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Sample records for partial thickness tearing

  1. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  2. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Matthewson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized.

  3. Tear progression of symptomatic full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears as measured by repeated MRI.

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    Kim, Yang-Soo; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Chang Kyun

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the natural course of symptomatic full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears treated non-operatively and to identify risk factors affecting tear enlargement. One hundred and twenty-two patients who received non-surgical treatment for a partial- or full-thickness supraspinatus tear were included in this study. All rotator cuff tears were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the same modality was used for follow-up studies. Follow-up MRI was performed after at least a 6-month interval. We evaluated the correlation between tear enlargement and follow-up duration. Eleven risk factors were analysed by both univariate and multivariate analyses to identify factors that affect enlargement of rotator cuff tears. The mean follow-up period was 24.4 ± 19.5 months. Out of 122 patients, 34 (27.9%) patients had an initial full-thickness tear and 88 (72.1%) patients had a partial-thickness tear. Considering all patients together, tear size increased in 51/122 (41.8%) patients, was unchanged in 65/122 (53.3%) patients, and decreased in 6/122 (4.9%) patients. Tear size increased for 28/34 (82.4%) patients with full-thickness tears and 23/88 (26.1%) patients with partial-thickness tears. From the two groups which were followed over 12 months, a higher rate of enlargement was observed in full-thickness tears than in partial-thickness tears (6-12 months, n.s.; 12-24 months, P = 0.002; over 24 months, P rotator cuff tears and 23/88 (26.1%) of symptomatic partial-thickness tears increased in size over a follow-up period of 6-100 months. Full-thickness tears showed a higher rate of enlargement than partial-thickness tears regardless of the follow-up duration. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that full-thickness tear was the most reliable risk factor for tear enlargement. The clinical relevance of these observations is that full-thickness rotator cuff tears treated conservatively should be

  4. MRI in diagnosing partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    In this study 270 patients who had been treated for 10 years and had suspected rupture of the tendon and complete or partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff were diagnosed. Among these patients, MRI images in 50 cases were investigated to establish the diagnostic criteria for partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The rupture sites included the bursal surface in 15 shoulders, the articular surface in 30 shoulders, complicated cases of both surfaces in five shoulders with no intrasubstance. As for the imaging method, T2-weighted images were employed and the oblique coronary section, which is parallel to the scapula, was used as a imaging plane. From the results of the variation of the MRI signal intensity in the tendon, it was found that the signal intensity increased to 80% in the rupture of the bursal surface and 93.3% in the rupture of the articular surface. As for sites where the signals in the tendon increased, these were found at the bursal side in 83.3% of rupture at the bursal surface, and at the articular side in 100% of rupture at the articular surface. From these findings, the MRI-diagnostic criteria of partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff was defined as those cases which show a localized increase in signal intensity on the oblique coronary surface of T2 weighted images, but not in whole layers of the tendon. A high diagnostic rate with these criteria could be obtained with a sensitivity of 82.0%, specificity 90.9%, accuracy 84.7%, and positive predictive value 95.3%. (author)

  5. Comparisons of the Various Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears on MR Arthrography and Arthroscopic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Young Joo

    2010-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of the various types of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by comparing the MR imaging findings with the arthroscopic findings. The series of MR arthrography studies included 202 patients consisting of 100 patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 102 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, which were reviewed in random order. At arthroscopy, 54 articularsided, 26 bursal-sided, 20 both articular- and bursal-sided partial-thickness tears were diagnosed. The MR arthrographies were analyzed by two radiologists for articular-sided tears, bursal-sided tears, and both articular- and bursal-sided tears of the rotator cuff. The sensitivity and specificity of each type of partial-thickness tears were determined. Kappa statistics was calculated to determine the interand intra-observer agreement of the diagnosis of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The sensitivity and specificity of the various types of rotator cuff tears were 85% and 90%, respectively for articular-sided tears, 62% and 95% for bursal- sided tears, as well as 45% and 99% for both articular- and bursal-sided tears. False-negative assessments were primarily observed in the diagnosis of bursal-sided tears. Conversely, both articular- and bursal-sided tears were overestimated as full-thickness tears. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the diagnosis of articular-sided tears (k = 0.70), moderate (k = 0.59) for bursal-sided tears, and fair (k = 0.34) for both articular- and bursal-sided tears, respectively. Intra-observer agreement for the interpretation of articular- and bursal-sided tears was excellent and good, respectively, whereas intra-observer agreement for both articular- and bursal-sided tears was moderate. MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, but has limitations in that it has low sensitivity in bursal- and

  6. Comparisons of the Various Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears on MR Arthrography and Arthroscopic Correlation

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    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Young Joo [Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St.Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of the various types of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by comparing the MR imaging findings with the arthroscopic findings. The series of MR arthrography studies included 202 patients consisting of 100 patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 102 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, which were reviewed in random order. At arthroscopy, 54 articularsided, 26 bursal-sided, 20 both articular- and bursal-sided partial-thickness tears were diagnosed. The MR arthrographies were analyzed by two radiologists for articular-sided tears, bursal-sided tears, and both articular- and bursal-sided tears of the rotator cuff. The sensitivity and specificity of each type of partial-thickness tears were determined. Kappa statistics was calculated to determine the interand intra-observer agreement of the diagnosis of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The sensitivity and specificity of the various types of rotator cuff tears were 85% and 90%, respectively for articular-sided tears, 62% and 95% for bursal- sided tears, as well as 45% and 99% for both articular- and bursal-sided tears. False-negative assessments were primarily observed in the diagnosis of bursal-sided tears. Conversely, both articular- and bursal-sided tears were overestimated as full-thickness tears. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the diagnosis of articular-sided tears (k = 0.70), moderate (k = 0.59) for bursal-sided tears, and fair (k = 0.34) for both articular- and bursal-sided tears, respectively. Intra-observer agreement for the interpretation of articular- and bursal-sided tears was excellent and good, respectively, whereas intra-observer agreement for both articular- and bursal-sided tears was moderate. MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, but has limitations in that it has low sensitivity in bursal- and

  7. Transtendon, Double-Row, Transosseous-Equivalent Arthroscopic Repair of Partial-Thickness, Articular-Surface Rotator Cuff Tears

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    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Miller, Lindsay R.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-s...

  8. Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears: tendon quality as a prognostic factor for repair integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Jong Pil; Lyu, Seong Hwa; Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Se Bong

    2015-03-01

    The healing failure rate is high for partial-thickness or small full-thickness rotator cuff tears. To retrospectively evaluate and compare outcomes after arthroscopic repair of high-grade partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears and factors affecting rotator cuff healing. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Included in the study were 55 consecutive patients (mean age, 57.9 ± 7.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair for high-grade partial-thickness (n = 34) and small full-thickness (n = 21) rotator cuff tears. The study patients also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at least 6 months postoperatively, and their functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months). All partial-thickness tears were repaired after being converted to full-thickness tears; thus, the repair process was almost the same as for small full-thickness tears. The tendinosis of the torn tendon was graded from the MRI images using a 4-point scale, and the reliabilities were assessed. The outcomes between high-grade partial-thickness tears that were converted to small full-thickness tears and initially small full-thickness tears were compared, and factors affecting outcomes were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the tendinosis grade were good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.706 and 0.777, respectively). Failure to heal as determined by CTA was observed in 12 patients with a high-grade partial-thickness tear (35.3%; complete failure in 4 and partial failure in 8) and in 3 patients with a small full-thickness tear (14.3%; complete failure in 1 and partial failure in 2). The patients with high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears showed a higher tendinosis grade than did those with small full-thickness tears (P = .014), and the severity of the tendinosis was related to the failure to heal (P = .037). Tears with a higher tendinosis grade

  9. Transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilisio, Matthew F; Miller, Lindsay R; Higgins, Laurence D

    2014-10-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears. Direct visualization of the reduction of the retracted articular tendon layer to its insertion on the greater tuberosity is the key to the procedure. Linking the medial-row anchors and using a double-row construct provide a stable repair that allows early shoulder motion to minimize the risk of postoperative stiffness.

  10. Limited diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

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    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Schmitt, Cornelia; Haupert, Alexander; Kohn, Dieter; Lorbach, Olaf

    2017-12-01

    The reliable diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff is still elusive in clinical practise. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff as well as the combination of these parameters. 334 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies for rotator cuff pathologies performed during the time period between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively for the findings of common clinical signs for rotator cuff lesions and preoperative MR imaging. These were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as "gold standard". The reports of the MR imaging were evaluated with regard to the integrity of the rotator cuff. The Ellman Classification was used to define partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff in accordance with the arthroscopic findings. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. MR imaging showed 80 partial-thickness and 70 full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The arthroscopic examination confirmed 64 partial-thickness tears of which 52 needed debridement or refixation of the rotator cuff. Sensitivity for MR imaging to identify partial-thickness tears was 51.6%, specificity 77.2%, positive predictive value 41.3% and negative predictive value 83.7%. For the Jobe-test, sensitivity was 64.1%, specificity 43.2%, positive predictive value 25.9% and negative predictive value 79.5%. Sensitivity for the Impingement-sign was 76.7%, specificity 46.6%, positive predictive value 30.8% and negative predictive value 86.5%. For the combination of MR imaging, Jobe-test and Impingement-sign sensitivity was 46.9%, specificity 85.4%, positive predictive value 50% and negative predictive value 83.8%. The diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests (Jobe-test and Impingement-sign) alone is limited for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Additionally

  11. Operative management of partial-thickness tears of the proximal hamstring muscles in athletes.

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    Bowman, Karl F; Cohen, Steven B; Bradley, James P

    2013-06-01

    Partial tears of the hamstring muscle origin represent a challenging clinical problem to the patient and orthopaedic surgeon. Although nonoperative treatment is frequently met with limited success, there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of surgical management for partial proximal hamstring tears in the active and athletic population. To evaluate the results of an anatomic repair for partial tears of the hamstring muscle origin in athletes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The records of 17 patients with partial tears of the proximal hamstring origin were reviewed after institutional review board approval was obtained. All patients were treated with open debridement and primary tendon repair after failure of at least 6 months of nonoperative therapy. Clinical and operative records, radiographs, and magnetic resonance images were reviewed for all patients. A patient-reported outcomes survey was completed by 14 patients that included the Lower Extremity Functional Score (LEFS), Marx activity rating scale, custom LEFS and Marx scales, and subjective patient satisfaction scores. Early and late postoperative complications were recorded. There were 3 male and 14 female patients; their average age was 43 years (range, 19-64 years) and average follow-up was 32 months (range, 12-51 months). There were 2 collegiate athletes (field hockey, track), 14 amateur athletes (distance running, waterskiing, tennis), and a professional bodybuilder. Postoperative LEFS was 73.3 ± 9.9 (range, 50-80) and custom LEFS was 66.7 ± 17.0 (range, 37-80) of a maximum 80 points. The most commonly reported difficulty was with prolonged sitting and explosive direction change while running. The average Marx score was 6.5 ± 5.3 (range, 0-16) of a maximum 16, correlating with a greater return to recreational running activities in this patient cohort than regular participation in pivoting or cutting sports. Marx custom scores were 20 of a maximum 20 in all patients, demonstrating no disability in

  12. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using κ coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from κ=0.55 to κ=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from κ=0.79 and 0.53 to κ=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff tendon

  13. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

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    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Yang-Soo (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using kappa coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from kappa=0.55 to kappa=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from kappa=0.79 and 0.53 to kappa=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff

  14. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods TC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tom C Woods,4 Michael J Carroll,1 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Randa Berdusco,1 Stephen Sohmer,3 Richard S Boorman,1,2 Ian KY Lo1,21Department of Surgery, 2Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 4St Joseph's Hospital, Comox, BC, CanadaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA lesions.Patients and methods: Patients in the senior author's practice who had isolated PASTA lesions treated by transtendon rotator-cuff repair were included (n=8 and retrospectively reviewed. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at a mean of 21.2 months (±9.7 months postoperatively using standardized clinical evaluation (physical exam, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Simple Shoulder Test. All patients underwent postoperative imaging with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram.Results: There was a significant improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (42.7±17.5 to 86.9±25.2 and Simple Shoulder Test (4.6±3.2 to 10.1±3.8 scores from pre- to postoperative, respectively. Postoperative imaging demonstrated full-thickness medial cuff tearing in seven patients, and one patient with a persistent partial articular surface defect.Conclusion: Transtendon repair of PASTA lesions may lead to improvements in clinical outcome. However, postoperative imaging demonstrated a high incidence of full-thickness rotator-cuff defects following repair.Keywords: rotator cuff, PASTA lesion, transtendon repair

  15. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A.; Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der; Willems, W.J.; Bipat, Shandra

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  16. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

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    Schreinemachers, Saskia A. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willems, W.J. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Orthopaedic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra [University of Amsterdam (NL). Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  17. High-grade bursal-side partial rotator cuff tears: comparison of mid- and long-term results following arthroscopic repair after conversion to a full-thickness tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nuri; Karaismailoglu, Bedri

    2017-07-21

    Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are one of the leading causes of shoulder dysfunction. Successful results have been reported with different treatment techniques, but the long-term consequences of these procedures are not yet clearly known. The purposes of this study were to evaluate and compare the mid- and long-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopically repaired bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears and identify the possible effects of age, gender, and hand dominance on clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine patients who had undergone arthroscopic repair of a significant bursal-side PTRCT were functionally evaluated. The repair was made after conversion to a full-thickness tear. The average patient age was 55.2 years (range 35-69 years, SD ±7.6 years). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Constant Shoulder Score (CSS) and Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS pain) were used as outcome measures. The average CSS improved from 38.9 preoperatively to 89.2 and 87.8 at 2 and 5 years after surgery, respectively (p functional outcomes and VAS pain scores at 2 and 5 years after surgery compared with the preoperative period. The patients who underwent surgery from their non-dominant extremity showed a significantly higher CSS increase relative to those who underwent surgery on the dominant extremity (p = 0.022). Arthroscopic repair of high-grade bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears is a reliable surgical technique with good functional outcomes and pain relief both at mid- and long-term follow-ups. Surgery on the non-dominant side may be related to better functional outcomes.

  18. Accuracy of MR imaging in partial tears of rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Masao; Ito, Nobuyuki; Tomonaga, Tadashi; Harada, Shin'ichi; Rabbi, M.E.; Iwasaki, Katsuro

    1997-01-01

    MRI is very useful for the diagnosis of the rotator cuff tear However. in case of partial tears it is sometimes controvertible. In this study, we studied the accuracy of MRI in the diagnosis of partial tears. 67 patients who underwent MRI investigation before operation were chosen for this study. There were 61 males and 6 females, ranging from 30 to 80 years (mean: 54.8 years at the time of operation). MRI was performed with 1.5T superconductive system with shoulder surface coil. MPGR T2-weighted images were performed in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. Complete tears were diagnosed when full thickness high intensity was observed in the rotator cuff, whereas with partial high intensity of the rotator cuff, was considered as partial tears. MRI demonstrated 77.8% sensitivity, 91.4% specificity and 89.6% accuracy in the diagnosis of partial tear. In 8 cases MRI had misinterpretation. In MPGR T2-weighted images, not only the partial tears but the degenerative changes also show high intensity of the rotator cuff. Therefore, it is difficult to differentiate and maybe this is the reason of misinterpretations of partial tears by MRI. MRI provided with useful pre-operative informations of partial tears of the rotator cuff. However, in few cases it is hard to differentiate for the degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (author)

  19. Preservation of bursal-sided tendon in partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears: a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique.

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    Shin, Sang-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Yoon Sang; Kim, Rag Gyu

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique that spares the intact bursal-sided tendon in articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCT) and to present shoulder functional outcomes in patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT that involves more than 50 % of its thickness after arthroscopic repair using a novel technique. Eighteen patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT involving more than 50 % of the tendon's thickness underwent arthroscopic repair using a devised technique. The devised technique restores only the torn articular portion of the rotator cuff at the anatomical footprint using a suture anchor, and preserves the integrity of the corresponding bursal-sided tendon by tying knots at the most lateral bursal side on the subacromial space. Clinical and functional outcome using ASES and Constant scores were evaluated. The structural integrity of the rotator cuff was evaluated by MRI at 6 months postoperatively. Pain relief and shoulder functional outcomes were encouraging during the recovery phase after operation. ASES (preoperative 54.0 ± 10.3 to postoperative 92.6 ± 8.0), Constant score (61.2 ± 8.5-88.0 ± 5.3), VAS for pain (4.9 ± 2.6-0.6 ± 0.7) improved significantly after arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair (p rotator cuff retears on 6-month MRI. No complications related to surgical procedures had occurred. The devised technique of arthroscopic transtendon repair provided satisfactory functional outcomes without postoperative discomforts. This technique minimizes over-tightening of the articular layer and reduces tension mismatches between the articular and bursal layers, which are considered as important factors for improvement of postoperative shoulder motion.

  20. Single-leaf partial meniscectomy in extensive horizontal tears of the discoid lateral meniscus: Does decreased peripheral meniscal thickness affect outcomes? (Mean four-year follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Won; Chun, Yong-Min; Choi, Chong-Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Min; Han, Joon-Woo; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate whether single-leaf partial meniscectomy in horizontal tears along the entire discoid lateral meniscus has any advantages in clinical and radiological results compared with other meniscectomies in discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 145 patients with a horizontal tear pattern in symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-seven patients had undergone full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy (group A), 60 had undergone conventional partial meniscectomy (saucerization) maintaining peripheral meniscal height (group B), and 58 patients had undergone total meniscectomy (group C). Each patient was evaluated with the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective grading, and modified Kellgren-Lawrence grade in plain radiography at their last follow-up. Group C had inferior functional results to groups A and B on the Lysholm knee score and IKDC subjective score. There was no significant difference between groups A and B. Group C fared significantly worse than groups A and B (p=0.003, pmeniscus tears, the full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy group had no adverse results compared with the total meniscectomy group and was not significantly different compared to the conventional partial meniscectomy group. Cohort study. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament tear: comparison of MR features between complete and partial tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ki Young; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yu Jin; Rho, Eun Jin; Kim, Young Hoon; Yi, Jeong Geun; Ahn, Joong Mo

    1997-01-01

    To determine the MRI features which distinguish complete and partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and to thus improve MRI interpretation. In 80 patients, we analyzed MR findings of direct and indirect signs of ACL tear (complete tear, 61 cases, partial tear, 19 cases) confirmed by arthroscopy or surgery, and compared the relative incidence of each sign in cases of complete and partial tear. Direct and indirect signs were found in 61 (100%) and 60 cases (98.4%), respectively, in complete tears, but in 16 (84.2%) and 15 cases (78.9%), respectively, in partial tears. Poor visualization, discontinuity and hyperintensity were seen in all complete tears but in only nine cases (47.4%) of partial tear. A wavy or abnormal contour was seen in 53 cases (86.9%) of complete tear and 14 (73.7%) of partial tear. A wavy contour without other direct signs was seen in only five cases (26.3%) of partial tear. Three cases (15.8%) of partial tear showed normal MR finding. Indirect signs, i.e. abnormal ACL angle, abnormal ACL-Blumensaat line angle, abnormal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) line, abnormal PCL angle, PCL buckling, anterior displacement of tibia, posterior displacement of lateral meniscus, bone bruise, Segond fracture, tear of collateral ligaments, PCL, and tear of meniscus were commoner in complete than in partial tears. Two cases of O'Donoghue's triad and two of popliteus injury were seen only in complete tears. Direct and indirect signs of ACL tear were more commonly noted in complete than in partial tears. The latter showed MR features varying from normal to almost complete tear. We suggest that a wavy contour without other direct signs is indicative of a partial tear, and that O'Donoghue's triad and popliteus muscle injury are indirect signs of a complete tear

  2. Validity of GNRB® arthrometer compared to Telos™ in the assessment of partial anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, N; Bohu, Y; Naouri, J F; Klouche, S; Herman, S

    2014-02-01

    The main goal of this study was to compare the results of the GNRB(®) arthrometer to those of Telos™ in the diagnosis of partial thickness tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A prospective study performed January-December 2011 included all patients presenting with a partial or full-thickness ACL tears without ACL reconstruction and with a healthy contralateral knee. Anterior laxity was measured in all patients by the Telos™ and GNRB(®) devices. This series included 139 patients, mean age 30.7 ± 9.3 years. Arthroscopic reconstruction was performed in 109 patients, 97 for complete tears and 12 single bundle reconstructions for partial thickness tears. Conservative treatment was proposed in 30 patients with a partial thickness tear. The correlation between the two devices was evaluated by the Spearman coefficient. The optimal laxity thresholds were determined with ROC curves, and the diagnostic value of the tests was assessed by the area under the curve (AUC). The differential laxities of full and partial thickness tears were significantly different with the two tests. The correlation between the results of laxity measurement with the two devices was fair, with the strongest correlation between Telos™ 250 N and GNRB(®) 250 N (r = 0.46, p = 0.00001). Evaluation of the AUC showed that the informative value of all tests was fair with the best results with the GNRB(®) 250 N: AUC = 0.89 [95 % CI 0.83-0.94]. The optimal differential laxity threshold with the GNRB(®) 250 N was 2.5 mm (Se = 84 %, Sp = 81 %). The diagnostic value of GNRB(®) was better than Telos™ for ACL partial thickness tears.

  3. Can MRI distinguish between acute partial and complete anterior cruciate ligament tear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamato, Minoru; Yamagishi, Tsuneo.

    1996-01-01

    A study to elucidate the title problem was done. Subjects were 8 patients with partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear diagnosed by both MRI and arthroscopy within 6 weeks after trauma, 14 patients with complete ACL tear diagnosed similarly and 10 control patients with arthroscopically intact ACL. Proton density-and T2-weighted MRI imaging of the sagittal section of the knee was performed with 1.5 T magnets (Siemens Magnetom H15, Shimadzu SMT150GUX) by using a dedicated knee coil, with slice thickness of 4-5 mm and 14-16 cm field of view. The examination was done on the primary (discontinuity of low signal band, abnormal axis of the ligament and focal or diffuse increased signal intensity) and secondary (bone bruise, anterior translocation of the tibia and PCL curvature value) signs of ACL tear. In proton density-weighted sagittal images, it was found easy to distinguish acute partial ACL tear from normal ligament but not from complete ACL tear. In T2-weighted images, partial ACL tear was suggested to keep continuity of the ligament. (H.O.)

  4. Is nonoperative management of partial distal biceps tears really successful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Tyler M; Wong, Justin C; Lazarus, Mark D

    2018-04-01

    The current treatment of partial distal biceps tears is a period of nonoperative management, followed by surgery, if symptoms persist. Little is known about the success rate and outcomes of nonoperative management of this illness. We identified 132 patients with partial distal biceps tears through an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code query of our institution's database. Patient records were reviewed to abstract demographic information and confirm partial tears of the distal biceps tendon based on clinical examination findings and confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventy-four patients completed an outcome survey. In our study, 55.7% of the contacted patients who tried a nonoperative course (34 of 61 patients) ultimately underwent surgery, and 13 patients underwent immediate surgery. High-need patients, as defined by occupation, were more likely to report that they recovered ideally if they underwent surgery, as compared with those who did not undergo surgery (odds ratio, 11.58; P = .0138). For low-need patients, the same analysis was not statistically significant (P = .139). There was no difference in satisfaction scores between patients who tried a nonoperative course before surgery and those who underwent immediate surgery (P = .854). An MRI-diagnosed tear of greater than 50% was a predictor of needing surgery (odds ratio, 3.0; P = .006). This study has identified clinically relevant information for the treatment of partial distal biceps tears, including the following: the failure rate of nonoperative treatment, the establishment of MRI percent tear as a predictor of failing nonoperative management, the benefit of surgery for the high-need occupational group, and the finding that nonoperative management does not negatively affect outcome if subsequent surgery is necessary. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Partial and complete tear of the anterior cruciate ligament. Direct and indirect MR signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.T.; Tu, H.Y.; Chen, R.C.; Shih, T.T.F.; Shau, W.Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MR direct and indirect signs for knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) partial or complete tear. Material and Methods: According to documented MR direct and indirect signs for ACL tear, we retrospectively reviewed the incidence of those signs in 15 partial ACL tear and 17 complete ACL tear patients. The findings were also compared with duration of injury (less or more than 6 weeks, as acute or chronic stages). Results: A residual straight and tight ACL fiber in at least one pulse sequence was more frequently detected in partial ACL tears. The empty notch sign, a wavy contour of ACL, bone contusion at lateral compartment and lateral meniscus posterior horn tear were significantly more frequently seen in complete tear cases. The posterior cruciate ligament angle in chronic complete ACL tear cases (109 deg ±20 deg) had a tendency to be less than in chronic partial ACL tear cases (119 deg ±18 deg). Conclusion: The empty notch sign, a wavy ACL, bone contusion, and posterior horn of lateral meniscus tears are suggestive of a complete ACL tear. A residual straight and tight ACL fiber seen in at least one image section is a helpful sign to diagnosis of partial ACL tear. In the acute ACL injury stage, a focal increase of the ACL signal intensity is more suggestive of a partial ACL tear

  6. The value of clinical tests in acute full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Klaus; Sørensen, Anne Kathrine Belling; Jørgensen, Uffe Viegh

    2010-01-01

    Early repair of rotator cuff tears leads to superior results. To detect symptomatic full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon at an early stage, we conducted a prospective study to evaluate the value of clinical examination with and without subacromial lidocaine within the first weeks after...

  7. Goldmann tonometry tear film error and partial correction with a shaped applanation surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Sean J; Enikov, Eniko T; Schwiegerling, Jim; Ashley, Sean M

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the isolated tear film adhesion error in a Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) prism and in a correcting applanation tonometry surface (CATS) prism. The separation force of a tonometer prism adhered by a tear film to a simulated cornea was measured to quantify an isolated tear film adhesion force. Acrylic hemispheres (7.8 mm radius) used as corneas were lathed over the apical 3.06 mm diameter to simulate full applanation contact with the prism surface for both GAT and CATS prisms. Tear film separation measurements were completed with both an artificial tear and fluorescein solutions as a fluid bridge. The applanation mire thicknesses were measured and correlated with the tear film separation measurements. Human cadaver eyes were used to validate simulated cornea tear film separation measurement differences between the GAT and CATS prisms. The CATS prism tear film adhesion error (2.74±0.21 mmHg) was significantly less than the GAT prism (4.57±0.18 mmHg, p film adhesion error was independent of applanation mire thickness ( R 2 =0.09, p =0.04). Fluorescein produces more tear film error than artificial tears (+0.51±0.04 mmHg; p film adhesion error (1.40±0.51 mmHg) was significantly less than that of the GAT prism (3.30±0.38 mmHg; p =0.002). Measured GAT tear film adhesion error is more than previously predicted. A CATS prism significantly reduced tear film adhesion error bŷ41%. Fluorescein solution increases the tear film adhesion compared to artificial tears, while mire thickness has a negligible effect.

  8. MRI study of associated shoulder pathology in patients with full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinning; Fallon, Jonathan; Egge, Natalie; Curry, Emily J; Patel, Ketan; Owens, Brett D; Busconi, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears are a well-established cause of shoulder pain. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the associated shoulder pathology in patients with full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears using magnetic resonance imaging. Forty-seven magnetic resonance imaging studies taken between 2008 and 2009 with a diagnosis of full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears were reviewed. The size of the subscapularis tendon tear, amount of muscle volume loss, Goutallier grade, biceps tendon pathology, coracohumeral distance, and associated rotator cuff tears were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed. Patients 55 years and older vs those 54 years and younger had an average subscapularis tear size of 35 vs 19 mm, an average Goutallier grade of 2.7 vs 0.8, and a total muscle volume loss of 25% vs 5%, respectively. Patients with a dislocated vs normal biceps tendons had an average subscapularis tear size of 37 vs 23 mm, an average Goutallier grade of 3 vs 0.9, and a total muscle volume loss of 28% vs 7%, respectively. Patients with vs without concomitant rotator cuff tears had an average subscapularis tear size of 32 vs 17 mm, an average Goutallier grade of 2.3 vs 0.6, and a total muscle volume loss of 21% vs 3%, respectively. Overall average coracohumeral distance measured in the axial plane was 10.8±4.6 mm. Average coracaohumeral distance was 14.8 vs 8.1 mm in patients with a Goutallier grade of 0 vs 3 or 4, resepectively, and 13.6 vs 8.5 mm in patients with no rotator cuff tear vs those with a supra- and infraspinatus tear, respectively. Increased age, dislocated biceps tendons, and concomitant rotator cuff tears in patients with full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears are associated with larger subscapularis tendon tear size, higher Goutallier grades, and increased subscapularis muscle volume loss. Decreased coracohumeral distance is associated with a higher Goutallier grade and rotator cuff tears. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare patient reported outcomes from before surgery to 52 weeks after surgery between individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic meniscal tears and those for degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Comparative prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four public......-55, and undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (defined by a combination of age and symptom onset). INTERVENTIONS: Both participant groups underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a meniscal tear, with operating surgeons recording relevant information......% women) with a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (n=141, mean age 38.7 years (standard deviation 10.9); n=256, 46.6 years (6.4); respectively) were included in the main analysis. At 52 weeks after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, 55 (14%) patients were lost to follow-up. Statistically...

  10. Isolated partial tear and partial avulsion of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon presenting as posterior medial knee pain

    OpenAIRE

    Watura, Christopher; Ward, Anthony; Harries, William

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of medial head of gastrocnemius tendon tear. The type of injury widely reported in the literature is tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle or ‘tennis leg’. We previously reported an isolated partial tear and longitudinal split of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius at its musculotendinous junction. The case we now present has notable differences; the tear was interstitial and at the proximal (femoral attachment) part of the tendon, the patient’s symptoms...

  11. Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Correlate With Sleep Disturbance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Bryan A; Hull, Brandon R; Kurth, Alexander B; Kukowski, Nathan R; Mulligan, Edward P; Khazzam, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    Many patients with rotator cuff tears suffer from nocturnal shoulder pain, resulting in sleep disturbance. To determine whether rotator cuff tear size correlated with sleep disturbance in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with a diagnosis of unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears (diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a visual analog scale (VAS) quantifying their shoulder pain, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) questionnaire. Shoulder MRI scans were analyzed for anterior-posterior tear size (mm), tendon retraction (mm), Goutallier grade (0-4), number of tendons involved (1-4), muscle atrophy (none, mild, moderate, or severe), and humeral head rise (present or absent). Bivariate correlations were calculated between the MRI characteristics and baseline survey results. A total of 209 patients with unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears were included in this study: 112 (54%) female and 97 (46%) male (mean age, 64.1 years). On average, shoulder pain had been present for 24 months. The mean PSQI score was 9.8, and the mean VAS score was 5.0. No significant correlations were found between any of the rotator cuff tear characteristics and sleep quality. Only tendon retraction had a significant correlation with pain. Although rotator cuff tears are frequently associated with nocturnal pain and sleep disruption, this study demonstrated that morphological characteristics of full-thickness rotator cuff tears, such as size and tendon retraction, do not correlate with sleep disturbance and have little to no correlation with pain levels.

  12. Degenerative full thickness rotator cuff tears : Towards optimal management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The shoulder is one of the most complex joints in the body. Besides a wide range of motion it also has to be stable. The rotator cuff is a major stabiliser of the glenohumoral joint. With increasing age rotator cuff tears are common. Successful treatment is described following surgical (rotator cuff

  13. Sonographic Visualization of the Rotator Cable in Patients With Symptomatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation With Tear Size, Muscular Fatty Infiltration and Atrophy, and Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Nathalie J; Blain-Paré, Etienne; Tétreault, Patrice; Rouleau, Dominique M; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of sonographic visualization of the rotator cable in patients with symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears and asymptomatic controls and to correlate rotator cable visualization with tear size, muscular fatty infiltration and atrophy, and the functional outcome in the patients with rotator cuff tears. Fifty-seven patients with rotator cuff tears and 30 asymptomatic volunteers underwent shoulder sonography for prospective assessment of the rotator cable and rotator cuff tear and responded to 2 functional outcome questionnaires (shortened Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [QuickDASH] and Constant). In the patients with rotator cuff tears, appropriate tests were used to correlate rotator cable visualization with the tear size, functional outcome, muscular fatty infiltration, and atrophy. The patients with rotator cuff tears included 25 women and 32 men (mean age,57 years; range, 39-67 years), and the volunteers included 13 women and 17 men (mean age, 56 years; range, 35-64 years). The rotator cable was identified in 77% (23 of 30) of controls and 23% (13 of 57) of patients with rotator cuff tears. In the patients, nonvisualization of the rotator cable correlated with larger tears (P tears than asymptomatic controls and was associated with a larger tear size and greater supraspinatus fatty infiltration and atrophy. Diligent assessment of the supraspinatus muscle should be done in patients with rotator cuff tears without a visible rotator cable, as the integrity of these anatomic structures may be interdependent.

  14. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Frois Temponi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction and classical (anatomical reconstruction.

  15. Goldmann tonometry tear film error and partial correction with a shaped applanation surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCafferty SJ

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sean J McCafferty,1–4 Eniko T Enikov,5 Jim Schwiegerling,2,3 Sean M Ashley1,3 1Intuor Technologies, 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, 3University of Arizona College of Optical Science, 4Arizona Eye Consultants, 5Department of Mechanical and Aerospace, University of Arizona College of Engineering, Tucson, AZ, USA Purpose: The aim of the study was to quantify the isolated tear film adhesion error in a Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT prism and in a correcting applanation tonometry surface (CATS prism.Methods: The separation force of a tonometer prism adhered by a tear film to a simulated cornea was measured to quantify an isolated tear film adhesion force. Acrylic hemispheres (7.8 mm radius used as corneas were lathed over the apical 3.06 mm diameter to simulate full applanation contact with the prism surface for both GAT and CATS prisms. Tear film separation measurements were completed with both an artificial tear and fluorescein solutions as a fluid bridge. The applanation mire thicknesses were measured and correlated with the tear film separation measurements. Human cadaver eyes were used to validate simulated cornea tear film separation measurement differences between the GAT and CATS prisms.Results: The CATS prism tear film adhesion error (2.74±0.21 mmHg was significantly less than the GAT prism (4.57±0.18 mmHg, p<0.001. Tear film adhesion error was independent of applanation mire thickness (R2=0.09, p=0.04. Fluorescein produces more tear film error than artificial tears (+0.51±0.04 mmHg; p<0.001. Cadaver eye validation indicated the CATS prism’s tear film adhesion error (1.40±0.51 mmHg was significantly less than that of the GAT prism (3.30±0.38 mmHg; p=0.002.Conclusion: Measured GAT tear film adhesion error is more than previously predicted. A CATS prism significantly reduced tear film adhesion error by ~41%. Fluorescein solution increases the tear film adhesion compared to

  16. Three tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: can we differentiate complete from partial tears?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten Duffel/Mechelen, Department of Radiology, Duffel (Belgium); Dossche, Lieven; Gestel, Jozef van [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Orthopedics, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Scientific Coordination and Biostatistics, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    To determine the ability of 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to identify partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to allow distinction of complete from partial ACL tears. One hundred seventy-two patients were prospectively studied by 3.0T MR imaging and arthroscopy in our institution. MR images were interpreted in consensus by two experienced reviewers, and the ACL was diagnosed as being normal, partially torn, or completely torn. Diagnostic accuracy of 3.0T MR for the detection of both complete and partial tears of the ACL was calculated using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. There were 132 patients with an intact ACL, 17 had a partial, and 23 had a complete tear of the ACL seen at arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 3.0T MR for complete ACL tears were 83, 99, and 97%, respectively, and, for partial ACL tears, 77, 97, and 95%, respectively. Five of 40 ACL lesions (13%) could not correctly be identified as complete or partial ACL tears. MR imaging at 3.0T represents a highly accurate method for identifying tears of the ACL. However, differentiation between complete and partial ACL tears and identification of partial tears of this ligament remains difficult, even at 3.0T. (orig.)

  17. Three tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: can we differentiate complete from partial tears?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M.; Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Dossche, Lieven; Gestel, Jozef van; Wouters, Kristien

    2011-01-01

    To determine the ability of 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to identify partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to allow distinction of complete from partial ACL tears. One hundred seventy-two patients were prospectively studied by 3.0T MR imaging and arthroscopy in our institution. MR images were interpreted in consensus by two experienced reviewers, and the ACL was diagnosed as being normal, partially torn, or completely torn. Diagnostic accuracy of 3.0T MR for the detection of both complete and partial tears of the ACL was calculated using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. There were 132 patients with an intact ACL, 17 had a partial, and 23 had a complete tear of the ACL seen at arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 3.0T MR for complete ACL tears were 83, 99, and 97%, respectively, and, for partial ACL tears, 77, 97, and 95%, respectively. Five of 40 ACL lesions (13%) could not correctly be identified as complete or partial ACL tears. MR imaging at 3.0T represents a highly accurate method for identifying tears of the ACL. However, differentiation between complete and partial ACL tears and identification of partial tears of this ligament remains difficult, even at 3.0T. (orig.)

  18. Contribution of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears to acquired subcoracoid impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacMahon, P.J. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland)]. E-mail: petermacmahon@yahoo.com; Taylor, D.H. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland); Duke, D. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland); Brennan, D.D. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland); O' Brien, J. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland); Eustace, S.J. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland)

    2007-06-15

    Aim: To assess the relationship between the severity of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears and the development of subcoracoid impingement. Materials and methods: Fifty-one magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shoulder examination reports with full-thickness supraspinatus tears were retrospectively identified and reviewed by two dedicated musculoskeletal radiologists. The appearances of the rotator cuff muscles, biceps tendon and the lesser tubercle were recorded. The acromio-humeral distance and the axial coraco-humeral distance were measured. The data were recorded and analysed electronically. Results: The kappa values for inter-observer agreement were: 0.91 for acromio-humeral distance and 0.85 for coraco-humeral distance measurements. Twenty-six patients had significant retraction of the supraspinatus tendon, 85% (22 cases) of this group had imaging evidence of tear or tendonopathy of the subscapularis tendon. Twenty-five patients had no significant retraction of the supraspinatus, 56% (14 cases) of this group had imaging evidence of a subscapularis tear or tendonopathy. The acromio-humeral distance was significantly less in patients with supraspinatus tears and retraction (p < 0.05). The subscapularis tendon was significantly more likely to be abnormal if the supraspinatus was retracted than if no retraction was present (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in coraco-humeral distances between the groups. Conclusion: Subscapularis tendon signal and structural changes are frequently associated with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears, particularly if the supraspinatus is significantly retracted. In this static MRI series, the data do not support the occurrence of classical subcoracoid impingement as an aetiology; however, they may support the possibility of a dynamic mechanism, to which future studies could be directed.

  19. Contribution of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears to acquired subcoracoid impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMahon, P.J.; Taylor, D.H.; Duke, D.; Brennan, D.D.; O'Brien, J.; Eustace, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To assess the relationship between the severity of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears and the development of subcoracoid impingement. Materials and methods: Fifty-one magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shoulder examination reports with full-thickness supraspinatus tears were retrospectively identified and reviewed by two dedicated musculoskeletal radiologists. The appearances of the rotator cuff muscles, biceps tendon and the lesser tubercle were recorded. The acromio-humeral distance and the axial coraco-humeral distance were measured. The data were recorded and analysed electronically. Results: The kappa values for inter-observer agreement were: 0.91 for acromio-humeral distance and 0.85 for coraco-humeral distance measurements. Twenty-six patients had significant retraction of the supraspinatus tendon, 85% (22 cases) of this group had imaging evidence of tear or tendonopathy of the subscapularis tendon. Twenty-five patients had no significant retraction of the supraspinatus, 56% (14 cases) of this group had imaging evidence of a subscapularis tear or tendonopathy. The acromio-humeral distance was significantly less in patients with supraspinatus tears and retraction (p < 0.05). The subscapularis tendon was significantly more likely to be abnormal if the supraspinatus was retracted than if no retraction was present (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in coraco-humeral distances between the groups. Conclusion: Subscapularis tendon signal and structural changes are frequently associated with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears, particularly if the supraspinatus is significantly retracted. In this static MRI series, the data do not support the occurrence of classical subcoracoid impingement as an aetiology; however, they may support the possibility of a dynamic mechanism, to which future studies could be directed

  20. Partial tears of the distal biceps tendon: MR appearance and associated clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.D.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Weishaupt, D.; Miller, L.S. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lerman, J. [Lerman Imaging, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Rubenstein, D.L. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rosenberg, Z.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and associated clinical findings of partial distal biceps tendon tears. Design: Twenty elbow MR images at 1.5 T, performed over a 7 year period, were reviewed for an appearance of partial tears in the distal biceps. These images were assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists for the extent of: (a) abnormal signal intensity within the tendon, and the presence of (b) bicipitoradial bursitis, and (c) bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity. Medical records for nine of the 20 cases were reviewed for the clinical findings of ecchymosis, trauma, sensation of a ''pop'', loss of function, and acuity of onset. Results: Twenty partial distal biceps tendon tears were seen. All displayed an abnormally increased signal in the distal biceps tendon. Three of 20 (15%) showed a 25% to 50% tear, ten of 20 (50%) showed a 50% tear, and seven of 20 (35%) showed a 75% to 90% tear. Bicipitoradial bursitis was seen in 11 of 20 (55%) cases. Bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity was observed in 10 of 20 (50%). Of the nine cases reviewed for associated clinical findings, surprisingly, only three (33%) experienced an acute traumatic episode with an abrupt onset of pain. An insidious onset was reported in four of nine (44%). Sensation of a ''pop'' was recorded in only two of nine (22%) cases. Ecchymosis and loss of function were not seen in any of the cases. Finally, surgical conformation was obtained for three cases. Conclusion: Partial distal biceps tendon tears have a characteristic MR appearance, demonstrate little functional deficit, and may be attritional in their etiology due to the observation of a low number of patients reporting trauma or an acute onset. (orig.)

  1. Partial tears of the distal biceps tendon: MR appearance and associated clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.D.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Weishaupt, D.; Miller, L.S.; Rubenstein, D.L.; Rosenberg, Z.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and associated clinical findings of partial distal biceps tendon tears. Design: Twenty elbow MR images at 1.5 T, performed over a 7 year period, were reviewed for an appearance of partial tears in the distal biceps. These images were assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists for the extent of: (a) abnormal signal intensity within the tendon, and the presence of (b) bicipitoradial bursitis, and (c) bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity. Medical records for nine of the 20 cases were reviewed for the clinical findings of ecchymosis, trauma, sensation of a ''pop'', loss of function, and acuity of onset. Results: Twenty partial distal biceps tendon tears were seen. All displayed an abnormally increased signal in the distal biceps tendon. Three of 20 (15%) showed a 25% to 50% tear, ten of 20 (50%) showed a 50% tear, and seven of 20 (35%) showed a 75% to 90% tear. Bicipitoradial bursitis was seen in 11 of 20 (55%) cases. Bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity was observed in 10 of 20 (50%). Of the nine cases reviewed for associated clinical findings, surprisingly, only three (33%) experienced an acute traumatic episode with an abrupt onset of pain. An insidious onset was reported in four of nine (44%). Sensation of a ''pop'' was recorded in only two of nine (22%) cases. Ecchymosis and loss of function were not seen in any of the cases. Finally, surgical conformation was obtained for three cases. Conclusion: Partial distal biceps tendon tears have a characteristic MR appearance, demonstrate little functional deficit, and may be attritional in their etiology due to the observation of a low number of patients reporting trauma or an acute onset. (orig.)

  2. Outcome of surgical treatment and the prognostic factors in full-thickness rotator cuff tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Giti

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rotator cuff tendon tear injury is one of the most frequently seen orthopaedic conditions, and surgical repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure. The purpose of the present study was to determine the results of full-thickness rotator cuff repair and to look for predictors of outcomes. Methods: we studied 27 patients (17 men and 10 women with a mean age of 57.7 years who underwent open rotator cuff repair surgery for full-thickness tear between 2001 and 2005 at the Imam Khomeini Hospital and were subsequently followed-up for 6 and 12 months after surgery. The shoulder function was assessed by Constant classification and factors potentially associated with outcomes were Results: The mean of preoperative Constant score (CS was 45.8 ± 14.1 after 12 months, 6 patients (22.2% had good results and 21 patients (77.8% had excellent result according to CS. Pain relief was generally satisfactory. Using multiple regression analysis, treatment was significantly correlated preoperative CS and acromio-humeral interval (AHI however, no correlation was found between the result of the treatment and pretreatment atrophy, tear size, acromial morphology, preoperative symptom duration and age. Conclusion: In this study, a standard rotator cuff repair technique reduced pain severity and was associated with good results, however larger studies are necessary to define the long-term outcome of this procedure.

  3. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial....... Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised exercise therapy as a treatment option. Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01002794)....

  4. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Randomised controlled superiority trial. SETTING: Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. INTERVENTIONS: 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial....... Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised exercise therapy as a treatment option.Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01002794)....

  5. Comparison of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of partial tears of finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swen, W. A.; Jacobs, J. W.; Hubach, P. C.; Klasens, J. H.; Algra, P. R.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Finger extensor tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may lead to partial and eventually to complete tendon tears. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of sonography (SG) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize partial tendon tears. Twenty-one RA patients

  6. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpfendorfer, Claus; Subhas, Naveen; Winalski, Carl S.; Ilaslan, Hakan [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Miniaci, Anthony [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a ''cyclops lesion,'' on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the ''pseudocyclops'' lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The ''pseudocyclops'' lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. (orig.)

  7. Treatment of Partial Rotator Cuff Tear with Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetrivel Chezian Sengodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tear has presented substantial challenge to orthopaedic surgeons as it can vary from conservative to surgical repair. Researches have established the influence of platelet rich plasma in healing damaged tissue. Currently very few data are available regarding the evidence of clinical and radiological outcome of partial rotator cuff tear treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection in English literature. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears were treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection. Before and after the injection of platelet rich plasma scoring was done with visual analogue score, Constant shoulder score, and UCLA shoulder score at 8 weeks and third month. A review ultrasound was performed 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection to assess the rotator cuff status. Results: Our study showed statistically significant improvements in 17 patients in VAS pain score, constant shoulder score and UCLA shoulder score. No significant changes in ROM were noted when matched to the contra-lateral side (P < 0.001 at the 3 month follow-up. The study also showed good healing on radiological evaluation with ultrasonogram 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection for partial rotator cuff tears is an effective procedure that leads to significant decrease in pain, improvement in shoulder functions, much cost-effective and less problematic compared to a surgical treatment.

  8. The evaluation of central corneal thickness and intraocular pressure in conjunction with tear IGF-1 levels in patients with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Emrah; Kan, Elif K; Okuyucu, Ali

    2017-08-30

    To compare the central corneal thickness (CCT), intraocular pressure (IOP), and tear insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels between patients with acromegaly and a control group and to evaluate the possible effect of tear IGF-1 and duration of the disease on CCT and IOP. We included 31 patients with acromegaly (study group) and 40 age- and sex-matched controls in the study. Patients with acromegaly were divided into 2 subgroups based on disease status (active/inactive). All participants underwent complete ophthalmologic evaluation including CCT and IOP values. Basal tear samples were collected from both groups and tear IGF-1 levels were measured. The CCT, IOP, and tear IGF-1 levels were compared between groups and subgroups and the association between tear IGF-I levels and ocular parameters (CCT, IOP) and disease duration were also evaluated. Central corneal thickness, IOP, and tear IGF-1 levels did not show a significant difference between study and control groups. We also did not find a significant difference in terms of CCT, IOP, or tear IGF-1 levels between subgroups of patients. Correlation analysis did not show an association between the duration of disease and tear IGF-1 levels with CCT or IOP. There was no significant difference in tear IGF-1 levels between patients with acromegaly and controls. Additionally, there was no correlation between disease duration and tear IGF-1 levels with CCT or IOP levels. This lack of association may suggest that tear IGF-1 levels might not have an effect on CCT or IOP findings in patients with acromegaly.

  9. Effects of artificial tear treatment on corneal epithelial thickness and corneal topography findings in dry eye patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, B; Doğan, E; Çelik, E; Babashli, T; Uçak, T; Alagöz, G

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the effects of artificial tear treatment on central corneal epithelial thickness, and central, mid-peripheral and peripheral corneal thicknesses in patients with dry eye disease (DED). Patients with DED underwent ocular examinations, including Schirmer-2 test, slit lamp examination for tear break-up time (BUT), corneal topography (CT) for measuring mean central, mid-peripheral and peripheral corneal thickness values and anterior segment optic coherence tomography (AS-OCT) for obtaining central corneal epithelial thickness. After artificial tear treatment (carboxymethylcellulose and sodium hyaluronate formulations) for one month, patients were examined again at a second visit and the results were compared. Sixty-one eyes of 33 female dry eye patients (mean age: 38.3±5.7 years) were enrolled. The mean follow-up time was 36.4±3.3 days. The mean tear BUT and Schirmer-1 tests revealed significant improvement after treatment (P=0.000, P=0.000, respectively). Central corneal epithelium and mean mid-peripheral corneal thicknesses measured significantly higher after treatment (P=0.001, P=0.02). Changes in central and peripheral corneal thicknesses were not statistically significant. Artificial tear treatment in dry eye patients seems to increase central corneal epithelial and mid-peripheral corneal thicknesses. Measurement of corneal epithelial thickness can be a useful tool for evaluation of treatment response in dry eye patients. Further long-term prospective studies are needed to investigate this item. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Partial tear of the quadriceps tendon in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, George

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of partial rupture of the quadriceps tendon in an 8-year-old girl. This is one of the youngest patients reported with a quadriceps tendon rupture, an entity seen predominantly in middle-aged people. The strength of the muscle tendon unit in a child makes tendon injuries extremely unusual as compared to apophyseal avulsions. The MR imaging findings of this unusual pediatric injury are illustrated. (orig.)

  11. The natural history of partial rotator cuff tear evaluated by MRI. Can we predict the prognosis of partial rotator cuff tear by MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Koumei

    2010-01-01

    The cause and progress of the tear in the title are not fully understood and its treatment varies dependently on the injured site, depth, accompanied disease and symptom, and imaging profile. The author classified the tears in 4 types in MRI findings, followed their temporal progression and clinical symptom, and found that this classification in MRI finding was helpful to predict the prognosis, which is described in this paper. Subjects are 47 shoulders of 45 patients (M19/F26, av. age 71.0 y) who underwent conservative treatment of the disease during the time May, 2003-Oct. 2008, periodical MRI (2.7 times in av.) for 18.5 mo in av. and follow-up diagnosis until 24.9 mo in av. MRI is conducted with the machine 1.0 T Siemens harmonicdome to acquire the fast spin echo T1, T2 weighted images, and short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) coronal, axial and sagittal ones. Tears in MRI are classified in Type 1 (abnormal signal type) (25 shoulders), Type 2 (abnormal signal and swelling type) (7 shoulders), Type 3 (cut off end type) (10 shoulders) and Type 4 (tapered end type) (5 shoulders). The partial rotator cuff tear is suggested to be originated from the denaturation of the cuff with a subsequent certain injury or loading to become Type 1 to 2 and to progress to Type 3 to 4 by continuous acrominal impingement. It is suggested that at the first diagnosis the Type 1 does not have so much serious symptom, but which tends to last long while the symptom is serious in Type 2 and 3: the prognosis in Type 4 is good. (K.T)

  12. A new knee arthrometer, the GNRB: experience in ACL complete and partial tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, H; Nouveau, S; Gageot, S; Gagnière, B

    2009-05-01

    Clinical diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears (Lachman test and Pivot shift test in valgus and internal rotation) is reliable in case of complete ACL tear but reveals elusive in case of partial tears. Quantitative assessment of anterior tibial translation proves to be imprecise, subjective and poorly reproducible especially with the KT-1000 arthrometer. We developed the GNRB, an alternative original anterior knee laxity measurement device. The lower limb is placed in a rigid support with the knee at 0 degrees of rotation, the restraining power being recorded. A 0-250 N thrust force is transmitted by a jack to the upper segment of the calf. This force is only applied in the absence of hamstring muscles contraction. Displacement of the anterior tibial tubercle is recorded using a sensor with a 0.1mm precision. We hypothesize that this knee laxity measurement device is more reliable and reproducible than other currently available arthrometers. During a first validation study, the GNRB was compared to the KT-1000 arthrometer, in 20 pairs of healthy knees, measurements being performed by two investigators. Variance analyses were carried out at 134 N. In a second clinical study, 21 complete ACL tears (the notch is devoid of ACL) and 24 partial ACL tears (anterior or posterior bundle tear and cicatricial ACL remnant in continuity) were tested with these arthrometers to exact a differential laxity threshold value between both knees at 250 N. Statistical analysis was subsequently performed using variance and ROC curves analysis. The GNRB arthrometer reveals to be significantly more reproducible than the KT-1000, irrespectively of the tester's experience level. Moreover, unlike the KT-1000, the achieved measurement is independent from the uninvolved side. Reproducibility of laximetry proves to be significantly better with the GNRB than with the KT-1000, wherever the examiner's experience stands and whatever the evaluated side condition could be. When

  13. Partial repair in irreparable rotator cuff tear: our experience in long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, E D; Di Benedetto, Paolo; Fiocchi, Andrea; Beltrame, Alessandro; Causero, Araldo

    2017-10-18

    Massive rotator cuff tears are a common source of shoulder pain and dysfunction, especially in middle age patient; these lesions represent about 20% of all rotator cuff tears and 80% of recurrent tears. Some lesions are not repairable or should not be repaired: in this case, a rotator cuff partial repair should be recommended. The aim of the study is to evaluate the outcome of rotator cuff partial repair in irreparable rotator cuff massive tear at medium and long-term follow-up. We have evaluated 74 consecutive patients treated with functional repair of rotator cuff by the same surgeon between 2006 and 2014. We divided patients into 2 groups, obtaining 2 average follow-up: at about 6,5 (group A) and 3 years (group B). In December 2015, we evaluated in every patient ROM and Constant Score. We analyzed difference between pre-operatory data and the 2 groups.  Results: We found statistical significant difference in ROM and in Constant Score between pre-operatory data and group A and group B. Between group A and group B there is relevant difference in Constant Score but not in ROM. Partial repair can give good results in a medium follow-up, in terms of pain relief and improvement of ROM, as well as in quality of life. Difference in ROM and Constant Score between group A and group B may indicate the begin of partial repair failure; according to our data, 6-7 years may be the time limit for this surgery technique.

  14. Healing of Achilles tendon partial tear following focused shockwave: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Chun Hsu,1,* Wei-Ting Wu,2,* Ke-Vin Chang,2–4 Der-Sheng Han,2–4 Li-Wei Chou5–7 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, 3National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, Taipei, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, 6Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, 7Department of Rehabilitation, Asia University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Achilles tendinopathy is a common cause of posterior heel pain and can progress to partial tendon tear without adequate treatment. Effects of traditional treatments vary, and many recent reports focus on the use of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT for Achilles tendinopathy but not for Achilles tendon partial tear. Here, we report the case of a 64-year-old female suffering from severe left heel pain for half a year. All treatment and rehabilitation were less effective until ESWT was applied. Each course of focused shockwave therapy included 2500 shots with energy flux density from 0.142 mJ/mm2 to 0.341 mJ/mm2. The visual analog scale decreased from nine to one degree. High-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasonography was performed before and 1 month after the treatment, which revealed healing of the torn region and decrease in inflammation. ESWT had shown to be an alternative treatment for Achilles tendon partial tear under safety procedure and ultrasound observation. Keywords: focused shockwave, Achilles tendon, partial tear, ultrasonography

  15. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Sam Soo; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Oh, Yu-Whan; Jeong, Woong-Kyo; Kim, Baek Hyun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small ( 3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  16. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kangwon-do (Korea); Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kangwon-do (Korea); Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Oh, Yu-Whan [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jeong, Woong-Kyo [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Baek Hyun [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan City (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small (<1 cm), medium (1-3 cm), and large (>3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  17. Comparative diagnostic imaging of a partial patellar ligament tear in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ricciardi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic lesions of the patellar ligament (PL are rare in dogs. The resulting injury can be a complete or partial laceration, depending on the quantity of torn collagen fibres. Information obtained from imaging evaluation is of great value to the clinical approach towards PL injuries, because subsequent treatment options are affected by the distinction between complete or partial tears. Imaging diagnosis of PL damage in veterinary practice commonly relies on radiographic examination through the recognition of indirect signs, such as “patella alta”, bone fragments at the level of the patellar or tibial insertion, and soft tissue opacity at the cranial aspect of the joint. Although ultrasound (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been described as useful diagnostic tools for the assessment of PL tears in human patients, specific comparative data regarding the evaluation of PL rupture in dogs using different imaging modalities is lacking in the veterinary literature. This paper describes the radiographic, ultrasonographic, CT and MRI imaging findings of a partial PL tear in a dog and discusses the utility of these techniques in diagnosing this condition. CT provided more detailed information than X-ray examination in the assessment of the osteoligamentous junction, the exclusion of microfracture and distal PL avulsion, but did not add information regarding PL integrity. MRI and US provided the most useful information regarding intra-ligamentous damage and as such their combined use may be considered for the assessment of PL injuries after clinical examination and survey radiographs.

  18. Diagnosis of partial and complete rotator cuff tears using combined gradient echo and spin echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, M.J.; Yandow, D.R.; DeSmet, A.A.; Orwin, J.F.; Quintana, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    Most magnetic resonance (MR) studies evaluating the rotator cuff for tears have used T2-weighted imaging in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. T2 * -weighted gradient echo imaging, however, has advantages over spin echo imaging, including contiguous slices without cross-talk, high contrast around the cuff, and intrinsically shorter imaging times which can be used to increase the number of signals averaged and thus improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We reviewed the shoulder MR scans of 87 consecutive patients who underwent both a MR scan and a shoulder arthroscopy during which the size of tears, if present, was graded. The reviewers were blinded as to the history and arthroscopic results. The MR scans included oblique coronal T2 * -weighted gradient echo and oblique sagittal T2-weighted spin echo images. MR cuff grades were correlated with arthroscopic findings. For complete tears, the sensitivity of MR was 0.91 and the specificity 0.95. For partial tears, the sensitivity was 0.74 and the specificity 0.87. This accuracy is similar to two-plane T2-weighted imaging as previously reported in the literature. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.0005) between the cuff grade as determined by MR and the arthroscopic findings. (orig.)

  19. Diagnosis of partial and complete rotator cuff tears using combined gradient echo and spin echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yandow, D R [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); DeSmet, A A [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Orwin, J F [Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Quintana, F A [Dept. of Biostatistics, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Most magnetic resonance (MR) studies evaluating the rotator cuff for tears have used T2-weighted imaging in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. T2{sup *}-weighted gradient echo imaging, however, has advantages over spin echo imaging, including contiguous slices without cross-talk, high contrast around the cuff, and intrinsically shorter imaging times which can be used to increase the number of signals averaged and thus improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We reviewed the shoulder MR scans of 87 consecutive patients who underwent both a MR scan and a shoulder arthroscopy during which the size of tears, if present, was graded. The reviewers were blinded as to the history and arthroscopic results. The MR scans included oblique coronal T2{sup *}-weighted gradient echo and oblique sagittal T2-weighted spin echo images. MR cuff grades were correlated with arthroscopic findings. For complete tears, the sensitivity of MR was 0.91 and the specificity 0.95. For partial tears, the sensitivity was 0.74 and the specificity 0.87. This accuracy is similar to two-plane T2-weighted imaging as previously reported in the literature. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.0005) between the cuff grade as determined by MR and the arthroscopic findings. (orig.)

  20. The effect of unilateral partial edentulism to muscle thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca-Ceylan, Golzem; Guler, Ahmet U.; Taskay-Yelmir, Nergiz; Lutfi, Incesu; Aksoz, Tolga

    2003-01-01

    Teeth and muscle play a very important role for occlusal equilibrium and function.when tooth loss begins ,it may also effect the function of muscle tissues. The thickness of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were measured bilaterally in 30 healthy fully dentate adults and in 30 unilateral edentulous patients by using ultrasonographic imaging. All scans were carried out by the same radiologist to eliminate the inter-observer difference, using a real time scanner (Toshiba SSA -270A,Japan). A 7.5 MHz linear transducer was used. The effect of age, sex, duration of partial edentulism, unilateral chewing habits of the individuals to the muscle thickness were also evaluated. In all subjects,facial proportion index was also determined. Main purpose of this study was to compare and establish the differences of muscle thickness between dentate and edentulous side in unilateral partial edentulous patients with ultrasonography and to test whether the variation in the thickness of the muscle is related to the variation in the facial and morphology. Ultrasonography revealed a large variation in the thickness of the masseter and temporolis muscles in experimental and controlled groups ,both relaxed and contracted conditions.The thickness of muscles in females was less in both conditions.In experimental group, a high negative correlation was found between the thickness of the masseter muscle and Facial Proportion Index ( FPI) in the females ,however, the statistical analysis showed no significant difference in the males. Also a high negative correlation was found in female control group. There was no statistically significant relationship between unilateral chewing habits and muscle thickness .In this study the duration of partial edentulism did not affect the thickness of the muscle.Further research is required to study muscular atrophy for comparison with total edentulism. (author)

  1. Clinical diagnosis of partial or complete anterior cruciate ligament tears using patients' history elements and physical examination tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décary, Simon; Fallaha, Michel; Belzile, Sylvain; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Feldman, Debbie; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Desmeules, François

    2018-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic validity of clusters combining history elements and physical examination tests to diagnose partial or complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. Prospective diagnostic study. Orthopaedic clinics (n = 2), family medicine clinics (n = 2) and community-dwelling. Consecutive patients with a knee complaint (n = 279) and consulting one of the participating orthopaedic surgeons (n = 3) or sport medicine physicians (n = 2). Not applicable. History elements and physical examination tests performed independently were compared to the reference standard: an expert physicians' composite diagnosis including history elements, physical tests and confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging. Penalized logistic regression (LASSO) was used to identify history elements and physical examination tests associated with the diagnosis of ACL tear and recursive partitioning was used to develop diagnostic clusters. Diagnostic accuracy measures including sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), predictive values and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+/-) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Forty-three individuals received a diagnosis of partial or complete ACL tear (15.4% of total cohort). The Lachman test alone was able to diagnose partial or complete ACL tears (LR+: 38.4; 95%CI: 16.0-92.5). Combining a history of trauma during a pivot with a "popping" sensation also reached a high diagnostic validity for partial or complete tears (LR+: 9.8; 95%CI: 5.6-17.3). Combining a history of trauma during a pivot, immediate effusion after trauma and a positive Lachman test was able to identify individuals with a complete ACL tear (LR+: 17.5; 95%CI: 9.8-31.5). Finally, combining a negative history of pivot or a negative popping sensation during trauma with a negative Lachman or pivot shift test was able to exclude both partial or complete ACL tears (LR-: 0.08; 95%CI: 0.03-0.24). Diagnostic clusters combining history elements and physical

  2. The 'bridging sign', a MR finding for combined full-thickness tears of the subscapularis tendon and the supraspinatus tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Cha, Dong Ik; Yoo, Jae-Chul; Jung, Jee Young

    2013-01-01

    Background: In daily practice, we discovered one of the secondary magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the subscapularis (SSC) tendon tear, the 'bridging sign', which has not been previously described. Purpose: To describe the 'bridging sign' on shoulder MR imaging and its radiological and clinical significance in patients with SSC tendon tear. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine patients who had undergone shoulder arthroscopy and had full-thickness tear of the subscapularis tendon were enrolled. The medical records of the 29 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the duration of shoulder pain, rotator cuff tears, and associated arthroscopic findings: biceps tendon abnormality and superior glenoid labral tear. Then, preoperative shoulder MR images were retrospectively reviewed for the presence or absence of the 'bridging sign' and associated MR findings: periarticular fluid and fatty atrophy of the supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. The type of rotator cuff tear associated with the 'bridging sign' was assessed and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 'bridging sign' for the diagnosis of a certain type of rotator cuff tear were calculated. Associated arthroscopic and MR findings and mean duration of the shoulder pain between the patients with and without the 'bridging sign' were compared. Results: The 'bridging sign' was seen in 17 of 29 patients and corresponded to a complex of the torn and superomedially retracted subscapularis tendon, coracohumeral ligament, and superior glenohumeral ligament, adhered to the anterior margin of the torn supraspinatus (SSP) tendon on arthroscopy. All patients with the 'bridging sign' had combined full-thickness tear (FTT) of the cranial 1/2 portion of the subscapularis tendon and anterior 1/2 portion of the SSP tendon. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 'bridging sign' for the diagnosis of combined FTTs of the SSC tendon and anterior portion of the SSP tendon were 81.0%, 100%, and 86

  3. Masseter muscle thickness in unilateral partial edentulism: An ultrasonographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sathasivasubramanian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teeth and facial muscles play a very important role in occlusal equilibrium and function. Occlusal derangement, seen in unilateral partially edentulous individuals, has an effect on masseter muscle anatomy and function. The present study aims to evaluate masseter muscle thickness in unilateral partial edentulism. Patients and Methods: Institutional ethics committee approval was obtained before the commencement of the study. The study involved patients who routinely visited the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Sri Ramachandra University. The study sample included 27 unilateral edentulous patients (Group E and 30 controls (Group C. The masseter muscle thickness was evaluated using high-resolution ultrasound real-time scanner (linear transducer − 7.5–10 MHz at both relaxed and contracted states. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. Duration of edentulism and muscle thickness was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The study patients' age ranged between 25 and 48 years (mean – 36 years. The comparative evaluation of masseter muscle thickness between the dentulous and edentulous sides of experimental group was statistically significant (P < 0.05. However, no statistically significant difference in masseter muscle thickness was found between the dentulous side of control and experimental groups. The correlation between the duration of partial edentulism and muscle thickness was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: The study proves masseter atrophy in the edentulous side. However, since the difference is found to be marginal with the present sample, a greater sample is necessary to establish and prove the present findings as well as to correlate with the duration of edentulism. Further studies are aimed to assess the muscle morphology after prosthetic rehabilitation.

  4. MRI differential diagnosis of complete and partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: the usefulness of oblique coronal T2-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seo Young; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Bang, Sun Woo; Ryu, Seok Jong; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Jeong Seok

    2002-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of T2-weighted oblique coronal MR imaging (T2OCI) in the differential diagnosis of complete and partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee. Thirty-three patients with ACL tear (16 complete and 17 partial tears), comfirmed by arthroscopy, were included in this study. Conventional MR imaging and T2OCI were performed, and the findings were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists in terms of continuity, shape, axis and internal signal intensity of the ligament. Each finding was tested if there were stastistically significant differences in its prevalence between partial and complete tears. The diagnostic accuracy of T2OCI and conventional MR imaging in the detection of partial and complete tears of the ACL were compared. Conventional MR imaging revealed no statistically significant finding for differential diagnosis of complete and partial ACL tears. The reliable and statistically significant (p<0.001) findings of T2OCI were complete discontinuity of the ligament in cases involving complete ACL tears (14 of 16 complete tears and 2 of 17 partial tears) and the preservation of the band form for partial ACL tears (2 of 16 complete tears and 15 of 17 partial tears). The accuracy of T2OCI and conventional MR imaging was 88% and 70%, respectively. When ACL injury is vague on conventional MR images, a modality which is more useful in the differential diagnosis of partial and complete tears of the ACL, and in predicting the site of a tear, is T2-weighted oblique coronal imaging

  5. Partial-thickness burn wounds healing by topical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Saeidinia, Amin; Keihanian, Faeze; Lashkari, Ardalan Pasdaran; Lahiji, Hossein Ghavvami; Mobayyen, Mohammadreza; Heidarzade, Abtin; Golchai, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Burns are common event and associated with a high incidence of death, disability, and high costs. Centella asiatica (L.) is a medicinal herb, commonly growing in humid areas in several tropical countries that improve wound healing. On the basis of previous studies, we compared the efficacy of Centiderm versus silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in partial thickness burning patients. Methods: Study population comprised burn victims referred to Velayat Burning Hospital at Rasht, Iran...

  6. Negative pressure wound therapy for partial-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumville, Jo C; Munson, Christopher; Christie, Janice

    2014-12-15

    A burn wound is a complex and evolving injury, with both local and systemic consequences. Burn treatments include a variety of dressings, as well as newer strategies, such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), which, by means of a suction force that drains excess fluids from the burn, tries to promote the wound healing process and minimise progression of the burn wound. To assess the effectiveness of NPWT for people with partial-thickness burns. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 04 September 2014); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that evaluated the safety and effectiveness of NPWT for partial-thickness burns. Two review authors used standardised forms, and extracted the data independently. We assessed each trial for risk of bias, and resolved differences by discussion. One RCT, that was an interim report, satisfied the inclusion criteria. We undertook a narrative synthesis of results, as the absence of data and poor reporting precluded us from carrying out any formal statistical analysis. The trial was at high risk of bias. There was not enough evidence available to permit any conclusions to be drawn regarding the use of NPWT for treatment of partial-thickness burn wounds.

  7. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K.; Imhoff, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  8. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, A.B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Sports Orthopedics, Munich (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  9. A Case Report of Intra-articular Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture for Partial Tear of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee, Kwangho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case was to report a case of Partial Tear of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex treated by Intra-articular bee venom Pharmacopuncture. Methods: The patient was treated by Intra-articular bee venom Pharmacopuncture. The Effect of Treatment was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale(VAS and Modified Mayo Wrist Score(Wrist Score. Results & Conclusions: After Treatment, Patient's VAS decreased and Wrist Score increased. For this results, Intra-articular Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture may be effective for Partial Tear of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

  10. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.)

  11. Tearing stability analysis of an axial surface flaw in thick-walled pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.B. (NOVETECH Corp., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents two fracture mechanics models for evaluation of an axial surface flaw in pressure vessels. The surface flaw is located on the outside surface of the vessel. The first model assumes yielding of the remaining ligament directly ahead of the flaw. The second model assumes contained yielding ahead of the flaw and uses a linear elastic fracture mechanics solution. The former model is suitable for cases where the combination of material toughness, flaw size, and load is such that initiation of flaw growth follows ligament yielding. The latter model is suitable for low-toughness materials where initiation of crack growth and potential tearing instability may occur prior to the yielding of the ligament. Both models are suitable for thick-walled vessels. The paper discusses the applicability regime for both models. The models are then applied to a test vessel and the predicted failure pressure is compared against the pressure attained in the test. Results show that both models can be applied successfully. In particular, the contained yielding model when used with the plane-stress assumption can give reasonable predictions even for cases that involve yielding of the ligament. (orig.).

  12. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, D.; Lang, T.; Heeb, B. [Nichtmetallische Werkstoffe, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 {mu}m. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains were parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6{degrees}. At 77K/OT a critical current density of 15`000 A/cm{sup 2} was reached in films of the dimension 1cm x 2cm x 20{mu}m (1{mu}V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4K/OT the highest value was 350`000 A/cm{sup 2} (1nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  13. Biomechanical comparison of double-row versus transtendon single-row suture anchor technique for repair of the grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Gang; Zhao, De-Wei; Wang, Wei-Ming; Ren, Ming-Fa; Li, Rui-Xin; Yang, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Peng

    2010-11-01

    For partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff, double-row fixation and transtendon single-row fixation restore insertion site anatomy, with excellent results. We compared the biomechanical properties of double-row and transtendon single-row suture anchor techniques for repair of grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears. In 10 matched pairs of fresh-frozen sheep shoulders, the infraspinatus tendon from 1 shoulder was repaired with a double-row suture anchor technique. This comprised placement of 2 medial anchors with horizontal mattress sutures at an angle of ≤ 45° into the medial margin of the infraspinatus footprint, just lateral to the articular surface, and 2 lateral anchors with horizontal mattress sutures. Standardized, 50% partial, articular-sided infraspinatus lesions were created in the contralateral shoulder. The infraspinatus tendon from the contralateral shoulder was repaired using two anchors with transtendon single-row mattress sutures. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading from 10 to 100 N for 50 cycles, followed by tensile testing to failure. Gap formation and strain over the footprint area were measured using a motion capture system; stiffness and failure load were determined from testing data. Gap formation for the transtendon single-row repair was significantly smaller (P row repair for the first cycle ((1.74 ± 0.38) mm vs. (2.86 ± 0.46) mm, respectively) and the last cycle ((3.77 ± 0.45) mm vs. (5.89 ± 0.61) mm, respectively). The strain over the footprint area for the transtendon single-row repair was significantly smaller (P row repair. Also, it had a higher mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness. For grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears, transtendon single-row fixation exhibited superior biomechanical properties when compared with double-row fixation.

  14. Clinical diagnosis of partial or complete anterior cruciate ligament tears using patients' history elements and physical examination tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallaha, Michel; Belzile, Sylvain; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Feldman, Debbie; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Desmeules, François

    2018-01-01

    Objective To assess the diagnostic validity of clusters combining history elements and physical examination tests to diagnose partial or complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. Design Prospective diagnostic study. Settings Orthopaedic clinics (n = 2), family medicine clinics (n = 2) and community-dwelling. Participants Consecutive patients with a knee complaint (n = 279) and consulting one of the participating orthopaedic surgeons (n = 3) or sport medicine physicians (n = 2). Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures History elements and physical examination tests performed independently were compared to the reference standard: an expert physicians’ composite diagnosis including history elements, physical tests and confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging. Penalized logistic regression (LASSO) was used to identify history elements and physical examination tests associated with the diagnosis of ACL tear and recursive partitioning was used to develop diagnostic clusters. Diagnostic accuracy measures including sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), predictive values and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+/-) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results Forty-three individuals received a diagnosis of partial or complete ACL tear (15.4% of total cohort). The Lachman test alone was able to diagnose partial or complete ACL tears (LR+: 38.4; 95%CI: 16.0–92.5). Combining a history of trauma during a pivot with a “popping” sensation also reached a high diagnostic validity for partial or complete tears (LR+: 9.8; 95%CI: 5.6–17.3). Combining a history of trauma during a pivot, immediate effusion after trauma and a positive Lachman test was able to identify individuals with a complete ACL tear (LR+: 17.5; 95%CI: 9.8–31.5). Finally, combining a negative history of pivot or a negative popping sensation during trauma with a negative Lachman or pivot shift test was able to exclude both partial or complete ACL tears (LR

  15. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-07-01

    There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods.

  16. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Jong-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES. Results: In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Conclusions: Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods.

  17. Knee function and knee muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional limitations exist postmeniscectomy, but preoperative data are scarce. PURPOSE: To examine knee function, knee muscle strength and performance in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears, eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. STUDY DESIGN: Cross......-sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-two participants with MRI verified degenerative meniscal tear (35% women, mean age 49 years) answered the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and were tested for isokinetic knee muscle strength and lower extremity performance (one-leg hop for distance, 6 m timed...

  18. Deltoid muscle and tendon tears in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Recht, Michael P.; Iannotti, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of tears of the deltoid muscle and tendon in patients with rotator cuff tears and without a prior history of shoulder surgery. Deltoid tears diagnosed on MR examinations were prospectively recorded between February 2003 through June 2004. The images of these patients were then retrospectively reviewed to determine the location of the deltoid tear, the presence of rotator cuff tears, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, degree of humeral head subluxation, bony erosive changes involving the undersurface of the acromion, and the presence of edema or fluid-like signal intensity in the deltoid muscle and overlying subcutaneous tissues. There were 24 (0.3%) patients with deltoid tears; nine men and 15 women. The age range was 54 to 87 (average 73) years. The right side was involved in 20 cases, and the left in four cases. Fifteen patients had full thickness and nine had partial thickness tears of the deltoid. Shoulder pain was the most common presenting symptom. The physical examination revealed a defect in the region of the deltoid in two patients. Nineteen patients had tears in the muscle belly near the musculotendinous junction, and five had avulsion of the tendon from the acromial origin. Full thickness rotator cuff tears were present in all of the patients, and 22 patients had associated muscle atrophy. Subcutaneous edema and fluid-like signal was present in 15 patients. Tears of the deltoid muscle or tendon is an unusual finding, but they can be seen in patients with chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Partial thickness tears tend to involve the undersurface of the deltoid muscle and tendon. Associated findings such as intramuscular cyst or ganglion in the deltoid muscle belly and subcutaneous edema or fluid-like signal overlying the deltoid in a patient with a rotator cuff tear should raise the suspicion of a deltoid tear. (orig.)

  19. Deltoid muscle and tendon tears in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Recht, Michael P. [Cleveland Clinic, Musculoskeletal Radiology/A21, Division of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Iannotti, Joseph P. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of tears of the deltoid muscle and tendon in patients with rotator cuff tears and without a prior history of shoulder surgery. Deltoid tears diagnosed on MR examinations were prospectively recorded between February 2003 through June 2004. The images of these patients were then retrospectively reviewed to determine the location of the deltoid tear, the presence of rotator cuff tears, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, degree of humeral head subluxation, bony erosive changes involving the undersurface of the acromion, and the presence of edema or fluid-like signal intensity in the deltoid muscle and overlying subcutaneous tissues. There were 24 (0.3%) patients with deltoid tears; nine men and 15 women. The age range was 54 to 87 (average 73) years. The right side was involved in 20 cases, and the left in four cases. Fifteen patients had full thickness and nine had partial thickness tears of the deltoid. Shoulder pain was the most common presenting symptom. The physical examination revealed a defect in the region of the deltoid in two patients. Nineteen patients had tears in the muscle belly near the musculotendinous junction, and five had avulsion of the tendon from the acromial origin. Full thickness rotator cuff tears were present in all of the patients, and 22 patients had associated muscle atrophy. Subcutaneous edema and fluid-like signal was present in 15 patients. Tears of the deltoid muscle or tendon is an unusual finding, but they can be seen in patients with chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Partial thickness tears tend to involve the undersurface of the deltoid muscle and tendon. Associated findings such as intramuscular cyst or ganglion in the deltoid muscle belly and subcutaneous edema or fluid-like signal overlying the deltoid in a patient with a rotator cuff tear should raise the suspicion of a deltoid tear. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of partial latissimus dorsi muscle tendon tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Huy B.Q.; Lee, Steven T.; Lane, Michael D.; Munk, Peter L.; Malfair, David; Blachut, Piotr A.

    2009-01-01

    There is still a paucity of information about the clinical presentation, treatment and imaging findings of latissimus muscle tears. Only one study has specifically described the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of latissimus tendon tears. We describe a case of a high-grade tear in the latissimus muscle tendon in an active water skier with no significant prior medical history. MRI demonstrated at least a 50% tear of the latissimus tendon, manifesting as increased signal intensity on T2-weighted sequences and surrounding edema, as well as a diminutive tendon at the humeral insertion. (orig.)

  1. [Epidemiologic study of tear film lipid layer thickness measurement in the population of Taishitun Community in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Q F; Du, X H; Su, Y D; Wang, N L; Wei, Z J; Labbé, Antoine

    2017-07-11

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of tear film lipid layer thickness (LLT) and the relationship between symptoms and signs of dry eye and tear film LLT in the population of Taishitun Community in Beijing. Methods: A cross-sectional study. From May 2016 to August 2016, three streets of Taishitun Community were randomly selected as survey districts and 540 persons were taken as investigation subjects. Every participant completed 6 items of dry eye examinations as follows: questionnaire (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI), measurement of tear film LLT, tear film break-up time (TBUT), corneal and conjunctival staining, SchirmerⅠtest and the infrared meibomian photography. According to their age, all participants were divided into four groups: junior group (analysis and multivariate Logistic regression analysis, distribution of the variables of LLT and the relationship between dry eye symptoms and LLT were studied. Results: A total of 473 residents finally participated in this study, and the response ratio was 87.6%. The values of LLT were normally distributed. The average LLT was (59.87±18.50) nm [(60.16±19.15) nm in males and (59.67±18.57) nm in females], and the comparison of LLT with different genders was not statistically significant ( t= 0.198, P= 0.843). The tear film LLT of four different age groups had statistical significance ( F= 15.092, P0.05. F= 0.538, P >0.05). In the OSDI symptom questionnaire, only blurred vision and decreased visual acuity were related to the tear film LLT ( Pfilm LLT ( P> 0.05). Conclusions: In Taishitun Community of Beijing, the values of tear film LLT had a normal distribution. The LLT was positively correlated with age, but inversely correlated with the severity of the symptoms of dry eye. There was no significant correlation between the LLT and the TBUT, SchirmerⅠtest result and meibomian gland loss rate. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 495-501) .

  2. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, You-zhi; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Xiang-jin

    2015-12-01

    The use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an innovative clinical therapy, especially in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical improvement and tendon-to-bone healing with and without PRP therapy in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A systematic search was done in the major medical databases to evaluate the studies using PRP therapy (PRP+) or with no PRP (PRP-) for the treatment of patients with rotator cuff tears. We reviewed clinical scores such as the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Rating Scale, the Simple Shoulder Test, and the failure-to-heal rate by magnetic resonance imaging between PRP+ and PRP- groups. Five studies included in this review were used for a meta-analysis based on data availability. There were no statistically significant differences between PRP+ and PRP- groups for overall outcome scores (P > .05). However, the PRP+ group exhibited better healing rates postoperatively than the PRP- group (P = .03) in small/moderate full-thickness tears. The use of PRP therapy in full-thickness rotator cuff repairs showed no statistically significant difference compared with no PRP therapy in clinical outcome scores, but the failure-to-heal rate was significantly decreased when PRP was used for treatment of small-to-moderately sized tears. PRP therapy may improve tendon-to-bone healing in patients with small or moderate rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative studies of MRI and operative findings in rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Seigo; Ichikawa, Norikazu; Itadera, Eichi; Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hajime

    2001-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with operative findings in the evaluation of patients associated with rotator cuff tears. Fifty-four of 60 shoulders (58 patients) examined by MRI were confirmed as full-thickness tears and 6 as partial-thickness tears at the time of surgery. The oblique coronal, oblique sagittal, and axial planes of T2-weighted images with the 0.5 tesla MRI system were obtained preoperatively and compared with operative findings. MRI correctly identified 46 of 54 full-thickness rotator cuff tears and 5 of 6 partial-thickness tears. A comparison of MRI and operative findings in full-thickness cuff tears showed a sensitivity of 85%, a specificity of 83%, and a positive prospective value (PPV) of 99%. A comparison of partial-thickness tears showed a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 85%, and PPV of 39%. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the MRI assessment and measurement at the time of surgery (r=0.90, P<0.01). MRI was useful in evaluating large and medium-sized rotator cuff tears, but less useful in distinguishing small full-thickness tears from partial-thickness tears. (author)

  4. Comparative outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave therapy for shoulder tendinitis or partial tears of the rotator cuff in athletes and non-athletes: Retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Yi; Wang, Ching-Jen; Wu, Kuan-Ting; Yang, Ya-Ju; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Wang, Shih-Wei

    2018-03-01

    Refractory shoulder tendinitis or partial thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are common findings in overhead athletes. Previous studies have examined the effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) for shoulder tendinitis. In the current study, we recruited 36 shoulders and performed a comparison between the professional athletes (13 shoulders, athletic group; AG) and the non-athletic population (23 shoulders, non-athletic group, NAG) with PTRCTs or shoulder tendinitis of the shoulder after ESWT. Patients with symptomatic tendinitis of the shoulder with or without a partial tear of the rotator cuff tendon and failed oral medication and physical therapy for more than 3 months were treated with electrohydraulic mode of ESWT. All patients that met the inclusion criteria were categorized into two groups according to their pre-treatment activity level. We found that NAG exhibited significant aging and degenerative change around the glenohumeral joint and subacromial space. After ESWT treatment, the patients in AG were with 53.8% high satisfaction rating and patients in NAG were 52.1% by one-year followed up. The results showed ESWT was equally effective treatment in both AG and NAG. In light of its efficacy and less-invasive nature, we suggest ESWT can be used to treat athletes with refractory tendinitis or PTRCTs before proceeding to arthroscopic intervention. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anterior versus posterior, and rim-rent rotator cuff tears: prevalence and MR sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, M.J.; Turnbull, J.R.; Orwin, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the relative distribution of the locations of rotator cuff tears, and the sensitivity of anterior versus posterior tears on MR images. Patients and methods. We identified 110 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR and either a partial-thickness or a small full-thickness rotator cuff tear diagnosed at arthroscopy. MR sensitivity and patient age were compared between patients with tears in the anterior and posterior halves of the cuff. In addition, in patients with partial tears less than 2 cm in diameter, an age comparison between those with tears in the critical zone and those with articular surface tears adjacent to the bony insertion (rim-rent tear) was performed. Results. The tear was centered in the anterior half of the rotator cuff in 79% of the patients younger than 36 years old, and in 89% of the patients 36 years old and over. The average age of the patients with tears in the anterior half (44 years) was not significantly different from the average age of those with posterior tears (40 years). The sensitivity of MR for anterior tears was 0.69, and for posterior tears it was 0.56. Five of the nine rim-rent tears (0.56) were interpreted correctly on the original MR report; two of the other tears were misinterpreted as intratendinous fluid but were diagnosable in retrospect. Conclusion. Even in patients less than 36 years old, most partial and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears are centered in the anterior half of the supraspinatus. Although our figure for MR sensitivity for these tears is lower than in recent articles, we found no significant difference between the sensitivity of MR for diagnosing posterior tears versus tears in the anterior half of the supraspinatus tendon. Rim-rent tears can be mistaken for intratendinous signal, and should be carefully looked for in younger patients with shoulder pain. (orig.)

  6. Epidemiology, natural history, and indications for treatment of rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z

    2012-10-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff disease is likely multifactorial, including age-related degeneration and microtrauma and macrotrauma. The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with aging with more than half of individuals in their 80s having a rotator cuff tear. Smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and genetics have all been shown to influence the development of rotator cuff tearing. Substantial full-thickness rotator cuff tears, in general, progress and enlarge with time. Pain, or worsening pain, usually signals tear progression in both asymptomatic and symptomatic tears and should warrant further investigation if the tear is treated conservatively. Larger (>1-1.5 cm) symptomatic full-thickness cuff tears have a high rate of tear progression and, therefore, should be considered for earlier surgical repair in younger patients if the tear is reparable and there is limited muscle degeneration to avoid irreversible changes to the cuff, including tear enlargement and degenerative muscle changes. Smaller symptomatic full-thickness tears have been shown to have a slower rate of progression, similar to partial-thickness tears, and can be considered for initial nonoperative treatment due to the limited risk for rapid tear progression. In both small full-thickness tears and partial-thickness tears, increasing pain should alert physicians to obtain further imaging as it can signal tear progression. Natural history data, along with information on factors affecting healing after rotator cuff repair, can help guide surgeons in making appropriate decisions regarding the treatment of rotator cuff tears. The management of rotator cuff tears should be considered in the context of the risks and benefits of operative versus nonoperative treatment. Tear size and acuity, the presence of irreparable changes to the rotator cuff or glenohumeral joint, and patient age should all be considered in making this decision. Initial nonoperative care can be safely undertaken in older patients (>70

  7. MR Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation with Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Sudarshan; Khandige, Ganesh; Kabra, Utkarsh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rotator cuff tears are quite common and can cause significant disability. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has now emerged as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of patients with rotator cuff injuries, in view of its improved inherent soft tissue contrast and resolution. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine MRI in the detection and characterisation of rotator cuff tears, by correlating the findings with arthroscopy. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out between July 2014 and August 2016 at the AJ Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India. A total of 82 patients were diagnosed with rotator cuff injury on MRI during this period, out of which 45 patients who underwent further evaluation with arthroscopy were included in this study. The data collected was analysed for significant correlation between MRI diagnosis and arthroscopic findings using kappa statistics. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of full and partial thickness tears were calculated using arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Results There were 27 males and 18 females in this study. The youngest patient was 22 years and the oldest was 74 years. Majority of rotator cuff tears (78%) were seen in patients above the age of 40 years. MRI showed a sensitivity of 89.6%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 83.3% for the diagnosis of full thickness rotator cuff tears. For partial thickness tears, MRI showed a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 86.6%, positive predictive value of 78.9% and negative predictive value of 100%. The accuracy was 93.1% for full thickness tears and 91.1% for partial thickness tears. The p-value was less than 0.01 for both full and partial thickness tears. There was good agreement between the MRI and arthroscopic findings, with kappa value of 0.85 for full thickness tears and 0.81 for partial

  8. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H.; Maeder, Matthew E.; Salisbury, Shelia R.

    2014-01-01

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  9. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Maeder, Matthew E. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lenox Hill Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Salisbury, Shelia R. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  10. Partial-thickness burn wounds healing by topical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidinia, Amin; Keihanian, Faeze; Lashkari, Ardalan Pasdaran; Lahiji, Hossein Ghavvami; Mobayyen, Mohammadreza; Heidarzade, Abtin; Golchai, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Burns are common event and associated with a high incidence of death, disability, and high costs. Centella asiatica (L.) is a medicinal herb, commonly growing in humid areas in several tropical countries that improve wound healing. On the basis of previous studies, we compared the efficacy of Centiderm versus silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in partial thickness burning patients. Methods: Study population comprised burn victims referred to Velayat Burning Hospital at Rasht, Iran. The intervention group received Centiderm and control group SSD cream. Burn wounds were treated once daily at home. All of the wounds were evaluated till complete healing occurred and at the admission, days 3, 7, 14 objective signs; visual acuity score (VAS) and subjective signs were recorded. Re-epithelialization time and complete healing days were recorded. We used random fixed block for randomization. The randomization sequence was created using the computer. Patients and burning specialist physician were blinded. Results: Seventy-five patients randomized into 2 groups; (40 patients: Centiderm group; 35 patients: SSD group). The mean age of them was 30.67 ± 9.91 years and 19 of them were male (31.7%). Thirty patients in Centiderm and 30 patients in SSD group were analyzed. All of objective and subjective signs and mean of re-epithelialization and complete healing were significantly better in Centiderm group rather than SSD group (P < 0.05). There was no infection in Centiderm group. Conclusions: We showed that use of Centiderm ointment not only improved the objective and subjective signs in less than 3 days, but also the re-epithelialization and complete healing rather than SSD without any infection in the subjects. PMID:28248871

  11. Comparing two acromegalic patients with respect to central corneal thickness, intraocular pressure, and tear insulin-like growth factor levels before and after treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the central corneal thickness (CCT, intraocular pressure (IOP, and tear insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 levels of 2 patients with acromegaly before and after the surgical treatment of the disease. CCTs, IOP levels, and tear IGF-1 values showed a decrease after the treatment in 2 patients. As we found higher CCT, IOP, and tear IGF-1 levels in the active phase of the disease in two acromegaly patients, detailed information about the activity of the disease may be important before the examination of these patients.

  12. A prospective evaluation of survivorship of asymptomatic degenerative rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Jay D; Galatz, Leesa M; Teefey, Sharlene A; Middleton, William D; Steger-May, Karen; Stobbs-Cucchi, Georgia; Patton, Rebecca; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2015-01-21

    The purpose of this prospective study was to report the long-term risks of rotator cuff tear enlargement and symptom progression associated with degenerative asymptomatic tears. Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in one shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder enrolled as part of a prospective longitudinal study. Two hundred and twenty-four subjects (118 initial full-thickness tears, fifty-six initial partial-thickness tears, and fifty controls) were followed for a median of 5.1 years. Validated functional shoulder scores were calculated (visual analog pain scale, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES], and simple shoulder test [SST] scores). Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography and clinical evaluations. Tear enlargement was seen in 49% of the shoulders, and the median time to enlargement was 2.8 years. The occurrence of tear-enlargement events was influenced by the severity of the final tear type, with enlargement of 61% of the full-thickness tears, 44% of the partial-thickness tears, and 14% of the controls (p tear enlargement. One hundred subjects (46%) developed new pain. The final tear type was associated with a greater risk of pain development, with the new pain developing in 28% of the controls, 46% of the shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, and 50% of those with a full-thickness tear (p tear enlargement was associated with the onset of new pain (p muscle were associated with tear enlargement, with supraspinatus muscle degeneration increasing in 4% of the shoulders with a stable tear compared with 30% of the shoulders with tear enlargement (p tear showed increased infraspinatus muscle degeneration compared with 28% of those in which the tear had enlarged (p = 0.07). This study demonstrates the progressive nature of degenerative rotator cuff disease. The risk of tear enlargement and progression of muscle degeneration is greater for shoulders with a full-thickness tear, and tear

  13. Arthroscopic Partial Repair of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Preoperative Factors Associated With Outcome Deterioration Over 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Kim, Won Ju; Kim, Kyung Cheon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial repair is a treatment option in irreparable large-to-massive rotator cuff tears without arthritic changes. However, there are indications that arthroscopic partial repair does not yield satisfactory outcomes. To report the clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic partial repairs in patients with irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears. In addition, an analysis was performed regarding preoperative factors that may influence patient outcomes and patient-rated satisfaction over time. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From 2005 to 2011, a total of 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic partial repair for irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears were retrospectively evaluated. Partial repair was defined as posterior cuff tissue repair with or without subscapularis tendon repair to restore the transverse force couple of the cuff. Pain visual analog scale (PVAS), questionnaire results (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] and Simple Shoulder Test [SST]), and radiographic changes (acromiohumeral distance and degenerative change) were assessed preoperatively, at first follow-up (roughly 1 year postoperatively), and at final follow-up (>2 years postoperatively). Patients rated their satisfaction level at each postoperative follow-up as well. Preoperative factors that might influence outcomes, such as patient demographics, tear size, and fatty infiltration, were investigated. The preoperative, first follow-up, and final follow-up results for mean PVAS (5.13, 2.13, and 3.16, respectively) and questionnaires (ASES: 41.97, 76.37, and 73.78; SST: 3.61, 6.33, and 6.07, respectively) improved significantly (all P .05) from the first to the final follow-up. Among preoperative factors, fatty infiltration of the teres minor was identified as the only statistically significant factor affecting patient-rated satisfaction (P = .007). This study showed that arthroscopic partial repair may produce initial improvement in selected outcomes at 2-year

  14. The relationship between tear severity, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy in the supraspinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Jeffrey J; Lansdown, Drew A; Cheung, Sunny; Feeley, Brian T; Ma, C Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy have been described as interrelated characteristic changes that occur within the muscles of the rotator cuff after cuff tears, and both are independently associated with poor outcomes after surgical repair. We hypothesize that fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy are two distinct processes independently associated with supraspinatus tears. A retrospective review of 377 patients who underwent shoulder magnetic resonance imaging at one institution was performed. Multivariate analysis was performed based on parameters including age, sex, rotator cuff tear severity, fatty infiltration grade, and muscle atrophy. A total of 116 patients (30.8%) had full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, 153 (40.6%) had partial thickness tears, and 108 (28.7%) had no evidence of tear. With increasing tear severity, the prevalence of substantial fatty infiltration (grade ≥2) increased: 6.5% of patients with no tears vs 41.4% for complete tears (P tear severity: 36.1% of no tears vs 77.6% of complete tears (P muscle atrophy when taking into account sex, age, and tear severity. Fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy are independently associated processes. Fatty infiltration is also related to increasing age, muscle tear severity, and sex, whereas muscle atrophy is related to increasing age but not tear severity. In patients without rotator cuff tears, fatty infiltration and atrophy prevalence increased independently with increasing age. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging versus ultrasound for the detection of symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Guja, Kip E; Subhas, Naveen; Virk, Mandeep S; Gold, Heather T

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound-based imaging strategies in the evaluation of a hypothetical population with a symptomatic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (FTST) tear using formal cost-effectiveness analysis. A decision analytic model from the health care system perspective for 60-year-old patients with symptoms secondary to a suspected FTST tear was used to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness of 3 imaging strategies during a 2-year time horizon: MRI, ultrasound, and ultrasound followed by MRI. Comprehensive literature search and expert opinion provided data on cost, probability, and quality of life estimates. The primary effectiveness outcome was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) through 2 years, with a willingness-to-pay threshold set to $100,000/QALY gained (2016 U.S. dollars). Costs and health benefits were discounted at 3%. Ultrasound was the least costly strategy ($1385). MRI was the most effective (1.332 QALYs). Ultrasound was the most cost-effective strategy but was not dominant. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for MRI was $22,756/QALY gained, below the willingness-to-pay threshold. Two-way sensitivity analysis demonstrated that MRI was favored over the other imaging strategies over a wide range of reasonable costs. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, MRI was the preferred imaging strategy in 78% of the simulations. MRI and ultrasound represent cost-effective imaging options for evaluation of the patient thought to have a symptomatic FTST tear. The results indicate that MRI is the preferred strategy based on cost-effectiveness criteria, although the decision between MRI and ultrasound for an imaging center is likely to be dependent on additional factors, such as available resources and workflow. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  17. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

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    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of bell-hammer tear as an indirect sign of partial anterior cruciate ligament rupture on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, N; Naouri, J F; Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Herman, S

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the bell-hammer sign in the diagnosis of partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee on MRI. A retrospective study was performed including all patients who underwent ACL reconstruction for partial or complete tears from 2008 to 2009. The diagnosis of partial or complete ACL tears was based on the appearance of the ligament bundles and the signal quality on MRI. On arthroscopy, which is considered the gold standard, each bundle was classified as normal, partially or completely torn depending on the extent of the rupture and the quality of the remaining fibres. The study included 312 patients, 83 women and 229 men (mean age 33.3 ± 19.6 years). A diagnosis of a tear was made in all patients on preoperative MRI. Arthroscopy did not show any normal ACL, 247/312 (79.2 %) complete tears and 65/312 (20.8%) partial tears, 50/65 (76.9%) on the anteromedial bundle (AM) and 15/65 (23.1%) the posterolateral bundle. The bell-hammer sign was found on MRI in 13/312 patients (4.5%). It involved 9/65 (13.8%) partial tears, all in the AM bundle, and 4/247 (1.6%) complete tears, significantly more frequent in cases of partial rupture (p hammer sign (sensitivity CI 95% = 23.1 ± 10%, specificity CI 95% = 95.9 ± 2.5%) and with the bell-hammer sign in 23/65 cases (sensitivity CI 95% = 35.4 ± 11%, specificity CI 95% = 93.9 ± 3%). The association of the bell-hammer sign with conventional radiological diagnostic criteria has improved diagnosis performance of MRI for partial tears but not significantly (ns). The most important interest of the bell-hammer sign in the day-to-day clinical work is to suggest partial tears on MRI. It aids making a diagnosis, but its absence does not exclude partial ACL rupture. Diagnostic study, Level II.

  19. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears using a microscopy coil. Noninvasive detection without intraarticular contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitachi, Shin; Takase, Kei; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Tanaka, Minoru; Tojo, Yuichi; Tabata, Shiro; Majima, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a microscopy coil for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears by comparing the method to conventional MRI and MRI arthrography. A total of 68 shoulders were prospectively studied using a 1.5-T MRI unit. Conventional MRI scans were obtained with a surface coil and high-resolution MRI scans with a microscopy coil. MRI arthrography was performed in 28 shoulders using a surface coil. MRI evaluation of tears of rotator cuff tendons was compared with arthroscopic findings and surgical results. The surgery revealed 40 full-thickness tears, 13 partial-thickness tears, and 15 intact cuffs. In all, 35 (88%) full-thickness tears were correctly diagnosed on conventional MRI and 40 (100%) on high-resolution MRI. MR arthrography delineated 11 of 12 (92%) full-thickness tears. Altogether, 5 (38%) of the partial-thickness tears were detected on conventional MRI, and 12 (92%) were clearly demonstrated on high-resolution MRI. MRI arthrography depicted three (60%) of five partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI showed higher sensitivity than conventional MRI (P<0.05) and had values equivalent to those of MRI arthrography for diagnosing partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil is a feasible, noninvasive technique for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. (author)

  20. Analysis of Factors Associated With the Tear Film Lipid Layer Thickness in Normal Eyes and Patients With Dry Eye Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji Won; Park, Si Yoon; Kim, Jin Sun; Kim, Eung Kweon; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Kim, Tae-Im

    2016-08-01

    To determine the effects of clinical variables, including age, sex, history of refractive or cataract surgery, contact lens use, and ocular surface and meibomian gland parameters on the lipid layer thickness (LLT) in normal subjects and patients with dry eye syndrome (DES). A total of 64 normal subjects and 326 patients with DES were enrolled, and they underwent measurements of LLT with a LipiView interferometer and tear meniscus height using optical coherence tomography, tear film break-up time (TBUT) determination, ocular surface staining, Schirmer's test, examination of the lid margins and meibomian glands, and assessment using the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI). In normal subjects, the median (range) LLT was 67 (33-100) nm, and age was the only factor that was significantly associated with LLT (β = 0.678, P = 0.028). In patients with DES, the median (range) LLT was 84 (20-100) nm, and 79.0% of the participants fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). In a multivariate analysis, increased age and female sex were significantly related to increased LLT (β = 0.282, P = 0.005 and β = 11.493, P < 0.001), and hypersecretory MGD and lid margin inflammation were independently associated with increased LLT (β = 11.299, P = 0.001 and β = 12.747, P = 0.001). Lipid layer thickness measurements using a new interferometer are significantly affected by demographic factors such as age, sex, ocular surgical history, and MGD type. Therefore, all of these factors must be considered in the diagnosis of ocular surface diseases.

  1. Structural Characteristics Are Not Associated With Pain and Function in Rotator Cuff Tears: The ROW Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Emily J; Matzkin, Elizabeth E; Dong, Yan; Higgins, Laurence D; Katz, Jeffrey N; Jain, Nitin B

    2015-05-01

    Structural characteristics of rotator cuff tears are used in surgical decision making. However, data on the association of tear size with patient-reported pain and function are sparse. To assess the association of tear size, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy with shoulder pain/function in patients with cuff tears undergoing operative and nonoperative treatment. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 67 patients with rotator cuff tears were recruited for this longitudinal cohort study. Patients were determined to have a cuff tear using clinical assessment and blinded magnetic resonance imaging review. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) was used as a measure of shoulder pain and function. Tear size and thickness were not significantly associated with pain (SPADI pain score, 60.6 [95% CI, 49.8-71.5] for partial-thickness tear; 56.8 [95% CI, 42.8-70.7] for tear; 60.4 [95% CI, 51.7-69.0] for ≥2 cm full-thickness tear). Tear size and thickness were not associated with function (SPADI disability score, 42.7 [95% CI, 29.8-55.6] for partial-thickness tear; 37.6 [95% CI, 23.9-51.4] for tear; 45.1 [95% CI, 35.4-54.8] for ≥2 cm full-thickness tear). Fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and tendon retraction were also not significantly associated with SPADI pain and disability scores. A Mental Health Index score of tears undergoing operative and nonoperative treatment, pain and functional status were not associated with tear size and thickness, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy. Conversely, factors unrelated to cuff anatomy such as mental health, comorbidities, age, and sex were associated with pain/function. These findings have clinical implications during surgical decision making and suggest that pain and functional disability in patients with rotator cuff tears is multifactorial and should not solely be attributed to structural characteristics.

  2. Delaminated rotator cuff tear: extension of delamination and cuff integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Sagong, Seung-Yeob; Shin, John

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extension of delamination and the cuff integrity after arthroscopic repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Sixty-five patients with delaminated rotator cuff tears were retrospectively reviewed. The delaminated tears were divided into full-thickness delaminated tears and partial-thickness delaminated tears. To evaluate the medial extension, we calculated the coronal size of the delaminated portion. To evaluate the posterior extension, we checked the tendon involved. Cuff integrity was evaluated by computed tomography arthrography. The mean medial extension in the full-thickness and partial-thickness delaminated tears was 18.1 ± 6.0 mm and 22.7 ± 6.3 mm, respectively (P = .0084). The posterior extension into the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus was 36.9% and 32.3%, respectively, in the full-thickness delaminated tears, and it was 27.7% and 3.1%, respectively, in the partial-thickness delaminated tears (P = .0043). With regard to cuff integrity, 35 cases of anatomic healing, 10 cases of partial healing defects, and 17 cases of retear were detected. Among the patients with retear and partial healing of the defect, all the partially healed defects showed delamination. Three retear patients showed delamination, and 14 retear patients did not show delamination; the difference was statistically significant (P = .0001). The full-thickness delaminated tears showed less medial extension and more posterior extension than the partial-thickness delaminated tears. Delamination did not develop in retear patients, but delamination was common in the patients with partially healed defects. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The 'bridging sign', a MR finding for combined full-thickness tears of the subscapularis tendon and the supraspinatus tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Saint Paul' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Cheol; Cha, Dong Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: ycyoon@skku.edu; Yoo, Jae-Chul [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Background: In daily practice, we discovered one of the secondary magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the subscapularis (SSC) tendon tear, the 'bridging sign', which has not been previously described. Purpose: To describe the 'bridging sign' on shoulder MR imaging and its radiological and clinical significance in patients with SSC tendon tear. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine patients who had undergone shoulder arthroscopy and had full-thickness tear of the subscapularis tendon were enrolled. The medical records of the 29 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the duration of shoulder pain, rotator cuff tears, and associated arthroscopic findings: biceps tendon abnormality and superior glenoid labral tear. Then, preoperative shoulder MR images were retrospectively reviewed for the presence or absence of the 'bridging sign' and associated MR findings: periarticular fluid and fatty atrophy of the supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. The type of rotator cuff tear associated with the 'bridging sign' was assessed and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 'bridging sign' for the diagnosis of a certain type of rotator cuff tear were calculated. Associated arthroscopic and MR findings and mean duration of the shoulder pain between the patients with and without the 'bridging sign' were compared. Results: The 'bridging sign' was seen in 17 of 29 patients and corresponded to a complex of the torn and superomedially retracted subscapularis tendon, coracohumeral ligament, and superior glenohumeral ligament, adhered to the anterior margin of the torn supraspinatus (SSP) tendon on arthroscopy. All patients with the 'bridging sign' had combined full-thickness tear (FTT) of the cranial 1/2 portion of the subscapularis tendon and anterior 1/2 portion of the SSP tendon. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 'bridging sign' for the diagnosis of combined FTTs of

  4. [Assessment of lipid layer thickness of tear film in the diagnosis of dry-eye syndrome in children after the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpińska, Małgorzata; Gorczyńska, Ewa; Owoc-Lempach, Joanna; Bernacka, Aleksandra; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta; Chybicka, Alicja

    2011-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome (DES), also known as keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is recognized as the most frequent ocular complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). KCS can appear either due to insufficient tear production or excessive tear evaporation, both resulting in tears hyperosmolarity that leads to ocular damage. The evaporation rate and better film stability is determined primarily by the status of the lipid layer. Observation and classification of tear film lipid layer interference patterns in normal and dry eyes in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a follow-up time of 6 months-5 years (median 26.54 months). Investigation of the relation between the lipid layer interference patterns in normal and dry eyes and the results of other dry eye examinations and complaints. Relation between DES and conditioning regimes, including total body irradiation and high-dose chemotherapy, immunosuppressive drugs, the time after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and chronic graft-versus-host disease. Precorneal tears lipid layer interference patterns, were examined in 114 eyes in treatment group with the Tearscope-plus. Patient with dry eye were identified on the basis of Schirmer test scores and/or tear breakup time, and positive lissamine and/or fluorescein staining. 42 of 114 eyes (36.8%) developed DES after allo-SCT A significant correlation between thickness of lipid layer and BUT, Schirmer test, lissamine green and fluorescein staining was found in the treatment group. A significant association was found between present chronic GVHD and DES in children. DES was not associated with TBI, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and the time in the present study. Tears lipid layer interference patterns are highly correlated with the diagnosis of DES. Tears lipid layer interference patterns ( noninvasive method), can be used to diagnose early DES in children after allo-SCT. Chronic GVHD play a major role in development of DES

  5. Ultrasonography of symptomatic rotator cuff tears compared with MR imaging and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia N.; Vlychou, Marianna; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Karataglis, Dimitrios S.; Palladas, Panagiotis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods: Ninety-six patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff pathology underwent ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder. The findings in 88 patients were compared with arthroscopy or open surgery. Results: Full-thickness tear was confirmed in 57 cases, partial-thickness tear in 30 cases and degenerative changes without tear in 1. In all 57 cases of full-thickness tear and in 28 out of 30 cases of partial-thickness tear the supraspinatus tendon was involved. The accuracy in the detection of full-thickness tears was 98 and 100% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The accuracy in the detection of bursal or articular partial-thickness tears was 87 and 90% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Conclusions: In experienced hands ultrasonography should be considered as an accurate modality for the initial investigation of rotator cuff, especially supraspinatus, tears

  6. Ultrasonography of symptomatic rotator cuff tears compared with MR imaging and surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia N. [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece); Radiology Department, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: natfot@yahoo.gr; Vlychou, Marianna [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece)], E-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr; Papadopoulos, Periklis [University Orthopaedic Clinic, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: perpap@otenet.gr; Karataglis, Dimitrios S. [University Orthopaedic Clinic, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: dkarataglis@yahoo.gr; Palladas, Panagiotis [Radiology Department, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: palladaspan@in.gr; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece)], E-mail: oswestanast@yahoo.gr

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods: Ninety-six patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff pathology underwent ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder. The findings in 88 patients were compared with arthroscopy or open surgery. Results: Full-thickness tear was confirmed in 57 cases, partial-thickness tear in 30 cases and degenerative changes without tear in 1. In all 57 cases of full-thickness tear and in 28 out of 30 cases of partial-thickness tear the supraspinatus tendon was involved. The accuracy in the detection of full-thickness tears was 98 and 100% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The accuracy in the detection of bursal or articular partial-thickness tears was 87 and 90% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Conclusions: In experienced hands ultrasonography should be considered as an accurate modality for the initial investigation of rotator cuff, especially supraspinatus, tears.

  7. A Case Report of Intra-articular Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture combining with oriental medical treatment for Acute Traumatic Partial Tear of Meniscus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This case was report of intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection on the patient with Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus. We used intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection to Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus diagnosed by symptoms and MR imaging. Be under treatment if necessary we prescribed herbal medication and physiotherapy. The state of patient was measured by Visual Analog Scale(VAS and Walking time and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities(WOMAC Index score. After several times of treatments, noticeable reduction of pain was measured and increased time of walking on floor and decreased WOMAC score. This results suggest that intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection are effective to treatments of Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus.

  8. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409.

  9. Anterior versus posterior, and rim-rent rotator cuff tears: prevalence and MR sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J; Turnbull, J R; Orwin, J F [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-05-01

    Purpose. To determine the relative distribution of the locations of rotator cuff tears, and the sensitivity of anterior versus posterior tears on MR images. Patients and methods. We identified 110 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR and either a partial-thickness or a small full-thickness rotator cuff tear diagnosed at arthroscopy. From the arthroscopy videotapes, we classified the tears as centered in the anterior or posterior half of the cuff, and as either in the critical zone or adjacent to the bony insertion. The original MR interpretation was compared with the arthroscopic findings. MR sensitivity and patient age were compared between patients with tears in the anterior and posterior halves of the cuff. In addition, in patients with partial tears less than 2 cm in diameter, an age comparison between those with tears in the critical zone and those with articular surface tears adjacent to the bony insertion (rim-rent tear) was performed. Results. The tear was centered in the anterior half of the rotator cuff in 79% of the patients younger than 36 years old, and in 89% of the patients 36 years old and over. The average age of the patients with tears in the anterior half (44 years) was not significantly different from the average age of those with posterior tears (40 years)(P=0.23). The sensitivity of MR for anterior tears was 0.69, and for posterior tears it was 0.56 (P=0.17). The average age of the 9 patients with rim-rent tears was 31 years, while that of the 28 patients with similarly-sized partial tears not involving the insertion was 40 years old (P=0.048). Five of the nine rim-rent tears (0.56) were interpreted correctly on the original MR report; two of the other tears were misinterpreted as intratendinous fluid but were diagnosable in retrospect. Conclusion. Even in patients less than 36 years old, most partial and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears are centered in the anterior half of the supraspinatus. Although our figure for MR sensitivity

  10. Optimal treatment of partial thickness burns in children: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloemans, A.F.P.M.; Hermans, M.; van der Wal, M.; Liebregts, J.; Middelkoop, E.

    2014-01-01

    A large part of the patient population of a burn centre consists of children, most of whom are younger than four years. The majority of these young children suffer from superficial and deep partial thickness scald burns that may easily deepen to full thickness burns. A proper wound therapy, that

  11. Role of ultrasound in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, H.A.; Mirza, T.

    2010-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound in rotator cuff tears and to compare it with MRI. Total number of patients was thirty. All of these were above thirty years of age and were referred by clinicians, with shoulder pain for diagnostic workup. Post operative patients were excluded. Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were performed on each patient. Same operator performed ultrasound in all patients. Ultrasound (US) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) detected equal number of full thickness tears while two partial thickness tears were missed on US. Hypoechoic defect was the most important primary sign while cortical irregularity and fluid in subacromial and subdeltroid busra were the most important secondary signs on US. US was equally effective to MRI in detection of rotator cuff tears. It should be the primary investigation because of its availability, cost effective and real time evaluation provided significant expertise is developed, as it is highly operator dependent. (author)

  12. Bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus: meniscal intrusion rather than meniscal extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossberg, S.; Umans, H.; Flusser, G.; DiFelice, G.S.; Lerer, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of medial meniscal extrusion (MME) versus ''medial meniscal intrusion'' in the setting of bucket handle tears. Images were evaluated for previously reported risk factors for MME, including: medial meniscal root tear, radial tear, degenerative joint disease and joint effusion. Forty-one consecutive cases of bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus were reviewed by consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Imaging was performed using a 1.5 GE Signa MR unit. Patient age, gender, medial meniscal root integrity, MME, medial meniscal intrusion, degenerative joint disease, effusion and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear were recorded. Thirteen females and 27 males (age 12-62 years, median=30 years) were affected; one had bucket handle tear of each knee. Effusion was small in 13, moderate in 9 and large in 18. Degenerative joint disease was mild in three, moderate in two and severe in one. 26 ACL tears included three partial and three chronic. Medial meniscal root tear was complete in one case and partial thickness in two. None of the 40 cases with an intact or partially torn medial meniscal root demonstrated MME. MME of 3.1 mm was seen in the only full-thickness medial meniscal root tear, along with chronic ACL tear, moderate degenerative joint disease and large effusion. Medial meniscal intrusion of the central bucket handle fragment into the intercondylar notch was present in all 41 cases. Given an intact medial meniscal root in the setting of a ''pure'' bucket handle tear, there is no MME. (orig.)

  13. MRI diagnosis of ACL bundle tears: value of oblique axial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Alex W.H.; Griffith, James F.; Hung, Esther H.Y. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China); Law, Kan Yip; Yung, Patrick S.H. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-02-15

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of oblique axial intermediate weighting MR imaging in detecting partial thickness anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundle tears. The study protocol was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Sixty-one subjects (43 male, 18 female; mean age 27.4 years; range 9 to 57 years) with clinically suspected ACL tear or meniscal tear between September 2009 and January 2011 were studied with MRI and arthroscopy. Detection of partial tear for the ACL as a whole and for each ACL bundle by protocol A (standard orthogonal sequences) and protocol B (standard orthogonal sequences plus oblique axial intermediate weighted imaging) was compared in a blinded fashion. Performance characteristics for protocol A and protocol B were compared using sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and ROC curves. A two-tailed p value of <0.05 indicated statistical significance. Fifteen (24.6%) normal, 15 (24.6%) partial and 31 complete tears were diagnosed by arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of protocol A for the diagnosis of partial tear of the ACL was 33%, 87% and 74%, while for protocol B the values were 87%, 87% and 87% respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) for the diagnosis of partial ACL tear and individual bundle tear was higher for protocol B, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). The addition of oblique axial imaging to standard MR imaging improves diagnostic accuracy for detecting partial tears of the ACL as well as individual bundle tears of the ACL. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results in the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears With and Without the Anterior Attachment of the Rotator Cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Su; Moon, Seong Cheol; Hong, Se Jung; Bae, Seong Hae; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-09-01

    The anterior rotator cable is critical in force transmission of the rotator cuff. However, few clinical studies have examined the correlation between the integrity of the anterior supraspinatus tendon and surgical outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears. To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without anterior disruption of the supraspinatus tendon. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. One hundred eighty-one shoulders available for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, with a minimum 1-year follow-up, were enrolled. The anterior attachment of the rotator cable was disrupted in 113 shoulders (group A) and intact in 68 shoulders (group B). The mean age at the time of surgery in groups A and B was 59.6 and 59.2 years, respectively, and the mean follow-up period was 24.2 and 25.1 months, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in the preoperative tear size and pattern and muscle fatty degeneration between the 2 groups ( P = .004, P = .008, and P rotator cable, the mean 24-month follow-up demonstrated excellent pain relief and improvement in the ability to perform activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. However, tears with anterior disruption of the rotator cable showed a significantly larger and more complex tear pattern and more advanced fatty degeneration. Additionally, the retear rate was significantly higher in patients with a tear involving the anterior attachment of the rotator cable.

  15. Supraspinatus tendon tears at 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography: diagnosis with 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo SPACE sequence versus 2D conventional sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Michael Y.; Lee, So-Yeon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang-Soo [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To assess the diagnostic performance of shoulder MR arthrography with 3D isotropic fat-suppressed (FS) turbo spin-echo sequence (TSE-SPACE) for supraspinatus tendon tears in comparison with 2D conventional sequences at 3.0 T. The study was HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board with a waiver of informed consent. Eighty-seven arthroscopically confirmed patients who underwent 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography with 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE were included in a consecutive fashion from March 2009 to February 2010. Two reviewers independently analyzed 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement ({kappa}) were compared between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE for full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together and for partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone. There were 33 full-thickness tears and 28 partial-thickness tears of supraspinatus tendons. For full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of both readers were 96, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 91, 84, and 89% on 3D TSE-SPACE. For partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 84, 85, and 84% on 3D TSE-SPACE. There was no statistical difference between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Interobserver agreements were almost perfect on 2D conventional sequences and substantial on 3D TSE-SPACE. Compared with 2D conventional sequences, MR arthrography using 3D TSE-SPACE was comparable for diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears despite limitations in detecting small partial-thickness tears and in discriminating between full-thickness and deep partial-thickness tears. (orig.)

  16. Supraspinatus tendon tears at 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography: diagnosis with 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo SPACE sequence versus 2D conventional sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Michael Y.; Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of shoulder MR arthrography with 3D isotropic fat-suppressed (FS) turbo spin-echo sequence (TSE-SPACE) for supraspinatus tendon tears in comparison with 2D conventional sequences at 3.0 T. The study was HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board with a waiver of informed consent. Eighty-seven arthroscopically confirmed patients who underwent 3.0 T shoulder MR arthrography with 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE were included in a consecutive fashion from March 2009 to February 2010. Two reviewers independently analyzed 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement (κ) were compared between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE for full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together and for partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone. There were 33 full-thickness tears and 28 partial-thickness tears of supraspinatus tendons. For full-thickness and partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears together, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of both readers were 96, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 91, 84, and 89% on 3D TSE-SPACE. For partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears alone, the mean sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95, 92, and 94% on 2D sequences and 84, 85, and 84% on 3D TSE-SPACE. There was no statistical difference between 2D sequences and 3D TSE-SPACE. Interobserver agreements were almost perfect on 2D conventional sequences and substantial on 3D TSE-SPACE. Compared with 2D conventional sequences, MR arthrography using 3D TSE-SPACE was comparable for diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears despite limitations in detecting small partial-thickness tears and in discriminating between full-thickness and deep partial-thickness tears. (orig.)

  17. Management of a facial partial thickness chemical burn in a dog caused by bleach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalilak, Lukas T; Fransson, Boel A; Alessio, Terri L

    2017-03-01

    To describe the management and successful outcome of a late-recognition partial thickness bleach burn to the face and corneas of a dog. A 1-year-old male neutered Fox Terrier mix breed dog was evaluated for sloughing facial epithelium 5 days after coming into contact with an 8.25% household bleach cleaning solution. Severe erythema, edema, and crusting were noted around the muzzle and margins of both eyes, with moderate to severe alopecia in these areas. A partially detached, partial thickness eschar was present on the muzzle, while a firmly attached eschar was present in the region of both frontal sinuses. These injuries were consistent with a focal, superficial, and partial thickness chemical burn. Multiple ocular abnormalities, the most concerning of which was corneal ulceration, were also present. The patient's wounds were managed conservatively with limited surgical debridement of the affected epithelium 11 and 22 days after the initial exposure. Topical ocular medications, corneal debridement, and a superficial keratectomy were also used. All lesions resolved completely by 84 days postexposure, with no residual effects on the patient's quality of life. Chemical burns caused by contact with alkaline agents such as bleach (sodium hypochlorite) result in extensive necrosis of the skin and underlying structures. This is the first report of management alkaline facial burns in a dog. If inadequate or delayed hydrotherapy following exposure has resulted in superficial partial thickness burns, conservative management can be successful when traditional treatments, especially bandaging, are not feasible. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  18. Long-Term MRI Findings in Operated Rotator Cuff Tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyroelae, K.; Niemitukia, L.; Jaroma, H.; Vaeaetaeinen, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at long-term follow-up after rotator cuff (RC) tear using standard MRI sequences without fat saturation. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients aged 55.8±7.6 underwent MRI examination 4.6±2.1 years after surgery for RC tear. Standard sequences in oblique coronal, oblique sagittal, and axial planes were obtained. The RC, including re-tears and tendon degeneration, was independently evaluated by two observers. Thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and narrowing of the subacromial space were measured. The clinical outcome was evaluated with the Constant score and compared with the MRI findings. Results: The RC tear was traumatic in 18 (64%) patients and degenerative in 10 (36%). At follow-up, 11 (39%) had normal RC tendons with good clinical outcome. Four (14%) patients had painful tendinosis without RC tear. A full-thickness RC tear was found in 7 (25%) patients and a partial tear in 6 (21%). In one patient with a full-thickness tear, and in two with partial tear, tendinosis was found in another of the RC tendons. The subacromial space was narrowed in 13 (46%) of the patients. A narrowing of the subacromial space correlated with re-tear (P<0.05). Conclusions: The RC may be evaluated with standard MRI sequences without fat saturation at long-term follow-up. A normal appearance of the RC is correlated with good clinical outcome, while re-tear and tendinosis are associated with pain

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnumurthy H. Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS Thirty patients clinically suspected to have rotator cuff tear who underwent ultrasonography and arthroscopy of shoulder were included in the study. Duration of study was for two years. All ultrasonography examinations were conducted in ultrasound machine using GE Voluson 730 PRO high frequency (10-12 MHz linear array transducer done by two experienced radiologists. Arthroscopies were done by two experienced shoulder arthroscopic surgeons. RESULTS Age of the patients with rotator cuff tears ranged from 40 to 80 years. 57% were females and 43% were males among the patients who had rotator cuff tears. 71.43% of the rotator cuff tears were found in the dominant arm. 64.28% of patients with rotator cuff tear had given history of fall or trauma to the corresponding shoulder within 6 months prior to presentation. 39.28% of patients who had rotator cuff tears were known diabetics. Supraspinatus tendon was the most commonly affected tendon, followed by infraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. For overall detection of rotator cuff tears, ultrasonography in comparison with the arthroscopy has sensitivity and specificity of 92.85% and 100%. For detection of full thickness rotator cuff tear, its sensitivity and specificity was 94.73% and 100% and for partial thickness rotator cuff tears 76.92% and 100%. Ultrasonography has 100% sensitivity and specificity for detection of supraspinatus full thickness tear. For supraspinatus partial thickness tear, sensitivity and specificity was 88

  20. Electro-physical properties of superconducting ceramic thick film prepared by partial melting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2013-05-01

    BiSrCaCuO superconductor thick films were prepared at several curing temperatures, and their electro-physical properties were determined to find an optimum fabrication conditions. Critical temperatures of the superconductors were decreased with increasing melting temperature, which was related to the amount of equilibrium phases of the superconducting materials with temperature. The critical temperature of BiSrCaCuO bulk and thick film superconductors were 107 K and 96 K, respectively. The variation of susceptibility of the superconductor thick film formed at 950 degrees C had multi-step-type curve for 70 G externally applied field, whereas, a superconductor thick film formed at 885 degrees C had a single step-type curve like a bulk BiSrCaCuO ceramic superconductor in the temperature-susceptibility curves. A partial melting at 865 degrees C is one of optimum conditions for making a superconductor thick film with a relatively homogeneous phase.

  1. Honey compared with silver sulphadiazine in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Kamran Ishaque; Malik, M A Nasir; Aslam, Azhar

    2010-10-01

    Burn injury is associated with a high incidence of death and disability; yet, its management remains problematic and costly. We conducted this clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of honey in the treatment of superficial and partial-thickness burns covering less than 40% of body surface area and compared its results with those of silver sulphadiazine (SSD). In this randomised comparative clinical trial, carried out Burn Center of POF Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan, from May 2007 to February 2008, 150 patients of all ages having similar types of superficial and partial-thickness burns at two sites on different parts of body were included. Each patient had one burn site treated with honey and one treated with topical SSD, randomly. The rate of re-epithelialization and healing of superficial and partial-thickness burns was significantly faster in the sites treated with honey than in the sites treated with SSD (13·47 ± 4·06 versus 15·62 ± 4·40 days, respectively: P honey healed completely in less than 21 days versus 24 days for the site treated with SSD. Six patients had positive culture for Pseudomonas aeroginsa in honey-treated site, whereas 27 patients had positive culture in SSD-treated site. The results clearly showed greater efficacy of honey over SSD cream for treating superficial and partial-thickness burns. 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  2. Are platelet-rich products necessary during the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelet-rich products (PRP are widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether platelet-rich products produce superior clinical or radiological outcomes is controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare clinical and radiological outcomes between groups with or without platelet-rich products. METHODS: The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before April 20, 2013. Studies were selected that clearly reported a comparison between the use or not of platelet-rich products. The Constant, ASES, UCLA, and SST scale systems and the rotator cuff retear rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects model. RESULTS: Seven studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis. No significant differences were found for the Constant scale (0.73, 95% CI, -1.82 to 3.27, P=0.58, ASES scale (-2.89, 95% CI, -6.31 to 0.53, P=0.1, UCLA scale (-0.79, 95% CI, -2.20 to 0.63, P=0.28, SST scale (0.34, 95% CI, -0.01 to 0.69, P=0.05, and the overall rotator cuff retear rate (0.71, 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.05, P=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to the initial tear size showed a lower retear rate in small- and medium-sized tears (0.33, 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.91, P=0.03 after platelet-rich product application but no difference for large- and massive-sized tears (0.86, 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.23, P=0.42. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the platelet-rich products have no benefits on the overall clinical outcomes and retear rate for the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, a decrease occurred in the rate of retears among patients treated with PRP for small- and medium-sized rotator cuff tears but not for large- and massive-sized tears. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II.

  3. What happens to patients when we do not repair their cuff tears? Five-year rotator cuff quality-of-life index outcomes following nonoperative treatment of patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorman, Richard S; More, Kristie D; Hollinshead, Robert M; Wiley, James P; Mohtadi, Nicholas G; Lo, Ian K Y; Brett, Kelly R

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 5-year outcomes in a prospective cohort of patients previously enrolled in a nonoperative rotator cuff tear treatment program. Patients with chronic (>3 months), full-thickness rotator cuff tears (demonstrated on imaging) who were referred to 1 of 2 senior shoulder surgeons were enrolled in the study between October 2008 and September 2010. They participated in a comprehensive, nonoperative, home-based treatment program. After 3 months, the outcome in these patients was defined as "successful" or "failed." Patients in the successful group were essentially asymptomatic and did not require surgery. Patients in the failed group were symptomatic and consented to undergo surgical repair. All patients were followed up at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 or more years. At 5 or more years, all patients were contacted for follow-up; the response rate was 84%. Approximately 75% of patients remained successfully treated with nonoperative treatment at 5 years and reported a mean rotator cuff quality-of-life index score of 83 of 100 (SD, 16). Furthermore, between 2 and 5 years, only 3 patients who had previously been defined as having a successful outcome became more symptomatic and underwent surgical rotator cuff repair. Those in whom nonoperative treatment had failed and who underwent surgical repair had a mean rotator cuff quality-of-life index score of 89 (SD, 11) at 5-year follow-up. The operative and nonoperative groups at 5-year follow-up were not significantly different (P = .11). Nonoperative treatment is an effective and lasting option for many patients with a chronic, full-thickness rotator cuff tear. While some clinicians may argue that nonoperative treatment delays inevitable surgical repair, our study shows that patients can do very well over time. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  5. Does Additional Biceps Augmentation Improve Rotator Cuff Healing and Clinical Outcomes in Anterior L-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears? Clinical Comparisons With Arthroscopic Partial Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Lee, Juyeob; Kim, Rag Gyu; Ko, Young-Won; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2017-11-01

    The repair of anterior L-shaped tears is usually difficult because of the lack of anterior rotator cuff tendon to cover the footprint. The biceps tendon is usually exposed from the retracted anterolateral corner of the torn tendon and can be easily used to augment rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: This study compared the clinical outcomes of the biceps augmentation technique with those of partial tendon repair for the arthroscopic treatment of large anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears to evaluate the role of additional biceps augmentation in tendon healing. We hypothesized that the biceps augmentation technique would lead to a lower rotator cuff tendon retear rate and provide satisfactory functional outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 64 patients with anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (31 patients) underwent repair of an anterior L-shaped tear combined with biceps augmentation, and group B (33 patients) had a partially repaired tendon whose footprint was exposed after repair without undue tension on the retracted tendon. Clinical evaluations were performed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, muscle strength, visual analog scale for pain, and patient satisfaction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for tendon integrity at 6 months postoperatively. The mean period of follow-up was 29.1 ± 3.5 months (range, 24-40 months). The mean ASES and Constant scores significantly improved from 52.8 ± 10.6 and 43.2 ± 9.9 preoperatively to 88.2 ± 6.9 and 86.8 ± 6.2 at final follow-up in group A ( P rotation [ER]: 57.5 ± 9.9 to 86.8 ± 9.3; internal rotation [IR]: 68.1 ± 10.8 to 88.1 ± 8.4; P rotator cuff tendon on postoperative MRI. The retear rate between the 2 groups showed no significant difference ( P = .552). Regarding clinical outcomes, both groups had no significant difference in the ASES score

  6. Partial cranial cruciate ligament tears treated with stem cell and platelet rich plasma combination therapy in 36 dogs: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Canapp

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate outcomes in 36 dogs with a partial CCL tear treated with autologous bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC or adipose derived progenitor cells (ADPC with platelet rich plasma (PRP combination.Materials and Methods: Medical records of client-owned dogs diagnosed with an early partial (≤50% tear of the craniomedial band of the CCL that were treated with BMAC-PRP or ADPC-PRP were reviewed from 2010-2015. Signalment, medical history, physical and orthopedic examination, objective temporospatial gait analyses, radiographs, day 0 and day 90 diagnostic arthroscopy findings, treatment, and outcome were among the data collected. A functional owner questionnaire, including the validated Helsinki chronic pain index (HCPI, was sent to owners whose dog was known to not have had a TPLO. Statistical analysis was performed on data, where significance was established at p50% CCL tear and a TPLO was performed. Four additional dogs were known to have had a TPLO performed elsewhere. Baseline and day 90 post treatment objective gait analyses were available on 11 of the 36 dogs. A significant difference was found between the treated limb TPI% at day 0 and day 90 (p=0.0124, and between the treated limb and contralateral limb TPI% at day 0 (p=0.0003. No significant difference was found between the treated limb and contralateral limb TPI% at day 90 (p=0.7466. Twelve questionnaires were returned, of which 8 were performance/sporting dogs. Seven of the 8 had returned to sport; the remaining dog had just begun a return to sport conditioning program 6 months post treatment. All 12 respondents believed their dog had an excellent or very good quality of life, and rated their dog’s procedural outcome as excellent or good.Conclusion: The use of BMAC-PRP and ADPC-PRP shows promise for the treatment of early partial CCL tears in dogs.

  7. Treatment of Partial Thickness Burns with a Novel Extracellular Matrix in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-20

    partial thickness burn was produced using a brass scale weight. Groups of 10 rats were randomly assigned to the various treatments . Jackets made from...Objectives: The objective this study was to examine the cellular and immune responses to various extracellular matrices (ECM) in a rat burn model...significant difference between treatments in terms of mean wound area (p = 0.77). Histologic examination revealed that all of the grafts were infected, with

  8. Effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Xi; Yan Li; Xiaojin Ge; Dandan Liu; Mingsan Miao

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Observing the effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit. Method: We prepared boiling water scalded rabbits with deep II degree scald models and applied high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film for different time and area. Then we compared the difference of burned paper weight before administration and after administration model burns, burn local skin irritation points infection, skin crusting and scabs from th...

  9. Anti-scar Treatment for Deep Partial-thickness Burn Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    applied topically to deep partial-thickness burn wounds reduced α-SMA protein expression ( ELISA ). Mouse burn wounds were treated with PFD twice...immediately and at 48 hrs post- burn. α-SMA in wound skin homogenates was assayed by ELISA . α-SMA protein was significantly lower in mice treated with...Inflammatory cytokines in wound skin homogenates were assayed by ELISA . This early treatment during the inflammatory stage of healing significantly reduced

  10. Tears of the Supraspinatus Tendon: Assessment with Indirect Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in 67 Patients with Arthroscopic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, P. van; Gielen, J.L.; Parizel, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is generally regarded as the gold standard for shoulder imaging. As an alternative to direct MR arthrography, the less invasive indirect MR arthrography technique was proposed, offering logistic advantages because fluoroscopic or ultrasonographic guidance for joint injection is not required. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness supraspinatus tears in a symptomatic population. Material and Methods: Two radiologists with different levels of experience independently and retrospectively interpreted indirect MR (1.5T) arthrograms of the shoulder obtained in 67 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopy. On MR, the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated for full- or partial-thickness tear. With arthroscopy as the standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography in the detection of full- and partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon was calculated. Kappa (κ) statistics were used for the assessment of the agreement between arthroscopic and imaging findings and for the assessment of interobserver agreement. Results: For full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon, sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies exceeded 90% for both observers, with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 0.910). For partial-thickness tears, sensitivities (38-50%) and accuracies (76-78%) were poor for both reviewers, and interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.491). Discrepancies between MR diagnosis and arthroscopy were predominantly observed with small partial-thickness tears. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears with indirect MR arthrography remains faulty, because exact demarcation of degenerative change and partial rupture is difficult. On the basis of

  11. Tears of the Supraspinatus Tendon: Assessment with Indirect Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in 67 Patients with Arthroscopic Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, P. van; Gielen, J.L.; Parizel, P.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium)) (and others)

    2009-11-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is generally regarded as the gold standard for shoulder imaging. As an alternative to direct MR arthrography, the less invasive indirect MR arthrography technique was proposed, offering logistic advantages because fluoroscopic or ultrasonographic guidance for joint injection is not required. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness supraspinatus tears in a symptomatic population. Material and Methods: Two radiologists with different levels of experience independently and retrospectively interpreted indirect MR (1.5T) arthrograms of the shoulder obtained in 67 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopy. On MR, the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated for full- or partial-thickness tear. With arthroscopy as the standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography in the detection of full- and partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon was calculated. Kappa (kappa) statistics were used for the assessment of the agreement between arthroscopic and imaging findings and for the assessment of interobserver agreement. Results: For full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon, sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies exceeded 90% for both observers, with excellent interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.910). For partial-thickness tears, sensitivities (38-50%) and accuracies (76-78%) were poor for both reviewers, and interobserver agreement was moderate (kappa = 0.491). Discrepancies between MR diagnosis and arthroscopy were predominantly observed with small partial-thickness tears. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears with indirect MR arthrography remains faulty, because exact demarcation of degenerative change and partial rupture is difficult. On the

  12. Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears With and Without Acromioplasty: Randomized Prospective Trial With 2-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Geoffrey D; Gupta, Anil K; Hussey, Kristen E; Tetteh, Elizabeth S; Karas, Vasili; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2014-06-01

    Acromioplasty is commonly performed during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, but its effect on short-term outcomes is debated. To report the short-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without acromioplasty. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears were randomized into acromioplasty or nonacromioplasty groups. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and Short Form-12 (SF-12) health assessment were collected along with physical examination including range of motion and dynamometer strength testing. Intraoperative data including tear size, repair configuration, and concomitant procedures were recorded. Follow-up examination was performed at regular intervals up to 2 years. Preoperative imaging was reviewed to classify the acromial morphologic type, acromial angle, and lateral acromial angulation. A total of 114 patients were initially enrolled in the study, and 95 (83%; 43 nonacromioplasty, 52 acromioplasty) were available for a minimum 2-year follow-up. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, including number of tendons torn, repair configuration, concomitant procedures, and acromion type and angles. Within groups, there was a significant (P < .001) improvement in all functional outcome scores from preoperatively to all follow-up time points, including 2 years, for the nonacromioplasty and acromioplasty groups (ASES score: 55.1-91.5, 48.8-89.0; Constant score: 48.3-75.0, 51.9-78.7, respectively). There were no significant differences in functional outcomes between nonacromioplasty and acromioplasty groups or between subjects with different acromial features at any time point. The results of this study demonstrate no difference in clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair

  13. Is the arthroscopic suture bridge technique suitable for full-thickness rotator cuff tears of any size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kweon, Seok Hyun; Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Se Jin; Park, Jin Sung

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes and tendon integrity between the suture bridge and modified tension band techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A consecutive series of 128 patients who underwent the modified tension band (MTB group; 69 patients) and suture bridge (SB group; 59 patients) techniques were enrolled. The pain visual analogue scale (VAS), Constant, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were determined preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Rotator cuff hypotrophy was quantified by calculating the occupation ratio (OR). Rotator cuff integrity and the global fatty degeneration index were determined by using magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. The average VAS, Constant, and ASES scores improved significantly at the final follow-up in both groups (p bridge groups (7.0 vs. 6.8%, respectively; p = n.s.). The retear rate of large-to-massive tears was significantly lower in the suture bridge group than in the modified tension band group (33.3 vs. 70%; p = 0.035). Fatty infiltration (postoperative global fatty degeneration index, p = 0.022) and muscle hypotrophy (postoperative OR, p = 0.038) outcomes were significantly better with the suture bridge technique. The retear rate was lower with the suture bridge technique in the case of large-to-massive rotator cuff tears. Additionally, significant improvements in hypotrophy and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff were obtained with the suture bridge technique, possibly resulting in better anatomical outcomes. The suture bridge technique was a more effective method for the repair of rotator cuff tears of all sizes as compared to the modified tension band technique. Retrospective Cohort Design, Treatment Study, level III.

  14. MR imaging of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    A total of 115 patients with clinical symptoms and signs suggesting rotator cuff tears underwent MR imaging with a 1.5-Tesla system. The body coil was used as the receiver coil in 24 patients and a single 10 cm surface coil in 91. Arthrography or MR imaging with intra-articular Gd-DTPA (MR arthrography) was performed in 95 of the 115. T2-weighted images with the body coil showed high signal intensity lesions in rotator cuffs in only seven of the 10 patients who had tears demonstrated by arthrography or MR arthrography. On the other hand, T2-weighted images with the surface coil demonstrated high signal intensity lesions in cuffs in all 27 patients who were diagnosed to have tears by arthrography or MR arthrography. In 12 patietns, T2-wighted images with the surface coil showed high signal intensity lesions in cuffs, while arthrography and MR arthrography did not show tears. Surgery was performed in four of the 12 patients and partial tears were confirmed. A single 10 cm surface coil, 3 mm slice thickness and 2.5 second repetition time seem to account for the fine visualization of cuff tears by the T2-weighted images. These results suggest that T2-weighted images obtained with the surface coil are superior to arthrography and MR arthrography. (author)

  15. Use of a copolymer dressing on superficial and partial-thickness burns in a paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M; Massand, S; Davis, W; Burkey, B; Glat, P M

    2015-07-01

    Despite extensive research into the treatment of partial-thickness burns, to date there has not been the emergence of a preeminent modality. This pilot study, the first such study to be performed in a burn unit in the US, was designed to evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of the application of copolymer dressing (Suprathel; PolyMedics Innovations Corporation, Stuttgart, Germany) for both superficial and deeper partial-thickness burns. The copolymer dressing was used as a primary wound dressing to treat superficial and deep partial-thickness burns (average 5% total body surface area) in paediatric patients. Burns were debrided within 24 hours, at bedside, in the burn unit or in the operating room. The copolymer dressing was then applied directly to the wound and covered with a non-adherent second layer and an absorptive outer dressing. After discharge, patients were seen every 5-7 days until healed. Parameters evaluated included average hospital length of stay, average number of intravenous doses of narcotics administered, pain score at first follow-up visit, average time to complete re epithelialisation, incidence of burn wound infection, and patient/parent satisfaction on a 4-point scale. We also evaluated our experience with the dressing. Data were evaluated retrospectively under an Investigational Review Board approved protocol. Of the 17 patients assessed the average hospital length of stay was 1.4 days during which the average number of intravenous narcotic doses administered before copolymer dressing application was 1.5 and after was 0.1 doses. At the first follow-up visit, average pain score was 1.2 on a 10-point scale and the average time to re epithelialisation was 9.5 days. There was no incidence of burn wound infection. Patient/parent satisfaction was average of 3.66 on a 4-point scale. The staff had found that the self-adherence and elasticity of the dressing made it easy to apply and stay adherent, especially in areas of difficult contour. There were

  16. Automated Measurement of Tear Film Dynamics and Lipid Layer Thickness for Assessment of Non-Sjögren Dry Eye Syndrome With Meibomian Gland Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yong Woo; Lee, Jeihoon; Lee, Hun; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Kim, Eung Kweon; Kim, Tae-Im

    2017-02-01

    To investigate automated values from an advanced corneal topographer with a built-in real keratometer, color camera, and ocular surface interferometer for the evaluation of non-Sjögren dry eye syndrome (NSDES) with meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Sixty-four patients (64 eyes) diagnosed with NSDES with MGD were enrolled. All eyes were evaluated using the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI), fluorescence staining score, tear film breakup time (TBUT), Schirmer test, and MGD grade. Noninvasive Keratograph average tear film breakup time (NIKBUTav), tear meniscus height (TMHk), meibomian gland (MG) dropout grade, and lipid layer thickness (LLT) using interferometry were measured. Among automated indexes, NIKBUTav (mean 7.68 ± 4.07 s) and the MG dropout grade (mean 1.0 ± 0.5) significantly correlated with the OSDI (mean 40.6 ± 22.9) (r = -0.337, P = 0.006; and r = 0.201, P = 0.023, respectively), as did all conventional indicators, except the Schirmer score (mean 9.1 ± 5.9 mm). TMHk (mean 0.21 ± 0.18 mm) had significant correlation with the Schirmer score, the staining score (mean 1.2 ± 0.7), TBUT (mean 3.8 ± 1.8 s), and NIKBUTav (r = 0.298, P = 0.007; r = -0.268, P = 0.016; r = 0.459, P < 0.001; and r = 0.439, P < 0.001, respectively), but not any MGD indicator, even the MG dropout grade. NIKBUTav showed significant correlations with all clinical parameters and other automated values, except the Schirmer score and LLT (mean 83.94 ± 20.82 nm) (all (Equation is included in full-text article.)≥ 0.25 and P < 0.01). The MG dropout grade highly correlated with all indexes except TMHk (all (Equation is included in full-text article.)≥ 0.25 and P < 0.05). LLT was significantly associated with TBUT, MGD grade (mean 2.0 ± 0.7), and MG dropout grade (r = 0.219, P = 0.047; r = -0.221, P = 0.039; and r = 0.433, P < 0.001, respectively), although it was not related to patient symptoms. Automated noninvasive measurements using an advanced corneal topographer and LLT

  17. The use of Hyalomatrix PA in the treatment of deep partial-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravante, Gianpiero; Delogu, Daniela; Giordan, Nicola; Morano, Giuseppina; Montone, Antonio; Esposito, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    Since 2001, Hyalomatrix PA (Fidia Advanced Biopolymers, Abano Terme, Italy) has been used in our center on pediatric burned patients as a temporary dermal substitute to cover deep partial-thickness burns after dermabrasion. This "bridge" treatment was adopted to remove necrotic debris (dermabrasion) and to stimulate regeneration in a humid and protected environment (Hyalomatrix PA). We present results obtained with this approach. On the third to fifth day after admission, dermabrasion was practiced on deep burned areas, which were covered with Hyalomatrix PA. Change of dressings was performed every 7 days. On day 21, those areas still without signs of recovery were removed with classic escharectomy and covered with thin skin grafts. We treated 300 patients. Sixty-one percent needed only one dermabrasion treatment, 22.3% (67 patients) more than one, and 16.7% (50 patients) the classic escharectomy. A total of 83% of patients healed within 21 days. Our study suggests that the combination of dermabrasion with a temporary dermal substitute could be a good and feasible approach for treatment of deep partial-thickness burns. Prospective randomized studies are now necessary to compare our protocol with the gold standard treatment of topical dressings.

  18. Effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Peng; Li, Yan; Ge, Xiaojin; Liu, Dandan; Miao, Mingsan

    2018-05-01

    Observing the effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit. We prepared boiling water scalded rabbits with deep II degree scald models and applied high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film for different time and area. Then we compared the difference of burned paper weight before administration and after administration model burns, burn local skin irritation points infection, skin crusting and scabs from the time, and the impact of local skin tissue morphology. Rabbits deep II degree burn model successful modeling; on day 12, 18, high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film significantly reduced skin irritation of rabbits infected with the integral value ( P  film group significantly decreased skin irritation, infection integral value ( P  film significantly reduced film rabbits' scalded skin crusting time ( P  film on the deep partial thickness burns has a significant therapeutic effect; external use has a significant role in wound healing.

  19. Optimal treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vloemans, A F P M; Hermans, M H E; van der Wal, M B A; Liebregts, J; Middelkoop, E

    2014-03-01

    A large part of the patient population of a burn centre consists of children, most of whom are younger than four years. The majority of these young children suffer from superficial and deep partial thickness scald burns that may easily deepen to full thickness burns. A proper wound therapy, that prevents infection and ensures a moist wound condition, might prevent the deterioration of the wound. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of wound management and dressing materials to select the best treatment option for children with burns. A search in Medline and Embase revealed 51 articles for a critical appraisal. The articles were divided into randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and a group of case-reports. Total appraisal did not differ much amongst the groups; the level of evidence was highest in the randomized controlled trials and lowest in the case-reports. In 16 out of 34 comparative studies, silver sulfadiazine or a silver sulfadiazine/chlorhexidine-gluconate combination was the standard of wound care treatment. The competitor dressing was Biobrane(®) in six studies and amnion membrane in three. Tulle gauze, or tulle gauze impregnated with an antibacterial addition were the standard of care treatment in seven studies. In general, membranous dressings like Biobrane(®) and amnion membrane performed better than the standard of care on epithelialization rate, length of hospital stay and pain for treatment of partial thickness burns in children. However, hardly any of the studies investigated long-term results like scar formation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J.; Loon, Ton van; Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  1. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and HTA, Geert Grooteplein Noord 21, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  2. Dielectric response of fully and partially depleted ferroelectric thin films and inversion of the thickness effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misirlioglu, I B; Yildiz, M

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of full and partial depletion on the dielectric response characteristics of ferroelectric thin films with impurities via a computational approach. Using a thermodynamic approach along with the fundamental equations for semiconductors, we show that films with partial depletion display unique features and an enhanced dielectric response compared with those fully depleted. We find that the capacitance peak at switching can be significantly suppressed in the case of high impurity densities (>10 25 m −3 ) with relatively low ionization energy, of the order of 0.5 eV. For conserved number of species in films, electromigration of ionized impurities at room temperature is negligible and has nearly no effect on the dielectric response. In films with high impurity density, the dielectric response at zero bias is enhanced with respect to charge-free films or those with relatively low impurity density ( 24 m −3 ). We demonstrate that partially depleted films should be expected to exhibit peculiar capacitance–voltage characteristics at low and high bias and that the thickness effect probed in experiments in ferroelectric thin films could be entirely inverted in thin films with depletion charges where a higher dielectric response can be measured in thicker films. Therefore, depletion charge densities in ferroelectric thin films should be estimated before size-effect-related studies. Finally, we noted that these findings are in good qualitative agreement with dielectric measurements carried out on PbZr x Ti 1−x O 3 . (paper)

  3. Does high location and thickness of the Wrisberg ligament affect discoid lateral meniscus tear type based on peripheral detachment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Dong Uk; Lee, Do Kyung; Kim, Jun Ho

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) types based on peripheral detachment and anatomic features of Wrisberg ligament (WL) such as location and thickness based on magnetic resonance image (MRI). A total of 322 knees in 292 patients were reviewed. Patients were divided into four DLM types according to peripheral detachment: no shift (type 1), anterocentral shift (type 2), posterocentral shift (type 3) and central shift (type 4). We reviewed all MRI concentrating on the presence, location (high or low location), running angle, thickness of WL, and WL/posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) thickness ratio. The relationship between DLM types and anatomic features of WL were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. According to DLM types based on peripheral detachment, 149 knees were type 1, 38 were type 2, 79 were type 3, and 56 were type 4. Among the 322 knees, 302 (93.8%) had WL on MRI. In DLM patients, type 3 showed a statistically significant (Plocation of WL. In addition, type 3 had significantly larger (Plocation and thick WL are related to posterocentral shift type of DLM based on peripheral detachment. Based on our results, the high location and thick WL might provide information to surgeons in predicting the direction of peripheral detachment in symptomatic DLM patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ERK2 dependent signaling contributes to wound healing after a partial-thickness burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yasushi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Takeuchi, Atsuya; Ojima, Kenichiro; Kouzu, Keita; Kawakami, Saki; Ito, Masataka; Ishihara, Masayuki; Sato, Shunichi; Takishima, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Burn healing is a complex physiological process involving multiple cell activities, such as cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Although extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) have a pivotal role in regulating a variety of cellular responses, little is known about the individual functions of ERK isoform for healing in vivo. This study investigated the role of ERK2 in burn healing. To assess this, Erk2 +/- mice generated by gene targeting were used. The resultant mice exhibited significant delay in re-epithelization of partial-thickness burns in the skin in comparison to wild-type. An in vitro proliferation assay revealed that keratinocytes from Erk2 +/- mice grew significantly slower than those prepared from wild-type. These results highlight the importance of ERK2 in the process of burn healing.

  5. Effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Observing the effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit. Method: We prepared boiling water scalded rabbits with deep II degree scald models and applied high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film for different time and area. Then we compared the difference of burned paper weight before administration and after administration model burns, burn local skin irritation points infection, skin crusting and scabs from the time, and the impact of local skin tissue morphology. Result: Rabbits deep II degree burn model successful modeling; on day 12, 18, high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film significantly reduced skin irritation of rabbits infected with the integral value (P < 0.01, P < 0.05; high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film group significantly decreased skin irritation, infection integral value (P < 0.01, P < 0.05; high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film significantly reduced film rabbits’ scalded skin crusting time (P < 0.01, significantly shortened the rabbit skin burns from the scab time (P < 0.01, and significantly improved the treatment of skin diseases in rabbits scald model change (P < 0.01, P < 0.05. Conclusion: The nano-silver hydrogel coating film on the deep partial thickness burns has a significant therapeutic effect; external use has a significant role in wound healing. Keywords: Nano-silver hydrogel coating film, Deep degree burns, Topical, Rabbits

  6. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Polar Lipids on Tear Film Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Aydemir, E.

    2010-06-17

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model describing the effect of polar lipids, excreted by glands in the eyelid and present on the surface of the tear film, on the evolution of a pre-corneal tear film. We aim to explain the interesting experimentally observed phenomenon that the tear film continues to move upward even after the upper eyelid has become stationary. The polar lipid is an insoluble surface species that locally alters the surface tension of the tear film. In the lubrication limit, the model reduces to two coupled non-linear partial differential equations for the film thickness and the concentration of lipid. We solve the system numerically and observe that increasing the concentration of the lipid increases the flow of liquid up the eye. We further exploit the size of the parameters in the problem to explain the initial evolution of the system. © 2010 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  8. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical Center of Kurume University, 155-1 Kokubu-machi, Kurume City, Fukuoka 839-0862 (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  9. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  10. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis reduces neutrophil infiltration and necrosis in partial-thickness scald burns in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Jill; Delarosa, Sara; Wu, Jianfeng; Peterson, Jonathan R; Eboda, Oluwatobi N; Su, Grace L; Hemmila, Mark; Krebsbach, Paul H; Cederna, Paul S; Wang, Stewart C; Xi, Chuanwu; Levi, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), present in thermally injured tissue, modulates the inflammatory response and causes significant tissue damage. The authors hypothesize that neutrophil infiltration and ensuing tissue necrosis would be mitigated by removing ATP-dependent signaling at the burn site. Mice were subjected to 30% TBSA partial-thickness scald burn by dorsal skin immersion in a water bath at 60 or 20°C (nonburn controls). In the treatment arm, an ATP hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, was applied directly to the site immediately after injury. Skin was harvested after 24 hours and 5 days for hematoxylin and eosin stain, elastase, and Ki-67 staining. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-β expression were measured through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. At 24 hours, the amount of neutrophil infiltration was different between the burn and burn + apyrase groups (P burn group at 24 hours and 5 days. TNF-α and IFN-β expression at 24 hours in the apyrase group was lower than in the burn group (P burn site allays the neutrophil response to thermal injury and reduces tissue necrosis. This decrease in inflammation and tissue necrosis is at least partially because of TNF-α and IFN-β signaling. Apyrase could be used as topical inflammatory regulators to quell the injury caused by inflammation.

  11. Assessment of lamellar tearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnerney, J.W.

    1978-03-01

    Information on lamellar tearing is summarized and related to proposed ASME Code requirements. Lamellar tearing is characterized as a complex phenomenon related to poor short transverse ductility and through-thickness strain. The material, welding, and design variables that affect lamellar tearing are shown to be complex and interrelated. The commonly reported tests for assessing material susceptibility are described, with the controversy over their validity being carefully detailed. Although the use of a nondestructive test such as ultrasonic examination is most desirable, a widely applicable test method does not appear to be available. Of the destructive tests, the short transverse tensile reduction-of-area currently offers the most applicable means of assessing material susceptibility. However, because of the importance of matrix toughness, the short transverse Charpy V-notch test should be considered for use as an additional test if acceptance limits are developed. The ultrasonic detection of lamellar tears is susceptible to interpretation errors, which can make it overly conservative and lead to unnecessary repairs. The repair of tears is described as costly, difficult, and sometimes ineffective. Current design requirements appear to preclude any failures during static and fatigue service loads. However, without improvement of short transverse ductility, certain dynamic service loads could cause lamellar tearing failures. Two alternate design paths are recommended to prevent tearing during fabrication or service loading. The current and proposed ASME requirements dealing with lamellar tearing are reviewed and recommendations are made

  12. [Clinical study and pathological examination on the treatment of deep partial thickness burn wound with negative charge aerosol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-zeng; Xu, Ying-bin; Hu, Xiao-gen; Shen, Rui; Peng, Xiao-dong; Wu, Wei-jiang; Luo, Lan; Dai, Xin-ming; Zou, Yong-tong; Qi, Shao-hai; Wu, Li-ping; Xie, Ju-lin; Deng, Xiao-xin; Chen, E; Zhang, Hui-Zhen

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the effect of negative charge aerosol (NCA) on the treatment of burn wound. Patients with superficial or deep partial thickness burn only were enrolled in the study, and they were randomly divided into trial group (T, including 180 cases of superficial thickness burn and 100 cases of deep partial thickness burn), control group (C, including 30 cases with superficial thickness burn and 30 with deep partial thickness burn), and self control group (SC, including 10 cases with superficial thickness burn and 10 with deep partial thickness burn). The patients in T and SC groups were treated with NCA for 1.5 hours, 1-2 times a day, from 6 postburn hour (PBH) to 2 postburn day (PBD), while those in C group received conventional treatment. For those in SC group, some of the wounds were covered with sterile schissel, while other wounds without schissel covering. The general changes in the wounds during NCA treatment were observed, and bacterial culture before and after NCA treatment was performed. The healing time was recorded and the blood biochemical parameters were determined. Rat model with deep partial thickness scald was established, and the rats were also divided into T and C groups, and received treatment as in human. Tissue samples were harvested from the wounds of rats in the 2 groups before and 1, 2, 3 weeks after treatment for pathological examination. There was no infection and little exudation in the patients in T group. No bacteria were found in the wound before and after NCA treatment. The healing time of the wounds of patients with superficial and deep partial thickness burn in T group was 6.3 +/- 1.6 d and 15.1 +/- 3.1 d, respectively, which was obviously shorter than those in C group (11.3 +/- 1.4 d and 21.2 +/- 1.4 d, P Negative charge aerosol is safe and effective in promoting wound healing of the patients with partial thickness burns.

  13. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  14. Angled oblique sagittal MR imaging of rotator cuff tears: comparison with standard oblique sagittal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, M.J.; Asinger, D.; Orwin, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To compare the accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears of oblique coronal images supplemented with standard oblique sagittal images versus thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images.Design and patients. The study included 75 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR scan followed by arthroscopy. MR images included oblique coronal, oblique sagittal (4 mm thick, 1 mm interslice gap), and angled oblique sagittal (3 mm/0.2 mm) images perpendicular to the lateral cuff. A musculoskeletal staff radiologist and fellow separately evaluated the cuff for tears on the oblique coronal images supplemented with either the oblique sagittal or the angled sagittal images.Results. For distinguishing a cuff tear from no tear, the staff radiologist had an accuracy of 0.76 (95% confidence interval: 0.67, 0.85) with the standard sagittal set, and 0.88 (0.80, 0.95) with the angled set (P=0.04). There was a nonsignificant improvement in accuracy for the fellow, calculated as 0.73 (0.63, 0.83) on the standard sagittal set and 0.76 (0.67, 0.85) on the angled set. Both readers also improved their diagnostic accuracy for partial-thickness tears with the angled set, although the improvement was statistically significant only for the staff radiologist.Conclusion. There is a slight improvement in accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears, particularly partial-thickness tears, for the more experienced radiologist using thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images. These images may be useful as a supplemental sequence in patients where it is important to identify partial-thickness tears accurately. (orig.)

  15. Angled oblique sagittal MR imaging of rotator cuff tears: comparison with standard oblique sagittal images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J; Asinger, D; Orwin, J F [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Objective. To compare the accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears of oblique coronal images supplemented with standard oblique sagittal images versus thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images.Design and patients. The study included 75 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR scan followed by arthroscopy. MR images included oblique coronal, oblique sagittal (4 mm thick, 1 mm interslice gap), and angled oblique sagittal (3 mm/0.2 mm) images perpendicular to the lateral cuff. A musculoskeletal staff radiologist and fellow separately evaluated the cuff for tears on the oblique coronal images supplemented with either the oblique sagittal or the angled sagittal images.Results. For distinguishing a cuff tear from no tear, the staff radiologist had an accuracy of 0.76 (95% confidence interval: 0.67, 0.85) with the standard sagittal set, and 0.88 (0.80, 0.95) with the angled set (P=0.04). There was a nonsignificant improvement in accuracy for the fellow, calculated as 0.73 (0.63, 0.83) on the standard sagittal set and 0.76 (0.67, 0.85) on the angled set. Both readers also improved their diagnostic accuracy for partial-thickness tears with the angled set, although the improvement was statistically significant only for the staff radiologist.Conclusion. There is a slight improvement in accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears, particularly partial-thickness tears, for the more experienced radiologist using thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images. These images may be useful as a supplemental sequence in patients where it is important to identify partial-thickness tears accurately. (orig.)

  16. Trabecular microstructure and surface changes in the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yebin; Zhao, Jenny; Ouyang, Xiaolong; Genant, Harry K.; Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van; Flynn, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective. When planning surgery in patients with rotator cuff tear, strength of bone at the tendon insertion and trabecular bone structure in the greater tuberosity are usually taken into consideration. We investigated radiographic changes in bone structure of the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears.Design. Twenty-two human cadaveric shoulders from subjects ranging from 55 to 75 years of age were obtained. The integrity of the rotator cuff was examined by sonography to determine if it is intact without any tear, or torn partially or completely. The humeral head was sectioned in 3 mm thick coronal slab sections and microradiographed. After digitization of the microradiographs and imaging processing with in-house semi-automated image processing software tools developed using software interfaces on a Sun workstation, the trabecular histomorphometrical structural parameters and connectivity in the greater tuberosity were quantified. The degenerative changes on the surface of the greater tuberosity were interpreted blindly by 2 independent readers.Results. Among the 22 shoulder specimens, the rotator cuff was found intact in 10 shoulders, partially in 7 and fully torn in 5. Statistically significant loss in apparent trabecular bone volume fraction, number of trabecular nodes, and number of trabecular branches, and a statistically significant increase in apparent trabecular separation and number of trabecular free ends were found in the greater tuberosity of the shoulders with tears. The loss was greater in association with full tear than in partial tear. Thickening of the cortical margin of the enthesis, irregularity of its surface, and calcification beyond the tidemark were observed in 2 (20%) shoulders with intact rotator cuff, in 6 (86%) shoulders with partial tear, and in 5 (100%) shoulders with full tear.Conclusions. Rotator cuff tears are associated with degenerative changes on the bone surface and with disuse osteopenia of the greater tuberosity

  17. Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment on Deep Partial-Thickness Burn Injury in Rats: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Djedovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT enhances tissue vascularization and neoangiogenesis. Recent animal studies showed improved soft tissue regeneration using ESWT. In most cases, deep partial-thickness burns require skin grafting; the outcome is often unsatisfactory in function and aesthetic appearance. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of ESWT on skin regeneration after deep partial-thickness burns. Under general anesthesia, two standardized deep partial-thickness burns were induced on the back of 30 male Wistar rats. Immediately after the burn, ESWT was given to rats of group 1 (N=15, but not to group 2 (N=15. On days 5, 10, and 15, five rats of each group were analyzed. Reepithelialization rate was defined, perfusion units were measured, and histological analysis was performed. Digital photography was used for visual documentation. A wound score system was used. ESWT enhanced the percentage of wound closure in group 1 as compared to group 2 (P<0.05. The reepithelialization rate was improved significantly on day 15 (P<0.05. The wound score showed a significant increase in the ESWT group. ESWT improves skin regeneration of deep partial-thickness burns in rats. It may be a suitable and cost effective treatment alternative in this type of burn wounds in the future.

  18. Partial-thickness macular hole in vitreomacular traction syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Sabti Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vitreomacular traction syndrome has recently been recognized as a distinct clinical condition. It may lead to many complications, such as cystoid macular edema, macular pucker formation, tractional macular detachment, and full-thickness macular hole formation. Case presentation We report a case of vitreomacular traction syndrome with eccentric traction at the macula and a partial-thickness macular hole in a 63-year-old Pakistani Punjabi man. The patient was evaluated using optical coherence tomography, and he underwent a successful pars plana vitrectomy. After the operation, his foveal contour regained normal configuration, and his visual acuity improved from 20/60 to 20/30. Conclusions Pars plana vitrectomy prevents the progression of a partial thickness macular hole in vitreomacular traction syndrome. The relief of traction by vitrectomy restores foveal anatomy and visual acuity in this condition.

  19. Neotendon infilling of a full thickness rotator cuff foot print tear following ultrasound guided liquid platelet rich plasma injection and percutaneous tenotomy: favourable outcome up to one year [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arockia Doss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on excellent clinical outcome and neotendon infilling at one year follow up in a degenerative rotator cuff full thickness tear following percutaneous tenotomy and platelet rich plasma injection.

  20. Comparison of three different dressings for partial thickness burns in children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, Emma; Kimble, Roy M; Cuttle, Leila; Stockton, Kellie

    2013-11-25

    In the paediatric population, pain and distress associated with burn injuries during wound care procedures remain a constant challenge. Although silver dressings are the gold standard for burn care in Australasia, very few high-level trials have been conducted that compare silver dressings to determine which will provide the best level of care clinically. Therefore, for paediatric patients in particular, identifying silver dressings that are associated with lower levels of pain and rapid wound re-epithelialisation is imperative. This study will determine whether there is a difference in time to re-epithelialisation and pain and distress experienced during wound care procedures among Acticoat™, Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ and Mepilex Ag™ dressings for acute, paediatric partial thickness burns. Children aged 0 to 15 years with an acute partial thickness (superficial partial to deep partial thickness inclusive) burn injury and a burn total body surface area of ≤ 10% will be eligible for the trial. Patients will be randomised to one of the three dressing groups: (1) Acticoat™ or (2) Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ or (3) Mepilex Ag™. A minimum of 28 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Primary measures of pain, distress and healing will be repeated at each dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialisation occurs or skin grafting is required. Additional data collected will include infection status at each dressing change, physical function, scar outcome and scar management requirements, cost effectiveness of each dressing and staff perspectives of the dressings. The results of this study will determine the effects of three commonly used silver and silicone burn dressing combinations on the rate of wound re-epithelialisation and pain experienced during dressing procedures in acute, paediatric partial thickness burn injuries. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000105741.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for rotator cuff tears in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.O., E-mail: toby.smith@uea.ac.uk [Department of Physiotherapy, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Back, T. [Department of Physiotherapy, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Toms, A.P. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hing, C.B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound to detect partial and complete thickness rotator cuff tears based on all available clinical trials. Materials and methods: An electronic search of databases registering published and unpublished literature was conducted. All diagnostic accuracy studies that directly compared the accuracy of ultrasound (the index test) to either arthroscopic or open surgical findings (the reference test) for rotator cuff tear were included. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed using the QUADAS form. When appropriate, pooled sensitivity and specificity analysis was conducted, with an assessment of the summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each analysis. Results: Sixty-two studies assessing 6007 patients and 6066 shoulders were included. Ultrasonography had good sensitivity and specificity for the assessment of partial thickness (sensitivity 0.84; specificity 0.89), and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.93). However, the literature poorly described population characteristics, assessor blinding, and was based on limited sample sizes. The literature assessing transducer frequency was particularly small in size. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is an appropriate radiological technique for the assessment of rotator cuff tears with an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. The diagnostic test accuracy of ultrasound is superior for the detection of full-thickness compared to partial-thickness cuff tears. Further study assessing the effect of transducer frequency is warranted.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for rotator cuff tears in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.O.; Back, T.; Toms, A.P.; Hing, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound to detect partial and complete thickness rotator cuff tears based on all available clinical trials. Materials and methods: An electronic search of databases registering published and unpublished literature was conducted. All diagnostic accuracy studies that directly compared the accuracy of ultrasound (the index test) to either arthroscopic or open surgical findings (the reference test) for rotator cuff tear were included. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed using the QUADAS form. When appropriate, pooled sensitivity and specificity analysis was conducted, with an assessment of the summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each analysis. Results: Sixty-two studies assessing 6007 patients and 6066 shoulders were included. Ultrasonography had good sensitivity and specificity for the assessment of partial thickness (sensitivity 0.84; specificity 0.89), and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.93). However, the literature poorly described population characteristics, assessor blinding, and was based on limited sample sizes. The literature assessing transducer frequency was particularly small in size. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is an appropriate radiological technique for the assessment of rotator cuff tears with an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. The diagnostic test accuracy of ultrasound is superior for the detection of full-thickness compared to partial-thickness cuff tears. Further study assessing the effect of transducer frequency is warranted.

  3. Hypertrophic changes of the teres minor muscle in rotator cuff tears: quantitative evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Ide, Junji; Kikuchi, Ken; Morita, Makoto; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Ogata, Hiroomi

    2014-12-01

    Few reports have assessed the teres minor (TM) muscle in rotator cuff tears. This study aimed to quantitatively analyze the morphologic changes of the TM muscle in patients with or without rotator cuff tears by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study consisted of 279 subjects classified on the basis of interpretations of conventional MRI observations into 6 groups: no cuff tear; partial-thickness supraspinatus (SSP) tear; full-thickness SSP tear; SSP and subscapularis tears; SSP and infraspinatus (ISP) tears; and SSP, ISP, and subscapularis tears. With use of ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA) for oblique sagittal MRI, we measured the areas of ISP, TM, and anatomic external rotation (ISP + TM) muscles on the most lateral side in which the scapular spine was in contact with the scapular body. The occupational ratios of the TM muscle area to the anatomic external rotation muscle area were calculated. Ratios above the maximum of the 95% confidence intervals of the occupational ratio in the no-tear group were defined as hypertrophy of the TM muscle. Occupational ratios of the TM muscle in the no-tear group followed a normal distribution, and ratios >0.288 were defined as hypertrophic. Hypertrophic changes of the TM muscle were confirmed in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP tendon. A negative correlation was found between the occupational ratios of TM and ISP (P muscle appeared hypertrophic in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP, and the progression of ISP muscle atrophy seemed to induce the development of this compensatory hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Efficacy observation on application of negative pressure therapy in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness scald wound in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chuan-an; Chai, Jia-ke; Tuo, Xiao-ye; Cai, Jian-hua; Li, Dong-jie; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Hua; Cai, Jin-dong

    2013-02-01

    To observe the effect of negative pressure therapy in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness scald in children. Three hundred and seven children with superficial partial-thickness scald hospitalized from August 2009 to May 2012 were divided into negative pressure therapy group (NPT, n = 145) and control group (C, n = 162) according to the random number table. Patients in group NPT were treated with negative pressure from within post injury day (PID) 3 to PID 9 (with -16 kPa pressure), while traditional occlusive dressing method was used in group C. Changes in body temperature, wound healing condition, frequency of dressing change were compared between group NPT and group C. Bacterial culture results of wounds were compared before and after treatment in group NPT. Volume of drained transudate per one percent of wound area was recorded in group NPT on PID 1 to PID 3. Data were processed with t test or chi-square test. The incidence of high fever was significantly lower in group NPT (26.9%, 39/145) than in group C (63.6%, 103/162, χ(2) = 41.419, P partial-thickness scald.

  5. Impact of a Newly Implemented Burn Protocol on Surgically Managed Partial Thickness Burns at a Specialized Burns Center in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Khwee-Soon Vincent; Chong, Si-Jack; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a newly implemented protocol for superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns which involves early surgery and rapid coverage with biosynthetic dressing in a specialized national burns center in Singapore. Consecutive patients with 5% or greater total body surface area (TBSA) superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns injury admitted to the Burns Centre at the Singapore General Hospital between August and December 2014 for surgery within 48 hours of injury were prospectively recruited into the study to form the protocol group. Comparable historical cases from the year 2013 retrieved from the burns center audit database were used to form the historical control group. Demographics (age, sex), type and depth of burns, %TBSA burnt, number of operative sessions, and length of stay were recorded for each patient of both cohorts. Thirty-nine burns patients managed under the new protocol were compared with historical control (n = 39) comparable in age and extensiveness of burns. A significantly shorter length of stay (P burns was observed in the new protocol group (0.74 day/%TBSA) versus historical control (1.55 day/%TBSA). Fewer operative sessions were needed under the new protocol for burns 10% or greater TBSA burns (P protocol for surgically managed burns patients which involves early surgery and appropriate use of biosynthetic dressing on superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns. Clinically, shorter lengths of stay, fewer operative sessions, and decreased need for skin grafting of burns patient were observed.

  6. 16-slice MDCT arthrography of the shoulder: accuracy for detection of glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gang Deuk; Kim, Huoung Jun; Kim, Hye Won; Oh, Jung Taek; Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ah [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice MDCT arthrography (CTA) for glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. We enrolled forty-five patients who underwent arthroscopy after CTA for pain or instability of the shoulder joint. The CTA images were analyzed for the existence, sites and types of glenoid labral tears and the presence and severity of rotator cuff tears. We determined the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CTA for detecting glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears on the basis of the arthroscopy findings. At arthroscopy, there were 33 SLAP lesions (9 type I, 23 type II and 1 type III), 6 Bankart lesions and 31 rotator cuff lesions (21 supraspinatus, 9 infraspinatus and 1 subscapularis). On CTA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting 24 SLAP lesions, excluding the type I lesions, were 83%, 100% and 91%, the total rotator cuff tears were 90%, 100% and 98%, the full thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 100%, 94% and 96%, and the partial thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 29%, 100% and 89%, respectively. 16-slice MDCT arthrography has high accuracy for the diagnosis of abnormality of the glenoid labrum or rotator cuff tears and it can be a useful alternative to MRI or US.

  7. 16-slice MDCT arthrography of the shoulder: accuracy for detection of glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gang Deuk; Kim, Huoung Jun; Kim, Hye Won; Oh, Jung Taek; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Lee, Sung Ah

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice MDCT arthrography (CTA) for glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. We enrolled forty-five patients who underwent arthroscopy after CTA for pain or instability of the shoulder joint. The CTA images were analyzed for the existence, sites and types of glenoid labral tears and the presence and severity of rotator cuff tears. We determined the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CTA for detecting glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears on the basis of the arthroscopy findings. At arthroscopy, there were 33 SLAP lesions (9 type I, 23 type II and 1 type III), 6 Bankart lesions and 31 rotator cuff lesions (21 supraspinatus, 9 infraspinatus and 1 subscapularis). On CTA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting 24 SLAP lesions, excluding the type I lesions, were 83%, 100% and 91%, the total rotator cuff tears were 90%, 100% and 98%, the full thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 100%, 94% and 96%, and the partial thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 29%, 100% and 89%, respectively. 16-slice MDCT arthrography has high accuracy for the diagnosis of abnormality of the glenoid labrum or rotator cuff tears and it can be a useful alternative to MRI or US

  8. Partial thickness autologus calvarial bone orbitocranioplasty for a sphenorbital encephalocele presenting as pulsatile exophthalmos

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Adarsh; Garg, Amrish Kumar; Hiran, Subodh

    2015-01-01

    Basal encephalocele accounts only 1.5% of all encephaloceles. But Sphenorbital encephalocele is the rarest cause of herniation of brain into orbit leading to pulsatile exphothalmos. Authors presenting a case of sphenorbital encephalocele in a 16 yrs old girl successsfully managed by orbitcranioplasty by partilal thickness autologus calvarial bone graft.

  9. Stepwise surgical approach to diabetic partial foot amputations with autogenous split thickness skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical treatment of severe diabetic foot infections, substantial soft tissue loss often accompanies partial foot amputations. These sizeable soft tissue defects require extensive care with the goal of expedited closure to inhibit further infection and to provide resilient surfaces capable of withstanding long-term ambulation. Definitive wound closure management in the diabetic population is dependent on multiple factors and can have a major impact on the risk of future diabetic foot complications. In this article, the authors provide an overview of autogenous skin grafting, including anatomical considerations, clinical conditions, surgical approach, and adjunctive treatments, for diabetic partial foot amputations.

  10. Crustal Thickness Beneath Libya and the Origin of Partial Melt Beneath AS Sawda Volcanic Province From Receiver Function Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemnifi, Awad A.; Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Browning, John; Aouad, Nassib S.; El Ebaidi, Saad K.; Liu, Kelly K.; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates crustal thickness and properties within the Libyan region. Results obtained from 15 seismic stations belonging to the Libyan Center for Remote Sensing and Space Science are reported, in addition to 3 seismic stations publically available, using receiver functions. The results show crustal thicknesses ranging from 24 km to 36 km (with uncertainties ranging between ±0.10 km and ±0.90 km). More specifically, crustal thickness ranges from 32 km to 36 km in the southern portion of the Libyan territory then becomes thinner, between 24 km and 30 km, in the coastal areas of Libya and thinnest, between 24 km and 28 km, in the Sirt Basin. The observed high Vp/Vs value of 1.91 at one station located at the AS Sawda Volcanic Province in central Libya indicates the presence of either partial melt or an abnormally warm area. This finding suggests that magma reservoirs beneath the Libyan territory may still be partially molten and active, thereby posing significant earthquake and volcanic risks. The hypothesis of an active magma source is further demonstrated though the presence of asthenospheric upwelling and extension of the Sirt Basin. This study provides a new calculation of unconsolidated sediment layers by using the arrival time of the P to S converted phases. The results show sediments thicknesses of 0.4 km to 3.7 km, with the Vp/Vs values ranging from 2.2 to 4.8. The variations in crustal thickness throughout the region are correlated with surface elevation and Bouguer gravity anomalies, which suggest that they are isostatically compensated.

  11. Is sonography performed by the rheumatologist as useful as arthrography executed by the radiologist for the assessment of full thickness rotator cuff tears?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swen, W. A.; Jacobs, J. W.; Neve, W. C.; Bal, D.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Sonography and arthrography are techniques used to detect rotator cuff tears (RCT). The diagnostic value of sonography executed by a rheumatologist versus that of arthrography performed by a radiologist for assessment of RCT was investigated among patients with unilateral chronic shoulder complaints

  12. Cost-effectiveness of silver dressings for paediatric partial thickness burns: An economic evaluation from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, E; Stockton, K; Kimble, R M; Cuttle, L; McPhail, S M

    2017-06-01

    Partial thickness burns of up to 10% total body surface area (TBSA) in children are common injuries primarily treated in the outpatient setting using expensive silver-containing dressings. However, economic evaluations in the paediatric burns population are lacking to assist healthcare providers when choosing which dressing to use. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three silver dressings for partial thickness burns ≤10% TBSA in children aged 0-15 years using days to full wound re-epithelialization as the health outcome. This study was a trial based economic evaluation (incremental cost effectiveness) conducted from a healthcare provider perspective. Ninety-six children participated in the trial investigating Acticoat™, Acticoat™ with Mepitel™ or Mepilex Ag™. Costs directly related to the management of partial thickness burns ≤10% TBSA were collected during the trial from March 2013 to July 2014 and for a one year after re-epithelialization time horizon. Incremental cost effectiveness ratios were estimated and dominance probabilities calculated from bootstrap resampling trial data. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the potential effect of accounting for infrequent, but high cost, skin grafting surgical procedures. Costs (dressing, labour, analgesics, scar management) were considerably lower in the Mepilex Ag™ group (median AUD$94.45) compared to the Acticoat™ (median $244.90) and Acticoat™ with Mepitel™ (median $196.66) interventions. There was a 99% and 97% probability that Mepilex Ag™ dominated (cheaper and more effective than) Acticoat™ and Acticoat™ with Mepitel™, respectively. This pattern of dominance was consistent across raw cost and effects, after a priori adjustments, and sensitivity analyses. There was an 82% probability that Acticoat™ with Mepitel dominated Acticoat™ in the primary analysis, although this probability was sensitive to the effect of skin graft procedures. This

  13. Random Pattern Vertically Oriented, Partial Thickness Buccinator Myomucosal Flap for Intraoral Reconstruction: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Rahpeyma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reconstruction of the oral cavity witha flap design containing the buccal mucosa and buccinator muscle but excluding the facial artery and vein is the topic of these case reports. Case Reports: This article uses random pattern vertically oriented partial thickness buccinator myomucosal flap for intraoral reconstruction in two cases. The first was for lining the mandibular anterior vestibule in a trauma patient. The second was for oral side coverage of bone graft in special cleft patient. In both patients, this flap survived and good bone coverage with non-keratinized mucosa was obtained. Conclusion:  Thin long buccal myomucosal flap not including facial artery and vein can survive.

  14. Location of Rotator Cuff Tear Initiation: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of 191 Shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Min, Seul Ki; Park, Keun Min; Park, Yong Bok; Han, Kwang Joon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2018-03-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are generally thought to originate at the anterior margin of the supraspinatus tendon. However, a recent ultrasonography study suggested that they might originate more posteriorly than originally thought, perhaps even from the isolated infraspinatus (ISP) tendon, and propagate toward the anterior supraspinatus. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that this finding could be reproduced with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose was to determine the most common location of degenerative RCTs by using 3-dimensional multiplanar MRI reconstruction. It was assumed that the location of the partial-thickness tears would identify the area of the initiation of full-thickness tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective analysis was conducted including 245 patients who had RCTs (nearly full- or partial-thickness tears) at the outpatient department between January 2011 and December 2013. RCTs were measured on 3-dimensional multiplanar reconstruction MRI with OsiriX software. The width and distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear were measured on T2-weighted sagittal images. In a spreadsheet, columns of consecutive numbers represented the size of each tear (anteroposterior width) and their locations with respect to the biceps brachii tendon. Data were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of all tears. Frequency histograms of the columns were made to visualize the distribution of tears. The tears were divided into 2 groups based on width (group A, location related to size. The mean width of all RCTs was 11.9 ± 4.1 mm, and the mean length was 11.1 ± 5.0 mm. Histograms showed the most common location of origin to be 9 to 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. The histograms of groups A and B showed similar tear location distributions, indicating that the region approximately 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon is the most common site of tear initiation. These

  15. Diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jee, Sukkyung

    2015-06-01

    Indirect magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is a non-invasive method for shoulder imaging. However, there are no studies that have examined the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears in a large patient population. To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect fast spin-echo (FSE) MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears at 3.0 T. A total of 149 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery were enrolled in this retrospective study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated images from each patient for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) or subscapularis (SSC) tendon tears. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the overall diagnostic performance and detection rates for SSP-ISP and SSC tendon tears were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of readers I and II for the diagnosis of SSP-ISP tendon tears were 94% and 95%, 89% and 85%, and 93% and 93%, respectively. The sensitivity of imaging for detection of SSP-ISP tendon tears by readers I and II were 100% and 100% for full-thickness tears and 84% and 86% for partial-thickness tears, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of readers I and II for the diagnosis of SSC tendon tears were 80% and 76%, 89% and 93%, and 85% and 85%, respectively. Indirect MR arthrography is useful for the detection of SSP-ISP and SSC tendon tears. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Partial rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy for the treatment of patients with massive cuff tears and retained overhead elevation: midterm outcomes with a minimum 5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Derek J; Pupello, Derek R; Santoni, Brandon G

    2016-11-01

    A subset of patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears present with retained overhead elevation and pain as their primary complaint. Our aim was to evaluate the outcomes of partial arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with biceps tenotomy and to report the failure rate of this procedure for patients with >5 years of follow-up. Thirty-four patients underwent partial rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy for treatment of a massive rotator cuff tear. Patients had preoperative active forward elevation >120° and no radiographic evidence of glenohumeral arthritis. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically, and 28 patients had a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. Failure was defined as an American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score of 90°, or revision to reverse shoulder arthroplasty during the study period. Patients demonstrated improvements in average preoperative to postoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (46.6 to 79.3 [P rotation (38° to 39° [P = 1.0]), or internal rotation (84% to 80% [P = 1.0]) was identified; 36% of patients had progression of the Hamada stage. The failure rate was 29%; 75% of patients were satisfied with their index procedure. Partial rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy for patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears with retained overhead elevation and pain as the primary complaint produced reasonable outcomes at midterm follow-up of at least 5 years. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rotator cuff tear state modulates self-renewal and differentiation capacity of human skeletal muscle progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kelsey A; Gibbons, Michael C; Lane, John G; Singh, Anshuman; Ward, Samuel R; Engler, Adam J

    2017-08-01

    Full thickness rotator cuff tendon (RCT) tears have long-term effects on RC muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, with lasting damage even after surgical tendon repair. Skeletal muscle progenitor cells (SMPs) are critical for muscle repair in response to injury, but the inability of RC muscles to recover from chronic RCT tear indicates possible deficits in repair mechanisms. Here we investigated if muscle injury state was a crucial factor during human SMP expansion and differentiation ex vivo. SMPs were isolated from muscles in patients with no, partial-thickness (PT), or full-thickness (FT) RCT tears. Despite using growth factors, physiological niche stiffness, and muscle-mimetic extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, we found that SMPs isolated from human RC muscle with RCT tears proliferated slower but fused into myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotubes at higher rates than SMPs from untorn RCTs. Proteomic analysis of RC muscle tissue revealed shifts in muscle composition with pathology, as muscle from massive RCT tears had increased ECM deposition compared with no tear RC muscle. Together these data imply that the remodeled niche in a torn RCT primes SMPs not for expansion but for differentiation, thus limiting longer-term self-renewal necessary for regeneration after surgical repair. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1816-1823, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparison of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and clinical assessment in differentiating between superficial and deep partial thickness burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Saadia Nosheen; Khan, Farid Ahmed; Bashir, Muhammad Mustehsan; Nasir, Muneeb; Ansari, Hamid Hussain; Shami, Hussan Birkhez; Nazir, Umer; Hanif, Asif; Sohail, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    To compare the accuracy of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and clinical assessment in differentiating between superficial and deep partial thickness burns to decide whether early tangential excision and grafting or conservative management should be employed to optimize burn and patient management. March 2015 to November 2016. Ninety two wounds in 34 patients reporting within 5days of less than 40% burn surface area were included. Unstable patients, pregnant females and those who expired were excluded. The wounds were clinically assessed and LDI done concomitantly Plastic Surgeons blinded to each other's findings. Wound appearance, color, blanching, pain, hair follicle dislodgement were the clinical parameters that distinguished between superficial and deep partial thickness burns. On day 21, the wounds were again assessed for the presence of healing by the same plastic surgeons. The findings were correlated with the initial findings on LDI and clinical assessment and the results statistically analyzed. The data of 92 burn wounds was analyzed using SPSS (ver. 17). Clinical assessment correctly identified the depth of 75 and LDI 83 wounds, giving diagnostic accuracies of 81.52% and 90.21% respectively. The sensitivity of clinical assessment was 81% and of LDI 92.75%, whereas the specificity was 82% for both. The positive predictive value was 93% for clinical assessment and 94% for LDI while the negative predictive value was 59% and 79% respectively. Predictive accuracy of LDI was found to be better than clinical assessment in the prediction of wound healing, the gold standard for wound healing being 21 days. As such it can prove to be a reliable and viable cost effective alternative per se to clinical assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Chungang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Chul [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  20. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jee Young; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  1. Predicting Retear after Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear: Two-Point Dixon MR Imaging Quantification of Fatty Muscle Degeneration-Initial Experience with 1-year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Tasaki, Atsushi; Horiuchi, Saya; Ochi, Junko; Starkey, Jay; Hara, Takeshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the degree of preoperative fatty degeneration within muscles, postoperative longitudinal changes in fatty degeneration, and differences in fatty degeneration between patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears who do and those who do not experience a retear after surgery. Materials and Methods This prospective study had institutional review board approval and was conducted in accordance with the Committee for Human Research. Informed consent was obtained. Fifty patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears (18 men, 32 women; mean age, 67.0 years ± 8.0; age range, 41-91 years) were recruited. The degrees of preoperative and postoperative fatty degeneration were quantified by using a two-point Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence; two radiologists measured the mean signal intensity on in-phase [S(In)] and fat [S(Fat)] images. Estimates of fatty degeneration were calculated with "fat fraction" values by using the formula S(Fat)/S(In) within the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis muscles at baseline preoperative and at postoperative 1-year follow-up MR imaging. Preoperative fat fractions in the failed-repair group and the intact-repair group were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The preoperative fat fractions in the supraspinatus muscle were significantly higher in the failed-repair group than in the intact-repair group (37.0% vs 19.5%, P muscle tended to progress at 1 year postoperatively in only the failed-repair group. Conclusion MR imaging quantification of preoperative fat fractions by using a two-point Dixon sequence within the rotator cuff muscles may be a viable method for predicting postoperative retear. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  2. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Subacromial Bursa Causing a Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Neumann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up.

  3. Diagnosis of rotator cuff tears using 3-Tesla MRI versus 3-Tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarvey, Ciaran; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian; Ajuied, Adil [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Health Partners, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Houghton, Russell [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Health Partners, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Corbett, Steven [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Health Partners, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Fortius Clinic, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 2-dimensional magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) and 3-dimensional isotropic MRA in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears when performed exclusively at 3-T. A systematic review was undertaken of the Cochrane, MEDLINE and PubMed databases in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Studies comparing 3-T MRI or 3-T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic surgical findings (reference test) were included. Methodological appraisal was performed using QUADAS 2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated and summary receiver-operating curves generated. Kappa coefficients quantified inter-observer reliability. Fourteen studies comprising 1332 patients were identified for inclusion. Twelve studies were retrospective and there were concerns regarding index test bias and applicability in nine and six studies respectively. Reference test bias was a concern in all studies. Both 3-T MRI and 3-T MRA showed similar excellent diagnostic accuracy for full-thickness supraspinatus tears. Concerning partial-thickness supraspinatus tears, 3-T 2D MRA was significantly more sensitive (86.6 vs. 80.5 %, p = 0.014) but significantly less specific (95.2 vs. 100 %, p < 0.001). There was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA showed similar accuracy to 3-T conventional 2D MRA. Three-Tesla MRI appeared equivalent to 3-T MRA in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness tears, although there was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA appears equivalent to 3-T 2D MRA for all types of tears. (orig.)

  4. Diagnosis of rotator cuff tears using 3-Tesla MRI versus 3-Tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarvey, Ciaran; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian; Ajuied, Adil; Houghton, Russell; Corbett, Steven

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 2-dimensional magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) and 3-dimensional isotropic MRA in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears when performed exclusively at 3-T. A systematic review was undertaken of the Cochrane, MEDLINE and PubMed databases in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Studies comparing 3-T MRI or 3-T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic surgical findings (reference test) were included. Methodological appraisal was performed using QUADAS 2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated and summary receiver-operating curves generated. Kappa coefficients quantified inter-observer reliability. Fourteen studies comprising 1332 patients were identified for inclusion. Twelve studies were retrospective and there were concerns regarding index test bias and applicability in nine and six studies respectively. Reference test bias was a concern in all studies. Both 3-T MRI and 3-T MRA showed similar excellent diagnostic accuracy for full-thickness supraspinatus tears. Concerning partial-thickness supraspinatus tears, 3-T 2D MRA was significantly more sensitive (86.6 vs. 80.5 %, p = 0.014) but significantly less specific (95.2 vs. 100 %, p < 0.001). There was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA showed similar accuracy to 3-T conventional 2D MRA. Three-Tesla MRI appeared equivalent to 3-T MRA in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness tears, although there was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA appears equivalent to 3-T 2D MRA for all types of tears. (orig.)

  5. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle. PMID:24500519

  6. Not all ultrasounds are created equal: general sonography versus musculoskeletal sonography in the detection of rotator cuff tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brandi; Twibill, Kristen; Lam, Patrick; Hackett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional analytic diagnostic accuracy study was designed to compare the accuracy of ultrasound performed by general sonographers in local radiology practices with ultrasound performed by an experienced musculoskeletal sonographer for the detection of rotator cuff tears. Methods In total, 238 patients undergoing arthroscopy who had previously had an ultrasound performed by both a general sonographer and a specialist musculoskeletal sonographer made up the study cohort. Accuracy of diagnosis was compared with the findings at arthroscopy. Results When analyzed as all tears versus no tears, musculoskeletal sonography had an accuracy of 97%, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 95%, whereas general sonography had an accuracy of 91%, a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 86%. When the partial tears were split with those ≥ 50% thickness in the tear group and those tear group, musculoskeletal sonography had an accuracy of 97%, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% and general sonography had an accuracy of 85%, a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 87%. Conclusions Ultrasound in the hands of an experienced musculoskeletal sonographer is highly accurate for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. General sonography has improved subsequent to earlier studies but remains inferior to an ultrasound performed by a musculoskeletal sonographer. PMID:27660657

  7. Meniscus Tears (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Meniscus Tears KidsHealth / For Teens / Meniscus Tears What's in this ... surgery to fix it. What Is a Meniscus Tear? Your knee is made up of three bones: ...

  8. Full and Partial Thickness Burns from Spontaneous Combustion of E-Cigarette Lithium-Ion Batteries with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treitl, Daniela; Solomon, Rachele; Davare, Dafney L; Sanchez, Rafael; Kiffin, Chauniqua

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has increased worldwide. Most electronic nicotine delivery systems use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are relatively safe, but in rare cases these batteries can spontaneously combust, leading to serious full and partial thickness burn injuries. Explosions from lithium-ion batteries can cause a flash fire and accelerant-related burn injuries. A retrospective chart review was conducted of 3 patients with lithium-ion battery burns seen at our Level I community-based trauma center. Clinical presentation, management, and outcome are presented. All 3 patients sustained burn injuries (total body surface area range 5-13%) from the spontaneous combustion of lithium-ion batteries used for e-cigarettes. All patients were treated with debridement and local wound care. All fully recovered without sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians can expect to treat burn cases due to spontaneous lithium-ion battery combustion as e-cigarette use continues to increase. The cases presented here are intended to bring attention to lithium-ion battery-related burns, prepare physicians for the clinical presentation of this burn mechanism, and facilitate patient education to minimize burn risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Topical silver sulfadiazine vs collagenase ointment for the treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlie, Daniel J; Juang, David; Aguayo, Pablo; Pettiford-Cunningham, Janine P; Erkmann, Erin A; Rash, Diane E; Sharp, Susan W; Sharp, Ronald J; St Peter, Shawn D

    2012-06-01

    The 2 most commonly used topical agents for partial thickness burns are silver sulfadiazine (SSD) and collagenase ointment (CO). Silver sulfadiazine holds antibacterial properties, and eschar separation occurs naturally. Collagenase ointment is an enzyme that cleaves denatured collagen facilitating separation but has no antibacterial properties. Currently, there are no prospective comparative data in children for these 2 agents. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized trial. After institutional review board approval, patients were randomized to daily debridement with SSD or CO. Primary outcome was the need for skin grafting. Patients were treated for 2 days with SSD with subsequent randomization. Polymyxin was mixed with CO for antibacterial coverage. Debridements were performed daily for 10 days or until the burn healed. Grafting was performed after 10 days if not healed. From January 2008 to January 2011, 100 patients were enrolled, with no differences in patient characteristics. There were no differences in clinical course, outcome, or need for skin grafting. Wound infections occurred in 7 patients treated with CO and 1 patient treated with SSD (P = .06). Collagenase ointment was more expensive than SSD (P burns results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rotator cuff tears: should abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning be performed before image acquisition? A CT arthrography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, Hubert [Hopital Cardiologique du Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France); Couderc, Stephane; Pele, Eric; Moreau-Durieux, Marie-Helene; Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Bordeaux (France); Amoretti, Nicolas [CHU Archet, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Nice (France)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the impact of abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning performed before image acquisition on the assessment of rotator cuff tears. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent an initial CT arthrogram of the shoulder in neutral position, immediately followed by temporary ABER positioning, before a second CT acquisition in neutral position. Two observers blinded to potential pre-procedure ABER positioning independently analysed the randomly distributed images. Lesions were classified into partial-thickness (PT) and full-thickness (FT) tear subtypes. Lesion detection and measurements of pre- and post-ABER studies were compared. We found no influence of pre-test ABER positioning on FT detection or measurements. Every PT detected on pre-ABER study was also detected on post-ABER study (28/28 for reader 1, and 32/32 for reader 2). Seven and eight additional PT were found by readers 1 and 2, respectively, on post-ABER study. Lesion size increased after ABER in terms of area (P < 0.001 for both readers) and Ellman's grade (P = 0.02 and 0.002 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). ABER positioning before CT is associated with improved delineation of partial tears, a higher number of detected tears and modification of treatment planning. (orig.)

  11. Interferometric characterization of tear film dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeau, Brian Christopher

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye is the thin tear film that forms on the surface of the cornea. When a contact lens is on worn, the tear film covers the contact lens as it would a bare cornea, and is affected by the contact lens material properties. Tear film irregularity can cause both discomfort and vision quality degradation. Under normal conditions, the tear film is less than 10 microns thick and the thickness and topography change in the time between blinks. In order to both better understand the tear film, and to characterize how contact lenses affect tear film behavior, two interferometers were designed and built to separately measure tear film behavior in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed using a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. The fluid behavior on the contact lens surface is measured, allowing quantitative analysis beyond what typical contact angle or visual inspection methods provide. The in vivo interferometer is a similar system, with additional modules included to provide capability for human testing. This tear film measurement allows analysis beyond capabilities of typical fluorescein visual inspection or videokeratometry and provides better sensitivity and resolution than shearing interferometry methods.

  12. Clinical Outcomes and Safety of Partial Full-Thickness Myotomy versus Circular Muscle Myotomy in Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Achalasia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Here we aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety between partial full-thickness myotomy and circular muscle myotomy during POEM procedure in achalasia patients. Methods. Clinical data of achalasia of cardia (AC patients who underwent POEM in our center during January 2014 to January 2015 was collected (34 cases. 19 patients who received partial full-thickness myotomy were assigned to group A and 14 patients who received circular muscle myotomy were assigned to group B. The procedure-related parameters between the two groups were compared. Symptom relief rate and postprocedure manometry outcomes were compared to evaluate the efficacy. Procedure-related adverse events and complications were compared to evaluate the safety. Results. (1 Mean operation times were significantly shorter in group A than group B (62.42±23.17 vs 87.86±26.44 min, p0.05. (3 Comparison of procedure-related adverse events and complications had no statistical differences (all p>0.05. Conclusion. Partial full-thickness myotomy had no significant differences in efficacy or safety with circular myotomy, but partial full-thickness myotomy significantly reduced the procedure time.

  13. Partial-thickness burn wounds healing by topical treatment: A randomized controlled comparison between silver sulfadiazine and centiderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidinia, Amin; Keihanian, Faeze; Lashkari, Ardalan Pasdaran; Lahiji, Hossein Ghavvami; Mobayyen, Mohammadreza; Heidarzade, Abtin; Golchai, Javad

    2017-03-01

    Burns are common event and associated with a high incidence of death, disability, and high costs. Centella asiatica (L.) is a medicinal herb, commonly growing in humid areas in several tropical countries that improve wound healing. On the basis of previous studies, we compared the efficacy of Centiderm versus silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in partial thickness burning patients. Study population comprised burn victims referred to Velayat Burning Hospital at Rasht, Iran. The intervention group received Centiderm and control group SSD cream. Burn wounds were treated once daily at home. All of the wounds were evaluated till complete healing occurred and at the admission, days 3, 7, 14 objective signs; visual acuity score (VAS) and subjective signs were recorded. Re-epithelialization time and complete healing days were recorded. We used random fixed block for randomization. The randomization sequence was created using the computer. Patients and burning specialist physician were blinded. Seventy-five patients randomized into 2 groups; (40 patients: Centiderm group; 35 patients: SSD group). The mean age of them was 30.67 ± 9.91 years and 19 of them were male (31.7%). Thirty patients in Centiderm and 30 patients in SSD group were analyzed. All of objective and subjective signs and mean of re-epithelialization and complete healing were significantly better in Centiderm group rather than SSD group (P < 0.05). There was no infection in Centiderm group. We showed that use of Centiderm ointment not only improved the objective and subjective signs in less than 3 days, but also the re-epithelialization and complete healing rather than SSD without any infection in the subjects.

  14. Comparison of three dimensional isotropic and two dimensional conventional indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoo, Jae Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jee, Suk Kyoung [Joeun Madi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears.

  15. Comparison of three dimensional isotropic and two dimensional conventional indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoo, Jae Chul; Cha, Jang Kyu; Jee, Suk Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    To compare the accuracy between a three-dimensional (3D) indirect isotropic T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography and a conventional two-dimensional (2D) T1-weighted sequences of indirect MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. The study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. In total, 205 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery for 206 shoulders were included in this study. Both conventional 2D T1-weighted FSE sequences and 3D isotropic T1-weighted FSE sequence were performed in all patients. Two radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of full- or partial-thickness tears in the supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) tendons and tears in the subscapularis (SSC) tendons. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the diagnostic performances of both methods were analyzed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Arthroscopy confirmed 165 SSP-ISP tendon tears and 103 SSC tendon tears. For diagnosing SSP-ISP tendon tears, the AUC values were 0.964 and 0.989 for the 2D sequences and 3D T1-weighted FSE sequence, respectively, in reader I and 0.947 and 0.963, respectively, in reader II. The AUC values for diagnosing SSC tendon tears were 0.921 and 0.925, respectively, for reader I and 0.856 and 0.860, respectively, for reader II. There was no significant difference between the AUC values of the 2D and 3D sequences in either reader for either type of tear. 3D indirect isotropic MR arthrography with FSE sequence and the conventional 2D arthrography are not significantly different in terms of accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears.

  16. Diagnosis of rotator cuff tears using 3-Tesla MRI versus 3-Tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Ciaran; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian; Houghton, Russell; Corbett, Steven; Ajuied, Adil

    2016-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 2-dimensional magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) and 3-dimensional isotropic MRA in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears when performed exclusively at 3-T. A systematic review was undertaken of the Cochrane, MEDLINE and PubMed databases in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Studies comparing 3-T MRI or 3-T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic surgical findings (reference test) were included. Methodological appraisal was performed using QUADAS 2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated and summary receiver-operating curves generated. Kappa coefficients quantified inter-observer reliability. Fourteen studies comprising 1332 patients were identified for inclusion. Twelve studies were retrospective and there were concerns regarding index test bias and applicability in nine and six studies respectively. Reference test bias was a concern in all studies. Both 3-T MRI and 3-T MRA showed similar excellent diagnostic accuracy for full-thickness supraspinatus tears. Concerning partial-thickness supraspinatus tears, 3-T 2D MRA was significantly more sensitive (86.6 vs. 80.5 %, p = 0.014) but significantly less specific (95.2 vs. 100 %, p Tesla 3D isotropic MRA showed similar accuracy to 3-T conventional 2D MRA. Three-Tesla MRI appeared equivalent to 3-T MRA in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness tears, although there was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA appears equivalent to 3-T 2D MRA for all types of tears.

  17. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Wolf, Petra

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  18. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Wolf, Petra [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  19. A biomechanical and histological comparison of the suture bridge and conventional double-row techniques of the repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Wenyong; Guo, Weichun

    2015-06-16

    The suture bridge (SB) technique and conventional double-row (DR) are both effective in repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears . However, increasing numbers of scholars believe that the SB technique produces better results than conventional DR because of the higher bone-tendon contact area and pressure. However, The clinical outcomes have been mixed and little direct evidence has been supplied in vivo. This study was designed using the SB and DR techniques to determine which is the better technique. Sixty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups, the SB group and DR group. SB and DR were then used to repair their rotator cuff tears. Rabbits were then sacrificed at the 2(nd), 4(th), or 8(th) week after surgery and a histological comparison was made. The biomechanical comparison was made at the 8(th) week. The load to failure of the SB group was 134.59 ± 17.69 N at the 8(th) postoperative week, and that was significantly higher than in the DR group (103.83 ± 6.62, P = 0.001), but both repair groups remained lower than in the control group (199.25 ± 14.81). Histological evaluation showed that both the SB and DR groups healed at the bone-tendon interface. But there were subtle differences between the two groups in the structure and morphology of collagen fibers and cartilage cells at bone-tendon interface. In general, the collagen fibers of the SB group were more compact than those of the DR group at all times tested. At the 4(th) and 8(th) weeks, the collagen fibers and cartilage cells in the SB group were arranged in a column modality, but those in the DR group were distributed horizontally. The SB technique facilitated healing more effectively than the conventional DR technique. The difference in morphology of collagen fibers and cartilage cells may be related to the difference in bone-tendon contact pressure.

  20. Simvastatin reduces fibrosis and protects against muscle weakness after massive rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Max E; Korn, Michael A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Harning, Julie A; Saripalli, Anjali L; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rotator cuff tears are a common source of shoulder pain and disability, and patients with chronic cuff tears often have substantial weakness, fibrosis, inflammation, and fat accumulation. Identifying therapies to prevent the development of these pathologic processes will likely have a positive impact on clinical outcomes. Simvastatin is a drug with demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects in many tissues but had not previously been studied in the context of rotator cuff tears. We hypothesized that after the induction of a massive supraspinatus tear, simvastatin would protect muscles from a loss of force production and fibrosis. We measured changes in muscle fiber contractility, histology, and biochemical markers of fibrosis and fatty infiltration in rats that received a full-thickness supraspinatus tear and were treated with either carrier alone or simvastatin. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, simvastatin did not have an appreciable effect on muscle fiber size, but treatment did increase muscle fiber specific force by 20%. Simvastatin also reduced collagen accumulation by 50% but did not affect triglyceride content of muscles. Several favorable changes in the expression of genes and other markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and regeneration were also observed. Simvastatin partially protected muscles from the weakness that occurs as a result of chronic rotator cuff tear. Fibrosis was also markedly reduced in simvastatin-treated animals. Whereas further studies are necessary, statin medication could potentially help improve outcomes for patients with rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. EXERCISE REHABILITATION IN THE NON-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Peter; Ebert, Jay; Joss, Brendan; Bhabra, Gev; Ackland, Tim; Wang, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with age, with full-thickness rotator cuff tears present in approximately 25% of individuals in their sixties, and more than 50% of those in their eighties. While surgery is considered an effective treatment, recurrent tears at the insertion site are common, especially with degenerative tears, which are frequent in the older population. More recently, there has been increasing interest in exercise rehabilitation and physical therapy as a means to manage partial and full thickness tears of the rotator cuff by addressing weakness and functional deficits. Recent studies have suggested that patients opting for physical therapy have demonstrated high satisfaction, an improvement in function, and success in avoiding surgery. When considering the increasing rate of shoulder surgery and the associated economic and social burden rotator cuff surgery places on both the patient and the health care system, non-surgical management such as physical therapy and exercise may, in selected cases, be a treatment alternative to surgical repair. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of rotator cuff pathology and pathogenesis, and to present an evidence-based case for the role of conservative rehabilitation in the management of rotator cuff injuries. Level of Evidence Level 5 PMID:27104061

  2. Interaction of tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satya, Y.; Schmidt, G.

    1979-01-01

    A fully developed tearing mode modifies the magnetic field profile. The effect of this profile modification on the linear growth rate of a different tearing mode in a slab and cylindrical geometry is investigated

  3. Tear-Film Evaporation Rate from Simultaneous Ocular-Surface Temperature and Tear-Breakup Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, Thomas J; Li, Wing; Taraz, Baseem; Lin, Meng C; Radke, Clayton J

    2018-01-01

    A corneal heat-transfer model is presented to quantify simultaneous measurements of fluorescein tear-breakup area (TBA) and ocular-surface temperature (OST). By accounting for disruption of the tear-film lipid layer (TFLL), we report evaporation rates through lipid-covered tear. The modified heat-transfer model provides new insights into evaporative dry eye. A quantitative analysis is presented to assess human aqueous tear evaporation rate (TER) through intact TFLLs from simultaneous in vivo measurement of time-dependent infrared OST and fluorescein TBA. We interpret simultaneous OST and TBA measurements using an extended heat-transfer model. We hypothesize that TBAs are ineffectively insulated by the TFLL and therefore exhibit higher TER than does that for a well-insulting TFLL-covered tear. As time proceeds, TBAs increase in number and size, thereby increasing the cornea area-averaged TER and decreasing OST. Tear-breakup areas were assessed from image analysis of fluorescein tear-film-breakup video recordings and are included in the heat-transfer description of OST. Model-predicted OSTs agree well with clinical experiments. Percent reductions in TER of lipid-covered tear range from 50 to 95% of that for pure water, in good agreement with literature. The physical picture of noninsulating or ruptured TFLL spots followed by enhanced evaporation from underlying cooler tear-film ruptures is consistent with the evaporative-driven mechanism for local tear rupture. A quantitative analysis is presented of in vivo TER from simultaneous clinical measurement of transient OST and TBA. The new heat-transfer model accounts for increased TER through expanding TBAs. Tear evaporation rate varies strongly across the cornea because lipid is effectively missing over tear-rupture troughs. The result is local faster evaporation compared with nonruptured, thick lipid-covered tear. Evaporative-driven tear-film ruptures deepen to a thickness where fluorescein quenching commences and local

  4. Blocked Tear Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the nose (lacrimal sac). From there tears travel down a duct (the nasolacrimal duct) draining into your nose. Once in the nose, tears are reabsorbed. A blockage can occur at any point in the tear drainage system, from the puncta ...

  5. Evaporation-driven instability of the precorneal tear film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Chun; Cerretani, Colin; Braun, Richard J; Radke, C J

    2014-04-01

    Tear-film instability is widely believed to be a signature of eye health. When an interblink is prolonged, randomly distributed ruptures occur in the tear film. "Black spots" and/or "black streaks" appear in 15 to 40 s for normal individuals. For people who suffer from dry eye, tear-film breakup time (BUT) is typically less than a few seconds. To date, however, there is no satisfactory quantitative explanation for the origin of tear rupture. Recently, it was proposed that tear-film breakup is related to locally high evaporative thinning. A spatial variation in the thickness of the tear-film lipid layer (TFLL) may lead to locally elevated evaporation and subsequent tear-film breakup. We examine the local-evaporation-driven tear-film-rupture hypothesis in a one-dimensional (1-D) model for the evolution of a thin aqueous tear film overriding the cornea subject to locally elevated evaporation at its anterior surface and osmotic water influx at its posterior surface. Evaporation rate depends on mass transfer both through the coating lipid layer and through ambient air. We establish that evaporation-driven tear-film breakup can occur under normal conditions but only for higher aqueous evaporation rates. Predicted roles of environmental conditions, such as wind speed and relative humidity, on tear-film stability agree with clinical observations. More importantly, locally elevated evaporation leads to hyperosmolar spots in the tear film and, hence, vulnerability to epithelial irritation. In addition to evaporation rate, tear-film instability depends on the strength of healing flow from the neighboring region outside the breakup region, which is determined by the surface tension at the tear-film surface and by the repulsive thin-film disjoining pressure. This study provides a physically consistent and quantitative explanation for the formation of black streaks and spots in the human tear film during an interblink. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ceramic inlays and partial ceramic crowns: influence of remaining cusp wall thickness on the marginal integrity and enamel crack formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifka, Stephanie; Anthofer, Thomas; Fritzsch, Marcus; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried; Federlin, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    No information is currently available about what the critical cavity wall thickness is and its influence upon 1) the marginal integrity of ceramic inlays (CI) and partial ceramic crowns (PCC) and 2) the crack formation of dental tissues. This in vitro study of CI and PCC tested the effects of different remaining cusp wall thicknesses on marginal integrity and enamel crack formation. CI (n = 25) and PCC (n = 26) preparations were performed in extracted human molars. Functional cusps of CI and PCC were adjusted to a 2.5 mm thickness; for PCC, the functional cusps were reduced to a thickness of 2.0 mm. Non-functional cusps were adjusted to wall thicknesses of 1) 1.0 mm and 2) 2.0 mm. Ceramic restorations (Vita Mark II, Cerec3 System) were fabricated and adhesively luted to the cavities with Excite/Variolink II. The specimens were exposed to thermocycling and central mechanical loading (TCML: 5000 x 5 degrees C-55 degrees C; 30 seconds/cycle; 500000 x 72.5N, 1.6Hz). Marginal integrity was assessed by evaluating a) dye penetration (fuchsin) on multiple sections after TCML and by using b) quantitative margin analysis in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after TCML. Ceramic- and tooth-luting agent interfaces (LA) were evaluated separately. Enamel cracks were documented under a reflective light microscope. The data were statistically analyzed with the Mann Whitney U-test (alpha = 0.05) and the Error Rates Method (ERM). Crack formation was analyzed with the Chi-Square-test (alpha = 0.05) and ERM. In general, the remaining cusp wall thickness, interface, cavity design and TCML had no statistically significant influence on marginal integrity for both CI and PCC (ERM). Single pairwise comparisons showed that the CI and PCC of Group 2 had a tendency towards less microleakage along the dentin/LA interface than Group 1. Cavity design and location had no statistically significant influence on crack formation, but the specimens with 1.0 mm of remaining wall

  7. Posterior horn lateral meniscal tears simulating meniscofemoral ligament attachment in the setting of ACL tear: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Lawrence S.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Jamadar, David A.; Caoili, Elaine; Kalume-Brigido, Monica; Wojtys, Edward

    2007-01-01

    We have noted apparent far lateral meniscal attachment of the meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This study evaluates MFL attachment and association with posterior horn lateral meniscus (PHLM) tear. Nine months of knee arthroscopy reports were reviewed to classify the PHLM and ACL as torn or normal. After excluding those with prior knee surgery, MR images were reviewed by two radiologists to determine the number of images lateral to PCL, which showed the ligaments of Humphrey and Wrisberg visible as structures separate from the PHLM. Any patient with abnormal PHLM surface signal not continuous with the MFL was excluded. MRI findings were compared with arthroscopy using Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Of the 54 participants, 5 had PHLM tears and 49 were normal. Twenty-one had ACL tears; all those with an PHLM tear had an ACL tear. The ligament of Humphrey inserted on average 0.9 consecutive images lateral to the PCL without an PHLM tear and 4.7 with an PHLM tear; the ligament of Wrisberg inserted on average 3.0 consecutive images without an PHLM tear and 4.5 with an PHLM tear (slice thickness/gap = 3 mm/0.5 mm). There was a significant association between PHLM tear and number of images (p = 0.0028), and between ACL tear and this type of PHLM tear (p = 0.0064). Apparent far lateral meniscal extension of a meniscofemoral ligament (greater than or equal to four images lateral to the PCL) should be considered as a possible PHLM tear, especially in the setting of an ACL tear. (orig.)

  8. MR imaging-based diagnosis and classification of meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jie C; De Smet, Arthur A; Graf, Ben K; Rosas, Humberto G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently the modality of choice for detecting meniscal injuries and planning subsequent treatment. A thorough understanding of the imaging protocols, normal meniscal anatomy, surrounding anatomic structures, and anatomic variants and pitfalls is critical to ensure diagnostic accuracy and prevent unnecessary surgery. High-spatial-resolution imaging of the meniscus can be performed using fast spin-echo and three-dimensional MR imaging sequences. Normal anatomic structures that can mimic a tear include the meniscal ligament, meniscofemoral ligaments, popliteomeniscal fascicles, and meniscomeniscal ligament. Anatomic variants and pitfalls that can mimic a tear include discoid meniscus, meniscal flounce, a meniscal ossicle, and chondrocalcinosis. When a meniscal tear is identified, accurate description and classification of the tear pattern can guide the referring clinician in patient education and surgical planning. For example, longitudinal tears are often amenable to repair, whereas horizontal and radial tears may require partial meniscectomy. Tear patterns include horizontal, longitudinal, radial, root, complex, displaced, and bucket-handle tears. Occasionally, meniscal tears can be difficult to detect at imaging; however, secondary indirect signs, such as a parameniscal cyst, meniscal extrusion, or linear subchondral bone marrow edema, should increase the radiologist's suspicion for an underlying tear. Awareness of common diagnostic errors can ensure accurate diagnosis of meniscal tears. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2014.

  9. Streaming tearing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, M.; Sato, T.; Dasgupta, B.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic stability of streaming tearing mode is investigated numerically. A bulk plasma flow parallel to the antiparallel magnetic field lines and localized in the neutral sheet excites a streaming tearing mode more strongly than the usual tearing mode, particularly for the wavelength of the order of the neutral sheet width (or smaller), which is stable for the usual tearing mode. Interestingly, examination of the eigenfunctions of the velocity perturbation and the magnetic field perturbation indicates that the streaming tearing mode carries more energy in terms of the kinetic energy rather than the magnetic energy. This suggests that the streaming tearing mode instability can be a more feasible mechanism of plasma acceleration than the usual tearing mode instability.

  10. Topical petrolatum gel alone versus topical silver sulfadiazine with standard gauze dressings for the treatment of superficial partial thickness burns in adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuino, Glenn Angelo S; Baluyut-Angeles, Kathrina Victoria; Espiritu, Andre Paolo T; Lapitan, Marie Carmela M; Buckley, Brian S

    2014-11-01

    Non-extensive superficial partial thickness burns constitute a major proportion of burns. Conventional treatment involves regular changing of absorptive dressings including the application of a topical antimicrobial, commonly silver sulfadiazine. A systematic review has found insufficient evidence to support or refute such antimicrobial prophylaxis. Another review compared silver sulfadiazine dressings with other occlusive and non-antimicrobial dressings and found insufficient evidence to guide practice. Other research has suggested that dressings with petrolatum gel are as effective as silver sulfadiazine. Single-center, randomized, controlled parallel group trial comparing conventional silver sulfadiazine dressings with treatment with petrolatum gel alone. Consenting adults 18-45 years old with superficial partial thickness burns≤10% total body surface area seen within 24h of the injury were randomized to daily dressing either with petrolatum gel without top dressings or conventional silver sulfadiazine treatment with gauze dressings. Primary outcomes were blinded assessment of time to complete re-epithelialization, wound infection or allergic contact dermatitis. Secondary outcomes included assessment of ease, time and pain of dressing changes. 26 patients were randomized to petrolatum and 24 to silver sulfadiazine dressings. Follow up data available for 19 in each group. Mean time to re-epithelialization was 6.2 days (SD 2.8) in the petrolatum group and 7.8 days (SD 2.1) in the silver sulfadiazine group (p=0.050). No wound infection or dermatitis was observed in either group. Scores for adherence to wound, ease of dressing removal and time required to change dressings were significantly better in the petrolatum treatment arm (ptreatment of minor superficial partial thickness burns in adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won; Kwon, Soon Tae

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined

  12. Tratamento conservador das lesões parciais e completas do manguito rotador Conservative treatment of partial and complete tears of the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvandré Lech

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A lesão do manguito rotador é a mais freqüente patologia do ombro. Cerca de 180 pacientes foram tratados conservadoramente nos dois Serviços nos anos de 1996 e 1997. Este grupo recebeu uma ampla gama de tratamentos (apenas medicação, exercícios caseiros, infiltração, fisioterapia, etc.. Este estudo avaliou os resultados do tratamento conservador em 26 pacientes com rupturas parcial e total do manguito rotador. O protocolo consistiu de um programa com 6 meses de duração que incluiu terapia miofascial específica, exercícios ativos assistidos e de fortalecimento dos músculos do manguito rotador e da musculatura axioescapular. Os fatores de inclusão no estudo foram: 1 realizar todo o programa com apenas um reabilitador; 2 não ter recebido infiltração; 3 não ter tido cirurgia prévia; 4 não ter reumatopatia diagnosticada. Seis meses após a alta, dezoito pacientes (69,22% apresentavam resultado satisfatório, enquanto que os demais 08 casos (30,78% foram considerados insatisfatórios e tiveram indicação cirúrgica.The lesion of rotator cuff is the most frequent lesion of the shoulder. Circa 180 patients were conservatively treated in both Clinics during the years of 1976 and 1997. This group of patients received a wide range of treatments (only medication, home exercises, infiltration, physiotherapy, etc. This study evaluated the results of the conservative treatment in 26 patients with partial and total rupture of the rotator cuff. The protocol consisted of a program with duration of 6 months including specific miofascial therapy, assisted active exercises and of strengthening of the muscles of the rotator cuff and axioscapular musculature. The inclusion criteria of the study were: 1 to carry the program with just one reabilitator; 2 no previous infiltration; 3 no previous surgery; 4 absence of diagnosed rheumatopathy. Six months after the end of treatment, eighteen patients (69,22% presented with satisfactory results, while

  13. An Overview of the use of Bromelain-Based Enzymatic Debridement (Nexobrid®) in Deep Partial & Full Thickness Burns: Appraising the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Yew L; Goh, Benjamin K L; Jeffery, S

    2018-03-22

    Recent introduction of rapid bromelain-based enzymatic debridement has been increasingly popular in its use in non-surgical debridement in deep partial and full thickness burns. We designed this study to evaluate the evidence suggested by current studies on the perceived benefits of using Nexobrid® as compared to traditional surgical standard of care (SOC) in burns wound debridement. A comprehensive search on electronic databases Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science was done to identify studies published between 1986 to 2017 involving the use of Nexobrid in deep partial and full thickness burns. Studies were evaluated for proposed benefits and categorised under supporting evidence, contradicting evidence and anecdotal opinions. 7 well designed prospective studies met the inclusion comprising of 4 randomised controlled trials. 6 proposed benefits associated with the use of Nexobrid were extracted including reduced time to complete debridement, need for surgery, area of burns excised, need for autograft, time to wound closure and improved scar quality. Most proposed benefits have strong supporting evidences with minimal anecdotal opinions from controlled trials except the proposed improvement in scar quality and reduced time to wound healing that had at least 3 refuting evidence and 1 anecdotal evidence. Incidence of pain was also evaluated and were mainly anecdotal lacking formal objective assessment or cohort study. Despite the lack of literatures available, the benefits of Nexobrid is evident in published randomised and single arm studies. Large number of studies are needed to aid further evaluating the proposed benefits of Nexobrid.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute and chronic rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buirski, G.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has been assessed in patients with acute rotator cuff tears and normal radiographs (9 cases) and those with chronic tears and changes of cuff arthropathy (9 cases). All images were obtained using a low field strength system (FONAR 0.3 T). Particular attention was placed on the appearances of the tendon and the cuff muscles themselves. Six complete acute tears were clearly identified, but MRI failed to demonstrate two partial tears. Muscle bulk was preserved in all patients in this group. In contrast, all patients with cuff arthropathy had complete tears of the supraspinatus tendon with marked tendon retraction and associated muscle atrophy: These changes precluded primary surgical repair. MRI should be used to assess muscle atrophy preoperatively in those patients with acute tears. When plain radiographs demonstrate cuff arthropathy, the MRI appearances are predictable and primary repair is unlikely to be successful. Further imaging is therefore not indicated. (orig.)

  15. Clinical effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashaan, Zjir M; Krijnen, Pieta; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; van Baar, Margriet E; Vloemans, Adrianus F P; Dokter, Jan; Tempelman, Fenike R H; van der Vlies, Cees H; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-03-05

    Partial thickness burns are painful, difficult to manage and can have a negative effect on quality of life through scarring, permanent disfigurement and loss of function. The aim of burn treatment in partial thickness burns is to save lives, stimulate wound healing by creating an optimumly moist wound environment, to have debriding and analgesic effects, protect the wound from infection and be convenient for the patient and caregivers. However, there is no consensus on the optimal treatment of partial thickness wounds. Flaminal® and Flamazine® are two standard treatment options that provide the above mentioned properties in burn treatment. Nevertheless, no randomized controlled study has yet compared these two common treatment modalities in partial thickness burns. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns. In this two-arm open multi-center randomized controlled trial, 90 patients will be randomized between Flaminal® and Flamazine® and followed for 12 months. The study population will consist of competent or temporarily non-competent (because of sedation and/or intubation) patients, 18 years of age or older, with acute partial thickness burns and a total body surface area (TBSA) of less than 30 %. The main study outcome is time to complete re-epithelialization (greater than 95 %). Secondary outcome measures include need for grafting, wound colonization/infection, number of dressing changes, pain and anxiety, scar formation, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and costs. This study will contribute to the optimal treatment of patients with partial thickness burn wounds and will provide evidence on the (cost-)effectiveness and quality of life of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns. Netherlands Trial Register NTR4486 , registered on 2 April 2014.

  16. Progression of Fatty Muscle Degeneration in Atraumatic Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Teefey, Sharlene A; Steger-May, Karen; Chamberlain, Aaron M; Middleton, William; Robinson, Kathryn; Yamaguchi, Ken; Keener, Jay D

    2017-05-17

    The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the progression of fatty muscle degeneration over time in asymptomatic shoulders with degenerative rotator cuff tears. Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in 1 shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder were enrolled in a prospective cohort. Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography, which evaluated tear size, location, and fatty muscle degeneration. Tears that were either full-thickness at enrollment or progressed to a full-thickness defect during follow-up were examined. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was necessary for eligibility. One hundred and fifty-six shoulders with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were potentially eligible. Seventy shoulders had measurable fatty muscle degeneration of at least 1 rotator cuff muscle at some time point. Patients with fatty muscle degeneration in the shoulder were older than those without degeneration (mean, 65.8 years [95% confidence interval (CI), 64.0 to 67.6 years] compared with 61.0 years [95% CI, 59.1 to 62.9 years]; p tears at baseline was larger in shoulders with degeneration than in shoulders that did not develop degeneration (13 and 10 mm wide, respectively, and 13 and 10 mm long; p Tears with fatty muscle degeneration were more likely to have enlarged during follow-up than were tears that never developed muscle degeneration (79% compared with 58%; odds ratio, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.29 to 5.39]; p muscle degeneration occurred more frequently in shoulders with tears that had enlarged (43%; 45 of 105) than in shoulders with tears that had not enlarged (20%; 10 of 51; p tears with enlargement and progression of muscle degeneration were more likely to extend into the anterior supraspinatus than were those without progression (53% and 17%, respectively; p tear size (p = 0.56). The median time from tear enlargement to progression of fatty muscle degeneration was 1.0 year (range, -2.0 to 6.9 years) for the

  17. Sonographic evaluation of digital annular pulley tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E.; Bianchi, S.; Garcia, J.F.; Nebiolo, M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the sonographic (US) appearance of digital annular pulley (DAP) tears in high-level rock climbers. Design and patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the US examinations of 16 high-level rock climbers with clinical signs of DAP lesions. MRI and surgical evaluation were performed in five and three patients respectively. The normal US and MRI appearances of DAP were evaluated in 40 and three normal fingers respectively. Results. Nine of 16 patients presented a DAP tear. In eight subjects (seven with complete tears involving the fourth finger and one the fifth finger), US diagnosis was based on the indirect sign of volar bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Injured pulleys were not appreciated by US. Tears concerned the A2 and A3 in six patients and the A3 and A4 in two patients. A2 pulley thickening and hypoechogenicity compatible with a partial tear was demonstrated in one patient. MRI and surgical data correlated well with the US findings. Four patients had tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons but no evidence of pulley disruption. US examinations of three patients were normal. In the healthy subjects US demonstrated DAP in 16 of 40 digits. Conclusion. US can diagnose DAP tears and correlates with the MRI and surgical data. Because of its low cost and non-invasiveness we suggest US as the first imaging modality in the evaluation of injuries of the digital pulley. (orig.)

  18. Sonographic evaluation of digital annular pulley tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Bianchi, S.; Garcia, J.F. [Dept. de Radiologie, Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Geneve (Switzerland); Nebiolo, M. [Reparto Pronto Soccorso Medico, Pietra Ligure (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the sonographic (US) appearance of digital annular pulley (DAP) tears in high-level rock climbers. Design and patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the US examinations of 16 high-level rock climbers with clinical signs of DAP lesions. MRI and surgical evaluation were performed in five and three patients respectively. The normal US and MRI appearances of DAP were evaluated in 40 and three normal fingers respectively. Results. Nine of 16 patients presented a DAP tear. In eight subjects (seven with complete tears involving the fourth finger and one the fifth finger), US diagnosis was based on the indirect sign of volar bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Injured pulleys were not appreciated by US. Tears concerned the A2 and A3 in six patients and the A3 and A4 in two patients. A2 pulley thickening and hypoechogenicity compatible with a partial tear was demonstrated in one patient. MRI and surgical data correlated well with the US findings. Four patients had tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons but no evidence of pulley disruption. US examinations of three patients were normal. In the healthy subjects US demonstrated DAP in 16 of 40 digits. Conclusion. US can diagnose DAP tears and correlates with the MRI and surgical data. Because of its low cost and non-invasiveness we suggest US as the first imaging modality in the evaluation of injuries of the digital pulley. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance findings in skeletal muscle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of skeletal muscle tears can clearly delineate the severity of muscle injury. Although MR imaging is seldom necessary in patients with acute musle trauma, it can be helpful in deciding on clinical management. The two major MR findings in acute muscle tears are deformity of the muscle and the presence of abnormal signal reflecting hemorrhage and edema. In acute tears, methemoglobin within the extravascular blood causes high-signal areas on both T1- and T2-weighted images. With partial tears, the blood may dissect in a distinctive linear pattern along the muscle bundles and fibers. As healing begins, the muscle signal diminishes, first on the T1-weighted images and then on the T2-weighted images. When there is residual abnormal signal on images obtained more than several months after the injury, it is presumed to represent hemorrhage from recurrent tears. In patients with a questionable history of a remote injury, the clinical presentation may be that of persistent pain or a soft tissue mass. In these cases MR imaging may identify the cause of the pain and can exclude a neoplasm by proving that the mass is a hypertrophied or retracted musle. Thus, MR imaging has a limited, but occasionally important role in selected patients with skeletal muscle tears. (orig.)

  20. Iatrogenic tracheal tear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dias, A

    2010-10-01

    Large post intubation tracheal tears are usually detected intra-operatively due to unstable signs namely impaired ventilation and mediastinal emphysema and often require surgical management. Smaller tracheal tears are often missed during anaesthesia and recognized during the postoperative period. Conservative management should be considered in these latter cases.

  1. Tearing instabilities in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Effects of micro-turbulence on tearing instabilities are investigated by numerically solving a reduced set of two-fluid equations. Micro-turbulence excites both large-scale and small-scale Fourier modes through energy transfer due to nonlinear mode coupling. The energy transfer to large scale mode does not directly excite tearing instability but it gives an initiation of tearing instability. When tearing instability starts to grow, the excited small scale mode plays an important role. The mixing of magnetic flux by micro-turbulence is the dominant factor of non-ideal MHD effect at the resonant surface and it gives rise to magnetic reconnection which causes tearing instability. Tearing instabilities were investigated against static equilibrium or flowing equilibrium so far. On the other hand, the recent progress of computer power allows us to investigate interactions between turbulence and coherent modes such as tearing instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas by means of direct numerical simulations. In order to investigate effects of turbulence on tearing instabilities we consider a situation that tearing mode is destabilized in a quasi-equilibrium including micro-turbulence. We choose an initial equilibrium that is unstable against kinetic ballooning modes and tearing instabilities. Tearing instabilities are current driven modes and thus they are unstable for large scale Fourier modes. On the other hand kinetic ballooning modes are unstable for poloidal Fourier modes that are characterized by ion Larmor radius. The energy of kinetic ballooning modes spreads over wave number space through nonlinear Fourier mode coupling. We present that micro-turbulence affects tearing instabilities in two different ways by three-dimensional numerical simulation of a reduced set of two-fluid equations. One is caused by energy transfer to large scale modes, the other is caused by energy transfer to small scale modes. The former is the excitation of initial

  2. Idiopathic Bilateral Bloody Tearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrullah Beyazyıldız

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloody tear is a rare and distinct clinic phenomenon. We report a case presenting with the complaint of recurrent episodes of bilateral bloody tearing. A 16-year-old girl presented to our clinic with complaint of bloody tearing in both eyes for 3 months. Bloody tearing was not associated with her menses. A blood-stained discharge from the punctum was not observed during the compression of both nasolacrimal ducts. Nasolacrimal passage was not obstructed. Imaging studies such as dacryocystography and gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of nasolacrimal canal were normal. Intranasal endoscopic evaluation was normal. We collected samples from bloody tears two times and pathological examination was performed. Pathological analysis showed lots of squamous cells and no endometrial cells; dysplastic cells were found. Further evaluations for underlying causes were unremarkable. No abnormalities were found in ophthalmologic, radiologic, and pathologic investigations. This condition is likely a rare abnormality and the least recognized aetiology for the idiopathic phenomenon.

  3. Antimicrobial compounds in tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Alison M

    2013-12-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rotator cuff tear measurement by arthropneumotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcoyne, R.F.; Matsen, F.A. III

    1983-01-01

    Five years of experience with a method of shoulder arthrography using upright tomography in cases of suspected or known rotator cuff tears has demonstrated its effectiveness. The value of the procedure lies in its ability to demonstrate the size of the cuff tear and the thickness of the remaining cuff tissue. This information provides the surgeon with a preoperative estimate of the difficulty of the repair and the prognosis for a good functional recovery. In 33 cases, there was good correlation between the upright thin-section tomogram findings and the surgical results. The tomograms provided better information about the size of the tear and the quality of the remaining cuff than did plain arthrograms

  5. Rotator cuff tears: correlation between geometric tear patterns on MRI and arthroscopy and pre- and postoperative clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Yaron; Eshed, Iris; Shapira, Shachar; Oran, Ariel; Vogel, Guy; Herman, Amir; Perry Pritsch, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered to be the best non-invasive procedure for the evaluation of rotator cuff (RC) tendon tears. Burkhart's classification is a geometric classification of full-thickness RC tears on MRI. To correlate MRI and arthroscopic geometric full-thickness RC tears according to the Burkhart's classification with pre- and postoperative clinical findings. Patients who underwent arthroscopic RC repair between 2006 and 2010 were retrospectively evaluated. Preoperative MRI and arthroscopic surgical reports were reviewed for tear geometry (Burkhart's) by three (1 radiologist, 2 surgeons) and two (surgeons) readers. MRIs were also evaluated for tear size and change of tear size in successive sagittal sections and for muscle mass and fatty infiltration. Clinical examinations were performed preoperatively and at least 12 months afterwards. Postoperative function questionnaires were filled in by the patients. Forty-six patients (35 men, 11 women; mean age, 57 years; range, 41-72 years) were evaluated. Tears depicted on MRIs were classified as crescent in 11 patients (24%), longitudinal in three (6.5%), massive contracted in 29 (63%), and cuff arthropathy in three (6.5%). Muscle changes were noted almost exclusively in patients with massive tears and cuff arthropathy (16/32 patients, P = 0.013). MRIs and arthroscopic geometric classifications were in close agreement. Tear type did not correlate with pre- and postoperative physical examination or with postoperative clinical questionnaires scores. Geometric RC tear characterizations on preoperative MRIs were closely associated with arthroscopic findings. Postoperative results were not affected by the geometric pattern of the tears. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Ultrasound evaluation of arthroscopic full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff repair: single-row versus double-row suture bridge (transosseous equivalent) fixation. Results of a prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartsman, Gary M; Drake, Gregory; Edwards, T Bradley; Elkousy, Hussein A; Hammerman, Steven M; O'Connor, Daniel P; Press, Cyrus M

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the structural outcomes of a single-row rotator cuff repair and double-row suture bridge fixation after arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff tear. We evaluated with diagnostic ultrasound a consecutive series of ninety shoulders in ninety patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears at an average of 10 months (range, 6-12) after operation. A single surgeon at a single hospital performed the repairs. Inclusion criteria were full-thickness supraspinatus tears less than 25 mm in their anterior to posterior dimension. Exclusion criteria were prior operations on the shoulder, partial thickness tears, subscapularis tears, infraspinatus tears, combined supraspinatus and infraspinatus repairs and irreparable supraspinatus tears. Forty-three shoulders were repaired with single-row technique and 47 shoulders with double-row suture bridge technique. Postoperative rehabilitation was identical for both groups. Ultrasound criteria for healed repair included visualization of a tendon with normal thickness and length, and a negative compression test. Eighty-three patients were available for ultrasound examination (40 single-row and 43 suture-bridge). Thirty of 40 patients (75%) with single-row repair demonstrated a healed rotator cuff repair compared to 40/43 (93%) patients with suture-bridge repair (P = .024). Arthroscopic double-row suture bridge repair (transosseous equivalent) of an isolated supraspinatus rotator cuff tear resulted in a significantly higher tendon healing rate (as determined by ultrasound examination) when compared to arthroscopic single-row repair. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Superior glenoid inclination and rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Peter N; Beck, Lindsay; Granger, Erin; Henninger, Heath; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2018-03-23

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether glenoid inclination (1) could be measured accurately on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using computed tomography (CT) as a gold standard, (2) could be measured reliably on MRI, and (3) whether it differed between patients with rotator cuff tears and age-matched controls without evidence of rotator cuff tears or glenohumeral osteoarthritis. In this comparative retrospective radiographic study, we measured glenoid inclination on T1 coronal MRI corrected into the plane of the scapula. We determined accuracy by comparison with CT and inter-rater reliability. We compared glenoid inclination between patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears and patients aged >50 years without evidence of a rotator cuff tear or glenohumeral arthritis. An a priori power analysis determined adequate power to detect a 2° difference in glenoid inclination. (1) In a validation cohort of 37 patients with MRI and CT, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.877, with a mean difference of 0° (95% confidence interval, -1° to 1°). (2) For MRI inclination, the inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.911. (3) Superior glenoid inclination was 2° higher (range, 1°-4°, P rotator cuff tear group of 192 patients than in the control cohort of 107 patients. Glenoid inclination can be accurately and reliably measured on MRI. Although superior glenoid inclination is statistically greater in those with rotator cuff tears than in patients of similar age without rotator cuff tears or glenohumeral arthritis, the difference is likely below clinical significance. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effects of seawater immersion on the inflammatory response and oxygen free radical injury of rats with superficial partial-thickness scald at early stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y X; Wang, J H; Liu, L; Zou, Q; Zhang, Y; Bai, Z

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To study the effects of seawater immersion on the inflammatory response and oxygen free radical injury of rats with superficial-thickness scald at early stage. Methods: Seventy Wistar rats were divided into healthy control group (HC, n =7), pure scald group (PS, n =21), scald+ fresh water immersion group (SF, n =21), and scald+ seawater immersion group (SS, n =21) according to the random number table. Rats in group HC did not receive any treatment, while 5% total body surface area superficial partial-thickness scald was made on the back of rats in the latter three groups. Rats in group PS lived freely immediately post burn, while wounds on the back of rats in groups SF and SS were immersed into fresh water and seawater, respectively. Serum and full-thickness skin tissue in the center of wounds on the back of 7 rats in groups PS, SF, and SS at post immersion (injury) hour (PIH) 2, 4, and 6 were collected, respectively, while serum and full-thickness skin tissue at the same position of the 7 rats in group HC were collected at PIH 6 of rats in other groups. Morphology of skin tissue was observed with HE staining; tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) content in serum and skin tissue was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; superoxide dismutase (SOD) content in serum and skin tissue was determined by hydroxylamine method; malondialdehyde content in serum and skin tissue was determined by thiobarbituric acid method. Data were processed with analysis of variance of factorial design, one-way analysis of variance, Welch test, LSD test, and Tamhane test. Results: (1) Epidermal cells of skin tissue of rats in group HC arranged in order and continuously, and the dermis tissue and accessory structures were clear and complete. The skin layer and epidermis of wounds of rats in group PS had no significant change, but the edema of epidermis and dermis and infiltration of inflammatory cells enhanced over time at PIH 2, 4, and 6. The horny layer of epidermis of

  9. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Francesco S.; Governi, Simone; Burresi, Francesca; Vigni, Francesco; Stefani, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears. Surgical findings were used as the gold standard in detecting tears. A total of 44 patients were assessed with transverse and longitudinal US scans with respect to the long axis of the rotator cuff tendons and then examined with MR arthrography. This technique involved free-hand injection of contrast medium into the shoulder joint. At surgery 20 incomplete and 24 complete tears were observed. Ultrasound offered good results for the large tears, but its sensitivity decreased proportionally with the size of the tears. Magnetic resonance arthrography correctly diagnosed 43 tears, whereas only one false-negative diagnosis of tendinosis was made for a partial tear on the bursal side. Since it improves the diagnosis of small tears, MR arthrography must be performed on all patients for whom surgical repair is necessary in order to restore normal functions. (orig.)

  10. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Francesco S.; Governi, Simone; Burresi, Francesca; Vigni, Francesco; Stefani, Paolo [Department of Radiologic and Orthopaedic-Rehabilitative Sciences, University Hospital Siena (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears. Surgical findings were used as the gold standard in detecting tears. A total of 44 patients were assessed with transverse and longitudinal US scans with respect to the long axis of the rotator cuff tendons and then examined with MR arthrography. This technique involved free-hand injection of contrast medium into the shoulder joint. At surgery 20 incomplete and 24 complete tears were observed. Ultrasound offered good results for the large tears, but its sensitivity decreased proportionally with the size of the tears. Magnetic resonance arthrography correctly diagnosed 43 tears, whereas only one false-negative diagnosis of tendinosis was made for a partial tear on the bursal side. Since it improves the diagnosis of small tears, MR arthrography must be performed on all patients for whom surgical repair is necessary in order to restore normal functions. (orig.)

  11. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplas, Monica C.; Schneider, Erika; Sundaram, Murali

    2011-01-01

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed. (orig.)

  12. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koplas, Monica C. [University of Mississippi Medical Center, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Radiology, Jackson, MS (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed. (orig.)

  13. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplas, Monica C; Schneider, Erika; Sundaram, Murali

    2011-05-01

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed.

  14. Ultrasonography versus magnetic resonance imaging in detecting and grading common extensor tendon tear in chronic lateral epicondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Bachta

    Full Text Available To investigate the diagnostic performance and reliability of ultrasonography (US in detecting and grading common extensor tendon (CET tear in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis (LE, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as the reference standard.The study comprised fifty-eight chronic LE patients. Each patient underwent US and MRI. CET status was classified as: high-grade tear (≥50% thickness, low-grade tear (<50% thickness, suspected tear (possible but not evident tear, no tear. Additionally, the following dichotomous scale was used: confirmed or unconfirmed CET tear. Relative US parameters (versus MRI for detecting CET tear included: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy. The agreement between US and MRI findings was measured using the weighted Cohen kappa coefficient (κ.US showed moderate agreement with MRI in detecting and grading CET tear (κ = 0.49. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CET tear detecting by US were 64.52%, 85.19%, and 72.73%, respectively. PPV and NPV of US were 83.33% and 67.65%, respectively. No patient with unconfirmed CET tear on US had high-grade CET tear on MRI.Ultrasonography is a valuable imaging modality that can be used as a screening tool to exclude high-grade CET tear in chronic LE patients. Once a tear is evident on US, MRI should be considered to assess precisely the extent of tendon injury.

  15. As tears go by : Baby tears trigger more brain activity than adult tears in nulliparous women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricx-Riem, M.M.E.; De Carli, P.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The current functional magnetic resonance imaging study examines brain activity during the perception of infant and adult tears. Infant tears evoke stronger responses in the visual cortex than adult tears, indicating that infant tears are highly salient. In addition, our study shows that infant

  16. Hip Labral Tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that joint in the future. Prevention Hip labral tears are often associated with sports participation. If your sport puts a lot of strain on your hips, condition the surrounding muscles with strength and flexibility exercises. Try to avoid ...

  17. Haemolacria (bloody tears)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-08-06

    Aug 6, 2014 ... menstruation, drugs, hyperthyroidism, nasolacrimal tu- berculosis ... no bleeding from any other body orifice. However ... All age groups can be affected from infancy to ... the system and thus lead to bloody tears emerging from.

  18. Meniscotibial (coronary) ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khoury, G.Y.; Usta, H.Y.; Berger, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Preservation of the meniscus whenever possible is essential in maintaining knee stability and preventing premature osteoarthritis. Peripheral meniscal tears are the most amenable to surgical repair. This study evaluates the peripheral attachments of the medial meniscus and focuses on a specific tear limited to the meniscotibial ligament (coronary ligament). The diagnosis is made arthrographically when the medial meniscus floats above the tibial plateau without separating completely from the capsule. The lateral meniscus is rarely involved in this type of injury. (orig.)

  19. Comparison between 3D isotropic and 2D conventional MR arthrography for diagnosing rotator cuff tear and labral lesions: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Hwa; Yun, Seong Jong; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2018-03-30

    Although 3D-isotropic MR arthrography has been characterized as a substitute imaging tool for rotator cuff tear (RCT) and labral lesions, it has not been commonly used in clinical practice because of controversy related to image blurring and indistinctness of structural edges. To perform a comparison of the diagnostic performance of 3D-isotropic MR arthrography and 2D-conventional MR arthrography for diagnosis of RCT (solely RCT, full/partial-thickness supraspinatus [SST]-infraspinatus [IST] tear, or subscapularis [SSc] tear) and labral lesions. Meta-analysis. Patients with shoulder pain. 3D-isotropic and 2D-conventional MR arthrography at 3.0T or 1.5T. PubMed and EMBASE were searched following the PRISMA guidelines. Bivariate modeling and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic modeling were performed to compare the overall diagnostic performance of 3D-isotropic and 2D-conventional MR arthrography. Multiple-subgroup analyses were performed for diagnosing RCT, full/partial-thickness SST-IST tear, SSc tear, and labral lesions. Meta-regression analyses were performed according to subject, study, and MR arthrography characteristics including 3D-isotropic sequences (turbo spine echo [TSE] vs. gradient echo [GRE]). Eleven studies (825 patients) were included. Overall, 3D-isotropic MR arthrography had similar pooled sensitivity (0.90 [95% CI, 0.87-0.93]) (P = 0.95) and specificity (0.92 [95% CI, 0.87-0.95]) (P = 0.99), relative to 2D-conventional MR arthrography (sensitivity, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.86-0.94]); specificity, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.87-0.95]). Multiple-subgroup analyses showed that sensitivities (P = 0.13-0.91) and specificities (P = 0.26-0.99) on 3D-isotropic MR arthrography for diagnosing RCT, full/partial-thickness SST-IST tear, SSC tear, and labral lesions were not significantly different from 2D-conventional MR arthrography. On meta-regression analysis, 3D-TSE sequence demonstrated higher sensitivity (P 3D-GRE for RCT and labral

  20. The tear turnover and tear clearance tests - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaszczuk, Izabela K; Montes Mico, Robert; Iskander, D Robert; Expósito, Alejandro Cerviño

    2018-03-01

    The aim is to provide a summary of methods available for the assessment of tear turnover and tear clearance rates. The review defines tear clearance and tear turnover and describes their implication for ocular surface health. Additionally, it describes main types of techniques for measuring tear turnover, including fluorescein tear clearance tests, techniques utilizing electromagnetic spectrum and tracer molecule and novel experimental techniques utilizing optical coherence tomography and fluorescein profilometry. Areas covered: Internet databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar) and most frequently cited references were used as a principal resource of information on tear turnover rate and tear clearance rate, presenting methodologies and equipment, as well as their definition and implications for the anterior eye surface health and function. Keywords used for data-search were as follows: tear turnover, tear clearance, fluorescein clearance, scintigraphy, fluorophotometry, tear flow, drainage, tear meniscus dynamics, Krehbiel flow and lacrimal functional unit. Expert commentary: After decades, the topic of tear turnover assessment has been reintroduced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to propose less invasive, less time consuming and simpler methodologies for the assessment of tear dynamics that have the potential to be utilized in clinical practice.

  1. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  2. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  3. Accelerated re-epithelialization of partial-thickness skin wounds by a topical betulin gel: Results of a randomized phase III clinical trials program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Juan P; Podmelle, Fred; Lipový, Břetislav; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Schumann, Hauke; Schwieger-Briel, Agnes; Zahn, Tobias R; Metelmann, Hans-Robert

    2017-09-01

    The clinical significance of timely re-epithelialization is obvious in burn care, since delayed wound closure is enhancing the risk of wound site infection and extensive scarring. Topical treatments that accelerate wound healing are urgently needed to reduce these sequelae. Evidence from preliminary studies suggests that betulin can accelerate the healing of different types of wounds, including second degree burns and split-thickness skin graft wounds. The goal of this combined study program consisting of two randomized phase III clinical trials in parallel is to evaluate whether a topical betulin gel (TBG) is accelerating re-epithelialization of split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor site wounds compared to standard of care. Two parallel blindly evaluated, randomised, controlled, multicentre phase III clinical trials were performed in adults undergoing STSG surgery (EudraCT nos. 2012-003390-26 and 2012-000777-23). Donor site wounds were split into two equal halves and randomized 1:1 to standard of care (a non-adhesive moist wound dressing) or standard of care plus TBG consisting of 10% birch bark extract and 90% sunflower oil (Episalvan, Birken AG, Niefern-Oeschelbronn, Germany). The primary efficacy assessment was the intra-individual difference in time to wound closure assessed from digital photographs by three blinded experts. A total of 219 patients were included and treated in the two trials. Wounds closed faster with TBG than without it (15.3 vs. 16.5 days; mean intra-individual difference=-1.1 days [95% CI, -1.5 to -0.7]; p<0.0001). This agreed with unblinded direct clinical assessment (difference=-2.1 days [95% CI, -2.7 to -1.5]; p<0.0001). Adverse events possibly related to treatment were mild or moderate and mostly at the application site. TBG accelerates re-epithelialization of partial thickness wounds compared to the current standard of care, providing a well-tolerated contribution to burn care in practice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  4. Aquacel(®) Ag dressing versus Acticoat™ dressing in partial thickness burns: a prospective, randomized, controlled study in 100 patients. Part 1: burn wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Heyneman, Alexander; Pirayesh, Ali; Monstrey, Stan

    2014-05-01

    Studies comparing contemporary silver dressings in burns are scarce. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study, counting 50 patients/research group, we compared two frequently used silver dressings, Acticoat™ and Aquacel(®) Ag, in the management of partial thickness burns with a predicted healing time between 7 and 21 days as assessed by laser Doppler imaging between 48 and 72h after burn. Variables investigated were related to baseline research group characteristics, wound healing, bacteriology, economics, nurse, and patient experience. Both research groups were comparably composed taking into account gender, age and burn characteristics. Similar results were obtained as to healing time and bacterial control with both silver dressings. A statistically significant difference in favor of the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing was found for average ease of use (p<0.001), average ease of application (p=0.001), patient pain (p<0.001), patient comfort with the dressing (p=0.017), silver staining (p<0.001), and cost effectiveness (p<0.001). Both silver dressings resulted in comparable healing times and bacterial control but the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing significantly increased comfort for patients as well as nurses and was significantly more cost-effective than the Acticoat™ dressing for the given indication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Human tears contain a chemosignal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelstein, Shani; Yeshurun, Yaara; Rozenkrantz, Liron; Shushan, Sagit; Frumin, Idan; Roth, Yehudah; Sobel, Noam

    2011-01-14

    Emotional tearing is a poorly understood behavior that is considered uniquely human. In mice, tears serve as a chemosignal. We therefore hypothesized that human tears may similarly serve a chemosignaling function. We found that merely sniffing negative-emotion-related odorless tears obtained from women donors induced reductions in sexual appeal attributed by men to pictures of women's faces. Moreover, after sniffing such tears, men experienced reduced self-rated sexual arousal, reduced physiological measures of arousal, and reduced levels of testosterone. Finally, functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that sniffing women's tears selectively reduced activity in brain substrates of sexual arousal in men.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of 3T conventional shoulder MRI in the detection of the long head of the biceps tendon tears associated with rotator cuff tendon tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ro Woon; Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Shin, Dong Rock; Kang, Chae Hoon [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Man Ho [Andong Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Andong-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance (DP) of 3T (3 Tesla field strength) conventional shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) tears in association with rotator cuff tendon tears. This study included 80 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tendon tears. Two radiologists independently evaluated the preoperative 3T shoulder MRI for the presence of LHBT tears. The DP of MRI was evaluated using the results of arthroscopy as the reference standard. We also evaluated the DP of several MR signs of LHBT in detection of partial LHBT tears. Arthroscopic examination revealed 35 partial and 5 complete tears. According to the results of evaluation by reviewers 1 and 2, shoulder MRI exhibited sensitivities of 77.14 and 80 % and specificities of 71.11 and 73.33 % in detection of partial LHBT tears and sensitivities of 80 and 100 % and a specificity of 100% (both) in detection of complete LHBT tears. In detecting partial LHBT tears, increased T2 signal intensity of the LHBT exhibited high sensitivities (reviewers 1 and 2; 82.85 and 80 %, respectively) and the presence of intratendinous defects or C-signs exhibited the highest specificities (reviewers 1 and 2; 95.55 and 93.33 %, respectively), followed by abnormalities in shape and outer margins of the LHBT (reviewers 1 and 2; 91.11 and 82 %; 91.11 and 86.66 %, respectively). Non-contrast-enhanced 3T shoulder MRI is potentially highly accurate in detection of complete LHBT tears, but moderately accurate in detection of partial LHBT tears. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of 3T conventional shoulder MRI in the detection of the long head of the biceps tendon tears associated with rotator cuff tendon tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ro Woon; Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Shin, Dong Rock; Kang, Chae Hoon; Lee, Man Ho; Lee, Ki Won

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance (DP) of 3T (3 Tesla field strength) conventional shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) tears in association with rotator cuff tendon tears. This study included 80 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tendon tears. Two radiologists independently evaluated the preoperative 3T shoulder MRI for the presence of LHBT tears. The DP of MRI was evaluated using the results of arthroscopy as the reference standard. We also evaluated the DP of several MR signs of LHBT in detection of partial LHBT tears. Arthroscopic examination revealed 35 partial and 5 complete tears. According to the results of evaluation by reviewers 1 and 2, shoulder MRI exhibited sensitivities of 77.14 and 80 % and specificities of 71.11 and 73.33 % in detection of partial LHBT tears and sensitivities of 80 and 100 % and a specificity of 100% (both) in detection of complete LHBT tears. In detecting partial LHBT tears, increased T2 signal intensity of the LHBT exhibited high sensitivities (reviewers 1 and 2; 82.85 and 80 %, respectively) and the presence of intratendinous defects or C-signs exhibited the highest specificities (reviewers 1 and 2; 95.55 and 93.33 %, respectively), followed by abnormalities in shape and outer margins of the LHBT (reviewers 1 and 2; 91.11 and 82 %; 91.11 and 86.66 %, respectively). Non-contrast-enhanced 3T shoulder MRI is potentially highly accurate in detection of complete LHBT tears, but moderately accurate in detection of partial LHBT tears. (orig.)

  8. Tear secretion and tear stability of women on hormonal contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustina Kemdinum Idu

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Injectable hormonal contraceptives had no significant effects on tear secretion and tear stability of healthy women of childbearing age. Further studies may be required to determine the effects of hormonal contraceptives on tear volume and stability of women with dry eyes.

  9. An optimized animal model for partial and total skin thickness burns studies Um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras superficiais e profundas da pele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bomfim Soares Campelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Development of an improved animal model for studying skin burns in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n=6: G1-Control, G2- T100°C, G3-T150°C and G4-T200°C. Two 10 x 10 mm squares were outlined with a sterile surgical marker on each side and along the vertebral column using a prepared template positioned between the anterior and posterior limbs. G2-G4 rats were subjected to 100°C, 150°C and 200ºC thermal burns, respectively. G1 rats served as controls. Burns were inflicted by applying a copper plate connected to an electronic temperature controlling device to the dorsal skin of anesthetized rats. Four burns were produced on each animal (total area: 4 cm²/animal leaving about 1 cm of undamaged skin between burn areas. Analgesia was administered during 24 h after burn injury by adding 30 mg codeine phosphate hemihydrate to 500 ml tap water. RESULTS: The application of 100°C and 150ºC resulted in partial thickness skin burns with central reepithelialization of the burned area only at 100°C. In G4 group the whole thickness of the skin was injured without central reepithelialization. However, there was marginal reepithelialization in all groups. CONCLUSION: The model studied is inexpensive and easily reproducible, enabling the achievement of controlled burns with partial or total impairment of the skin in experimental animals.OBJETIVO: Desenvolvimento de um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras cutâneas em ratos. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro ratos Wistar, machos, foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=6: G1-Controle, G2-T100°C, G3-T150°C e G4-T200°C. Dois quadrados medindo 10x10 mm foram delineados com um marcador cirúrgico estéril em cada lado e ao longo da coluna vertebral e posicionados entre os membros anteriores e posteriores, utilizando um molde previamente preparado. Os ratos dos grupos G2-G4 foram submetidos a queimaduras térmicas de 100

  10. Nonlinear drift tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear study of magnetic perturbation development under single-mode conditions in collision-free plasma in configurations with the magnetic field shear is investigated. Results are obtained with regard of transverse component of electrical field and its effect on ion dynamics within wide range of ion Larmor radius value and values of magnetic field shear. Increments of nonlinear drift tearing mode are obtained and it is shown that excitation drastic conditions of even linearly stable modes are possible. Mechanism of instability nonlinear stabilization is considered and the value of magnetic island at the saturation threshold is estimeted. Energy of nonlinear drift tearing mode is discussed

  11. Comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings for patients with partial-thickness burns: study protocol of a systematic review and a Bayesian framework network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Zhao-Hong; Wang, Shun-Bin; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-22

    Selecting a suitable wound dressing for patients with partial-thickness burns (PTBs) is important in wound care. However, the comparative effectiveness of different dressings has not been studied. We report the protocol of a network meta-analysis designed to combine direct and indirect evidence of wound dressings in the management of PTB. We will search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the wound-healing effect of a wound dressing in the management of PTB. Searches will be conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register and CINAHL. A comprehensive search strategy is developed to retrieve articles reporting potentially eligible RCTs. Besides, we will contact the experts in the field and review the conference proceedings to locate non-published studies. The reference lists of articles will be reviewed for any candidate studies. Two independent reviewers will screen titles and abstracts of the candidate articles. All eligible RCTs will be obtained in full text to perform a review. Disagreement on eligibility of an RCT will be solved by group discussion. The information of participants, interventions, comparisons and outcomes from included RCTs will be recorded and summarised. The primary outcome is time to complete wound healing. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of burns completely healed at the end of treatment, change in wound surface area at the end of treatment, incidence of adverse events, etc. The result of this review will provide evidence for the comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings in the management of PTB. It will also facilitate decision-making in choosing a suitable wound dressing. We will disseminate the review through a peer-review journal and conference abstracts or posters. PROSPERO CRD42016041574; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  12. Artificially modified collagen fibril orientation affects leather tear strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Susyn J; Wells, Hannah C; Sizeland, Katie H; Kirby, Nigel; Edmonds, Richard L; Ryan, Tim; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2018-07-01

    Ovine leather has around half the tear strength of bovine leather and is therefore not suitable for high-value applications such as shoes. Tear strength has been correlated with the natural collagen fibril alignment (orientation index, OI). It is hypothesized that it could be possible to artificially increase the OI of the collagen fibrils and that an artificial increase in OI could increase tear strength. Ovine skins, after pickling and bating, were strained biaxially during chrome tanning. The strain ranged from 2 to 15% of the initial sample length, either uniformly in both directions by 10% or with 3% in one direction and 15% in the other. Once tanned, the leather tear strengths were measured and the collagen fibril orientation was measured using synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering. The OI increased as a result of strain during tanning from 0.48 to 0.79 (P = 0.001) measured edge-on and the thickness-normalized tear strength increased from 27 to 43 N mm -1 (P leather was strained 10% in two orthogonal directions. This is evidence to support a causal relationship between high OI (measured edge-on), highly influenced by thickness, and tear strength. It also provides a method to produce stronger leather. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Tears of Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliotti, Marcos

    2004-01-01

    The unique occurrence of the upward motion of a thin film of wine, and its formation into drops inside the wall of a wine glass is explained. Evaporation of alcohol generates a surface tension gradient, moving the film of wine upwards on the internal sides of a wine glass, where it collects and forms into drops or tears.

  14. Relationship of Tear Size and Location to Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. Mike; Dahiya, Nirvikar; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Keener, Jay D.; Galatz, Leesa M.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Background: Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles may have detrimental effects on both anatomical and functional outcomes following shoulder surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tear geometry and muscle fatty degeneration in shoulders with a deficient rotator cuff. Methods: Ultrasonograms of both shoulders of 262 patients were reviewed to assess the type of rotator cuff tear and fatty degeneration in the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. The 251 shoulders with a full-thickness tear underwent further evaluation for tear size and location. The relationship of tear size and location to fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles was investigated with use of statistical comparisons and regression models. Results: Fatty degeneration was found almost exclusively in shoulders with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Of the 251 shoulders with a full-thickness tear, eighty-seven (34.7%) had fatty degeneration in either the supraspinatus or infraspinatus, or both. Eighty-two (32.7%) of the 251 full-thickness tears had a distance of 0 mm between the biceps tendon and anterior margin of the tear. Ninety percent of the full-thickness tears with fatty degeneration in both muscles had a distance of 0 mm posterior from the biceps, whereas only 9% of those without fatty degeneration had a distance of 0 mm. Tears with fatty degeneration had significantly greater width and length than those without fatty degeneration (p Tears with fatty degeneration had a significantly shorter distance posterior from the biceps than those without fatty degeneration (p tear width and length were found to be the most important predictors for infraspinatus fatty degeneration. Conclusions: Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles is closely associated with tear size and location. The finding of this study suggests that the integrity of the anterior supraspinatus tendon is important to the development of fatty

  15. Software Simulation of Hot Tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.; Hansen, P.N.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    1999-01-01

    The brittleness of a solidifying alloy in a temperature range near the solidus temperature has been recognised since the fifties as the mechanism responsible for hot tearing. Due to this brittlenes, the metal will crack under even small amounts of strain in that temperature range. We see these hot...... tears in castings close to hot centres, where the level of strain is often too high.Although the hot tearing mechanism is well understood, until now it has been difficult to do much to reduce the hot tearing tendency in a casting. In the seventies, good hot tearing criteria were developed by considering...... the solidification rate and the strain rate of the hot tear prone areas. But, until recently it was only possible to simulate the solidification rate, so that the criteria could not be used effectively.Today, with new software developments, it is possible to also simulate the strain rate in the hot tear prone areas...

  16. Tearing resistance of some co-polyester sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Sung; Karger-Kocsis, Jozsef

    2004-01-01

    A three-zone model consisting of initial, evolutionary and stabilised plastic zones for tearing resistance was proposed for polymer sheets. An analysis with the model, based on the essential work of fracture (EWF) approach, was demonstrated to be capable for predicting specific total work of fracture along the tear path across all the plastic zones although accuracy of specific essential work of fracture is subject to improvement. Photo-elastic images were used for identification of plastic deformation sizes and profiles. Fracture mode change during loading was described in relation with the three zones. Tearing fracture behaviour of extruded mono- and bi-layer sheets of different types of amorphous co-polyesters and different thicknesses was investigated. Thick material exhibited higher specific total work of tear fracture than thin mono-layer sheet in the case of amorphous polyethylene terephthalate (PET). This finding was explained in terms of plastic zone size formed along the tear path, i.e., thick material underwent larger plastic deformation than thin material. When PET and polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG) were laminated with each other, specific total work of fracture of the bi-layer sheets was not noticeably improved over that of the constituent materials

  17. The natural course of nonoperatively treated rotator cuff tears: an 8.8-year follow-up of tear anatomy and clinical outcome in 49 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmayer, Stefan; Gärtner, Anne V; Tariq, Rana

    2017-04-01

    The natural course of nonoperatively treated rotator cuff tears is not fully understood. We explored the long-term development of tear anatomy and assessed functional outcomes. Eighty-nine small to medium-sized full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff, all primarily treated by physiotherapy, were identified retrospectively. Twenty-three tears needed surgical treatment later on, and 17 patients were unable to meet for follow-up. The remaining 49 still unrepaired tears were re-examined after 8.8 (8.2-11.0) years with sonography. Re-examination by magnetic resonance imaging was possible for 37 patients. Shoulder function was assessed with shoulder scores. Primary outcome measures were progression of tear size, muscle atrophy, and fatty degeneration and the Constant score (CS). Mean tear size increased by 8.3 mm in the anterior-posterior plane (P = .001) and by 4.5 mm in the medial-lateral plane (P = .001). Increase of tear size was -5 to +9.9 mm in 33 patients, 10 to 19.9 mm in 8 patients, and ≥20 mm in 8 patients. The CS was 81 points for tear increases Muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration progressed in 18 and 15 of the 37 patients, respectively. In tears with no progression of atrophy, the CS was 82 points compared with 75.5 points in tears with progression (P = .04). Anatomic tear deterioration was found in the majority of patients, but it was often moderate. Large tear size increases and progression of muscle atrophy were correlated to a poorer functional outcome. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tears of anterior cruciate ligament and associated injury in the knee joint: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ahn, Jin Whan; Yoon, Yup

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the characteristic findings in tears of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and associated injury at MR imaging. We reviewed the findings of MR images and the corresponding arthroscopic results of 32 patients with ACL tears. We evaluated the signal intensity and contour of ACL surrounding bony structures, menisci and associated injury of the knee joint. Complete ACL tears were present in 25 patients and partial ACL tears were in 7 patients. Complete ACL tears showed heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of the ACL in 14 patients (56%) and without bulging or absence in 11 patients(44%). Most patients torn ACL with contour bulging(12/14) had bone bruise, but only one patient torn ACL without bulging contour had bone bruise. ACL with thin continuous low signal band surrounding heterogenously increased signal intensity suggests partial tear which was seen in three patients of seven proved partial ACL tears. Combined bone injury in ACL tear were in 23 patients (73%) and most of these(22/23) were at midportion of lateral notch of femur and/or posterior portion of lateral tibial plateu. Deepening of lateral notch of femur were noted in 17 patients(53%). Associated injuries of the other ligaments of knee joint were buckling of the posterior cruciate ligament(16/32, 50%) and tears of the medial collateral ligament(11/32, 34%). Posterior horns of menisci were more frequent site of combined injury within menisci in patients with ACL tear. Acute tearing of ACL in MRI is seen as heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of ACL and combined bone bruises. Patients with torn ACL frequently have various combined injury. In patient with knee injury, these associated or ancillary findings suggest that ACL tear is present

  19. [Rotator cuff tear athropathy prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Soriano, F; Encalada-Díaz, M I; Ruiz-Suárez, M; Valero-González, F S

    2017-01-01

    Glenohumeral arthritis secondary to massive rotator cuff tear presents with a superior displacement and femoralization of the humeral head with coracoacromial arch acetabularization. The purpose of this study was to establish prevalence of rotator cuff tear artropathy (CTA) at our institution. Four hundred electronic records were reviewed from which we identified 136 patients with rotator cuff tears. A second group was composed with patients with massive cuff tears that were analized and staged by the Seebauer cuff tear arthropathy classification. Thirty four patients with massive rotator cuff tears were identified, 8 male and 26 female (age 60.1 ± 10.26 years). Massive rotator cuff tear prevalence was 25%. CTA prevalence found in the rotator cuff group was 19 and 76% in the massive cuff tears group. Patients were staged according to the classification with 32% in stage 1a, 11% 1b, 32% 2a and 0% 2b. CTA prevalence in patients with rotator cuff tears and massive cuff tears is higher than the one reported in American population. We consider that a revision of the Seebauer classification to be appropriate to determine its reliability.

  20. Pele's tears and spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, L. A.; Quane, S.; Russell, K.

    2011-12-01

    Pele's tears are a well known curiosity commonly associated with low viscosity basaltic explosive eruptions. However, these pyroclasts are rarely studied in detail and there is no full explanation for their formation. These intriguing pyroclasts have smooth glassy surfaces, vesiculated interiors, and fluidal morphologies tending towards droplets and then spheres as they decrease in size to Pele's tears from the 1959 fire-fountaining eruption of Kilauea Iki involving size and density measurements. Using thin section and SEM analysis we also consider their internal and external morphologies, porosity and bubble size distributions, and surface textures. Finally we consider the mechanisms of magma fragmentation, timescales of relaxation, and cooling rates that are responsible for their formation.

  1. MR imaging of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, Daniel M.; Chen, Steven; Miller, Theodore T.; Hofman, Josh

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to describe the imaging appearances and location of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons on non-contrast conventional MR imaging. This study was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board. The reports of 548 consecutive MR examinations of the shoulder were reviewed, looking for mention or description of delamination tears of the rotator cuff. The images of the identified cases were then reviewed by two radiologists to confirm the findings. Correlation with surgical and arthroscopic information was then performed. Delamination tears were defined as horizontal retraction of either the bursal or articular surface of the tendon, manifest as thickening of the torn retracted edge, and/or interstitial splitting of the tendon, manifest as fluid-like high signal intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted oblique coronal images. Fourteen cases of delamination tears were identified in 13 patients. Ten of the cases involved the supraspinatus tendon, all with articular surface involvement. Nine of these supraspinatus cases were isolated tears and one occurred as part of a full thickness tear. All 10 of these supraspinatus cases showed medial retraction of the articular surface of the tendon, with thickening of the retracted edge, and 5 of the 10 had a demonstrable horizontal cleft in the interstitium. Four cases involved the subscapularis tendon, with articular surface disruption in three and pure interstitial delamination in one. Medial subluxation of the tendon of the long head of the biceps was present in all four cases. No delamination tears occurred on the bursal surface. Only three of the 14 shoulders underwent surgical repair with one confirmation of supraspinatus delamination, one confirmation of a subscapularis tear that had become a full thickness tear 10 months after initial imaging and another interstitial subscapularis delamination that was not identified arthroscopically. Delamination tears occur most often in the

  2. MR imaging of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Daniel M.; Chen, Steven [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Manhasset, NY (United States); Miller, Theodore T. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Hofman, Josh [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15

    The objective was to describe the imaging appearances and location of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons on non-contrast conventional MR imaging. This study was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board. The reports of 548 consecutive MR examinations of the shoulder were reviewed, looking for mention or description of delamination tears of the rotator cuff. The images of the identified cases were then reviewed by two radiologists to confirm the findings. Correlation with surgical and arthroscopic information was then performed. Delamination tears were defined as horizontal retraction of either the bursal or articular surface of the tendon, manifest as thickening of the torn retracted edge, and/or interstitial splitting of the tendon, manifest as fluid-like high signal intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted oblique coronal images. Fourteen cases of delamination tears were identified in 13 patients. Ten of the cases involved the supraspinatus tendon, all with articular surface involvement. Nine of these supraspinatus cases were isolated tears and one occurred as part of a full thickness tear. All 10 of these supraspinatus cases showed medial retraction of the articular surface of the tendon, with thickening of the retracted edge, and 5 of the 10 had a demonstrable horizontal cleft in the interstitium. Four cases involved the subscapularis tendon, with articular surface disruption in three and pure interstitial delamination in one. Medial subluxation of the tendon of the long head of the biceps was present in all four cases. No delamination tears occurred on the bursal surface. Only three of the 14 shoulders underwent surgical repair with one confirmation of supraspinatus delamination, one confirmation of a subscapularis tear that had become a full thickness tear 10 months after initial imaging and another interstitial subscapularis delamination that was not identified arthroscopically. Delamination tears occur most often in the

  3. On tear film breakup (TBU): dynamics and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Richard J; Driscoll, Tobin A; Begley, Carolyn G; King-Smith, P Ewen; Siddique, Javed I

    2018-06-13

    We report the results of some recent experiments to visualize tear film dynamics. We then study a mathematical model for tear film thinning and tear film breakup (TBU), a term from the ocular surface literature. The thinning is driven by an imposed tear film thinning rate which is input from in vivo measurements. Solutes representing osmolarity and fluorescein are included in the model. Osmolarity causes osmosis from the model ocular surface, and the fluorescein is used to compute the intensity corresponding closely to in vivo observations. The imposed thinning can be either one-dimensional or axisymmetric, leading to streaks or spots of TBU, respectively. For a spatially-uniform (flat) film, osmosis would cease thinning and balance mass lost due to evaporation; for these space-dependent evaporation profiles TBU does occur because osmolarity diffuses out of the TBU into the surrounding tear film, in agreement with previous results. The intensity pattern predicted based on the fluorescein concentration is compared with the computed thickness profiles; this comparison is important for interpreting in vivo observations. The non-dimensionalization introduced leads to insight about the relative importance of the competing processes; it leads to a classification of large vs small TBU regions in which different physical effects are dominant. Many regions of TBU may be considered small, revealing that the flow inside the film has an appreciable influence on fluorescence imaging of the tear film.

  4. Evaluation of the Subscapularis Tendon Tears on 3T Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of T1-Weighted Spectral Presaturation with Inversion-Recovery and T2-Weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoseok; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kang, Yusuhn; Oh, Joo Han; Lee, Eugene; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik

    2018-01-01

    To compare the T1-weighted spectral presaturation with inversion-recovery sequences (T1 SPIR) with T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences (T2 TSE) on 3T magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) in the evaluation of the subscapularis (SSC) tendon tear with arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. This retrospective study included 120 consecutive patients who had undergone MRA within 3 months between April and December 2015. Two musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the arthroscopic results evaluated T1 SPIR and T2 TSE images in separate sessions for the integrity of the SSC tendon, examining normal/articular-surface partial-thickness tear (PTTa)/full-thickness tear (FTT). Diagnostic performance of T1 SPIR and T2 TSE was calculated with arthroscopic results as the reference standard, and sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared using the McNemar test. Interobserver agreement was measured with kappa (κ) statistics. There were 74 SSC tendon tears (36 PTTa and 38 FTT) confirmed by arthroscopy. Significant differences were found in the sensitivity and accuracy between T1 SPIR and T2 TSE using the McNemar test, with respective rates of 95.9-94.6% vs. 71.6-75.7% and 90.8-91.7% vs. 79.2-83.3% for detecting tear; 55.3% vs. 31.6-34.2% and 85.8% vs. 78.3-79.2%, respectively, for FTT; and 91.7-97.2% vs. 58.3-61.1% and 89% vs. 78-79.3%, respectively, for PTTa. Interobserver agreement for T1 SPIR was almost perfect for T1 SPIR (κ = 0.839) and substantial for T2 TSE (κ = 0.769). T1-weighted spectral presaturation with inversion-recovery sequences is more sensitive and accurate compared to T2 TSE in detecting SSC tendon tear on 3T MRA.

  5. Tearing instability in cylindrical plasma configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyj, L.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the neutral-layer cylindrical geometry on the development of the tearing instability has been investigated in detail. The increments of the instability for all the regimes have been found. The influence of cylindrical effects becomes manifesting itself at small, as compared to the layer characteristic thickness, distances from the axis, and, finally, the electron regime of the instability development transforms into an ion one. The results obtained are of interest for studying the plasma stability in the devices of the ''Astron'' type and in magnetospheres of cosmic objects

  6. Standard sonography and arthrosonography in the study of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dalati, Ghassan; Martone, Enrico; Caffarri, Sabrina; Fusaro, Michele; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto; Castellarin, Gianluca; Ricci, Matteo; Vecchini, Eugenio

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of ultrasonography, integrating standard ultrasound and arthrosonography after injecting a saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity in cases of suspected rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods. We respectively examinated 40 patients awaiting shoulder arthroscopy for suspected or diagnosed tears of the rotator cuff. A radiologist, unaware of the pre-operative diagnosis, performed an ultrasound scan on all the patients before and after the injection of saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity. The parameters considered were presence or absence of a rotator cuff injury; type of injury according to Snyder and its extent along the longitudinal and transverse planes; presence or absence of effusion into the articular cavity; subacromial/subdeltoid bursal distension. All the patients underwent arthroscopy either the same day of the day after the ultrasound examination. Results. Standard sonography showed 26 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 2 partial tears (type B according to Snyder) and 12 intact rotator cuffs. Arthrosonography detected 31 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Arthroscopy identified 32 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Analysis of the results shows that, taking arthroscopy as the gold standard, the sensitivity of normal sonography is 81.2%, whereas that of arthosonography is 96.8% (p [it

  7. The Degeneration of Meniscus Roots Is Accompanied by Fibrocartilage Formation, Which May Precede Meniscus Root Tears in Osteoarthritic Knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Do Young; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Young Jick; Kim, Mijin; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Joon Ho

    2015-12-01

    Fibrocartilage metaplasia in tendons and ligaments is an adaptation to compression as well as a pathological feature during degeneration. Medial meniscus posterior roots are unique ligaments that resist multidirectional forces, including compression. To characterize the degeneration of medial meniscus posterior root tears in osteoarthritic knees, with an emphasis on fibrocartilage and calcification. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Samples of medial meniscus posterior roots were harvested from cadaveric specimens and patients during knee replacement surgery and grouped as follows: normal reference, no tear, partial tear, and complete tear. Degeneration was analyzed with histology, immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on specimens with and without fibrocartilage. Quantifiable data were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test with the Dunn comparison test. Thirty, 28, and 42 samples harvested from 99 patients were allocated into the no tear, partial tear, and complete tear groups, respectively. Mean modified Bonar tendinopathy scores for each group were 3.97, 9.31, and 14.15, respectively, showing a higher degree of degeneration associated with the extent of the tear (P fibrocartilage according to the extent of the tear. Tear margins revealed fibrocartilage in 59.3% of partial tear samples and 76.2% of complete tear samples, with a distinctive cleavage-like shape. Root tears with a similar shape were induced within fibrocartilaginous areas during uniaxial tensile testing. Even in the no tear group, 56.7% of samples showed fibrocartilage in the anterior margin of the root, adjacent to the meniscus. An increased stained area of calcification and expression of the ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 gene were observed in the complete tear group compared with the no tear group (P Fibrocartilage and calcification increased in medial meniscus posterior roots, associated

  8. Complex descemet′s membrane tears and detachment during phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faik Orucoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of complex Descemet′s membrane detachment (DMD and tears during phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Case Report: A 64-year-old woman underwent phacoemulsification surgery in her right eye and developed tears and partial loss of Descemet′s membrane (DM while the aspiration port was inserted through the main incision. Massive corneal edema obscured the view and the anterior chamber was barely visible the following day. Scheimpflug imaging was used to complement slit lamp examination in the postoperative period. Frequent topical corticosteroid drops were initiated. After 5 days of treatment, multiple tears and detachment of DM were visible and the anterior chamber was filled with air. After 5 weeks, the cornea regained much of its clarity despite large DM tears and focal loss of DM. Conclusion: Despite partial loss of DM, the corneal edema mostly disappeared after 5 weeks of air bubble injection. Scheimpflug imaging was beneficial in the diagnosis and monitoring of DM tears and detachments.

  9. Tear dynamics in healthy and dry eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretani, Colin F; Radke, C J

    2014-06-01

    Dry-eye disease, an increasingly prevalent ocular-surface disorder, significantly alters tear physiology. Understanding the basic physics of tear dynamics in healthy and dry eyes benefits both diagnosis and treatment of dry eye. We present a physiological-based model to describe tear dynamics during blinking. Tears are compartmentalized over the ocular surface; the blink cycle is divided into three repeating phases. Conservation laws quantify the tear volume and tear osmolarity of each compartment during each blink phase. Lacrimal-supply and tear-evaporation rates are varied to reveal the dependence of tear dynamics on dry-eye conditions, specifically tear osmolarity, tear volume, tear-turnover rate (TTR), and osmotic water flow. Predicted periodic-steady tear-meniscus osmolarity is 309 and 321 mOsM in normal and dry eyes, respectively. Tear osmolarity, volume, and TTR all match available clinical measurements. Osmotic water flow through the cornea and conjunctiva contribute 10 and 50% to the total tear supply in healthy and dry-eye conditions, respectively. TTR in aqueous-deficient dry eye (ADDE) is only half that in evaporative dry eye (EDE). The compartmental periodic-steady tear-dynamics model accurately predicts tear behavior in normal and dry eyes. Inclusion of osmotic water flow is crucial to match measured tear osmolarity. Tear-dynamics predictions corroborate the use of TTR as a clinical discriminator between ADDE and EDE. The proposed model is readily extended to predict the dynamics of aqueous solutes such as drugs or fluorescent tags.

  10. Peroneus longus tears associated with pathology of the os peroneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Kristopher G; Brodsky, James W

    2014-04-01

    There is a range of different types of tears and pathology of the peroneal tendons. One of the least common types is the tear of the peroneus longus associated with fracture, enlargement, or entrapment at the cuboid tunnel of the os peroneum. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pathologic patterns of these uncommon peroneal tendon tears, to review the treatment, and to report the patient outcomes following treatment with excision of the os peroneum, debridement, and tenodesis of the peroneus longus to the peroneus brevis. A 5-year retrospective review of all patients with peroneal tendon tears identified 12 patients operatively treated for peroneus longus tendon tears with associated pathology of the os peroneum, and in whom there was a viable peroneus brevis. All patients were treated with an operative procedure consisting of excision of the os peroneum, debridement, and tenodesis of the peroneus longus to the peroneus brevis. Mean age was 51.5 (range, 33 to 73) years, including 7 males and 5 females. Operative and radiographic records were reviewed to characterize the nature of the peroneus longus tears and associated pathology. Preoperative and postoperative AOFAS hindfoot, SF-36 questionnaires, and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores were compiled and patient records were reviewed for complications. Mean follow-up after surgery was 63.3 (range, 12 to 114) months. All of the patients had an os peroneum associated with a complex, irreparable tear of the peroneus longus tendon. The peroneus longus was typically enlarged, fibrotic, and adhered to the surrounding tissues. In 8 patients, the peroneus longus tendon tear was associated with a fracture of the os peroneum, and in 4 patients with an enlarged and entrapped os peroneum which prevented movement at the cuboid tunnel. Of the 12 patients, 9 had partial tears of the peroneus brevis, which were treated with debridement and suture repair. AOFAS hindfoot scores increased from a preoperative mean of 61

  11. Linear stability of tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Hahm, T.S.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines the stability of tearing modes in a sheared slab when the width of the tearing layer is much smaller than the ion Larmor radius. The ion response is nonlocal, and the quasineutrality retains its full integal form. An expansion procedure is introduced to solve the quasineutrality equation in powers of the width of the tearing layer over the ion Larmor radius. The expansion procedure is applied to the collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes. The first order terms in the expansion we find to be strongly stabilizing. The physics of the mode and of the stabilization is discussed. Tearing modes are observed in experiments even though the slab theory predicts stability. It is proposed that these modes grow from an equilibrium with islands at the rational surfaces. If the equilibrium islands are wider than the ion Larmor radius, the mode is unstable when Δ' is positive

  12. Modelling the evaporation of a tear film over a contact lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbott, Kevin; Xu, Amber; Anderson, Daniel M; Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan

    2015-06-01

    A contact lens (CL) separates the tear film into a pre-lens tear film (PrLTF), the fluid layer between the CL and the outside environment, and a post-lens tear film (PoLTF), the fluid layer between the CL and the cornea. We examine a model for evaporation of a PrLTF on a modern permeable CL allowing fluid transfer between the PrLTF and the PoLTF. Evaporation depletes the PrLTF, and continued evaporation causes depletion of the PoLTF via fluid loss through the CL. Governing equations include Navier-Stokes, heat and Darcy's equations for the fluid flow and heat transfer in the PrLTF and porous layer. The PoLTF is modelled by a fixed pressure condition on the posterior surface of the CL. The original model is simplified using lubrication theory for the PrLTF and CL applied to a sagittal plane through the eye. We obtain a partial differential equation (PDE) for the PrLTF thickness that is first-order in time and fourth-order in space. This model incorporates evaporation, conjoining pressure effects in the PrLTF, capillarity and heat transfer. For a planar film, we find that this PDE can be reduced to an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that can be solved analytically or numerically. This reduced model allows for interpretation of the various system parameters and captures most of the basic physics contained in the model. Comparisons of ODE and PDE models, including estimates for the loss of fluid through the lens due to evaporation, are given. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  13. Posterior meniscus root tears: associated pathologies to assist as diagnostic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Lauren M; Ockuly, Andrew C; Steadman, J Richard; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associated pathologies identified at arthroscopy in patients with meniscus root tears. This study was Institutional Review Board approved. All patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery where a complete meniscus root tear was identified were included in this study. Concurrent ligament tears and articular cartilage changes ≥Outerbridge grade 2 were recorded and stored in a data registry. Fifty patients (28 males, 22 females) [mean age = 36.5 years (range 17.1-68.1 years)] who were diagnosed with a medial or lateral meniscus root tear at arthroscopy were included in this study out of 673 arthroscopic surgeries (prevalence 7.4 %). Twenty-three (46 %) patients had a medial meniscus root tear, 26 (52 %) patients had a lateral meniscus root tear and one (2 %) patient had both. Thirty-four per cent of patients (n = 17) underwent partial meniscectomy, while 60 % (n = 31) underwent suture repair. During arthroscopy, 60 % (n = 30) of patients were diagnosed with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Patients with lateral meniscus root tears were 10.3 times (95 % CI 2.6-42.5) more likely to have ACL tears than patients with medial meniscus root tears (p = 0.012). Patients who had medial meniscus root tears were 5.8 times (95 % CI 1.6-20.5) more likely to have chondral defects than patients who had lateral meniscus root tears (p = 0.044). In this study, patients' preoperative functional scores and activity levels were low. Patients with lateral meniscal root tears were more likely to have an ACL tear. Patients with medial meniscal root tears were more likely to have an knee articular cartilage defect with an Outerbridge grade 2 or higher chondral defect. This study confirms the importance of comprehensive assessment of concurrent injuries to properly diagnose meniscus root tears. IV.

  14. MRI diagnosis of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuga, Naoyuki; Oh, Toshihiro

    1996-01-01

    We studied the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in fifty-six patients who were also examined arthroscopically. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 96%, 100%, and 95% for medial meniscal tears, and 91%, 67%, and 100% for lateral meniscal tears respectively. Two MRIs of the medial meniscus were false-positives. These MRI findings were both meniscocapsular separation of the medial meniscus, but the arthroscopic findings were normal. One case was an ACL injury and the other PCL and MCL injury. Hemorrhage and edema of the medial capsule caused by valgus stress at injury may look like a meniscal pseudo-tear on MRI. Five MRIs of the lateral meniscus were false-negatives. All menisci showed normal signal and shape on MRI but traumatic and stable tears of the lateral meniscus were identified arthroscopically. All were associated with ACL tears and lateral condylar bone bruise. The traumatic and stable tear of the meniscus tended to be overlooked on MRI because a meniscus without degeneration shows a normal signal. (author)

  15. Incomplete response to artificial tears is associated with features of neuropathic ocular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Batawi, Hatim; Felix, Elizabeth R; Margolis, Todd P; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D; Martin, Eden R; Levitt, Roy C

    2016-06-01

    Artificial tears are first-line therapy for patients with dry eye symptoms. It is not known, however, which patient factors associate with a positive response to therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether certain ocular and systemic findings are associated with a differential subjective response to artificial tears. Cross-sectional study of 118 individuals reporting artificial tears use (hypromellose 0.4%) to treat dry eye-associated ocular pain. An evaluation was performed to assess dry eye symptoms (via the dry eye questionnaire 5 and ocular surface disease index), ocular and systemic (non-ocular) pain complaints and ocular signs (tear osmolarity, tear breakup time, corneal staining, Schirmer testing with anaesthesia, and eyelid and meibomian gland assessment). The main outcome measures were factors associated with differential subjective response to artificial tears. By self-report, 23 patients reported no improvement, 73 partial improvement and 22 complete improvement in ocular pain with artificial tears. Patients who reported no or partial improvement in pain with artificial tears reported higher levels of hot-burning ocular pain and sensitivity to wind compared with those with complete improvement. Patients were also asked to rate the intensity of systemic pain elsewhere in the body (other than the eye). Patients who reported no or incomplete improvement with artificial tears had higher systemic pain scores compared with those with complete improvement. Both ocular and systemic (non-ocular) pain complaints are associated with a differential subjective response to artificial tears. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy and Tear Film Dysfunction in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuti L. Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare tear film metrics in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM and healthy controls and investigate the association between peripheral neuropathy and ocular surface quality. Methods. Dry eye symptoms were quantified in 53 patients with type 1 DM and 40 age-matched controls. Ocular examination included tear film lipid layer thickness grading, tear film stability and quantity measurement, and retinal photography. DM individuals additionally underwent a detailed neuropathy assessment. Results. Neither mean age nor dry eye symptom scores differed significantly between the DM and control groups (P=0.12 and P=0.33, resp.. Tear lipid thickness (P=0.02, stability (P<0.0001, and quantity (P=0.01 were significantly lower in the DM group. Corneal sensitivity was also reduced in the DM group (P<0.001 and tear film stability was inversely associated with total neuropathy score (r=-0.29, P=0.03. Conclusion. The DM group exhibited significantly reduced tear film stability, secretion, and lipid layer quality relative to the age-matched control group. The negative correlation between tear film parameters and total neuropathy score suggests that ocular surface abnormalities occur in parallel with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  17. Repair mechanism of retinal pigment epithelial tears in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Ryo; Sato, Taku; Kishi, Shoji

    2015-03-01

    To investigate repair mechanisms of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tears in age-related macular degeneration. The authors retrospectively studied 10 eyes with age-related macular degeneration that developed RPE tears during follow-up or after treatment with an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drug or photodynamic therapy combined with ranibizumab. After development of the RPE tears, all follow-ups exceeded 13 months. Spectral domain or swept-source optical coherence tomography have been used to examine consecutive retinal changes where the RPE tears developed and attempted to determine the repair mechanisms. Retinal pigment epithelial tears developed during the natural course (n = 4) after ranibizumab treatment (n = 2) and after photodynamic therapy and ranibizumab (n = 4). Subretinal fluid persisted for more than 6 months after the RPE tears developed (n = 4), with the area where the RPE was lost found to be covered with thickened proliferative tissue. In 6 eyes where the subretinal fluid was absorbed within 2 months, optical coherence tomography showed the outer retina appeared to be directly attached to Bruch membrane, and there was attenuation of the normal hyperreflective band attributable to normal RPE during follow-up. Results suggest that two repair processes may be present in the area where RPE tears developed. Persistent subretinal fluid may lead to repair with thick proliferative tissue, while the outer retina appears to attach to Bruch membrane when there is early subretinal fluid resolution after RPE tear development.

  18. Effect of lipid-based dry eye supplements on the tear film in wearers of eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael T M; Cho, Irene Sung Hee; Jung, Soo Hee; Craig, Jennifer P

    2017-08-01

    To compare the effects on tear film parameters and contamination in cosmetic eyeliner wearers, after single application of two lipid-based dry eye treatments: a lipid-containing lubricant eye drop and a phospholipid liposomal spray. Fifty participants were enrolled in a prospective, randomised, paired-eye, investigator-masked trial. Pencil eyeliner (Body Shop ® Crayon Eye Definer) was applied to the upper eyelid periocular skin of both eyes, anterior to the lash line. Baseline tear film quality was assessed fifteen minutes after eyeliner application. A lubricant drop (Systane ® Balance) was then applied to one eye (randomised), and liposomal spray (Tears Again ® ) to the contralateral eye. Tear film contamination, lipid layer grade, non-invasive tear film break-up time and tear evaporation rate were evaluated fifteen minutes post-treatment and compared to pre-treatment values. Pre-treatment measurements did not differ between eyes assigned to lubricant drop and liposomal spray. Tear film contamination was observed in a greater proportion of eyes following both treatments (both p0.05). Changes in tear film parameters did not differ between treatments (all p>0.05). Both the lipid-containing lubricant eye drop and phospholipid liposomal spray result in clinically apparent tear film contamination in eyeliner cosmetic wearers. Although both treatments effected an increase in lipid layer thickness, neither displayed clinical efficacy in improving tear film stability. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of an axial MR scan on the diagnosis a meniscal tear of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Suk Keu; Kim, Baek Hyun; Hong, Suk Joo; Seol, Hae Young

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the role of standard axial MR images for the diagnosis for meniscal tears of the knee. Forty-five patients with a prior MRI examination that underwent arthroscopic surgery of the knee due to clinical impression of a meniscal tear were included in the study group. The sequence for meniscal evaluation was an axial fat-saturated proton density-weighted image with a 4 mm slice thickness. Axial MR images were independently reviewed by two radiologists and were compared with findings of arthroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of the axial MR scan for the diagnosis of the meniscal tear were calculated. A total 90 menisci of 45 patients were evaluated in the axial MR scans. Forty-two patients had meniscal tears, and two of the patients had tears in both menisci; thus, a total of 44 meniscal tears were found by arthroscopy. For meniscal tears, the sensitivity of the axial plane was 76.2%, the specificity was 89.1% and the accuracy was 81.1%. False negative meniscal tears were seen in 12 cases and false positive meniscal tears were seen in 5 cases on the axial MR images. In standard knee MRI examinations, axial images may be valuable for the detection and localization of meniscal tears

  20. Acetabular labral tears in patients with sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chan; Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Cha, Soo-Min

    2009-12-01

    We wanted to investigate acetabular labral tears and their correlation with femoroacetabular impingement in patients with sports injury. Among 111 patients who were diagnosed with the acetabular labral tears after arthroscopic treatment from January 2004 to December 2007, we selected 41 patients with sports injury. There were 12 cases of Taekwondo injury, 5 of golf injury, 4 of soccer injury, 3 of gymnastics injury, 2 of Hapkido injury, 2 of aerobics injury, 2 of rock-climbing injury, 2 of fitness training injury and 9 of other sports injuries. We checked the subtypes of acetabular labral tears and the accompanying femoroacetabular impingement. For the cases with accompanying femoroacetabular impingement, we investigated the subtypes according to the types of sports, gender and age. At last follow-up, we checked the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) sports scale and the percentage of patients who returned to their sports activity. The average age of symptomatic onset was 26 years (range, 12 to 65 years). The ratio of males to females was 29 : 12. An average duration of the hip pain was 17 months (range, 1 to 60 months). The degenerative type of acetabular labral tears was the most prevalent with 32 cases (78%), and there were 9 cases (22%) of the partial tear type. Thirty cases (73%) were accompanied by femoroacetabular impingement. The average age of the 23 cases (56%) of the cam-type was 23 years (range, 12 to 48 years), and it was more likely to occur in men (87%) and for people practicing martial arts such as Taekwondo or Hapkido. An average age of the 5 cases (12%) of the pincer-type was 26 (range, 16 to 43 years), it usually occurred in women (60%) and for non-martial arts such as golf and gymnastics. There were 2 cases of the mixed type (cam + pincer-type). At 27 months follow-up, the HHS was 61 to 92 points, the HOS sports scale increased 43 to 75%, and the rate of returning to sports was 71%. In spite of the early expression of symptoms

  1. Examination of rotator cuff re-tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Yoshihiro; Norimatsu, Takahiro; Adachi, Shinji; Sera, Keisuke

    2010-01-01

    The six-month post-operative re-tear rate in 72 arthroscopic rotator cuff repair cases was 16.3% by MRI. The re-tear rate of massive tears was 50%. We investigated the details of the re-tears by MRI and arthroscopic findings. High re-tear rates were connected with cuff tear size and fatty degeneration of muscle belly. Cases with poor cuff quality in arthroscopically showed high re-tear rate. These results suggest that surgery operation should be performed as soon as possible after diagnosis of cuff tear to obtain good results. Cases with damage of long head of the biceps (LHB) are likely to develop impingement causes of re-tears. Some type of rehabilitation is required to avoid impingement in such cases. (author)

  2. Nonlinear tearing mode and vortex chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, D.; Vranjes, J.

    1996-01-01

    We study the nonlinear stage of a tearing mode, whose island width exceeds the tearing layer thickness, and the wavelength is of the order of collisionless skin depth. A coherent solution is found in the form of a moving vortex chain. It is the result of a self-organization process, which adjusts the profile of the sheared poloidal magnetic field and excites a localized perpendicular sheared plasma flow, consisting of three counterstreaming jets. A numerical solution shows a twin chain of plasma vortices, coupled with a single chain of magnetic islands, whose width is of the order of collisionless skin depth. Adiabatic evolution of the vortex chain in the presence of small viscosity reveals its finite lifetime. The chain destruction may occur either directly, or through a sequence of bifurcations (corresponding to abrupt changes of the vortex chain parameters) to magnetic field stochastization within a layer of the collisionless skin depth scale, which occurs before the magnetic island overlapping takes place. This provides a new mechanism for the anomalous transport. (orig.)

  3. Return to Sport After Rotator Cuff Tear Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, Shahnaz; Lefevre, Nicolas; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Bohu, Yoann

    2016-07-01

    One of the most frequent demands from athletes after rotator cuff tear repair is to return to sport, if possible at the same level of play. The main goal of this study was to determine the rate of return to sport after treatment of rotator cuff tears. Meta-analysis and systematic review. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were followed to perform this systematic review and meta-analysis of the results in the literature, as well as for the presentation of results. A search of the literature was performed on the electronic databases MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the MINORS (Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies) checklist. Inclusion criteria were studies in English evaluating return to sport after treatment of traumatic, degenerative, partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears in patients practicing a sport regularly, whatever the level, all ages and sports included. The main judgment criterion was the number of patients who returned to a sports activity after treatment of a rotator cuff tear. The criterion was analyzed in 2 ways: return to sport (yes/no) and the level of play (identical or higher/lower level). Twenty-five studies were reviewed, including 859 patients (683 athletes), all treated surgically after a mean follow-up of 3.4 years (range, 0.3-13.4 years). The level of sports was recorded in 23 studies or 635 (93%) athletes and included 286 competitive or professional athletes and 349 recreational athletes. The most commonly practiced sports were baseball (224 participants), tennis (104 participants), and golf (54 participants). The overall rate of return to sport was 84.7% (95% CI, 77.6%-89.8%), including 65.9% (95% CI, 54.9%-75.4%) at an equivalent level of play, after 4 to 17 months. Of the professional and competitive athletes, 49.9% (95% CI, 35.3-64.6%) returned to the same level of play. Most

  4. Post-lens tear turbidity and visual quality after scleral lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, Gonzalo; Serramito-Blanco, Maria; Martin-Gil, Alba; Wang, Zicheng; Rodriguez-Pomar, Candela; Pintor, Jesús

    2017-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate the turbidity and thickness of the post-lens tear layer and its effect on visual quality in patients with keratoconus after the beginning of lens wear and before lens removal at the end of eight hours. Twenty-six patients with keratoconus (aged 36.95 ± 8.95 years) participated voluntarily in the study. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with intrastromal corneal ring (ICRS group) and patients without ICRS (KC group). Distance visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity, pachymetry, post-lens tear layer height and post-lens tear layer turbidity (percentage area occupied and number of particles per mm 2 ) were evaluated with optical coherence tomography before and after wearing a scleral lens. A significant increase of turbidity was found in all groups assessed (p turbidity parameters with distance VA but no correlation between turbidity and post-lens tear layer thickness at the beginning was found (p > 0.05). A strong correlation in all groups between the post-lens tear layer at the beginning and differences of tear layer thickness between two measures was also found (p turbidity. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  5. Muscle architectural changes after massive human rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael C; Sato, Eugene J; Bachasson, Damien; Cheng, Timothy; Azimi, Hassan; Schenk, Simon; Engler, Adam J; Singh, Anshuman; Ward, Samuel R

    2016-12-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tendon tears lead to negative structural and functional changes in the associated musculature. The structural features of muscle that predict function are termed "muscle architecture." Although the architectural features of "normal" rotator cuff muscles are known, they are poorly understood in the context of cuff pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tear and repair on RC muscle architecture. To this end thirty cadaveric shoulders were grouped into one of four categories based on tear magnitude: Intact, Full-thickness tear (FTT), Massive tear (MT), or Intervention if sutures or hardware were present, and key parameters of muscle architecture were measured. We found that muscle mass and fiber length decreased proportionally with tear size, with significant differences between all groups. Conversely, sarcomere number was reduced in both FTT and MT with no significant difference between these two groups, in large part because sarcomere length was significantly reduced in MT but not FTT. The loss of muscle mass in FTT is due, in part, to subtraction of serial sarcomeres, which may help preserve sarcomere length. This indicates that function in FTT may be impaired, but there is some remaining mechanical loading to maintain "normal" sarcomere length-tension relationships. However, the changes resulting from MT suggest more severe limitations in force-generating capacity because sarcomere length-tension relationships are no longer normal. The architectural deficits observed in MT muscles may indicate deeper deficiencies in muscle adaptability to length change, which could negatively impact RC function despite successful anatomical repair. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2089-2095, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Discrepancy between fluoroscopic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with arthroscopically confirmed supraspinatus tendon tears: The additional benefit of cine fluoroscopic arthrography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Seok; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck

    2016-01-01

    To determine the additional diagnostic benefits of fluoroscopic arthrography (FA) in patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by comparing FA images with magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images. This study included FA and MRA images of 53 patients who were confirmed to have full-thickness SST tears by arthroscopy. In the FA analysis, the presence of contrast leakage into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was recorded. In the MRA analysis, contrast leakage, retraction of a torn tendon, width and length of the tear, and supraspinatus atrophy were evaluated. Patients were divided into the concordant group or the discordant group based on the presence of contrast leakage to compare the characteristics of SST tears. We used Fisher's exact test and two-sample t-test for the comparison. Of the 53 patients, 34 were included in the concordant group and 19 were included in the discordant group. In the concordant group, the grades of retraction were higher than those in the discordant group; the width and length of the tears were larger. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the concordant group. A full-thickness SST tear did not always exhibit contrast leakage on FA, particularly small SST tears or tears with low-grade retraction. FA can provide diagnostic information regarding the severity of full-thickness SST tears by itself

  7. Discrepancy between fluoroscopic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with arthroscopically confirmed supraspinatus tendon tears: The additional benefit of cine fluoroscopic arthrography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Seok; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Dept. Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Medical Convergence Research Institute, and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To determine the additional diagnostic benefits of fluoroscopic arthrography (FA) in patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by comparing FA images with magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images. This study included FA and MRA images of 53 patients who were confirmed to have full-thickness SST tears by arthroscopy. In the FA analysis, the presence of contrast leakage into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was recorded. In the MRA analysis, contrast leakage, retraction of a torn tendon, width and length of the tear, and supraspinatus atrophy were evaluated. Patients were divided into the concordant group or the discordant group based on the presence of contrast leakage to compare the characteristics of SST tears. We used Fisher's exact test and two-sample t-test for the comparison. Of the 53 patients, 34 were included in the concordant group and 19 were included in the discordant group. In the concordant group, the grades of retraction were higher than those in the discordant group; the width and length of the tears were larger. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the concordant group. A full-thickness SST tear did not always exhibit contrast leakage on FA, particularly small SST tears or tears with low-grade retraction. FA can provide diagnostic information regarding the severity of full-thickness SST tears by itself.

  8. Sprains, Strains, and Tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to-side • Tubing exercises in all motions (pain free) • Toe raises (advanced) • Hops – start forward and back, short hops (advanced) • Weights – Heavy tubing or cuff weights (advanced) JOINT POSITION (REGAINING BALANCE) • Standing with eyes closed – partial squats and side-to-side shifts • One-legged stand ...

  9. Tearing modes in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Cowley, S.C.; Hastie, R.J.; Hender, T.C.; Hood, A.; Martin, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The separation of the cylindrical tearing mode stability problem into a resistive resonant layer calculation and an external marginal ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculation (Δ' calculation) is generalized to axisymmetric toroidal geometry. The general structure of this separation is analyzed and the marginal ideal MHD information (the toroidal generalization of Δ') required to discuss stability is isolated. This can then, in principle, be combined with relevant resonant layer calculations to determine tearing mode growth rates in realistic situations. Two examples are given: the first is an analytic treatment of toroidally coupled (m = 1, n = 1) and (m = 2, n = 1) tearing modes in a large aspect ratio torus; the second, a numerical treatment of the toroidal coupling of three tearing modes through finite pressure effects in a large aspect ratio torus. In addition, the use of a coupling integral approach for determining the stability of coupled tearing modes is discussed. Finally, the possibility of using initial value resistive MHD codes in realistic toroidal geometry to determine the necessary information from the ideal MHD marginal solution is discussed

  10. A comparison of basal and eye-flush tears for the analysis of cat tear proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petznick, Andrea; Evans, Margaret D M; Madigan, Michele C; Markoulli, Maria; Garrett, Qian; Sweeney, Deborah F

    2011-02-01

    To identify a rapid and effective tear collection method providing sufficient tear volume and total protein content (TPC) for analysis of individual proteins in cats. Domestic adult short-haired cats (12-37 months; 2.7-6.6 kg) were used in the study. Basal tears without stimulation and eye-flush tears after instillation of saline (10 μl) were collected using microcapillary tubes from animal eyes either unwounded control or wounded with 9-mm central epithelial debridement giving four groups with n = 3. Tear comparisons were based on total time and rate for tear collection, TPC using micro bicinchoninic acid (BCA), tear immunoglobulin A (IgA), total matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and MMP-9 activity. Eye-flush tears were collected significantly faster than basal tears in wounded eyes with higher rates for tear collection in unwounded control and wounded eyes. TPC was significantly lower in eye-flush tears compared to basal tears. The relative proportion of tear IgA normalized to TPC (% IgA of TPC) was not significantly different between basal and eye-flush tears. In unwounded control eyes, MMP-9 was slightly higher in eye-flush than in basal tears; activity of MMP-9 in both tear types was similar. In wounded eyes, eye-flush tears showed highest MMP-9 levels and activity on Day 1, which subsequently decreased to Day 7. MMP-9 activity in basal tears from wounded eyes did not display changes in expression. Eye-flush tears can be collected rapidly providing sufficient tear volume and TPC. This study also indicates that eye-flush tears may be more suitable than basal tears for the analysis of MMPs following corneal wounding. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  11. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of capsulolabral tears after traumatic primary anterior shoulder dislocation. A prospective comparison with arthroscopy of 25 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suder, P.A.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Hougaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    . Subacute MRI evaluation identified 15 labral tears, 12 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial joint side rotator cuff lesion, and 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon. Arthroscopic examination revealed 22 labral tears, 15 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial...... joint side rotator cuff tear, 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon, and 1 osseous Bankart lesion. Anterior capsulolabral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions appeared with a high incidence after acute anterior primary shoulder dislocation. Conventional MRI was only moderately reliable in the preoperative...... evaluation of labral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions, and it failed to give an accurate, differentiated preoperative diagnosis of the capsulolabral lesions....

  13. Duplex Tear Film Evaporation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapf, M R; Braun, R J; King-Smith, P E

    2017-12-01

    Tear film thinning, hyperosmolarity, and breakup can cause irritation and damage to the human eye, and these form an area of active investigation for dry eye syndrome research. Recent research demonstrates that deficiencies in the lipid layer may cause locally increased evaporation, inducing conditions for breakup. In this paper, we explore the conditions for tear film breakup by considering a model for tear film dynamics with two mobile fluid layers, the aqueous and lipid layers. In addition, we include the effects of osmosis, evaporation as modified by the lipid, and the polar portion of the lipid layer. We solve the system numerically for reasonable parameter values and initial conditions and analyze how shifts in these cause changes to the system's dynamics.

  14. Does the Rotator Cuff Tear Pattern Influence Clinical Outcomes After Surgical Repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott; Allen, Benjamin; Robbins, Chris; Bedi, Asheesh; Gagnier, Joel J; Miller, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    Limited literature exists regarding the influence of rotator cuff tear morphology on patient outcomes. To determine the effect of rotator cuff tear pattern (crescent, U-shape, L-shape) on patient-reported outcomes after rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of known full-thickness rotator cuff tears were observed prospectively at regular intervals from baseline to 1 year. The tear pattern was classified at the time of surgery as crescent, U-shaped, or L-shaped. Primary outcome measures were the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. The tear pattern was evaluated as the primary predictor while controlling for variables known to affect rotator cuff outcomes. Mixed-methods regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to examine the effects of tear morphology on patient-reported outcomes after surgical repair from baseline to 1 year. A total of 82 patients were included in the study (53 male, 29 female; mean age, 58 years [range, 41-75 years]). A crescent shape was the most common tear pattern (54%), followed by U-shaped (25%) and L-shaped tears (21%). There were no significant differences in outcome scores between the 3 groups at baseline. All 3 groups showed statistically significant improvement from baseline to 1 year, but analysis failed to show any predictive effect in the change in outcome scores from baseline to 1 year for the WORC, ASES, or VAS when tear pattern was the primary predictor. Further ANOVA also failed to show any significant difference in the change in outcome scores from baseline to 1 year for the WORC ( P = .96), ASES ( P = .71), or VAS ( P = .86). Rotator cuff tear pattern is not a predictor of functional outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  15. What emotional tears convey : Tearful individuals are seen as warmer, but also as less competent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Niels; Meijs, Maartje; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.

    Earlier research found that the mere sight of tears promotes the willingness to provide support to the person shedding the tears. Other research, however, found that deliberate responses towards tearful persons could be more negative as well. We think this is because tears have ambivalent effects on

  16. Surface tearing modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori; Kurita, Gen-ichi; Azumi, Masafumi; Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1985-10-01

    Surface tearing modes in tokamaks are studied numerically and analytically. The eigenvalue problem is solved to obtain the growth rate and the mode structure. We investigate in detail dependences of the growth rate of the m/n = 2/1 resistive MHD modes on the safety factor at the plasma surface, current profile, wall position, and resistivity. The surface tearing mode moves the plasma surface even when the wall is close to the surface. The stability diagram for these modes is presented. (author)

  17. Assessment of Corneal and Tear Film Parameters in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Using Anterior Segment Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fayoumi, Dina; Youssef, Maha Mohamed; Khafagy, Mohamed Mahmoud; Badr El Dine, Nashwa; Gaber, Wafaa

    2018-01-01

    To study the corneal changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in vivo, using spectral domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). A case-control study was done on 43 RA patients and 40 controls. The disease activity score (DAS28-ESR) was calculated and all participants had lower tear meniscus, corneal thickness, and epithelial thickness evaluation using AS-OCT. The lower tear meniscus height (LTMH) and the lower tear meniscus area (LTMA) were significantly lower in the RA patients than in controls (p < 0.001). RA patients also had a significantly thinner central corneal thickness (p = 0.02) and their epithelium was found to be thinner in the superotemporal peripheral sector. The LTMH and LTMA are significantly reduced in RA patients, despite the absence of clinical diagnosis of dry eye. RA patients have thinner corneal thickness and epithelial thickness than controls, which did not correlate with either disease duration or activity.

  18. A Special Tear Pattern of Anterior Horn of the Lateral Meniscus: Macerated Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiapeng; Zhai, Wenliang; Li, Qiang; Jia, Qianxin; Lin, Dasheng

    2017-01-01

    We describe a special, interesting phenomenon found in the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM): most tear patterns in the AHLM are distinctive, with loose fibers in injured region and circumferential fiber bundles were separated. We name it as macerated tear. The goal of this study was to bring forward a new type of meniscal tear in the AHLM and investigate its clinical value. AHLM tears underwent arthroscopic surgery from January 2012 to December 2014 were included. Data regarding the integrity of AHLM were prospectively recorded in a data registry. Tear morphology and treatment received were subsequently extracted by 2 independent reviewers from operative notes and arthroscopic surgical photos. A total of 60 AHLM tears in 60 patients (mean age 27.1 years) were grouped into horizontal tears (n = 15, 25%), vertical tears (n = 14, 23%), complex tears (n = 6, 10%), and macerated tears (n = 25, 42%). There were 6 patients with AHLM cysts in macerated tear group and one patient in vertical tear group. 60 patients were performed arthroscopic meniscus repairs and were followed-up with averaged 18.7 months. Each group had significant postoperative improvement in Lysholm and IKDC scores (p 0.05). This study demonstrated that the macerated tear is common in the tear pattern of AHLM. However, feasibility of the treatment of this type of meniscal tear, especially the meniscus repairs still requires further study.

  19. Kinetic theory of tearing instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, J.F.; Lee, Y.C.

    1977-01-01

    The transition of the tearing instability from the collisional to the collisionless regime is investigated kinetically using a Fokker--Planck collision operator to represent electron-ion collisions. As a function of the collisionality of the plasma, the tearing instability falls into three regions, which are referred to as collisionless, semi-collisional, and collisional. The width Δ of the singular layer around kxB 0 =0 is limited by electron thermal motion along B 0 in the collisional and semi-collisional regimes and is typically smaller than rho/sub i/, the ion Larmor radius. Previously accepted theories, which are based on the assumption Δvery-much-greater-thanrho/sub i/, are found to be valid only in the collisional regime. The effects of density and temperature gradients on the instabilities are also studied. The tearing instability is only driven by the temperature gradient in the collisional and semi-collisional regimes. Numerical calculations indicate that the semi-collisional tearing instability is particularly relevant to present day high temperature tokamak discharges

  20. Bifurcation of steady tearing states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saramito, B.; Maschke, E.K.

    1985-10-01

    We apply the bifurcation theory for compact operators to the problem of the nonlinear solutions of the 3-dimensional incompressible visco-resistive MHD equations. For the plane plasma slab model we compute branches of nonlinear tearing modes, which are stationary for the range of parameters investigated up to now

  1. Plate Tearing by a Cone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with steady-state plate tearing by a cone. This is a scenario where a cone is forced through a ductile metal plate with a constant lateral tip penetration in a motion in the plane of the plate. The considered process could be an idealisaton of the damage, which...... as for the out-of-plane reaction force....

  2. Energy balance in tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The energy balance in tearing modes is described in terms of exact separate energy balance equations. Each of these equations describes identified physical processes, and their sum gives the conservation of total energy. One of the energy balance equations corresponds to Furth's description. (Author)

  3. Classification and localization of acetabular labral tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbaker, D.G.; De Smet, A.A.; Keene, J.S.; Fine, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings on hip MR arthrography (MRA) with the published MRA and arthroscopic classifications of hip labral tears and to evaluate a clock-face method for localizing hip labral tears. We retrospectively reviewed 65 hip MRA studies with correlative hip arthroscopies. Each labrum was evaluated on MRA using the classification system of Czerny and an MRA modification of the Lage arthroscopic classification. In addition, each tear was localized on MRA by using a clock-face description where 6 o'clock was the transverse ligament and 3 o'clock was anterior. These MRA findings were then correlated with the arthroscopic findings using the clock-face method of localization and the Lage arthroscopic classification of labral tears. At MRA, there were 42 Czerny grade 2 and 23 grade 3 labral tears and 22 MRA Lage type 1, 11 type 2, 22 type 3 and 10 type 4 tears. At arthroscopy, there were 10 Lage type 1 flap tears, 20 Lage type 2 fibrillated tears, 18 Lage type 3 longitudinal peripheral tears and 17 Lage type 4 unstable tears. The Czerny MRA classification and the modified MRA Lage classification had borderline correlation with the arthroscopic Lage classification. Localization of the tears using a clock-face description was within 1 o'clock of the arthroscopic localization of the tears in 85% of the patients. The Lage classification, which is the only published arthroscopic classification system for hip labral tears, does not correlate well with the Czerny MRA or an MRA modification of the Lage classification. Using a clock-face description to localize tears provides a way to accurately localize a labral tear and define its extent. (orig.)

  4. Atraumatic tears of the ligamentum teres are more frequent in professional ballet dancers than a sporting population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2016-07-01

    To compare the frequency of atraumatic ligamentum teres (LT) tear in professional ballet dancers with that of athletes, and to determine the relationship with clinical and imaging findings. Forty-nine male and female professional ballet dancers (98 hips) and 49 age and sex-matched non-dancing athletes (98 hips) completed questionnaires on hip symptoms and physical activity levels, underwent hip rotation range of movement (ROM) and hypermobility testing, and 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3 T MRI) on both hips to detect LT tears, acetabular labral tears, and articular cartilage defects, and to measure the lateral centre edge angles (LCE). A higher frequency of LT tear was found in dancers (55 %) compared with athletes (22 %, P = 0.001). The frequency and severity of LT tears in dancers increased with older age (P = 0.004, P = 0.006, respectively). The Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS) pain scores or hip rotation ROM did not differ significantly among participants with normal, partial, or complete tears of LT (P > 0.01 for all). Neither the frequency of generalised joint hypermobility (P = 0.09) nor the LCE angles (P = 0.32, P = 0.16, left and right hips respectively) differed between those with and those without LT tear. In most hips, LT tear co-existed with either a labral tear or a cartilage defect, or both. The higher frequency of atraumatic LT tears in professional ballet dancers suggests that the LT might be abnormally loaded in ballet, and caution is required when evaluating MRI, as LT tears may be asymptomatic. A longitudinal study of this cohort is required to determine if LT tear predisposes the hip joint to osteoarthritis.

  5. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p tear size (p tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  6. Hot tearing studies in AA5182

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaften, W. M.; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2002-10-01

    One of the major problems during direct chill (DC) casting is hot tearing. These tears initiate during solidification of the alloy and may run through the entire ingot. To study the hot tearing mechanism, tensile tests were carried out in semisolid state and at low strain rates, and crack propagation was studied in situ by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These experimentally induced cracks were compared with hot tears developed in an AA5182 ingot during a casting trial in an industrial research facility. Similarities in the microstructure of the tensile test specimens and the hot tears indicate that hot tearing can be simulated by performing tensile tests at semisolid temperatures. The experimental data were compared with existing hot tearing models and it was concluded that the latter are restricted to relatively high liquid fractions because they do not take into account the existence of solid bridges in the crack.

  7. Collisionless tearing mode reconnection at the dayside magnetopause of the earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quest, K.B.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine if the collisionless tearing mode, a plasma instability, is a viable mechanism for interconnecting field lines at the dayside magnetopause. More generally, it was wished to test theoretically the assertion that collisionless tearing is a probable first step in cosmical reconnection. The procedure was to model the magnetopause as a local one-dimensional Vlasov equilibrium, and then calculate the linear and nonlinear stability properties of tearing and tearing-like oscillations. Quantitative estimates of the range of plasma parameter space over which significant growth occurs were obtained. Assuming that significant tearing mode growth implies significant reconnection, conditions were determined for which tearing will be important to dayside reconnection. Linearly it was found that the growth rate is relatively insensitive to the temperature of the species, but depends sensitively on (1) the thickness of the magnetopause current, (2) the number density at the location of the singular layer, and (3) the magnitude of the magnetic shear. For significant linear growth the magnetopause half-sheet thickness was required to be on the order of or less than a thermal ion gyroradius, the number density was required to be no more than 100 cm - 3 , and the magnetosheath field was required to be locally antialigned with the magnetospheric field. If the above conditions are met, which are stringent but not impossible, the mode will linearly amplify. Another topic examined is the question of the structure of the tearing eigenmodes at the dayside magnetopause. By considering finite transit time effects on electron Landau resonance it was concluded that magnetopause tearing turbulence probably occurs in spatially bounded wave packets

  8. Deformation behavior of curling strips on tearing tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Won; Kwon, Tae Soo; Jung, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jin Sung [Dept. of Robotics and Virtual Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper discusses the analysis of the curl deformation behavior when a dynamic force is applied to a tearing tube installed on a flat die to predict the energy absorption capacity and deformation behavior. The deformation of the tips of the curling strips was obtained when the curl tips and tube body are in contact with each other, and a formula describing the energy dissipation rate caused by the deformation of the curl tips is proposed. To improve this formula, we focused on the variation of the curl radius and the reduced thickness of the tube. A formula describing the mean curl radius is proposed and verified using the curl radius measurement data of collision test specimens. These improved formulas are added to the theoretical model previously proposed by Huang et al. and verified from the collision test results of a tearing tube.

  9. Tear Mediators in Corneal Ectatic Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorottya Pásztor

    Full Text Available To compare the concentrations of 11 tear mediators in order to reveal the biochemical difference between pellucid marginal degeneration (PMD and keratoconus (KC.We have designed a cross-sectional study in which patients with corneal ectasia based on slit-lamp biomicroscopy and Pentacam HR (keratometry values (K1, K2, Kmax, astigmatism, minimal radius of curvature (Rmin, corneal thickness (Apex and Min, indices (surface variation, vertical asymmetry, keratoconus, central keratoconus, height asymmetry and decentration were enrolled. Eyes of keratoconic patients were similar to the PMD patients in age and severity (K2, Kmax and Rmin. Non-stimulated tear samples were collected from nine eyes of seven PMD patients, 55 eyes of 55 KC patients and 24 eyes of 24 healthy controls. The mediators' (interleukin -6, -10, chemokine ligand 5, -8, -10, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP -9, -13, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, nerve growth factor concentrations were measured using Cytometric Bead Array.MMP-9 was the only mediator which presented relevant variances between the two patient groups (p = 0.005. The ratios of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were 2.45, 0.40 and 0.23 in PMD, KC and the controls, respectively.As far as we are aware, this is the first study that aims to reveal the biochemical differences between PMD and KC. Further studies of biomarkers to investigate the precise role of these mediators need to be defined, and it is important to confirm the observed changes in a larger study to gain further insights into the molecular alterations in PMD.

  10. Effect of castor oil emulsion eyedrops on tear film composition and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïssa, Cécile; Guillon, Michel; Simmons, Peter; Vehige, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    An emulsion eyedrop containing castor oil has been shown to modify the tear film lipid layer and increase tear film stability. The primary objectives of this investigation were to measure the prevalence of castor oil in the tear fluid over time and quantify the effects on the lipid layer. A secondary objective was to quantify the initial effects on ocular symptomatology. The investigation was an open label pilot study on 5 normal and 10 dry eye subjects. A single eyedrop (Castor oil emulsion, Allergan) was instilled in each eye; the tear film appearance and composition were monitored for 4h via in vivo visualisation using the Tearscope and post in vivo tear samples analysis by HPLC. Combined results for both normal and dry eye subjects showed that castor oil was detected up to 4h after a single eyedrop instillation and associated with an increase in the level of tear film lipid. The relative amount of various lipid families was also changed. An increase in tear lipid layer thickness was significant up to one hour post-instillation for the symptomatic sub-population. The changes in tear film characteristics were associated with significantly lower symptoms up to four hours post-instillation for the symptomatic sub-population. This pilot investigation showed that castor oil eyedrops achieved a residence time of at least four hours post-instillation, producing a more stable tear film and an associated significant decrease in ocular symptoms over the entire follow-up period for the symptomatic subjects. 2009 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative diagnostic imaging of a partial patellar ligament tear in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-04-27

    Apr 27, 2018 ... of the patellar or tibial insertion, and soft tissue opacity at the cranial aspect of the joint. ... the exclusion of microfracture and distal PL avulsion, but did not add information ..... angles and under stress (Hodgson et al., 2012).

  12. Changes in Contact Area in Meniscus Horizontal Cleavage Tears Subjected to Repair and Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Brandon S; Walley, Kempland C; Okajima, Stephen; Manoukian, Ohan S; Perez-Viloria, Miguel; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J; Nazarian, Ara

    2017-03-01

    To assess the changes in tibiofemoral contact pressure and contact area in human knees with a horizontal cleavage tear before and after treatment. Ten human cadaveric knees were tested. Pressure sensors were placed under the medial meniscus and the knees were loaded at twice the body weight for 20 cycles at 0°, 10°, and 20° of flexion. Contact area and pressure were recorded for the intact meniscus, the meniscus with a horizontal cleavage tear, after meniscal repair, after partial meniscectomy (single leaflet), and after subtotal meniscectomy (double leaflet). The presence of a horizontal cleavage tear significantly increased average peak contact pressure and reduced effective average tibiofemoral contact area at all flexion angles tested compared with the intact state (P contact pressure after creation of the horizontal cleavage tear. Repairing the horizontal cleavage tear restored peak contact pressures and areas to within 15% of baseline, statistically similar to the intact state at all angles tested (P contact pressure and reduced average contact area at all degrees of flexion compared with the intact state (P contact area and a significant elevation in contact pressure. These changes may accelerate joint degeneration. A suture-based repair of these horizontal cleavage tears returns the contact area and contact pressure to nearly normal, whereas both partial and subtotal meniscectomy lead to significant reductions in contact area and significant elevations in contact pressure within the knee. Repairing horizontal cleavage tears may lead to improved clinical outcomes by preserving meniscal tissue and the meniscal function. Understanding contact area and peak contact pressure resulting from differing strategies for treating horizontal cleavage tears will allow the surgeon to evaluate the best strategy for treating his or her patients who present with this meniscal pathology. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier

  13. TFOS DEWS II Tear Film Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Mark D P; Argüeso, Pablo; Georgiev, Georgi A; Holopainen, Juha M; Laurie, Gordon W; Millar, Tom J; Papas, Eric B; Rolland, Jannick P; Schmidt, Tannin A; Stahl, Ulrike; Suarez, Tatiana; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Uçakhan, Omür Ö; Jones, Lyndon

    2017-07-01

    The members of the Tear Film Subcommittee reviewed the role of the tear film in dry eye disease (DED). The Subcommittee reviewed biophysical and biochemical aspects of tears and how these change in DED. Clinically, DED is characterized by loss of tear volume, more rapid breakup of the tear film and increased evaporation of tears from the ocular surface. The tear film is composed of many substances including lipids, proteins, mucins and electrolytes. All of these contribute to the integrity of the tear film but exactly how they interact is still an area of active research. Tear film osmolarity increases in DED. Changes to other components such as proteins and mucins can be used as biomarkers for DED. The Subcommittee recommended areas for future research to advance our understanding of the tear film and how this changes with DED. The final report was written after review by all Subcommittee members and the entire TFOS DEWS II membership. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshirfar M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Majid Moshirfar,1 Kasey Pierson,2,* Kamalani Hanamaikai,3,* Luis Santiago-Caban,1 Valliammai Muthappan,1 Samuel F Passi11Department of Ophthalmology, John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 3A T Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, Mesa, AZ, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient’s clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived. Keywords: dry eye, tear film, dysfunctional tear syndrome, ophthalmic lubricant, artificial tears, lipid layer, tear osmolarity, TBUT, Systane®, Refresh®, Blink®, GenTeal®, Soothe®, Lacrisert®, ocular surface inflammatory disease, Sjogren

  15. Plate Tearing by a Cone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1998-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with steady-state plate tearing by a cone. This is a scenario where a cone is forced through a ductile metal plate with a constant lateral tip penetration in a motion in the plane of the plate. The considered process could be an idealisation of the damage, which...... as for the out-of-plane reaction force. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Tear and decohesion of bovine pericardial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Elices, Manuel; Bourges, Jean Yves; Rojo, Francisco Javier; Atienza, José Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fracture-by tear and delamination-of bovine pericardium tissues which are usually employed for the manufacture of bioprosthetic valves. A large number of samples (77) were tested in root-to-apex and circumferential directions, according to a standardised tear test (ASTM D 1938). Before performing the tear test, some samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of fatigue to a maximum stress of 3MPa. Fracture toughness of tearing and delamination were computed by following a simple fracture model. The study showed significantly lower values of delamination toughness compared with tear delamination. Moreover, tear forces were different in each test direction, revealing a clear orthotropic behaviour. All these results, as well as the testing procedure, could be of value for future research in the physiological function of pericardium tissues and clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tearing mode saturation with finite pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    With finite pressure, the saturation of the current-driven tearing mode is obtained in three-dimensional nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations for Tokamak plasmas. To effectively focus on the tearing modes, the perturbed pressure effects are excluded while the finite equilibrium pressure effects are retained. With this model, the linear growth rates of the tearing modes are found to be very insensitive to the equilibrium pressure increase. The nonlinear aspects of the tearing modes, however, are found to be very sensitive to the pressure increase in that the saturation level of the nonlinear harmonics of the tearing modes increases monotonically with the pressure rise. The increased level is associated with enhanced tearing island sizes or increased stochastic magnetic field region. (author)

  18. MRI of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, T.H.; Hinson, G.W. [Menorah Medical Center, Overland Park, KS (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-09-01

    A meniscal bucket-handle tear is a tear with an attached fragment displaced from the meniscus of the knee joint. Low sensitivity of MRI for detection of bucket-handle tears (64% as compared with arthroscopy) has been reported previously. We report increased sensitivity for detecting bucket-handle tears with the use of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images. Results. By using four criteria for diagnosis of meniscal bucket-handle tears, our overall sensitivity compared with arthroscopy was 93% (28 of 30 meniscal bucket-handle tears seen at arthroscopy were detected by MRI). The meniscal fragment was well visualized in all 28 cases on coronal STIR images. The double posterior cruciate ligament sign was seen in 8 of 30 cases, the flipped meniscus was seen in 10 of 30 cases and a fragment in the intercondylar notch was seen in 18 of 30 cases. (orig.)

  19. The influence of non-polar lipids on tear film dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, M.; Breward, C.  J.  W.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. In this paper we examine the effect that physiological non-polar lipids, residing on the surface of an aqueous tear film, have on the film evolution. In our model we track the evolution of the thickness of the non

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels in tears of patients with retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, M; Balogh, Z; Biro, L; Ujhelyi, B; Damjanovich, J; Csutak, A; Várdai, J; Berta, A; Nagy, V

    2015-09-01

    We measured vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in tear fluid and serum in patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Eight patients with RVO due to secondary macular oedema were examined. VEGF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All patients had a full ophthalmic examination (visual acuity, slit lamp biomicroscopy, perimetry, and fluorescein angiography). Central retinal thickness (CRT) was examined using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Tear and serum samples were collected and examinations were performed at diagnosis and 1 and 4 weeks later. VEGF levels in the tears of RVO eyes were significantly higher than in fellow eyes at diagnosis and after both 1 and 4 weeks (paired t test, p1 = 0.01, p2 = 0.02, p3 = 0.006). We found a weak but significant positive correlation between VEGF levels in tear fluid and serum of patients with RVO (r = 0.21), while this correlation tended to be stronger between the fellow eyes and serum levels (r = 0.33). To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to report an increased level of VEGF in the tear fluid of patients with RVO. Alterations of VEGF levels in tears may be useful for determining stages of RVO. This non-invasive and objective method may also be helpful for estimating the severity of macular oedema and efficacy of treatment.

  1. Percentage Level of Tannin fur Rabbit for Leather Concerning Stitch Tearing Strength, Tearing Strength and Flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Mustakim Mustakim; Aris Sri Widati; Lisa Purnaningtyas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the appropriate of tannin level for rabbit fur leather concerning stitch tearing strength, tearing strength, and flexibility. The result were expected to contribute good information for the society, leather craftsman, and further researchers about fur leather tanning especially rabbit fur leather with tannin concerning stitch tearing strength, tearing strength and flexibility. The material that used were 12 pieces of four months of rabbit skin. The re...

  2. Thick Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in individuals with nail fungus (onychomycosis), psoriasis and hypothyroidism. Those who have problems with the thickness of their toenails should consult a foot and ankle surgeon for proper diagnosis and treatment. Find an ACFAS Physician Search Search Tools Find ...

  3. Tear clearance implications for ocular surface health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Cintia Sade; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2004-03-01

    Tear clearance/turnover provides a global assessment of the function of the lacrimal functional unit and of tear exchange on the ocular surface. It is an indirect measure of dry eye induced inflammation on the ocular surface. It shows better correlation with the severity of ocular irritation symptoms and corneal epithelial disease in dry eye than the Schirmer 1 test. Delayed tear clearance may prove to be the best measure for identifying patients with tear film disorders who may respond to anti-inflammatory therapy.

  4. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient’s clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived. PMID:25114502

  5. Influence of helical external driven current on nonlinear resistive tearing mode evolution and saturation in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2017-06-01

    The influences of helical driven currents on nonlinear resistive tearing mode evolution and saturation are studied by using a three-dimensional toroidal resistive magnetohydrodynamic code (CLT). We carried out three types of helical driven currents: stationary, time-dependent amplitude, and thickness. It is found that the helical driven current is much more efficient than the Gaussian driven current used in our previous study [S. Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 23(5), 052503 (2016)]. The stationary helical driven current cannot persistently control tearing mode instabilities. For the time-dependent helical driven current with f c d = 0.01 and δ c d < 0.04 , the island size can be reduced to its saturated level that is about one third of the initial island size. However, if the total driven current increases to about 7% of the total plasma current, tearing mode instabilities will rebound again due to the excitation of the triple tearing mode. For the helical driven current with time dependent strength and thickness, the reduction speed of the radial perturbation component of the magnetic field increases with an increase in the driven current and then saturates at a quite low level. The tearing mode is always controlled even for a large driven current.

  6. Organization of lipids in the tear film: a molecular-level view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Wizert

    Full Text Available Biophysical properties of the tear film lipid layer are studied at the molecular level employing coarse grain molecular dynamics (MD simulations with a realistic model of the human tear film. In this model, polar lipids are chosen to reflect the current knowledge on the lipidome of the tear film whereas typical Meibomian-origin lipids are included in the thick non-polar lipids subphase. Simulation conditions mimic those experienced by the real human tear film during blinks. Namely, thermodynamic equilibrium simulations at different lateral compressions are performed to model varying surface pressure, and the dynamics of the system during a blink is studied by non-equilibrium MD simulations. Polar lipids separate their non-polar counterparts from water by forming a monomolecular layer whereas the non-polar molecules establish a thick outermost lipid layer. Under lateral compression, the polar layer undulates and a sorting of polar lipids occurs. Moreover, formation of three-dimensional aggregates of polar lipids in both non-polar and water subphases is observed. We suggest that these three-dimensional structures are abundant under dynamic conditions caused by the action of eye lids and that they act as reservoirs of polar lipids, thus increasing stability of the tear film.

  7. Rotator cuff tear reduces muscle fiber specific force production and induces macrophage accumulation and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Davis, Max E; Bradley, Joshua R; Stafford, Patrick L; Schiffman, Corey J; Lynch, Evan B; Claflin, Dennis R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2012-12-01

    Full-thickness tears to the rotator cuff can cause severe pain and disability. Untreated tears progress in size and are associated with muscle atrophy and an infiltration of fat to the area, a condition known as "fatty degeneration." To improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a greater understanding of the changes in the contractile properties of muscle fibers and the molecular regulation of fatty degeneration is essential. Using a rat model of rotator cuff injury, we measured the force generating capacity of individual muscle fibers and determined changes in muscle fiber type distribution that develop after a full thickness rotator cuff tear. We also measured the expression of mRNA and miRNA transcripts involved in muscle atrophy, lipid accumulation, and matrix synthesis. We hypothesized that a decrease in specific force of rotator cuff muscle fibers, an accumulation of type IIb fibers, and an upregulation in fibrogenic, adipogenic, and inflammatory gene expression occur in torn rotator cuff muscles. Thirty days following rotator cuff tear, we observed a reduction in muscle fiber force production, an induction of fibrogenic, adipogenic, and autophagocytic mRNA and miRNA molecules, and a dramatic accumulation of macrophages in areas of fat accumulation. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Which oblique plane is more helpful in diagnosing an anterior cruciate ligament tear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, J.W.; Yoon, Y.C.; Kim, Y.N.; Ahn, J.H.; Choe, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic role of additional oblique coronal and oblique sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Materials and methods: A total of 101 patients who had undergone preoperative knee MRI examinations with orthogonal and two sets of oblique images were enrolled in the study. Two radiologists evaluated the MRI images by the use of four methods: orthogonal images only (method A); orthogonal and additional oblique coronal images (method B); orthogonal and oblique sagittal images (method C); and orthogonal images with oblique coronal and sagittal images (method D). The status of the ACL (normal or tear) was determined by consensus. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for an ACL tear with the use of each method were calculated in comparison with arthroscopy as the reference standard, and values were statistically analysed using the McNemar test. The diagnostic accuracies were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Arthroscopy identified 10 partial ACL tears and 30 complete ACL tears. The specificities and accuracies for methods B, C, and D were significantly higher than the specificities and accuracies for method A (p 0.05). Conclusions: Additional oblique imaging for an ACL tear improved the specificity. Either of the oblique imaging methods is sufficient, and no further improvement in the diagnostic efficacy was achieved by simultaneous use

  9. Recurrent rotator cuff tear: is ultrasound imaging reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Ron; Atoun, Ehud; Cohen, Ornit; Tsvieli, Oren; Rath, Ehud; Lakstein, Dror; Levy, Ofer

    2018-02-02

    The diagnostic workup of the painful shoulder after rotator cuff repair (RCR) can be quite challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of ultrasonography (US) for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears in patients with shoulder pain after RCR. We hypothesized that US for the diagnosis of recurrent rotator cuff tear after RCR would not prove to be reliable when compared with surgical arthroscopic confirmation (gold standard). In this cohort study (diagnosis), we retrospectively analyzed the data of 39 patients with shoulder pain after arthroscopic RCR who had subsequently undergone US, followed by revision arthroscopy. The rotator cuff was evaluated first using US for the presence of retears. Thereafter, revision arthroscopy was performed, and the diagnosis was either established or disproved. The sensitivity and specificity of US were assessed in reference to revision arthroscopy (gold standard). A rotator cuff retear was indicated by US in 21 patients (54%) and by revision arthroscopy in 26 patients (67%). US showed a sensitivity of 80.8% and specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of rotator cuff retears. Omission of partial rotator cuff retears resulted in a spike in sensitivity to 94.7%, with 100% specificity remaining. US imaging is a highly sensitive and specific test for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears, as confirmed by revision arthroscopy, in patients with a painful shoulder after primary RCR. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of single-helicity neoclassical MHD tearing instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Shaing, K.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Callen, J.D.; Garcia, L.

    1988-10-01

    Neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects can significantly alter the nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing instabilities. This is studied numerically by using a flux-surface-averaged set of evolution equations that includes the lowest-order neoclassical MHD effects. The new terms in the equations are fluctuating bootstrap current, neoclassical modification of the resistivity, and neoclassical damping of the vorticity. Single-helicity tearing modes are studied in a cylindrical model over a range of neoclassical viscosities (μ/sub e//ν/sup e/) and values of the Δ' parameter of tearing mode theory. Increasing the neoclassical viscosity leads to increased growth rate and saturated island width as predicted analytically. The larger island width is caused by the fluctuating bootstrap current contribution in Ohm's law. The Δ' parameter no longer solely determines the island width, and finite-width saturated islands may be obtained even when Δ' is negative. The importance of the bootstrap current (/approximately/∂/rho///partial derivative/psi/) in the nonlinear dynamics leads us to examine the sensitivity of the results with respect to different models for the density evolution. 11 refs., 8 figs

  11. Divalent cations in tears, and their influence on tear film stability in humans and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojia Eric; Markoulli, Maria; Millar, Thomas J; Willcox, Mark D P; Zhao, Zhenjun

    2012-06-05

    Reduced tear film stability is reported to contribute to dry eye. Rabbits are known to have a more stable tear film than humans. Thus, we sought to examine the tears of rabbits and humans for metal cations, and to test how they influence tear film stability. Tears were collected from 10 healthy humans and 6 rabbits. Tear osmolality was measured by vapor pressure osmometer, and metals analyzed using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry or ICP atomic emission spectroscopy. The influence of divalent cations on tears was analyzed by measuring surface tension using the Langmuir trough in vitro, using different concentrations of cations in the subphase, and grading the tear break-up in rabbits in vivo after instillation of chelating agents. Rabbit tears had a higher osmolality compared to humans. Major metals did not differ between species; however, rabbits had higher levels of Mg(2+) (1.13 vs. 0.39 mM) and Ca(2+) (0.75 vs. 0.36 mM). In rabbit tears in vitro, diminishing divalent cations resulted in a decrease in the maximum surface pressure from 37 to 30 mN/m. In vivo, an increase in the amount of tear film that was broken-up was found. In contrast, when changing divalent cation concentrations in human tears, the maximum surface pressure remained at 26 mN/m. The normal osmolality of rabbit tears is significantly higher than that in humans. While divalent cations had little influence on human tears, they appear to have an important role in maintaining tear film stability in rabbits.

  12. MR Imaging findings of avulsion fracture of the tibial spine of the knee, focusing of cruciate ligament tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Jin, Wook

    2003-01-01

    To determine the presence of cruciate ligament tears following avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL, and to correlate the findings with those of surgery. Between March 1997 and May 2002, avulsion injury involving the ACL and PCL was diagnosed in 19 patients. Ten of these [8 males and 2 females aged 10-51 (avergae, 27.7) years] were included in this study. We assessed the presence of cruciate ligament tears at MR imaging, correlating the findings with those of surgery. Associated intra-articular injuries, treatment methods and follow-up results were also evaluated. Among seven patients with ACL avulsion injury, this was assessed at MR imaging as complete tear (n=1), partial tear (n=5), or intact (n=1), while all MR images of PCL avulsion injury (n=3) showed that this was partial teat. All imaging findings corresponded with the surgical findings. In four patients there was associated knee injury involving, respectively, teats of the medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, PCL and MCL, and popliteal ligament. Our findings showed that with one exception, patients with avulsion injury of the ACL or PCL had suffered either a partial or complete tear. MR imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of tears of the cruciate ligament which have not been noticed at surgery or arthroscopy in avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL

  13. A review on hot tearing of magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng Song

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hot tearing is often a major casting defect in magnesium alloys and has a significant impact on the quality of their casting products. Hot tearing of magnesium alloys is a complex solidification phenomenon which is still not fully understood, it is of great importance to investigate the hot tearing behaviour of magnesium alloys. This review attempts to summarize the investigations on hot tearing of magnesium alloys over the past decades. The hot tearing criteria including recently developed Kou's criterion are summarized and compared. The numeric simulation and assessing methods of hot tearing, factors influencing hot tearing, and hot tearing susceptibility (HTS of magnesium alloys are discussed.

  14. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK

  15. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK.

  16. Influence of Ophthalmic Solutions on Tear Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeyasu, Chika; Yamada, Masakazu; Akune, Yoko

    2016-11-01

    Tear fluids are a mixture of secretions derived from lacrimal glands, accessory lacrimal glands, conjunctiva, and meibomian glands. Compositional changes to tears occur in the normal state and during ocular surface disease, such as dry eye conditions. We have investigated compositional changes to tears after topical application of ophthalmic solutions, with regard to tear-specific proteins (secretory immunoglobulin A, lactoferrin, lipocalin-1, and lysozyme) and ocular surface mucin in normal and dry eye conditions using high-performance liquid chromatography. After application of saline solution (0.9% sodium chloride) in normal subjects, transient but significant decreases in all tear components were observed. The recovery of protein concentrations took up to 30 minutes and lasted longer when the saline solution was applied more frequently. When applying ophthalmic solutions, a balance between washout and dilutional effects should be considered in addition to the therapeutic effect. Investigation of the effect of diquafosol solution (3%) in normal subjects revealed a significant increase in sialic acid concentration, a marker of ocular mucin, at 5 minutes after application, whereas a significant decrease was observed with saline. This result indicates the accelerated secretion of mucin from ocular tissues induced by diquafosol. A clinical study to determine the efficacy of diquafosol in patients with dry eye revealed improvements in tear breakup time, keratoconjunctival staining scores, and Schirmer test score, accompanied by an increase in sialic acid concentration in tears. Investigating normal and dry eye conditions through tear analysis may clarify the pathophysiology of dry eye conditions and support the efficacy of treatments.

  17. The social impact of emotional tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.; van de Ven, N.; van der Velden, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The question what specific functions the production of emotional tears fulfills has received only limited attention of behavioral scientists. We report the results of two studies on the social impact of emotional tears. In Study 1 (96 Dutch females), perceived helplessness and felt connectedness

  18. Detecting meniscal tears in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeker, B.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Although meniscal tears are a very common phenomenon uncertainty exists about the diagnosis and treatment of meniscal tears in primary care. This thesis aims to provide evidence for general practitioners and physical therapists regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with a suspected

  19. Tear exchange and contact lenses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntz, Alex; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Sorbara, Luigina; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Tear exchange beneath a contact lens facilitates ongoing fluid replenishment between the ocular surface and the lens. This exchange is considerably lower during the wear of soft lenses compared with rigid lenses. As a result, the accumulation of tear film debris and metabolic by-products between the cornea and a soft contact lens increases, potentially leading to complications. Lens design innovations have been proposed, but no substantial improvement in soft lens tear exchange has been reported. Researchers have determined post-lens tear exchange using several methods, notably fluorophotometry. However, due to technological limitations, little remains known about tear hydrodynamics around the lens and, to-date, true tear exchange with contact lenses has not been shown. Further knowledge regarding tear exchange could be vital in aiding better contact lens design, with the prospect of alleviating certain adverse ocular responses. This article reviews the literature to-date on the significance, implications and measurement of tear exchange with contact lenses. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Pulley lesions in rotator cuff tears: prevalence, etiology, and concomitant pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Nael; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Garving, Christina; Habermeyer, Peter; Tauber, Mark

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of lesions in the biceps pulley complex in a representative, consecutive series of rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff interval treatments. We also analyzed associated tear pattern of rotator cuff injuries and superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. We evaluated the relationships of these lesions to traumatic genesis and the prevalence of pulley lesions in revision cases. This retrospective study analyzed all pre- and intra-operative documentation on arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstructions and isolated pulley lesion treatments performed by a single surgeon over 2 consecutive years. According to Habermeyer et al., we classified cases into four groups, based on the presence of additional or related complete or partial rotator cuff tears, SLAP lesions, trauma, and primary or revision surgery. Among 382 patients with rotator cuff tears, 345 (90.3%) had an injured pulley system; 151 (43.8%) had partial tears of the rotator cuff; out of these, 106 (30.6%) were articular-sided. All of these articular-sided partial tears showed extension into the pulley complex. In 154 cases (44.6%), history of shoulder trauma was associated with the beginning of symptoms. In addition, concomitant SLAP lesions occurred in 25-62% of pulley lesions, correlating with the severity of pulley lesions. Among the 345 cases, there have been 32 (9.3%) revision cases where a pulley lesion was intra-operatively identified and addressed. Pulley complex lesions are present in 90.3% of surgically treated rotator cuff lesions, particularly in articular-sided injuries. In addition, we found a significant relationship between the incidence of SLAP lesions and the severity of pulley lesions. It seems reasonable to assume an important role of pulley system injuries in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff lesions.

  1. Tearing mode instability due to anomalous resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Atsushi; Itoh, Sanae I.; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2000-01-01

    Tearing mode instability in the presence of microscopic truculence is investigates. The effects of microscopic turbulence on tearing mode are taken as drags which are calculated by one-point renormalization method and mean-field approximation. These effects are reduced to effective diffusivities in reduced MHD equations. Using these equations, the stability analyses of the tearing mode are performed. It is shown that a finite amplitude of fluctuation enhances the growth rate of tearing mode. For very high values of turbulent diffusivities, marginally stable state exists. The effects of each turbulent diffusivity on mode stability are examined near marginal stability boundary. Parameter dependence of the resistive ballooning mode turbulence on tearing mode is analyzed as an example. (author)

  2. The ocular surface and tear film and their dysfunction in dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, M; Zierhut, M

    2001-03-01

    The ocular surface, tear film, lacrimal glands, and eyelids act as a functional unit to preserve the quality of the refractive surface of the eye and to resist injury and protect the eye against changing bodily and environmental conditions. Events that disturb the homeostasis of this functional unit can result in a vicious cycle of ocular surface disease. The tear film is the most dynamic structure of the functional unit, and its production and turnover is essential to maintaining the health of the ocular surface. Classically, the tear film is reported to be composed of three layers: the mucin, aqueous, and lipid layers. The boundaries and real thickness of such layers is still under discussion. A dysfunction of any of these layers can result in dry eye disease.

  3. Painful locking of the knee due to bucket handle tear of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Rui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 A case of swelling and anterior painful knee due to tear of mediopatellar plica is reported. The patient also felt clunk of the patellofemoral joint and knee locking. Under arthroscopic examination, a thick and fibrous plica was found medial to patellar, and a bucket tear along the plica from medial patellar retinaculum to infrapatellar fat pad. Polarized microscopic examination showed collagen fiber fragment and loss of light reflecting property. Neuroimmunohistology suggested up-regulation of synovial plica innervation in the area around the crack. This may be related to the pain. The bucket tear of mediopatellar plicacaused pain and lock of knee are more common than previously reported. Key words: Knee injuries; Arthroscopy; Patellofemoral joint

  4. Percentage Level of Tannin fur Rabbit for Leather Concerning Stitch Tearing Strength, Tearing Strength and Flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustakim Mustakim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out the appropriate of tannin level for rabbit fur leather concerning stitch tearing strength, tearing strength, and flexibility. The result were expected to contribute good information for the society, leather craftsman, and further researchers about fur leather tanning especially rabbit fur leather with tannin concerning stitch tearing strength, tearing strength and flexibility. The material that used were 12 pieces of four months of rabbit skin. The research method was Completely Randomized Design, consist of three treatments of tannin, they were: M1 (mimosa 15%, M2 (mimosa 20%, and M3 (mimosa 25%. Each of treatment hold on four repetition, the variables which measured were stitch tearing strength, tearing strength, and flexibility of fur leather. Data were  analysed by analysis variance followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. The result of this research indicate that the use level of tannin give significant influence (P<0.05 among stitch tearing strength, tearing strength. It gave a very significant influence (P<0.01 for flexibility of rabbit fur leather. Based on the result, can be concluded that 25 % of tannin (mimosa, produce the best  result on stitch tearing strength and tearing strength. The increase of tannin offer will decrease the flexibility of fur leather but the lowest tannin produced the best flexibility of fur leather (15 percent. The best quality of rabbit fur leather produced by 25 % of tannin.   Keywords : leather, tannin, quality

  5. Mass spectrometric identification of phospholipids in human tears and tear lipocalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Austin W; Glasgow, Ben J

    2012-04-02

    The purpose of this article was to identify by mass spectrometry phosphocholine lipids in stimulated human tears and determine the molecules bound to tear lipocalin or other proteins. Tear proteins were separated isocratically from pooled stimulated human tears by gel filtration fast performance liquid chromatography. Separation of tear lipocalin was confirmed by SDS tricine gradient PAGE. Protein fractions were extracted with chloroform/methanol and analyzed with electrospray ionization MS/MS triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in precursor ion scan mode for select leaving groups. For quantification, integrated ion counts were derived from standard curves of authentic compounds of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine. Linear approximation was possible from integration of the mass spectrometrically obtained ion peaks at 760 Da for the PC standard. Tears contained 194 ng/mL of the major intact PC (34:2), m/z 758.6. Ten other monoisotopic phosphocholines were found in tears. A peak at 703.3 Da was assigned as a sphingomyelin. Four lysophosphatidylcholines (m/z 490-540) accounted for about 80% of the total integrated ion count. The [M+H](+) compound, m/z 496.3, accounted for 60% of the signal intensity. Only the tear lipocalin-bearing fractions showed phosphocholines (104 ng/mL). Although the intact phospholipids bound to tear lipocalin corresponded precisely in mass and relative signal intensity to that found in tears, we did not identify phosphocholines between m/z 490 and 540 in any of the gel-filtration fractions. Phospholipids, predominantly lysophospholipids, are present in tears. The higher mass intact PCs in tears are native ligands of tear lipocalin.

  6. Evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament tears after acute lateral patellar dislocation: comparison of high-frequency ultrasound and MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-Ying; Ding, Hong-Yu [Shandong University, Department of Ultrasonography, Qianfoshan Hospital, Jinan (China); Zheng, Lei; Sun, Bai-Sheng [Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Department of Radiology, Shandong Provincial Corps Hospital, Jinan (China); Li, En-Miao [Jinan Third People' s Hospital, Department of Ultrasonography, Jinan (China); Shi, Hao [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Qianfoshan Hospital, Jinan (China)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of high-frequency ultrasound with MR in the evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD). High-frequency ultrasound and MR images were prospectively obtained in 97 consecutive patients with acute LPD. Images were acquired using standardised protocols and were independently evaluated by two radiologists. The MPFL was assessed at three sites (patellar insertion, femoral attachment, and mid-substance) for signs of injury. Of a total of 291 sites in 97 MPFLs, 127 showed proven MPFL tear at surgery, including 51 sites of complete tear and 76 sites of partial tear. In a site-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-frequency ultrasound was 90.8 %, 96.3 %, and 94.6 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 86.3 %, 96.3 %, and 94 %, respectively, for complete tear. For MR, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy was 81.6 %, 95.7 %, and 91.3 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 80.4 %, 95.7 %, and 92.1 %, respectively, for complete tear. There was no statistical difference between high-frequency ultrasound and MR in the assessment of partial (P = 0.1, 0.777, 0.155) or complete (P = 0.425, 0.777, 0.449) MPFL lesions. Interobserver agreement was very good for high-frequency ultrasound and good for MR. Data suggest that high-frequency ultrasound and MR have similar diagnostic performance in the evaluation of MPFL lesions after acute LPD. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament tears after acute lateral patellar dislocation: comparison of high-frequency ultrasound and MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guang-Ying; Ding, Hong-Yu; Zheng, Lei; Sun, Bai-Sheng; Li, En-Miao; Shi, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of high-frequency ultrasound with MR in the evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD). High-frequency ultrasound and MR images were prospectively obtained in 97 consecutive patients with acute LPD. Images were acquired using standardised protocols and were independently evaluated by two radiologists. The MPFL was assessed at three sites (patellar insertion, femoral attachment, and mid-substance) for signs of injury. Of a total of 291 sites in 97 MPFLs, 127 showed proven MPFL tear at surgery, including 51 sites of complete tear and 76 sites of partial tear. In a site-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-frequency ultrasound was 90.8 %, 96.3 %, and 94.6 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 86.3 %, 96.3 %, and 94 %, respectively, for complete tear. For MR, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy was 81.6 %, 95.7 %, and 91.3 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 80.4 %, 95.7 %, and 92.1 %, respectively, for complete tear. There was no statistical difference between high-frequency ultrasound and MR in the assessment of partial (P = 0.1, 0.777, 0.155) or complete (P = 0.425, 0.777, 0.449) MPFL lesions. Interobserver agreement was very good for high-frequency ultrasound and good for MR. Data suggest that high-frequency ultrasound and MR have similar diagnostic performance in the evaluation of MPFL lesions after acute LPD. (orig.)

  8. Aging-associated exacerbation in fatty degeneration and infiltration following rotator cuff tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Korn, Michael A; Saripalli, Anjali L; Flood, Michael D; Phan, Anthony C; Roche, Stuart M; Lynch, Evan B; Claflin, Dennis R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2013-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints and a substantial source of morbidity in elderly patients. Chronic cuff tears are associated with muscle atrophy and an infiltration of fat to the area, a condition known as “fatty degeneration.” To improve the treatment of cuff tears in elderly patients, a greater understanding of the changes in the contractile properties of muscle fibers and the molecular regulation of fatty degeneration is essential. Methods Using a full-thickness, massive supraspinatus and infraspinatus tear model in elderly rats, we measured fiber contractility and determined changes in fiber type distribution that develop 30 days after tear. We also measured the expression of mRNA and miRNA transcripts involved in muscle atrophy, lipid accumulation, and matrix synthesis. We hypothesized that a decrease in specific force of muscle fibers, an accumulation of type IIb fibers, and an upregulation in atrophic, fibrogenic, and inflammatory gene expression would occur in torn cuff muscles. Results Thirty days following tear, we observed a reduction in muscle fiber force and an induction of RNA molecules that regulate atrophy, fibrosis, lipid accumulation, inflammation and macrophage recruitment. A marked accumulation of advanced glycation end products, and a significant accretion of macrophages in areas of fat accumulation were observed. Conclusions The extent of degenerative changes in old rats was greater than that observed in adults. Additionally, we identified that the ectopic fat accumulation that occurs in chronic cuff tears does not occur by activation of canonical intramyocellular lipid storage and synthesis pathways. PMID:23790676

  9. Reduced muscle fiber force production and disrupted myofibril architecture in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Christopher L; Roche, Stuart M; Harning, Julie A; Davis, Max E; Lynch, Evan B; Sibilsky Enselman, Elizabeth R; Jacobson, Jon A; Claflin, Dennis R; Calve, Sarah; Bedi, Asheesh

    2015-01-01

    A persistent atrophy of muscle fibers and an accumulation of fat, collectively referred to as fatty degeneration, commonly occur in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears. The etiology of fatty degeneration and function of the residual rotator cuff musculature have not been well characterized in humans. We hypothesized that muscles from patients with chronic rotator cuff tears have reduced muscle fiber force production, disordered myofibrils, and an accumulation of fat vacuoles. The contractility of muscle fibers from biopsy specimens of supraspinatus muscles of 13 patients with chronic full-thickness posterosuperior rotator cuff tears was measured and compared with data from healthy vastus lateralis muscle fibers. Correlations between muscle fiber contractility, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, and tear size were analyzed. Histology and electron microscopy were also performed. Torn supraspinatus muscles had a 30% reduction in maximum isometric force production and a 29% reduction in normalized force compared with controls. Normalized supraspinatus fiber force positively correlated with ASES score and negatively correlated with tear size. Disordered sarcomeres were noted, along with an accumulation of lipid-laden macrophages in the extracellular matrix surrounding supraspinatus muscle fibers. Patients with chronic supraspinatus tears have significant reductions in muscle fiber force production. Force production also correlates with ASES scores and tear size. The structural and functional muscle dysfunction of the residual muscle fibers is independent of the additional area taken up by fibrotic tissue. This work may help establish future therapies to restore muscle function after the repair of chronically torn rotator cuff muscles. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetic theory of tearing instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Dobrott, D.; Wang, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The guiding-center kinetic equation with Fokker-Planck collision term is used to study, in cylindrical geometry, a class of dissipative instabilities of which the classical tearing mode is an archetype. Variational solution of the kinetic equation obviates the use of an approximate Ohm's law or adiabatic assumption, as used in previous studies, and it provides a dispersive relation which is uniformly valid for any ratio of wave frequency to collision frequency. One result of using the rigorous collision operator is the prediction of a new instability. This instability, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is predicted to occur under the long mean-free path conditions of present tokamak experiments, and has significant features in common with the kink-like oscillations observed in such experiments

  11. Effects of wearing a daily disposable lens on tear film: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pamela Qin Yi; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Boo, Cynthia; Tong, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Contact lens-induced dry eye is commonly encountered, although its extent is not well documented with daily disposable lenses. A novel type of contact lens system incorporating moisturising agent (alginic acid) has been developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of wearing daily 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate disposable contact lenses for seven days on tear stability, conjunctival and limbal redness and dry eye symptoms. Then, we aimed to determine whether lens solutions containing alginic acid had any influence on tear parameters. This was a seven-day parallel group double-masked clinical trial of previous contact lens wearers, where participants were randomly assigned to wearing SEED 1dayPure moisture contact lenses with (n = 15) or without alginic acid (n = 15). Tear lipid layer thickness (LLT), non-invasive tear break-up time (NIBUT), conjunctival redness, corneal fluorescein staining, tear break-up time and Schirmer I readings were measured. Symptom severity and frequency were evaluated and combined using a global score from visual analogue scales. The mean age and standard deviation of the participants was 25 ± 3.8 years. There were 24 females and six males. After reintroduction of contact lens wear for one week, there was significant improvement in the global symptom score; however, this may not be clinically significant. There were small and clinically insignificant changes in limbal and conjunctival hyperaemia but no significant changes in lipid layer thickness, Schirmer I and NIBUT in overall participants. The use of alginic acid in lens solutions did not affect these parameters compared to control lenses (p > 0.05). After seven days of wearing a modern daily disposable lens, there was no significant deterioration of tear function in a group of young contact lens wearers. In this short-term study, there was no evidence of significant benefit of lens solutions containing alginic acid used with HEMA lenses. © 2016 The Authors Clinical and

  12. Computed tear film and osmolarity dynamics on an eye-shaped domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longfei; Braun, Richard J.; Driscoll, Tobin A.; Henshaw, William D.; Banks, Jeffrey W.; King-Smith, P. Ewen

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of ions, or osmolarity, in the tear film is a key variable in understanding dry eye symptoms and disease. In this manuscript, we derive a mathematical model that couples osmolarity (treated as a single solute) and fluid dynamics within the tear film on a 2D eye-shaped domain. The model includes the physical effects of evaporation, surface tension, viscosity, ocular surface wettability, osmolarity, osmosis and tear fluid supply and drainage. The governing system of coupled non-linear partial differential equations is solved using the Overture computational framework, together with a hybrid time-stepping scheme, using a variable step backward differentiation formula and a Runge–Kutta–Chebyshev method that were added to the framework. The results of our numerical simulations provide new insight into the osmolarity distribution over the ocular surface during the interblink. PMID:25883248

  13. Tear ferning in normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates tear ferning as an ancillary technique for the evaluation of the canine tear film in normal eyes and eyes affected by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Thirty dogs with KCS and 50 control dogs with normal tear film were evaluated with a full ophthalmoscopic examination and a Schirmer tear test type 1 ...

  14. Acromion Index in Korean Population and Its Relationship with Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Dong Ho; Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Keun Min; Lee, Eun Su; Park, Yong Bok; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2017-06-01

    Among the many causes of rotator cuff tears, scapular morphology is associated with the accelerating degenerative process of the rotator cuff. Acromion index (AI) was previously introduced and compared in two populations. We enrolled 100 Korean patients diagnosed with full-thickness rotator cuff tears by magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative arthroscopic findings between January and December 2013. Another 100 Korean patients with an intact rotator cuff tendon identified on magnetic resonance imaging and other shoulder diseases, such as frozen shoulder and instability, were enrolled as controls. We retrospectively compared these 100 rotator cuff tear patients (mean age, 63 years) and 100 controls (mean age, 51 years) in this study. Two independent orthopedic surgeons assessed the AI on radiographs. We performed an interobserver reliability test of the AI assessment, and then compared the AI between two groups. The measurement of the AI showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.82). The mean AI in the rotator cuff tear group was 0.68 and it was significantly different between groups ( p rotator cuff tears in a Korean population.

  15. Alteration of galectin-3 in tears of patients with dry eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Yuichi; Mauris, Jerome; Woodward, Ashley M; Dieckow, Julia; Amparo, Francisco; Dana, Reza; Mantelli, Flavio; Argüeso, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the expression, release, and proteolytic degradation of galectin-3 in patients with dry eye disease. Observational case series with a comparison group. Tear washes and conjunctival impression cytology specimens were collected through standard procedures from 16 patients with dry eye and 11 age-matched healthy subjects. Galectin-3 content in tears was analyzed by quantitative Western blot, using recombinant galectin-3 protein to generate a calibration curve. The relative expression of galectin-3 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The cleavage of galectin-3 was studied in vitro using activated recombinant MMP9 and protease inhibitors. The concentration of galectin-3 protein in tears, but not galectin-3 expression in conjunctival epithelium, was significantly higher in tears of patients with dry eye (0.38 ng/μg total protein, range 0.04-1.36) compared to healthy subjects (0.12 ng/μg total protein, range 0.00-0.41) (P tear samples from healthy subjects, whereas 50% of the dry eye samples were characterized by the additional presence of a partially degraded form (∼25.4 kDa). In our experiments, elevated expression of MMP9 in dry eye subjects correlated with the ability of active MMP9 to cleave galectin-3 from recombinant origin. Interestingly, cleavage of endogenous galectin-3 in tear samples was impaired using a broad-spectrum proteinase inhibitor cocktail, but not the pan-specific MMP inhibitor GM6001, suggesting the presence of proteases other than MMPs in promoting galectin-3 degradation in dry eye. Our results indicate that release of cellular galectin-3 into tears is associated with epithelial dysfunction in dry eye, and that galectin-3 proteolytic cleavage may contribute to impaired ocular surface barrier function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. US detection of rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soble, M.G.; Guay, R.C.; Kaye, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Between June 1986 and April 1988, 75 patients suspected of having a tear of the rotator cuff underwent shoulder sonography and arthrography. Compared with anthrography, US demonstrated 92% of rotor cuff tears, with a specificity of 84% and a negative predictive value of 95%. In 30 patients who underwent surgery for a rotator cuff tear or other soft-tissue abnormality, sonography demonstrated a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 73%, while arthrography demonstrated a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 100%. The above data indicate that US is a useful, noninvasive screening procedure for patients suspected of having rotator cuff injury

  17. Graft Utilization in the Bridging Reconstruction of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewington, Matthew R; Ferguson, Devin P; Smith, T Duncan; Burks, Robert; Coady, Catherine; Wong, Ivan Ho-Bun

    2017-11-01

    Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common conditions affecting the shoulder. Because of the difficulty in managing massive rotator cuff tears and the inability of standard techniques to prevent arthropathy, surgeons have developed several novel techniques to improve outcomes and ideally alter the natural history. To systematically review the existing literature and analyze reported outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of using a bridging graft reconstruction technique to treat large to massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. Systematic review. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CENTRAL was employed with the key terms "tear," "allograft," and "rotator cuff." Eligibility was determined by a 3-phase screening process according to the outlined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data in relation to the primary and secondary outcomes were summarized. The results were synthesized according to the origin of the graft and the level of evidence. Fifteen studies in total were included in this review: 2 comparative studies and 13 observational case series. Both the biceps tendon and the fascia lata autograft groups had significantly superior structural integrity rates on magnetic resonance imaging at 12-month minimum follow-up when compared with their partial primary repair counterparts (58% vs 26%, P = .036; 79% vs 58%, P rotator cuff tears demonstrated high structural healing rates (74%-90%, 73%-100%, and 60%-90%, respectively). Additionally, both comparative studies and case series demonstrated a general improvement of patients' functional outcome scores. Using a graft for an anatomic bridging rotator cuff repair results in improved function on objective testing and may be functionally better than nonanatomic or partial repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears. Allograft or xenograft techniques appear to be favorable options, given demonstrated functional improvement, imaging-supported graft survival, and lack of harvest complication risk. More high

  18. Classification of ulnar triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. A treatment algorithm for Palmer type IB tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzei, A; Luchetti, R; Garagnani, L

    2017-05-01

    The classical definition of 'Palmer Type IB' triangular fibrocartilage complex tear, includes a spectrum of clinical conditions. This review highlights the clinical and arthroscopic criteria that enable us to categorize five classes on a treatment-oriented classification system of triangular fibrocartilage complex peripheral tears. Class 1 lesions represent isolated tears of the distal triangular fibrocartilage complex without distal radio-ulnar joint instability and are amenable to arthroscopic suture. Class 2 tears include rupture of both the distal triangular fibrocartilage complex and proximal attachments of the triangular fibrocartilage complex to the fovea. Class 3 tears constitute isolated ruptures of the proximal attachment of the triangular fibrocartilage complex to the fovea; they are not visible at radio-carpal arthroscopy. Both Class 2 and Class 3 tears are diagnosed with a positive hook test and are typically associated with distal radio-ulnar joint instability. If required, treatment is through reattachment of the distal radio-ulnar ligament insertions to the fovea. Class 4 lesions are irreparable tears due to the size of the defect or to poor tissue quality and, if required, treatment is through distal radio-ulnar ligament reconstruction with tendon graft. Class 5 tears are associated with distal radio-ulnar joint arthritis and can only be treated with salvage procedures. This subdivision of type IB triangular fibrocartilage complex tear provides more insights in the pathomechanics and treatment strategies. II.

  19. Functional evaluation of patient after arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Jadhav, Umesh

    2014-06-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a common problem either after trauma or after degenerative tear in old age group. Arthroscopic repair is the current concept of rotator cuff repair. Here, we are trying to evaluate the functional outcome after arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear (single row) in Indian population. Twenty five patients (14 males and 11 females) who underwent arthroscopic repair of full thickness rotator cuff tear at a single institution were included in the study. Postoperatively patient's shoulder was rated according to UCLA score, pain was graded according to the visual analog score. The range of motion was analysed and documented. The mean age of the patients were 50.48 years. The preoperative VAS score mode was 7 and post operative VAS was 1 (p value fair in 12% (n = 3), excellent in 8% (n = 2) and poor results were seen in none of the patients. The mean UCLA improved from a score of 15.84 to 30.28 with a p value advantages, hence we used a single row repair considering the Indian population and the cost effectiveness of the surgery with good to excellent results.

  20. Comparison between T2*- and T2-weighted images in diagnosing rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hideo; Ito, Hisao; Kubo, Atsushi.

    1995-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the merits of T2 * -weighted images in diagnosing rotator cuff tear, compared with T2-weighted images. T2- and T2 * -weighted images were obtained in 10 asymptomatic volunteers and 94 patients with symptoms referable to the rotator cuff. The increased signal with full thickness of the rotator cuff was not shown on either T2- or T2 * -weighted images in the volunteers. These findings on T2-weighted images and on T2 * -weighted images were observed in 33 and 58 of 94 patients with symptoms, respectively. Every patient who showed these abnormal findings on T2-weighted images had the abnormal findings on T2 * -weighted images. These findings on T2 * -weighted images were wider than those on T2-weighted images in 20 of 33 patients. Surgical findings were available in 21 of 94 patients. Rotator cuff tears were surgically confirmed in 20 patients whose MR images showed increased signal lesions on both T2- and T2 * -weighted images. On the other hand, one patient who did not have rotator cuff tear showed increased signal lesion with full thickness on T2 * -weighted images, but not on T2-weighted images. We think increased signal lesions on T2-weighted images may strongly suggest rotator cuff tear, whereas those on T2 * -weighted images are not specific. (author)

  1. Electrostatic effect for the collisionless tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, M.

    1987-01-01

    Electron dynamics has not been self-consistently considered in collisionless tearing mode theories to date because of the mathematical complexity of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. We have found using computer simulations that electrostatic fields play an important role in the tearing mode. Vlasov theory, including the electrostatic field, is investigated for topologies with both antiparallel and nonantiparallel magnetic field lines. The electrostatic field influences the resonant current in the neutral sheet which is a non-MHD effect, and modifies the linear growth rate. At the magnetopause, where the field lines are not antiparallel, the electrostatic effect acts to raise the linear growth rate of the tearing mode. On the other hand, in the magnetotail, where magnetic field lines are antiparallel, the electrostatic effect reduces the tearing mode growth rate. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  2. Influence of toroidal rotation on tearing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huishan; Cao, Jintao; Li, Ding

    2017-10-01

    Tearing modes stability analysis including toroidal rotation is studied. It is found that rotation affects the stability of tearing modes mainly through the interaction with resistive inner region of tearing mode. The coupling of magnetic curvature with centrifugal force and Coriolis force provides a perturbed perpendicular current, and a return parallel current is induced to affect the stability of tearing modes. Toroidal rotation plays a stable role, which depends on the magnitude of Mach number and adiabatic index Γ, and is independent on the direction of toroidal rotation. For Γ >1, the scaling of growth rate is changed for typical Mach number in present tokamaks. For Γ = 1 , the scaling keeps unchanged, and the effect of toroidal rotation is much less significant, compared with that for Γ >1. National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program and National Science Foundation of China under Grants No. 2014GB106004, No. 2013GB111000, No. 11375189, No. 11075161 and No. 11275260, and Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS.

  3. An Athlete's Nightmare: Tearing the ACL

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the balls of their feet. "If the calf muscles are not absorbing the force, and if the knee is not in the proper position, the knee buckles and tears the ACL," explains Dr. Boden. After her initial ...

  4. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1997-12-01

    A new Δ' shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio (ε ≤ 0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth et al. results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease Δ', are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric element stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low β regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. Double tearing modes in toroidal geometries are examined as well. Furthermore, m ≥ 2 tearing mode stability criteria are compared with three dimensional initial value MHD simulation by the FAR code

  5. Efficacy of artificial tears for children xerophthalmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the efficacy and safety of artificial tears for children xerophthalmia.METHODS:Fifty-eight cases with 116 eyes were diagnosed as xerophthalmia by tear break-up time(BUT, Schirmer Ⅰ test(SⅠt, tear meniscus height, corneal staining, meibomian gland function test and were given artificial tears therapy for 1mo. Then the aforementioned tests were conducted again for statistical analysis.RESULTS:The mean BUT of all the children before treatments was 6.03±1.19s, SⅠt was 7.67±2.32mm/5min, tear meniscus height was 0.20±0.02mm, corneal staining was 1.02±0.13 scores and meibomian gland function was 2.45±0.86 scores. Sixty-two eyes in 31 cases were the lipid-deficient type, 40 eyes in 20 cases were aqueous-deficient type, and 14 eyes in 7 cases were other types. According to their types, corresponding artificial tears therapy was given. At 1mo after treatments, the clinical symptoms were improved significantly. BUT was 13.72±1.83s, SⅠt was 12.38±3.64mm/5min, tear meniscus height was 0.36±0.08mm, corneal fluorescein staining was 0.03±0.24 scores and meibomian gland function was 1.57±0.93 scores. Compared with those before treatments, the difference of each observed indicators was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION:Artificial tears treatment for children xerophthalmia is safe and effective.

  6. Ponderomotive modification of drift tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquijo, G.; Singh, R.; Sen, A.

    1997-01-01

    The linear characteristics of drift tearing modes are investigated in the presence of a significant background of radio-frequency (RF) waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The ponderomotive force, arising from the radial gradients in the RF field energy, is found to significantly modify the inner layer solutions of the drift tearing modes. It can have a stabilizing influence, even at moderate RF powers, provided the field energy has a decreasing radial profile at the mode rational surface. (author)

  7. Human tears reveal insights into corneal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Nadia; Van Grasdorff, Sigi; Wouters, Kristien; Rozema, Jos; Koppen, Carina; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Berneman, Zwi; Tassignon, Marie-José

    2012-01-01

    Corneal neovascularization results from the encroachment of blood vessels from the surrounding conjunctiva onto the normally avascular cornea. The aim of this study is to identify factors in human tears that are involved in development and/or maintenance of corneal neovascularization in humans. This could allow development of diagnostic tools for monitoring corneal neovascularization and combination monoclonal antibody therapies for its treatment. In an observational case-control study we enrolled a total of 12 patients with corneal neovascularization and 10 healthy volunteers. Basal tears along with reflex tears from the inferior fornix, superior fornix and using a corneal bath were collected along with blood serum samples. From all patients, ocular surface photographs were taken. Concentrations of the pro-angiogenic cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP-1) and Fas Ligand (FasL) were determined in blood and tear samples using a flow cytometric multiplex assay. Our results show that the concentration of pro-angiogenic cytokines in human tears are significantly higher compared to their concentrations in serum, with highest levels found in basal tears. Interestingly, we could detect a significantly higher concentration of IL- 6, IL-8 and VEGF in localized corneal tears of patients with neovascularized corneas when compared to the control group. This is the first study of its kind demonstrating a significant difference of defined factors in tears from patients with neovascularized corneas as compared to healthy controls. These results provide the basis for future research using animal models to further substantiate the role of these cytokines in the establishment and maintenance of corneal neovascularization.

  8. Neoclassical tearing modes in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1988-08-01

    Linear tearing instability is studied in the banana collisionality regime in tokamak geometry. Neoclassical effects produce significant modifications of Ohm's law and the vorticity equation so that the growth rate of tearing modes driven by Δ' is dramatically reduced compared to the usual resistive MHD value. Consequences of this result, regarding the presence of pressure-gradient-driven neoclassical resistive interchange instabilities and the evolution of magnetic islands in the Rutherford regime, are discussed. 10 refs

  9. Thermal effects on tearing mode saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.; Chu, M.S.; Greene, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of geometry on tearing modes, saturated states of tearing modes, and the thermal effect on tearing modes are presented. The configuration of current and magnetic fields are quite different in slabs and in Tokamaks. However, for any magnetic island regardless of geometry and heating conditions, at island saturation the product of resistivity and current is the same at magnetic O and X lines. The temperature perturbation effect on the nonlinear development of tearing modes is investigated. Thermal conduction along the field lines is much faster than that in the perpendicular direction, and thus the temperature profile follows the island structure. Utilizing Spitzer's conductivity relation, the temperature perturbation is modelled as helical components of resistivity. For a usual tearing mode unstable Tokamak, where shear is positive, the islands continue to grow to a larger size when the islands are cooled. When they are heated, the island sizes are reduced. The temperature perturbation can induce islands even for equilibria stable with respect to tearing modes. Again, the islands appear when cooling takes place. The equilibria with the cooled islands show enhanced field line stochasticity, thus enhanced heat transport. Therefore, thermal instability can be directly related to pressure disruptions. (author)

  10. Tear ferning test in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriá, Arianne P; Raposo, Ana Claudia S; Araújo, Nayone L L C; Lima, Felipe B; Masmali, Ali M

    2017-11-07

    To evaluate and compare three tear sampling methods using two grading scales for administering the tear ferning test (TFT) to healthy dogs. In total, 90 dogs (180 eyes) were subjected to tear sampling using millimetered strips, reused after the Schirmer tear test (STT) (Schirmer group, SG). Then, the dogs were subdivided into three groups according to sampling approach: micropipette (MPG), microcapillary (MCG), and Schirmer sample 2 (S2G). The collected tears were dried on a clean microscope glass slide at room temperature and humidity. The ferning patterns were observed under a polarized light microscope and classified according to the Rolando and Masmali grading scales. Although all three methods were feasible, the STT was easier to perform in clinical settings. Type I and Grade 1 were the most commonly observed (64.17% and 61.7%, respectively) regardless of collection method. There was no significant difference between the STT median values and the TFT classifications. The TFT is appropriate for dogs and can be performed using the three suggested sampling methods, with a higher frequency of Type I and Grade 1. Thus, it is possible to use both grading scales in the classification of tear ferning in dogs. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  11. Rotator cuff tear: A detailed update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear has been a known entity for orthopaedic surgeons for more than two hundred years. Although the exact pathogenesis is controversial, a combination of intrinsic factors proposed by Codman and extrinsic factors theorized by Neer is likely responsible for most rotator cuff tears. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, but the emergence of ultrasound has revolutionized the diagnostic capability. Even though mini-open rotator cuff repair is still commonly performed, and results are comparable to arthroscopic repair, all-arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear is now fast becoming a standard care for rotator cuff repair. Appropriate knowledge of pathology and healing pattern of cuff, strong and biological repair techniques, better suture anchors, and gradual rehabilitation of postcuff repair have led to good to excellent outcome after repair. As the healing of degenerative cuff tear remains unpredictable, the role of biological agents such as platelet-rich plasma and stem cells for postcuff repair augmentation is still under evaluation. The role of scaffolds in massive cuff tear is also being probed.

  12. Diet, nutraceuticals and the tear film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Nutrition disorders and their correlates such as obesity are increasingly prevalent worldwide. A number of studies to date have suggested numerous potential associations between diet and tear film health; this paper will provide a summary of the available literature. The tear film is characterized through its protein and lipid content and through clinical measurements of characteristics such as osmolarity, volume and stability. Malnutrition, protein and vitamin-A deficiencies are extremely deleterious to tear film health and supplementation with oral vitamin A in this setting is of clear benefit. The relative impact of diet on tear film within what would be considered normal ranges of consumption is less clear. A number of population studies have suggested that hyperlipidemia and a diet low in omega-3 fatty acids are risks factor for dry eye disease. Numerous studies have investigated the effectiveness of oral supplementation with antioxidants, omega-3 (e.g. fish oil and linseed oil) and omega-6 (e.g. evening primrose oil) fatty acids in the last 10 years. Taken together, these suggest a small benefit of oral supplementation on tear film volume, stability and decreased ocular symptoms in patients previously diagnosed with diseases involving the ocular surface (e.g. Sjögren's syndrome, meibomian gland dysfunction, dry eye disease) and contact lens wearers suffering from dry eye. More research is required to determine the exact composition, dosage and indications for their use and to fully characterize how these nutraceuticals modulate the tear film. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A 12-Week Exercise Therapy Program in Middle-Aged Patients With Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Roos, Ewa M.; Risberg, May Arna

    2012-01-01

    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 STUDY DESIGN: Case Series. BACKGROUND: Exercise is a viable treatment alternative to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears. No study has reported in detail type of exercises, progres......Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 STUDY DESIGN: Case Series. BACKGROUND: Exercise is a viable treatment alternative to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears. No study has reported in detail type of exercises......, progression, tolerance, and potential benefit from an exercise therapy program in these patients who have not had surgery. This study describes a progressive exercise therapy program aiming at improving neuromuscular function and muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears...... had undergone surgery. DISCUSSION: The described neuromuscular- and strength-training program should be considered for rehabilitation of middle-aged individuals with degenerative meniscus tears. Head-to-head comparison of programs in a randomized design is however needed to be able to answer...

  14. Magnetic tearing in plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkawy, W.

    1994-01-01

    A plasma focus device used is Mather type filled with hydrogen gas at pressure between 0.1 and 1 torr. When connected to a large capacitor ≤10 KV a discharge is started with peak current 100 KA. Under the influence of the radial electric field E r , due to the potential between electrodes, and B φ the plasma will drift in the axial direction with velocity cE r /B φ . An induced axial magnetic field B z has been detected which due to sheath velocity. A propagation of magnetosonic wave has been observed with velocity ≅10 3 m sec -1 . Such a wave might be excited when the magnetic pressure is much greater than the plasma kinetic pressure B 2 /8π>nKT. Assuming (MHD) to be stable, Tearing model was driven which generally has smaller growth rates than (MHD) modes. Using the designed theoretical model and the plasma parameters the electron energy dΦ/dt=Ba 2 /τ R was calculated to be 2.22 KeV, which is comparable with that detected from X-ray measurements. (author)

  15. Middle-aged patients with an MRI-verified medial meniscal tear report symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B.; Stefan Lohmander, L.; Kise, Nina Jullum

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — No consensus exists on when to perform arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since MRI and clinical tests are not accurate in detecting a symptomatic meniscal lesion, the patient’s symptoms often play a large role when deciding...... when to perform surgery. We determined the prevalence and severity of self-reported knee symptoms in patients eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy due to a degenerative meniscal tear. We investigated whether symptoms commonly considered to be related to meniscus injury were associated...... with early radiographic signs of knee osteoarthritis. Patients and methods — We included individual baseline items from the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score collected in 2 randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment for an MRI-verified degenerative medial meniscal tears in 199 patients aged...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome

  17. Quantitative analysis of tear film fluorescence and discomfort during tear film instability and thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Carolyn; Simpson, Trefford; Liu, Haixia; Salvo, Eliza; Wu, Ziwei; Bradley, Arthur; Situ, Ping

    2013-04-12

    The purpose of this study was to test the association between tear film fluorescence changes during tear break-up (TBU) or thinning and the concurrent ocular sensory response. Sixteen subjects kept one eye open as long as possible (MBI), indicated their discomfort level continuously, and rated ocular sensations of irritation, stinging, burning, pricking, and cooling using visual analog scales (VAS). Fluorescence of the tear film was quantified by a pixel-based analysis of the median pixel intensity (PI), TBU, and percentage of dark pixels (DarkPix) over time. A cutoff of 5% TBU was used to divide subjects into either break-up (BU) or minimal break-up (BUmin) groups. Tear film fluorescence decreased (median PI) and the percentage of TBU and DarkPix increased in all trials, with the rate significantly greater in the BU than the BUmin group (Mann-Whitney U test, P film thinning best explains decreasing tear film fluorescence during trials. This was highly correlated with increasing ocular discomfort, suggesting that both tear film thinning and TBU stimulate underlying corneal nerves, although TBU produced more rapid stimulation. Slow increases in tear film hyperosmolarity may cause the gradual increase in discomfort during slow tear film thinning, whereas the sharp increases in discomfort during TBU suggest a more complex stimulus.

  18. The influence of simulated rotator cuff tears on the risk for impingement in handbike and handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Schlüssel, Matthias; Arnet, Ursina; Veeger, Dirkjan

    2013-06-01

    Rotator cuff tears strongly affect the biomechanics of the shoulder joint in their role to regulate the joint contact force needed to prevent the joint from dislocation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulated progressed rotator cuff tears on the (in)stability of the glenohumeral joint and the risk for impingement during wheelchair and handbike propulsion. The Delft Shoulder and Elbow Model was used to calculate the magnitude of the glenohumeral joint reaction force and the objective function J, which is an indication of the effort needed to complete the task. Full-thickness tears were simulated by virtually removing muscles from the model. With larger cuff tears the joint reaction force was higher and more superiorly directed. Also extra muscle force was necessary to balance the external force such that the glenohumeral joint did not dislocate. A tear of only the supraspinatus leads only to a minor increase in muscle forces and a minor shift of the force on the glenoid, indicating that it is possible to function well with a torn supraspinatus muscle. A massive tear shifts the direction of the joint reaction force to the superior border of the glenoid, increasing the risk for impingement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Danish translation and validation of the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel Skin Tear Classification System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiveren, J; Bermark, S; LeBlanc, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to translate, validate and establish reliability of the International Skin Tear Classification System in Danish. METHOD: Phase 1 of the project involved the translation of the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel (ISTAP) Skin Tear Classification System......) and social and health-care assistants (non-RN) from both primary health care and a Danish university hospital in Copenhagen. Thirty photographs, with equal representation of the three types of skin tears, were selected to test validity. The photographs chosen were those originally used for internal...... and external validation by the ISTAP group. The subjects were approached in their place of work and invited to participate in the study and to attend an educational session related to skin tears. RESULTS: The Danish translation of the ISTAP classification system was tested on 270 non-wound specialists...

  20. T lymphocytes are not required for the development of fatty degeneration after rotator cuff tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, J.; Flood, M.; Harning, J.; Phan, A.; Roche, S.; Lynch, E.; Bedi, A.; Mendias, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Rotator cuff tears are among the most common and debilitating upper extremity injuries. Chronic cuff tears result in atrophy and an infiltration of fat into the muscle, a condition commonly referred to as ‘fatty degeneration’. While stem cell therapies hold promise for the treatment of cuff tears, a suitable immunodeficient animal model that could be used to study human or other xenograft-based therapies for the treatment of rotator cuff injuries had not previously been identified. Methods A full-thickness, massive supraspinatus and infraspinatus tear was induced in adult T-cell deficient rats. We hypothesised that, compared with controls, 28 days after inducing a tear we would observe a decrease in muscle force production, an accumulation of type IIB fibres, and an upregulation in the expression of genes involved with muscle atrophy, fibrosis and inflammation. Results Chronic cuff tears in nude rats resulted in a 30% to 40% decrease in muscle mass, a 23% reduction in production of muscle force, and an induction of genes that regulate atrophy, fibrosis, lipid accumulation, inflammation and macrophage recruitment. Marked large lipid droplet accumulation was also present. Conclusions The extent of degenerative changes in nude rats was similar to what was observed in T-cell competent rats. T cells may not play an important role in regulating muscle degeneration following chronic muscle unloading. The general similarities between nude and T-cell competent rats suggest the nude rat is likely an appropriate preclinical model for the study of xenografts that have the potential to enhance the treatment of chronically torn rotator cuff muscles. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:262–72. PMID:25185444

  1. Water-evaporation reduction by duplex films: application to the human tear film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretani, Colin F; Ho, Nghia H; Radke, C J

    2013-09-01

    Water-evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films is especially important to understand the physiology of the human tear film. Secreted lipids, called meibum, form a duplex film that coats the aqueous tear film and purportedly reduces tear evaporation. Lipid-layer deficiency is correlated with the occurrence of dry-eye disease; however, in-vitro experiments fail to show water-evaporation reduction by tear-lipid duplex films. We review the available literature on water-evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films and outline the theoretical underpinnings of spreading and evaporation kinetics that govern behavior of these systems. A dissolution-diffusion model unifies the data reported in the literature and identifies dewetting of duplex films into lenses as a key challenge to obtaining significant evaporation reduction. We develop an improved apparatus for measuring evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films including simultaneous assessment of film coverage, stability, and temperature, all under controlled external mass transfer. New data reported in this study fit into the larger body of work conducted on water-evaporation reduction by duplex-oil films. Duplex-oil films of oxidized mineral oil/mucin (MOx/BSM), human meibum (HM), and bovine meibum (BM) reduce water evaporation by a dissolution-diffusion mechanism, as confirmed by agreement between measurement and theory. The water permeability of oxidized-mineral-oil duplex films agrees with those reported in the literature, after correction for the presence of mucin. We find that duplex-oil films of bovine and human meibum at physiologic temperature reduce water evaporation only 6-8% for a 100-nm film thickness pertinent to the human tear film. Comparison to in-vivo human tear-evaporation measurements is inconclusive because evaporation from a clean-water surface is not measured and because the mass-transfer resistance is not characterized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Energetic approach for ductile tearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, St.

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on ductile crack initiation and propagation. It aims to propose an approach for the engineer allowing the prediction of the evolution of cracks in large scale components, from parameters determined on laboratory specimens. A crack initiation criterion, defining a J i tenacity related to crack tip blunting proposed in the literature is validated in the study. This criterion is shown to be transferable from laboratory specimens to structures. The literature review shows that an approach based on the dissipated energy in the fracture process during propagation offers an economical and simple solution to simulate large crack growth. A numerical method is proposed to estimate this fracture energy. The existence of an energy parameter G fr is shown, by simulating the propagation by the simultaneous release of several elements and by the use of the Rice integral with an original integration path. This parameter represents the needed energy for a unit crack extension and appears to be intrinsic to the material. A global energy statement allows to relate this parameter to a variation of the plastic part of J integral. It offers a second numerical method to simulate the propagation just from stationary numerical calculations, as well as the elaboration of a simplified method. This approach, using two parameters J i and G fr , intrinsic to the material and experimentally measurable on specimens, is validated on many tests such as crack pipes subjected to four points bending and cracked rings in compression. For example, this approach allows to model up to 90 mm ductile tearing in a pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack in ferritic steel, or to anticipate the evolution of a semi-elliptical crack in an aged austenitic ferritic steel plate subjected to bending. (author)

  3. Do Lipids Retard the Evaporation of the Tear Fluid?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantamaki, A. H.; Javanainen, M.; Vattulainen, I.

    2012-01-01

    phosphatidylcholine (PC), nonpolar cholesteryl ester, triglycerides, and wax ester (WE). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and interfacial shear rheometry (ISR) were used to assess the lateral structure and shear stress response of the lipid layers, respectively. RESULTS. Olive oil and long-chain alcohol decreased......PURPOSE. We examined in vitro the potential evaporation-retarding effect of the tear film lipid layer (TFLL). The artificial TFLL compositions used here were based on the present knowledge of TFLL composition. METHODS. A custom-built system was developed to measure evaporation rates at 35 degrees C....... Lipids were applied to an air-water interface, and the evaporation rate through the lipid layer was defined as water loss from the interface. A thick layer of olive oil and a monolayer of long-chain alcohol were used as controls. The artificial TFLLs were composed of 1 to 4 lipid species: polar...

  4. A case of recurrent bloody tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karslıoğlu Ş

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Şafak Karslioğlu1, Ilke Bahçeci Şimşek2, Müslime Akbaba11Ìstanbul Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery and Ocular Oncology Center, 2Ophthalmology Department, Medicine Hospital, Ìstanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Well-known causes of blood-tinged epiphora are conjunctival lesions, tumors of the lacrimal apparatus, and systemic bleeding disorders. We describe an unusual patient who presented with recurrent episodes of bloody tearing which began following an erythema multiforme-like drug eruption. He experienced chronic conjunctivitis which resulted in a few minor symblephara. One year later, the patient developed attacks of bloody tearing. All clinical, radiologic, and laboratory investigations related to bloody epiphora were within normal limits except for a mild, nonspecific chronic inflammatory reaction in the perivascular tissues of the lacrimal gland and orbital soft tissues. Also, an increase in vascular permeability and contrast extravasation on carotid angiography was detected. High-dose vitamin C was administered. The patient continued to have unilateral bloody tears intermittently for two years, but the episodes became much less frequent and had resolved by three years. It is conceivable that increased vascular permeability following the systemic inflammatory process could have played a role in the etiology of recurrent bloody tears in this atypical patient.Keywords: bloody tears, erythema multiforme, drug eruption, vitamin C

  5. Allergy and allergic mediators in tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The identification of inflammatory mediators in the tear fluid have been extensively used in ocular allergy to find either a 'disease marker', to better understand the immune mechanisms involved in the ocular surface inflammation, or to identify potential targets for therapeutic interventions. While the clinical characteristics allow a relatively convincing diagnosis of ocular allergic diseases, in the initial, non active phases, or in the chronic stages, the diagnosis may not be clear. Although not highly specific, total tear IgE can be measured with local tests by inserting a paper strip in the lower meniscus. The measurement of tear specific inflammatory markers, such as histamine, tryptase, ECP, IL-4, IL-5 and eotaxin, may be useful for the diagnosis or monitoring ocular allergy. New technologies such as multiplex bead assays, membrane-bound antibody array and proteomic techniques can characterize the distribution of a wide range of bioactive trace proteins in tears. Dozens of mediators, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, angiogenic modulators, enzymes and inhibitors were thus identified in small tear samples using these techniques, providing the possible identification of specific biomarker for either specific disease or disease activity. However, to date, there is no a single specific laboratory test suitable for the diagnosis and monitoring of allergic conjunctivitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-linear numerical studies of the tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnack, D.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A non-linear, time dependent, hydromagnetic model is developed and applied to the tearing mode, one of a class of instabilities which can occur in a magnetically confined plasma when the constraint of infinite conductivity is relaxed. The model is based on the eight partial differential equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The equations are expressed as a set of conservation laws which conserves magnetic flux, momentum, mass, and total energy. These equations are then written in general, orthogonal, curvilinear coordinates in two space dimensions, so that the model can readily be applied to a variety of geometries. No assumption about the ordering of terms is made. The resulting equations are then solved by the method of finite differences on an Eulerian mesh. The model is applied to several geometries

  7. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan; Christensen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology...... of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus...... lesion and mild/no knee osteoarthritis, is greater after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than following sham surgery....

  8. Plate Tearing Under Mixed Mode Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rasmus Grau; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Felter, Christian Lotz

    2016-01-01

    the mesh cannot accurately capture the localization process that precedes ductile failure. To fertilize accurate predictions of such sheet tearing, the energy dissipated during localization must, therefore, be accounted for in the cohesive traction-separation law. The fact is that the local thinning...... that takes place in front of an advancing crack can significantly enhance the crack growth resistanceas the energy going into thinning the sheet typically dominates the total fracture energy.This has been investigated in great details for the case of pure Mode I tearing and both the energy dissipation, peak...... stress, and shape of the cohesive traction-separation law have been laid out. In a similar fashion, the present study resolves the sequence of failure details related to steady-state sheet tearing under mixed mode loading by employing the micro-mechanics based Gurson model. But, the fracture process...

  9. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Hallie E.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  10. Bilateral Giant Retinal Tear and Sequential Vitrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mushawiahti; Roufail Franzco, Edward

    2017-01-01

    To describe the excellent outcome of surgery for bilateral giant retinal tears (GRTs) with better options of endotamponade. This is a case report of a 62-year-old man who presented with bilateral GRTs and associated retinal detachment. The tear in the right eye was supero-temporal and silicone oil was used as an endotamponade. The tear in the left eye was infero-temporal and perfluorocarbon liquid was used as an endotamponade. The outcome at 6 months after surgery was excellent with visual acuities of 6/6 in both eyes. Improved availability of endotamponade agents allows repair of bilateral GRTs to be done at the same time, with good surgical outcomes.

  11. Surgical Versus Nonsurgical Management of Rotator Cuff Tears: Predictors of Treatment Allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Christopher; Gagnier, Joel J; Robbins, Christopher B; Bedi, Asheesh; Carpenter, James E; Miller, Bruce S

    2015-10-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common shoulder disorder resulting in significant disability to patients and financial burden on the health care system. While both surgical and nonsurgical management are accepted treatment options, there is a paucity of data to support a treatment algorithm for care providers. Defining variables to guide treatment allocation may be important for patient education and counseling, as well as to deliver the most efficient care plan at the time of presentation. To identify independent variables at the time of initial clinical presentation that are associated with preferred allocation to surgical versus nonsurgical management for patients with known full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Case control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 196 consecutive adult patients with known full-thickness rotator cuff tears were enrolled into a prospective cohort study. Robust data were collected for each subject at baseline, including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), shoulder activity score, smoking status, size of cuff tear, duration of symptoms, functional comorbidity index, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index (WORC), and the Veterans Rand 12-Item Health Survey (VR-12). Logistic regression was performed to identify variables associated with treatment allocation, and the corresponding odds ratios were calculated. Of the 196 patients enrolled, 112 underwent surgical intervention and 84 nonoperative management. With covariates controlled for, significant baseline patient characteristics predictive of eventual allocation to surgical treatment included younger age, lower BMI, and durations of symptoms less than 1 year. Increasing age, higher BMI, and duration of symptoms longer than 1 year were predictive of nonsurgical treatment. Factors that were not associated with treatment allocation included sex, tear size, functional comorbidity score, or any of the patient-derived outcome scores at presentation

  12. Meniscal Tear Film Fluid Dynamics Near Marx’s Line

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.; Breward, C. J. W.; Gaffney, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity

  13. Introduction to the linear theory of tearing instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1978-02-01

    The reasons why tearing instabilities might bear importantly on tokamak performance are considered. The mechanism of tearing is described and the method by which this mechanism is analyzed is outlined. A survey is given of typical growth rate predictions

  14. Use of MR arthrography in detecting tears of the ligamentum teres with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Gill, Corey M.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Simeone, Frank J.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, Joseph C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To demonstrate the normal appearance of the ligamentum teres on MR arthrography (MRA) and evaluate the accuracy of MRA in detecting ligamentum teres tears with arthroscopic correlation. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained with a waiver for informed consent because of the retrospective study design. A total of 165 cases in 159 patients (111 females, 48 males; mean age 41 ± 12 years) who underwent both MRA and hip arthroscopy were evaluated for appearance of the ligamentum teres, including the size, number of bundles, and ligamentum teres tears. Marrow edema of the fovea capitis adjacent to the ligamentum teres insertion and the presence of hip plicae were also recorded. The mean thickness and length of the ligamentum teres were 3.5 ± 1.5 mm and 25.2 ± 3.8 mm, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and accuracy of MRA for the detection of ligamentum teres tears were 78, 97, 74, 97, and 95 %, respectively. MRA is an accurate method to evaluate the normal morphology and to detect tears of the ligamentum teres. (orig.)

  15. Linear growth rates of resistive tearing modes with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, L. N.; Ma, Z. W.

    2014-01-01

    The tearing instability with sub-Alfvénic streaming flow along the external magnetic field is investigated using resistive MHD simulation. It is found that the growth rate of the tearing mode instability is larger than that without the streaming flow. With the streaming flow, there exist two Alfvén resonance layers near the central current sheet. The larger perturbation of the magnetic field in two closer Alfvén resonance layers could lead to formation of the observed cone structure and can largely enhance the development of the tearing mode for a narrower streaming flow. For a broader streaming flow, a larger separation of Alfvén resonance layers reduces the magnetic reconnection. The linear growth rate decreases with increase of the streaming flow thickness. The growth rate of the tearing instability also depends on the plasma beta (β). When the streaming flow is embedded in the current sheet, the growth rate increases with β if β  s , but decreases if β > β s . The existence of the specific value β s can be attributed to competition between the suppressing effect of β and the enhancing effect of the streaming flow on the magnetic reconnection. The critical value β s increases with increase of the streaming flow strength

  16. Solute Dynamics and Imaging in the Tear Film on an Eye-shaped Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R. J.; Li, Longfei; Henshaw, William; Driscoll, Tobin; King-Smith, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    The concentration of ions in the tear film (osmolarity) is a key variable in understanding dry eye symptoms and disease, yet its global distribution is not available; direct measurements are restricted to a region near the temporal canthus. It has been suggested that imaging methods that use solutes such as fluorescein can be used as a proxy for estimating the osmolarity. The concentration of fluorescein is not measured directly either but the intensity as a function of concentration and thickness of the film is well established. We derived a mathematical model that couples multiple solutes and fluid dynamics within the tear film on a 2D eye-shaped domain. The model includes the physical effects of evaporation, surface tension, viscosity, ocular surface wettability, osmolarity, osmosis, fluorescence and tear fluid supply and drainage. We solved the governing system of coupled nonlinear PDEs using the Overture computational framework developed at LLNL, together with a hybrid time stepping scheme (using variable step BDF and RKC). Results of our numerical simulations provide new insight about the osmolarity distribution and its connection with images obtained in vivo over the whole ocular surface and in local regions of tear thinning due to evaporation and other effects. This work was supported in part by NSF grants 1022706 and 1412085, and NIH grant 1R01EY021794.

  17. Superior labrum anterior-to-posterior tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, Jonathan C; Omid, Reza

    2012-12-01

    The patient was a 25-year-old male college student with a chief complaint of right shoulder pain. The patient was initially diagnosed with bicipital tendinitis by his physician and had been treated for 4 weeks by a physical therapist. However, his symptoms did not improve and he was unable to return to his preinjury activity levels, so he sought the services of another physical therapist for a second opinion. Due to concern for a labrum tear, the physical therapist referred the patient to an orthopaedic surgeon. Magnetic resonance arthrography revealed findings consistent with a superior labrum anterior-to-posterior tear.

  18. Botulinum toxin is detrimental to repair of a chronic rotator cuff tear in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilotra, Mohit; Nguyen, Thao; Christian, Matthew; Davis, Derik; Henn, R Frank; Hasan, Syed Ashfaq

    2015-08-01

    Re-tear continues to be a problem after rotator cuff repair. Intramuscular botulinum toxin (Botox) injection can help optimize tension at the repair site to promote healing but could have an adverse effect on the degenerated muscle in a chronic tear. We hypothesized that Botox injection would improve repair characteristics without adverse effect on the muscle in a chronic rotator cuff tear model. The supraspinatus tendon of both shoulders in 14 rabbits underwent delayed repair 12 weeks after transection. One shoulder was treated with intramuscular Botox injection and the other with a saline control injection. Six weeks after repair, outcomes were based on biomechanics, histology, and magnetic resonance imaging. Botox-treated repairs were significantly weaker (2.64 N) than control repairs (5.51 N, p = 0.03). Eighty percent of Botox-treated repairs and 40% of control repairs healed with some partial defect. Fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus was present in all shoulders (Goutallier Grade 3 or 4) but was increased in the setting of Botox. This study provides additional support for the rabbit supraspinatus model of chronic cuff tear, showing consistent fatty infiltration. Contrary to our hypothesis, Botox had a negative effect on repair strength and might increase fatty infiltration. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fracture toughness of partially welded joints of SUS316 stainless steel at 4 K by large bend tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, A.; Tobler, R.L.; Tamura, H.; Imagawa, S.; Mito, T.; Yamamoto, J.; Motojima, O.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, S.

    1996-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels in relatively thick sections are specified in support structure designs for huge superconducting magnets in fusion energy machines such as the Large Helical Device (LHD). In the LHD under construction at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, partial welding of SUS 316 stainless steel is employed to fabricate the 100-mm thick coil can and coil support structures. Partial welding lowers the heat input and reduces residual deformation after welding. The main disadvantage is that a sizable crack-like defect remains embedded in the unwelded portion of the primary structural component. Here, SUS 316 stainless steel bars were partially welded and tested in 3-point bending to evaluate the effect of natural cracks on fusion zone toughness at 4 K. The specimens had a cross-section 87.5 mm x 175 mm and were fractured in liquid helium using a 10 MN cryogenic mechanical testing machine. In two tests, unstable fracture occurred at maximum load and at critical stress intensity factors K max = 227 and 228 MPa√m. Results indicate a high resistance to fracture initiation but no stable tearing. Therefore, no resistance to crack propagation may exist in a fusion zone at a weld root under cryogenic temperature

  20. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Iman M; Khalil, Noha M; El-Gendy, Heba A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P = 0.002), with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive correlation was found between tear film volume and stability. Conclusion. Diabetes affects the tear film in various ways. Diabetics should be examined for dry eye signs even in absence of symptoms which may be masked by associated neuropathy. Duration of diabetes has an impact on tear film status.

  1. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman M. Eissa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P=0.002, with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive correlation was found between tear film volume and stability. Conclusion. Diabetes affects the tear film in various ways. Diabetics should be examined for dry eye signs even in absence of symptoms which may be masked by associated neuropathy. Duration of diabetes has an impact on tear film status.

  2. Quasi-linear evolution of tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellat, R.; Frey, M.; Tagger, M.

    1983-07-01

    The growth of a Tearing instability in Rutherford's nonlinear regime is investigated. Using a singular perturbation technique, lowest order Rutherford's result is recovered. To the following order it is shown that the mode generates a quasi-linear deformation of the equilibrium flux profile, whose resistive diffusion slows down the growth and shows the possibility of a saturation of the instability

  3. Simulation of saturated tearing modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Canh N.; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2004-01-01

    A quasi-linear model, which includes the effect of the neoclassical bootstrap current, is developed for saturated tearing modes in order to compute magnetic island widths in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas with arbitrary aspect ratio and cross-sectional shape. The model is tested in a simple stand-alone code and is implemented in the BALDUR [C. E. Singer et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 275 (1982)] predictive modeling code. It is found that the widths of tearing mode islands increase with decreasing aspect ratio and with increasing elongation. Also, the island widths increase when the gradient of the current density increases at the edge of the islands and when the current density inside the islands is suppressed, such as the suppression caused by the near absence of the bootstrap current within the islands. In simulations of tokamak discharges, it is found that tearing mode island widths oscillate in time in response to periodic sawtooth crashes. The local enhancements in the transport produced by magnetic islands have a noticeable effect on global plasma confinement in simulations of low aspect ratio, high beta tokamaks, where saturated tearing mode islands can occur with widths that are greater than 15% of the plasma minor radius

  4. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    To compare, in young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, the mid-term (five year) patient reported and radiographic outcomes between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  5. Glenohumeral stability in simulated rotator cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Helm, F.C.; Rozing, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears disrupt the force balance in the shoulder and the glenohumeral joint in particular, resulting in compromised arm elevation torques. The trade-off between glenohumeral torque and glenohumeral stability is not yet understood. We hypothesize that compensation of lost abduction torque

  6. Acute compartment syndrome after medial gastrocnemius tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Yan Kit; Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-02-01

    Acute compartment syndrome after medial gastrocnemius tear is very rare. It can involve the superficial posterior compartment alone or progress to involve all the 4 compartments of the lower legs. Those patients with high pain tolerance and minor trauma can lead to delayed presentation. Immediate fasciotomy is the treatment of choice. Therapeutic Level IV, Case Study. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. Simultaneous acute rotator cuff tear and distal biceps rupture in a strongman competitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael S

    2010-04-01

    Acute rotator cuff tear is commonly associated with tearing of the proximal biceps tendon, but has never been reported to occur simultaneously with a distal biceps tendon rupture. A 38-year-old right-hand-dominant strongman competitor attempted a 300-pound overhead axle press and experienced immediate pain in the right shoulder and elbow. He had no known systemic risk factors for tendon ruptures including hyperparathyroidism, hemodialysis, alcoholism, rheumatoid arthritis, statin medications, fluoroquinolones, and steroid use.Right shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a full-thickness supraspinatus tear with 3 cm of retraction. There was minimal fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus on the sagittal cuts consistent with acute rupture. The subscapularis was intact. The long head of the biceps tendon had mild medial subluxation but was completely within the bicipital groove. Right elbow MRI showed a complete distal biceps tendon rupture. Thirteen days after his injury, the patient underwent arthroscopic supraspinatus repair and proximal biceps tenodesis. Distal biceps tendon repair was performed using the modified 2-incision muscle-splitting technique. At 24-month follow-up, the patient was pain free and had returned to full activity including weightlifting but had not returned to strongman competition.This is the first report of simultaneous acute full thickness ruptures of the rotator cuff and distal biceps tendon. This case report underscores the importance of a complete physical examination and a high index of suspicion for additional concomitant injuries, particularly in athletes with unusually high stresses to the body. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Radiographic diagnosis of rotator cuff tear based on the supraspinatus muscle radiodensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallenberg, B.; Rommens, J.; Metens, T.; Gevenois, P.A.; Legrand, C.; De Maertelaer, V.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the supraspinatus muscle radiodensity on the outlet view as an indication of a tendon tear.Design and patients. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were obtained on both shoulders of 40 subjects aged 23-70 years, including 13 asymptomatic volunteers and 27 patients. Two readers analyzed the superior contour and the heterogeneity of the supraspinatus muscle radiodensity and compared them with the MRI findings.Results and conclusion. Significant concordances (P<0.001) were found between the assessments of the superior contour and the heterogeneity of the muscle radiodensity, respectively, on plain radiographs and MR images. For the diagnosis of a full-thickness tear, the analysis of the superior contour and the heterogeneity of the muscle radiodensity reached an accuracy of 85% and 80% respectively. Stepwise discriminant analyses showed low to moderate benefit of considering the contour and the heterogeneity simultaneously. The inter- and intraobserver agreement ranged from moderate to good. We conclude that on the outlet view, modifications in the superior contour and heterogeneity of the supraspinatus muscle radiodensity suggest a full-thickness tear. (orig.)

  9. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David [Department of Radiology, Neuroimaging Institute, 27 East Hibiscus Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  10. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David

    2002-01-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  11. The Tear Osmolarity Changes After Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Öncel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To determine the tear osmolarity changes in patients who had undergone phacoemulsification surgery. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Tear osmolarity measurements were performed in 30 eyes of 30 patients who had undergone cataract surgery without any complication. Measurements were performed before surgery and consecutively at 1st month, 3rd month, and 6th month after the surgery. TearLab osmometer (TearLab Corporation, San Diego, CA, USA device was used for the measurements and paired ttest was used for statistical analysis. Re sults: The mean age of the patients was 72.3±3.7 (67-78 years. Thirteen patients were men and 17 patients were women. The mean osmolarity values were 305.8±6.5 mOsm/L before the surgery and 312.3±6.4 mOsm/L at 1st month, 307.5±5.1 mOsm/L at 3rd month and 305.1±5.7 at 6th month after the surgery. The difference between the values before surgery and at 1st month was found statistically significant (p=0.001. Dis cus si on: The tear osmolarity increases at the first month after surgery but decreases to the levels measured before surgery at the 3rd month. The increase at the first month may be due to the corneal incisions and medication used after the surgery. We think that we have to take into account this similarity increase in all cataract patients, especially in those who also have dry eye disease. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 35-7

  12. [Alterations in tears aqueous layer during cytostatics treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Katarzyna; Wieckowska-Szakiel, Marzena; Rózalska, Barbara; Jurowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate tears secretion, pH and lysozyme activity in tears aqueous layer during chemotherapy in lung, breast and bowel cancer. 36 patients were enrolled to the study. Depending on the type of cancer and type of chemotherapy patients were divided into three groups. Group I (12 patients) diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with PE schema (cisplatin, etoposide), Group II (12 patients) with breast cancer treated with FAC schema (fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide), Group III (12 patients) with bowel cancer treated with FU/LV schema (fluorouracil, leucovorin). In all the patients: Schirmer's I test, pH measurements and lysozyme test were performed. Patients were examined before chemotherapy, after 2nd, 4th, 6th cycle. In group I and II lowering of tears secretion (p tears secretion (p tears film in all groups (p tears aqueous layer causing alterations of tears secretions. PH alterations depending on type of chemotherapy was observed. Lowering of lysozyme activity in tears was observed. All the deteriorations aggravate with duration of chemotherapy. Alterations of tears film parameters during chemotherapy may influence upon eye surface homeostasis and infectious complication. tears aqueous layer, Schirmer's test, lysozyme activity, tears pH.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dfouni, N.; Garcia, J.; Kindynis, Ph.; Bosson, D.

    1997-01-01

    To define MR signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears and evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of this technique. Retrospective study of 30 patients with a meniscal bucket-handle tear and 30 with a different type of tear, all proven by arthroscopy. The following MR signs of a bucket-handle tear were evaluated: 'separate meniscal fragment, 'double posterior cruciate ligament', 'snake sign' and 'double anterior horn'. A correct diagnosis of a bucket-handle tear was only made in 18/30 of patients. Several of the MR signs were seen in the same patient in 17 cases. A double posterior cruciate ligament was present only in cases of medial meniscus tears. The 12 menisci without these signs, and therefore not diagnosed as bucket-handle tears, were all classified as meniscal tears on the basis of signal extending to the meniscal surface. Nine of these were not displaced into the inter-condylar notch at arthroscopy. The interobserver agreement was excellent: kappa 0.88. The diagnosis of a bucket-handle meniscal tear, if it is displaced, can be made when one or more of the four MR evaluated signs are present. Other forms of meniscal tears are only exceptionally diagnosed as bucket-handle tears. (authors)

  14. Standard test method for dynamic tear testing of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the dynamic tear (DT) test using specimens that are 3/16 in. to 5/8 in. (5 mm to 16 mm) inclusive in thickness. 1.2 This test method is applicable to materials with a minimum thickness of 3/16 in. (5 mm). 1.3 The pressed-knife procedure described for sharpening the notch tip generally limits this test method to materials with a hardness level less than 36 HRC. Note 1—The designation 36 HRC is a Rockwell hardness number of 36 on Rockwell C scale as defined in Test Methods E 18. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. MRI on the tear of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yoko; Sasaki, Taisuke; Sasaki, Yukio; Nishi, Naoko; Yodono, Hiraku; Takekawa, Shoichi; Toh, Satoshi; Harata, Seikou (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-07-01

    MRI of the wrist joints in the normal volunteers and patients with triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injury was performed and usefulness of MRI of TFC injury was discussed. Small FOV and thin slice thickness were selected. Normal TFCs were shown as low signal intensity areas. Injury of TFC was demonstrated as increased signal intensity areas. Diagnosis of TFC injury should be made after considering their ages and symptoms because TFC shows degenerative change with aging. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in the detection of TFC tears were 80.0%, 81.8% and 81.0% respectively. MRI is considered to be a non-invasive good modality to demonstrate TFC tears. (author).

  16. Effect of Exercise Therapy Compared with Arthroscopic Surgery on Knee Muscle Strength and Functional Performance in Middle-Aged Patients with Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a 12-wk exercise therapy program and arthroscopic partial meniscectomy on knee strength and functional performance in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears. DESIGN: A total of 82 patients (mean age, 49 yrs; 35% women......) with a symptomatic, unilateral, magnetic resonance imaging-verified degenerative meniscus tear and no or mild radiographic osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to a supervised neuromuscular and strength exercise program or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Outcomes assessed 3 mos after intervention initiation were...

  17. A systematic review and comprehensive classification of pectoralis major tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMaraghy, Amr W; Devereaux, Moira W

    2012-03-01

    Reported descriptions of pectoralis major (PM) injury are often inconsistent with the actual musculotendinous morphology. The literature lacks an injury classification system that is consistently applied and accurately reflects surgically relevant anatomic injury patterns, making meaningful comparison of treatment techniques and outcomes difficult. Published cases of PM injury between 1822 and 2010 were analyzed to identify incidence and injury patterns and the extent to which these injuries fit into a classification category. Recent work outlining the 3-dimensional anatomy of the PM muscle and tendon, as well as biomechanical studies of PM muscle segments, were reviewed to identify the aspects of musculotendinous anatomy that are clinically and surgically relevant to injury classification. We identified 365 cases of PM injury, with 75% occurring in the last 20 years; of these, 83% were a result of indirect trauma, with 48% occurring during weight-training activities. Injury patterns were not classified in any consistent way in timing, location, or tear extent, particularly with regard to affected muscle segments contributing to the PM's bilaminar tendon. A contemporary injury classification system is proposed that includes (1) injury timing (acute vs chronic), (2) injury location (at the muscle origin or muscle belly, at or between the musculotendinous junction and the tendinous insertion, or bony avulsion), and (3) standardized terminology addressing tear extent (anterior-to-posterior thickness and complete vs incomplete width) to more accurately reflect the musculotendinous morphology of PM injuries and better inform surgical management, rehabilitation, and research. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of suprascapular neuropathy with rotator cuff tendon tears and fatty degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lewis L; Boykin, Robert E; Lin, Albert; Warner, Jon J P

    2014-03-01

    The mutual influence of suprascapular neuropathy (SSN) and rotator cuff tendon tears on muscle pathology is unclear. Debate continues as to how retracted cuff tears can lead to SSN and whether SSN or tendon retraction causes muscle fatty degeneration. A cohort of 87 patients suspected of having SSN was identified from a prospectively collected registry. All underwent electromyography/nerve conduction velocity study (EMG/NCV) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their shoulders. EMG/NCVs were performed and interpreted by electrodiagnosticians, and MRI cuff tendon quality and muscle fatty degeneration were interpreted by two surgeons. Out of 87 patients, 32 patients had SSN on EMG/NCV, and 55 patients had normal suprascapular nerve. MRI showed that 59 of 87 supraspinatus had no fatty degeneration or mild fatty streaks (Goutallier grades 0 and 1), and 28 patients had significant fatty degeneration (grades 2-4); infraspinatus fatty degeneration was similar. Review of supraspinatus tendon showed 41 patients with intact tendons or partial tears, and 46 with full tears. Infraspinatus tendons pathology was similar. Tendon pathology and fatty degeneration were related (P-valuetears were associated with SSN (P = .01), but SSN was not related to fatty degeneration of either supraspinatus or infraspinatus (P-values .65, .54). The exact association and etiology of SSN in patients with rotator cuff pathology remain unclear. SSN is correlated to tendon tear size, but it does not have significant influence on fatty degeneration of either supraspinatus or infraspinatus. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antioxidant content and ultraviolet absorption characteristics of human tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Camus Kar Man; Cho, Pauline; Benzie, Iris F F

    2011-04-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a common age-related disorder, and decreased antioxidant/ultraviolet (UV) radiation protection in tears may be part of the cause. This study aimed to compare the tear antioxidant content and flow rate in young and older adults. The total antioxidant content and UV absorbing properties of various commercially available ophthalmic solutions used to alleviate dry eye symptoms were also examined. Minimally stimulated tears were collected from 120 healthy Chinese adults with no ocular pathology. Two age groups were studied: 19 to 29 years (n = 58) and 50 to 75 years (n = 62). Tear samples from each subject and 13 ophthalmic solutions were analyzed for total antioxidant content (as the Ferric Reducing/Antioxidant Power value). Tear flow rates were estimated from time taken to collect a fixed volume of tear fluid. UV absorbance spectra of pooled fresh reflex tear fluid and the ophthalmic solutions were determined. Results showed that the antioxidant content of minimally stimulated tears from older subjects (398 ± 160 μmol/l) was not significantly lower than that of younger subjects (348 ± 159 μmol/l; p = 0.0915). However, there was a significant difference in the tear flow rates between the two groups (p tears. The effect of low flow rate on the dynamic antioxidant supply to the corneal surface indicates that older subjects have poorer overall defense against photooxidative and other oxidative processes. This could predispose older persons to corneal stress and development of dry eye syndrome. The commercially available artificial tears tested lack both the antioxidant content and UV absorbing characteristics of natural tears. Artificial tears formulations that help restore natural antioxidant and UV absorbing properties to the tear film of the aging eye may help prevent or improve dry eye symptoms and promote ocular health.

  20. Comparison of CT and MRI in patients with tibial plateau fracture: can CT findings predict ligament tear or meniscal injury?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mui, Leonora W.; Engelsohn, Eliyahu; Umans, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    (1) To determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of ligament tear and avulsion in patients with tibial plateau fracture. (2) To evaluate whether the presence or severity of fracture gap and articular depression can predict meniscal injury. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist retrospectively reviewed knee CT and MRI examinations of 41 consecutive patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with tibial plateau fractures. Fracture gap, articular depression, ligament tear and footprint avulsions were assessed on CT examinations. The MRI studies were examined for osseous and soft tissue injuries, including meniscal tear, meniscal displacement, ligament tear, and ligament avulsion. CT demonstrated torn ligaments with 80% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Only 2% of ligaments deemed intact on careful CT evaluation had partial or complete tears on MRI. Although the degree of fracture gap and articular depression was significantly greater in patients with meniscal injury compared with those without meniscal injury, ROC analysis demonstrated no clear threshold for gap or depression that yielded a combination of high sensitivity and specificity. In the acute setting, CT offers high sensitivity and specificity for depicting osseous avulsions, as well as high negative predictive value for excluding ligament injury. However, MRI remains necessary for the preoperative detection of meniscal injury. (orig.)

  1. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old......) with a suspected degenerative medial meniscal tear participated in this study. Three dimensional knee biomechanics were assessed on the injured and contralateral leg before and three months after APM. The visual analogue scale was used to assess knee pain and the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score was used...

  2. An engineering interpretation of pop-in arrest and tearing arrest in terms of static crack arrest, Ksub(Ia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    When fracture toughness specimens are tested under displacement controlled conditions, they are often observed to exhibit unstable cleavage fracture followed by arrest of the cleavage mode wherein a significant load remains on the specimen (pop-in arrest). This behavior carries over into the ductile tearing regime wherein tearing may occur rapidly identified by load reduction and then proceeds at a discernible less rate (tearing arrest). Both these behaviors represent an initiation condition followed by an arrest condition. In this paper it is demonstrated that from either of the arrest conditions an arrest value may be determined which, for available experimental data, is shown to be an engineering estimate for the static crack arrest toughness, Ksub(Ia). A data analysis procedure is outlined and Ksub(Ic) and Ksub(Ia) estimates from sixty-eight 1/2, 1 and 2 in. thick compact specimens from two steels (A533 Grade B Class 1 and AISI 1018) tested between -40 deg F and 200 deg F are summarized. The crack arrest estimates are seen to compare favorably with Ksub(Ia) results obtained by other investigators using 2 in. thick specimens. Also it is demonstrated that when failure is by fully ductile tearing, the crack arrest toughness is at least equal to the estimate for Ksub(Ic) for the specimen. (author)

  3. A prospective, randomised study of a novel transforming methacrylate dressing compared with a silver-containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose dressing on partial-thickness skin graft donor sites in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan; Arnoldo, Brett; Purdue, Gary; Burris, Agnes; Skrinjar, Edda; Duschek, Nikolaus; Leaper, David J

    2015-06-01

    This prospective, randomised study compares a new transforming methacrylate dressing (TMD) with a silver-containing carboxymethylcellulose dressing (CMC-Ag) after application to split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites. This was an unblinded, non-inferiority, between-patient, comparison study that involved patients admitted to a single-centre burn unit who required two skin graft donor sites. Each patient's donor sites were covered immediately after surgery: one donor site with TMD and the other with CMC-Ag. The donor sites were evaluated until healing or until 24 days post-application, whichever came first. Study endpoints were time to healing, daily pain scores, number of dressing changes, patient comfort and physicians' and patients' willingness to use the dressings in the future. Nineteen patients had both the dressings applied. No statistically significant difference was noted in time to healing between the two dressings (14·2 days using TMD compared with 13·2 days using CMC-Ag). When pain scores were compared, TMD resulted in statistically significantly less pain at three different time periods (2-5 days, 6-10 days and 11-15 days; P < 0·001 at all time periods). Patients also reported greater comfort with TMD (P < 0·001). Users rated TMD as being less easy to use because of the time and technique required for application. Reductions in pain and increased patient comfort with the use of the TMD dressing, compared with CMC-Ag, were seen as clinical benefits as these are the major issues in donor site management. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Through thickness property variations in a thick plate AA7050 friction stir welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaday, Clinton T.; Moore, Matthew A.; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, moderately thick (32 mm) AA7050 plates were joined by friction stir welding (FSW). Various methods were used to characterize the welded joints, including nugget grain size measurements at different locations through the thickness, micro-hardness indentation through nugget, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat affected zone (HAZ) at different cross section heights, and residual stress measurement using the cut compliance method with full thickness and partial thickness specimens. All testing results are consistent with the presence of a strong gradient in peak temperature through the plate thickness during FSW.

  5. Partial Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Partial Cancellation. Full Cancellation is desirable. But complexity requirements are enormous. 4000 tones, 100 Users billions of flops !!! Main Idea: Challenge: To determine which cross-talker to cancel on what “tone” for a given victim. Constraint: Total complexity is ...

  6. Tear dysfunction and the cornea: LXVIII Edward Jackson Memorial Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2011-12-01

    To describe the cause and consequence of tear dysfunction-related corneal disease. Perspective on effects of tear dysfunction on the cornea. Evidence is presented on the effects of tear dysfunction on corneal morphology, function, and health, as well as efficacy of therapies for tear dysfunction-related corneal disease. Tear dysfunction is a prevalent eye disease and the most frequent cause for superficial corneal epithelial disease that results in corneal barrier disruption, an irregular optical surface, light scattering, optical aberrations, and exposure and sensitization of pain-sensing nerve endings (nociceptors). Tear dysfunction-related corneal disease causes irritation and visual symptoms such as photophobia and blurred and fluctuating vision that may decrease quality of life. Dysfunction of 1 or more components of the lacrimal functional unit results in changes in tear composition, including elevated osmolarity and increased concentrations of matrix metalloproteinases, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. These tear compositional changes promote disruption of tight junctions, alter differentiation, and accelerate death of corneal epithelial cells. Corneal epithelial disease resulting from tear dysfunction causes eye irritation and decreases visual function. Clinical and basic research has improved understanding of the pathogenesis of tear dysfunction-related corneal epithelial disease, as well as treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluating tear clearance rate with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaszczuk, Izabela K; Mousavi, Maryam; Cervino Exposito, Alejandro; Bartuzel, Maciej M; Montes-Micó, Robert; Iskander, D Robert

    2018-02-01

    To assess the early-phase of tear clearance rate (TCR) with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to determine the association between TCR and other clinical measures of the tear film in a group of young subjects with different levels of tear film quality. TCR was classified as the percentage decrease of subject's inferior tear meniscus height 30s after instillation of 5μl 0.9% saline solution. Fifty subjects (32F and 18M) aged (mean±standard deviation) 25.5±4.3 years volunteered for the study. It consisted of a review of medical history, Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, tear film osmolarity measurements, slit lamp examination and TCR estimation based on dynamic measurements of the lower tear meniscus with OCT. Estimates of TCR were contrasted against subject age and tear film measures commonly used for dry eye diagnosis, which includes OSDI score, fluorescein tear film break-up time (FBUT), tear meniscus height (TMH), blinking frequency, tear film osmolarity and corneal staining. The group mean TCR was 29±13% and 36±19% respectively after 30 and 60s margin after saline solution instillation. Statistically significant correlations were found between TCR and FBUT (r 2 =0.319, placrimal functional unit. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of the subject of tearing instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, P.C.

    1977-07-01

    A simple approach is taken to the mechanics of potential instability associated with the steady tearing portion of J-Integral R-curves. The analysis is developed from simple examples of structural component (or test specimen) configurations with cracks, examining their instability possibilities individually, in order to draw more general conclusions about elastic-plastic cracking instability as contrasted to linear-elastic behavior. Finally, an attempt is made to model a more local cleavage-like instability for material in the fracture process zone just ahead of a crack tip. Results are then presented of a testing program which clearly demonstrates the appropriateness of the tearing instability analysis and which illustrates its broad potential for future application, as well as presenting guidelines for its further development. The material selected for analysis was Ni-Cr-Mo-V rotor steel

  9. Saturated tearing modes in tokamaks with divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, G.

    1982-12-01

    We have developed a self-consistent theory of saturated tearing modes capable of predicting multiple magnetic island widths in tokamaks with no assumptions on the cross-sectional shape, aspect ratio, or plasma pressure. We are in the process of implementing this algorithm in the form of a computer code. We propose: (1) to complete, refine, document and publish this computer code; (2) to carry out a survey in which we vary the current profile, aspect ratio, cross-sectional shape, and pressure profile in order to determine their effect on saturated tearing mode magnetic island widths; and (3) to determine the effect of some externally applied magnetic perturbation harmonics on these magnetic island widths. Particular attention will be paid to the coupling between different helical harmonics, the effect of multiple magnetic islands on the profiles of temperature, pressure and current, and the potential of magnetic island overlap leading to a disruptive instability

  10. Stability of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1994-02-01

    The stability properties of m ≥ 2 tearing instabilities in tokamak plasmas are analyzed. A boundary layer theory is used to find asymptotic solutions to the ideal external kink equation which are used to obtain a simple analytic expression for the tearing instability parameter Δ'. This calculation generalizes previous work on this topic by considering more general toroidal equilibria (however, toroidal coupling effects are ignored). Constructions of Δ' are obtained for plasmas with finite beta and for islands that have nonzero width. A simple heuristic estimate is given for the value of the saturated island width when the instability criterion is violated. A connection is made between the calculation of the asymptotic matching parameter in the finite beta and island width case to the nonlinear analog of the Glasser effect

  11. Geometrical influences on neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, S.E.; Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of geometry on the pressure drives of nonideal magnetohydrodynamic tearing modes is presented. In order to study the effects of elongation, triangularity, and aspect ratio, three different machines are considered to provide a range of tokamak configurations: TFTR (circular), DIII-D (D-shaped), and Pegasus (extremely low aspect ratio). For large aspect ratio tokamaks, shaping does very little to influence the pressure gradient drives, while at low aspect ratios, a very strong sensitivity to the profiles is found. In particular, this sensitivity is connected to the strong dependence on the magnetic shear. This suggests that at low aspect ratio it may be possible to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes by flattening the q profile near low order rational surfaces (e.g., q = 2/1) using a combination of shaping and localized current drive, whereas at large aspect ratio it is more difficult

  12. Influence of preoperative artificial tears on tear film after phacoemulsification on dry eye of diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Su

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To discuss the artificial tears on the tear film of diabetic patients with dry eye preoperatively, and the influence on the tear film's fuctional after phacoemulsification.METHODS: Fifty-four diabetic patients with dry eye(60 eyeswere followed up before phacoemulsification. Preoperatively, group A(30 eyes in 28 caseswas treated with Hydroxyl Indican eye drops and group B(30 eyes in 26 caseswas not treated. Postoperatively, both group A and B were treated with Tobramycin Dexamethasone eye drops, Oprah Winfrey Ibuprofen eye drops and Hydroxyl Indican eye drops. Dry eye symptoms, break up time(BUT, Schirmer Ⅰ test(S Ⅰ t, fluorescein stain test(FIwere measured at 3d preoperatively, and 1, 7, 30, 90d postoperatively.RESULTS: At 3d preoperatively, there was no statistical differences between the two groups for dry eye symptoms, BUT, SⅠt, FI(P>0.05. At 1 and 7d postoperatively, there were significant statistical differents between the two groups for dry eye symptoms(PPP>0.05.CONCLUSION: Using artificial tears before phacoemulsification can improve symptoms of the diabetic patients with dry eye and accelerate the recovery of the tear film.

  13. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Majid Moshirfar,1 Kasey Pierson,2,* Kamalani Hanamaikai,3,* Luis Santiago-Caban,1 Valliammai Muthappan,1 Samuel F Passi11Department of Ophthalmology, John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 3A T Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, Mesa, AZ, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the...

  14. Nonlinear growth of strongly unstable tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1993-11-01

    Rutherford's theory of the tearing instability is extended to cases where current nonlinearities are important, such as long wavelength modes in current slabs and the m = 1 instability in tokamaks with moderately large aspect-ratios. Of particular interest is the possibility that the associated magnetic islands, as a result of secondary instabilities, have a singular response to the Ohmic diffusion of the current. A family of islands is used to test this possibility; it is found that the response remains bounded

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of muscle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Heiner, J.P.; Keene, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance scans were obtained on 17 patients with acute, subacute, or chronic muscle tears. These patients presented with complaints of persistent pain or a palpable mass. Magnetic resonance findings were characterized according to alterations in muscle shape and the presence of abnormal high signal within the injured muscle. These areas of high signal were noted on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans and were presumed to represent areas of intramuscular hemorrhage. (orig.)

  16. Small-scale tearing mode in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, N.V.

    1983-01-01

    Considerations are given on the possible effect of small-scale tearing mode with m >> 1 on the plasma electron thermal conductivity in a tokamak. The estimate of the electron thermal conductivity coefficient is obtained. Calculation results are compared with experimental data. The calculated dependence of radial distribution of electron temperature is shown to vary weakly with the tn(m 2 /m 1 ) alteration everywhere, except for the vicinity of point r approximately 0

  17. Endoscopic Gluteus Medius Repair With Concomitant Arthroscopy for Labral Tears: A Case Series With Minimum 5-Year Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Itay; Mansor, Yosif; Yuen, Leslie C; Chen, Austin W; Chaharbakhshi, Edwin O; Domb, Benjamin G

    2017-12-01

    To report the minimum 5-year outcomes of endoscopic gluteus medius repair for partial- and full-thickness tears with concomitant hip arthroscopy. Data for all patients who underwent hip arthroscopy between February 2009 and September 2011 were prospectively collected. We included patients who underwent endoscopic gluteus medius repair with concomitant arthroscopic labral treatment and for whom the following measures were obtained preoperatively and at a minimum of 5 years' follow-up: modified Harris Hip Score, Non-Arthritic Hip Score, Hip Outcome Score-Sports Specific Subscale, and visual analog scale score for pain. For included patients, the International Hip Outcome Tool-12 (iHOT-12) score and satisfaction rating were also available at latest follow-up. Patients with at least 1 of the following criteria were excluded: preoperative Tönnis osteoarthritis grade of 2 or greater, previous hip conditions, severe dysplasia, and Workers' Compensation claims. There were 16 patients eligible for inclusion, 14 (87.5%) of whom had minimum 5-year follow-up, with a mean of 68.8 months (range, 60.1-79.6 months). The study group consisted of 13 women (92.9%) and 1 man (7.1%) with a mean age at surgery of 57.4 years (range, 46.3-74.8 years). Outcome scores improved as follows: modified Harris Hip Score, from 52.4 to 81.2 (P = .004); Non-Arthritic Hip Score, from 48.0 to 82.5 (P = .002); Hip Outcome Score-Sports Specific Subscale, from 30.1 to 66.4 (P arthroscopy for labral tears is safe and shows favorable outcomes at minimum 5-year follow-up. Patient outcomes were as favorable at 5 years as they were at 2 years postoperatively. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of tear film osmolarity using the TearLab™ osmometer in normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbag, Lionel; Park, Shin Ae; Kass, Philip H; Maggs, David J; Attar, Mayssa; Murphy, Christopher J

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility of tear osmolarity measured using the TearLab ™ osmometer in normal dogs and to assess its diagnostic potential in dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Beagle dogs; six normal and five with KCS. Tear osmolarity and Schirmer tear test-1 (STT-1) values were obtained at various times. Normal dogs were assessed for diurnal variation and repeatability and reproducibility of measurements. Dogs with KCS were evaluated before and after 5 months' topical twice-daily therapy with 2% cyclosporine. Mean ± SD tear osmolarity (mOsm/L) was significantly higher in normal dogs (337.4 ± 16.2) than in dogs with KCS before therapy (306.2 ± 18.0; P dogs, tear osmolarity readings were stable during the daytime (P = 0.99). Repeated measurements revealed high variability and typically poor-to-moderate repeatability and reproducibility, although this was improved by taking three successive measurements at each session. Considering combined data from all dogs, a positive correlation existed between STT-1 and tear osmolarity measurements (Pearson's correlation test, P = 0.04, r = 0.62). Canine tear osmolarity as determined by TearLab ™ osmometer was variable, required multiple readings to be informative, and differed from values reported for humans. Dogs with KCS had a lower tear osmolarity than did normal dogs, and this increased following cyclosporine therapy. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Partial processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This discussion paper considers the possibility of applying to the recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors a particular method of partial processing based on the PUREX process but named CIVEX to emphasise the differences. The CIVEX process is based primarily on the retention of short-lived fission products. The paper suggests: (1) the recycle of fission products with uranium and plutonium in thermal reactor fuel would be technically feasible; (2) it would, however, take ten years or more to develop the CIVEX process to the point where it could be launched on a commercial scale; (3) since the majority of spent fuel to be reprocessed this century will have been in storage for ten years or more, the recycling of short-lived fission products with the U-Pu would not provide an effective means of making refabrication fuel ''inaccessible'' because the radioactivity associated with the fission products would have decayed. There would therefore be no advantage in partial processing

  20. Surgical treatment of partial biceps tendon ruptures at the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaero, David T; Mallon, William J

    2006-01-01

    We present the treatment and results of a consecutive series of 7 patients (mean age, 42.7 years) with partial ruptures of the distal biceps tendon. All injuries occurred as the result of either heavy labor or weightlifting. Diagnosis in all cases was made with magnetic resonance imaging. After failure of conservative therapy, the patients were treated with repai