-electrolytes permeability, in membrane fluidity, in peroxidation of unsaturated lipids as well as chemical composition or structural modifications has been observed. However, only few studies deal with the effects of ionizing radiation on pathological red blood cells. In this work, we have investigated by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy the effects of 60 Co γ-radiation on the normal and homozygous β-thalassemic human erythrocyte membranes. (orig.)

  8. The rate of DNA synthesis in normal human and ataxia telangiectasia cells after exposure to X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, J. de; Bootsma, D.; Jaspers, N.G.J.; Rijksverdedigingsorganisatie TNO, Rijswijk

    1981-01-01

    The rate of DNA synthesis was studied in normal cell strains and in strains from patients suffering from the inherited disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT). After exposure to relatively low doses of oxic X-rays (0- 4 krad) DNA synthesis was depressed in AT cell strains to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells. This response was observed in both an excision-deficient and an excision-proficient strain. In contrast, there was no difference in DNA-synthesis inhibition between AT and normal cells after UV exposure. After X-irradiation of cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, both complementation group A and XP variants, the observed rate of DNA synthesis was equal to that in normal cells. An exception was the strain XP3BR which has been shown to be X-ray-sensitive. This strain exhibited diminished DNA synthesis inhibition after X-ray doses below 1 krad. These data suggest a relationship between hypersensitivity to X-rays and diminished depression of DNA synthesis. (orig.)

  9. Normal state resistivity of single crystalline V3Si as a function of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caton, R.; Viswanathan, R.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of the normal state resistivity of a neutron damaged single crystal of V 3 Si shows two different regions of behavior: one for T/sub c/ equal to or greater than 10 0 K and another for T/sub c/ equal to or less than 10 0 K

  10. Optimal noise reduction in 3D reconstructions of single particles using a volume-normalized filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Charles V.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    The high noise level found in single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) image data presents a special challenge for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the imaged molecules. The spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SSNR) and related Fourier shell correlation (FSC) functions are commonly used to assess and mitigate the noise-generated error in the reconstruction. Calculation of the SSNR and FSC usually includes the noise in the solvent region surrounding the particle and therefore does not accurately reflect the signal in the particle density itself. Here we show that the SSNR in a reconstructed 3D particle map is linearly proportional to the fractional volume occupied by the particle. Using this relationship, we devise a novel filter (the “single-particle Wiener filter”) to minimize the error in a reconstructed particle map, if the particle volume is known. Moreover, we show how to approximate this filter even when the volume of the particle is not known, by optimizing the signal within a representative interior region of the particle. We show that the new filter improves on previously proposed error-reduction schemes, including the conventional Wiener filter as well as figure-of-merit weighting, and quantify the relationship between all of these methods by theoretical analysis as well as numeric evaluation of both simulated and experimentally collected data. The single-particle Wiener filter is applicable across a broad range of existing 3D reconstruction techniques, but is particularly well suited to the Fourier inversion method, leading to an efficient and accurate implementation. PMID:22613568

  11. Pluripotent stem cells with normal or reduced self renewal survive lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.; Neben, S.; Yee, M.; Bullis, J.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Transfusion with 10,000 or 20,000 marrow cells resulted in 30+ days survival of 15%-50% of mice exposed to an Ld90 or LD100 or radiation. The use of congenic mice with alloenzyme markers permitted the identification of host and donor cells in the peripheral blood of transfused animals. Donor cells were present initially in all hosts. Between 55% and 92% of the animals became 100% host type by 12-24 weeks after transfusion in three separate experiments. To explore whether the temporary repopulation by donor cells was due to short-lived stem cells, the marrows of several primary hosts were transfused into secondary, lethally irradiated hosts. Some of the retransplanted primary donor and host cells persisted only temporarily. It is suggested that some of the donor stem cells in both the primary and secondary hosts had an intrinsically shortened life span

  12. Iso-effect tables for tolerance of irradiated normal human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.; Creditor, M.

    1983-01-01

    Available literature on a radiation injury to human tissues (lung, brain, kidney and intestine) was surveyed. A parameter search program (RAD3) was used to derive best-fitting cell kinetic parameters, on the assumption that radiation injury arises from depletion of parenchymal cells in the irradiated organs. From these parameters iso-effect tables were constructed for a wide range of treatment schedules, including daily treatment as well as fractionation at longer intervals, for each tissue. The tables provide a set of limiting doses, above which the risk of radiation injury becomes substantial. Tolerance limits and dose-time-factors were substantially different in the four tissues. It is concluded that computed iso-effect tables provide a more reliable guide to treatment than conventional time-dose equations

  13. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurobori, Toshio, E-mail: kurobori@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yanagida, Yuka [Oarai Research Center, Chiyoda Technol Corporation, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kodaira, Satoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shirao, Taichi [Nikon Instech Co., Ltd., Tanakanishi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8221 (Japan)

    2017-05-21

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed. - Highlights: • 3D track images are demonstrated using a confocal laser microscopy. • Fluorescent track detectors are based on RPL Ag-doped phosphate glass. • The dose distributions are examined for X-ray, gamma ray and HCP irradiations. • The origins of the reduction in RPL efficiency are investigated and discussed.

  14. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Yanagida, Yuka; Kodaira, Satoshi; Shirao, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed. - Highlights: • 3D track images are demonstrated using a confocal laser microscopy. • Fluorescent track detectors are based on RPL Ag-doped phosphate glass. • The dose distributions are examined for X-ray, gamma ray and HCP irradiations. • The origins of the reduction in RPL efficiency are investigated and discussed.

  15. HTCAP: a FORTRAN IV program for calculating coated-particle operating temperatures in HFIR target irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.

    1976-05-01

    A description is presented of HTCAP, a computer code that calculates in-reactor operating temperatures of loose coated ThO 2 particles in the HFIR target series of irradiation tests. Three computational models are employed to determine the following: (1) fission heat generation rates, (2) capsule heat transfer analysis, and (3) maximum particle surface temperature within the design of an HT capsule. Maximum particle operating temperatures are calculated at daily intervals during each irradiation cycle. The application of HTCAP to sleeve CP-62 of HT-15 is discussed, and the results are compared with those obtained in an earlier thermal analysis on the same capsule. Agreement is generally within +-5 percent, while decreasing the computational time by more than an order of magnitude. A complete FORTRAN listing and summary of required input data are presented in appendices. Included is a listing of the input data and a tabular output from the thermal analysis of sleeve CP-62 of HT-15

  16. Survival of human diploid skin fibroblasts from normal individuals after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Strong, L.C.; Nichols, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of X-rays was measured by a colony formation assay in multiple experiments with fibroblast cell strains derived from 24 presumably normal individuals, received as 65 different coded and blinded samples. Each strain was received on two or more occasions at different times and bearing different codes. The means and standard deviations of the survival curve parameters for the 24 strains were: D 0 = 123 +- 23; D 10 = 273 +- 42 cGy. The D 0 ranged from 89 to 175 and the D 10 from 196 to 372 cGy. The degree of interexperimental variation, though generally minimal, differed considerably among cell strains. There was no systematic effect of passage level, cloning efficiency, serum lot, age or sex of the donor on X-ray survival. These results confirm that the intrinsic radiosensitivity varies significantly among skin fibroblasts isolated from clinically normal individuals, apparently owing to as yet unidentified genetic factors. (Author)

  17. Dose rate effect of 125I irradiation on normal rabbit eyes and experimental choroidal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.M.; Olsen, K.R.; Schwade, J.G.; Houdek, P.V.; Markoe, A.M.; Pisciotta, V.; Xiaodong Wu

    1993-01-01

    The dose rate effect of radiation by 125 I plaque on choroidal melanoma and normal intraocular tissue was studied. In the first part of the experiment, high activity plaques (HAP) and low activity plagues (LAP) were implanted on rabbit eyes with experimental Greene choroidal melanoma to deliver a total dose of 10 000 cGy to the tumor apex. The mean dose rate calculated at 0.5 mm from the inner sclera in eight eyes with high activity plaques was 3341.5 cGy hr -1 while that in ten eyes with low activity plaques was 239.9 cGy hr -1 . For tumors less than 1.0 mm in height, both groups showed complete tumor regression at the tumor implantation site after plaque treatment. For tumours more than 1.0 mm in height, two out of two eyes in the low activity plaque group and one of four eyes in the high activity plaque group failed to show complete tumor regression. In the second part of the experiment, 125 I plaques were implanted on the sclera of 12 normal rabbits' eyes. Six received high dose rate plaque treatment, while the other six received low dose rate plaque treatment. Clinical and histologic examinations demonstrated more damaging effects to the normal chorioretinal tissues at the plaque implantation site in the high dose rate plaque group. These results suggest that high dose rate plaques are more effective than low dose rate plaques when tumor height is statistically controlled. (Author)

  18. No significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations in the progeny of bystander primary human fibroblasts after alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Burong; Zhu, Jiayun; Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    2013-02-01

    A major concern for bystander effects is the probability that normal healthy cells adjacent to the irradiated cells become genomically unstable and undergo further carcinogenesis after therapeutic irradiation or space mission where astronauts are exposed to low dose of heavy ions. Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells. In the present study, two irradiation protocols were performed in order to ensure pure populations of bystander cells and the genomic instability in their progeny were investigated. After irradiation, chromosomal aberrations of cells were analyzed at designated time points using G2 phase premature chromosome condensation (G2-PCC) coupled with Giemsa staining and with multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH). Our Giemsa staining assay demonstrated that elevated yields of chromatid breaks were induced in the progeny of pure bystander primary fibroblasts up to 20 days after irradiation. mFISH assay showed no significant level of inheritable interchromosomal aberrations were induced in the progeny of the bystander cell groups, while the fractions of gross aberrations (chromatid breaks or chromosomal breaks) significantly increased in some bystander cell groups. These results suggest that genomic instability occurred in the progeny of the irradiation associated bystander normal fibroblasts exclude the inheritable interchromosomal aberration.

  19. Pre- and post-irradiation characterization and properties measurements of ZrC coated surrogate TRISO particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Zirconium carbide is a candidate to either replace or supplement silicon carbide as a coating material in TRISO fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels. Six sets of ZrC coated surrogate microsphere samples, fabricated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition method, were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developmental samples available for the irradiation experiment were in conditions of either as-fabricated coated particles or particles that had been heat-treated to simulate the fuel compacting process. Five sets of samples were composed of nominally stoichiometric compositions, with the sixth being richer in carbon (C/Zr = 1.4). The samples were irradiated at 800 and 1250 C with fast neutron fluences of 2 and 6 dpa. Post-irradiation, the samples were retrieved from the irradiation capsules followed by microstructural examination performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis Laboratory. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor program as part of International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative collaboration with Japan. This report includes progress from that INERI collaboration, as well as results of some follow-up examination of the irradiated specimens. Post-irradiation examination items included microstructural characterization, and nanoindentation hardness/modulus measurements. The examinations revealed grain size enhancement and softening as the primary effects of both heat-treatment and irradiation in stoichiometric ZrC with a non-layered, homogeneous grain structure, raising serious concerns on the mechanical suitability of these particular developmental coatings as a replacement for SiC in TRISO fuel. Samples with either free carbon or carbon-rich layers dispersed in the ZrC coatings experienced negligible grain size

  20. Increased CD147 and MMP-9 expression in the normal rat brain after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Wei Ming; Li Shenghui; Zhou Ziwei; Xu Desheng

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced vascular injury is a major complication of Gamma knife surgery (GKS). Previous studies have shown that CD147 and MMP-9 are closely associated with vascular remodeling and pathological angiogenesis. Thus, we analysed changes in CD147 and MMP-9 expression in the cerebral cortex to investigate the correlation between CD147 and MMP-9 in the rat following GKS. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to GKS at a maximum dose of 75 Gy and then euthanized 1 to 12 weeks later. Using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, we found that CD147 and MMP-9 expression were markedly upregulated in the target area 8-12 weeks after GKS when compared with the control group. Immunofluorescent double staining demonstrated that CD147 signals colocalized with CD31, GFAP and MMP-9-positive cells. Importantly, CD147 levels correlated with increased MMP-9 expression in irradiated brain tissue. For the first time, these data demonstrate a potential relationship between CD147 and MMP-9 following GKS. In addition, our study also suggests that CD147 and MMP-9 may play a role in vascular injury after GKS. (author)

  1. Physiological properties of afferents to the rat cerebellum during normal development and after postnatal x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puro, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The consequences of an altered cerebellar cortical development on afferent transmission and terminal organization were analyzed in adult rats which had received x irradiation to the cerebellum postnatally. Rats, anesthetized with 0.5 percent halothane, were studied in various ages from day 3 to adult. The ascending mossy and climbing fiber systems were activated by electrical stimulation of the limbs with needle electrodes. Stimulation of the motor cortex activated the descending climbing fiber pathways. Extracellular responses from cerebellar Purkinje cells were observed on an oscilloscope as poststimulus time histograms were constructed ''on-line''. Conclusions and assertions include: (1) Synaptogenesis between incoming afferent fibers and target neurons takes place early in cerebellar cortical development. (2) Mossy fiber transmission is mature before the bulk of cerebellar synaptogenesis occurs. (3) The ascending and descending components of the climbing fiber system mature, with respect to latency, in synchrony. (4) The terminal synaptic organization has little effect on the development of transmission characteristics in these afferent systems. (5) One possible mechanism by which an adult neural structure can have an abnormal synaptic organization is to maintain immature synaptic relationships due to the neonatal loss of interneurons

  2. Radiation and biophysical studies on cells and viruses. Progress report 1 July 1977--30 June 1978. [Particle beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Arthur; Ansevin, Allen T.; Corry, Peter M.

    1978-08-01

    Studies on genetic structure included arrangement of interphase and mitotic chromosomes, nucleoproteins, and DNA. Studies on analysis of sensitive sites by particle beam irradiation included location of cellular sites for mutation induction and cell transformation. Studies on radiation damage and repair and radiation as an investigative tool included damage to nuclear proteins and other model systems; detection and quantitation of cell surface antigens; interaction of hyperthermia and irradiation; radioinduced cell transformation alkaline elution studies of damage and repair; and low dose, low LET lethality. (HLW)

  3. Normal incidence spectrophotometer using high density transmission grating technology and highly efficiency silicon photodiodes for absolute solar EUV irradiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Korde, R.

    1992-01-01

    New developments in transmission grating and photodiode technology now make it possible to realize spectrometers in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (wavelengths less than 1000 A) which are expected to be virtually constant in their diffraction and detector properties. Time dependent effects associated with reflection gratings are eliminated through the use of free standing transmission gratings. These gratings together with recently developed and highly stable EUV photodiodes have been utilized to construct a highly stable normal incidence spectrophotometer to monitor the variability and absolute intensity of the solar 304 A line. Owing to its low weight and compactness, such a spectrometer will be a valuable tool for providing absolute solar irradiance throughout the EUV. This novel instrument will also be useful for cross-calibrating other EUV flight instruments and will be flown on a series of Hitchhiker Shuttle Flights and on SOHO. A preliminary version of this instrument has been fabricated and characterized, and the results are described.

  4. Evolution of porous network in GaSb under normally incident 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, D.P. [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751 005, Odisha (India); Kanjilal, A. [Department of Physics, Shiv Nadar University, Gautam Budh Nagar 203 207, Uttar Pradesh (India); Garg, S.K. [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751 005, Odisha (India); Sahoo, P.K. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751 005, Odisha (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, T., E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751 005, Odisha (India)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We show the evolution of a nanoporous layer in GaSb under Ar{sup +}-ion bombardment at normal incidence in the hitherto unexplored high fluence regime, namely 7 × 10{sup 16}–3 × 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup −2}. • Fluence dependent formation and growth of patches on top of the nanoporous layer is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. • We also show high amount of oxidation of such ion-beam-generated nanoporous structures, with formation of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Our study reveals the presence of nanocrystallites within the porous layer even at the highest fluence used in the experiment. • We interpret the experimental observations through a qualitative model where we take into account the effect of re-deposition of atoms sputtered from the nanoporous layer during Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation of GaSb. - Abstract: GaSb(1 0 0) samples were irradiated with 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ions at normal incidence for fluences in the range of 7 × 10{sup 16} to 3 × 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup −2} at room temperature, showing gradual evolution of a porous surface layer containing interconnected nanofibers. In particular, fluence dependent formation of patches on the nanoporous layer is observed by scanning electron microscopy. Combined results of grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal the presence of nanocrystallites in the porous structures. Compositional analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates the development of oxide phases, mainly Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} where the former increases with fluence. We have proposed a model addressing a competition between ion-induced-defect driven growth of the nanoporous layer and redeposition of sputtered target atoms on the growing layer.

  5. Theory of emission spectra from metal films irradiated by low energy electrons near normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann, E.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1980-01-01

    The emission spectrum produced by low energy electrons incident on a rough metal surface has been calculated for a roughness auto-correlation function containing a prominent peak at a high wave vector. For low energy electrons near normal incidence, the high wavevector peak dominates the roughness coupled surface plasmon radiation (RCSPR) process. The calculation yields estimates of the ratio of RCSPR to transition radiation, the dependence of emission intensity on electron energy and the shape and position of the RCSPR peak. The most interesting result is that the high-wavevector roughness can split the RCSPR radiation into peaks lying above and below the asymptotic surface plasma frequency. The results are compared with data from Ag in the following paper. (orig.)

  6. Contaminant degradation by irradiated semiconducting silver chloride particles: kinetics and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tian; Garg, Shikha; Miller, Christopher J; Waite, T David

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of light-mediated formic acid (HCOO(-)) degradation in the presence of semiconducting silver chloride particles are investigated in this study. Our experimental results show that visible-light irradiation of AgCl(s) results in generation of holes and electrons with the photo-generated holes and its initial oxidation product carbonate radical, oxidizing HCOO(-) to form CO2. The HCOO(-) degradation rate increases with increase in silver concentration due to increase in rate of photo-generation of holes while the increase in chloride concentration decreases the degradation rate of HCOO(-) as a result of the scavenging of holes by Cl(-), thereby resulting in decreased holes and carbonate radical concentration. The results obtained indicate that a variety of other solution conditions including dioxygen concentration, bicarbonate concentration and pH influence the availability of holes and hence the HCOO(-) degradation rate in a manner consistent with our understanding of key processes. Based on our experimental results, we have developed a kinetic model capable of predicting AgCl(s)-mediated HCOO(-) photo-degradation over a wide range of conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultra-high vacuum target assembly for charged particle irradiations in the materials research field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressers, J.; Cassanelli, G.; Cat, R. de; Kohnen, H.; Gherardi, G.

    1978-01-01

    A target assembly designed for ion irradiation and ion implantation experiments on different particle accelerators is described. It consists of a target chamber separated from the beam line by a thin metal window, thus allowing implantations to be carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Homogeneous in-depth distribution of the implanted ion species is realized by rotating the target about an axis perpendicular to the ion beam (rocking). The target holder is driven by means of a stepping motor with a constant step angle and a rocking device controller containing the required rocking angle-dwell time relation. Ion beam homogeneity over a sufficiently large target area is arrived at by transforming the Gaussian beam intensity profile into a flat beam intensity distribution by means of an electrostatic ring lens. The beam intensity profile is monitored by means of a specially designed ion beam monitor based on the Nipkov disc principle. A toroidal beam current monitoring transformer continuously measures the total beam current. Beam scanners and current measuring collimators complete the beam analysing equipment

  8. Development of elemental technique for single particle irradiation system to cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Matsumoto, Kenichi

    2004-01-01

    A single-ion microbeam facility (SPICE: Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell) are constructing at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The system was design to deliver the defined number of helium or hydrogen ions into an area smaller than the nuclei of cells in culture on thin films. The beam will be focused into 2μmθ (in diameter) by triplet-Q magnet. We have established the monitoring system using thin plastic scintillator, IIT and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to measure the size and position of microbeam. The monitoring system for microbeam has been evaluated in the middle energy course using 4.3 MeV protons. We have designed and made two new type collimators to get the microbeam, and have evaluated its scattering effect. We have confirmed that the collimated beam spot (100 ions/sec) was observed in CCD image as small light spot. This system is now installed into SPICE apparatus. (authors)

  9. Comparison between particulate matter and ultrafine particle emission by electronic and normal cigarettes in real-life conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprecht, Ario Alberto; De Marco, Cinzia; Pozzi, Paolo; Munarini, Elena; Mazza, Roberto; Angellotti, Giorgia; Turla, Francesca; Boffi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes may be safer than conventional cigarettes as they generate less indoor pollution in terms of particulate matter (PM); however, recent findings in experimental conditions demonstrated that secondhand exposure to PM may be expected from e-cigarette smoking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emission of PM generated by e-cigarettes and normal cigarettes under real-life conditions. Real-time measurement and comparison of PM and ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by electronic cigarettes with and without nicotine and by normal cigarettes in a 50 m3 office of an Italian comprehensive cancer center was performed. PM mass as PM1, PM2.5, PM7, PM10, total suspended particles (TSP) in μg/m³ and UFP in number of particles per cubic centimeter from 10 to 1,000 nanometers were measured. Outdoor concentrations were measured contemporaneously to compensate for urban background changes. Regardless of their nicotine content, e-cigarettes generated lower PM levels than conventional cigarettes. Notably, nicotine-enriched e-cigarettes produced lower PM levels than their nicotine-free counterparts. E-cigarettes appear to generate less indoor pollution than normal cigarettes and may therefore be safer. Further studies are required to investigate the long-term health-related effects of secondhand e-cigarette exposure.

  10. Q-switched ruby laser irradiation of normal human skin. Histologic and ultrastructural findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruza, G J; Dover, J S; Flotte, T J; Goetschkes, M; Watanabe, S; Anderson, R R

    1991-12-01

    The Q-switched ruby laser is used for treatment of tatoos. The effects of Q-switched ruby laser pulses on sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, as well as senile lentigines, were investigated with clinical observation, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A pinpricklike sensation occurred at radiant exposures as low as 0.2 J/cm2. Immediate erythema, delayed edema, and immediate whitening occurred with increasing radiant exposure. The threshold for immediate whitening varied inversely with skin pigmentation, ranging from a mean of 1.4 J/cm2 in lentigines to 3.1 J/cm2 in sun-protected skin. Transmission electron microscopy showed immediate alteration of mature melanosomes and nuclei within keratinocytes and melanocytes, but stage I and II melanosomes were unaffected. Histologically, immediate injury was confined to the epidermis. There was minimal inflammatory response 1 day after exposure. After 1 week, subthreshold exposures induced hyperpigmentation, with epidermal hyperplasia and increased melanin staining noted histologically. At higher radiant exposures, hypopigmentation occurred with desquamation of a pigmented scale/crust. All sites returned to normal skin color and texture without scarring within 3 to 6 months. These observations suggest that the human skin response to selective photothermolysis of pigmented cells is similar to that reported in animal models, including low radiant exposure stimulation of melanogenesis and high radiant exposure lethal injury to pigmented epidermal cells.

  11. The effect of charge collection recovery in silicon p-n junction detectors irradiated by different particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Abreu, M.; Anbinderis, P.; Anbinderis, T.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Cindro, V.; Dezillie, B.; Dierlamm, A.; Eremin, V.; Gaubas, E.; Gorbatenko, V.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Grohmann, S.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Hempel, O.; Herzog, R.; Haerkoenen, J.; Ilyashenko, I.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Kalesinskas, V.; Kapturauskas, J.; Laiho, R.; Li, Z.; Mandic, I.; De Masi, Rita; Menichelli, D.; Mikuz, M.; Militaru, O.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Perea Solano, B.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato Mendes, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Tuominen, E.; Vaitkus, J.; Da Via, C.; Wobst, E.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2003-01-01

    The recovery of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) at low temperatures, the so-called 'Lazarus effect', was studied in Si detectors irradiated by fast reactor neutrons, by protons of medium and high energy, by pions and by gamma-rays. The experimental results show that the Lazarus effect is observed: (a) after all types of irradiation; (b) before and after space charge sign inversion; (c) only in detectors that are biased at voltages resulting in partial depletion at room temperature. The experimental temperature dependence of the CCE for proton-irradiated detectors shows non-monotonic behaviour with a maximum at a temperature defined as the CCE recovery temperature. The model of the effect for proton-irradiated detectors agrees well with that developed earlier for detectors irradiated by neutrons. The same midgap acceptor-type and donor-type levels are responsible for the Lazarus effect in detectors irradiated by neutrons and by protons. A new, abnormal 'zigzag'-shaped temperature dependence of the CCE was observed for detectors irradiated by all particles (neutrons, protons and pions) and by an ultra-high dose of γ-rays, when operating at low bias voltages. This effect is explained in the framework of the double-peak electric field distribution model for heavily irradiated detectors. The redistribution of the space charge region depth between the depleted regions adjacent to p + and n + contacts is responsible for the 'zigzag'- shaped curves. It is shown that the CCE recovery temperature increases with reverse bias in all detectors, regardless of the type of radiation

  12. Advanced Electron Microscopy and Micro analytical technique development and application for Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles from the AGR-1 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lillo, Thomas Martin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wen, Haiming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Karen Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Madden, James Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Aguiar, Jeffery Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A series of up to seven irradiation experiments are planned for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Quantification Program, with irradiation completed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the first experiment (i.e., AGR-1) in November 2009 for an effective 620 full power days. The objective of the AGR-1 experiment was primarily to provide lessons learned on the multi-capsule test train design and to provide early data on fuel performance for use in fuel fabrication process development and post-irradiation safety testing data at high temperatures. This report describes the advanced microscopy and micro-analysis results on selected AGR-1 coated particles.

  13. Structural and morphological changes in pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide caused by irradiation with high-energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernykh, M.A.; Belov, V.T.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the structural and morphological changes, occurring under the electron beam in pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide, prepared in seven different solutions and irradiated beforehand by protons of x-rays, with the aim of elucidating the structure of anodic aluminum oxides. An increased stability of the pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide has been observed towards the action of the electron beam of an UEMV-100K microscope at standard working regimes (75 keV) as a result of irradiation with protons or x-rays. A difference has been found to exist between structural and morphological changes of anodic aluminum oxide films, prepared in different solutions, when irradiated with high-energy particles. A structural and phase inhomogeneity of amorphous pseudobarrier films of anodic aluminum oxide has been detected and its influence on the character of solid-phase transformations under the maximum-intensity electron beam

  14. Electron Microscopic Examination of Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of Compact 6-3-2 of AGR-1 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riesterer, Jessica Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Brandon Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Janney, Dawn Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ploger, Scott Arden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The electron microscopic examination of selected irradiated TRISO coated particles of the AGR-1 experiment of fuel compact 6-3-2 are presented in this report. Compact 6-3-2 refers to the compact in Capsule 6 at level 3 of Stack 2. The fuel used in capsule 6 compacts, are called the “baseline” fuel as it is fabricated with refined coating process conditions used to fabricate historic German fuel, because of its excellent irradiation performance with UO2 kernels. The AGR-1 fuel is however made of low-enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO). Kernel diameters are approximately 350 µm with a U-235 enrichment of approximately 19.7%. Compact 6-3-2 has been irradiated to 11.3% FIMA compact average burn-up with a time average, volume average temperature of 1070.2°C and with a compact average fast fluence of 2.38E21 n/cm

  15. Thymectomized, irradiated, and bone marrow-reconstituted chimeras have normal cytolytic T lymphocyte precursors but a defect in lymphokine production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprez, V.; Maziarz, R.; Weinberger, O.; Burakoff, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    A model system has been developed to study extrathymic T cell differentiation; mice have been thymectomized, lethally irradiated, and reconstituted with bone marrow cells depleted of Thy-1 + cells. After 8 wk, the spleen cells of these athymic, bone marrow-reconstituted chimeras contain Thy-1 + precytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) that are able to respond to antigen only if supernatant from Con A-activated T cells is added to culture. The phenotype of these pre-CTL is similar to that of thymocytes, suggesting that they may be immature T cells. Initial evaluation of the CTL repertoire of these athymic mice demonstrated that the CTL generated to trinitrophenyl-modified syngeneic cells are H-2-restricted, and that the CTL generated to alloantigens have many of the cross-reactivities observed in normal mice but not in nude mice. In this report, the authors demonstrate a helper T cell defect in these thymectomized chimeras. These chimeras lack an Ly-1 + helper cell required for thymocytes to differentiate to CTL. Further studies revealed that when spleen cells from these thymectomized chimeras were stimulated with Con A, they produced normal levels of interleukin 2. However, these splenocytes were defective in the production of another factor needed for CTL differentiation

  16. In-vitro secretion of inhibin-like activity by Sertoli cells from normal and prenatally irradiated immature rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultee-van Gessel, A.M.; Leemborg, F.G.; Jong, F.H. de; Molen, H.J. van der

    1986-01-01

    The influence of in-vitro conditions on the production of inhibin by Sertoli cells from 21-day-old normal and prenatally irradiated rat testes was studied by measuring inhibin activity in culture media, using the suppression of the release of FSH from cultured rat pituitary cells. Sertoli cells secreted inhibin-like activity during at least 21 days of culture, and cells cultured at 37 0 C produced significantly more inhibin than those cultured at 32 0 C. The presence of fetal calf serum had no significant effect on inhibin production at 32 0 C, while at 37 0 C the production was decreased. The presence of ovine FSH stimulated inhibin secretion, while inhibin concentrations in Sertoli cell culture media were decreased after the addition of testosterone. Testosterone, added together with ovine FSH, suppressed inhibin secretion when compared with the levels found in the presence of FSH alone. The presence of spermatogenic cells decreased the release of inhibin. From these results it was concluded that both Sertoli cells isolated from normal immature rat testes and those from testes without spermatogenic cells can secrete inhibin-like activity in culture. A number of discrepancies with in-vivo observations was observed. (author)

  17. Apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukaemia: normal responses by progenitor cells to growth factor deprivation, X-irradiation and glucocorticoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, T.A.S.; Lewis, J.L.; Grand, F.H.; Gooding, R.P.; Goldman, J.M.; Gordon, M.Y. [Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis (genetically programmed active cell death) by p210 BCR-ABL expression is a mechanism that might contribute to clonal expansion in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Since cell death following exposure to ionizing radiation and many chemotherapeutic agents can occur by the apoptotic pathway, inhibition of apoptosis would be expected to confer a relative resistance to these treatments. Similarly, cells deprived of growth factors in vitro die by apoptosis, and inhibition of apoptosis would therefore be expected to allow cells to survive better in growth factor-deprived conditions. We found that the survival of normal and CML myeloid progenitors was the same after in vitro incubation in deprived conditions and after treatment with X-irradiation or glucocorticoids. We also found that mature cells in colonies produced by CML progenitors (CFU-GM) did not survive better than those produced by normal progenitor cells. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide-stained cells provided a direct indication that the degree of apoptosis may correspond to the degree of deprivation. These results suggest that inhibition of apoptosis may not be the primary mechanism whereby BCR-ABL influences the expansion of the malignant clone in CML. (Author).

  18. Apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukaemia: normal responses by progenitor cells to growth factor deprivation, X-irradiation and glucocorticoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, T.A.S.; Lewis, J.L.; Grand, F.H.; Gooding, R.P.; Goldman, J.M.; Gordon, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis (genetically programmed active cell death) by p210 BCR-ABL expression is a mechanism that might contribute to clonal expansion in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Since cell death following exposure to ionizing radiation and many chemotherapeutic agents can occur by the apoptotic pathway, inhibition of apoptosis would be expected to confer a relative resistance to these treatments. Similarly, cells deprived of growth factors in vitro die by apoptosis, and inhibition of apoptosis would therefore be expected to allow cells to survive better in growth factor-deprived conditions. We found that the survival of normal and CML myeloid progenitors was the same after in vitro incubation in deprived conditions and after treatment with X-irradiation or glucocorticoids. We also found that mature cells in colonies produced by CML progenitors (CFU-GM) did not survive better than those produced by normal progenitor cells. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide-stained cells provided a direct indication that the degree of apoptosis may correspond to the degree of deprivation. These results suggest that inhibition of apoptosis may not be the primary mechanism whereby BCR-ABL influences the expansion of the malignant clone in CML. (Author)

  19. Selective tumor irradiation without normal tissue exposure in non-resectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order, S.E.; Siegel, J.A.; Lustig, R.A.; Principato, L.S.; Zeiger, L.; Lang, P.; Wallner, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum dose of colloidal 32 P that may be interstitially infused in non-resectable pancreatic cancer prior to external radiation [60 Gy + 5FU]. Materials and Methods: Forty-seven patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer with and without metastasis entered a dose escalation Phase I study beginning at a specific activity of 4 mCi. Under CT guidance the center of the pancreatic tumor was localized by computer the distance and angle from a grid on the abdomen to the center of the tumor mass determined. Three drugs were infused: 4 mg Decadron - 10 minute delay; 2.5 million particles of macroaggregated albumin [MAA]; and with final dose escalation two infusions of 30 mCi colloidal chromic phosphate 32 P [3.5 ml] followed by a needle cleansing dose of .25 ml of macroaggregated albumin. Bremsstrahlung scans on three separate days determined tumor localization and radiation dose. One week later infusional brachytherapy was repeated, that is Decadron, MAA, colloidal 32 P, followed by three additional bremsstrahlung scans. Two weeks later a course of 60 Gy external radiation was initiated with four doses of 5FU [500 mg] administered with every other radiation treatment day. Toxicity was recorded using RTOG cooperative group criteria. CA19-9 and CEA were used as biomarkers to evaluate tumor progression or remission in conjunction with CT scans and clinical course. Results: Completion of the Phase I study was limited, not by toxicity, but by the volume of colloidal 32 P that could be infused into the stroma of the tumor, i.e. 3.5 ml containing 30 mCi. No significant (grade 3-4) toxicity occurred in patients with pancreatic cancer only. Patients without metastasis had reduction and, in some cases, elimination of CA19-9, etc. The median survival in 28 patients within the Phase I non-resectable pancreas cancer study without metastasis was one year in 19 patients; with metastasis was 6.9 months. The two infusions of 30 mCi 32 P ordinarily yields a

  20. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omotoso, E., E-mail: ezekiel.omotoso@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Departments of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife 220005 (Nigeria); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P.N.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×10{sup 10} to 9.2×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Current–voltage (I–V), capacitance–voltage (C–V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBH{sub I–V}) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, N{sub d} decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×10{sup 16} to 1.1×10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in N{sub d} shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm{sup −1}. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E{sub 0.39} and E{sub 0.62}), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E{sub 0.39} as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E{sub 0.62} has the attribute of Z{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}.

  1. Multiscale virtual particle based elastic network model (MVP-ENM) for normal mode analysis of large-sized biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin

    2017-12-20

    In this paper, a multiscale virtual particle based elastic network model (MVP-ENM) is proposed for the normal mode analysis of large-sized biomolecules. The multiscale virtual particle (MVP) model is proposed for the discretization of biomolecular density data. With this model, large-sized biomolecular structures can be coarse-grained into virtual particles such that a balance between model accuracy and computational cost can be achieved. An elastic network is constructed by assuming "connections" between virtual particles. The connection is described by a special harmonic potential function, which considers the influence from both the mass distributions and distance relations of the virtual particles. Two independent models, i.e., the multiscale virtual particle based Gaussian network model (MVP-GNM) and the multiscale virtual particle based anisotropic network model (MVP-ANM), are proposed. It has been found that in the Debye-Waller factor (B-factor) prediction, the results from our MVP-GNM with a high resolution are as good as the ones from GNM. Even with low resolutions, our MVP-GNM can still capture the global behavior of the B-factor very well with mismatches predominantly from the regions with large B-factor values. Further, it has been demonstrated that the low-frequency eigenmodes from our MVP-ANM are highly consistent with the ones from ANM even with very low resolutions and a coarse grid. Finally, the great advantage of MVP-ANM model for large-sized biomolecules has been demonstrated by using two poliovirus virus structures. The paper ends with a conclusion.

  2. Behavior of LASL-made graphite, ZrC, and ZrC-containing coated particles in irradiation tests HT-28 and HT-29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiswig, R.D.; Wagner, P.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    Three types of materials, extruded graphite, hot-pressed ZrC, and particles with ZrC coatings, were irradiated in ORNL High Fluence Isotope Reactor Irradiation tests HT-28 and HT-29. The ZrC seemed unaffected. The graphite changed in dimensions, x-ray diffraction parameters, and thermal conductivity. The four types of coated particles tested all resisted the irradiation well, except one set of particles with double-graded C-ZrC-C coats. Overall, the results were considered encouraging for use of ZrC and extruded graphite fuel matrices. 16 fig

  3. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. The gaps may represent single-strand breaks. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or beta-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G2 phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G2 phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives

  4. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G 2 phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or #betta#-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G 2 phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, which destroys H 2 O 2 , or mannitol, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G 2 phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives

  5. Device for irradiation with electron and a magnetic lens for deviation of beams of charged particles, especially electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderberg, B.

    1990-01-01

    An electron beam is sweeping aver the object while this is moved forward. In order to achieve a uniform irradiation and compensate for geometric errors, an additional magnetic lens is located immediately beneath the exposed area. The magnetic lens refract the electron beam in such a manner that the particle trajectories become parallel or slightly convergent after the lens. The lens consists of two parallel permanent bar magnets, preferably laminated magnets. (L.F.)

  6. Theoretical and experimental radiation effectiveness of the free radical dosimeter alanine to irradiation with heavy charged particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Olsen, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response characteristics have been measured for the crystalline amino acid L-.alpha.-alanine irradiated with ion beams of 6 and 16 MeV protons, 20 MeV .alpha. particles, 21 MeV7Li ions, 64 MeV16O ions, and 80 MeV32S ions. The experimental radiation effectiveness (RE) with reference to low-LE...

  7. Alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in SiO2 films of Si-SiO2 structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koman, B.P.; Gal'chynskyy, O.V.; Kovalyuk, R.O.; Shkol'nyy, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in Si-SiO 2 structures by means of the thermostimulated discharge currents (TSDC) analysis. The object of investigation were (p-Si)-SiO 2 structures formed by a combined oxidation of the industrial p-Si wafers in dry and wet oxygen at temperature of 1150 C. The TSD currents were investigated in the temperature range between 90 and 500 K under linear heating rate. Pu 238 isotopes were the source of alpha-particles with an energy of 4-5 MeV and a density of 5.10 7 s -1 cm -2 . The TSD current curves show two peculiar maxima at about 370 and 480 K. Alpha-particle irradiation doesn't affect the general shape of the TSDC curves but leads to a shift of the maximum at 370 K and reduces the total electret charge which is accumulated in the Si-SiO 2 structures during polarization. The energy distribution function of the defects which are involved in SiO 2 polarization has been calculated. It showes that defects with activation energies of about 0.8 and 1.0 eV take part in forming the electret state, and these activation energies have certain energy distributions. It has been found that the TSDC maximum at 370 K has space charge nature and is caused by migration of hydrogen ions. In irradiated samples hydrogen and natrium ions localize on deeper trapping centres induced by alpha-particle irradiation. (orig.)

  8. Investigation of normal tissue complication probabilities in prostate and partial breast irradiation radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, E.; Takam, R.; Bensaleh, S.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Normal- Tissue-Complication Probabilities of rectum, bladder and urethra following various radiation techniques for prostate cancer were evaluated using the relative-seriality and Lyman models. NTCPs of lungs, heart and skin, their dependence on sourceposition, balloon-deformation were also investigated for HDR mammosite brachytherapy. The prostate treatment techniques included external three dimentional conformal-radiotherapy, Low-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (1-125), High-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (Ir-I92). Dose- Volume-Histograms of critical structures for prostate and breast radiotherapy, retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems, were converted to Biological Effective Dose (BEffD)-based and Equivalent Dose(Deq)-based DVHs to account for differences in radiation delivery and fractionation schedule. Literature-based model parameters were used to calculate NTCPs. Hypofractionated 3D-CRT (2.75 Gy/fraction, total dose 55 Gy) NTCPs of rectum, bladder and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 4-field 3D-CRT (2-Gy/fraction, 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 4- and 5-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy). Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%) following the dose-escalated 4-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed techniques. The average NTCP for rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDRBT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. For Mammosite, NTCP was estimated to be 0.1 %, 0.1 %, 1.2% and 3.5% for skin desquamation, erythema, telangiectasia and fibrosis respectively (the source positioned at the balloon centre). A 4 mm Mammosite-balloon deformation leads to overdosing of PTV regions by ∼40%, resulting in excessive skin dose and increased NTCP. Conclusions Prostate brachytherapy resulted in NTCPs lower compared to external beam techniques. Mammosite-brachytherapy resulted in no heart/lung complications regardless of balloon deformation. However, 4 mm deformation caused 0.6% increase in tissue fibrosis NTCP.

  9. Effects of fuel particle size and fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the in-pile behavior in CERCER composite pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yunmei [Institute of Mechanics and Computational Engineering, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ding, Shurong, E-mail: dsr1971@163.com [Institute of Mechanics and Computational Engineering, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Xunchao; Wang, Canglong; Yang, Lei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-12-15

    The micro-scale finite element models for CERCER pellets with different-sized fuel particles are developed. With consideration of a grain-scale mechanistic irradiation swelling model in the fuel particles and the irradiation creep in the matrix, numerical simulations are performed to explore the effects of the particle size and the fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep on the thermo-mechanical behavior of CERCER pellets. The enhanced irradiation creep effect is applied in the 10 μm-thick fission fragment damage matrix layer surrounding the fuel particles. The obtained results indicate that (1) lower maximum temperature occurs in the cases with smaller-sized particles, and the effects of particle size on the mechanical behavior in pellets are intricate; (2) the first principal stress and radial axial stress remain compressive in the fission fragment damage layer at higher burnup, thus the mechanism of radial cracking found in the experiment can be better explained. - Highlights: • A grain-scale gas swelling model considering the development of recrystallization and resolution is adopted for particles. • The influence of fission-gas-induced porosity is considered in the constitutive relations for particles. • A simulation method is developed for the multi-scale thermo-mechanical behavior. • The effects of fuel particle size and fission-fragment-enhanced irradiation creep are investigated in pellets.

  10. SU-F-P-46: Comparative Study Between Two Normalization Prescriptions for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Dosimetric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P; Sharma, D; Gandhi, A; Binjola, A; Subramani, V; Chander, S [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) plan with the normalized basal dose points and 5mm box prescription. Methods: Five patients of APBI were planned twice in Oncentra Master planning TPS (Version 4.3) using TG-43 algorithm. The number of catheters for all the patients was 10 to 16 and implant plane 2 to 3. For planning all catheters were reconstructed. Source loading was done as per HR-CTV contoured. The HR-CTV volume range was from 75cc to 182cc. Plans were normalized in two methods. First all plans were normalized on Basal dose points (PlanA) and second all the plan were normalized on 5mm box (PlanB). The prescription dose (PD) was 35Gy in 10 fractions. All the plans were completely based on normalization and without optimization. Plan evaluation was based on certain parameters coverage Index (CI), dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformity index (COIN), over dose volume index (OI). Results: The average and median of CI for planA was 0.835 and 0.8154, for planB 0.82 and 0.799 respectively. The median and average of DHI for planA was 0.66 and 0.6062, for planB 0.67 and 0.62 respectively. The range of COIN for planA and planB was from 0.58 to 0.65 respectively. The range of OI was from 0.083 to 0.169 for planA and planB. The treatment time in planA was in average 1.13 times more than planB as V150% of HR-CTV in planA was 4–6% more. The ipsilateral lung was getting 30% of PD which was 0.6% to 3.5%. Conclusion: Treatment Planning should be individualized based on implants characteristics. Planning with prescription to basal dose points should be preferred to 5mm box prescription, in order to achieve better DHI and less treatment time.

  11. Mechanical properties and the evolution of matrix molecules in PTFE upon irradiation with MeV alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Gregory L.; Lakis, Rollin E.; Davis, Charles C.; Szakal, Christopher; Swadener, John G.; Wetteland, Christopher J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    The morphology, chemical composition, and mechanical properties in the surface region of α-irradiated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) have been examined and compared to unirradiated specimens. Samples were irradiated with 5.5 MeV 4 He 2+ ions from a tandem accelerator to doses between 1 x 10 6 and 5 x 10 10 Rad. Static time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), using a 20 keV C 60 + source, was employed to probe chemical changes as a function of α dose. Chemical images and high resolution spectra were collected and analyzed to reveal the effects of α particle radiation on the chemical structure. Residual gas analysis (RGA) was utilized to monitor the evolution of volatile species during vacuum irradiation of the samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphological variation of samples with increasing α particle dose, and nanoindentation was engaged to determine the hardness and elastic modulus as a function of α dose. The data show that PTFE nominally retains its innate chemical structure and morphology at α doses 9 Rad. At α doses ≥10 9 Rad the polymer matrix experiences increased chemical degradation and morphological roughening which are accompanied by increased hardness and declining elasticity. At α doses >10 10 Rad the polymer matrix suffers severe chemical degradation and material loss. Chemical degradation is observed in ToF-SIMS by detection of ions that are indicative of fragmentation, unsaturation, and functionalization of molecules in the PTFE matrix. The mass spectra also expose the subtle trends of crosslinking within the α-irradiated polymer matrix. ToF-SIMS images support the assertion that chemical degradation is the result of α particle irradiation and show morphological roughening of the sample with increased α dose. High resolution SEM images more clearly illustrate the morphological roughening and the mass loss that accompanies high doses of α particles. RGA confirms the supposition that

  12. Synthesis of gold nano particles with enlargement size by gamma Co-60 irradiation and investigation of anti oxidation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ngoc Duy; Dang Van Phu; Le Anh Quoc; Nguyen Quoc Hien

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with size in the range of 10-53 nm were synthesized by gamma Co-60 irradiation using water-soluble chitosan (WSC) as stabilizer and size enlargement by seed approach. Absorption wavelength (λ max ) was measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy and particle size was determined from TEM images. Results showed that value of λ max increased from 523 nm (seed particles) to 525, 537 and 549 nm and the size of AuNPs increased from 10 nm (seed particles) to 20, 38 and 53 nm, respectively, for concentration ratio of Au 3+ /Au 0 (seed) of 2.5, 5 and 10. Antioxidant effect of AuNPs with size of 10, 20, 38 and 53 nm was investigated using free radical 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS .+ ). Results indicated that the smaller the particle size was (10 nm) the stronger the antioxidant effect attained. Thus, AuNPs/WSC synthesis by gamma Co-60 irradiation are promising for applications as antioxidants in cosmetics and in other fields as well. (author)

  13. Expression profiling of murine lung 70 days following exposure to fractionated or acute dose of 1.0 Gy 56Fe- particle irradiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiation of the K-rasLA1 mouse model with a fractionated dose of 1.0Gy 56Fe- particles increases the incidence of invasive carcinoma compared to unirradiated...

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of ETAS®50 by Inhibiting Nuclear Factor-κB p65 Nuclear Import in Ultraviolet-B-Irradiated Normal Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Shirato

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV irradiation induces proinflammatory responses in skin cells, including dermal fibroblasts, accelerating premature skin aging (photoaging. ETAS 50, a standardized extract from the Asparagus officinalis stem, is a novel and unique functional food that suppresses proinflammatory responses of hydrogen peroxide-stimulated skin fibroblasts and interleukin- (IL- 1β-stimulated hepatocytes. To elucidate its antiphotoaging potencies, we examined whether ETAS 50 treatment after UV-B irradiation attenuates proinflammatory responses of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs. UV-B-irradiated NHDFs showed reduced levels of the cytosolic inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB α (IκBα protein and increased levels of nuclear p65 protein. The nuclear factor-κB nuclear translocation inhibitor JSH-23 abolished UV-B irradiation-induced IL-1β mRNA expression, indicating that p65 regulates transcriptional induction. ETAS 50 also markedly suppressed UV-B irradiation-induced increases in IL-1β mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that ETAS 50 retained p65 in the cytosol after UV-B irradiation. Western blotting also showed that ETAS 50 suppressed the UV-B irradiation-induced increases in nuclear p65 protein. Moreover, ETAS 50 clearly suppressed UV-B irradiation-induced distribution of importin-α protein levels in the nucleus without recovering cytosolic IκBα protein levels. These results suggest that ETAS 50 exerts anti-inflammatory effects on UV-B-irradiated NHDFs by suppressing the nuclear import machinery of p65. Therefore, ETAS 50 may prevent photoaging by suppressing UV irradiation-induced proinflammatory responses of dermal fibroblasts.

  15. AFM of metallic nano-particles and nano-structures in heavily irradiated NaCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaynutdinov, R; Vainshtein, DI; Hak, SJ; Tolstikhina, A; Den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    AFM investigations are reported for heavily, electron irradiated NaCl crystals in ultra high vacuum (UHV) in the non-contact mode-with an UHV AFM/STM Omicron system. To avoid chemical reactions between the radiolytic Na and oxygen and water, the irradiated samples were cleaved and prepared for the

  16. The effects of intense gamma-irradiation on the alpha-particle response of silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) semiconductor radiation detectors are being developed for alpha-particle, X-ray and Gamma-ray, and fast-neutron energy spectrometry. SiC detectors have been operated at temperatures up to 306 deg. C and have also been found to be highly resistant to the radiation effects of fast-neutron and charged-particle bombardments. In the present work, the alpha-particle response of a SiC detector based on a Schottky diode design has been carefully monitored as a function of 137 Cs gamma-ray exposure. The changes in response have been found to be negligible for gamma exposures up to and including 5.4 MGy, and irradiations to higher doses are in progress

  17. GIF++: A new CERN Irradiation Facility to test large-area particle detectors for the High-Luminosity LHC program

    CERN Document Server

    Guida, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade is setting a new challenge for particle detector technologies. The increase in luminosity will produce a higher particle background with respect to present conditions. To study performance and stability of detectors at LHC and future HL-LHC upgrades, a new dedicated facility has been built at CERN: the new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). The GIF++ is a unique place where high energy charged particle beams (mainly muons) are combined with gammas from a 14 TBq 137Cesium source which simulates the background radiation expected at the LHC experiments. Several centralized services and infrastructures are made available to the LHC detector community to facilitate the different R&D; programs.

  18. Altered ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to chemically distinct metal welding fume particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedan, Jeffrey S., E-mail: jsf2@cdc.gov; Thompson, Janet A.; Meighan, Terence G.; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Antonini, James M.

    2017-07-01

    Welding fume inhalation causes pulmonary toxicity, including susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized that airway epithelial ion transport is a target of fume toxicity, and investigated the effects of fume particulates from manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) on ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) cultured in air-interface. MMA-SS particles, more soluble than GMA-MS particles, contain Cr, Ni, Fe and Mn; GMA-MS particles contain Fe and Mn. MMA-SS or GMA-MS particles (0.0167–166.7 μg/cm{sup 2}) were applied apically to NHBEs. After 18 h transepithelial potential difference (V{sub t}), resistance (R{sub t}), and short circuit current (I{sub sc}) were measured. Particle effects on Na{sup +} and Cl¯ channels and the Na{sup +},K{sup +},2Cl¯-cotransporter were evaluated using amiloride (apical), 5-nitro-2-[(3-phenylpropyl)amino]benzoic acid (NPPB, apical), and bumetanide (basolateral), respectively. MMA-SS (0.0167–16.7 μg/cm{sup 2}) increased basal V{sub t}. Only 16.7 μg/cm{sup 2} GMA-MS increased basal V{sub t} significantly. MMA-SS or GMA-MS exposure potentiated I{sub sc} responses (decreases) to amiloride and bumetanide, while not affecting those to NPPB, GMA-MS to a lesser degree than MMA-SS. Variable effects on R{sub t} were observed in response to amiloride, and bumetanide. Generally, MMA-SS was more potent in altering responses to amiloride and bumetanide than GMA-MS. Hyperpolarization occurred in the absence of LDH release, but decreases in V{sub t}, R{sub t}, and I{sub sc} at higher fume particulate doses accompanied LDH release, to a greater extent for MMA-SS. Thus, Na{sup +} transport and Na{sup +},K{sup +},2Cl¯-cotransport are affected by fume exposure; MMA-MS is more potent than GMA-MS. Enhanced Na{sup +} absorption and decreased airway surface liquid could compromise defenses against infection. - Highlights: • Welding fume particle toxicity was investigated in human bronchial

  19. Blood leukocyte responses to extracorporeal circulation. 2. Medium term extracorporeal circulation without and with extracorporeal irradiation in normal and splenectomized dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, P.; Fliedner, T.M. (Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Klinische Physiologie)

    1983-01-01

    Medium term (6-8 h) extracorporeal irradiation without and with irradiation of blood was performed in normal and splenectomized dogs to reveal the changes of blood leukocytes including CFU-C. A regular but transitory decrease of granulocytes and a longer lasting diminution of lymphocytes in the blood were observed. The CFU-C level became and mostly remained very low during the procedure. Splenectomy did not influence significantly the changes of peripheral leukocyte counts. No marked difference of leukocytes was seen in the blood samples taken from the arterial or venous side of the shunt or even from the cubital vein. Also, the irradiation did not produce any difference in the alterations of blood cell counts compared to those without irradiation. The possible explanations of these results are discussed.

  20. Hemopoietic regeneration in murine spleen following transfusion of normal and irradiated marrow: different response of granulocyte/macrophage and erythroid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangenheim, K.-H. von; Peterson, H.-P.; Huebner, G.E.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate cell proliferation in regenerating spleen, bone marrow of normal and gamma-irradiated donor mice (3 weeks after 5 Gy) was transfused into lethally irradiated recipients. In the donors and in the recipient spleens numbers of CFU-S and progenitor cells were determined. In the irradiated donors the progenitors were at control level after 3 weeks of recovery although CFU-S were still at 50% of control. Recipients of the irradiated marrow received therefore an increased proportion of progenitors. CFU-C appeared to be self-renewing and/or increased in number due to enhanced CFU-S differentiation, but not the erythroid progenitors. CFU-S self-renewal was reduced after 5 Gy. The data suggest that cell differentiation and maturation proceed during early splenic regeneration. The quantity of CFU-C does not necessarily mirror the situation in the stem cell compartment. (author)

  1. Effect of DNA repair on the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of uv irradiation and of chemical carcinogens in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and of aromatic amides or polycyclic hydrocarbons was quantitatively compared in normally repairing strains of human cells and in several excision-repair deficient or post-replication repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) strains

  2. Comparison of single, fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, P.G.S.; Kimler, B.F.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of fractionated thoracic irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rats was compared to that produced by single doses. Animals received a single dose of 15 Gy, 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (fractionation), or 30 Gy in 30 fractions of 1 Gy each 3 times a day (hyperfractionation). The treatments produced minimal lethality since a total of only 6 animals died between days 273 and 475 after the initiation of treatment, with no difference in survival observed between the control and any of the 3 treated groups. Despite the lack of lethality, evidence of lung damage was obtained by histological examination. Animals that had received either single doses or fractionated doses had more of the pulmonary parenchyma involved than did animals that had received hyperfractionated doses. The authors conclude that, in the rat lung model, a total radiation dose of 30 Gy fractionated over 14 days produces no more lethality nor damage to lung tissue than does 15 Gy delivered as a single dose. However, long-term effects as evidenced by deposits of collagen and development of fibrosis are significantly reduced by hyperfractionation when compared to single doses and daily fractionation

  3. Investigation of double strand breaks induced by alpha particle irradiation using C.N.B.G. microbeam in human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouthier, Th.

    2006-12-01

    To understand the mechanisms of interaction of ionizing radiation with living tissues exposed to low and protracted doses remains a major issue for risk evaluation. The response cannot be found in epidemiological studies because the only available data concern accidental exposures to high doses of radiation. The natural exposure represents the main source of exposure in the daily life, just before the medical sources (radiology, radiotherapy). In addition, this kind of exposure is very difficult to reproduce in vitro by irradiating cell lines. The method per preference is based on random irradiation of cell populations. The mean number of particles having traversed cells is then calculated on the basis of Poisson statistics. In addition to inevitable multiple impacts, the numerous potential intracellular targets (nuclei, cytoplasm), the indirect effects induced by the impact of particles on neighbouring cells or simply the extracellular targets, constitute phenomena that make more complex the interpretation of experimental data. A charged particle microbeam was developed at C.E.N.B.G. to perform the targeted irradiation of individual cells with a targeting precision of a few microns. It is possible to deliver a counted number of alpha particles down to the ultimate dose of one alpha per cell, to target predetermined cells and then to observe the response of the neighbouring cells. This facility has been validated during this work on human keratinocyte cells expressing a recombinant nuclear fluorescent protein (histone H2B-GFP). The combination of ion micro-beams with confocal microscopy and numeric quantitative analysis allowed the measurement of DNA double strand breaks via the phosphorylation of the histone H2A.X in individual cells. The mechanisms of DNA reparation and apoptosis induction were also in the scope of those studies. The experimental results obtained during this thesis validate the methodology we have developed by demonstrating the targeting

  4. Development of a High Irradiance LED Configuration for Small Field of View Motion Estimation of Fertilizer Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Cool

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Better characterization of the fertilizer spreading process, especially the fertilizer pattern distribution on the ground, requires an accurate measurement of individual particle properties and dynamics. Both 2D and 3D high speed imaging techniques have been developed for this purpose. To maximize the accuracy of the predictions, a specific illumination level is required. This paper describes the development of a high irradiance LED system for high speed motion estimation of fertilizer particles. A spectral sensitivity factor was used to select the optimal LED in relation to the used camera from a range of commercially available high power LEDs. A multiple objective genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal configuration of LEDs resulting in the most homogeneous irradiance in the target area. Simulations were carried out for different lenses and number of LEDs. The chosen configuration resulted in an average irradiance level of 452 W/m2 with coefficient of variation less than 2%. The algorithm proved superior and more flexible to other approaches reported in the literature and can be used for various other applications.

  5. On the Use of the Log-Normal Particle Size Distribution to Characterize Global Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Robert; Rincon, Rafael; Liao, Liang

    2003-01-01

    Although most parameterizations of the drop size distributions (DSD) use the gamma function, there are several advantages to the log-normal form, particularly if we want to characterize the large scale space-time variability of the DSD and rain rate. The advantages of the distribution are twofold: the logarithm of any moment can be expressed as a linear combination of the individual parameters of the distribution; the parameters of the distribution are approximately normally distributed. Since all radar and rainfall-related parameters can be written approximately as a moment of the DSD, the first property allows us to express the logarithm of any radar/rainfall variable as a linear combination of the individual DSD parameters. Another consequence is that any power law relationship between rain rate, reflectivity factor, specific attenuation or water content can be expressed in terms of the covariance matrix of the DSD parameters. The joint-normal property of the DSD parameters has applications to the description of the space-time variation of rainfall in the sense that any radar-rainfall quantity can be specified by the covariance matrix associated with the DSD parameters at two arbitrary space-time points. As such, the parameterization provides a means by which we can use the spaceborne radar-derived DSD parameters to specify in part the covariance matrices globally. However, since satellite observations have coarse temporal sampling, the specification of the temporal covariance must be derived from ancillary measurements and models. Work is presently underway to determine whether the use of instantaneous rain rate data from the TRMM Precipitation Radar can provide good estimates of the spatial correlation in rain rate from data collected in 5(sup 0)x 5(sup 0) x 1 month space-time boxes. To characterize the temporal characteristics of the DSD parameters, disdrometer data are being used from the Wallops Flight Facility site where as many as 4 disdrometers have been

  6. Energy dependence of angular distributions of sputtered particles by ion-beam bombardment at normal incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Ueda, Yasutoshi; Uchino, Kiichiro; Muraoka, Katsunori; Maeda, Mitsuo; Akazaki, Masanori; Yamamura, Yasunori.

    1986-01-01

    The angular distributions of sputtered Fe-atoms were measured using the laser fluorescence technique during Ar-ion bombardment for energies of 0.6, 1, 2 and 3 keV at normal incidence. The measured cosine distribution at 0.6 keV progressively deviated to an over-cosine distribution at higher energies, and at 3 keV the angular distribution was an overcosine distribution of about 20 %. The experimental results agree qualitatively with calculations by a recent computer simulation code, ACAT. The results are explained by the competition between surface scattering and the effects of primary knock-on atoms, which tend to make the angular distributions over-cosine and under-cosine, respectively. (author)

  7. AFM of metallic nano-particles and nano-structures in heavily irradiated NaCl

    OpenAIRE

    Gaynutdinov, R; Vainshtein, DI; Hak, SJ; Tolstikhina, A; Den Hartog, HW

    2003-01-01

    AFM investigations are reported for heavily, electron irradiated NaCl crystals in ultra high vacuum (UHV) in the non-contact mode-with an UHV AFM/STM Omicron system. To avoid chemical reactions between the radiolytic Na and oxygen and water, the irradiated samples were cleaved and prepared for the experiments in UHV At the surface of freshly cleaved samples, we have observed sodium nano-precipitates with shapes, which depend on the irradiation dose and the volume fraction of the radiolytic Na...

  8. Coloration and darkening of methane clathrate and other ices by charged particle irradiation - Applications to the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Murray, B. G. J. P. T.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1987-01-01

    The results of laboratory experiments simulating the irradiation of hydrocarbon-H2O or hydrocarbon-H2O/NH3 clathrates by charged particles in the outer solar system are reported. Ices produced by condensing and boiling liquid CH4 on an H2O frost surface at 100 K or by cocondensing frosts from gaseous mixtures were exposed to coronal-discharge electron irradiation at 77 K, and the spectral properties of the irradiated surfaces were determined. Significant darkening of the initially white ices was observed at doses of 1 Gerg/sq cm, corresponding to 8-500 yrs of irradiation by Uranian magnetospheric electrons on the surfaces of the principal Uranian satellites, or to total destruction of CH4 in the upper 1 mm of the satellite surfaces after 0.05-3.0 Myr. It is estimated that 10 m or more of icy satellite or comet surfaces would be radiation-hardened to a CH4-free ice-tholin mixture over 4 Gyr.

  9. Synthesis of diamondlike carbon particles in/on a water substrate by laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Tokura, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    We proposed two-particle synthesis techniques using a liquid as a substrate. First, utilizing liquid instead of solid substrates, particle synthesis is expected on the liquid surface. Particles sink into the liquid before the particles grow into film, because of liquid fluidity. Second, the excitation of a gas dissolved in water was also attempted. An ArF excimer laser beam was focused in a chamber. The 60% volume of the chamber was filled with water, in which methane was dissolved and the remaining space of the chamber was filled with methane gas. As a result, diamondlike carbon particles could be synthesized in water. The particles synthesized from methane in the gas phase were 50-200 nm in diameter, and the particles synthesized from methane dissolved in water were 200-700 nm in diameter, and no structural differences were observed between the particles of two different diameters. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that particles contained a diamondlike carbon component and that graphite was attached to them. These particles were harder than graphite particles

  10. Enhanced proliferation of transfused marrow and reversal of normal growth inhibition of female marrow in male hosts 2 months after sublethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.; Mulcahy, K.; Tjio, J.H.; Raveche, E.

    1985-01-01

    It is well established that 0.5 to 1 million marrow cells suffice to rescue (though not necessarily fully restore) lethally irradiated mice, while even 40 million cells result only in minimal seeding in isogeneic, nonirradiated mice. It was originally suggested that the results imply the existence of special proliferative sites which are filled in the nonirradiated animal, but are emptied by high doses of irradiation. In 1982 the authors demonstrated the feasibility of establishing substantial numbers of donor cells in normal, non-irradiated hosts. After four daily transfusions of 50 million marrow cells, 20-40% of the host's marrow consisted of cells of donor origin. The present paper reports the marked enhancement of the proliferation of transfused marrow cells in mice exposed to sublethal doses of irradiation of 300-900 R. Two months later, when the peripheral blood counts of the irradiated animals had returned to normal, transfusion of 100 million cells resulted in donor cell percentages of 55-100% in the peripheral blood and marrow. The authors previously found that male donor cells proliferated as readily in female as in male hosts, while female donor cells proliferated to a comparable degree only in female hosts. In the present study, male animals that had been exposed to 600-900 R 2 months earlier sustained proliferation of male and female donor cells equally well

  11. Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B; Kato, Takamitsu A; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson, Paul F; Brogan, John R; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2014-01-01

    We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component.

  12. Effect of irradiation, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide (VP-16) on number of peripheral blood and peritoneal leukocytes in mice under normal conditions and during acute inflammatory reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van't Wout, J.W.; Linde, I.; Leijh, P.C.; van Furth, R.

    1989-01-01

    In order to develop a suitable model for studying the role of granulocytes and monocytes in resistance against pathogenic microorganisms, we investigated the effect of irradiation and cytostatic treatment (cyclophosphamide and VP-16) on the number of both peripheral blood and peritoneal leukocytes in male Swiss mice. Irradiation and cyclophosphamide treatment severely decreased the number of both granulocytes and monocytes in peripheral blood, whereas VP-16 only lowered the number of blood monocytes to a significant degree and had little effect on the number of blood granulocytes or lymphocytes. When normal mice were injected intraperitoneally with newborn calf serum (NBCS) the number of peritoneal granulocytes rose about 100-fold within 6 h. In irradiated and cyclophosphamide-treated mice, this influx of granulocytes into the peritoneal cavity was virtually eliminated, as was the concomitant increase in the number of blood granulocytes; in VP-16-treated mice, on the other hand, the number of peripheral blood and peritoneal granulocytes increased to the same degree as in normal mice. An increase in the number of peripheral blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages occurred 24-48 h after injection of NBCS in normal mice. This increase was significantly impaired by irradiation as well as by treatment with cyclophosphamide or VP-16

  13. Growth and sedimentation of fine particles produced in aqueous solutions of palladium sulfate and palladium sulfate-silver sulfate induced by gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, Motoyoshi; Jonah, C.D.

    1994-10-01

    It is known that palladium and palladium-silver fine particles were formed from deaerated aqueous solutions of palladium sulfate and palladium sulfate-silver sulfate induced by gamma-ray irradiation. Changes in particle size and with amount of particles in the solution with time during and after irradiation were studied using dynamic light scattering technique and UV spectrophotometer. The particles formed from palladium sulfate solution are found to be water-filled bulky particles of diameter of 200 nm, which grow by mutual coagulation even after irradiation was terminated. Average density depends on concentration of palladium ion in the solution and dose, and the lowest density was about 2 g/cm 3 for particles of 200 nm obtained from 0.06 mM solution by 2.4 kGy irradiation. The average density of the particles obtained from palladium sulfate-silver sulfate solutions was smaller than those obtained for the corresponding palladium sulfate solutions. Supersonic agitation destroyed coagulated precipitates to form fine particles, but did not form clusters of a few atoms. (author)

  14. Converging stereotactic radiotherapy using kilovoltage X-rays: experimental irradiation of normal rabbit lung and dose-volume analysis with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  15. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid affects γH2AX expression in osteosarcoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor and normal tissue cell lines after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, C.; Oertel, S.; Thiemann, M.; Weber, K.J.; Schmezer, P.; Zelezny, O.; Lopez Perez, R.; Kulozik, A.E.; Debus, J.; Ehemann, V.

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors are tumor entities with varying response to common standard therapy protocols. Histone acetylation affects chromatin structure and gene expression which are considered to influence radiation sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and irradiation on atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors and osteosarcoma compared to normal tissue cell lines. Clonogenic assay was used to determine cell survival. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) were examined by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE) as well as by γH2AX immunostaining involving flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and immunoblot analysis. SAHA lead to an increased radiosensitivity in tumor but not in normal tissue cell lines. γH2AX expression as an indicator for DSB was significantly increased when SAHA was applied 24 h before irradiation to the sarcoma cell cultures. In contrast, γH2AX expression in the normal tissue cell lines was significantly reduced when irradiation was combined with SAHA. Analysis of initial DNA fragmentation and fragment rejoining by PFGE, however, did not reveal differences in response to the SAHA pretreatment for either cell type. SAHA increases radiosensitivity in tumor but not normal tissue cell lines. The increased H2AX phosphorylation status of the SAHA-treated tumor cells post irradiation likely reflects its delayed dephosphorylation within the DNA damage signal decay rather than chromatin acetylation-dependent differences in the overall efficacy of DSB induction and rejoining. The results support the hypothesis that combining SAHA with irradiation may provide a promising strategy in the treatment of solid tumors. (orig.)

  16. The use of gamma irradiation in preparation of polybutadiene rubber nanopowder; Its effect on particle size, morphology and crosslink structure of the powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei Abadchi, Majid; Jalali-Arani, Azam, E-mail: ajalali@aut.ac.ir

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Vulcanized rubber powders were prepared by spray drying of irradiated rubber latexes. • Influence of absorbed dose on powder structure and characteristics was investigated. • The size of rubber latex particles did not changed by irradiation. • Crosslink density increased by increasing dose and 98% gel was obtained at 150 kGy. • T{sub g} of rubber powder increased with increasing the irradiation dose. -- Abstract: The aim of this work was the preparation and characterization of polybutadiene rubber (BR) powder by irradiating of rubber lattices using {sup 60}Co radiation and spray-drying of them at the appropriate condition. The influences of absorbed dose on the volume swelling ratio, molecular weight between crosslinks, gel fraction, and glass transition temperature of obtained powder were studied. Morphology, size and size distribution of rubber particles were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analyzer (LPSA) technique, respectively. Results obtained by LPSA revealed that radiation has no effect on particle size of rubber latex but after drying, adherence properties of rubber particle causes increase in particle size of rubber powder, as shown in SEM photograph. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of rubber powders confirmed that with increasing the irradiation dose, characteristic peak corresponds to the >C=C< double bands decreased. Also Charlesby–Pinner equation was used to evaluate radiation yield.

  17. The use of gamma irradiation in preparation of polybutadiene rubber nanopowder; Its effect on particle size, morphology and crosslink structure of the powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaei Abadchi, Majid; Jalali-Arani, Azam

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Vulcanized rubber powders were prepared by spray drying of irradiated rubber latexes. • Influence of absorbed dose on powder structure and characteristics was investigated. • The size of rubber latex particles did not changed by irradiation. • Crosslink density increased by increasing dose and 98% gel was obtained at 150 kGy. • T g of rubber powder increased with increasing the irradiation dose. -- Abstract: The aim of this work was the preparation and characterization of polybutadiene rubber (BR) powder by irradiating of rubber lattices using 60 Co radiation and spray-drying of them at the appropriate condition. The influences of absorbed dose on the volume swelling ratio, molecular weight between crosslinks, gel fraction, and glass transition temperature of obtained powder were studied. Morphology, size and size distribution of rubber particles were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analyzer (LPSA) technique, respectively. Results obtained by LPSA revealed that radiation has no effect on particle size of rubber latex but after drying, adherence properties of rubber particle causes increase in particle size of rubber powder, as shown in SEM photograph. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of rubber powders confirmed that with increasing the irradiation dose, characteristic peak corresponds to the >C=C< double bands decreased. Also Charlesby–Pinner equation was used to evaluate radiation yield

  18. Radiorestoring activity of few nucleotides on normal tissues of Jerusalem Artichoke after an irradiation with γ rays of 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonard, Robert; Bayonove, Jacqueline; Riedel, Michel.

    1978-01-01

    The nucleotides tested: adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (3',5'-cAMP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (3',5'-cGMP), are able to restore proliferation to irradiatedirradiation, 3,000 rad) Jesusalem Artichoke tissue. The 3',5'-cGMP shows the greater radiorestoring activity [fr

  19. Factors affecting color strength of printing on film-coated tablets by UV laser irradiation: TiO2 particle size, crystal structure, or concentration in the film, and the irradiated UV laser power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Akihiro; Kato, Yoshiteru

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to study factors affecting color strength of printing on film-coated tablets by ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation: particle size, crystal structure, or concentration of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in film, and irradiated UV laser power. Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films containing 4.0% of TiO2, of which BET particle sizes were ranging from 126.1 to 219.8 nm, were irradiated 3.14W of UV laser at a wavelength 355 nm to study effects of TiO2 particle size and crystal structure on the printing. The films containing TiO2 concentration ranging from 1.0 to 7.7% were irradiated 3.14 or 5.39W of the UV laser to study effect of TiO2 concentration on the printing. The film containing 4.0% of TiO2, was irradiated the UV laser up to 6.42W to study effect of the UV laser power on the printing. The color strength of the printed films was estimated by a spectrophotometer as total color difference (dE). Particle size, crystal structure, and concentration of TiO2 in the films did not affect the printing. In the relationship between the irradiated UV laser power and dE, there found an inflection point (1.6W). When the UV laser power was below 1.6W, the films were not printed. When it was beyond the point, total color difference increased linearly in proportion with the irradiated laser power. The color strength of the printing on film was not changed by TiO2 particle size, crystal structure, and concentration, but could be controlled by regulating the irradiated UV laser power beyond the inflection point.

  20. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Ovaries; Tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: les ovaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, E.; Champetier, C.; Zaccariotto, A.; Duberge, T.; Guerder, C. [Departement de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Pointreau, Y. [Service Corad, pole Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Ortholan, C. [Service de radiotherapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Chauvet, B. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2010-07-15

    Clinical situations requiring protections of ovaries are mainly paediatric irradiations and pre-menopausal pelvic irradiations. The main complication of ovarian irradiation is the induced castration. Ovaries are extremely radiosensitive organs with strong interpersonal variations. The castrative effect of irradiation depends mainly on two factors: patient's age and the dose delivered to ovaries. The surgical technique of ovarian transposition allows to minimize the dose received by ovaries by taking them away, out of irradiation fields; the aim is to exclude them from the volume receiving 5 Gy or more, and if possible from those receiving 2 Gy. This technique becomes integrated into a multidisciplinary approach of conservation of fertility for patients exposed to other cytotoxic treatments. (authors)

  1. Host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and chemically-treated herpes simplex virus-1 by xeroderma pigmentosum, xp heterozygotes and normal skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylamino-fluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP was studied in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human skin fibroblasts. Virus treated with either agent demonstrated lower survival in XP cells from complementation groups A, B, C and D than in normal fibroblasts. The relative reactivation ability of XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups was found to be the same for both irradiated and chemically treated virus. In addition, the inactivation kinetics for virus treated with either agent in the XP variant were comparable to that seen in normal skin fibroblasts. The addition of 2 or 4 mmoles caffeine to the post-infection assay medium had no effect on the inactivation kinetics of virus treated by either agent in the XP variant or in XP cells from the different genetic complementation groups. Treatment of the virus with nitrogen mustard resulted in equivalent survival in normal and XP genetic complementation group D cells. No apparent defect was observed in the ability of XP heterozygous skin fibroblasts to repair virus damaged with up to 100 μg N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene per ml. These findings indicate that the repair of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus is accomplished by the same pathway or different pathways sharing a common intermediate step and that the excision defect of XP cells plays little if any role in the reactivation of nitrogen mustard treated virus. (Auth.)

  2. Survival of alpha particle irradiated cells as a function of the shape and size of the sensitive volume (nucleus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinchcomb, T.G.; Roeske, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Microdosimetry is the study of the stochastic variation of energy deposited within sub-cellular targets. As such, the size and shape of the critical target (i.e. cell nucleus) are essential when considering microdosimetric quantities. In this work, a microdosimetric analysis examines the expected cell survival as a function of the size and shape of the cell nucleus under conditions of irradiation emitting alpha particles. The results indicate that, in general, cell survival is relatively insensitive to changes in the shape of the cell nucleus when the volume is held constant. However, cell survival is a strong function of the variation in the size of the target. These results are useful when analysing the results of cell survival experiments for alpha particle emitters. (Author)

  3. The sink effect of the second-phase particle on the cavity swelling in RAFM steel under Ar-ion irradiation at 773 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, T.L.; Wang, Z.G.; Yao, C.F.; Sun, J.R.; Li, Y.F.; Wei, K.F.; Zhu, Y.B.; Pang, L.L.; Cui, M.H.; Wang, J.; Zhu, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    The microstructures of the Chinese RAFM steel irradiated at 773 K with 792 MeV Ar-ions to fluences of 2.3 × 10 20 and 4.6 × 10 20 ions/m 2 , respectively, were investigated by using a transmission electron microscope with the cross-sectional specimen technique. Preferential nucleation and enhanced growth of the cavities at the interface between the second-phase particles and the matrix were observed in the irradiated specimen. The observation of the cavity-particle complex at lower dose indicated that the dose threshold for a cavity formation at the interface between MC particle and matrix was lower than that in matrix. With increasing irradiation dose, it was found that the second-phase particles changing their shape by attached cavities occurred. Furthermore, the role of the particle–matrix interface on nucleation and growth of the attached cavity with an increase of the dose were discussed in this work

  4. A particle-number conserving microscopic approach to octupole deformation of normal deformed and superdeformed states in 194Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nhan Hao, T.V.; Phu Dat, D.H.; Hoang Tung, N.; Tran, H.N.

    2015-01-01

    The left–right asymmetric deformation of normal deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) states of 194 Pb has been investigated in the framework of the parity-symmetry projection of the highly truncated diagonalization approach (HTDA), which is suited to treat the correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. A Skyrme energy density functional using the SIII and SkM* interactions has been considered to treat the particle–hole channel, whereas a density-independent δ force has been adopted for the residual interaction. The obtained results are compared with previous approaches. The calculated octupole phonon excitation energy is found to be in good qualitative agreement with available data in the ND state. (author)

  5. Altered ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to chemically distinct metal welding fume particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedan, Jeffrey S; Thompson, Janet A; Meighan, Terence G; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M

    2017-07-01

    Welding fume inhalation causes pulmonary toxicity, including susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized that airway epithelial ion transport is a target of fume toxicity, and investigated the effects of fume particulates from manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) on ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) cultured in air-interface. MMA-SS particles, more soluble than GMA-MS particles, contain Cr, Ni, Fe and Mn; GMA-MS particles contain Fe and Mn. MMA-SS or GMA-MS particles (0.0167-166.7μg/cm 2 ) were applied apically to NHBEs. After 18h transepithelial potential difference (V t ), resistance (R t ), and short circuit current (I sc ) were measured. Particle effects on Na + and Cl¯ channels and the Na + ,K + ,2Cl¯-cotransporter were evaluated using amiloride (apical), 5-nitro-2-[(3-phenylpropyl)amino]benzoic acid (NPPB, apical), and bumetanide (basolateral), respectively. MMA-SS (0.0167-16.7μg/cm 2 ) increased basal V t . Only 16.7μg/cm 2 GMA-MS increased basal V t significantly. MMA-SS or GMA-MS exposure potentiated I sc responses (decreases) to amiloride and bumetanide, while not affecting those to NPPB, GMA-MS to a lesser degree than MMA-SS. Variable effects on R t were observed in response to amiloride, and bumetanide. Generally, MMA-SS was more potent in altering responses to amiloride and bumetanide than GMA-MS. Hyperpolarization occurred in the absence of LDH release, but decreases in V t , R t , and I sc at higher fume particulate doses accompanied LDH release, to a greater extent for MMA-SS. Thus, Na + transport and Na + ,K + ,2Cl¯-cotransport are affected by fume exposure; MMA-MS is more potent than GMA-MS. Enhanced Na + absorption and decreased airway surface liquid could compromise defenses against infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Promotion of TNF-α on malignant transformation of syrian hamster embryo cells irradiated with α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Maoxiang; Guo Renfeng; Yang Zhihua; GongYifen

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To illustrate the role of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in radiation-induced cancer and regulatory mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Methods: Taking Syrian hamster embryo cells exposed to 0.5 Gy α-particles as the target, an array of biological indicators such as cell growth curve, transformation frequency (TF), colony formation efficiency (CFE) and tumor formation in nude mice were observed, and the activities of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases were measured. Results: Neither 0.5 Gy α-particle irradiation nor TNF-α alone could induce transformation of SHE cells morphologically, but the TF, CFE and levels of protein tyrosine phosphorylation were obviously increased in SHE cells treated with 600 U/ml TNF-α after exposure to 0.5 Gy α-particles, and malignant transformation was proved by tumorigenicity assays. Conclusion: TNF-α promotes significantly the transformation of SHE cells induced by α-particles, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation is probably involved in regulation of the process

  7. Advanced electron microscopic techniques applied to the characterization of irradiation effects and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Lillo, T.M.; Trowbridge, T.L.; Madden, J.M.; Wu, Y.Q.; Goran, D.

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary electron microscopy of coated fuel particles from the AGR-1 experiment was conducted using characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). Microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates was performed. Although numerous micro- and nano-sized precipitates observed in the coating layers during initial SEM characterization of the cross-sections, and in subsequent TEM diffraction patterns, were indexed as UPd 2 Si 2 , no Ag was conclusively found. Additionally, characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentrations of Ag in precipitates in the presence of significantly higher concentrations of Pd and U. The electron microscopy team followed a multi-directional and phased approach in the identification of fission products in irradiated TRISO fuel. The advanced electron microscopy techniques discussed in this paper, not only demonstrate the usefulness of the equipment (methods) as relevant research tools, but also provide relevant scientific results which increase the knowledge about TRISO fuel particles microstructure and fission products transport

  8. Structural-morphological variations in pseudo-barrier films of anode aluminium oxide under irradiation with high-energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernykh, M.A.; Belov, V.T.

    1988-01-01

    Comparative study of structural-morphological variations under electron beam effect in pseudo-barrier films of anode aluminium oxide, obtained in seven different solutions and proton or X-rays pre-irradiated to determine structure peculiarities of anode aluminium oxides, is presented. Such study is a matter of interest from the solid-phase transformation theory point of view and for anode aluminium films application under radiation. Stability increase of pseudo-barrier films of anode aluminium oxide to the effect of UEhMV-100 K microscope electron beam at standard modes of operation (75 kV) due to proton or X-rays irradiation is found. Difference in structural-monorphological variations obtained in different solutions of anode aluminium films under high-energy particles irradiation is determined. Strucural-phase microinhomogeneity of amorphous pseudo-barrier films of anode aluminium oxide and its influence on solid-phase transformations character under electron bean of maximal intensity are detected

  9. Electron Microscopic Examination of Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of Compact 6-3-2 of AGR-1 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riesterer, Jessica Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Brandon Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Janney, Dawn Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ploger, Scott Arden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The electron microscopic examination of selected irradiated TRISO coated particles of the AGR-1 experiment of fuel compact 6-3-2 are presented in this report. Compact 6-3-2 refers to the compact in Capsule 6 at level 3 of Stack 2. The fuel used in capsule 6 compacts, are called the “baseline” fuel as it is fabricated with refined coating process conditions used to fabricate historic German fuel, because of its excellent irradiation performance with UO2 kernels. The AGR-1 fuel is however made of low-enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO). Kernel diameters are approximately 350 µm with a U-235 enrichment of approximately 19.7%. Compact 6-3-2 has been irradiated to 11.3% FIMA compact average burn-up with a time average, volume average temperature of 1070.2°C and with a compact average fast fluence of 2.38E21 n/cm

  10. Measuring the critical current in superconducting samples made of NT-50 under pulse irradiation by high-energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, P.G.; Vladimirova, N.M.; Volkov, V.I.; Goncharov, I.N.; Zajtsev, L.N.; Zel'dich, B.D.; Ivanov, V.I.; Kleshchenko, E.D.; Khvostov, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of tests of superconducting samples of an uninsulated wire of the 0.5 mm diameter, containing 1045 superconducting filaments of the 10 μm diameter made of NT-50 superconductor in a copper matrix, are given. The upper part of the sample (''closed'') is placed between two glass-cloth-base laminate plates of the 50 mm length, and the lower part (''open'') of the 45 mm length is immerged into liquid helium. The sample is located perpendicular to the magnetic field of a superconducting solenoid and it is irradiated by charged particle beams at the energy of several GeV. The measurement results of permissible energy release in the sample depending on subcriticality (I/Isub(c) where I is an operating current through the sample, and Isub(c) is a critical current for lack of the beam) and the particle flux density, as well as of the maximum permissible fluence depending on subcriticality. In case of the ''closed'' sample irradiated by short pulses (approximately 1 ms) for I/Isub(c) [ru

  11. Study of energetic-particle-irradiation induced biological effect on Rhizopus oryzae through synchrotron-FTIR micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Qi, Zeming; Huang, Qing; Wei, Xiaoli; Ke, Zhigang; Fang, Yusheng; Tian, Yangchao; Yu, Zengliang

    2013-01-01

    Energetic particles exist ubiquitously and cause varied biological effects such as DNA strand breaks, lipid peroxidation, protein modification, cell apoptosis or death. An emerging biotechnology based on ion-beam technique has been developed to serve as an effective tool for mutation breeding of crops and microbes. In order to improve the effectiveness of ion-beam biotechnology for mutation breeding, it is indispensible to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems which is still elusive. A new trend is to conduct more comprehensive research which is based on micro-scaled observation of the changes of the cellular structures and compositions under the interactions. For this purpose, advanced synchrotron FTIR (s-FTIR) microscopy was employed to monitor the cellular changes of single fungal hyphae under irradiation of α-particles from 241Am. Intracellular contents of ROS, MDA, GSSG/GSH and activities of CAT and SOD were measured via biochemical assay. Ion-irradiation on Rhizopus oryzae causes localized vacuolation, autolysis of cell wall and membrane, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and conformational changes of proteins, which have been clearly revealed by the s-FTIR microspectroscopy. The different changes of cell viability, SOD and CAT activities can be explained by the ROS-involved chemical reactions. Evidently, the elevated level of ROS in hyphal cells upon irradiation plays the key role in the caused biological effect. This study demonstrates that s-FTIR microspectroscopy is an effective tool to study the damage of fungal hyphae caused by ionizing radiation and it facilitates the exploit of the mechanism for the interactions between the energetic ions and biological systems.

  12. Radiotherapy. Non-standard fractionated regimens improving cancer treatment. Part II. Response of normal tissues to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, A.; Hernandez, M.; Pera, J.; Cambray, M.; Villa, S.; Arnaiz, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The phenomena participating in the response of tissues to fractionated irradiation are analyzed with special emphasis on the most relevant points influencing the design of non-standard fractionated regimens. (Author)

  13. Cell biological effects of total body irradiation on growth and differentiation of acute myelogenous leukemia cells compared to normal bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberger, J S; Weichselbaum, R R; Botnick, L E; Sakakeeny, M; Moloney, W C

    1979-01-01

    Radiation therapy is used as total body treatment in preparation of the acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patient for bone marrow transplantation. Many AML patients will have residual leukemia cells at the time of total body irradiation (TBI). In the present study, the effect of TBI on leukemic myeloid cells was compared to the effect on normal marrow granulocytic stem cells (CFUc) in vitro. Little difference from that of normal CFUc was found in the radiosensitivity of two mouse myeloid leukemia cell lines. The effect of TBI on growth of WEHI-3 or J774 cells in millipore diffusion chambers was stimulatory. These AML cell lines as well as others derived from Friend or Abelson virus infected in vitro long term mouse marrow cultures showed some morphologic differentiation by 7 days growth in diffusion chambers in irradiated heterologous rat hosts, but immature cells predominated by day 21. Thus, evidence in murine models of AML indicates that residual AML cells surviving chemotherapy will show no greater susceptibility to radiation killing compared to normal stem cells and will rapidly repopulate the irradiated host.

  14. The use of gamma irradiation in preparation of polybutadiene rubber nanopowder; Its effect on particle size, morphology and crosslink structure of the powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Abadchi, Majid; Jalali-Arani, Azam

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work was the preparation and characterization of polybutadiene rubber (BR) powder by irradiating of rubber lattices using 60Co radiation and spray-drying of them at the appropriate condition. The influences of absorbed dose on the volume swelling ratio, molecular weight between crosslinks, gel fraction, and glass transition temperature of obtained powder were studied. Morphology, size and size distribution of rubber particles were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analyzer (LPSA) technique, respectively. Results obtained by LPSA revealed that radiation has no effect on particle size of rubber latex but after drying, adherence properties of rubber particle causes increase in particle size of rubber powder, as shown in SEM photograph. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of rubber powders confirmed that with increasing the irradiation dose, characteristic peak corresponds to the >Cdbnd C< double bands decreased. Also Charlesby-Pinner equation was used to evaluate radiation yield.

  15. PARTICLE, a Triplex-Forming Long ncRNA, Regulates Locus-Specific Methylation in Response to Low-Dose Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Bríd O’Leary

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to low-dose irradiation causes transiently elevated expression of the long ncRNA PARTICLE (gene PARTICLE, promoter of MAT2A-antisense radiation-induced circulating lncRNA. PARTICLE affords both a cytosolic scaffold for the tumor suppressor methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT2A and a nuclear genetic platform for transcriptional repression. In situ hybridization discloses that PARTICLE and MAT2A associate together following irradiation. Bromouridine tracing and presence in exosomes indicate intercellular transport, and this is supported by ex vivo data from radiotherapy-treated patients. Surface plasmon resonance indicates that PARTICLE forms a DNA-lncRNA triplex upstream of a MAT2A promoter CpG island. We show that PARTICLE represses MAT2A via methylation and demonstrate that the radiation-induced PARTICLE interacts with the transcription-repressive complex proteins G9a and SUZ12 (subunit of PRC2. The interplay of PARTICLE with MAT2A implicates this lncRNA in intercellular communication and as a recruitment platform for gene-silencing machineries through triplex formation in response to irradiation.

  16. The behaviour of transport from the fission products caesium and strontium in coated particles for high temperature reactors under irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, P.

    1976-07-01

    At first survey is given about existing knowledge of the behaviour of caesium and strontium fission product transport in coated particles. In order to describe the complicated fission product transport mechanisms under irradiation conditions a suitable calculating model (SLIPPER) is taken over and modified to the special problems of an irradiation experiment. Fundamentally, the fission product transport is represented by the two contributions of diffusion and recoil, at which the diffusion is described by effective diffusion coefficients. In difference of that the possibility of a two-phase-diffusion is examined for the Cs diffusion in the fuel kernel. The model application on measuring results from irradiation experiments of KFA-Juelich and Mol-Belgien allowed the explanation from the characteristic of fission product transport in coated particles under irradiation conditions and produced effective diffusion coefficients for the fission products Cs and Sr. (orig.) [de

  17. Charged-particle acceleration through laser irradiation of thin foils at Prague Asterix Laser System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cutroneo, Maria; Cavallaro, Salvatore; Musumeci, Paolo; Calcagno, Lucia; Wolowski, Jerzy; Rosinski, Marcin; Zaras-Szydlowska, Agnieszka; Ullschmied, Jiri; Krousky, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jiri; Velyhan, Andreiy

    2014-01-01

    Thin foils, 0.5–50 μm in thickness, have been irradiated in vacuum at Prague Asterix Laser System in Prague using 10 15–16  W cm −2 laser intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and different focal positions. Produced plasmas from metals and polymers films have been monitored in the forward and backward directions. Ion and electron accelerations have been investigated by using Thomson parabola spectrometer, x-ray streak camera, ion collectors and SiC semiconductor detectors, the latter employed in time-of-flight configuration. Ion acceleration up to about 3 MeV per charge state was measured in the forward direction. Ion and electron emissions were detected at different angles as a function of the irradiation conditions. (paper)

  18. Postirradiation examination report of TRISO and BISO coated ThO2 particles irradiated in capsules HT-31 and HT-33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlak, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Capsules HT-31 and HT-33 were uninstrumented capsule experiments irradiated in the target position of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experiments were used to evaluate the irradiation performance of (1) fuel fabricated in a 240-mm-diameter coater for production scale-up, (2) TRISO ThO 2 and BISO ThO 2 particles, and (3) fuel with certain OPyC variables. A total of 16 BISO particle samples and 32 TRISO particle samples were irradiated to fast neutron fluences ranging from 4.0 to 11.7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/ and heavy metal burnups between 3.5% and 13.2% FIMA at temperatures from 1150 0 to 1530 0 C

  19. CHARGE-2/C, Flux and Dose Behind Shield from Electron, Proton, Heavy Particle Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucker, W.R.; Lilley, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The CHARGE code computes flux spectra, dose and other response rates behind a multilayered spherical or infinite planar shield exposed to isotopic fluxes of electrons, protons and heavy charged particles. The doses, or other responses, to electron, primary proton, heavy particle, electron Bremsstrahlung, secondary proton, and secondary neutron radiations are calculated as a function of penetration into the shield; the materials of each layer may be mixtures of elements contained in the accompanying data library, or supplied by the user. The calculation may optionally be halted before the entire shield is traversed by specifying a minimum total dose rate; the computation stops when the dose drops below this value. The ambient electron, proton and heavy particle spectra may be specified in tabular or functional form. These incident charged particle spectra are divided into energy bands or groups, the number or spacing of which are controlled by input data. The variation of the group boundary energies and group spectra as a function of shield penetration uniquely determines charged particle dose rates and secondary particle production rates. The charged particle shielding calculation is essentially the integration of the range- energy equation which expresses the variation of particle energy wit distance travelled. 2 - Method of solution: The 'straight-ahead' approximation is used throughout, that is the changes in particle direction of motion due to elastic scattering are ignored. This approximation is corrected, in the case of electrons, by applying transmission factors obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. Inelastic scattering between protons and the shielding material is assumed to produce two classes of secondaries 1) Cascade protons and neutrons, emitted in the same direction as the primaries 2) Evaporation neutrons, emitted isotropically. The transmission of secondary protons is analyzed in exactly the same way as the

  20. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  1. Quantification of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors in the cerebellum of normal and x-irradiated rats during postnatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthiessen, L; Daval, G; Bailly, Y [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France). Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UA; Gozlan, H; Hamon, M; Verge, D [INSERM, Paris (France). Lab. de Neurobiologie Cellulaire et Fonctionnelle

    1992-11-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors were studied in rats during the first postnatal month in the normal cerebellum and in the granule cell-deprived cerebellum produced by X-irradiation at postnatal day 5. Quantitative autoradiographic studies on sagittal sections of cerebellar vermis, using [[sup 125]1]BH-8-MeO-N-PAT as radioligand or specific anti-receptor antibodies, revealed that 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors existed in the molecular/Purkinje cell layer but at variable density from one lobule to another. Thus, in both normal and X-irradiated rats, the posterior lobules were more heavily labelled than the anterior ones, and the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] sites decreased progressively in all the cerebellar folia down to hardly detectable levels at postnatal day 21. However, the intensity of labelling remained higher at postnatal day 8 and postnatal day 12 in X-irradiated rats than in age-paired controls. Measurements of [[sup 3]H]8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] specific binding to membranes from whole cerebellum confirmed that the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] sites per mg membrane protein (B[sub max]) was higher in X-irradiated animals than in age-paired controls. However, on a ''per cerebellum'' basis, no significant difference could be detected between the total number of 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] sites, which progressively increased in both control and X-irradiated animals during the first postnatal month. These results therefore show that 5-hydroxytryptamine[sub 1A] receptors are not located on developing granule cells. (author).

  2. Particle-in-cell simulation of electron trajectories and irradiation uniformity in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping, E-mail: aplpwang@hit.edu.cn; Zhou, Guangxue; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The transmission process of electrons and irradiation uniformity was simulated. • Influence of the irradiation parameters on irradiation uniformity are discussed. • High irradiation uniformity can be obtained in a wide processing window. - Abstract: In order to study electron trajectories in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) source based on carbon fiber bunches, the transmission process of electrons emitted from the annular cathode was simulated using a particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). The simulation results show that the intense flow of the electrons emitted from the annular cathode are expanded during the transmission process, and the uniformity of the electron distribution is improved in the transportation process. The irradiation current decreases with the irradiation distance and the pressure, and increases with the negative voltage. In addition, when the irradiation distance and the cathode voltage are larger than 40 mm and −15 kV, respectively, a uniform irradiation current distribution along the circumference of the anode can be obtained. The simulation results show that good irradiation uniformity of circular components can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  3. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  4. Elaboration by ion implantation of cobalt nano-particles in silica layers and modifications of their properties by electron and swift heavy ion irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Orleans, C.

    2003-07-01

    This work aims to investigate the capability of ion irradiations to elaborate magnetic nano-particles in silica layers, and to modify their properties. Co + ions have been implanted at 160 keV at fluences of 2.10 16 , 5.10 16 and 10 17 at/cm 2 , and at temperatures of 77, 295 and 873 K. The dependence of the particle size on the implantation fluence, and more significantly on the implantation temperature has been shown. TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) observations have shown a mean diameter varying from 1 nm for implantations at 2.10 16 Co + /cm 2 at 77 K, to 9.7 nm at 10 17 Co + /cm 2 at 873 K. For high temperature implantations, two regions of particles appear. Simulations based on a kinetic 3-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method reproduce quantitatively the features observed for implantations. Thermal treatments induce the ripening of the particles. Electron irradiations at 873 K induce an important increase in mean particle sizes. Swift heavy ion irradiations also induce the ripening of the particles for low fluences, and an elongation of the particles in the incident beam direction for high fluences, resulting in a magnetic anisotropy. Mechanisms invoked in thermal spike model could also explain this anisotropic growth. (author)

  5. Defect-induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors: A controllable approach by particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-01-01

    Making semiconductors ferromagnetic has been a long dream. One approach is to dope semiconductors with transition metals (TM). TM ions act as local moments and they couple with free carriers to develop collective magnetism. However, there are no fundamental reasons against the possibility of local moment formation from localized sp states. Recently, ferromagnetism was observed in nonmagnetically doped, but defective semiconductors or insulators including ZnO and TiO 2 . This kind of observation challenges the conventional understanding of ferromagnetism. Often the defect-induced ferromagnetism has been observed in samples prepared under non-optimized condition, i.e. by accident or by mistake. Therefore, in this field theory goes much ahead of experimental investigation. To understand the mechanism of the defect-induced ferromagnetism, one needs a better controlled method to create defects in the crystalline materials. As a nonequilibrium and reproducible approach of inducing defects, ion irradiation provides such a possibility. Energetic ions displace atoms from their equilibrium lattice sites, thus creating mainly vacancies, interstitials or antisites. The amount and the distribution of defects can be controlled by the ion fluence and energy. By ion irradiation, we have generated defect-induced ferromagnetism in ZnO, TiO 2 and SiC. In this short review, we also summarize some results by other groups using energetic ions to introduce defects, and thereby magnetism in various materials. Ion irradiation combined with proper characterizations of defects could allow us to clarify the local magnetic moments and the coupling mechanism in defective semiconductors. Otherwise we may have to build a new paradigm to understand the defect-induced ferromagnetism

  6. Relative biological effectiveness in canine osteosarcoma cells irradiated with accelerated charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Junko; Cartwright, Ian M.; Haskins, Jeremy S.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy ions, characterized by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, have advantages compared with low LET protons and photons in their biological effects. The application of heavy ions within veterinary clinics requires additional background information to determine heavy ion efficacy. In the present study, comparison of the cell-killing effects of photons, protons and heavy ions was investigated in canine osteosarcoma (OSA) cells in vitro. A total of four canine OSA cell lines with various radiosensitivities were irradiated with 137Cs gamma-rays, monoenergetic proton beams, 50 keV/µm carbon ion spread out Bragg peak beams and 200 keV/µm iron ion monoenergetic beams. Clonogenic survival was examined using colony-forming as says, and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values were calculated relative to gamma-rays using the D10 value, which is determined as the dose (Gy) resulting in 10% survival. For proton irradiation, the RBE values for all four cell lines were 1.0–1.1. For all four cell lines, exposure to carbon ions yielded a decreased cell survival compared with gamma-rays, with the RBE values ranging from 1.56–2.10. Iron ions yielded the lowest cell survival among tested radiation types, with RBE values ranging from 3.51–3.69 observed in the three radioresistant cell lines. The radiosensitive cell line investigated demonstrated similar cell survival for carbon and iron ion irradiation. The results of the present study suggest that heavy ions are more effective for killing radioresistant canine OSA cells when compared with gamma-rays and protons. This markedly increased efficiency of cell killing is an attractive reason for utilizing heavy ions for radioresistant canine OSA. PMID:27446477

  7. Real-time optical tracking for motion compensated irradiation with scanned particle beams at CNAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattori, G., E-mail: giovanni.fattori@psi.ch [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Seregni, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Pella, A. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Riboldi, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Capasso, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Donetti, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Giordanengo, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Pullia, M. [Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Marchetto, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Section of Torino, Torino 10125 (Italy); Baroni, G. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2016-08-11

    Purpose: We describe the interface developed at the National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy in Pavia to provide the dose delivery systems with real time respiratory motion information captured with an optical tracking system. An experimental study is presented to assess the technical feasibility of the implemented organ motion compensation framework, by analyzing the film response when irradiated with proton beams. Methods: The motion monitoring solution is based on a commercial hardware for motion capture running in-house developed software for respiratory signal processing. As part of the integration, the latency of data transmission to the dose delivery system was experimentally quantified and accounted for by signal time prediction. A respiratory breathing phantom is presented and used to test tumor tracking based either on the optical measurement of the target position or internal-external correlation models and beam gating, as driven by external surrogates. Beam tracking was tested considering the full target motion excursion (25×18 mm), whereas it is limited to 6×2 mm in the gating window. The different motion mitigation strategies were evaluated by comparing the experimental film responses with respect to static irradiation conditions. Dose inhomogeneity (IC) and conformity (CI) are provided as main indexes for dose quality assessment considering the irradiation in static condition as reference. Results: We measured 20.6 ms overall latency for motion signal processing. Dose measurements showed that beam tracking largely preserved dose homogeneity and conformity, showing maximal IC and CI variations limited to +0.10 and −0.01 with respect to the static reference. Gating resulted in slightly larger discrepancies (ΔIC=+0.20, ΔCI=−0.13) due to uncompensated residual motion in the gating window. Conclusions: The preliminary beam tracking and gating results verified the functionality of the prototypal solution for organ motion compensation based on

  8. Real-time optical tracking for motion compensated irradiation with scanned particle beams at CNAO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattori, G.; Seregni, M.; Pella, A.; Riboldi, M.; Capasso, L.; Donetti, M.; Ciocca, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Pullia, M.; Marchetto, F.; Baroni, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the interface developed at the National Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy in Pavia to provide the dose delivery systems with real time respiratory motion information captured with an optical tracking system. An experimental study is presented to assess the technical feasibility of the implemented organ motion compensation framework, by analyzing the film response when irradiated with proton beams. Methods: The motion monitoring solution is based on a commercial hardware for motion capture running in-house developed software for respiratory signal processing. As part of the integration, the latency of data transmission to the dose delivery system was experimentally quantified and accounted for by signal time prediction. A respiratory breathing phantom is presented and used to test tumor tracking based either on the optical measurement of the target position or internal-external correlation models and beam gating, as driven by external surrogates. Beam tracking was tested considering the full target motion excursion (25×18 mm), whereas it is limited to 6×2 mm in the gating window. The different motion mitigation strategies were evaluated by comparing the experimental film responses with respect to static irradiation conditions. Dose inhomogeneity (IC) and conformity (CI) are provided as main indexes for dose quality assessment considering the irradiation in static condition as reference. Results: We measured 20.6 ms overall latency for motion signal processing. Dose measurements showed that beam tracking largely preserved dose homogeneity and conformity, showing maximal IC and CI variations limited to +0.10 and −0.01 with respect to the static reference. Gating resulted in slightly larger discrepancies (ΔIC=+0.20, ΔCI=−0.13) due to uncompensated residual motion in the gating window. Conclusions: The preliminary beam tracking and gating results verified the functionality of the prototypal solution for organ motion compensation based on

  9. Interaction between UO2 kernel and pyrocarbon coating in irradiated and unirradiated HTR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drago, A.; Klersy, R.; Simoni, O.; Schrader, K.H.

    1975-08-01

    Experimental observations on unidirectional UO 2 kernel migration in TRISO type coated particle fuels are reported. An analysis of the experimental results on the basis of data and models from the literature is reported. The stoichiometric composition of the kernel is considered the main parameter that, associated with a temperature gradient, controls the unidirectional kernel migration

  10. DNA double-strand breaks measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in irradiated lymphocytes from normal humans and those with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobi, S.E.; Itzhaki, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The authors previously found that radiation-induced chromosome aberrations (dicentrics) are more numerous in lymphocytes from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients than in those from age-matched normal individuals (Tobi et al. 1990). They have examined double-strand breaks (dsb) produced by g amma - irradiation in the DNA of AD and normal lymphocytes by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The percentage of DNA migrating into the gels is an indirect measure of the number of dsb; DNA content of sequential slices of the gel was assayed by direct fluorometry and the percentage migrating was dose dependent. Results show that the level of damage is similar in AD and normal lymphocytes and preliminary assays of the rate of repair suggest that the half-time is also similar, the value being > 1 h. The latter is consistent with the known rate of rejoining of chromosome fragments in interphase lymphocytes (Pantelias and Maillie 1985). (Author)

  11. Confluent holding leads to a transient enhancement in mutagenesis in UV-light-irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum, Gardner's syndrome and normal human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Little, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of confluent holding periods of 0-24 h of UV-light-induced mutagenesis has been investigated in several human cell strains including xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA), Gardner's syndrome (GS) and normal human diploid fibroblasts (NHDF). Confluent cultures of NHDF exposed to UV light exhibited a time-dependent increase in survival when subculture was delayed up to 24 h after irradiation. GS and XPA fibroblasts showed no such increase. When allowed confluent holding periods of 1.5-24 h, GS, XPA and NHDF all exhibited a transient enhancement of mutagenesis such that a 5-10-fold increase in mutation frequency was observed in cells subcultured at 6-9 h after irradiation as compared to cells subcultured at 3-6 h. A decline in mutation frequency prior to the mutagenesis peak was observed in GS and normal cells but not in XPA. After 24 h of confluent holding, the mutation frequency in irradiated GS and NHDF had returned to near background levels although XPA mutation frequencies remain similar to those observed in immediately subcultured cells. A model to explain these overall results is discussed. (Auth.)

  12. The bystander cell-killing effect mediated by nitric oxide in normal human fibroblasts varies with irradiation dose but not with radiation quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yuichiro; Funayama, Tomoo; Mutou-Yoshihara, Yasuko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the dependence of the bystander cell-killing effect on radiation dose and quality, and to elucidate related molecular mechanisms. Normal human fibroblast WI-38 cells were irradiated with 0.125 - 2 Gy of γ-rays or carbon ions and were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells. Survival rates of bystander cells were investigated using the colony formation assays, and nitrite concentrations in the medium were measured using the modified Saltzman method. Survival rates of bystander cells decreased with doses of γ-rays and carbon ions of ≤ 0.5 Gy. Treatment of the specific nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenger prevented reductions in survival rates of bystander cells. Moreover, nitrite concentrations increased with doses of less than 0.25 Gy (γ-rays) and 1 Gy (carbon ions). The dose responses of increased nitrite concentrations as well as survival reduction were similar between γ-rays and carbon ions. In addition, negative relationships were observed between survival rates and nitrite concentrations. The bystander cell-killing effect mediated by NO radicals in normal human fibroblasts depends on irradiation doses of up to 0.5 Gy, but not on radiation quality. NO radical production appears to be an important determinant of γ-ray- and carbon-ion-induced bystander effects.

  13. Comparison of normal tissue dose with three-dimensional conformal techniques for breast cancer irradiation including the internal mammary nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Dolsma, Willemtje; van t Veld, Aart; Bijl, HP; Langendijk, JA

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the Para Mixed technique for irradiation of the internal mammary nodes (IMN) with three commonly used strategies, by analyzing the dose to the heart and other organs at risk. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Four different three-dimensional conformal dose plans were created for 30 breast

  14. Solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation induces selective influx of CD4+ T lymphocytes in normal human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nuzzo, S.; de Rie, M. A.; van der Loos, C. M.; Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    The proportion and composition of the human cutaneous CD3+ T lymphocyte population was determined in situ following a single exposure to physiological, erythema-inducing doses of simulated solar radiation, mainly consisting of UV radiation. Biopsies were taken 1, 2 and 7 days after local irradiation

  15. Transcriptional Response of Human Cells to Microbeam Irradiation with 2.1 MeV Alpha Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Bogner, S.; Spitta, L.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Greif, K. D.; Giesen, U.

    Within the next decades an increasing number of human beings in space will be simultaneously exposed to different stimuli especially microgravity and radiation To assess the risks for humans during long-duration space missions the complex interplay of these parameters at the cellular level must be understood Cellular stress protection responses lead to increased transcription of several genes via modulation of transcription factors Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappa B NF- kappa B pathway as a possible anti-apoptotic route represents such an important cellular stress response A screening assay for detection of NF- kappa B-dependent gene activation using the destabilized variant of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein d2EGFP as reporter protein had been developed It consists of Human Embryonic Kidney HEK 293 Cells stably transfected with a receptor-reporter-construct carrying d2EGFP under the control of a NF- kappa B response element Clones positive for Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha TNF- alpha inducible d2EGFP expression were selected as cellular reporters Irradiation was performed either with X-rays 150 kV 19 mA at DLR Cologne or with 2 1 MeV alpha particles LET sim 160 keV mu m at PTB Braunschweig After irradiation the following biological endpoints were determined i cell survival via the colony forming ability test ii time-dependent activation of NF- kappa B dependent d2EGFP gene expression using flow cytometry iii quantitative RT-PCR

  16. Natural killer activity and suppressor cells in irradiated mice repopulated with a mixture of cells from normal and 89Sr-treated donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, E.M.; Kumar, V.; Bennett, M.

    1981-01-01

    Mice that have been injected with 89 Sr have fairly normal B and T cell function, but are abnormal in that they lack natural killer (NK) activity and other functions that require an intact bone marrow. These mice also have an increased potential for suppressor cell activity. We had previously shown that spleen cells from 89 Sr-treated mice could transfer low NK activity and increased suppressor cell function to lethally irradiated syngeneic recipients. To investigate the mechanisms involved in perpetuating these defects, groups of normal spleen or bone marrow cells. Recipients were assayed for their NK activity and suppressor cell function 5 to 14 wk later. it was found that the addition of normal cells in the donor inoculum resulted in normal NK activity. This indicates that low NK activity in 89 Sr-treated mice was not due to the presence of a suppressor cell that prevented NK cell generation. It was additionally found that low NK activity in recipient mice could be boosted by interferon inducers. This would indicate that NK activity in the recipients was not due to a lack of interferon-sensitive pre-NK cells. Suppressor cell function in recipient mice depended on the type and number of normal cells in the donor inoculum. Bone marrow cells were very efficient in overcoming the tendency to produce suppressor cells. It took approximately 20 times more normal spleen cells to produce the same results. The implications of these findings are discussed

  17. The shape of dose-effect curves for diploid yeast cells irradiated with ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.

    1975-01-01

    In a cybernetic model for the radiation reactions in eukaryotic cells, after irradiation they are assumed to be in one of three states: (a) viable cells; (b) with repairable damage; and (c) with irreparable damage. Two biological counter reactions with certain time constants can be observed: (i) recovery from sublethal damage; and (ii) repair of potential lethal damage. The shape of the dose-effect curve is influenced in a characteristic way by the different occupation of these states of the cells and by the time constants of the biological counter reactions. The biochemical analysis of the biological counter reactions, recovery and repair, has shown that both are linked together by the energy pool in the cell. In this way changes in the slope of the dose-effect curve due to different metabolic states of the cells can be understood quantitatively. Also the complicated dependence of survival cells on the absorbed dose rate over a wide range can be explained quantitatively. (author)

  18. Axo-somatic synapses in the normal and X-irradiated dendate gyrus; factors affecting the density of afferent innervation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.S.; Gerbrandt, L.; Lynch, G.

    1982-01-01

    The density of synaptic input to the somata of dentate gyrus granule cells was examined utilizing quantitative electron microscopic techniques. In control (non-irradiated) material, greater numbers of axo-somatic synapses were observed in the superficial, earlier-generated cells as compared to the deep, later-generated cells. We further studied the X-irradiated dentate gyrus, in which the majority of granule cells were destroyed during postnatal genesis. The surviving cells displayed a density of innervation on their somata which exceeded that observed in either layer of the control material. These data are discussed in terms of the possible contribution of afferent-target cell interactions to the regulation of the density of synaptic innervation. (Auth.)

  19. Murine scid cells complement ataxia-telangiectasia cells and show a normal port-irradiation response of DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, K.; Yoshida, M.; Okumura, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The murine severe combined immunodeficient mutation (scid) is characterized by a lack of both B and T cells, due to a deficit in lymphoid variable-(diversity)-joining (V(D)J) rearrangement. Scid cells are highly sensitive to both radiation-induced killing and chromosomal aberrations. Significantly reduced D 0 and n values were demonstrated in scid cells and were similar to ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells (a unique human disease conferring whole body radiosensitivity). However, the kinetics of DNA synthesis after irradiation were different between the two cell types. In contrast with the radioresistant DNA synthesis of AT cells, DNA synthesis of scid cells was markedly inhibited after irradiation. The existence of different mutations was also supported by evidence of complementation in somatic cell hybrids between scid cells and AT cells. Results indicate that the radiobiological character of scid is similar to AT but is presumably caused by different mechanisms. (author)

  20. Axo-somatic synapses in the normal and X-irradiated dendate gyrus; factors affecting the density of afferent innervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K S [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.); Gerbrandt, L [Neuroscience Research Program, Boston, MA (USA); Lynch, G [California Univ., Irvine (USA)

    1982-10-07

    The density of synaptic input to the somata of dentate gyrus granule cells was examined utilizing quantitative electron microscopic techniques. In control (non-irradiated) material, greater numbers of axo-somatic synapses were observed in the superficial, earlier-generated cells as compared to the deep, later-generated cells. We further studied the X-irradiated dentate gyrus, in which the majority of granule cells were destroyed during postnatal genesis. The surviving cells displayed a density of innervation on their somata which exceeded that observed in either layer of the control material. These data are discussed in terms of the possible contribution of afferent-target cell interactions to the regulation of the density of synaptic innervation.

  1. Fabrication of substrates with curvature for cell cultivation by alpha-particle irradiation and chemical etching of PADC films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.M.; Tjhin, V.T.; Lin, A.C.C.; Cheng, J.P.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, we developed a microfabrication technology to generate cell-culture substrates with identical chemistry and well-defined curvature. Micrometer-sized pits with curved surfaces were created on a two-dimensional surface of a polymer known as polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC). A PADC film was first irradiated by alpha particles and then chemically etched under specific conditions to generate pits with well-defined curvature at the incident positions of the alpha particles. The surface with these pits was employed as a model system for studying the effects of substrate curvature on cell behavior. As an application, the present work studied mechanosensing of substrate curvature by epithelial cells (HeLa cells) through regulation of microtubule (MT) dynamics. We used end-binding protein 3–green fluorescent protein (EB3–GFP) as a marker of MT growth to show that epithelial cells having migrated into the pits with curved surfaces had significantly smaller MT growth speeds than those having stayed on flat surfaces without the pits.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of neutron irradiated Si and ZrN coated UMo particles prepared using FIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, W.; Miller, B. D.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Gan, J.; Madden, J. W.; Keiser, D. D.

    2018-01-01

    Two fuel plates, containing Si and ZrN coated U-Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al matrix, were irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK•CEN to a burn-up of ∼70% 235U. Five samples were prepared by INL using focused ion beam milling and transported to SCK•CEN for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation. Two samples were taken from the Si coated U-Mo fuel particles at a burn-up of ∼42% and ∼66% 235U and three samples from the ZrN coated U-Mo at a burn-up of ∼42%, ∼52% and ∼66% 235U. The evolution of the coating, fuel structure, fission products and the formation of interaction layers are discussed. Both coatings appear to be an effective barrier against fuel matrix interaction and only on the samples having received the highest burn-up and power, the formation of an interaction between Al and U(Mo) can be observed on those locations where breaches in the coatings were formed during plate fabrication.

  3. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after {alpha}-particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Wei [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chen Shaopeng [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-02-03

    Low-dose {alpha}-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose {alpha}-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-{beta}1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  4. Nitric oxide mediated DNA double strand breaks induced in proliferating bystander cells after α-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Chen Shaopeng; Yu, K.N.; Wu Lijun

    2010-01-01

    Low-dose α-particle exposures comprise 55% of the environmental dose to the human population and have been shown to induce bystander responses. Previous studies showed that bystander effect could induce stimulated cell growth or genotoxicity, such as excessive DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), micronuclei (MN), mutation and decreased cell viability, in the bystander cell population. In the present study, the stimulated cell growth, detected with flow cytometry (FCM), and the increased MN and DSB, detected with p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) immunofluorescence, were observed simultaneously in the bystander cell population, which were co-cultured with cells irradiated by low-dose α-particles (1-10 cGy) in a mixed system. Further studies indicated that nitric oxide (NO) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) played very important roles in mediating cell proliferation and inducing MN and DSB in the bystander population through treatments with NO scavenger and TGF-β1 antibody. Low-concentrations of NO, generated by spermidine, were proved to induce cell proliferation, DSB and MN simultaneously. The proliferation or shortened cell cycle in bystander cells gave them insufficient time to repair DSBs. The increased cell division might increase the probability of carcinogenesis in bystander cells since cell proliferation increased the probability of mutation from the mis-repaired or un-repaired DSBs.

  5. Irradiation behavior of the interaction product of U-Mo fuel particle dispersion in an Al matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo, E-mail: yskim@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We in-pile tested U-Mo dispersion in Al matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed interaction layer growth between U-Mo and Al and pore formation there. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pores degrades thermal conductivity and structural integrity of the fueled zone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amorphous behavior of interaction layers is thought to be the main reason for unstable large pore growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanism for pore formation and possible remedy to prevent it are proposed. - Abstract: Irradiation performance of U-Mo fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix is stable in terms of fuel swelling and is suitable for the conversion of research and test reactors from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). However, tests of the fuel at high temperatures and high burnups revealed obstacles caused by the interaction layers forming between the fuel particle and matrix. In some cases, fission gas filled pores grow and interconnect in the interdiffusion layer resulting in fuel plate failure. Postirradiation observations are made to examine the behavior of the interdiffusion layers. The interdiffusion layers show a fluid-like behavior characteristic of amorphous materials. In the amorphous interdiffusion layers, fission gas diffusivity is high and the material viscosity is low so that the fission gas pores readily form and grow. Based on the observations, a pore formation mechanism is proposed and potential remedies to suppress the pore growth are also introduced.

  6. Special topics. Advances of radiation biology in heavy particle therapy- review. Effects of photon and heavy particle irradiation on metastasis and angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Teshima, Teruki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Matsuura, Nariaki; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Described are effects of photon and heavy particle (HP) irradiation on the process of tumor metastasis (MT) and accompanying angiogenesis (AG) at molecular, cellular and animal levels. Recent animal studies of molecular mechanistic elucidation of increased MT by photon have revealed the participation of activated proteins like matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and integrins, of increased secretion of growth factors, of up-regulation of receptors like for that of urokinase-type plasminogen activator under hypoxia, and so on. Authors have studied the effect of HP on cellular MMP and integrins and on MT in tumor-bearing mice, and suggested a suppression of MT by HP. Vascular endothelial cells, playing a major role in AG, are resistant to low dose (e.g., 3 Gy) radiation and sensitive to higher dose (9-20 Gy), which has resulted in various complicating findings on MT. There are also many findings on MT and/or AG relations with various treatments like surgical or photon treatment of the primary tumor and AG suppressive substances, where further examinations are necessary for practical use of photon/drug therapy to prevent MT through AG participation. Authors have implicated in vitro that HP, even at low dose (0.1 Gy, sublethal), can suppress MT through AG mechanism. Thus prevention of MT by HP is thought promising in future when their mutual interaction is elucidated more clearly. (K.T.)

  7. Creep tests of AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated by alpha particles of 28 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segura, E.; Lucki, G.

    1986-01-01

    He-embrittlement effect in AISI 316 SS type throught creep tests performed with annealed and cold worked thin specimens is analized. Measurements were carried out at 700 and 750 0 C, stress of 100 MPa in vacuum better than 10 -5 torr. The He-implantations were made with the cyclotron CV-28 IPEN-CNEN/SP. Using an alpha-particle beam of 28 MeV, with concentration of 26 appm. From the valves of rupture deformation, epsilon sub(R), and rupture time, t sub(R), it was verified that he had a great effect on the operational life and ductility of this material. (Author) [pt

  8. Secondary neutron production from thick Pb target by light particle irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, J C; Debeauvais, M; Fernández, F; Krivopustov, M; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A; Zamani, M

    1999-01-01

    Neutron multiplicities from spallation neutron sources were measured by Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Light particles as protons, deuterons and alphas in the GeV range were used on Pb targets. For neutron thermalization the targets were covered by 6 cm paraffin moderator. Neutron multiplicity distributions were studied inside and on the moderator surface. Comparison of SSNTDs results were made for thermal-epithermal neutrons with sup 1 sup 3 sup 9 La activation method as well as with Dubna DCM/CEM code. Discussion including previous sup 1 sup 2 C results are given.

  9. Growing central axons deprived of normal target neurones by neonatal X-ray irradiation still terminate in a precisely laminated fashion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurberg, S.; Hjorth-Simonsen, A.

    1977-01-01

    Some studies are described on rat pups. The object was to study the fate of axons that normally terminate in a highly selective laminar fashion in the molecular layer of the medial limb of the dentate gyrus of the mammalian cerebral cortex when this is removed by neonatal X-ray irradiation. The rats were shielded with Pb, except for a field above the hippocampus and the dentate gyrus, and exposed to X-rays from a 250 kV source at a distance of 34 cm. (U.K.)

  10. Genomic instability in mutation induction on normal human fibroblasts irradiated with chronic low-dose radiations in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, M.; Tsuruoka, C.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: At a time when manned space exploration is more a reality with the planned the International Space Station (ISS) underway, the potential exposure of crews in a spacecraft to chronic low-dose radiations in the field of low-flux galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the subsequent biological effects have become one of the major concerns of space science. We have studied both in vitro life span and genomic instability in cellular effects in normal human skin fibroblasts irradiated with chronic low-dose radiations in heavy-ion radiation field. Cells were cultured in a CO2 incubator, which was set in the irradiation room for the biological study of heavy ions in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), and irradiated with scattered radiations produced from heavy ions. Absorbed dose measured using a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) and a Si-semiconductor detector was to be around 1.4 mGy per day when operating the HIMAC machine for biological experiments. The total population doubling number (tPDN) of low-dose irradiated cells was significantly smaller (79-93%) than that of unirradiated cells. The results indicate that the life span of the cell population shortens by irradiating with low-dose scattered radiations in the heavy-ion irradiation field. Genomic instability in cellular responses was examined to measure either cell killing or mutation induction in low-dose accumulated cells after exposing to X-ray challenging doses. The results showed that there was no enhanced effect on cell killing between low-dose accumulated and unirradiated cells after exposing to defined challenging doses of 200kV X rays. On the contrary, the mutation frequency on hprt locus of low-dose accumulated cells was much higher than that of unirradiated cells. The results suggested that genomic instability was induced in mutagenesis by the chronic low-dose irradiations in heavy-ion radiation field

  11. Thermoluminescent characterization of thin films of aluminium oxide irradiated with beta particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagran, E.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Gonzalez, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    By means of the laser ablation technique has been settled thin films of aluminium oxide on kapton substrates. These films present thermoluminescent response (Tl) when being exposed to beta radiation of a Sr 90 - Y 90 source (E max = 2.28 MeV). The brilliance curves show two peaks, one of them in 112 C degrees and the other one in 180 C degrees. The peak of low temperature is faded in some hours, whereas the high temperature one is more stable, showing a fading in the 15% order after three days of the irradiation. The Tl kinetic parameters were determined using the computerized deconvolution of the brilliance curve (CGDC). The results show that the high temperature peak is composed by four peaks which obey a second order kinetics with their maximum located at 165.7, 188.1, 215.3, and 246.5 C degrees. The depth of the traps (E) has values in the interval between 1.4 and 2.0 eV. The study of the dose response relation, show that the material presents a linear behavior in a dose interval from 150 mGy to 50 Gy. The obtained thin films of aluminium oxide could be a useful tool due to their potential applications in clinical dosimetry, in the determination of distributions of doses produced by penetrating weakly radiation, as well as in interfaces dosimetry. (Author)

  12. Electrically active defects in p-type silicon after alpha-particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danga, Helga T.; Auret, F. Danie; Tunhuma, Shandirai M.; Omotoso, Ezekiel; Igumbor, Emmanuel; Meyer, Walter E.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the defects introduced when boron (B) doped silicon (Si) was irradiated by making use of a 5.4 MeV americium (Am) 241 foil radioactive source with a fluence rate of 7×106 cm-2 s-1 at room temperature. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS measurements were used to investigate the electronic properties of the introduced defects. After exposure at a fluence of 5.1×1010 cm-2, the energy levels of the hole traps measured were: H(0.10), H(0.16), H(0.33) and H(0.52) The defect level H(0.10) was tri-vacancy related. H(0.33) was identified as the interstitial carbon (Ci) related defect which was a result of radiation induced damage. H(0.52) was a B-related defect. Explicit deductions about the origin of H(0.16) have not yet been achieved.

  13. CEMS and XRD studies on changing shape of iron nano-particles by irradiation of Au ions of Fe-implanted Al2O3 granular layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, T.; Wakabayashi, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Toriyama, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    2007-01-01

    In order to observe an inverse Ostwald ripening of Fe nano-particles in Fe-implanted Al 2 O 3 granular layers, 3 MeV Au ions were irradiated to Fe nano-particles in these layers with doses of 0.5x and 1.5x10 16 ions/cm 2 . It was found by Conversion Electron Mossbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) that the inverse Ostwald ripening occurred by fractions of percentages and the magnetic anisotropy of Fe nano-particles was induced to the direction of Au ion beam, i.e. perpendicular to the granular plane. The average crystallite diameters of Fe nano-particles for Au ions unirradiated and irradiated samples were measured using Scherrer's formula from FWHM of Fe (110) X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns obtained by 2θ and 2θ/θ methods. It was confirmed that the average crystallite diameters of Fe nano-particles in Fe-implanted Al 2 O 3 granular layers were extended by Au ions irradiation. (author)

  14. Distinctive Genomic Profiles of Normal and Transformed Thyrocytes Irradiated with Low vs. High Doses of X-irradiation both in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-El-Ardat, K. [Radiobiology, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Molecular Biotechnology, Universiteit Gent, Ghent (Belgium); Monsieurs, P. [Microbiology, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Janssen, A.; Beck, M; Michaux, A.; Benotmane, R.; Derradji, H.; Baatout, S. [Radiobiology, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Anastasov, N.; Atkinson, M. [Radiology, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Munich (Germany); Beckaert, S.; Van Criekinge, W. [Molecular Biotechnology, Universiteit Gent, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-07-01

    The increase in cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster led to an elevation of interest in the effect of radiation on the thyroid. Our work hopes to uncover some of the effects of low doses of external X-radiation in in vitro and in vivo models using several techniques and robust analysis. Here we describe the use of such models combined with micro-arrays and sound statistical analysis. we find that low doses of radiation act differently on murine thyroids carrying and lacking the RET/PTC translocation and even bear a distinctive profile to higher irradiation doses in both in vitro and in vivo models. We also find that micro-RNAs are involved in the response of these cells to radiation, even at low doses and that two in particular, let-7g and miR-106a, were significantly involved in the cells' p53-mediated anti-proliferative response

  15. Studies on c-AMP contents in sea urchin eggs fertilized with normal and x-irradiated sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    Intracellular levels of cyclic 3', 5'-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP) seemed to remain constant through the first cleavage cycle of sea urchin eggs. X-irradiation to the sperm, which induced the first cleavage delay, did not change this level. Although it was shown in the previous paper that X-ray-induced cleavage delay was reduced by caffeine but not by aminophyline, both caffeine and aminophyline caused an increase in c-AMP levels. These results indicated the possibility that c-AMP does not mediate this caffeine effect on cleavage delay. (auth.)

  16. Role of pigmentation in protecting bacterial cells against irradiation generated by accelerated charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwary, Bhupendra Nath; Das, Reena

    2013-01-01

    Beams of high-energy particles are useful for both fundamental and applied research in the sciences, and also in many technical and industrial fields unrelated to fundamental research. It has been estimated that there are approximately 26,000 accelerators world. Of these, only about 1% are research machines with energies above 1 GeV, while about 44% are for radiotherapy, 41% for ion implantation, 9% for industrial processing and research, and 4% for biomedical and other low-energy research. One aspect of these radiations can be studied for examining their effect in altering the viability of bacterial cells. The radiations generated by the simple technology of a single static high voltage to accelerate charged particles are known to produce reactive oxygen intermediates such as hydrogen peroxide or superoxide anions and target several cellular components of bacterial cells including the DNA. As a result of this interaction with the DNA the phosphodiester backbone of the DNA may break leading to single or double strand fission. Endogenous pigments, such as carotenoids and melanins, might provide a selective advantage to these microorganisms by photoprotection or shielding from UV radiation, including the UV-C and full UV-B range. The pigment, as an antioxidant scavenges reactive oxygen species generated by UV-A radiation and protect various microorganisms against oxidative damage caused by UV or ionizing radiation by scavenging free radicals. Environmental UV radiation is polychromatic and comprises the full spectrum of UV-A and UV-B radiation at wavelengths of λ > 290 nm. Accelerators, solar simulators and natural insulation can also prove to be a better alternate for understanding the responses of bacterial cells to the terrestrial UV radiation climate. (author)

  17. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  18. Effect of time intervals between irradiation and chemotherapeutic agents on the normal tissue damage. Comparison between in vivo and in vitro experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hisao; Nakayama, Toshitake; Hashimoto, Shozo (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-05-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the effect on the cell survivals at different time intervals between irradiation and chemotherapeutic agents (BLM, cisDDP, ADM and ACNU) in either the in vivo or the in vitro system. The intestinal epithelial assay was applied on the in vivo system. The clonogenic cell survivals of V/sub 79/ cells, both in the proliferative and the plateau phases, were determined in the in vitro system. The V/sub 79/ cells in the plateau phase were more sensitive to BLM, cisDDP and ACNU than those in the proliferative phase, however, the result was reverse with ADM. When BLM, cisDDP or ACNU was combined with irradiation at different time intervals, the response of the plateau phase V/sub 79/ cells to combination therapies were very similar to those of the intestinal epithelial cells. On the other hand, V/sub 79/ cells in the proliferative phase, which were treated with ADM and irradiation, showed the similar response as the intestinal cells. These results suggest that studies of chemo-radiotherapy with cultured cells which are sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents might be suitable to expect the in vivo damage of the normal tissue. (author).

  19. Physico-mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Irradiated Particle boards Based on Wood flour/ Polyethylene/Cement Kiln Dust Impregnated with Unsaturated Polyester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, H.A.; Khattab, M.M.; Ismail, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Particle boards were fabricated by mixing wood flour (WF), low density polyethylene (LDPE) and cement kiln dust (CKD) under hot pressure; and then impregnated in unsaturated polyester resin. These impregnated particle boards were subjected to various doses of electron beam irradiation up to 50 kGy. The physico-mechanical properties were characterized in terms of flexural strength, impact strength, water absorption, thickness swelling, and the thermal stability. The results showed that the partial replacement of wood flour with cement kiln dust up to 20% by weight improved the values of flexural strength, and impact strength. However, the water absorption percentage and thickness swelling values decreased with increasing the CKD ratio up to 40%. Furthermore, the treatment with electron beam irradiation doses improved the physico-mechanical properties of the impregnated particle boards up to 50 kGy. The improved results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  20. Host-cell reactivation of uv-irradiated and chemically treated Herpes simplex virus type 1 strain MP in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selsky, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    The host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated herpes simplex virus type 1 strain mp was studied in normal human skin fibroblasts and xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts from XP genetic complementation groups A-D and in an XP variant. The increasing relative order for the host-cell reactivation of both types of damaged virus in the different complementation groups is A = D < B < C; XP variant = normal controls. XP complementation group D cells, which manifest the most severe inhibition of her ability for both UV-irradiated and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus, can reactivate nitrogen mustard treated HSV-1 mp to the same extent as normal cells. Together, these results indicate that (1) Excision repair of UV and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene DNA damaged viruses share a common rate limiting enzymatic step and (2) The repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells plays little or no role in the recovery of nitrogen mustard treated virus. The results of studies on the effect of caffeine on the survival of both UV- and N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated virus in normal and XP cells imply that the reactivation of HSV-1 mp is mediated by an excision repair process with little if any recovery contributed by post-replication repair mechanisms. The host-cell reactivation of N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-treated HSV-1 mp was also correlated with the defective UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in two skin fibroblast strains established from a skin biopsy obtained from each of two juvenile females who had been clinically diagnosed as xeroderma pigmentosum. These findings are discussed in relation to the further characterization of the xeroderma pigmentosum phenotype and their possible utilization for the selection and isolation of new mammalian cell DNA repair mutants

  1. Normal and sublethally irradiated stem and granulocyte progenitor cell regeneration in an in vivo culture system. The cellular response to humoral factors released through the action of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacVittie, T.

    1977-01-01

    The in vivo diffusion chamber (DC) method of marrow culture was used to determine if the injection of host mice with cyclophosphamide (CY) caused, through its cytoxic action, the release of a humoral factor(s) capable of initiating stem cell (CFU-s) and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell (CFU-c) proliferation. Host mice were injected with CY 1-4 days prior to 800 rad of 60 Co WBI and implantation of DCs containing normal or 400 rad sublethally irradiated (SLI) marrow cells. The greatest proliferative response within CFU-s and CFU-c populations occurred in those mice injected with CY 3 days prior to implant. The marked CFU-s and CFU-c regeneration was initiated during the initial 24 hr of culture in both normal and SLI marrow cells. Thereafter growth rates were approximately the same. SLI marrow, however, showed a greater response to the humoral effects of CY injection than did normal marrow. These data provided evidence that CY induced the release of a diffusible factor(s) capable of accelerating regeneration of normal and sublethally irradiated CFU-s and CFU-c, the magnitude of which was dependent upon the time elapsed between CY injected and implantation of DCs. The marked proliferative response of the SLI stem and progenitor cells to the humoral stimulation may be indicative of the heterogeneity of both CFU-s and CFU-c populations surviving sublethal radiation exposure. The target cells may have possessed a differential sensitivity to the factor(s) initiating cell proliferation

  2. Mutagenesis and lethality following S phase irradiation of xeroderma pigmentosum and normal human diploid fibroblasts with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Little, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of u.v. light exposure in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle were determined in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XP-A), hereditary adenomatosis of the colon and rectum (ACR), and a normal, foreskin derived cell strain (AG1522). For AG1522, an increased sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of u.v. light was observed as compared to previous findings for confluent, non-proliferating cultures. XP-A fibroblasts were markedly hypersensitive and ACR fibroblasts exhibited an intermediate response. The mutagenic response of ACR fibroblasts, however, was similar to normal fibroblasts. A threshold of 1.5-2 J/m 2 was observed for u.v. induced mutagenesis in normal and ACR fibroblasts. XP fibroblasts, on the other hand, were strikingly hypermutable and demonstrated little or no threshold. When S phase mutagenesis was considered as a function of survival level rather than u.v. light dose, XP fibroblasts remained significantly hypermutable as compared with normal fibroblasts at all survival levels. Previous mutagenesis results with confluent, non-proliferating cultures of XP and normal fibroblasts were reanalyzed as a function of cytotoxicity; XP hypermutability at all survival levels was also observed. (author)

  3. The use of biological isodoses ''IsobioGy 2'' for evaluation of tumour and normal tissues response for fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Skolyszewski, J.; Majewski, S.; Lobodziec, W.; Jedynak, T.; Slosarek, K.

    1988-01-01

    Divergences between physical and biological dose distributions were analysed using linear quadratic model. It was found that small variations in physical dose distribution and differences in normal tissue sensitivity for change in dose per fraction, expressed by a α/β value, can cause a high difference between physical and biological doses. This difference significantly increases when one field instead of two fields is daily treated. If there is no enough separation between treated fields, the biological dose may dramatically increase. The use of biological ''isobioGy 2'' isodoses, instead of physical isodoses, can provide an important information on biological effect in tumour or normal tissue and may diminish the risk of giving too high dose to normal tissue and too low dose to the tumour. 6 figs., 13 refs. (author)

  4. Age/Radiation Parallels in the Effects of 56Fe Particle Irradiation and Protection by Berry Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, James; Bielinski, Donna; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Rabin, Bernard; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    Exposing young rats to particles of high-energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts the functioning of the dopaminergic system and behaviors mediated by this system in a manner similar to that seen in aged animals Previous research has shown that diets supplemented with 2% blueberry or strawberry extracts have the ability to retard and even reverse age-related deficits in behavior and signal transduction in rats, perhaps due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. A subsequent study has shown that whole-body irradiation with 1.5 Gy of 1 GeV/n high-energy 56 Fe particles impaired performance in the Morris water maze and measures of dopamine release one month following radiation; these deficits were protected by the antioxidant diets. The strawberry diet offered better protection against spatial deficits in the maze because strawberry-fed animals were better able to retain place information, while the blueberry-supplemented animals showed enhanced learning that was dependent on striatal functioning. Additional experiments in cell models to examine possible mechanisms involved in these beneficial effects have shown that, in addition to the well known free radical scavenging effects of berries, it appears that berry fruit can directly reduce stress signaling and enhance protective signals, suggesting the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the beneficial effects observed. Enhancements of "protective" signals (e.g., extracellular signal regulated kinase, ERK) include those that are involved in neuronal communication, neurogenesis, and learning and memory. Reductions in stress signaling include inhibiting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cytokines, among others, induced by oxidative and inflammatory stressors. We have found these changes in both BV2 mouse microglial and hippocampal cells. We believe that the possible addition of colorful fruits such as berry fruits to the diet can possibly

  5. Production and Magnetic Field Confinement of Laser-Irradiated Solid Particle Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haught, A. F.; Polk, D. H.; Fader, W. J. [United Aircraft Research Laboratories East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1969-01-15

    The focused high-intensity beam from a Q-spoiled laser has been used to form a high-temperature, high-density plasma from a single 10-20 micron radius solid particle of lithium hydride which is electrically suspended in a vacuum environment free of all material supports. Time-resolved charge collection measurements of the freely expanding plasma have shown that a high degree of ionization of the 10{sup 15} atoms in the lithium hydride particle can be achieved and that the plasma produced is essentially spherically symmetric in density over the full 4 {pi} solid angle. Time-of-flight studies of the plasma expansion have shown that average electron and ion energies exceeding 200 electron volts are obtained and that the plasma expansion rate, like the plasma density, is spherically symmetric. No charge separation or separation of the lithium and hydrogen ions is observed in the expanding plasma. Numerical calculations of the plasma formation and expansion have been made using a one-dimensional spherical hydrodynamic model and, on the basis of the results obtained, an integrated similarity model has been developed for calculations of the plasma time history and energy over the range of conditions employed in the experiments. These calculations, which include the effects of laser pulse time history, fraction of the incident beam occupied by the expanding plasma, radial density and velocity gradients within the plasma, and spatial distribution of the incident laser energy, give results for the plasma radial density distribution, velocity profile, and plasma energy in good agreement with those determined experimentally over the full range of the present measurements. Measurements have been carried out to examine the interaction of these laser -produced plasmas with mirror, cusp, and minimum-B magnetic fields. Experiments with mirror and minimum-B magnetic fields up to 8 kC show that plasmas with densities of 10{sup 12} -10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} are confined for times of 5

  6. Probabilistic methods for the simulation of fuel particles behavior under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannamela, C.

    2007-09-01

    This work is devoted to the evaluation of mathematical expectations in the context of structural reliability. We seek a failure probability estimate (that we assume low), taking into account the uncertainty of influential parameters of the System. Our goal is to reach a good compromise between the accuracy of the estimate and the associated computational cost. This approach is used to estimate the failure probability of fuel particles from a HTR-type nuclear reactor. This estimate is obtain by means of costly numerical simulations. We consider different probabilistic methods to tackle the problem. First, we consider a variance reducing Monte Carlo method: importance sampling. For the parametric case, we propose adaptive algorithms in order to build a series of probability densities that will eventually converge to optimal importance density. We then present several estimates of the mathematical expectation based on this series of densities. Next, we consider a multi-level method using Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm. Finally, we turn our attention to the related problem of quantile estimation (non extreme) of physical output from a large-scale numerical code. We propose a controlled stratification method. The random input parameters are sampled in specific regions obtained from surrogate of the response. The estimation of the quantile is then computed from this sample. (author)

  7. Clustering of DSB in DNA by X-Ray and a-particle irradiation in MCF-7 cells studied with anti γ-H2AX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia, O.; Soto, J.; Castro, F.A.; Berciano, Ma T; Lafarga, M.; Cos, S.; Sanchez-Barcelo, E.

    2007-01-01

    Among the effects produced by the ionizing radiations in cellular DNA, double strand breaks (DSB) are considered particularly important. These ruptures and their grouping in certain points, clustering, are acknowledged as the cause for mutagenic effects and cellular death. In this work we present the methodology and the results of the application of the DSB - DNA marking technique by using anti γ-H2AX, taking human cancerous cells MCF-7 as model and X-rays and a particles as irradiation agents. The obtained results are showed in a qualitative way like a set of figures. Are shows the effects of a dose of 2 Gy X-rays in the DSB - DNA after 30 minutes of the irradiation that responds to a certain pattern in which a spatially homogenous irradiation interacts with the DNA. As in previous case, the effects of X-rays in the DSB - DNA shows a different pattern affecting the cells that are in mitosis. Also, the effects of a dose of 2 Gy X-rays obtained after 24 hours of irradiation shows a number of DSB smaller, which is indicative of the repairing process. The results of the irradiation with a dose of 0.1 Gy originated from a particles cause a smaller number of DSB. Nevertheless, the existence of a bigger clustering with the appearance of clearly more intense points is appraised. Also, the effect of the irradiation is showed as an aligned trace of clusters that is possible to attribute to the passing of a a particle through the cellular nucleus. (Author)

  8. Regulation of macrophage accessory cell activity by mycobacteria. I. Ia expression in normal and irradiated mice infected with Mycobacterium mycroti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, P.M.; Feldmann, M.

    1986-01-01

    CBA/Ca mice were infected by either the intravenous or intraperitoneal route with Mycobacterium microti and the subsequent changes in local macrophage populations examined. Following infection, the number of macrophages increased and they showed greater expression of both MHC Class II molecules. This response was not dependent on viability of the mycobacteria, in contrast to reports with other microorganisms such as Listeria. Studies in sublethally irradiated mice indicated that persistent antigen could give rise to a response after a period of host recovery which was radiation dose dependent. This procedure also highlighted differences in the regulation of different murine class II antigens in vivo, as seen by delayed re-expression of I-E antigens. Macrophage accessory cell function, as assessed by an in vitro T cell proliferation assay, correlated with Ia expression after fixation, but not after indomethacin treatment; this highlights the diverse nature of regulatory molecules produced by these cells. (author)

  9. Oxide particle size distribution from shearing irradiated and unirradiated LWR fuels in Zircaloy and stainless steel cladding: significance for risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.; West, G.A.; Stacy, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Sieve fractionation was performed with oxide particles dislodged during shearing of unirradiated or irradiated fuel bundles or single rods of UO 2 or 96 to 97% ThO 2 --3 to 4% UO 2 . Analyses of these data by nonlinear least-squares techniques demonstrated that the particle size distribution is lognormal. Variables involved in the numerical analyses include lognormal median size, lognormal standard deviation, and shear cut length. Sieve-fractionation data are presented for unirradiated bundles of stainless-steel-clad or Zircaloy-2-clad UO 2 or ThO 2 --UO 2 sheared into lengths from 0.5 to 2.0 in. Data are also presented for irradiated single rods (sheared into lengths of 0.25 to 2.0 in.) of Zircaloy-2-clad UO 2 from BWRs and of Zircaloy-4-clad UO 2 from PWRs. Median particle sizes of UO 2 from shearing irradiated stainless-steel-clad fuel ranged from 103 to 182 μm; particle sizes of ThO 2 --UO 2 , under these same conditions, ranged from 137 to 202 μm. Similarly, median particle sizes of UO 2 from shearing unirradiated Zircaloy-2-clad fuel ranged from 230 to 957 μm. Irradiation levels of fuels from reactors ranged from 9,000 to 28,000 MWd/MTU. In general, particle sizes from shearing these irradiated fuels are larger than those from the unirradiated fuels. In addition, variations in particle size parameters pertaining to samples of a single vendor varied as much as those between different vendors. The fraction of fuel dislodged from the cladding is nearly proportional to the reciprocal of the shear cut length, until the cut length attains some minimum value below which all fuel is dislodged. Particles of fuel are generally elongated with a long-to-short axis ratio usually less than 3. Using parameters of the lognormal distribution deduced from experimental data, realistic estimates can be made of fractions of dislodged fuel having dimensions less than specified values

  10. Oxide particle size distribution from shearing irradiated and unirradiated LWR fuels in Zircaloy and stainless steel cladding: significance for risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W. Jr.; West, G.A.; Stacy, R.G.

    1979-03-22

    Sieve fractionation was performed with oxide particles dislodged during shearing of unirradiated or irradiated fuel bundles or single rods of UO/sub 2/ or 96 to 97% ThO/sub 2/--3 to 4% UO/sub 2/. Analyses of these data by nonlinear least-squares techniques demonstrated that the particle size distribution is lognormal. Variables involved in the numerical analyses include lognormal median size, lognormal standard deviation, and shear cut length. Sieve-fractionation data are presented for unirradiated bundles of stainless-steel-clad or Zircaloy-2-clad UO/sub 2/ or ThO/sub 2/--UO/sub 2/ sheared into lengths from 0.5 to 2.0 in. Data are also presented for irradiated single rods (sheared into lengths of 0.25 to 2.0 in.) of Zircaloy-2-clad UO/sub 2/ from BWRs and of Zircaloy-4-clad UO/sub 2/ from PWRs. Median particle sizes of UO/sub 2/ from shearing irradiated stainless-steel-clad fuel ranged from 103 to 182 ..mu..m; particle sizes of ThO/sub 2/--UO/sub 2/, under these same conditions, ranged from 137 to 202 ..mu..m. Similarly, median particle sizes of UO/sub 2/ from shearing unirradiated Zircaloy-2-clad fuel ranged from 230 to 957 ..mu..m. Irradiation levels of fuels from reactors ranged from 9,000 to 28,000 MWd/MTU. In general, particle sizes from shearing these irradiated fuels are larger than those from the unirradiated fuels; however, unirradiated fuel from vendors was not available for performing comparative shearing experiments. In addition, variations in particle size parameters pertaining to samples of a single vendor varied as much as those between different vendors. The fraction of fuel dislodged from the cladding is nearly proportional to the reciprocal of the shear cut length, until the cut length attains some minimum value below which all fuel is dislodged. Particles of fuel are generally elongated with a long-to-short axis ratio usually less than 3. Using parameters of the lognormal distribution estimates can be made of fractions of dislodged fuel having

  11. DNA rearrangements from γ-irradiated normal human fibroblasts preferentially occur in transcribed regions of the genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, H.B.; Radford, I.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: DNA rearrangement events leading to chromosomal aberrations are central to ionizing radiation-induced cell death. Although DNA double-strand breaks are probably the lesion that initiates formation of chromosomal aberrations, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that generate and modulate DNA rearrangement. Examination of the sequences that flank sites of DNA rearrangement may provide information regarding the processes and enzymes involved in rearrangement events. Accordingly, we developed a method using inverse PCR that allows the detection and sequencing of putative radiation-induced DNA rearrangements in defined regions of the human genome. The method can detect single copies of a rearrangement event that has occurred in a particular region of the genome and, therefore, DNA rearrangement detection does not require survival and continued multiplication of the affected cell. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA rearrangements were detected in several different regions of the genome of human fibroblast cells that were exposed to 30 Gy of γ-irradiation and then incubated for 24 hours at 37 deg C. There was a 3- to 5-fold increase in the number of products amplified from irradiated as compared with control cells in the target regions 5' to the C-MYC, CDKN1A, RB1, and FGFR2 genes. Sequences were examined from 121 DNA rearrangements. Approximately half of the PCR products were derived from possible inter-chromosomal rearrangements and the remainder were from intra-chromosomal events. A high proportion of the sequences that rearranged with target regions were located in genes, suggesting that rearrangements may occur preferentially in transcribed regions. Eighty-four percent of the sequences examined by reverse transcriptase PCR were from transcribed sequences in IMR-90 cells. The distribution of DNA rearrangements within the target regions is non-random and homology occurs between the sequences involved in rearrangements in some cases but is not

  12. Transcriptome Profiles in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells after Exposure to gamma-rays and different HZE particles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Distinct transcriptome profiles in response to low-LET and high-LET and different radiation qualities of HZE particles. Total RNA obtained from HBEC3KT cells after 1...

  13. Industrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Production lines for rubber gloves would not appear to have much in common with particle physics laboratories, but they both use accelerators. Electron beam irradiation is often used in industry to improve the quality of manufactured goods or to reduce production cost. Products range from computer disks, shrink packaging, tyres, cables, and plastics to hot water pipes. Some products, such as medical goods, cosmetics and certain foodstuffs, are sterilized in this way. In electron beam irradiation, electrons penetrate materials creating showers of low energy electrons. After many collisions these electrons have the correct energy to create chemically active sites. They may either break molecular bonds or activate a site which promotes a new chemical linkage. This industrial irradiation can be exploited in three ways: breaking down a biological molecule usually renders it useless and kills the organism; breaking an organic molecule can change its toxicity or function; and crosslinking a polymer can strengthen it. In addition to traditional gamma irradiation using isotopes, industrial irradiation uses three accelerator configurations, each type defining an energy range, and consequently the electron penetration depth. For energies up to 750 kV, the accelerator consists of a DC potential applied to a simple wire anode and the electrons extracted through a slot in a coaxially mounted cylindrical cathode. In the 1-5 MeV range, the Cockcroft-Walton or Dynamitron( R ) accelerators are normally used. To achieve the high potentials in these DC accelerators, insulating SF6 gas and large dimension vessels separate the anode and cathode; proprietary techniques distinguish the various commercial models available. Above 5 MeV, the size of DC accelerators render them impractical, and more compact radiofrequency-driven linear accelerators are used. Irradiation electron beams are actually 'sprayed' over the product using a magnetic deflection system. Lower energy beams of

  14. The influence of nano silica particles on gamma-irradiation ageing of elastomers based on chlorosulphonated polyethylene and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, G.; Marinović-Cincović, M.; Tanasić, Lj.; Jovanović, V.; Samaržija-Jovanović, S.; Vukić, N.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work was to study gamma irradiation ageing of rubber blends based on acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) and chlorosulphonated polyethylene rubber (CSM) reinforced by silica nano particles. The NBR/CSM compounds (50: 50, w/w) filled with different content of filler (0-100 phr) were crosslinked by sulfur. The vulcanization characteristics were assessed using the rheometer with an oscillating disk. The vulcanizates were prepared in a hydraulic press. The obtained materials were exposed to the different irradiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy). The mechanical properties (hardness, modulus at 100% elongation, tensile strength and elongation at break) and swelling numbers were assessed before and after gamma irradiation ageing.

  15. Age-related decrease in an early step of DNA-repair of normal human lymphocytes exposed to ultraviolet-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, M.; Emmons, L.R.; Haener, M.M.; Mueller, H.J.B.; Boyle, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay has been used to detect age-related changes in the rate of loss of photoproduct antigenicity from the DNA of peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated with 10 J m-2 uv-C. Lymphocytes were obtained from 75 healthy volunteers whose ages ranged from 14 months to 82 years. The samples were divided by age decades into groups of 10 individuals, except the first decade which contained only 5 individuals. The mean loss of antigenicity +/- 1 standard deviation was determined for each group at 10, 30, and 60 min after irradiation. The data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and by the Kruskal-Wallis test. After a recovery period of 10 min the loss of antigenicity was most rapid in group I (0-9 years), less rapid in group II (10-19 years), and least rapid in all other groups. The differences between groups became less at 30 min and were not significant at 60 min incubation. These data obtained from normal cells concur with our previous conclusions, that reductions in the rate of loss of antigenicity in nondiseased cells isolated from patients with melanoma and dysplastic naevus syndrome reflect genetic abnormalities in these patients

  16. Signaling factors and pathways of α-particle irradiation induced bilateral bystander responses between Beas-2B and U937 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Ping; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Cuiping; Bai, Yang; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation damage of Beas-2B cells was enhanced by macrophage-mediated bilateral bystander responses. • Expressions of TNF-α and IL-8 in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells were dependent on ERK and p38 pathways. • The neighboring U937 cells further increased the generation of TNF-α and IL-8 in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. • NF-κB dependent upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 was induced in the bystander U937 cells. - Abstract: Although radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been investigated for decades for their potential health risk, the underlying gene regulation is still largely unclear, especially the roles of immune system and inflammatory response in RIBE. In the present study, macrophage U937 cells and epithelial Beas-2B cells were co-cultured to disclose the cascades of bystander signaling factors and intercellular communications. After α-particle irradiation, both ERK and p38 pathways were activated in Beas-2B cells and were associated with the autocrine and paracrine signaling of TNF-α and IL-8, resulting in direct damage to the irradiated cells. Similar upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 was induced in the bystander U937 cells after co-culture with α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. This upregulation was dependent on the activation of NF-κB pathway and was responsible for the enhanced damage of α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. Interestingly, the increased expressions of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in the bystander U937 cells were clearly relayed on the activated ERK and p38 pathways in the irradiated Beas-2B cells, and the upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in co-cultured Beas-2B cells was also partly due to the activated NF-κB pathway in the bystander U937 cells. With the pretreatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) or BAY 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor), the aggravated damage in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells could be largely alleviated. Our results disclosed novel signaling cascades of macrophage-mediated bilateral

  17. Signaling factors and pathways of α-particle irradiation induced bilateral bystander responses between Beas-2B and U937 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiamei; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Ping; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Cuiping; Bai, Yang; Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation damage of Beas-2B cells was enhanced by macrophage-mediated bilateral bystander responses. • Expressions of TNF-α and IL-8 in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells were dependent on ERK and p38 pathways. • The neighboring U937 cells further increased the generation of TNF-α and IL-8 in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. • NF-κB dependent upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 was induced in the bystander U937 cells. - Abstract: Although radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been investigated for decades for their potential health risk, the underlying gene regulation is still largely unclear, especially the roles of immune system and inflammatory response in RIBE. In the present study, macrophage U937 cells and epithelial Beas-2B cells were co-cultured to disclose the cascades of bystander signaling factors and intercellular communications. After α-particle irradiation, both ERK and p38 pathways were activated in Beas-2B cells and were associated with the autocrine and paracrine signaling of TNF-α and IL-8, resulting in direct damage to the irradiated cells. Similar upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 was induced in the bystander U937 cells after co-culture with α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. This upregulation was dependent on the activation of NF-κB pathway and was responsible for the enhanced damage of α-irradiated Beas-2B cells. Interestingly, the increased expressions of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in the bystander U937 cells were clearly relayed on the activated ERK and p38 pathways in the irradiated Beas-2B cells, and the upregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs in co-cultured Beas-2B cells was also partly due to the activated NF-κB pathway in the bystander U937 cells. With the pretreatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) or BAY 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor), the aggravated damage in the α-irradiated Beas-2B cells could be largely alleviated. Our results disclosed novel signaling cascades of macrophage-mediated bilateral

  18. Depth Dose Distribution Study within a Phantom Torso after Irradiation with a Simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis; Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are compounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body itself Astronauts' radiation exposures are measured by means of personal dosimetry, but there remains substantial uncertainty associated with the computational extrapolation of skin dose to organ dose, which can lead to over- or underestimation of the health risk. Comparisons of models to data showed that the astronaut's Effective dose (E) can be predicted to within about a +10% accuracy using space radiation transport models for galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and trapped radiation behind shielding. However for solar particle event (SPE) with steep energy spectra and for extra-vehicular activities on the surface of the moon where only tissue shielding is present, transport models predict that there are large differences in model assumptions in projecting organ doses. Therefore experimental verification of SPE induced organ doses may be crucial for the design of lunar missions. In the research experiment "Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso" at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL, Brookhaven, USA the large 1972 SPE spectrum was simulated using seven different proton energies from 50 up to 450 MeV. A phantom torso constructed of natural bones and realistic distributions of human tissue equivalent materials, which is comparable to the torso of the MATROSHKA phantom currently on the ISS, was equipped with a comprehensive set of thermoluminescence detectors and human cells. The detectors are applied to assess the depth dose distribution and radiation transport codes (e.g. GEANT4) are used to assess the radiation field and interactions of the radiation field

  19. SOLIS IV. Hydrocarbons in the OMC-2 FIR4 Region, a Probe of Energetic Particle Irradiation of the Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Fontani, F.; Neri, R.; Manigand, S.; Kama, M.; Caselli, P.; Jaber Al-Edhari, A.; Kahane, C.; Alves, F.; Balucani, N.; Bianchi, E.; Caux, E.; Codella, C.; Dulieu, F.; Pineda, J. E.; Sims, I. R.; Theulé, P.

    2018-06-01

    We report new interferometric images of cyclopropenylidene, c-C3H2, toward the young protocluster OMC-2 FIR 4. The observations were performed at 82 and 85 GHz with the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) as part of the project Seeds Of Life In Space (SOLIS). In addition, IRAM-30 m data observations were used to investigate the physical structure of OMC-2 FIR 4. We find that the c-C3H2 gas emits from the same region where previous SOLIS observations showed bright HC5N emission. From a non-LTE analysis of the IRAM-30 m data, the c-C3H2 gas has an average temperature of ∼40 K, a H2 density of ∼3 × 105 cm‑3, and a c-C3H2 abundance relative to H2 of (7 ± 1) × 10‑12. In addition, the NOEMA observations provide no sign of significant c-C3H2 excitation temperature gradients across the region (about 3–4 beams), with T ex in the range 8 ± 3 up to 16 ± 7 K. We thus infer that our observations are inconsistent with a physical interaction of the OMC-2 FIR 4 envelope with the outflow arising from OMC-2 FIR 3, as claimed by previous studies. The comparison of the measured c-C3H2 abundance with the predictions from an astrochemical PDR model indicates that OMC-2 FIR 4 is irradiated by an FUV field ∼1000 times larger than the interstellar one, and by a flux of ionizing particles ∼4000 times larger than the canonical value of 1 × 10‑17 s‑1 from the Galaxy cosmic rays, which is consistent with our previous HC5N observations. This provides an important and independent confirmation of other studies that one, or more, source inside the OMC-2 FIR 4 region emits energetic (≥10 MeV) particles. Based on observations carried out under project number L15AA with the IRAM NOEMA Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  20. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick (/similar to/1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target (/similar to/1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs

  1. Benefit of particle therapy in re-irradiation of head and neck patients. Results of a multicentric in silico ROCOCO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eekers, Daniëlle B P; Roelofs, Erik; Jelen, Urszula; Kirk, Maura; Granzier, Marlies; Ammazzalorso, Filippo; Ahn, Peter H; Janssens, Geert O R J; Hoebers, Frank J P; Friedmann, Tobias; Solberg, Timothy; Walsh, Sean; Troost, Esther G C; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    In this multicentric in silico trial we compared photon, proton, and carbon-ion radiotherapy plans for re-irradiation of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) regarding dose to tumour and doses to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Twenty-five HNSCC patients with a second new or recurrent cancer after previous irradiation (70Gy) were included. Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and ion therapy (IMIT) re-irradiation plans to a second subsequent dose of 70Gy were compared to photon therapy delivered with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). When comparing IMIT and IMPT to VMAT, the mean dose to all investigated 22 OARs was significantly reduced for IMIT and to 15 out of 22 OARs (68%) using IMPT. The maximum dose to 2% volume (D 2 ) of the brainstem and spinal cord were significantly reduced using IMPT and IMIT compared to VMAT. The data are available on www.cancerdata.org. In this ROCOCO in silico trial, a reduction in mean dose to OARs was achieved using particle therapy compared to photons in the re-irradiation of HNSCC. There was a dosimetric benefit favouring carbon-ions above proton therapy. These dose reductions may potentially translate into lower severe complication rates related to the re-irradiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Fission-product behaviour in irradiated TRISO-coated particles: Results of the HFR-EU1bis experiment and their interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachin, M.; Dubourg, R.; Groot, S. de; Kissane, M.P.; Bakker, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The microstructure and FPs in UO 2 TRISO particles (10% FIMA, 1573 K) were studied. → Very large porosities (>10 μm) were observed in the high temperature particles. → Significant Xe and Cs releases from the kernel were observed. → Mo and Ru are mainly present in the metallic precipitates in the kernel. - Abstract: It is important to understand fission-product (FP) and kernel micro-structure evolution in TRISO-coated fuel particles. FP behaviour, while central to severe-accident evaluation, impacts: evolution of the kernel oxygen potential governing in turn carbon oxidation (amoeba effect and pressurization); particle pressurization through fission-gas release from the kernel; and coating mechanical resistance via reaction with some FPs (Pd, Cs, Sr). The HFR-Eu1bis experiment irradiated five HTR fuel pebbles containing TRISO-coated UO 2 particles and went beyond current HTR specifications (e.g., central temperature of 1523 K). This study presents ceramographic and EPMA examinations of irradiated urania kernels and coatings. Significant evolutions of the kernel (grain structure, porosity, metallic-inclusion size, intergranular bubbles) as a function of temperature are shown. Results concerning FP migration are presented, e.g., significant xenon, caesium and palladium release from the kernel, molybdenum and ruthenium mainly present in metallic precipitates. The observed FP and micro-structural evolutions are interpreted and explanations proposed. The effect of high flux rate and high temperature on fission-gas behaviour, grain-size evolution and kernel swelling is discussed. Furthermore, Cs, Mo and Zr behaviour is interpreted in connection with oxygen-potential. This paper shows that combining state-of-the-art post-irradiation examination and state-of-the-art modelling fundamentally improves understanding of HTR fuel behaviour.

  3. Coupling of morphology to surface transport in ion-beam-irradiated surfaces: normal incidence and rotating targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Garcia, Javier; Cuerno, Rodolfo; Castro, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Continuum models have proved their applicability to describe nanopatterns produced by ion-beam sputtering of amorphous or amorphizable targets at low and medium energies. Here we pursue the recently introduced 'hydrodynamic approach' in the cases of bombardment at normal incidence, or of oblique incidence onto rotating targets, known to lead to self-organized arrangements of nanodots. Our approach stresses the dynamical roles of material (defect) transport at the target surface and of local redeposition. By applying results previously derived for arbitrary angles of incidence, we derive effective evolution equations for these geometries of incidence, which are then numerically studied. Moreover, we show that within our model these equations are identical (albeit with different coefficients) in both cases, provided surface tension is isotropic in the target. We thus account for the common dynamics for both types of incidence conditions, namely formation of dots with short-range order and long-wavelength disorder, and an intermediate coarsening of dot features that improves the local order of the patterns. We provide for the first time approximate analytical predictions for the dependence of stationary dot features (amplitude and wavelength) on phenomenological parameters, that improve upon previous linear estimates. Finally, our theoretical results are discussed in terms of experimental data.

  4. In vitro study of the influence of alpha particles irradiation on the pre-neoplastic transformation of rat trachea epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, C.

    2001-12-01

    Intern contamination by actinide oxide inhalation is potentially one health hazard during the nuclear fuel fabrication process. The aerosol particles can induce pulmonary lesions, such as epithelial cancers in particular. Their toxicity is mainly due to radiotoxicity of α irradiation. The aim of this work was to contribute, by an in vitro model, to the study of the apparition of pre-neoplastic states on epithelial cells after high LET irradiation. Primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells were used. Two rat strain cells, SD TR for Sprague Dawley rats and WF TR for Wistar Furth I Fischer F344 rats, were compared after exposure to a dose range from 0 to 5 Gy. Reproductive cell death, i.e. senescent death, seems to be the main lethal way induced by α and γ irradiations. The nuclear volume of WF TR cells is higher than that of SD TR ones, explaining the higher α radiation-induced lethality of these cells. These WF TR cells are also much sensitive to dose rate and α particles energy. In the same manner, pre-neoplastic transformation rate of the cells seems to depend on the physical parameters of irradiation. But, it mainly varies as a function of cell radiosensitivity, that means cell death. In fact, the transformation rate of sensitive WF TR cells is lower than that of SD TR ones. In term of transformation for SD TR cells, dose-effect relationship fits to a linear and infra linear function after α irradiation, whereas the curve fits to linear and quadratic function after γ irradiation. The Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) of α particles for lethality and pre-neoplastic transformation were determined for several levels of dose. A constant value of about 3 was found for RBE of lethality whatever the α dose. By contrast, the RBE of transformation has a value of about 10 up to 0.5 Gy and gradually decreases at higher doses to reach a value of 1 at 5 Gy. Similar shapes of dose-effect relationship can be observed for malignant lung tumour induction after

  5. Discussion of the origin of secondary photon and secondary ion emission during energetic particle irradiation of solids. I. The collision cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.B.; Gruen, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Secondary photon and secondary ion emission during energetic particle irradiation of solid surfaces is assumed to arise due to excitation and de-excitation of sputtered particles originating from a collision cascade induced by the incident projectile. The excitation is postulated to occur by two alternative mechanisms: path (a), where excitation occurs at or very near the surface of the solid due to atom--atom or atom--electron collisions; and path (b), where excitation occurs as the sputtered particle leaves the solid, but is still under its influence so that electron exchange processes are permitted. Once the excited and/or ionized sputtered particle is formed nonradiative de-excitation processes are then included in the discussion which allow the excited and/or ionized particle to be de-excited and/or neutralized. The result of these nonradiative de-excitation processes is shown to provide a possible channel for the formation of new excited ''daughters'' by the de-excitation of the initial excited ''parent''. Depending on the initial excitation probability of the parent the new excited daughters are shown to contribute to various energy regions of the excited and/or ionized secondary particle energy distribution. A mathematical formalism is developed based on the neutral sputtered atom energy and velocity distributions assuming a collision cascade origin for these sputtered particles. By including various models for the excitation probability, and the survival probability for excited particles once formed to not undergo nonradiative de-excitation the resulting energy and velocity distributions of the sputtered excited and/or ionized secondary particles are calculated. These distributions are found to be a function of the emission angle depending on the model assumed for the initial excitation. From this formalism the total excited secondary particle yield may be calculated

  6. The SOD Mimic, MnTE-2-PyP, Protects from Chronic Fibrosis and Inflammation in Irradiated Normal Pelvic Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Shrishrimal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic radiation for cancer therapy can damage a variety of normal tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that radiation causes acute changes to pelvic fibroblasts such as the transformation to myofibroblasts and the induction of senescence, which persist months after radiation. The addition of the manganese porphyrin, MnTE-2-PyP, resulted in protection of these acute changes in fibroblasts and this protection persisted months following radiation exposure. Specifically, at two months post-radiation, MnTE-2-PyP inhibited the number of α-smooth muscle actin positive fibroblasts induced by radiation and at six months post-radiation, MnTE-2-PyP significantly reduced collagen deposition (fibrosis in the skin and bladder tissues of irradiated mice. Radiation also resulted in changes to T cells. At two months post-radiation, there was a reduction of Th1-producing splenocytes, which resulted in reduced Th1:Th2 ratios. MnTE-2-PyP maintained Th1:Th2 ratios similar to unirradiated mice. At six months post-radiation, increased T cells were observed in the adipose tissues. MnTE-2-PyP treatment inhibited this increase. Thus, MnTE-2-PyP treatment maintains normal fibroblast function and T cell immunity months after radiation exposure. We believe that one of the reasons MnTE-2-PyP is a potent radioprotector is due to its protection of multiple cell types from radiation damage.

  7. Effects of 1H + 16O Charged Particle Irradiation on Short-Term Memory and Hippocampal Physiology in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiffer, Frederico; Carr, Hannah; Groves, Thomas; Anderson, Julie E; Alexander, Tyler; Wang, Jing; Seawright, John W; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Carter, Gwendolyn; Boerma, Marjan; Allen, Antiño R

    2018-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) poses a significant health risk for deep-space flight crews. GCR are unique in their extremely high-energy particles. With current spacecraft shielding technology, some of the predominant particles astronauts would be exposed to are 1 H + 16 O. Radiation has been shown to cause cognitive deficits in mice. The hippocampus plays a key role in memory and cognitive tasks; it receives information from the cortex, undergoes dendritic-dependent processing and then relays information back to the cortex. In this study, we investigated the effects of combined 1 H + 16 O irradiation on cognition and dendritic structures in the hippocampus of adult male mice three months postirradiation. Six-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were irradiated first with 1 H (0.5 Gy, 150 MeV/n) and 1 h later with 16 O (0.1 Gy, 600 MeV/n) at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (Upton, NY). Three months after irradiation, animals were tested for hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance using the Y-maze. Upon sacrifice, molecular and morphological assessments were performed on hippocampal tissues. During Y-maze testing, the irradiated mice failed to distinguish the novel arm, spending approximately the same amount of time in all three arms during the retention trial relative to sham-treated controls. Irradiated animals also showed changes in expression of glutamate receptor subunits and synaptic density-associated proteins. 1 H + 16 O radiation compromised dendritic morphology in the cornu ammonis 1 and dentate gyrus within the hippocampus. These data indicate cognitive injuries due to 1 H + 16 O at three months postirradiation.

  8. Seasonal variations of the particle flux in the Peru-Chile current at 30°S under `normal' and El Niño conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Marchant, Margarita; Wefer, Gerold

    Time-series sediment traps were deployed 180 km off the Chilean coast at 30°S in the Peru-Chile Current during the El Niño period 1991/1992 (6 months) and during the 'normal' period 1993/1994 (12 months). Under normal conditions in 1993/1994 the particle fluxes display a pronounced seasonal cycle marked by a settling phytoplankton bloom in September, intermediate fluxes until January, and low fluxes between January and July. This seasonal pattern is also reflected in stable isotope data, measured on the planktic foraminifera species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (dex.) and Globigerina bulloides, which indicate persistent upwelling conditions between August and February followed by a stratified water column between March and July. The total flux under normal conditions amounts to 65.1 g m -2 a-1, with the main flux constituents contributing 47.6% (carbonate), 26.4% (lithogenic matter), 17.4% (biogenic opal), and 8.6% (organic matter), respectively. Based on these particle flux data the export production has been estimated to be 42 gC m -2 a-1. Although the main flux event in September was not sampled in the El Niño period 1991/1992, the available record from November 1991 to April 1992 allows an interesting comparison with the fluxes of the normal year. The total amount of fluxes and the timing of minor flux events are very similar under normal and under El Niño conditions. However, increased proportions of organic carbon and lithogenic matter under El Niño conditions are interpreted to reflect faster sedimentation and preferred scavenging of organic matter by elevated lithogenic fluxes rather than increased productivity. The higher lithogenic fluxes under El Niño conditions are probably due to increased precipitation and terrestial runoff in the arid to semiarid northern part of Chile.

  9. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Roos, Martin A.; Aluwini, Shafak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter displacement ensuring that both target coverage and normal tissue doses remain clinically acceptable. Besides the effect of total implant displacement, also displacements of catheters belonging to selected template rows only were evaluated in terms of target coverage and normal tissue dose, in order to analyse the change in dose distribution as a function of catheter dwell weight and catheter location. Material and methods: Five representative implant geometries, with 17 catheters each, were selected. The clinical treatment plan was compared to treatment plans in which an entire implant displacement in caudal direction over 3, 5, 7 and 10 mm was simulated. Besides, treatment plans were simulated considering a displacement of either the central, most ventral or most dorsal catheter rows only, over 5 mm caudally. Results: Due to displacement of the entire implant the target coverage drops below the tolerance of 93% for all displacements studied. The effect of displacement of the entire implant on organs at risk strongly depended on the patient anatomy; e.g., for 80% of the implant geometries the V 80 of the rectum exceeded its tolerance for all displacements. The effect of displacement of catheters belonging to selected template rows depended strongly on the relative weight of each catheter row when considering the target coverage and on its location when considering the dose in the organs at risk. Conclusion: This study supports the need for a check of the catheter locations before each fraction and correction of deviations of the catheter position exceeding 3 mm.

  10. Fission products silver, palladium, and cadmium identification in neutron-irradiated SiC TRISO particles using a Cs-Corrected HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: isabella.vanrooyen@inl.gov [Fuel Design and Development Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Olivier, E.J.; Neethling, J.H. [Centre for High Resolution Electron Microscopy, Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2016-08-01

    Electron microscopy investigations of selected coated particles from the first advanced gas reactor experiment at Idaho National Laboratory provided important information on fission product distribution and chemical composition in the silicon-carbide (SiC) layer. Silver precipitates were nano-sized, and therefore high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to provide more information at the atomic level. Based on gamma-ray analysis, this particle which was irradiated to an average burnup of 19.38% fissions per initial metal atom, may have released as much as 10% of its available Ag-110 m inventory during irradiation. The HRTEM investigation focused on silver, palladium, and cadmium due to interest in silver transport mechanisms and possible correlation with palladium and silver previously found. Palladium, silver, and cadmium were found to co-exist in some of the SiC grain boundaries and triple junctions. This study confirmed palladium both at inter and intragranular sites. Phosphor was identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points. - Highlights: • First high resolution electron microscopy fission product nano-structural locations of irradiated TRISO coated particles. • Pd observed inside SiC grains in proximity to planar defects e.g. stacking faults. • Ag co-exists with Pd and Cd only may suggest a Pd-assisted transport mechanism. • First finding of neutron transmutation product P, in SiC layer of TRISO coated particles. No direct link to Ag transport. • No significant Pd corrosion of SiC observed even at this high resolution images.

  11. Role of alkaline endonucleases in the release of soluble chromatin from thymus, spleen and liver nuclei of normal and irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suciu, D.

    1979-01-01

    Thymus, spleen and liver nuclei released a large fraction of soluble chromatin in vitro when incubation was carried out in sucrose media containing low concentrations of CaCl 2 and/or MgCl 2 . A significant fraction of deoxyribopolynucleotides (DPN) was also extracted from nuclei. After 30 min of incubation at 37 0 C, the maximum release of soluble chromatin was observed near a pH of 8, which corresponds to the optimum pH of the alkaline endonuclease activity from thymus, spleen and liver. The soluble chromatin and DPN were precipitated by increasing the bivalent ion concentration of the medium. The protein/DNA ratio and the molecular weight of DNA suggest that the soluble chromatin and DPN represent nucleosome-like particles. The release of soluble chromatin in the first 4 hours of incubation was significantly increased if the nuclear fraction was isolated from the thymus and spleen of whole-body irradiated mice (1000 rad). This effect was absent in the liver nuclei. (author)

  12. Effects of 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation on the electrical properties of nickel Schottky diodes on 4H–SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omotoso, E. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife 220005 (Nigeria); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Paradzah, A.T.; Diale, M.; Coelho, S.M.M.; Janse van Rensburg, P.J.; Ngoepe, P.N.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2015-12-15

    Current–voltage, capacitance–voltage and conventional deep level transient spectroscopy at temperature ranges from 40 to 300 K have been employed to study the influence of alpha-particle irradiation from an {sup 241}Am source on Ni/4H–SiC Schottky contacts. The nickel Schottky barrier diodes were resistively evaporated on n-type 4H–SiC samples of doping density of 7.1 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3}. It was observed that radiation damage caused an increase in ideality factors of the samples from 1.04 to 1.07, an increase in Schottky barrier height from 1.25 to 1.31 eV, an increase in series resistance from 48 to 270 Ω but a decrease in saturation current density from 55 to 9 × 10{sup −12} A m{sup −2} from I–V plots at 300 K. The free carrier concentration of the sample decreased slightly after irradiation. Conventional DLTS showed peaks due to four deep levels for as-grown and five deep levels after irradiation. The Richardson constant, as determined from a modified Richardson plot assuming a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights for the as-grown and irradiated samples were 133 and 151 A cm{sup −2} K{sup −2}, respectively. These values are similar to literature values.

  13. Catalytic property of an indium-deposited powder-type material containing silicon and its dependence on the dose of indium nano-particles irradiated by a pulse arc plasma process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yoshimura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indium nano-particle irradiations onto zeolite powders were carried out using a pulse arc plasma source system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic studies of an indium irradiated zeolite sample revealed that indium nano-particles were successfully deposited on the sample. Besides, the sample was found to be capable of catalyzing an organic chemical reaction (i.e., Friedel-Crafts alkylation. Then, we examined whether or not the catalytic ability depends on the irradiated indium dose, having established the optimal indium dose for inducing the catalytic effect.

  14. Analysis of irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Kikuchi, Teruo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Sato, Sadao; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Kashimura, Satoru.

    1991-07-01

    Irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles were analyzed by the MICROS-2 code for the fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) under its operating conditions. The analyses were made on the standard core fuel (A-type) and the test fuels comprising the advanced SiC-coated particle fuel (B-1 type) and the ZrC-coated particle fuel (B-2 type). For the B-1 type fuel, the stresses were relieved due to the thicker buffer and SiC layers than for the A type fuel. The slightly decreased thickness of the fourth layer for the B-1 type than for the A type fuel had no significant effect on the stresses. As for the B-2 type fuel, almost the same results as for the B-1 type were obtained under an assumption that the ZrC layer as well as the SiC layer undergoes negligible dimension change within the analysis conditions. The obtained results indicated that the B-1 and B-2 type fuels are better than the A type fuel in terms of integrity against the irradiation-induced stresses. Finally, research subjects for development of the analysis code on the fuel behavior are discussed. (author)

  15. Bactericidal effect of blue LED light irradiated TiO2/Fe3O4 particles on fish pathogen in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, T.C.; Yao, K.S.; Yeh, N.; Chang, C.I.; Hsu, H.C.; Gonzalez, F.; Chang, C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    This study uses blue LED light (λ max = 475 nm) activated TiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 particles to evaluate the particles' photocatalytic activity efficiency and bactericidal effects in seawater of variable salinities. Different TiO 2 to Fe 3 O 4 mole ratios have been synthesized using sol-gel method. The synthesized particles contain mainly anatase TiO 2 , Fe 3 O 4 and FeTiO 3 . The study has identified TiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 's bactericidal effect to marine fish pathogen (Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida BCRC17065) in seawater. The SEM photo reveals the surface destruction in bacteria incubated with blue LED irradiated TiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 . The result of this study indicates that 1) TiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 acquires photocatalytic activities in both the freshwater and the seawater via blue LED irradiation, 2) higher photocatalytic activities appear in solutions of higher TiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 mole ratio, and 3) photocatalytic activity decreases as salinity increases. These results suggest that the energy saving blue LED light is a feasible light source to activate TiO 2 /Fe 3 O 4 photocatalytic activities in both freshwater and seawater.

  16. Recent observations on the evolution of secondary-phase particles in zircaloy-2 under irradiation in a BWR to high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolhassani, S.; Graber, T.; Gavillet, D.; Groeschel, F.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of radiation on the corrosion of the fuel claddings in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) has been the subject of many investigations, and different aspects of the overall phenomena have been studied by different techniques. Analysis of the evolution of Secondary-Phase Particles (SPPs) for different periods of immersion of the cladding in the reactor enables the rate of corrosion to the structure of the material to be correlated. In the case of Zircaloy-2 in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), SPPs are dissolved under irradiation, and their dissolution affects the rate of oxidation and other correlated phenomena. In recent studies, the Zircaloy-2 in claddings loaded in the Leibstadt BWR are analysed after one, three and five cycles. Results are presented, and give an account of the changes which occurred in the materials under irradiation. (authors)

  17. Recent observations on the evolution of secondary-phase particles in zircaloy-2 under irradiation in a BWR to high burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolhassani, S.; Graber, T.; Gavillet, D.; Groeschel, F

    2000-07-01

    The influence of radiation on the corrosion of the fuel claddings in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) has been the subject of many investigations, and different aspects of the overall phenomena have been studied by different techniques. Analysis of the evolution of Secondary-Phase Particles (SPPs) for different periods of immersion of the cladding in the reactor enables the rate of corrosion to the structure of the material to be correlated. In the case of Zircaloy-2 in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), SPPs are dissolved under irradiation, and their dissolution affects the rate of oxidation and other correlated phenomena. In recent studies, the Zircaloy-2 in claddings loaded in the Leibstadt BWR are analysed after one, three and five cycles. Results are presented, and give an account of the changes which occurred in the materials under irradiation. (authors)

  18. Radiation-thermal effects change of physico-mechanical properties in reactor materials irradiated with neutrons and energetic charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the first part of the report (chapter 1) the earlier results of the important scientific and technological investigations which were performed in the seventies years in Poland have been presented. They concerned the fabrication, corrosion, mechanical properties of materials for research and power reactors. Being of the general survey character, the chapter includes own, original results of research of thermal irradiation effects on microstructure evolution phase transformations and mechanical properties of reactor materials. The kinetics of isothermal transformation β→α in U-Cr 0.4% wt. alloy has been studied. Factors affecting stress-corrosion cracking of zirconium in iodine vapour have been investigated. The rings and loops for irradiation specimens and Hot Laboratory for postirradiation examination of construction materials is described. In the second part (chapters 2, 3, 4, 5) performed the investigations and simulations of radiation damage in metals by heavy ion beams (E > 1 MeV/a.m.n.) were described scientific base and technical problems of the method of irradiation of heavy ions and of the examination of irradiated samples is presented. It is followed by a summary of the results of simulation and reactor experiments on different materials. Radiation hardening of a number metals (Al, Zr, Cu, Ni, U) irradiated by heavy ion and neutrons, mechanical properties and microstructural evolution in ion and neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel is described. The last chapter is a description of practical aspects of the presented studies in nuclear science and technology. (author)

  19. Modulation of the Rho/ROCK pathway in heart and lung after thorax irradiation reveals targets to improve normal tissue toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceau, Virginie; Pasinetti, Nadia; Schupp, Charlotte; Pouzoulet, Fred; Opolon, Paule; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine

    2010-11-01

    The medical options available to prevent or treat radiation-induced injury are scarce and developing effective countermeasures is still an open research field. In addition, more than half of cancer patients are treated with radiation therapy, which displays a high antitumor efficacy but can cause, albeit rarely, disabling long-term toxicities including radiation fibrosis. Progress has been made in the definition of molecular pathways associated with normal tissue toxicity that suggest potentially effective therapeutic targets. Targeting the Rho/ROCK pathway seems a promising anti-fibrotic approach, at least in the gut; the current study was performed to assess whether this target was relevant to the prevention and/or treatment of injury to the main thoracic organs, namely heart and lungs. First, we showed activation of two important fibrogenic pathways (Smad and Rho/ROCK) in response to radiation-exposure to adult cardiomyocytes; we extended these observations in vivo to the heart and lungs of mice, 15 and 30 weeks post-irradiation. We correlated this fibrogenic molecular imprint with alteration of heart physiology and long-term remodelling of pulmonary and cardiac histological structures. Lastly, cardiac and pulmonary radiation injury and bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis were successfully modulated using Rho/ROCK inhibitors (statins and Y-27632) and this was associated with a normalization of fibrogenic markers. In conclusion, the present paper shows for the first time, activation of Rho/ROCK and Smad pathways in pulmonary and cardiac radiation-induced delayed injury. Our findings thereby reveal a safe and efficient therapeutic opportunity for the abrogation of late thoracic radiation injury, potentially usable either before or after radiation exposure; this approach is especially attractive in (1) the radiation oncology setting, as it does not interfere with prior anti-cancer treatment and in (2) radioprotection, as applicable to the treatment of established

  20. Modulation of the ρ/rock pathway in heart and lung after thorax irradiation reveals targets to improve normal tissue toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monceau, V.; Pasinetti, N.; Schupp, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Opolon, P.; Vozenin, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    The medical options available to prevent or treat radiation-induced injury are scarce and developing effective countermeasures is still an open research field. In addition, more than half of cancer patients are treated with radiation therapy, which displays a high antitumor efficacy but can cause, albeit rarely, disabling long-term toxicities including radiation fibrosis. Progress has been made in the definition of molecular pathways associated with normal tissue toxicity that suggest potentially effective therapeutic targets. Targeting the Rho/ROCK pathway seems a promising anti-fibrotic approach, at least in the gut; the current study was performed to assess whether this target was relevant to the prevention and/or treatment of injury to the main thoracic organs, namely heart and lungs. First, we showed activation of two important fibro-genic pathways (Smad and Rho/ROCK) in response to radiation-exposure to adult cardio-myocytes; we extended these observations in vivo to the heart and lungs of mice, 15 and 30 weeks post-irradiation. We correlated this fibro-genic molecular imprint with alteration of heart physiology and long-term remodelling of pulmonary and cardiac histological structures. Lastly, cardiac and pulmonary radiation injury and bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis were successfully modulated using Rho/ROCK inhibitors (statins and Y-27632) and this was associated with a normalization of fibro-genic markers. In conclusion, the present paper shows for the first time, activation of Rho/ROCK and Smad pathways in pulmonary and cardiac radiation-induced delayed injury. Our findings thereby reveal a safe and efficient therapeutic opportunity for the abrogation of late thoracic radiation injury, potentially usable either before or after radiation exposure; this approach is especially attractive in (1) the radiation oncology setting, as it does not interfere with prior anti-cancer treatment and in (2) radioprotection, as applicable to the treatment of

  1. Sub-Coulomb 3He transfer and its use to extract three-particle asymptotic normalization coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, M. L.; Baby, L. T.; Belarge, J.; Keeley, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A. N.; Rogachev, G. V.; Rusek, K.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2018-01-01

    Data for the 13C(6Li,t )16O reaction, obtained in inverse kinematics at a 13C incident energy of 7.72 MeV, are presented. A distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis was used to extract spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for the 〈" close="〉6Li∣3He +3H 〉">16O∣13C +3He overlaps, subject to the assumption of a fixed ANCs as a function of various inputs to the DWBA calculations was explored. The extracted ANCs were found to vary as a cubic function of the radius of the potential well binding the transferred 3He to the 13C core while the spectroscopic factors varied as a quartic function of the radius. The ANC values could be determined to within a factor of two for this system.

  2. Morphological evolution of dissolving feldspar particles with anisotropic surface kinetics and implications for dissolution rate normalization and grain size dependence: A kinetic modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Lüttge, Andreas

    2009-11-01

    With previous two-dimensional (2D) simulations based on surface-specific feldspar dissolution succeeding in relating the macroscopic feldspar kinetics to the molecular-scale surface reactions of Si and Al atoms ( Zhang and Lüttge, 2008, 2009), we extended our modeling effort to three-dimensional (3D) feldspar particle dissolution simulations. Bearing on the same theoretical basis, the 3D feldspar particle dissolution simulations have verified the anisotropic surface kinetics observed in the 2D surface-specific simulations. The combined effect of saturation state, pH, and temperature on the surface kinetics anisotropy has been subsequently evaluated, found offering diverse options for morphological evolution of dissolving feldspar nanoparticles with varying grain sizes and starting shapes. Among the three primary faces on the simulated feldspar surface, the (1 0 0) face has the biggest dissolution rate across an extensively wide saturation state range and thus acquires a higher percentage of the surface area upon dissolution. The slowest dissolution occurs to either (0 0 1) or (0 1 0) faces depending on the bond energies of Si-(O)-Si ( ΦSi-O-Si/ kT) and Al-(O)-Si ( ΦAl-O-Si/ kT). When the ratio of ΦSi-O-Si/ kT to ΦAl-O-Si/ kT changes from 6:3 to 7:5, the dissolution rates of three primary faces change from the trend of (1 0 0) > (0 1 0) > (0 0 1) to the trend of (1 0 0) > (0 0 1) > (0 1 0). The rate difference between faces becomes more distinct and accordingly edge rounding becomes more significant. Feldspar nanoparticles also experience an increasing degree of edge rounding from far-from-equilibrium to close-to-equilibrium. Furthermore, we assessed the connection between the continuous morphological modification and the variation in the bulk dissolution rate during the dissolution of a single feldspar particle. Different normalization treatments equivalent to the commonly used mass, cube assumption, sphere assumption, geometric surface area, and reactive

  3. Nutrient digestibility response to sugarcane bagasse addition and corn particle size in normal and high Na diets for broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheravii, S K; Swick, R A; Choct, M; Wu, S-B

    2018-04-01

    Improving diet digestibility is important to the broiler industry. Therefore, this study focused on optimizing the physical structure of feed ingredients and addition of dietary fiber as strategies to improve nutrient digestibility in low and high sodium diets. A total of 672 day-old Ross 308 male broilers was allocated to 48 pens using a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 2 particle sizes of corn (coarse 3,576 μm or fine 1,113 μm geometric mean diameter), 2 levels of sugarcane bagasse (SB) (0 or 2%), and 2 levels of Na (0.16 or 0.4%). Protein digestibility coefficient was measured using pooled distal ileal digesta of 3 birds per pen on d 24. Meanwhile, starch and gross energy digestibility coefficients were measured using pooled duodenal, distal jejunal, and distal ileal digesta of 3 birds per pen on d 24. Coarsely ground corn (CC) resulted in improved ileal protein digestibility (P digestibility in the duodenum (P digestibility in distal ileum (P digestibility (P digestibility only in birds fed the diet with finely ground corn (FC) and 0.16% Na. These findings demonstrate that SB and CC are able to improve nutrient digestibility. It can be recommended for the poultry industry to use SB and coarsely ground corn in feed to improve the utilization of nutrients.

  4. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique.

  5. The NASA POWER SSE: Deriving the Direct Normal Counterpart from the CERES SYN1deg Hourly Global Horizontal Irradiance during Early 2000 to Near Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Westberg, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Prediction of Worldwide Energy Resource (POWER) Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) provides solar direct normal irradiance (DNI) data as well as a variety of other solar parameters. The currently available DNIs are monthly means on a quasi-equal-area grid system with grid boxes roughly equivalent to 1 degree longitude by 1 degree latitude around the equator from July 1983 to June 2005, and the data were derived from the GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) monthly mean global horizontal irradiance (GHI, Release 3) and regression analysis of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) data. To improve the quality of the DNI data and push the temporal coverage of the data to near present, we have applied a modified version of the DIRINDEX global-to-beam model to the GEWEX SRB (Release 3) all-sky and clear-sky 3-hourly GHI data and derived their DNI counterparts for the period from July 1983 to December 2007. The results have been validated against the BSRN data. To further expand the data in time to near present, we are now applying the DIRINDEX model to the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The CERES SYN1deg (Edition 4A) offers hourly all-sky and clear-sky GHIs on a 1 degree longitude by 1 degree latitude grid system from March 2000 to October 2016 as of this writing. Comparisons of the GHIs with their BSRN counterparts show remarkable agreements. Besides the GHIs, the inputs will also include the atmospheric water vapor and surface pressure from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and the aerosol optical depth from the Max-Planck Institute Climatology (MAC-v1). Based on the performance of the DIRINDEX model with the GEWEX SRB GHI data, we expect at least equally good or even better results. In this paper, we will show the derived hourly, daily, and monthly mean DNIs from the CERES SYN1deg hourly GHIs from March 2000 to October 2016 and how they compare with the BSRN data.

  6. Statistical Study in the mid-altitude cusp region: wave and particle data comparison using a normalized cusp crossing duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, B.; Escoubet, C. P.; Pitout, F.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E.

    2009-04-01

    In the mid altitude cusp region the DC magnetic field presents a diamagnetic cavity due to intense ion earthward flux coming from the magnetosheath. A strong ultra low frequency (ULF) magnetic activity is also commonly observed in this region. Most of the mid altitude cusp statistical studies have focused on the location of the cusp and its dependence and response to solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, dipole tilt angle parameters. In our study we use the database build by Pitout et al. (2006) in order to study the link of wave power in the ULF range (0.35-10Hz) measured by STAFF SC instrument with the ion plasma properties as measured by CIS (and CODIF) instrument as well as the diamagnetic cavity in the mid-altitude cusp region with FGM data. To compare the different crossings we don`t use the cusp position and dynamics but we use a normalized cusp crossing duration that permits to easily average the properties over a large number of crossings. As usual in the cusp, it is particularly relevant to sort the crossings by the corresponding interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation in order to analyse the results. In particular we try to find out what is the most relevant parameter to link the strong wave activity with. The global statistic confirms previous single case observations that have noticed a simultaneity between ion injections and wave activity enhancements. We will also present results concerning other ion parameters and the diamagnetic cavity observed in the mid altitude cusp region.

  7. G2M arrest and apoptosis in murine T lymphoma cells following exposure to 212Bi alpha particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palayoor, S.T.; Humm, J.L.; Macklis, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Asynchronous exponentially growing EL4 murine T lymphoma cells were exposed either to high LET α-radiation from 212 Bi-DTPA or to γ-radiation from a 137 Cs source. Radiation-induced cell cycle perturbation was studied by flow cytometry. Alpha irradiation, like γ, transiently arrested cells in the G2M phase in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum percentages of cells accumulated in G2M 18 h after α- and γ-irradiation were comparable, though the dose-response relationships differed. The ''RBE'' value for G2M block for α- versus γ-radiation was approx. 4. (author)

  8. Membrane-Dependent Bystander Effect Contributes to Amplification of the Response to Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Targeted and Nontargeted Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanot, Maite; Hoarau, Jim; Carriere, Marie; Angulo, Jaime F.; Khodja, Hicham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response. This study investigated their origin as well as their temporal and spatial impacts in the bystander effect. Methods and Materials: We employed a precise alpha-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of subconfluent osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). γH2AX-53BP1 foci, oxidative metabolism changes, and micronuclei induction in targeted and bystander cells were assessed. Results: Cellular membranes and mitochondria were identified as two distinct reactive oxygen species producers. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after cells were treated with filipin, evidence for the primal role of membrane in the bystander effect. To determine the membrane's impact at a cellular level, micronuclei yield was measured when various fractions of the cell population were individually targeted while the dose per cell remained constant. Induction of micronuclei increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells and was attenuated by filipin treatment, demonstrating a role for bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Conclusions: A complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals leads to a membrane-dependent amplification of cell responses that could influence therapeutic outcomes in tissues exposed to low doses or to environmental exposure.

  9. Determination of the structure and composition of Au-Ag bimetallic spherical nanoparticles using single particle ICP-MS measurements performed with normal and high temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéri, Albert; Kálomista, Ildikó; Ungor, Ditta; Bélteki, Ádám; Csapó, Edit; Dékány, Imre; Prohaska, Thomas; Galbács, Gábor

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the information that can be obtained by combining normal and high resolution single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) measurements for spherical bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) was assessed. One commercial certified core-shell Au-Ag nanoparticle and three newly synthesized and fully characterized homogenous alloy Au-Ag nanoparticle batches of different composition were used in the experiments as BNP samples. By scrutinizing the high resolution spICP-MS signal time profiles, it was revealed that the width of the signal peak linearly correlates with the diameter of nanoparticles. It was also observed that the width of the peak for same-size nanoparticles is always significantly larger for Au than for Ag. It was also found that it can be reliably determined whether a BNP is of homogeneus alloy or core-shell structure and that, in the case of the latter, the core comprises of which element. We also assessed the performance of several ICP-MS based analytical methods in the analysis of the quantitative composition of bimetallic nanoparticles. Out of the three methods (normal resolution spICP-MS, direct NP nebulization with solution-mode ICP-MS, and solution-mode ICP-MS after the acid dissolution of the nanoparticles), the best accuracy and precision was achieved by spICP-MS. This method allows the determination of the composition with less than 10% relative inaccuracy and better than 3% precision. The analysis is fast and only requires the usual standard colloids for size calibration. Combining the results from both quantitative and structural analyses, the core diameter and shell thickness of core-shell particles can also be calculated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Coordination of the Ser2056 and Thr2609 Clusters of DNA-PKcs in Regulating Gamma Rays and Extremely Low Fluencies of Alpha-Particle Irradiation to G0/G1 Phase Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Lin, Yu-Fen; Kato, Takamitsu A; Brogan, John R; Shih, Hung-Ying; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C; Little, John B

    2017-02-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) and its kinase activity are critical for mediation of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells after gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, DNA-PKcs phosphorylations at the T2609 cluster and the S2056 cluster also affect DSB repair and cellular sensitivity to gamma radiation. Previously we reported that phosphorylations within these two regions affect not only NHEJ but also homologous recombination repair (HRR) dependent DSB repair. In this study, we further examine phenotypic effects on cells bearing various combinations of mutations within either or both regions. Effects studied included cell killing as well as chromosomal aberration induction after 0.5-8 Gy gamma-ray irradiation delivered to synchronized cells during the G 0 /G 1 phase of the cell cycle. Blocking phosphorylation within the T2609 cluster was most critical regarding sensitization and depended on the number of available phosphorylation sites. It was also especially interesting that only one substitution of alanine in each of the two clusters separately abolished the restoration of wild-type sensitivity by DNA-PKcs. Similar patterns were seen for induction of chromosomal aberrations, reflecting their connection to cell killing. To study possible change in coordination between HRR and NHEJ directed repair in these DNA-PKcs mutant cell lines, we compared the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by very low fluencies of alpha particles with mutant cells defective in the HRR pathway that is required for induction of SCEs. Levels of true SCEs induced by very low fluence of alpha-particle irradiation normally seen in wild-type cells were only slightly decreased in the S2056 cluster mutants, but were completely abolished in the T2609 cluster mutants and were indistinguishable from levels seen in HRR deficient cells. Again, a single substitution in the S2056 together with a single

  11. Bactericidal effect of blue LED light irradiated TiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles on fish pathogen in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, T.C. [Department of Tropical Agriculture and International Cooperation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Yao, K.S. [Department of Horticulture, National Taitung Junior College, Taiwan (China); Yeh, N. [Mingdao University, Taiwan (China); Chang, C.I. [Aquaculture Division, Fisheries Research Institute, Council of Agriculture, Taiwan (China); Hsu, H.C. [Department of Life Science, Mingdao University, Taiwan (China); Gonzalez, F. [Department of Tropical Agriculture and International Cooperation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Chang, C.Y., E-mail: cyc1136@yahoo.com.tw [Center of General Education, National Taitung Junior College, Taiwan (China)

    2011-05-31

    This study uses blue LED light ({lambda}{sub max} = 475 nm) activated TiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles to evaluate the particles' photocatalytic activity efficiency and bactericidal effects in seawater of variable salinities. Different TiO{sub 2} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} mole ratios have been synthesized using sol-gel method. The synthesized particles contain mainly anatase TiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and FeTiO{sub 3}. The study has identified TiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}'s bactericidal effect to marine fish pathogen (Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida BCRC17065) in seawater. The SEM photo reveals the surface destruction in bacteria incubated with blue LED irradiated TiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The result of this study indicates that 1) TiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} acquires photocatalytic activities in both the freshwater and the seawater via blue LED irradiation, 2) higher photocatalytic activities appear in solutions of higher TiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} mole ratio, and 3) photocatalytic activity decreases as salinity increases. These results suggest that the energy saving blue LED light is a feasible light source to activate TiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} photocatalytic activities in both freshwater and seawater.

  12. Efecto de la espiral normal en el movimiento vortiginoso con partículas de bagazo de caña//Effect of normal spiral in the vortex movement with small sugar cane bagasse particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Francisco Bombino-Matos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Debido a la importancia que adquiere cada vez más el bagazo de caña, se estudia el movimiento vortiginoso de sus partículas transportadas por un gas y se comparan los resultados obtenidos experimentalmente con los simulados mediante un modelo matemático. La formación de la espiral se clasificó de tres formas, obteniéndose la velocidad y caída de presión en cada caso a través de un diseño de experimentos factorial multinivel con una réplica. Como variable dependiente cualitativa se tomó la formación de la espiral normal y como variables independientes cuantitativas la velocidad del gas, el tamaño de partículas y la concentración de la mezcla, obteniéndose una correlación que ajustó con84.64%. Se determinó el tamaño de muestra para comparar los valores de velocidades del gas y caídas de presión obtenidos experimentalmente con los simulados, los resultados experimentales cumplen una distribución normal y el modelo simula el proceso con error aceptable ingenierilmente.Palabras claves: movimiento de vórtice, secado neumático de bagazo, modelo matemático.______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe vortex movement of sugar cane bagasse carry by a gas is study and the results obtained in the laboratory are compared with the ones simulated through a mathematical model. The formation of the hairspring was classified in three ways, being obtained the speed and fall of pressure in each case througha design of multilevel factorial experiments with a replica. The formation of the normal hairspring was taken as qualitative dependent variable, and as quantitative independent variables, the gas speed, particles sizeand the mixture concentration were taken, being obtained a correlation that adjusted with 84.64%. The sample size was determined to compare the values of gas speed and the falls of pressure experimentally obtained with those obtained by the simulation, the experimental results

  13. Characteristics of the behavior of rare-earth oxides and composites on their base by charged particles and neutrons irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuseev, T.; Aksenova, T.I.; Berdauletov, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    In this work the results of comparative investigation of adsorption curves versus REM order number (La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Gd) and dose neutron irradiation are presented. It is discovered that the original REM oxides have high adsorption capacity both for donor gases and for acceptor ones. The adsorption capacity for oxygen and hydrogen becomes lower when the REM order number is higher, but it is contrary for water molecules. The obtained results showed that adsorption properties of REM oxides were changing on identical laws. But oxides of metals, having anomalous properties (variable valency, high cross-section capture) revealed especial adsorption properties under irradiation. In the time of consideration of possible mechanism of radiation - stimulated gas adsorption on oxide surface it is necessary to take in attention both the formation of radiation defects in crystal lattice and the characteristics of electron structure and presence of 4 f - cover in rare-earth metals

  14. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 2. Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Kangasluoma, J.; Wimmer, D.; Vuollekoski, H.; Schobesberger, S.; Lehtipalo, K.; Flagan, R. C.; Brus, D.; Donahue, N. M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Dunne, E. M.; Guida, R.; Henschel, H.; Junninen, H.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Määttänen, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Nieminen, T.; Onnela, A.; Praplan, A. P.; Riccobono, F.; Rondo, L.; Steiner, G.; Tome, A.; Walther, H.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K. S.; Dommen, J.; Hansel, A.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Vrtala, A.; Wagner, P. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-09-04

    We report comprehensive, demonstrably contaminant‐free measurements of binary particle formation rates by sulfuric acid and water for neutral and ion‐induced pathways conducted in the European Organization for Nuclear Research Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber. The recently developed Atmospheric Pressure interface‐time of flight‐mass spectrometer was used to detect contaminants in charged clusters and to identify runs free of any contaminants. Four parameters were varied to cover ambient conditions: sulfuric acid concentration (105 to 109 mol cm−3), relative humidity (11% to 58%), temperature (207 K to 299 K), and total ion concentration (0 to 6800 ions cm−3). Formation rates were directly measured with novel instruments at sizes close to the critical cluster size (mobility size of 1.3 nm to 3.2 nm). We compare our results with predictions from Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by Quantum Chemical calculation (QC‐normalized CNT), which is described in a companion pape...

  15. Analysis of the Variation of Energetic Electron Flux with Respect to Longitude and Distance Normal to the Magnetic Equatorial Plane for Galileo Energetic Particle Detector Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimm, R.; Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Evans, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this study we examine ten-minute omni-directional averages of energetic electron data measured by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD). Count rates from electron channels B1, DC2, and DC3 are evaluated using a power law model to yield estimates of the differential electron fluxes from 1 MeV to 11 MeV at distances from the planet Jupiter from 8 to 28 Jupiter radii. Whereas the orbit of the Galileo spacecraft remained close to the rotational equatorial plane of Jupiter, the approximately 11 degree tilt of the magnetic axis of Jupiter relative to its rotational axis allowed the EPD instrument to sample high energy electrons at limited distances normal to the magnetic equatorial plane. We present a Fourier analysis of the semi-diurnal variation of electron radiation with longitude. We also develop a model of the electron flux with respect to distance normal to the magnetic equatorial plane as a function of the distance from Jupiter.

  16. High sensitivity but normal DNA-repair activity after UV irradiation in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Orii, T.

    1980-01-01

    We established lymphoblastoid cell lines from 2 children with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), 2 xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients and control donors after transformation of peripheral lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We used these lymphoblastoid cell lines to investigate repair activity after ultraviolet irradiation. Cell survival of both CHS lymphoblastoid cell lines after irradiation by UV and treatment by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) fell between those of the XP and control cells lines. Unscheduled DNA synthesis of CHS cells after UV irradiation occured at rates similar to those of control cells. (orig.)

  17. Ultrastructural and cytochemical study of membrane alterations in x-irradiated liver tissue from normal and vitamin E-deficient ducklings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijbers, W.A.R.; Oosterbaan, J.A.; Meskendorp-Haarsma, T.J.; Hardonk, M.J.; Molenaar, I.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation into the differential susceptibility of liver cellular membranes to peroxidative processes has been performed, using x irradiation on the liver surface, resulting in a a 3-mm penetrating gradient of membrane damage. Ultrastructural, cytochemical, and histochemical findings in this area point to a differential sensitivity of cellular membranes to x irradiation. The plasma membrane and the lysosomal membrane, containing much lipid and cholesterol and little membrane and the lysosomal membrane, containing much lipid and cholesterol and little vitamin E, are highly susceptible to x irradiation. Less sensitive are the membranes of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, containing relatively much vitamin E and proteins and a lower amount of lipids and cholesterol

  18. Emulation of neutron irradiation effects with protons: validation of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Busby, J.T.; Allen, T.; Kenik, E.A.; Jensson, A.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Edwards, A.D.; Scott, P.M.; Andreson, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    denuded zones were only observed in neutron-irradiated samples. No cavities were observed for either irradiating particle. For both irradiating particles, hardening increased with dose for both heats, showing a more rapid increase and approach to saturation for heat B. In normal oxygenated water chemistry (NWC) at 288 deg. C, stress corrosion cracking in the 304 alloy was first observed at about 1.0 dpa and increased with dose. The 316 alloy was remarkably resistant to IASCC for both particle types. In hydrogen treated, de-oxygenated water (HWC), proton-irradiated samples of the 304 alloy exhibited IG cracking at 1.0 dpa compared to about 3.0 dpa for neutron-irradiated samples, although differences in specimen geometry, test condition and test duration can account for this difference. Cracking in heat P in HWC occurred at about 5.0 dpa for both irradiating particles. Thus, in all aspects of radiation effects, including grain boundary microchemistry, dislocation loop microstructure, radiation hardening and SCC behavior, proton-irradiation results were in good agreement with neutron-irradiation results, providing validation of the premise that the totality of neutron-irradiation effects can be emulated by proton irradiation of appropriate energy

  19. Differences in photoluminescence properties and thermal degradation between nanoparticle and bulk particle BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors under UV?VUV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bitao; Xin, Shuangyu; Li, Fenghua; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-05-01

    BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BAM) phosphors used for plasma display panels and three-band fluorescence lamps are exposed to an oxidizing environment at about 500 degrees C, which is currently unavoidable in actual applications. We investigated the mechanism of the luminance degradation of BAM caused by annealing at 500 degrees C based on the difference in luminance degradation of bulk particle and nanoparticle samples under various excitation source irradiations. When the samples were excited by the different light sources, more than 30% degradation of luminance occurred under 147 nm while less than 10% degradation occurred under 254 nm both for nanoparticle and bulk particle samples. In addition, the luminescence degradation of nanophosphors shows a different tendency compared to the bulk phosphors. With a model based on the particle size and excitation light penetration depth, we demonstrate that the degradation is still mainly ascribed to the oxidized of divalent Eu. The differences in luminescence properties between nanophosphors and bulk phosphors are also illustrated by this model. As a result, the potential industrial applications of nanophosphors are evaluated.

  20. Probabilistic methods for the simulation of fuel particles behavior under irradiation; Apport des methodes probabilistes dans la simulation du comportement sous irradiation du combustible a particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannamela, C

    2007-09-15

    This work is devoted to the evaluation of mathematical expectations in the context of structural reliability. We seek a failure probability estimate (that we assume low), taking into account the uncertainty of influential parameters of the System. Our goal is to reach a good compromise between the accuracy of the estimate and the associated computational cost. This approach is used to estimate the failure probability of fuel particles from a HTR-type nuclear reactor. This estimate is obtain by means of costly numerical simulations. We consider different probabilistic methods to tackle the problem. First, we consider a variance reducing Monte Carlo method: importance sampling. For the parametric case, we propose adaptive algorithms in order to build a series of probability densities that will eventually converge to optimal importance density. We then present several estimates of the mathematical expectation based on this series of densities. Next, we consider a multi-level method using Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm. Finally, we turn our attention to the related problem of quantile estimation (non extreme) of physical output from a large-scale numerical code. We propose a controlled stratification method. The random input parameters are sampled in specific regions obtained from surrogate of the response. The estimation of the quantile is then computed from this sample. (author)

  1. Effect of repeated addition of irradiated and normal sewage sludges on the uptake of macro - and micronutrients by wheat and sunflower crops grown successively on an inceptisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, V.; Patel, D.U.; Athalye, V.V.; D'Souza, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    Microplot field experiments were conducted to evaluate the uptake of macro - and micronutrients by wheat (Triticum sativum L. cv. Kalyan Sona) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Morden) as 5th and 6th crops. respectively, grown on an inceptisol amended with normal sewage sludge (NSS) and irradiated sewage sludge (ISS) at the application rates of 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 t ha -1 . Results indicated no significant differences in the dry matter yield (DMY) between the various treatments of either shoot or grain of both the crops. In general DMY of shoot was more than that of grain and also the DMY of wheat crop was more than that of sunflower. Data on the N, P, K contents of the two crops revealed no significant differences at the different treatments of both NSS and ISS; however, the different levels of NSS and ISS significantly enhanced the shoot N content of wheat, whereas grain P content of sunflower was significantly reduced. Nitrogen and P uptake in grain was higher than that of shoot of both the crops, but reverse was true for K. In general, N and P contents were higher in sunflower crop as compared to wheat crop and the opposite trend was obtained for K content. Results on the micronutrient contents of the two crops indicated an enhancement in the Cu and Zn contents of wheat crop by both NSS and ISS at different rates of application. Copper and Mn contents in wheat shoot were higher than that of wheat grain and the reverse was obtained for Zn. Copper, Zn and Mn contents of wheat shoot were lower than that of previous crops. Data on the micronutrient contents of sunflower crop indicated no significant differences between the different levels of NSS and ISS application. Manganese content of sunflower grain was higher than that of shoot and the opposite trend was noticed for Cu and Zn. Soil analysis after harvest of wheat crop indicated a significant enhancement in the soil characteristics such as pH, organic C and total N due to various levels of NSS and ISS

  2. Differential expression of genome in the progeny doubling 40 generations of normal human liver cells irradiated by 60Co γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Yahui; Wang Fang; Geng Xiaohua; Wang Xiaoli; Li Jianguo; Wang Zhongwen; Tong Jian

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the differential expression of genome in nomal human liver cell irradiated by 60 Co γ rays, cDNA chip was applied to assay the alterations of transcriptional profile of nomal human liver cell'rogeny exposed to 4 Gy and 8 Gy of γ ray from 60 Co. Then Quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm the commonly changed genes including VTN and INSIG1. The results demonstrated that the transcription level of 58 genes changed in the progeny of survival cells irradiated by 4 Gy γ rays, while 882 genes changed in the progeny of survival cells irradiated by 8 Gy γ rays. 16 genes changed in these cells irradiated by both 4 and 8 Gy γ rays. The transcription level was correlated to the original irradiation dose. Most of the genes were associated with transduction, cell cycle regulation, cellular immunity, cytoskeleton and movement, cell replication and repair mechanism, etc. The changed transcriptional level was further confirmed by RT-PCR assay for some of these genes. The results showed that differential expression of genome irradiated by different doses of γ rays. These results offer the fundamental materials for the research of genomic instability induced by radiation on the molecular level. (authors)

  3. INVESTIGATION OF NONAXISYMMETRIC STRESS STATE FOR QUASI-STATIC THERMAL POWER LOADING UNDER CONDITIONS OF HIGHEST-ENERGY PARTICLE IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chigarev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a virtual modeling 2D(r, θ for deformation of singly-connected cylindrical solid under conditions of thermo-irradiation impact. Influence of a circumferential distortion on nonaxisymmetric strain-stress state for various values of temperature amplitudes has been investigated in the paper. A solid cylinder  with internal heat sources has been considered as a model body. Properties of the model body correspond to cermet fuel (40 % UO2 + 60 % Cr. 

  4. Interactions of secondary particles with thorium samples in the setup QUINTA irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khushvaktov, J., E-mail: khushvaktov@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics ASRU, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adam, J. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR PRI (Czech Republic); Baldin, A.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Advanced Studies “OMEGA”, Dubna (Russian Federation); Chilap, V.V. [Center of Physical and Technical Projects “Atomenergomash”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Furman, V.I.; Sagimbaeva, F.; Solnyshkin, A.A.; Stegailov, V.I.; Tichy, P.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.M.; Tyutyunnikov, S.I.; Vespalec, R. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Vrzalova, J. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR PRI (Czech Republic); Yuldashev, B.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Physics ASRU, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Wagner, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR PRI (Czech Republic); Zavorka, L.; Zeman, M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The natural uranium assembly, QUINTA, was irradiated with 6 GeV deuterons. The {sup 232}Th samples were placed at the central axis of the setup QUINTA. The spectra of gamma rays emitted by the activated {sup 232}Th samples have been analysed and more than one hundred nuclei produced have been identified. For each of those products, reaction rates have been determined. The ratio of the weight of produced {sup 233}U to {sup 232}Th is presented. Experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations by FLUKA code.

  5. Interactions of secondary particles with thorium samples in the setup QUINTA irradiated with 6-GeV deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khushvaktov, J.H.; Yuldashev, B.S.; Adam, J.; Vrzalova, J.; Baldin, A.A.; Chilap, V.V.; Furman, V.I.; Sagimbaeva, F.; Solnyshkin, A.A.; Stegailov, V.I.; Tichy, P.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.M.; Tyutyunnikov, S.I.; Vespalec, R.; Zavorka, L.; Wagner, V.; Zeman, M.

    2016-01-01

    The natural uranium assembly, QUINTA, was irradiated with 6-GeV deuterons. The 232 Th samples were placed at the central axis of the setup QUINTA. The spectra of gamma rays emitted by the activated 232 Th samples have been analysed, and more than one hundred nuclei produced have been identified. For each of those products, reaction rates have been determined. The ratio of the weight of produced 233 U to that of 232 Th is presented. Experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA code. [ru

  6. Apparatus for real-time size and speed measurements of blow-off particles from pulsed irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Benken, C.; Johnson, E.A.; Nordberg, M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present an apparatus capable of detecting micron sized particles traveling at speeds up to 10 6 cm/sec. The apparatus uses light scattering methods with automated data processing. Data generated by this apparatus should be extremely useful in radiation damage studies of components in contamination sensitive optical systems

  7. A cytochemical study of histones in the muscular cells of Triturus cristatus limbs in normal regeneration of limbs irradiated by X-rays, of irradiated limbs in which the regenerative power is restored by cartilage implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desselle, J.-C.

    1976-01-01

    The muscular cells of regenerating limbs and of limbs in which regenerative power is restored, show an important decrease in the amount of cytophotometrically detected histones. This decrease is owing to the arginine rich fraction and to the lysine rich fraction. The muscular cells of irradiated limbs show a decrease in the amount of histones. This decrease is owing only to the arginine rich fraction and continues after the thirtieth day of irradiation and amputation [fr

  8. Antioxidant ability and radiosensitivity in malignant transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line BEP2D induced by α-particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Qiao; Zhang Wei; Wang Chunyan; Su Xu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antioxidant ability and radiosensitivity in the malignant transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line BEP2D induced by α-particle exposure. Methods: Glutathione Peroxidase (GPX), Catalase (CAT) and Glutathione (GSH) assay kits were employed to detect GPX and CAT enzyme abilities and the levels of GSH in BEP2D, RH21 (passage 21 of α-particle-irradiated BEP2D cells), and BERP35T-1 cells (derived from nude mice bearing malignant transformed cells generated from cells of passage 35 of α-particle-irradiated BEP2D cells). MTT assay were used to test the growth rate of BEP2D, RH21 and BERP35T-1 cells treated with 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 μmoL/L H 2 O 2 . Colony-forming test and MTT assay were used to examine the cell survival fraction and the growth rate of BEP2D, RH21 and BERP35T-1 cells exposed to 0, 2, 4, and 8 Gy of γ-rays,respectively. Results: GPX and CAT enzyme activities in RH21 and BERP35T-1 cells were obviously lower than in BEP2D (t=5.75-67.92, P<0.05). CAT enzyme activity in BERP35T-1 was lower than that in RH21 cells (t=22.25, P<0.01). Compared to BEP2D cells, decreased level of GSH was detected in BERP35T-1 cells (t=7.76, P<0.05), but there was no change in RH21. After treatment with 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 μmol/L H 2 O 2 , the growth rates of BEP2D were all higher than those of BERP35T-1 cells (t=10.37-58.36, P<0.01). Meanwhile,the growth rates of BEP2D were all higher than those of RH21 cells after treatment with 60, 90, 120, and 150 μ mol/L H 2 O 2 (t =29.90-84.68, P<0.01). In addition,compared to BEP2D cells,decreased cell survival fraction and growth rate of BERP35T-1 cells were observed after irradiation with 2, 4, and 8 Gy of y-rays (t=5.87-34.17, P<0.05). The cell survival fraction and growth rate of RH21 were all lower than those of BEP2D cells at 4 and 8 Gy post-irradiation (t=6.33- 45.00, P<0.05). Conclusion: The function of antioxidant system decreased in the α-particle-induced transformed cells

  9. In Situ Gamma Irradiation and Thermal Treatment Effects on the Static Bending Properties of Particle boards Based on Waste Materials and Different Adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khafaga, M.R.; El-Naggar, A.M.; Zahran, A.H.; Kandeel, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle boards based on different waste materials and different polymers as adhesives have been prepared by compression molding in a hot press at 120 degree and constant pressure. The used waste materials were cotton stalks, flax stalks and wood saw-dust whereas urea formaldehyde (UF), polystyrene (PS) and the epoxy resins 103 (E 103) and 150 (E 150) were used as adhesives. The thermally treated particleboard woods were subsequently exposed to gamma radiation. The static bending parameters of the different factors that may affect the mechanical properties such as irradiation dose, time of thermal treatment and adhesive content were also investigated. In general it was found that the highest mechanical properties of the unirradiated woods were obtained when the preparation was carried out under hot press for 20 min and the adhesive content was 20 wt.% (based on weight of waste material). The obtained results showed that the mechanical properties were greatly increased with increasing irradiation dose from 3 to 5 Mrad. Meanwhile, particleboard based on cotton or flax stalks and the epoxy resins 103 and 150 displayed higher mechanical properties than these based on wood saw-dust and the same adhesives

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  11. Measurement of charged particle yields from PMMA irradiated by a 220 MeV/u12Cbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Piersanti, L; Bini, FU. Rome La Sapienza (main); Collamati, F; De Lucia, E; Durante, M; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Iarocci, E; La Tessa, C; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Patera, V; Ortega, P G; Sarti, A; Schuy, C; Sciubba, A; Vanstalle, M; Voena, C

    2014-01-01

    The radiation used in hadrontherapy treatments interacts with the patient body producing secondary particles, either neutral or charged, that can be used for dose and Bragg peak monitoring and to provide a fast feedback on the treatment plans. Recent results obtained from the authors on simplified setups (mono-energetic primary beams interacting with homogeneous tissue like target) have already indicated the correlation that exists between the flux of these secondaries coming from the target (e.g. protons and photons) and the position of the primary beam Bragg peak. In this paper, the measurements of charged particle fluxes produced by the interaction of a 220 MeV/u carbon ion beam at GSI, Darmstadt, with a polymethyl methacrylate target are reported. The emission region of protons (p), deuterons (d) and tritons (t) has been characterized using a drift chamber while the particle time-of-flight, used to compute the kinetic energy spectra, was measured with a LYSO scintillator.The energy released in the LYSO cr...

  12. Reaction of blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow to infusion of biogenic amines in normal and supralethally x-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermans, R.; Gerber, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    The responss of blood pressure and mesenteric blood flow were recorded during infusion of biogenic amines (noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, and histamine) to control and x-irradiated rats (first and third days after 2 kR x irradiation). Responses to different doses of the amines were evaluated, and the results obtained correspond to those seen in other species (e.g., an increase in pressure and a decrease in flow after dopamine, an increase in pressure and a decrease in flow after serotonin, a decrease in pressure and flow after acetylcholine, and a decrease in flow after serotonin, a decrease in pressure and flow after acetylcholine, and a decrease in pressure and an increase in flow after histamine). Irradiated animals are more responsive to pressure-raising agents, in particular to noradrenaline. They also have an altered dose-pressure response curve for dopamine

  13. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Peripheral nerves; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: les nerfs peripheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Dejean, C.; Sargos, P.; Kantor, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Huchet, A.; Mamou, N. [Service d' oncologie medicale et de radiotherapie, CHU Saint-Andre, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Loiseau, H. [Service de neurochirurgie, CHU Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2010-07-15

    Plexopathies and peripheral neuropathies appear progressively and with several years delay after radiotherapy. These lesions are observed principally after three clinical situations: supraclavicular and axillar irradiations for breast cancer, pelvic irradiations for various pathologies and limb irradiations for soft tissue sarcomas. Peripheral nerves and plexus (brachial and lumbosacral) are described as serial structures and are supposed to receive less than a given maximum dose linked to the occurrence of late injury. Literature data, mostly ancient, define the maximum tolerable dose to a threshold of 60 Gy and highlight also a great influence of fractionation and high fraction doses. For peripheral nerves, most frequent late effects are pain with significant differences of occurrence between 50 and 60 Gy. At last, associated pathologies (diabetes, vascular pathology, neuropathy) and associated treatments have probably to be taken into account as additional factors, which may increase the risk of these late radiation complications. (authors)

  14. Effect of Whole-Body X-Irradiation of the Synthesis of Individual Fatty Acids in Liver Slices from Normal and Fasted Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Hansen, Lisbeth Grænge; Faber, M.

    1965-01-01

    (1) Using (2-14C) acetate and (1-14C) butyrate as precursors, rat-liver fatty acids were synthesized in vitro and assayed by paper chromatography. (2) Whole-body x-irradiation induced a change in the synthetic pattern of hepatic fatty acids towards a relatively enhanced synthesis of palmitic acid....... (3) X-irradiation and fasting seem to have opposite effects on fatty-acid synthesis. X-irradiation counteracts the drop in total synthesis and the relatively enhanced synthesis of palmitoleic acid induced by fasting. The relative enhancement of palmitic-acid synthesis mentioned under (2) stands...... in contrast to the effect of fasting, which specifically decreases the hepatic synthesis of palmitic acid. (4) There is a general similarity between corresponding fatty-acid patterns based on synthesis from (2-14C) acetate and (1-14C) butyrate, respectively....

  15. Elaboration by ion implantation of cobalt nano-particles in silica layers and modifications of their properties by electron and swift heavy ion irradiations; Elaboration par implantation ionique de nanoparticules de cobalt dans la silice et modifications de leurs proprietes sous irradiation d'electrons et d'ions de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Orleans, C

    2003-07-15

    This work aims to investigate the capability of ion irradiations to elaborate magnetic nano-particles in silica layers, and to modify their properties. Co{sup +} ions have been implanted at 160 keV at fluences of 2.10{sup 16}, 5.10{sup 16} and 10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2}, and at temperatures of 77, 295 and 873 K. The dependence of the particle size on the implantation fluence, and more significantly on the implantation temperature has been shown. TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) observations have shown a mean diameter varying from 1 nm for implantations at 2.10{sup 16} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 77 K, to 9.7 nm at 10{sup 17} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 873 K. For high temperature implantations, two regions of particles appear. Simulations based on a kinetic 3-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method reproduce quantitatively the features observed for implantations. Thermal treatments induce the ripening of the particles. Electron irradiations at 873 K induce an important increase in mean particle sizes. Swift heavy ion irradiations also induce the ripening of the particles for low fluences, and an elongation of the particles in the incident beam direction for high fluences, resulting in a magnetic anisotropy. Mechanisms invoked in thermal spike model could also explain this anisotropic growth. (author)

  16. Elaboration by ion implantation of cobalt nano-particles in silica layers and modifications of their properties by electron and swift heavy ion irradiations; Elaboration par implantation ionique de nanoparticules de cobalt dans la silice et modifications de leurs proprietes sous irradiation d'electrons et d'ions de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Orleans, C

    2003-07-15

    This work aims to investigate the capability of ion irradiations to elaborate magnetic nano-particles in silica layers, and to modify their properties. Co{sup +} ions have been implanted at 160 keV at fluences of 2.10{sup 16}, 5.10{sup 16} and 10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2}, and at temperatures of 77, 295 and 873 K. The dependence of the particle size on the implantation fluence, and more significantly on the implantation temperature has been shown. TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) observations have shown a mean diameter varying from 1 nm for implantations at 2.10{sup 16} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 77 K, to 9.7 nm at 10{sup 17} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 873 K. For high temperature implantations, two regions of particles appear. Simulations based on a kinetic 3-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method reproduce quantitatively the features observed for implantations. Thermal treatments induce the ripening of the particles. Electron irradiations at 873 K induce an important increase in mean particle sizes. Swift heavy ion irradiations also induce the ripening of the particles for low fluences, and an elongation of the particles in the incident beam direction for high fluences, resulting in a magnetic anisotropy. Mechanisms invoked in thermal spike model could also explain this anisotropic growth. (author)

  17. The multiplication constant of a microorganism in a colony is normally reduced by irradiation, but still remains as a characteristic constant: a new approach to determining irradiation pasteurization doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarman, T.; Kiyak, N.

    1991-01-01

    This work is based on a previous observation and on a related mathematical modeling regarding the ‘linear growth’ of a colony of microorganisms under given conditions. We had previously shown that the growth rate of the colony is merely proportional to the ‘individual exponential multiplication constant’, β, of the microorganisms. Tiny colonies of penicillium are subjected to different doses of irradiation. The subsequent observation of the colonies' growth rate beautifully furnishes a measure of how the multiplication constant, β, of the microorganism is affected by irradiation. The plot of β with respect to the irradiation dose, shows a linear interdependence between the two quantities. The extrapolation of this plot easily yields the radiation pasteurization dose of the microorganisms in hand

  18. Measurements of neutron spectrum from stopping-length target irradiated by several tens-MeV/u particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Takada, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tanaka, Susumu; Shin, Kazuo; Ono, Shinji

    1997-03-01

    Using a Time-of-Flight technique, we have measured neutron spectra from stopping-length targets bombarded with 68-MeV protons and 100-MeV {alpha}-particles. The measured spectra were used to validate the results calculated by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) plus Statistical Decay Model (SDM). The results of QMD plus SDM code agreed fairly well with the experimental data for the light target. On the other hand, the QMD plus SDM gives a larger value than the experimental for the heavy target. (author)

  19. Differential post-irradiation caffeine response in normal diploid versus SV40-transformed human fibroblasts: potential role of nuclear organization and protein-composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Y.C.; Parsian, A.J.; Duncan, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the enhancement of cell killing by post-irradiation treatment with caffeine (CAF) is mediated by alterations in chromatin structure, several nuclear parameters were examined in both caffeine-responsive and non-responsive cell lines. (author)

  20. Differential post-irradiation caffeine response in normal diploid versus SV40-transformed human fibroblasts: potential role of nuclear organization and protein-composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Y.C.; Parsian, A.J.; Duncan, P.G. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine)

    1993-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that the enhancement of cell killing by post-irradiation treatment with caffeine (CAF) is mediated by alterations in chromatin structure, several nuclear parameters were examined in both caffeine-responsive and non-responsive cell lines. (author).

  1. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Testicles; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sain: les testicules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champetier, C.; Gross, E.; Zaccariotto, A.; Duberge, T.; Guerder, C. [Service de radiotherapie, hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France); Pointreau, Y. [Pole Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Ortholan, C. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Chauvet, B. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2010-07-15

    Although there is very little evidence for direct irradiation of the testes, they may receive significant doses, especially in the treatment of pelvic tumors in adults and in pediatrics. The exocrine function of the testis seems to be more sensitive to radiotherapy. There is a risk of sterility, even after low doses of radiation. In the adult or the child who has reached puberty, we should propose a self-preservation of semen prior to radiotherapy. In pre-pubescent children, the problem is more delicate. In all cases, it is necessary to limit the dose to the testicles without affecting the coverage of tumour volume. Patients and/or their care-givers should be systematically informed of the risk of infertility related to irradiation. (authors)

  3. Comparative study of Monte Carlo particle transport code PHITS and nuclear data processing code NJOY for PKA energy spectra and heating number under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Y.; Ogawa, T.

    2016-01-01

    The modelling of the damage in materials irradiated by neutrons is needed for understanding the mechanism of radiation damage in fission and fusion reactor facilities. The molecular dynamics simulations of damage cascades with full atomic interactions require information about the energy distribution of the Primary Knock on Atoms (PKAs). The most common process to calculate PKA energy spectra under low-energy neutron irradiation is to use the nuclear data processing code NJOY2012. It calculates group-to-group recoil cross section matrices using nuclear data libraries in ENDF data format, which is energy and angular recoil distributions for many reactions. After the NJOY2012 process, SPKA6C is employed to produce PKA energy spectra combining recoil cross section matrices with an incident neutron energy spectrum. However, intercomparison with different processes and nuclear data libraries has not been studied yet. Especially, the higher energy (~5 MeV) of the incident neutrons, compared to fission, leads to many reaction channels, which produces a complex distribution of PKAs in energy and type. Recently, we have developed the event generator mode (EGM) in the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System PHITS for neutron incident reactions in the energy region below 20 MeV. The main feature of EGM is to produce PKA with keeping energy and momentum conservation in a reaction. It is used for event-by-event analysis in application fields such as soft error analysis in semiconductors, micro dosimetry in human body, and estimation of Displacement per Atoms (DPA) value in metals and so on. The purpose of this work is to specify differences of PKA spectra and heating number related with kerma between different calculation method using PHITS-EGM and NJOY2012+SPKA6C with different libraries TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 for fusion relevant materials

  4. Reducing loss in lateral charged-particle equilibrium due to air cavities present in x-ray irradiated media by using longitudinal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, Shahid A.; Li, X. Allen; Ramahi, Shada W.; Chu, James C.; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2001-01-01

    The underdosing of lesions distal to air cavities, such as those found in upper respiratory passages, occurs due to the loss in lateral charged-particle equilibrium (CPE). The degree of underdosing worsens for smaller field sizes, resulting in more frequent recurrence of the cancer treated. Higher photon energies further aggravate the outcome by producing longer second build-up regions beyond the cavity. Besides underdosing, the larger lateral spread of secondary electron fluence in the air cavity produces diffuse dose distributions at the tissue-air interface for shaped or intensity modulated fields. These disequilibrium effects create undesirable deviations from the intended treatment. The clinical concern is further intensified by the failure of traditional treatment planning systems to even account for such defects. In this work, the use of longitudinal magnetic fields on the order of 0.5 T is proposed for alleviating lateral electronic disequilibrium due to the presence of air cavities in the irradiated volume. The magnetic field enforces lateral CPE by restricting the lateral range of electrons in the air cavity. The problem is studied in a simple water-air-water slab geometry using EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations for 6 MV photons. Electronic disequilibrium is evaluated for beams of various sizes, shapes and intensity distributions constructed by linear superposition of the dose distributions for 0.5x0.5 cm 2 beamlets. Comparison is also made with 60 Co irradiation. The results indicate that the lateral confinement of secondary electrons in the air cavity by sub-MRI strength longitudinal fields is effective in reducing deterioration of dose distributions near tissue-air interfaces. This can potentially reduce recurrence rates of cancers such as the larynx carcinoma

  5. Generation and alteration of the defects induced by particle irradiation and electromagnetic radiation in alkali halogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions between electron beams, CO 2 - laser radiation and alkali halogen compound have led to interesting results: 1. The development of two types of F-centre respectively in normal lattice or near the dislocations. 2. The beginning of metal colloids development process at low temperature when a thermal treatment is applied. 3. An experimental confirmation of the Pooley-Hersh model for crystal defects has been brought up. 4. The surface penetration is an explosive process. 5. Surface polygonizations were also investigated. A model has been proposed to describe the destructive channels development within alkali halogen crystals with molecular anions impurities of less than 10 ppm. KCl monocrystals of advanced purity level was prepared for building up passive optical components of strong CO 2 lasers. (author)

  6. The In Vitro Response of Tissue Stem Cells to Irradiation With Different Linear Energy Transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagle, Peter W; Hosper, Nynke A; Ploeg, Emily M; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A; Chiu, Roland K; Coppes, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: A reduction in the dose, irradiated volume, and sensitivity of, in particular, normal tissue stem cells is needed to advance radiation therapy. This could be obtained with the use of particles for radiation therapy. However, the radiation response of normal tissue stem cells is still an

  7. Fission-product behaviour during irradiation of TRISO-coated particles in the HFREU1bis experiment - HTR2008-58125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Groot, S.; Bakker, K.; Barrachin, M.; Dubourg, R.; Kissane, M.

    2008-01-01

    The irradiation experiment HFR-EU1bis, coordinated by the European Joint Research Centre - Inst. for Energy, was performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten to test five spherical HTR fuel pebbles of former German production with TRISO coated particles in conditions beyond the specifications of current HTR reactor designs (central temperature of 1250 deg. C). In this paper, the behaviour of the fission products (FPs) and kernel micro-structure evolution during the test are investigated. While FP behaviour is a key issue for potential source term evaluation it also determines the evolution of the oxygen potential in the oxide kernel which in turn is important for formation of carbon oxides (amoeba effect and pressurization). F