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Sample records for partial thickness rotator

  1. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  2. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Matthewson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized.

  3. MRI in diagnosing partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    In this study 270 patients who had been treated for 10 years and had suspected rupture of the tendon and complete or partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff were diagnosed. Among these patients, MRI images in 50 cases were investigated to establish the diagnostic criteria for partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The rupture sites included the bursal surface in 15 shoulders, the articular surface in 30 shoulders, complicated cases of both surfaces in five shoulders with no intrasubstance. As for the imaging method, T2-weighted images were employed and the oblique coronary section, which is parallel to the scapula, was used as a imaging plane. From the results of the variation of the MRI signal intensity in the tendon, it was found that the signal intensity increased to 80% in the rupture of the bursal surface and 93.3% in the rupture of the articular surface. As for sites where the signals in the tendon increased, these were found at the bursal side in 83.3% of rupture at the bursal surface, and at the articular side in 100% of rupture at the articular surface. From these findings, the MRI-diagnostic criteria of partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff was defined as those cases which show a localized increase in signal intensity on the oblique coronary surface of T2 weighted images, but not in whole layers of the tendon. A high diagnostic rate with these criteria could be obtained with a sensitivity of 82.0%, specificity 90.9%, accuracy 84.7%, and positive predictive value 95.3%. (author)

  4. Tear progression of symptomatic full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears as measured by repeated MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Chang Kyun

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the natural course of symptomatic full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears treated non-operatively and to identify risk factors affecting tear enlargement. One hundred and twenty-two patients who received non-surgical treatment for a partial- or full-thickness supraspinatus tear were included in this study. All rotator cuff tears were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the same modality was used for follow-up studies. Follow-up MRI was performed after at least a 6-month interval. We evaluated the correlation between tear enlargement and follow-up duration. Eleven risk factors were analysed by both univariate and multivariate analyses to identify factors that affect enlargement of rotator cuff tears. The mean follow-up period was 24.4 ± 19.5 months. Out of 122 patients, 34 (27.9%) patients had an initial full-thickness tear and 88 (72.1%) patients had a partial-thickness tear. Considering all patients together, tear size increased in 51/122 (41.8%) patients, was unchanged in 65/122 (53.3%) patients, and decreased in 6/122 (4.9%) patients. Tear size increased for 28/34 (82.4%) patients with full-thickness tears and 23/88 (26.1%) patients with partial-thickness tears. From the two groups which were followed over 12 months, a higher rate of enlargement was observed in full-thickness tears than in partial-thickness tears (6-12 months, n.s.; 12-24 months, P = 0.002; over 24 months, P rotator cuff tears and 23/88 (26.1%) of symptomatic partial-thickness tears increased in size over a follow-up period of 6-100 months. Full-thickness tears showed a higher rate of enlargement than partial-thickness tears regardless of the follow-up duration. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that full-thickness tear was the most reliable risk factor for tear enlargement. The clinical relevance of these observations is that full-thickness rotator cuff tears treated conservatively should be

  5. Comparisons of the Various Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears on MR Arthrography and Arthroscopic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Young Joo

    2010-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of the various types of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by comparing the MR imaging findings with the arthroscopic findings. The series of MR arthrography studies included 202 patients consisting of 100 patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 102 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, which were reviewed in random order. At arthroscopy, 54 articularsided, 26 bursal-sided, 20 both articular- and bursal-sided partial-thickness tears were diagnosed. The MR arthrographies were analyzed by two radiologists for articular-sided tears, bursal-sided tears, and both articular- and bursal-sided tears of the rotator cuff. The sensitivity and specificity of each type of partial-thickness tears were determined. Kappa statistics was calculated to determine the interand intra-observer agreement of the diagnosis of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The sensitivity and specificity of the various types of rotator cuff tears were 85% and 90%, respectively for articular-sided tears, 62% and 95% for bursal- sided tears, as well as 45% and 99% for both articular- and bursal-sided tears. False-negative assessments were primarily observed in the diagnosis of bursal-sided tears. Conversely, both articular- and bursal-sided tears were overestimated as full-thickness tears. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the diagnosis of articular-sided tears (k = 0.70), moderate (k = 0.59) for bursal-sided tears, and fair (k = 0.34) for both articular- and bursal-sided tears, respectively. Intra-observer agreement for the interpretation of articular- and bursal-sided tears was excellent and good, respectively, whereas intra-observer agreement for both articular- and bursal-sided tears was moderate. MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, but has limitations in that it has low sensitivity in bursal- and

  6. Comparisons of the Various Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears on MR Arthrography and Arthroscopic Correlation

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    Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Young Joo [Catholic University of Korea Uijeongbu St.Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic performance of MR arthrography in the diagnosis of the various types of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by comparing the MR imaging findings with the arthroscopic findings. The series of MR arthrography studies included 202 patients consisting of 100 patients with partial-thickness rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 102 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, which were reviewed in random order. At arthroscopy, 54 articularsided, 26 bursal-sided, 20 both articular- and bursal-sided partial-thickness tears were diagnosed. The MR arthrographies were analyzed by two radiologists for articular-sided tears, bursal-sided tears, and both articular- and bursal-sided tears of the rotator cuff. The sensitivity and specificity of each type of partial-thickness tears were determined. Kappa statistics was calculated to determine the interand intra-observer agreement of the diagnosis of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The sensitivity and specificity of the various types of rotator cuff tears were 85% and 90%, respectively for articular-sided tears, 62% and 95% for bursal- sided tears, as well as 45% and 99% for both articular- and bursal-sided tears. False-negative assessments were primarily observed in the diagnosis of bursal-sided tears. Conversely, both articular- and bursal-sided tears were overestimated as full-thickness tears. Inter-observer agreement was excellent for the diagnosis of articular-sided tears (k = 0.70), moderate (k = 0.59) for bursal-sided tears, and fair (k = 0.34) for both articular- and bursal-sided tears, respectively. Intra-observer agreement for the interpretation of articular- and bursal-sided tears was excellent and good, respectively, whereas intra-observer agreement for both articular- and bursal-sided tears was moderate. MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, but has limitations in that it has low sensitivity in bursal- and

  7. Transtendon, Double-Row, Transosseous-Equivalent Arthroscopic Repair of Partial-Thickness, Articular-Surface Rotator Cuff Tears

    OpenAIRE

    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Miller, Lindsay R.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-s...

  8. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods TC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tom C Woods,4 Michael J Carroll,1 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Randa Berdusco,1 Stephen Sohmer,3 Richard S Boorman,1,2 Ian KY Lo1,21Department of Surgery, 2Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 4St Joseph's Hospital, Comox, BC, CanadaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA lesions.Patients and methods: Patients in the senior author's practice who had isolated PASTA lesions treated by transtendon rotator-cuff repair were included (n=8 and retrospectively reviewed. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at a mean of 21.2 months (±9.7 months postoperatively using standardized clinical evaluation (physical exam, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Simple Shoulder Test. All patients underwent postoperative imaging with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram.Results: There was a significant improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (42.7±17.5 to 86.9±25.2 and Simple Shoulder Test (4.6±3.2 to 10.1±3.8 scores from pre- to postoperative, respectively. Postoperative imaging demonstrated full-thickness medial cuff tearing in seven patients, and one patient with a persistent partial articular surface defect.Conclusion: Transtendon repair of PASTA lesions may lead to improvements in clinical outcome. However, postoperative imaging demonstrated a high incidence of full-thickness rotator-cuff defects following repair.Keywords: rotator cuff, PASTA lesion, transtendon repair

  9. Transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilisio, Matthew F; Miller, Lindsay R; Higgins, Laurence D

    2014-10-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears. Direct visualization of the reduction of the retracted articular tendon layer to its insertion on the greater tuberosity is the key to the procedure. Linking the medial-row anchors and using a double-row construct provide a stable repair that allows early shoulder motion to minimize the risk of postoperative stiffness.

  10. Limited diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

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    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Schmitt, Cornelia; Haupert, Alexander; Kohn, Dieter; Lorbach, Olaf

    2017-12-01

    The reliable diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff is still elusive in clinical practise. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff as well as the combination of these parameters. 334 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies for rotator cuff pathologies performed during the time period between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively for the findings of common clinical signs for rotator cuff lesions and preoperative MR imaging. These were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as "gold standard". The reports of the MR imaging were evaluated with regard to the integrity of the rotator cuff. The Ellman Classification was used to define partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff in accordance with the arthroscopic findings. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. MR imaging showed 80 partial-thickness and 70 full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The arthroscopic examination confirmed 64 partial-thickness tears of which 52 needed debridement or refixation of the rotator cuff. Sensitivity for MR imaging to identify partial-thickness tears was 51.6%, specificity 77.2%, positive predictive value 41.3% and negative predictive value 83.7%. For the Jobe-test, sensitivity was 64.1%, specificity 43.2%, positive predictive value 25.9% and negative predictive value 79.5%. Sensitivity for the Impingement-sign was 76.7%, specificity 46.6%, positive predictive value 30.8% and negative predictive value 86.5%. For the combination of MR imaging, Jobe-test and Impingement-sign sensitivity was 46.9%, specificity 85.4%, positive predictive value 50% and negative predictive value 83.8%. The diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests (Jobe-test and Impingement-sign) alone is limited for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Additionally

  11. Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears: tendon quality as a prognostic factor for repair integrity.

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    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Jong Pil; Lyu, Seong Hwa; Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Se Bong

    2015-03-01

    The healing failure rate is high for partial-thickness or small full-thickness rotator cuff tears. To retrospectively evaluate and compare outcomes after arthroscopic repair of high-grade partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears and factors affecting rotator cuff healing. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Included in the study were 55 consecutive patients (mean age, 57.9 ± 7.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair for high-grade partial-thickness (n = 34) and small full-thickness (n = 21) rotator cuff tears. The study patients also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at least 6 months postoperatively, and their functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months). All partial-thickness tears were repaired after being converted to full-thickness tears; thus, the repair process was almost the same as for small full-thickness tears. The tendinosis of the torn tendon was graded from the MRI images using a 4-point scale, and the reliabilities were assessed. The outcomes between high-grade partial-thickness tears that were converted to small full-thickness tears and initially small full-thickness tears were compared, and factors affecting outcomes were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the tendinosis grade were good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.706 and 0.777, respectively). Failure to heal as determined by CTA was observed in 12 patients with a high-grade partial-thickness tear (35.3%; complete failure in 4 and partial failure in 8) and in 3 patients with a small full-thickness tear (14.3%; complete failure in 1 and partial failure in 2). The patients with high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears showed a higher tendinosis grade than did those with small full-thickness tears (P = .014), and the severity of the tendinosis was related to the failure to heal (P = .037). Tears with a higher tendinosis grade

  12. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using κ coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from κ=0.55 to κ=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from κ=0.79 and 0.53 to κ=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff tendon

  13. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

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    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Yang-Soo (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using kappa coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from kappa=0.55 to kappa=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from kappa=0.79 and 0.53 to kappa=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff

  14. Preservation of bursal-sided tendon in partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears: a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Yoon Sang; Kim, Rag Gyu

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique that spares the intact bursal-sided tendon in articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCT) and to present shoulder functional outcomes in patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT that involves more than 50 % of its thickness after arthroscopic repair using a novel technique. Eighteen patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT involving more than 50 % of the tendon's thickness underwent arthroscopic repair using a devised technique. The devised technique restores only the torn articular portion of the rotator cuff at the anatomical footprint using a suture anchor, and preserves the integrity of the corresponding bursal-sided tendon by tying knots at the most lateral bursal side on the subacromial space. Clinical and functional outcome using ASES and Constant scores were evaluated. The structural integrity of the rotator cuff was evaluated by MRI at 6 months postoperatively. Pain relief and shoulder functional outcomes were encouraging during the recovery phase after operation. ASES (preoperative 54.0 ± 10.3 to postoperative 92.6 ± 8.0), Constant score (61.2 ± 8.5-88.0 ± 5.3), VAS for pain (4.9 ± 2.6-0.6 ± 0.7) improved significantly after arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair (p rotator cuff retears on 6-month MRI. No complications related to surgical procedures had occurred. The devised technique of arthroscopic transtendon repair provided satisfactory functional outcomes without postoperative discomforts. This technique minimizes over-tightening of the articular layer and reduces tension mismatches between the articular and bursal layers, which are considered as important factors for improvement of postoperative shoulder motion.

  15. Accuracy of MR imaging in partial tears of rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Masao; Ito, Nobuyuki; Tomonaga, Tadashi; Harada, Shin'ichi; Rabbi, M.E.; Iwasaki, Katsuro

    1997-01-01

    MRI is very useful for the diagnosis of the rotator cuff tear However. in case of partial tears it is sometimes controvertible. In this study, we studied the accuracy of MRI in the diagnosis of partial tears. 67 patients who underwent MRI investigation before operation were chosen for this study. There were 61 males and 6 females, ranging from 30 to 80 years (mean: 54.8 years at the time of operation). MRI was performed with 1.5T superconductive system with shoulder surface coil. MPGR T2-weighted images were performed in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. Complete tears were diagnosed when full thickness high intensity was observed in the rotator cuff, whereas with partial high intensity of the rotator cuff, was considered as partial tears. MRI demonstrated 77.8% sensitivity, 91.4% specificity and 89.6% accuracy in the diagnosis of partial tear. In 8 cases MRI had misinterpretation. In MPGR T2-weighted images, not only the partial tears but the degenerative changes also show high intensity of the rotator cuff. Therefore, it is difficult to differentiate and maybe this is the reason of misinterpretations of partial tears by MRI. MRI provided with useful pre-operative informations of partial tears of the rotator cuff. However, in few cases it is hard to differentiate for the degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (author)

  16. High-grade bursal-side partial rotator cuff tears: comparison of mid- and long-term results following arthroscopic repair after conversion to a full-thickness tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nuri; Karaismailoglu, Bedri

    2017-07-21

    Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are one of the leading causes of shoulder dysfunction. Successful results have been reported with different treatment techniques, but the long-term consequences of these procedures are not yet clearly known. The purposes of this study were to evaluate and compare the mid- and long-term clinical outcomes of arthroscopically repaired bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears and identify the possible effects of age, gender, and hand dominance on clinical outcomes. Twenty-nine patients who had undergone arthroscopic repair of a significant bursal-side PTRCT were functionally evaluated. The repair was made after conversion to a full-thickness tear. The average patient age was 55.2 years (range 35-69 years, SD ±7.6 years). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Constant Shoulder Score (CSS) and Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS pain) were used as outcome measures. The average CSS improved from 38.9 preoperatively to 89.2 and 87.8 at 2 and 5 years after surgery, respectively (p functional outcomes and VAS pain scores at 2 and 5 years after surgery compared with the preoperative period. The patients who underwent surgery from their non-dominant extremity showed a significantly higher CSS increase relative to those who underwent surgery on the dominant extremity (p = 0.022). Arthroscopic repair of high-grade bursal-side PTRCTs after conversion to full-thickness tears is a reliable surgical technique with good functional outcomes and pain relief both at mid- and long-term follow-ups. Surgery on the non-dominant side may be related to better functional outcomes.

  17. On partial fluidization in rotating fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, J.; Pfeffer, R.; Tardos, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    In a rotating fluidized bed, unlike in a conventional fluidized bed, the granules are fluidized layer by layer from the (inner) free surface outward at increasing radius as the gas velocity is increased. This is a very significant and interesting phenomenon and is extremely important in the design of these fluidized beds. The phenomenon was first suggested in a theoretical analysis and recently verified experimentally in the authors' laboratory. However, in the first paper, the equations presented are too cumbersome and the influence of bed thickness is not clearly stated. In this note the authors present simplified equations, based on that paper, for the pressure drop and the minimum fluidizing velocities in a rotating fluidized bed. Experimental data are also shown and compared with the theoretical model, and the effect of bed thickness is shown. Furthermore, an explanation for the observation of a maximum in the pressure drop vs. velocity curve instead of the plateau derived by Chen is proposed

  18. The effect of unilateral partial edentulism to muscle thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca-Ceylan, Golzem; Guler, Ahmet U.; Taskay-Yelmir, Nergiz; Lutfi, Incesu; Aksoz, Tolga

    2003-01-01

    Teeth and muscle play a very important role for occlusal equilibrium and function.when tooth loss begins ,it may also effect the function of muscle tissues. The thickness of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were measured bilaterally in 30 healthy fully dentate adults and in 30 unilateral edentulous patients by using ultrasonographic imaging. All scans were carried out by the same radiologist to eliminate the inter-observer difference, using a real time scanner (Toshiba SSA -270A,Japan). A 7.5 MHz linear transducer was used. The effect of age, sex, duration of partial edentulism, unilateral chewing habits of the individuals to the muscle thickness were also evaluated. In all subjects,facial proportion index was also determined. Main purpose of this study was to compare and establish the differences of muscle thickness between dentate and edentulous side in unilateral partial edentulous patients with ultrasonography and to test whether the variation in the thickness of the muscle is related to the variation in the facial and morphology. Ultrasonography revealed a large variation in the thickness of the masseter and temporolis muscles in experimental and controlled groups ,both relaxed and contracted conditions.The thickness of muscles in females was less in both conditions.In experimental group, a high negative correlation was found between the thickness of the masseter muscle and Facial Proportion Index ( FPI) in the females ,however, the statistical analysis showed no significant difference in the males. Also a high negative correlation was found in female control group. There was no statistically significant relationship between unilateral chewing habits and muscle thickness .In this study the duration of partial edentulism did not affect the thickness of the muscle.Further research is required to study muscular atrophy for comparison with total edentulism. (author)

  19. Surgical correction of cryptotia combined with an ultra-delicate split-thickness skin graft in continuity with a full-thickness skin rotation flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaobo; Yang, Qinghua; Jiang, Haiyue; Pan, Bo; Zhao, Yanyong; Lin, Lin

    2017-11-01

    Cryptotia is a common congenital ear deformity in Asian populations. In cryptotia, a portion of the upper ear is hidden and fixed in a pocket of the skin of the mastoid. Here we describe our method for cryptotia correction by using an ultra-delicate split-thickness skin graft in continuity with a full-thickness skin rotation flap. We developed a new method for correcting cryptotia by using an ultra-delicate split-thickness skin graft in continuity with a full-thickness skin rotation flap. Following ear release, the full-thickness skin rotation flap is rotated into the defect, and the donor site is covered with an ultra-delicate split-thickness skin graft raised in continuity with the flap. All patients exhibited satisfactory release of cryptotia. No cases involved partial or total flap necrosis, and post-operative outcomes using this new technique for cryptotia correction have been more than satisfactory. Our method of using an ultra-delicate split-thickness skin graft in continuity with a full-thickness skin rotation flap to correct cryptotia is simple and reliable. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Masseter muscle thickness in unilateral partial edentulism: An ultrasonographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sathasivasubramanian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teeth and facial muscles play a very important role in occlusal equilibrium and function. Occlusal derangement, seen in unilateral partially edentulous individuals, has an effect on masseter muscle anatomy and function. The present study aims to evaluate masseter muscle thickness in unilateral partial edentulism. Patients and Methods: Institutional ethics committee approval was obtained before the commencement of the study. The study involved patients who routinely visited the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Sri Ramachandra University. The study sample included 27 unilateral edentulous patients (Group E and 30 controls (Group C. The masseter muscle thickness was evaluated using high-resolution ultrasound real-time scanner (linear transducer − 7.5–10 MHz at both relaxed and contracted states. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. Duration of edentulism and muscle thickness was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: The study patients' age ranged between 25 and 48 years (mean – 36 years. The comparative evaluation of masseter muscle thickness between the dentulous and edentulous sides of experimental group was statistically significant (P < 0.05. However, no statistically significant difference in masseter muscle thickness was found between the dentulous side of control and experimental groups. The correlation between the duration of partial edentulism and muscle thickness was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: The study proves masseter atrophy in the edentulous side. However, since the difference is found to be marginal with the present sample, a greater sample is necessary to establish and prove the present findings as well as to correlate with the duration of edentulism. Further studies are aimed to assess the muscle morphology after prosthetic rehabilitation.

  1. Partial-thickness burn wounds healing by topical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Saeidinia, Amin; Keihanian, Faeze; Lashkari, Ardalan Pasdaran; Lahiji, Hossein Ghavvami; Mobayyen, Mohammadreza; Heidarzade, Abtin; Golchai, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Burns are common event and associated with a high incidence of death, disability, and high costs. Centella asiatica (L.) is a medicinal herb, commonly growing in humid areas in several tropical countries that improve wound healing. On the basis of previous studies, we compared the efficacy of Centiderm versus silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in partial thickness burning patients. Methods: Study population comprised burn victims referred to Velayat Burning Hospital at Rasht, Iran...

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy for partial-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumville, Jo C; Munson, Christopher; Christie, Janice

    2014-12-15

    A burn wound is a complex and evolving injury, with both local and systemic consequences. Burn treatments include a variety of dressings, as well as newer strategies, such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), which, by means of a suction force that drains excess fluids from the burn, tries to promote the wound healing process and minimise progression of the burn wound. To assess the effectiveness of NPWT for people with partial-thickness burns. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 04 September 2014); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that evaluated the safety and effectiveness of NPWT for partial-thickness burns. Two review authors used standardised forms, and extracted the data independently. We assessed each trial for risk of bias, and resolved differences by discussion. One RCT, that was an interim report, satisfied the inclusion criteria. We undertook a narrative synthesis of results, as the absence of data and poor reporting precluded us from carrying out any formal statistical analysis. The trial was at high risk of bias. There was not enough evidence available to permit any conclusions to be drawn regarding the use of NPWT for treatment of partial-thickness burn wounds.

  3. Rotating disk electrodes to assess river biofilm thickness and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulêtreau, Stéphanie; Charcosset, Jean-Yves; Gamby, Jean; Lyautey, Emilie; Mastrorillo, Sylvain; Azémar, Frédéric; Moulin, Frédéric; Tribollet, Bernard; Garabetian, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the relevance of an electrochemical method based on a rotating disk electrode (RDE) to assess river biofilm thickness and elasticity. An in situ colonisation experiment in the River Garonne (France) in August 2009 sought to obtain natural river biofilms exhibiting differentiated architecture. A constricted pipe providing two contrasted flow conditions (about 0.1 and 0.45 m s(-1) in inflow and constricted sections respectively) and containing 24 RDE was immersed in the river for 21 days. Biofilm thickness and elasticity were quantified using an electrochemical assay on 7 and 21 days old RDE-grown biofilms (t(7) and t(21), respectively). Biofilm thickness was affected by colonisation length and flow conditions and ranged from 36 ± 15 μm (mean ± standard deviation, n = 6) in the fast flow section at t(7) to 340 ± 140 μm (n = 3) in the slow flow section at t(21). Comparing the electrochemical signal to stereomicroscopic estimates of biofilms thickness indicated that the method consistently allowed (i) to detect early biofilm colonisation in the river and (ii) to measure biofilm thickness of up to a few hundred μm. Biofilm elasticity, i.e. biofilm squeeze by hydrodynamic constraint, was significantly higher in the slow (1300 ± 480 μm rpm(1/2), n = 8) than in the fast flow sections (790 ± 350 μm rpm(1/2), n = 11). Diatom and bacterial density, and biofilm-covered RDE surface analyses (i) confirmed that microbial accrual resulted in biofilm formation on the RDE surface, and (ii) indicated that thickness and elasticity represent useful integrative parameters of biofilm architecture that could be measured on natural river assemblages using the proposed electrochemical method. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhl, D.; Lang, T.; Heeb, B. [Nichtmetallische Werkstoffe, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 {mu}m. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains were parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6{degrees}. At 77K/OT a critical current density of 15`000 A/cm{sup 2} was reached in films of the dimension 1cm x 2cm x 20{mu}m (1{mu}V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4K/OT the highest value was 350`000 A/cm{sup 2} (1nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  5. Hydraulic jumps in a partially filled rotating cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, T.S.; Berman, A.S.

    1979-06-01

    A nonlinear analysis is made of the fluid dynamics of a thin film of liquid completely spun up along the cylindrical wall of a rotating cylinder. The analysis allows for the possibility of hydraulic jumps in the liquid film. Conditions are simulated under which jumps can occur. Under the assumption that synchronous runouts are small relative to the film thickness, a sample calculation of jump position and extent for various operating frequencies is presented. Comparison with experimental observations indicate good qualitative agreement between the analysis and the experiment. Under the additional restriction of constant film thickness and a simple lumped-parameter dynamic model for the rotor and its supports, an analysis is also provided which predicts the amplitude and frequency of the asynchronous runout as a function of operating frequency. A numerical example of the results of such a calculation is provided. 6 figures

  6. Degenerative full thickness rotator cuff tears : Towards optimal management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The shoulder is one of the most complex joints in the body. Besides a wide range of motion it also has to be stable. The rotator cuff is a major stabiliser of the glenohumoral joint. With increasing age rotator cuff tears are common. Successful treatment is described following surgical (rotator cuff

  7. Partial-thickness burn wounds healing by topical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidinia, Amin; Keihanian, Faeze; Lashkari, Ardalan Pasdaran; Lahiji, Hossein Ghavvami; Mobayyen, Mohammadreza; Heidarzade, Abtin; Golchai, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Burns are common event and associated with a high incidence of death, disability, and high costs. Centella asiatica (L.) is a medicinal herb, commonly growing in humid areas in several tropical countries that improve wound healing. On the basis of previous studies, we compared the efficacy of Centiderm versus silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in partial thickness burning patients. Methods: Study population comprised burn victims referred to Velayat Burning Hospital at Rasht, Iran. The intervention group received Centiderm and control group SSD cream. Burn wounds were treated once daily at home. All of the wounds were evaluated till complete healing occurred and at the admission, days 3, 7, 14 objective signs; visual acuity score (VAS) and subjective signs were recorded. Re-epithelialization time and complete healing days were recorded. We used random fixed block for randomization. The randomization sequence was created using the computer. Patients and burning specialist physician were blinded. Results: Seventy-five patients randomized into 2 groups; (40 patients: Centiderm group; 35 patients: SSD group). The mean age of them was 30.67 ± 9.91 years and 19 of them were male (31.7%). Thirty patients in Centiderm and 30 patients in SSD group were analyzed. All of objective and subjective signs and mean of re-epithelialization and complete healing were significantly better in Centiderm group rather than SSD group (P < 0.05). There was no infection in Centiderm group. Conclusions: We showed that use of Centiderm ointment not only improved the objective and subjective signs in less than 3 days, but also the re-epithelialization and complete healing rather than SSD without any infection in the subjects. PMID:28248871

  8. Partial rotational lattice order–disorder in stefin B crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renko, Miha; Taler-Verčič, Ajda; Mihelič, Marko; Žerovnik, Eva; Turk, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    Crystal lattice disorders are a phenomenon which may hamper the determination of macromolecular crystal structures. Using the case of the crystal structure of stefin B, identification of rotational order–disorder and structure determination are described. At present, the determination of crystal structures from data that have been acquired from twinned crystals is routine; however, with the increasing number of crystal structures additional crystal lattice disorders are being discovered. Here, a previously undescribed partial rotational order–disorder that has been observed in crystals of stefin B is described. The diffraction images revealed normal diffraction patterns that result from a regular crystal lattice. The data could be processed in space groups I4 and I422, yet one crystal exhibited a notable rejection rate in the higher symmetry space group. An explanation for this behaviour was found once the crystal structures had been solved and refined and the electron-density maps had been inspected. The lattice of stefin B crystals is composed of five tetramer layers: four well ordered layers which are followed by an additional layer of alternatively placed tetramers. The presence of alternative positions was revealed by the inspection of electron-density score maps. The well ordered layers correspond to the crystal symmetry of space group I422. In addition, the positions of the molecules in the additional layer are related by twofold rotational axes which correspond to space group I422; however, these molecules lie on the twofold axis and can only be related in a statistical manner. When the occupancies of alternate positions and overlapping are equal, the crystal lattice indeed fulfills the criteria of space group I422; when these occupancies are not equal, the lattice only fulfills the criteria of space group I4

  9. Elastic Stress Analysis of Rotating Functionally Graded Annular Disk of Variable Thickness Using Finite Difference Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Jalali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic stress analysis of rotating variable thickness annular disk made of functionally graded material (FGM is presented. Elasticity modulus, density, and thickness of the disk are assumed to vary radially according to a power-law function. Radial stress, circumferential stress, and radial deformation of the rotating FG annular disk of variable thickness with clamped-clamped (C-C, clamped-free (C-F, and free-free (F-F boundary conditions are obtained using the numerical finite difference method, and the effects of the graded index, thickness variation, and rotating speed on the stresses and deformation are evaluated. It is shown that using FG material could decrease the value of radial stress and increase the radial displacement in a rotating thin disk. It is also demonstrated that increasing the rotating speed can strongly increase the stress in the FG annular disk.

  10. A semi-analytical solution for elastic analysis of rotating thick cylindrical shells with variable thickness using disk form multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Nejad, Mohammad; Jabbari, Mehdi; Ghannad, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Using disk form multilayers, a semi-analytical solution has been derived for determination of displacements and stresses in a rotating cylindrical shell with variable thickness under uniform pressure. The thick cylinder is divided into disk form layers form with their thickness corresponding to the thickness of the cylinder. Due to the existence of shear stress in the thick cylindrical shell with variable thickness, the equations governing disk layers are obtained based on first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT). These equations are in the form of a set of general differential equations. Given that the cylinder is divided into n disks, n sets of differential equations are obtained. The solution of this set of equations, applying the boundary conditions and continuity conditions between the layers, yields displacements and stresses. A numerical solution using finite element method (FEM) is also presented and good agreement was found.

  11. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Elastic Analysis of Rotating Thick Cylindrical Shells with Variable Thickness Using Disk Form Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zamani Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using disk form multilayers, a semi-analytical solution has been derived for determination of displacements and stresses in a rotating cylindrical shell with variable thickness under uniform pressure. The thick cylinder is divided into disk form layers form with their thickness corresponding to the thickness of the cylinder. Due to the existence of shear stress in the thick cylindrical shell with variable thickness, the equations governing disk layers are obtained based on first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT. These equations are in the form of a set of general differential equations. Given that the cylinder is divided into n disks, n sets of differential equations are obtained. The solution of this set of equations, applying the boundary conditions and continuity conditions between the layers, yields displacements and stresses. A numerical solution using finite element method (FEM is also presented and good agreement was found.

  12. Increased supraspinatus tendon thickness following fatigue loading in rotator cuff tendinopathy: potential implications for exercise therapy

    OpenAIRE

    McCreesh, Karen M; Purtill, Helen; Donnelly, Alan E; Lewis, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    Background/aim Exercise imparts a load on tendon tissue that leads to changes in tendon properties. Studies suggest that loading immediately reduces tendon thickness, with a loss of this response in symptomatic tendinopathy. No studies investigating the response of tendon dimensions to load for the rotator cuff tendons exist. This study aimed to examine the short-term effect of loading on the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and acromiohumeral distance those with and without rotator cuff...

  13. Wall thickness tests by means of rotating electrodynamic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueschelrath, G.

    1986-01-01

    For about three years, the EROT system has been employed for measuring wall thicknesses on pipes of ferritic steels. The experience gathered and the degree of reliability reached up to now are definitely encouraging, so that an increased use of electrodynamic transducers can be expected for measuring pipes with outside diameters of up to 22 inches. (orig.) [de

  14. Optimal treatment of partial thickness burns in children: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloemans, A.F.P.M.; Hermans, M.; van der Wal, M.; Liebregts, J.; Middelkoop, E.

    2014-01-01

    A large part of the patient population of a burn centre consists of children, most of whom are younger than four years. The majority of these young children suffer from superficial and deep partial thickness scald burns that may easily deepen to full thickness burns. A proper wound therapy, that

  15. Control of confined vortex breakdown with partial rotating lids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mununga, L.; Lo Jacono, D.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    are amplified substantially by the use of larger control disks and higher rotation ratios. A series of numerical simulations close to the onset Reynolds number reveals that the control disk acts to generate a rotation-rate-invariant local positive or negative azimuthal vorticity source away from the immediate...

  16. A rotating helical sealing joint capable of partially melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jean; Ollier, J.-L.; Petit, Paul.

    1973-01-01

    A coagulated rotating helical joint providing gas and liquid tightness along a rotating shaft, comprising: a metal sleeve connected to the wall through which passes the rotating sleeve, an intermediate sleeve made of a fusible material, inert with respect to the fluid to be sealingly retained, and finally the rotating shaft provided with an engraved helical thread in register with the intermediate sleeve. Means are provided for regulating the intermediate sleeve temperature so that a thin melted film is formed on said intermediate sleeve when in contact with the rotating threaded shaft. This can be applied in the nuclear industry, including cases when the intermediate sleeve is constituted by the fluid itself, then in the solid state [fr

  17. Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Correlate With Sleep Disturbance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Bryan A; Hull, Brandon R; Kurth, Alexander B; Kukowski, Nathan R; Mulligan, Edward P; Khazzam, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    Many patients with rotator cuff tears suffer from nocturnal shoulder pain, resulting in sleep disturbance. To determine whether rotator cuff tear size correlated with sleep disturbance in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with a diagnosis of unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears (diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a visual analog scale (VAS) quantifying their shoulder pain, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) questionnaire. Shoulder MRI scans were analyzed for anterior-posterior tear size (mm), tendon retraction (mm), Goutallier grade (0-4), number of tendons involved (1-4), muscle atrophy (none, mild, moderate, or severe), and humeral head rise (present or absent). Bivariate correlations were calculated between the MRI characteristics and baseline survey results. A total of 209 patients with unilateral full-thickness rotator cuff tears were included in this study: 112 (54%) female and 97 (46%) male (mean age, 64.1 years). On average, shoulder pain had been present for 24 months. The mean PSQI score was 9.8, and the mean VAS score was 5.0. No significant correlations were found between any of the rotator cuff tear characteristics and sleep quality. Only tendon retraction had a significant correlation with pain. Although rotator cuff tears are frequently associated with nocturnal pain and sleep disruption, this study demonstrated that morphological characteristics of full-thickness rotator cuff tears, such as size and tendon retraction, do not correlate with sleep disturbance and have little to no correlation with pain levels.

  18. Management of a facial partial thickness chemical burn in a dog caused by bleach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalilak, Lukas T; Fransson, Boel A; Alessio, Terri L

    2017-03-01

    To describe the management and successful outcome of a late-recognition partial thickness bleach burn to the face and corneas of a dog. A 1-year-old male neutered Fox Terrier mix breed dog was evaluated for sloughing facial epithelium 5 days after coming into contact with an 8.25% household bleach cleaning solution. Severe erythema, edema, and crusting were noted around the muzzle and margins of both eyes, with moderate to severe alopecia in these areas. A partially detached, partial thickness eschar was present on the muzzle, while a firmly attached eschar was present in the region of both frontal sinuses. These injuries were consistent with a focal, superficial, and partial thickness chemical burn. Multiple ocular abnormalities, the most concerning of which was corneal ulceration, were also present. The patient's wounds were managed conservatively with limited surgical debridement of the affected epithelium 11 and 22 days after the initial exposure. Topical ocular medications, corneal debridement, and a superficial keratectomy were also used. All lesions resolved completely by 84 days postexposure, with no residual effects on the patient's quality of life. Chemical burns caused by contact with alkaline agents such as bleach (sodium hypochlorite) result in extensive necrosis of the skin and underlying structures. This is the first report of management alkaline facial burns in a dog. If inadequate or delayed hydrotherapy following exposure has resulted in superficial partial thickness burns, conservative management can be successful when traditional treatments, especially bandaging, are not feasible. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  19. Electro-physical properties of superconducting ceramic thick film prepared by partial melting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2013-05-01

    BiSrCaCuO superconductor thick films were prepared at several curing temperatures, and their electro-physical properties were determined to find an optimum fabrication conditions. Critical temperatures of the superconductors were decreased with increasing melting temperature, which was related to the amount of equilibrium phases of the superconducting materials with temperature. The critical temperature of BiSrCaCuO bulk and thick film superconductors were 107 K and 96 K, respectively. The variation of susceptibility of the superconductor thick film formed at 950 degrees C had multi-step-type curve for 70 G externally applied field, whereas, a superconductor thick film formed at 885 degrees C had a single step-type curve like a bulk BiSrCaCuO ceramic superconductor in the temperature-susceptibility curves. A partial melting at 865 degrees C is one of optimum conditions for making a superconductor thick film with a relatively homogeneous phase.

  20. Long-term functional evaluation of videoarthroscopic treatment of partial injuries of the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaydson Gomes Godinho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the functional results from high and low-grade isolated partial lesions of the supraspinatus tendon of bursal and articular types, after arthroscopic treatment.METHODS: Sixty-four patients with isolated partial lesions of the supraspinatus tendon were evaluated. The mean length of follow-up was 76 months (range: 29-193. The mean age was 59 years (range: 36-82. The dominant side was affected in 44 patients (68.8%. There were 35 bursal lesions (54.7% and 29 articular lesions (45.3%. We used the Ellman classification and characterized the lesions as low or high-grade according to whether they affected less than or more than 50% of the tendon thickness, respectively. Debridement was performed in 15 patients (23.5%, repair without completing the lesion in 11 (17% and repair after completing the lesion in 38 (59.5%. The functional assessments on the patients were done using the Constant & Murley and UCLA scores.RESULTS: The mean Constant & Murley score among the patients with bursal lesions was 82.64 ± 6.98 (range: 59.3-99 and among those with articular lesions, 83.57 ± 7.58 (range: 66-95, while the mean UCLA score in the bursal lesions was 33.37 ± 2.85 (range: 21-35 and in the articular lesions, 32.83 ± 2.95 (range: 22-35.CONCLUSION: Videoarthroscopic treatment of partial lesions of the rotator cuff presents good or excellent results when the low-grade lesions are debrided and the high-grade lesions are completed and repaired. These results are maintained over the long term, with a high satisfaction rate and few complications.

  1. Honey compared with silver sulphadiazine in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Kamran Ishaque; Malik, M A Nasir; Aslam, Azhar

    2010-10-01

    Burn injury is associated with a high incidence of death and disability; yet, its management remains problematic and costly. We conducted this clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of honey in the treatment of superficial and partial-thickness burns covering less than 40% of body surface area and compared its results with those of silver sulphadiazine (SSD). In this randomised comparative clinical trial, carried out Burn Center of POF Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan, from May 2007 to February 2008, 150 patients of all ages having similar types of superficial and partial-thickness burns at two sites on different parts of body were included. Each patient had one burn site treated with honey and one treated with topical SSD, randomly. The rate of re-epithelialization and healing of superficial and partial-thickness burns was significantly faster in the sites treated with honey than in the sites treated with SSD (13·47 ± 4·06 versus 15·62 ± 4·40 days, respectively: P honey healed completely in less than 21 days versus 24 days for the site treated with SSD. Six patients had positive culture for Pseudomonas aeroginsa in honey-treated site, whereas 27 patients had positive culture in SSD-treated site. The results clearly showed greater efficacy of honey over SSD cream for treating superficial and partial-thickness burns. 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  2. Creep Modeling in a Composite Rotating Disc with Thickness Variation in Presence of Residual Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state creep response in a rotating disc made of Al-SiC (particle composite having linearly varying thickness has been carried out using isotropic/anisotropic Hoffman yield criterion and results are compared with those using von Mises yield criterion/Hill's criterion ignoring difference in yield stresses. The steady-state creep behavior has been described by Sherby's creep law. The material parameters characterizing difference in yield stresses have been used from the available experimental results in literature. Stress and strain rate distributions developed due to rotation have been calculated. It is concluded that the stress and strain distributions got affected from the thermal residual stress in an isotropic/anisotropic rotating disc, although the effect of residual stress on creep behavior in an anisotropic rotating disc is observed to be lower than those observed in an isotropic disc. Thus, the presence of residual stress in composite rotating disc with varying thickness needs attention for designing a disc.

  3. Outcome of surgical treatment and the prognostic factors in full-thickness rotator cuff tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Giti

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rotator cuff tendon tear injury is one of the most frequently seen orthopaedic conditions, and surgical repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure. The purpose of the present study was to determine the results of full-thickness rotator cuff repair and to look for predictors of outcomes. Methods: we studied 27 patients (17 men and 10 women with a mean age of 57.7 years who underwent open rotator cuff repair surgery for full-thickness tear between 2001 and 2005 at the Imam Khomeini Hospital and were subsequently followed-up for 6 and 12 months after surgery. The shoulder function was assessed by Constant classification and factors potentially associated with outcomes were Results: The mean of preoperative Constant score (CS was 45.8 ± 14.1 after 12 months, 6 patients (22.2% had good results and 21 patients (77.8% had excellent result according to CS. Pain relief was generally satisfactory. Using multiple regression analysis, treatment was significantly correlated preoperative CS and acromio-humeral interval (AHI however, no correlation was found between the result of the treatment and pretreatment atrophy, tear size, acromial morphology, preoperative symptom duration and age. Conclusion: In this study, a standard rotator cuff repair technique reduced pain severity and was associated with good results, however larger studies are necessary to define the long-term outcome of this procedure.

  4. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pceramic was not significant (p=0.074), and the interaction between the thickness of ceramic and the materials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (pceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  5. Increased supraspinatus tendon thickness following fatigue loading in rotator cuff tendinopathy: potential implications for exercise therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreesh, Karen M; Purtill, Helen; Donnelly, Alan E; Lewis, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    Exercise imparts a load on tendon tissue that leads to changes in tendon properties. Studies suggest that loading immediately reduces tendon thickness, with a loss of this response in symptomatic tendinopathy. No studies investigating the response of tendon dimensions to load for the rotator cuff tendons exist. This study aimed to examine the short-term effect of loading on the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and acromiohumeral distance those with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Participants were 20 painfree controls, and 23 people with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy. Supraspinatus tendon thickness and acromiohumeral distance were measured using ultrasound scans before, and at three time points after loading (1, 6 and 24 hours). Loading involved isokinetic eccentric and concentric external rotation and abduction. There was a significant increase in supraspinatus tendon thickness in the pain group at 1 (7%, ∆=0.38, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.57) and 6 hours (11%, ∆=0.53, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.71), although only the 6 hours difference exceeded minimal detectable difference. In contrast, there was a small non-significant reduction in thickness in controls. The acromiohumeral distance reduced significantly in both groups at 1 hour (controls: ∆=0.64, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.90; pain: ∆=1.1, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.33), with a larger change from baseline in the pain group. Those diagnosed with painful supraspinatus tendinopathy demonstrated increased thickening with delayed return to baseline following loading. Rehabilitation professionals may need to take into account the impact of loading to fatigue when planning rehabilitation programmes.

  6. Sonographic Visualization of the Rotator Cable in Patients With Symptomatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation With Tear Size, Muscular Fatty Infiltration and Atrophy, and Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Nathalie J; Blain-Paré, Etienne; Tétreault, Patrice; Rouleau, Dominique M; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of sonographic visualization of the rotator cable in patients with symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears and asymptomatic controls and to correlate rotator cable visualization with tear size, muscular fatty infiltration and atrophy, and the functional outcome in the patients with rotator cuff tears. Fifty-seven patients with rotator cuff tears and 30 asymptomatic volunteers underwent shoulder sonography for prospective assessment of the rotator cable and rotator cuff tear and responded to 2 functional outcome questionnaires (shortened Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [QuickDASH] and Constant). In the patients with rotator cuff tears, appropriate tests were used to correlate rotator cable visualization with the tear size, functional outcome, muscular fatty infiltration, and atrophy. The patients with rotator cuff tears included 25 women and 32 men (mean age,57 years; range, 39-67 years), and the volunteers included 13 women and 17 men (mean age, 56 years; range, 35-64 years). The rotator cable was identified in 77% (23 of 30) of controls and 23% (13 of 57) of patients with rotator cuff tears. In the patients, nonvisualization of the rotator cable correlated with larger tears (P tears than asymptomatic controls and was associated with a larger tear size and greater supraspinatus fatty infiltration and atrophy. Diligent assessment of the supraspinatus muscle should be done in patients with rotator cuff tears without a visible rotator cable, as the integrity of these anatomic structures may be interdependent.

  7. Treatment of Partial Rotator Cuff Tear with Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetrivel Chezian Sengodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tear has presented substantial challenge to orthopaedic surgeons as it can vary from conservative to surgical repair. Researches have established the influence of platelet rich plasma in healing damaged tissue. Currently very few data are available regarding the evidence of clinical and radiological outcome of partial rotator cuff tear treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection in English literature. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears were treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection. Before and after the injection of platelet rich plasma scoring was done with visual analogue score, Constant shoulder score, and UCLA shoulder score at 8 weeks and third month. A review ultrasound was performed 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection to assess the rotator cuff status. Results: Our study showed statistically significant improvements in 17 patients in VAS pain score, constant shoulder score and UCLA shoulder score. No significant changes in ROM were noted when matched to the contra-lateral side (P < 0.001 at the 3 month follow-up. The study also showed good healing on radiological evaluation with ultrasonogram 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection for partial rotator cuff tears is an effective procedure that leads to significant decrease in pain, improvement in shoulder functions, much cost-effective and less problematic compared to a surgical treatment.

  8. Treatment of Partial Thickness Burns with a Novel Extracellular Matrix in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-20

    partial thickness burn was produced using a brass scale weight. Groups of 10 rats were randomly assigned to the various treatments . Jackets made from...Objectives: The objective this study was to examine the cellular and immune responses to various extracellular matrices (ECM) in a rat burn model...significant difference between treatments in terms of mean wound area (p = 0.77). Histologic examination revealed that all of the grafts were infected, with

  9. Effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Xi; Yan Li; Xiaojin Ge; Dandan Liu; Mingsan Miao

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Observing the effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit. Method: We prepared boiling water scalded rabbits with deep II degree scald models and applied high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film for different time and area. Then we compared the difference of burned paper weight before administration and after administration model burns, burn local skin irritation points infection, skin crusting and scabs from th...

  10. Anti-scar Treatment for Deep Partial-thickness Burn Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    applied topically to deep partial-thickness burn wounds reduced α-SMA protein expression ( ELISA ). Mouse burn wounds were treated with PFD twice...immediately and at 48 hrs post- burn. α-SMA in wound skin homogenates was assayed by ELISA . α-SMA protein was significantly lower in mice treated with...Inflammatory cytokines in wound skin homogenates were assayed by ELISA . This early treatment during the inflammatory stage of healing significantly reduced

  11. Flow and Heat Transfer of Bingham Plastic Fluid over a Rotating Disk with Variable Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyan; Pan, Mingyang; Zheng, Liancun; Ming, Chunying; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies the steady flow and heat transfer of Bingham plastic fluid over a rotating disk of finite radius with variable thickness radially in boundary layer. The boundary layer flow is caused by the rotating disk when the extra stress is greater than the yield stress of the Bingham fluid. The analyses of the velocity and temperature field related to the variable thickness disk have not been investigated in current literatures. The governing equations are first simplified into ordinary differential equations owing to the generalized von Kármán transformation for seeking solutions easily. Then semi-similarity approximate analytical solutions are obtained by using the homotopy analysis method for different physical parameters. It is found that the Bingham number clearly influences the velocity field distribution, and the skin friction coefficient Cfr is nonlinear growth with respect to the shape parameter m. Additionally, the effects of the involved parameters (i.e. shape parameter m, variable thickness parameter β, Reynolds number Rev, and Prandtl number Pr) on velocity and temperature distribution are investigated and analyzed in detail.

  12. Partial Discharge Measurements in HV Rotating Machines in Dependence on Pressure of Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kršňák

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the pressure of the coolant used in high voltage rotating machines on partial discharges occurring in stator insulation is discussed in this paper. The first part deals with a theoretical analysis of the topic. The second part deals with the results obtained on a real generator in industrial conditions. Finally, theoretical assumptions and obtained results are compared.

  13. Partial repair in irreparable rotator cuff tear: our experience in long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, E D; Di Benedetto, Paolo; Fiocchi, Andrea; Beltrame, Alessandro; Causero, Araldo

    2017-10-18

    Massive rotator cuff tears are a common source of shoulder pain and dysfunction, especially in middle age patient; these lesions represent about 20% of all rotator cuff tears and 80% of recurrent tears. Some lesions are not repairable or should not be repaired: in this case, a rotator cuff partial repair should be recommended. The aim of the study is to evaluate the outcome of rotator cuff partial repair in irreparable rotator cuff massive tear at medium and long-term follow-up. We have evaluated 74 consecutive patients treated with functional repair of rotator cuff by the same surgeon between 2006 and 2014. We divided patients into 2 groups, obtaining 2 average follow-up: at about 6,5 (group A) and 3 years (group B). In December 2015, we evaluated in every patient ROM and Constant Score. We analyzed difference between pre-operatory data and the 2 groups.  Results: We found statistical significant difference in ROM and in Constant Score between pre-operatory data and group A and group B. Between group A and group B there is relevant difference in Constant Score but not in ROM. Partial repair can give good results in a medium follow-up, in terms of pain relief and improvement of ROM, as well as in quality of life. Difference in ROM and Constant Score between group A and group B may indicate the begin of partial repair failure; according to our data, 6-7 years may be the time limit for this surgery technique.

  14. Use of a copolymer dressing on superficial and partial-thickness burns in a paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M; Massand, S; Davis, W; Burkey, B; Glat, P M

    2015-07-01

    Despite extensive research into the treatment of partial-thickness burns, to date there has not been the emergence of a preeminent modality. This pilot study, the first such study to be performed in a burn unit in the US, was designed to evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of the application of copolymer dressing (Suprathel; PolyMedics Innovations Corporation, Stuttgart, Germany) for both superficial and deeper partial-thickness burns. The copolymer dressing was used as a primary wound dressing to treat superficial and deep partial-thickness burns (average 5% total body surface area) in paediatric patients. Burns were debrided within 24 hours, at bedside, in the burn unit or in the operating room. The copolymer dressing was then applied directly to the wound and covered with a non-adherent second layer and an absorptive outer dressing. After discharge, patients were seen every 5-7 days until healed. Parameters evaluated included average hospital length of stay, average number of intravenous doses of narcotics administered, pain score at first follow-up visit, average time to complete re epithelialisation, incidence of burn wound infection, and patient/parent satisfaction on a 4-point scale. We also evaluated our experience with the dressing. Data were evaluated retrospectively under an Investigational Review Board approved protocol. Of the 17 patients assessed the average hospital length of stay was 1.4 days during which the average number of intravenous narcotic doses administered before copolymer dressing application was 1.5 and after was 0.1 doses. At the first follow-up visit, average pain score was 1.2 on a 10-point scale and the average time to re epithelialisation was 9.5 days. There was no incidence of burn wound infection. Patient/parent satisfaction was average of 3.66 on a 4-point scale. The staff had found that the self-adherence and elasticity of the dressing made it easy to apply and stay adherent, especially in areas of difficult contour. There were

  15. The use of Hyalomatrix PA in the treatment of deep partial-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravante, Gianpiero; Delogu, Daniela; Giordan, Nicola; Morano, Giuseppina; Montone, Antonio; Esposito, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    Since 2001, Hyalomatrix PA (Fidia Advanced Biopolymers, Abano Terme, Italy) has been used in our center on pediatric burned patients as a temporary dermal substitute to cover deep partial-thickness burns after dermabrasion. This "bridge" treatment was adopted to remove necrotic debris (dermabrasion) and to stimulate regeneration in a humid and protected environment (Hyalomatrix PA). We present results obtained with this approach. On the third to fifth day after admission, dermabrasion was practiced on deep burned areas, which were covered with Hyalomatrix PA. Change of dressings was performed every 7 days. On day 21, those areas still without signs of recovery were removed with classic escharectomy and covered with thin skin grafts. We treated 300 patients. Sixty-one percent needed only one dermabrasion treatment, 22.3% (67 patients) more than one, and 16.7% (50 patients) the classic escharectomy. A total of 83% of patients healed within 21 days. Our study suggests that the combination of dermabrasion with a temporary dermal substitute could be a good and feasible approach for treatment of deep partial-thickness burns. Prospective randomized studies are now necessary to compare our protocol with the gold standard treatment of topical dressings.

  16. Effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Peng; Li, Yan; Ge, Xiaojin; Liu, Dandan; Miao, Mingsan

    2018-05-01

    Observing the effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit. We prepared boiling water scalded rabbits with deep II degree scald models and applied high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film for different time and area. Then we compared the difference of burned paper weight before administration and after administration model burns, burn local skin irritation points infection, skin crusting and scabs from the time, and the impact of local skin tissue morphology. Rabbits deep II degree burn model successful modeling; on day 12, 18, high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film significantly reduced skin irritation of rabbits infected with the integral value ( P  film group significantly decreased skin irritation, infection integral value ( P  film significantly reduced film rabbits' scalded skin crusting time ( P  film on the deep partial thickness burns has a significant therapeutic effect; external use has a significant role in wound healing.

  17. Optimal treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vloemans, A F P M; Hermans, M H E; van der Wal, M B A; Liebregts, J; Middelkoop, E

    2014-03-01

    A large part of the patient population of a burn centre consists of children, most of whom are younger than four years. The majority of these young children suffer from superficial and deep partial thickness scald burns that may easily deepen to full thickness burns. A proper wound therapy, that prevents infection and ensures a moist wound condition, might prevent the deterioration of the wound. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of wound management and dressing materials to select the best treatment option for children with burns. A search in Medline and Embase revealed 51 articles for a critical appraisal. The articles were divided into randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and a group of case-reports. Total appraisal did not differ much amongst the groups; the level of evidence was highest in the randomized controlled trials and lowest in the case-reports. In 16 out of 34 comparative studies, silver sulfadiazine or a silver sulfadiazine/chlorhexidine-gluconate combination was the standard of wound care treatment. The competitor dressing was Biobrane(®) in six studies and amnion membrane in three. Tulle gauze, or tulle gauze impregnated with an antibacterial addition were the standard of care treatment in seven studies. In general, membranous dressings like Biobrane(®) and amnion membrane performed better than the standard of care on epithelialization rate, length of hospital stay and pain for treatment of partial thickness burns in children. However, hardly any of the studies investigated long-term results like scar formation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dielectric response of fully and partially depleted ferroelectric thin films and inversion of the thickness effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misirlioglu, I B; Yildiz, M

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of full and partial depletion on the dielectric response characteristics of ferroelectric thin films with impurities via a computational approach. Using a thermodynamic approach along with the fundamental equations for semiconductors, we show that films with partial depletion display unique features and an enhanced dielectric response compared with those fully depleted. We find that the capacitance peak at switching can be significantly suppressed in the case of high impurity densities (>10 25 m −3 ) with relatively low ionization energy, of the order of 0.5 eV. For conserved number of species in films, electromigration of ionized impurities at room temperature is negligible and has nearly no effect on the dielectric response. In films with high impurity density, the dielectric response at zero bias is enhanced with respect to charge-free films or those with relatively low impurity density ( 24 m −3 ). We demonstrate that partially depleted films should be expected to exhibit peculiar capacitance–voltage characteristics at low and high bias and that the thickness effect probed in experiments in ferroelectric thin films could be entirely inverted in thin films with depletion charges where a higher dielectric response can be measured in thicker films. Therefore, depletion charge densities in ferroelectric thin films should be estimated before size-effect-related studies. Finally, we noted that these findings are in good qualitative agreement with dielectric measurements carried out on PbZr x Ti 1−x O 3 . (paper)

  19. Universal Faraday Rotation in HgTe Wells with Critical Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvaev, A; Dziom, V; Kvon, Z D; Mikhailov, N N; Pimenov, A

    2016-09-09

    The universal value of the Faraday rotation angle close to the fine structure constant (α≈1/137) is experimentally observed in thin HgTe quantum wells with a thickness on the border between trivial insulating and the topologically nontrivial Dirac phases. The quantized value of the Faraday angle remains robust in the broad range of magnetic fields and gate voltages. Dynamic Hall conductivity of the holelike carriers extracted from the analysis of the transmission data shows a theoretically predicted universal value of σ_{xy}=e^{2}/h, which is consistent with the doubly degenerate Dirac state. On shifting the Fermi level by the gate voltage, the effective sign of the charge carriers changes from positive (holes) to negative (electrons). The electronlike part of the dynamic response does not show quantum plateaus and is well described within the classical Drude model.

  20. Mechanical and thermal stresses in a functionally graded rotating disk with variable thickness due to radially symmetry loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayat, Mehdi; Saleem, M.; Sahari, B.B.; Hamouda, A.M.S.; Mahdi, E.

    2009-01-01

    Rotating disks have many applications in the aerospace industry such as gas turbines and gears. These disks normally work under thermo mechanical loads. Minimizing the weight of such components can help reduce the overall payload in aerospace industry. For this purpose, a rotating functionally graded (FG) disk with variable thickness under a steady temperature field is considered in this paper. Thermo elastic solutions and the weight of the disk are related to the material grading index and the geometry of the disk. It is found that a disk with parabolic or hyperbolic convergent thickness profile has smaller stresses and displacements compared to a uniform thickness disk. Maximum radial stress due to centrifugal load in the solid disk with parabolic thickness profile may not be at the center unlike uniform thickness disk. Functionally graded disk with variable thickness has smaller stresses due to thermal load compared to those with uniform thickness. It is seen that for a given value of grading index, the FG disk having concave thickness profile is the lightest in weight whereas the FG disk with uniform thickness profile is the heaviest. Also for any given thickness profile, the weight of the FG disk lies in between the weights of the all-metal and the all-ceramic disks.

  1. ERK2 dependent signaling contributes to wound healing after a partial-thickness burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yasushi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Takeuchi, Atsuya; Ojima, Kenichiro; Kouzu, Keita; Kawakami, Saki; Ito, Masataka; Ishihara, Masayuki; Sato, Shunichi; Takishima, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Burn healing is a complex physiological process involving multiple cell activities, such as cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Although extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) have a pivotal role in regulating a variety of cellular responses, little is known about the individual functions of ERK isoform for healing in vivo. This study investigated the role of ERK2 in burn healing. To assess this, Erk2 +/- mice generated by gene targeting were used. The resultant mice exhibited significant delay in re-epithelization of partial-thickness burns in the skin in comparison to wild-type. An in vitro proliferation assay revealed that keratinocytes from Erk2 +/- mice grew significantly slower than those prepared from wild-type. These results highlight the importance of ERK2 in the process of burn healing.

  2. Effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Observing the effect of nano-silver hydrogel coating film on deep partial thickness scald model of rabbit. Method: We prepared boiling water scalded rabbits with deep II degree scald models and applied high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film for different time and area. Then we compared the difference of burned paper weight before administration and after administration model burns, burn local skin irritation points infection, skin crusting and scabs from the time, and the impact of local skin tissue morphology. Result: Rabbits deep II degree burn model successful modeling; on day 12, 18, high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film significantly reduced skin irritation of rabbits infected with the integral value (P < 0.01, P < 0.05; high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film group significantly decreased skin irritation, infection integral value (P < 0.01, P < 0.05; high, medium and low doses of nano-silver hydrogel coating film significantly reduced film rabbits’ scalded skin crusting time (P < 0.01, significantly shortened the rabbit skin burns from the scab time (P < 0.01, and significantly improved the treatment of skin diseases in rabbits scald model change (P < 0.01, P < 0.05. Conclusion: The nano-silver hydrogel coating film on the deep partial thickness burns has a significant therapeutic effect; external use has a significant role in wound healing. Keywords: Nano-silver hydrogel coating film, Deep degree burns, Topical, Rabbits

  3. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis reduces neutrophil infiltration and necrosis in partial-thickness scald burns in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Jill; Delarosa, Sara; Wu, Jianfeng; Peterson, Jonathan R; Eboda, Oluwatobi N; Su, Grace L; Hemmila, Mark; Krebsbach, Paul H; Cederna, Paul S; Wang, Stewart C; Xi, Chuanwu; Levi, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), present in thermally injured tissue, modulates the inflammatory response and causes significant tissue damage. The authors hypothesize that neutrophil infiltration and ensuing tissue necrosis would be mitigated by removing ATP-dependent signaling at the burn site. Mice were subjected to 30% TBSA partial-thickness scald burn by dorsal skin immersion in a water bath at 60 or 20°C (nonburn controls). In the treatment arm, an ATP hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, was applied directly to the site immediately after injury. Skin was harvested after 24 hours and 5 days for hematoxylin and eosin stain, elastase, and Ki-67 staining. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-β expression were measured through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. At 24 hours, the amount of neutrophil infiltration was different between the burn and burn + apyrase groups (P burn group at 24 hours and 5 days. TNF-α and IFN-β expression at 24 hours in the apyrase group was lower than in the burn group (P burn site allays the neutrophil response to thermal injury and reduces tissue necrosis. This decrease in inflammation and tissue necrosis is at least partially because of TNF-α and IFN-β signaling. Apyrase could be used as topical inflammatory regulators to quell the injury caused by inflammation.

  5. Drop deformation and breakup in a partially filled horizontal rotating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew; Pereira, Caroline; Hyacinthe, Hyaquino; Ward, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Drop deformation and breakup due to shear flow has been studied extensively in Couette devices as well as in gravity-driven flows. In these cases shear is generated either by the moving wall or the drop's motion. For such flows the drop shape remains unperturbed at low capillary number (Ca), deforms at moderate Ca , and can experience breakup as Ca --> 1 and larger. Here single drops of NaOH(aq) will be placed in a horizontal cylindrical rotating tank partially filled with vegetable oil resulting in 10-2 saponification, can yield lower minimum surface tensions and faster adsorption than non-reactive surfactant systems. Oil films between the wall and drop as well as drop shape will be observed as rotation rates and NaOH(aq) concentration are varied. Results will be presented in the context of previous work on bubble and drop shapes and breakup. NSF CBET #1262718.

  6. HoYbBIG epitaxial thick films used for Faraday rotator in the 1.55μm band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Z.W.; Xu, X.W.; Chong, T.C.; Yuan, S.N.; Li, M.H.; Zhang, G.Y.; Freeman, B.

    2005-01-01

    Ho 3-x-y Yb y Bi x Fe 5 O 12 (HoYbBIG) garnet thick films with Bi content of x=0.9-1.5 were prepared by the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) method. Optical properties and magneto-optical properties were characterized. The LPE-grown HoYbBIG thick films exhibited large Faraday rotation coefficients up to 1540 o /cm at 1.55μm, and good wavelength and temperature stability

  7. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-07-01

    There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods.

  8. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Jong-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES. Results: In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Conclusions: Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods.

  9. [Clinical study and pathological examination on the treatment of deep partial thickness burn wound with negative charge aerosol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-zeng; Xu, Ying-bin; Hu, Xiao-gen; Shen, Rui; Peng, Xiao-dong; Wu, Wei-jiang; Luo, Lan; Dai, Xin-ming; Zou, Yong-tong; Qi, Shao-hai; Wu, Li-ping; Xie, Ju-lin; Deng, Xiao-xin; Chen, E; Zhang, Hui-Zhen

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the effect of negative charge aerosol (NCA) on the treatment of burn wound. Patients with superficial or deep partial thickness burn only were enrolled in the study, and they were randomly divided into trial group (T, including 180 cases of superficial thickness burn and 100 cases of deep partial thickness burn), control group (C, including 30 cases with superficial thickness burn and 30 with deep partial thickness burn), and self control group (SC, including 10 cases with superficial thickness burn and 10 with deep partial thickness burn). The patients in T and SC groups were treated with NCA for 1.5 hours, 1-2 times a day, from 6 postburn hour (PBH) to 2 postburn day (PBD), while those in C group received conventional treatment. For those in SC group, some of the wounds were covered with sterile schissel, while other wounds without schissel covering. The general changes in the wounds during NCA treatment were observed, and bacterial culture before and after NCA treatment was performed. The healing time was recorded and the blood biochemical parameters were determined. Rat model with deep partial thickness scald was established, and the rats were also divided into T and C groups, and received treatment as in human. Tissue samples were harvested from the wounds of rats in the 2 groups before and 1, 2, 3 weeks after treatment for pathological examination. There was no infection and little exudation in the patients in T group. No bacteria were found in the wound before and after NCA treatment. The healing time of the wounds of patients with superficial and deep partial thickness burn in T group was 6.3 +/- 1.6 d and 15.1 +/- 3.1 d, respectively, which was obviously shorter than those in C group (11.3 +/- 1.4 d and 21.2 +/- 1.4 d, P Negative charge aerosol is safe and effective in promoting wound healing of the patients with partial thickness burns.

  10. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results in the Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears With and Without the Anterior Attachment of the Rotator Cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Su; Moon, Seong Cheol; Hong, Se Jung; Bae, Seong Hae; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-09-01

    The anterior rotator cable is critical in force transmission of the rotator cuff. However, few clinical studies have examined the correlation between the integrity of the anterior supraspinatus tendon and surgical outcomes in patients with rotator cuff tears. To compare the clinical and structural outcomes of the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without anterior disruption of the supraspinatus tendon. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. One hundred eighty-one shoulders available for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, with a minimum 1-year follow-up, were enrolled. The anterior attachment of the rotator cable was disrupted in 113 shoulders (group A) and intact in 68 shoulders (group B). The mean age at the time of surgery in groups A and B was 59.6 and 59.2 years, respectively, and the mean follow-up period was 24.2 and 25.1 months, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in the preoperative tear size and pattern and muscle fatty degeneration between the 2 groups ( P = .004, P = .008, and P rotator cable, the mean 24-month follow-up demonstrated excellent pain relief and improvement in the ability to perform activities of daily living after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. However, tears with anterior disruption of the rotator cable showed a significantly larger and more complex tear pattern and more advanced fatty degeneration. Additionally, the retear rate was significantly higher in patients with a tear involving the anterior attachment of the rotator cable.

  11. Low-term results from non-conventional partial arthroplasty for treating rotator cuff arthroplasthy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Tenor Júnior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evolution of the functional results from CTA(rhemiarthroplasty for surgically treating degenerative arthroplathy of the rotator cuff, with a mean follow-up of 5.4 years.METHODS: Eighteen patients who underwent CTA(r partial arthroplasty to treat degenerative arthroplathy of the rotator cuff between April 2007 and June 2009 were reevaluated, with minimum and mean follow-ups of 4.6 years and 5.4 years, respectively. Pre and postoperative parameters for functionality and patient satisfaction were used (functional scale of the University of California in Los Angeles, UCLA. All the patients underwent prior conservative treatment for 6 months and underwent surgical treatment because of the absence of satisfactory results. Patients were excluded if they presented any of the following: previous shoulder surgery; pseudoparalysis; insufficiency of the coracoacromial arch (type 2 B in Seebauer's classification; neurological lesions; or insufficiency of the deltoid muscle and the subscapularis muscle.RESULTS: With a mean follow-up of 5.4 years, 14 patients considered that they were satisfied with the surgery (78%; the mean range of joint motion for active elevation improved from 55.8° before the operation to 82.0° after the operation; the mean external rotation improved from 18.9° before the operation to 27.3° after the operation; and the mean medial rotation remained at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. The mean UCLA score after the mean follow-up of 5.4 years was 23.94 and this was an improvement in comparison with the preoperative mean and the mean 1 year after the operation.CONCLUSION: The functional results from CTA(r hemiarthroplasty for treating rotator cuff arthroplasty in selected patients remained satisfactory after a mean follow-up of 5.4 years.

  12. Finite Difference Solution of Elastic-Plastic Thin Rotating Annular Disk with Exponentially Variable Thickness and Exponentially Variable Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic-plastic stresses, strains, and displacements have been obtained for a thin rotating annular disk with exponentially variable thickness and exponentially variable density with nonlinear strain hardening material by finite difference method using Von-Mises' yield criterion. Results have been computed numerically and depicted graphically. From the numerical results, it can be concluded that disk whose thickness decreases radially and density increases radially is on the safer side of design as compared to the disk with exponentially varying thickness and exponentially varying density as well as to flat disk.

  13. The natural history of partial rotator cuff tear evaluated by MRI. Can we predict the prognosis of partial rotator cuff tear by MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Koumei

    2010-01-01

    The cause and progress of the tear in the title are not fully understood and its treatment varies dependently on the injured site, depth, accompanied disease and symptom, and imaging profile. The author classified the tears in 4 types in MRI findings, followed their temporal progression and clinical symptom, and found that this classification in MRI finding was helpful to predict the prognosis, which is described in this paper. Subjects are 47 shoulders of 45 patients (M19/F26, av. age 71.0 y) who underwent conservative treatment of the disease during the time May, 2003-Oct. 2008, periodical MRI (2.7 times in av.) for 18.5 mo in av. and follow-up diagnosis until 24.9 mo in av. MRI is conducted with the machine 1.0 T Siemens harmonicdome to acquire the fast spin echo T1, T2 weighted images, and short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) coronal, axial and sagittal ones. Tears in MRI are classified in Type 1 (abnormal signal type) (25 shoulders), Type 2 (abnormal signal and swelling type) (7 shoulders), Type 3 (cut off end type) (10 shoulders) and Type 4 (tapered end type) (5 shoulders). The partial rotator cuff tear is suggested to be originated from the denaturation of the cuff with a subsequent certain injury or loading to become Type 1 to 2 and to progress to Type 3 to 4 by continuous acrominal impingement. It is suggested that at the first diagnosis the Type 1 does not have so much serious symptom, but which tends to last long while the symptom is serious in Type 2 and 3: the prognosis in Type 4 is good. (K.T)

  14. Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment on Deep Partial-Thickness Burn Injury in Rats: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Djedovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT enhances tissue vascularization and neoangiogenesis. Recent animal studies showed improved soft tissue regeneration using ESWT. In most cases, deep partial-thickness burns require skin grafting; the outcome is often unsatisfactory in function and aesthetic appearance. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of ESWT on skin regeneration after deep partial-thickness burns. Under general anesthesia, two standardized deep partial-thickness burns were induced on the back of 30 male Wistar rats. Immediately after the burn, ESWT was given to rats of group 1 (N=15, but not to group 2 (N=15. On days 5, 10, and 15, five rats of each group were analyzed. Reepithelialization rate was defined, perfusion units were measured, and histological analysis was performed. Digital photography was used for visual documentation. A wound score system was used. ESWT enhanced the percentage of wound closure in group 1 as compared to group 2 (P<0.05. The reepithelialization rate was improved significantly on day 15 (P<0.05. The wound score showed a significant increase in the ESWT group. ESWT improves skin regeneration of deep partial-thickness burns in rats. It may be a suitable and cost effective treatment alternative in this type of burn wounds in the future.

  15. Partial-thickness macular hole in vitreomacular traction syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Sabti Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vitreomacular traction syndrome has recently been recognized as a distinct clinical condition. It may lead to many complications, such as cystoid macular edema, macular pucker formation, tractional macular detachment, and full-thickness macular hole formation. Case presentation We report a case of vitreomacular traction syndrome with eccentric traction at the macula and a partial-thickness macular hole in a 63-year-old Pakistani Punjabi man. The patient was evaluated using optical coherence tomography, and he underwent a successful pars plana vitrectomy. After the operation, his foveal contour regained normal configuration, and his visual acuity improved from 20/60 to 20/30. Conclusions Pars plana vitrectomy prevents the progression of a partial thickness macular hole in vitreomacular traction syndrome. The relief of traction by vitrectomy restores foveal anatomy and visual acuity in this condition.

  16. The effects of film thickness on the electrical, optical, and structural properties of cylindrical, rotating, magnetron-sputtered ITO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Ho; Seong, Tae-Yeon; Ahn, Kyung-Jun; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Seok, Hae-Jun; Seo, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Han-Ki

    2018-05-01

    We report the characteristics of Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) films intended for use as transparent conducting electrodes; the films were prepared via a five-generation, in-line type, cylindrical, rotating magnetron sputtering (CRMS) system as a function of film thickness. By using a rotating cylindrical ITO target with high usage (∼80%), we prepared high conductivity, transparent ITO films on five-generation size glass. The effects of film thickness on the electrical, optical, morphological, and structural properties of CRMS-grown ITO films are investigated in detail to correlate the thickness and performance of ITO films. The preferred orientation changed from the (2 2 2) to the (4 0 0) plane with increasing thickness of ITO is attributed to the stability of the (4 0 0) plane against resputtering during the CRMS process. Based on X-ray diffraction, surface field emission scanning electron microscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, we suggest a possible mechanism to explain the preferred orientation and effects of film thickness on the performance of CRMS-grown ITO films.

  17. Unsteady hydromagnetic free-convection flow with radiative heat transfer in a rotating fluid of arbitrary optical thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestman, A.R.; Adjepong, S.K.

    1987-11-01

    This paper investigates transient effect on the flow of a thermally radiating and electrically conducting compressible gas in a rotating medium bounded by a vertical flat plate. The transience is provoked by a time dependent perturbation on a constant plate temperature. The problem particularly focusses on an optically thick gas and a gas of arbitrary optical thickness when the difference between the wall and free stream temperatures is small. Analytical results are possible only for limiting values of time and these results are discussed quantitatively. Indeed the assumption of small temperature difference is more appropriate for plates which are opaque rather than transparent. (author). 3 refs

  18. The Karush–Kuhn–Tucker optimality conditions in minimum weight design of elastic rotating disks with variable thickness and density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Jafari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotating discs work mostly at high angular velocity. High speed results in large centrifugal forces in discs and induces large stresses and deformations. Minimizing weight of such disks yields various benefits such as low dead weights and lower costs. In order to attain a certain and reliable analysis, disk with variable thickness and density is considered. Semi-analytical solutions for the elastic stress distribution in rotating annular disks with uniform and variable thicknesses and densities are obtained under plane stress assumption by authors in previous works. The optimum disk profile for minimum weight design is achieved by the Karush–Kuhn–Tucker (KKT optimality conditions. Inequality constrain equation is used in optimization to make sure that maximum von Mises stress is always less than yielding strength of the material of the disk.

  19. Comparison of three different dressings for partial thickness burns in children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, Emma; Kimble, Roy M; Cuttle, Leila; Stockton, Kellie

    2013-11-25

    In the paediatric population, pain and distress associated with burn injuries during wound care procedures remain a constant challenge. Although silver dressings are the gold standard for burn care in Australasia, very few high-level trials have been conducted that compare silver dressings to determine which will provide the best level of care clinically. Therefore, for paediatric patients in particular, identifying silver dressings that are associated with lower levels of pain and rapid wound re-epithelialisation is imperative. This study will determine whether there is a difference in time to re-epithelialisation and pain and distress experienced during wound care procedures among Acticoat™, Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ and Mepilex Ag™ dressings for acute, paediatric partial thickness burns. Children aged 0 to 15 years with an acute partial thickness (superficial partial to deep partial thickness inclusive) burn injury and a burn total body surface area of ≤ 10% will be eligible for the trial. Patients will be randomised to one of the three dressing groups: (1) Acticoat™ or (2) Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ or (3) Mepilex Ag™. A minimum of 28 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Primary measures of pain, distress and healing will be repeated at each dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialisation occurs or skin grafting is required. Additional data collected will include infection status at each dressing change, physical function, scar outcome and scar management requirements, cost effectiveness of each dressing and staff perspectives of the dressings. The results of this study will determine the effects of three commonly used silver and silicone burn dressing combinations on the rate of wound re-epithelialisation and pain experienced during dressing procedures in acute, paediatric partial thickness burn injuries. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000105741.

  20. Does Additional Biceps Augmentation Improve Rotator Cuff Healing and Clinical Outcomes in Anterior L-Shaped Rotator Cuff Tears? Clinical Comparisons With Arthroscopic Partial Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yoon Sang; Lee, Juyeob; Kim, Rag Gyu; Ko, Young-Won; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2017-11-01

    The repair of anterior L-shaped tears is usually difficult because of the lack of anterior rotator cuff tendon to cover the footprint. The biceps tendon is usually exposed from the retracted anterolateral corner of the torn tendon and can be easily used to augment rotator cuff repair. Hypothesis/Purpose: This study compared the clinical outcomes of the biceps augmentation technique with those of partial tendon repair for the arthroscopic treatment of large anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears to evaluate the role of additional biceps augmentation in tendon healing. We hypothesized that the biceps augmentation technique would lead to a lower rotator cuff tendon retear rate and provide satisfactory functional outcomes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included 64 patients with anterior L-shaped rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic repair. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (31 patients) underwent repair of an anterior L-shaped tear combined with biceps augmentation, and group B (33 patients) had a partially repaired tendon whose footprint was exposed after repair without undue tension on the retracted tendon. Clinical evaluations were performed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, muscle strength, visual analog scale for pain, and patient satisfaction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for tendon integrity at 6 months postoperatively. The mean period of follow-up was 29.1 ± 3.5 months (range, 24-40 months). The mean ASES and Constant scores significantly improved from 52.8 ± 10.6 and 43.2 ± 9.9 preoperatively to 88.2 ± 6.9 and 86.8 ± 6.2 at final follow-up in group A ( P rotation [ER]: 57.5 ± 9.9 to 86.8 ± 9.3; internal rotation [IR]: 68.1 ± 10.8 to 88.1 ± 8.4; P rotator cuff tendon on postoperative MRI. The retear rate between the 2 groups showed no significant difference ( P = .552). Regarding clinical outcomes, both groups had no significant difference in the ASES score

  1. Biomechanical comparison of double-row versus transtendon single-row suture anchor technique for repair of the grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Gang; Zhao, De-Wei; Wang, Wei-Ming; Ren, Ming-Fa; Li, Rui-Xin; Yang, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Peng

    2010-11-01

    For partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff, double-row fixation and transtendon single-row fixation restore insertion site anatomy, with excellent results. We compared the biomechanical properties of double-row and transtendon single-row suture anchor techniques for repair of grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears. In 10 matched pairs of fresh-frozen sheep shoulders, the infraspinatus tendon from 1 shoulder was repaired with a double-row suture anchor technique. This comprised placement of 2 medial anchors with horizontal mattress sutures at an angle of ≤ 45° into the medial margin of the infraspinatus footprint, just lateral to the articular surface, and 2 lateral anchors with horizontal mattress sutures. Standardized, 50% partial, articular-sided infraspinatus lesions were created in the contralateral shoulder. The infraspinatus tendon from the contralateral shoulder was repaired using two anchors with transtendon single-row mattress sutures. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading from 10 to 100 N for 50 cycles, followed by tensile testing to failure. Gap formation and strain over the footprint area were measured using a motion capture system; stiffness and failure load were determined from testing data. Gap formation for the transtendon single-row repair was significantly smaller (P row repair for the first cycle ((1.74 ± 0.38) mm vs. (2.86 ± 0.46) mm, respectively) and the last cycle ((3.77 ± 0.45) mm vs. (5.89 ± 0.61) mm, respectively). The strain over the footprint area for the transtendon single-row repair was significantly smaller (P row repair. Also, it had a higher mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness. For grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears, transtendon single-row fixation exhibited superior biomechanical properties when compared with double-row fixation.

  2. [Efficacy observation on application of negative pressure therapy in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness scald wound in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chuan-an; Chai, Jia-ke; Tuo, Xiao-ye; Cai, Jian-hua; Li, Dong-jie; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Hua; Cai, Jin-dong

    2013-02-01

    To observe the effect of negative pressure therapy in the treatment of superficial partial-thickness scald in children. Three hundred and seven children with superficial partial-thickness scald hospitalized from August 2009 to May 2012 were divided into negative pressure therapy group (NPT, n = 145) and control group (C, n = 162) according to the random number table. Patients in group NPT were treated with negative pressure from within post injury day (PID) 3 to PID 9 (with -16 kPa pressure), while traditional occlusive dressing method was used in group C. Changes in body temperature, wound healing condition, frequency of dressing change were compared between group NPT and group C. Bacterial culture results of wounds were compared before and after treatment in group NPT. Volume of drained transudate per one percent of wound area was recorded in group NPT on PID 1 to PID 3. Data were processed with t test or chi-square test. The incidence of high fever was significantly lower in group NPT (26.9%, 39/145) than in group C (63.6%, 103/162, χ(2) = 41.419, P partial-thickness scald.

  3. Impact of a Newly Implemented Burn Protocol on Surgically Managed Partial Thickness Burns at a Specialized Burns Center in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Khwee-Soon Vincent; Chong, Si-Jack; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a newly implemented protocol for superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns which involves early surgery and rapid coverage with biosynthetic dressing in a specialized national burns center in Singapore. Consecutive patients with 5% or greater total body surface area (TBSA) superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns injury admitted to the Burns Centre at the Singapore General Hospital between August and December 2014 for surgery within 48 hours of injury were prospectively recruited into the study to form the protocol group. Comparable historical cases from the year 2013 retrieved from the burns center audit database were used to form the historical control group. Demographics (age, sex), type and depth of burns, %TBSA burnt, number of operative sessions, and length of stay were recorded for each patient of both cohorts. Thirty-nine burns patients managed under the new protocol were compared with historical control (n = 39) comparable in age and extensiveness of burns. A significantly shorter length of stay (P burns was observed in the new protocol group (0.74 day/%TBSA) versus historical control (1.55 day/%TBSA). Fewer operative sessions were needed under the new protocol for burns 10% or greater TBSA burns (P protocol for surgically managed burns patients which involves early surgery and appropriate use of biosynthetic dressing on superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns. Clinically, shorter lengths of stay, fewer operative sessions, and decreased need for skin grafting of burns patient were observed.

  4. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, You-zhi; Zhang, Chi; Lin, Xiang-jin

    2015-12-01

    The use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an innovative clinical therapy, especially in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical improvement and tendon-to-bone healing with and without PRP therapy in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A systematic search was done in the major medical databases to evaluate the studies using PRP therapy (PRP+) or with no PRP (PRP-) for the treatment of patients with rotator cuff tears. We reviewed clinical scores such as the Constant score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Rating Scale, the Simple Shoulder Test, and the failure-to-heal rate by magnetic resonance imaging between PRP+ and PRP- groups. Five studies included in this review were used for a meta-analysis based on data availability. There were no statistically significant differences between PRP+ and PRP- groups for overall outcome scores (P > .05). However, the PRP+ group exhibited better healing rates postoperatively than the PRP- group (P = .03) in small/moderate full-thickness tears. The use of PRP therapy in full-thickness rotator cuff repairs showed no statistically significant difference compared with no PRP therapy in clinical outcome scores, but the failure-to-heal rate was significantly decreased when PRP was used for treatment of small-to-moderately sized tears. PRP therapy may improve tendon-to-bone healing in patients with small or moderate rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnosis of partial and complete rotator cuff tears using combined gradient echo and spin echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, M.J.; Yandow, D.R.; DeSmet, A.A.; Orwin, J.F.; Quintana, F.A.

    1994-01-01

    Most magnetic resonance (MR) studies evaluating the rotator cuff for tears have used T2-weighted imaging in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. T2 * -weighted gradient echo imaging, however, has advantages over spin echo imaging, including contiguous slices without cross-talk, high contrast around the cuff, and intrinsically shorter imaging times which can be used to increase the number of signals averaged and thus improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We reviewed the shoulder MR scans of 87 consecutive patients who underwent both a MR scan and a shoulder arthroscopy during which the size of tears, if present, was graded. The reviewers were blinded as to the history and arthroscopic results. The MR scans included oblique coronal T2 * -weighted gradient echo and oblique sagittal T2-weighted spin echo images. MR cuff grades were correlated with arthroscopic findings. For complete tears, the sensitivity of MR was 0.91 and the specificity 0.95. For partial tears, the sensitivity was 0.74 and the specificity 0.87. This accuracy is similar to two-plane T2-weighted imaging as previously reported in the literature. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.0005) between the cuff grade as determined by MR and the arthroscopic findings. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosis of partial and complete rotator cuff tears using combined gradient echo and spin echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yandow, D R [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); DeSmet, A A [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Orwin, J F [Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Quintana, F A [Dept. of Biostatistics, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Most magnetic resonance (MR) studies evaluating the rotator cuff for tears have used T2-weighted imaging in the coronal oblique and sagittal oblique planes. T2{sup *}-weighted gradient echo imaging, however, has advantages over spin echo imaging, including contiguous slices without cross-talk, high contrast around the cuff, and intrinsically shorter imaging times which can be used to increase the number of signals averaged and thus improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We reviewed the shoulder MR scans of 87 consecutive patients who underwent both a MR scan and a shoulder arthroscopy during which the size of tears, if present, was graded. The reviewers were blinded as to the history and arthroscopic results. The MR scans included oblique coronal T2{sup *}-weighted gradient echo and oblique sagittal T2-weighted spin echo images. MR cuff grades were correlated with arthroscopic findings. For complete tears, the sensitivity of MR was 0.91 and the specificity 0.95. For partial tears, the sensitivity was 0.74 and the specificity 0.87. This accuracy is similar to two-plane T2-weighted imaging as previously reported in the literature. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.0005) between the cuff grade as determined by MR and the arthroscopic findings. (orig.)

  7. Partial thickness autologus calvarial bone orbitocranioplasty for a sphenorbital encephalocele presenting as pulsatile exophthalmos

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Adarsh; Garg, Amrish Kumar; Hiran, Subodh

    2015-01-01

    Basal encephalocele accounts only 1.5% of all encephaloceles. But Sphenorbital encephalocele is the rarest cause of herniation of brain into orbit leading to pulsatile exphothalmos. Authors presenting a case of sphenorbital encephalocele in a 16 yrs old girl successsfully managed by orbitcranioplasty by partilal thickness autologus calvarial bone graft.

  8. Stepwise surgical approach to diabetic partial foot amputations with autogenous split thickness skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical treatment of severe diabetic foot infections, substantial soft tissue loss often accompanies partial foot amputations. These sizeable soft tissue defects require extensive care with the goal of expedited closure to inhibit further infection and to provide resilient surfaces capable of withstanding long-term ambulation. Definitive wound closure management in the diabetic population is dependent on multiple factors and can have a major impact on the risk of future diabetic foot complications. In this article, the authors provide an overview of autogenous skin grafting, including anatomical considerations, clinical conditions, surgical approach, and adjunctive treatments, for diabetic partial foot amputations.

  9. Crustal Thickness Beneath Libya and the Origin of Partial Melt Beneath AS Sawda Volcanic Province From Receiver Function Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemnifi, Awad A.; Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Browning, John; Aouad, Nassib S.; El Ebaidi, Saad K.; Liu, Kelly K.; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates crustal thickness and properties within the Libyan region. Results obtained from 15 seismic stations belonging to the Libyan Center for Remote Sensing and Space Science are reported, in addition to 3 seismic stations publically available, using receiver functions. The results show crustal thicknesses ranging from 24 km to 36 km (with uncertainties ranging between ±0.10 km and ±0.90 km). More specifically, crustal thickness ranges from 32 km to 36 km in the southern portion of the Libyan territory then becomes thinner, between 24 km and 30 km, in the coastal areas of Libya and thinnest, between 24 km and 28 km, in the Sirt Basin. The observed high Vp/Vs value of 1.91 at one station located at the AS Sawda Volcanic Province in central Libya indicates the presence of either partial melt or an abnormally warm area. This finding suggests that magma reservoirs beneath the Libyan territory may still be partially molten and active, thereby posing significant earthquake and volcanic risks. The hypothesis of an active magma source is further demonstrated though the presence of asthenospheric upwelling and extension of the Sirt Basin. This study provides a new calculation of unconsolidated sediment layers by using the arrival time of the P to S converted phases. The results show sediments thicknesses of 0.4 km to 3.7 km, with the Vp/Vs values ranging from 2.2 to 4.8. The variations in crustal thickness throughout the region are correlated with surface elevation and Bouguer gravity anomalies, which suggest that they are isostatically compensated.

  10. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A.; Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der; Willems, W.J.; Bipat, Shandra

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  11. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willems, W.J. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Orthopaedic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra [University of Amsterdam (NL). Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of the influence of air gap thickness and eccentricity on the noise of the rotating electrical machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donát M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the numerical modelling of the dynamic response of the rotating electrical machine on the application of the magnetic forces. The special attention is paid to the modelling of the magnetic forces that act on the stator winding of the machine and the computational model of the modal properties of the stator winding. The created computational model was used to investigation of the influence of the nominal air gap thickness and the air gap eccentricity on the sound power radiated by outer surface of the stator of the machine. The obtained results show that the nominal air gap thickness has slightly greater influence on the sound power of the machine than eccentricity of the air gap.

  13. Elastic and Viscoelastic Stresses of Nonlinear Rotating Functionally Graded Solid and Annular Disks with Gradually Varying Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allam M. N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical and numerical nonlinear solutions for rotating variable-thickness functionally graded solid and annular disks with viscoelastic orthotropic material properties are presented by using the method of successive approximations.Variable material properties such as Young’s moduli, density and thickness of the disk, are first introduced to obtain the governing equation. As a second step, the method of successive approximations is proposed to get the nonlinear solution of the problem. In the third step, the method of effective moduli is deduced to reduce the problem to the corresponding one of a homogeneous but anisotropic material. The results of viscoelastic stresses and radial displacement are obtained for annular and solid disks of different profiles and graphically illustrated. The calculated results are compared and the effects due to many parameters are discussed.

  14. Comparative outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave therapy for shoulder tendinitis or partial tears of the rotator cuff in athletes and non-athletes: Retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Yi; Wang, Ching-Jen; Wu, Kuan-Ting; Yang, Ya-Ju; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Wang, Shih-Wei

    2018-03-01

    Refractory shoulder tendinitis or partial thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are common findings in overhead athletes. Previous studies have examined the effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) for shoulder tendinitis. In the current study, we recruited 36 shoulders and performed a comparison between the professional athletes (13 shoulders, athletic group; AG) and the non-athletic population (23 shoulders, non-athletic group, NAG) with PTRCTs or shoulder tendinitis of the shoulder after ESWT. Patients with symptomatic tendinitis of the shoulder with or without a partial tear of the rotator cuff tendon and failed oral medication and physical therapy for more than 3 months were treated with electrohydraulic mode of ESWT. All patients that met the inclusion criteria were categorized into two groups according to their pre-treatment activity level. We found that NAG exhibited significant aging and degenerative change around the glenohumeral joint and subacromial space. After ESWT treatment, the patients in AG were with 53.8% high satisfaction rating and patients in NAG were 52.1% by one-year followed up. The results showed ESWT was equally effective treatment in both AG and NAG. In light of its efficacy and less-invasive nature, we suggest ESWT can be used to treat athletes with refractory tendinitis or PTRCTs before proceeding to arthroscopic intervention. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Operative management of partial-thickness tears of the proximal hamstring muscles in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Karl F; Cohen, Steven B; Bradley, James P

    2013-06-01

    Partial tears of the hamstring muscle origin represent a challenging clinical problem to the patient and orthopaedic surgeon. Although nonoperative treatment is frequently met with limited success, there is a paucity of data on the efficacy of surgical management for partial proximal hamstring tears in the active and athletic population. To evaluate the results of an anatomic repair for partial tears of the hamstring muscle origin in athletes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The records of 17 patients with partial tears of the proximal hamstring origin were reviewed after institutional review board approval was obtained. All patients were treated with open debridement and primary tendon repair after failure of at least 6 months of nonoperative therapy. Clinical and operative records, radiographs, and magnetic resonance images were reviewed for all patients. A patient-reported outcomes survey was completed by 14 patients that included the Lower Extremity Functional Score (LEFS), Marx activity rating scale, custom LEFS and Marx scales, and subjective patient satisfaction scores. Early and late postoperative complications were recorded. There were 3 male and 14 female patients; their average age was 43 years (range, 19-64 years) and average follow-up was 32 months (range, 12-51 months). There were 2 collegiate athletes (field hockey, track), 14 amateur athletes (distance running, waterskiing, tennis), and a professional bodybuilder. Postoperative LEFS was 73.3 ± 9.9 (range, 50-80) and custom LEFS was 66.7 ± 17.0 (range, 37-80) of a maximum 80 points. The most commonly reported difficulty was with prolonged sitting and explosive direction change while running. The average Marx score was 6.5 ± 5.3 (range, 0-16) of a maximum 16, correlating with a greater return to recreational running activities in this patient cohort than regular participation in pivoting or cutting sports. Marx custom scores were 20 of a maximum 20 in all patients, demonstrating no disability in

  16. Cost-effectiveness of silver dressings for paediatric partial thickness burns: An economic evaluation from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, E; Stockton, K; Kimble, R M; Cuttle, L; McPhail, S M

    2017-06-01

    Partial thickness burns of up to 10% total body surface area (TBSA) in children are common injuries primarily treated in the outpatient setting using expensive silver-containing dressings. However, economic evaluations in the paediatric burns population are lacking to assist healthcare providers when choosing which dressing to use. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three silver dressings for partial thickness burns ≤10% TBSA in children aged 0-15 years using days to full wound re-epithelialization as the health outcome. This study was a trial based economic evaluation (incremental cost effectiveness) conducted from a healthcare provider perspective. Ninety-six children participated in the trial investigating Acticoat™, Acticoat™ with Mepitel™ or Mepilex Ag™. Costs directly related to the management of partial thickness burns ≤10% TBSA were collected during the trial from March 2013 to July 2014 and for a one year after re-epithelialization time horizon. Incremental cost effectiveness ratios were estimated and dominance probabilities calculated from bootstrap resampling trial data. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the potential effect of accounting for infrequent, but high cost, skin grafting surgical procedures. Costs (dressing, labour, analgesics, scar management) were considerably lower in the Mepilex Ag™ group (median AUD$94.45) compared to the Acticoat™ (median $244.90) and Acticoat™ with Mepitel™ (median $196.66) interventions. There was a 99% and 97% probability that Mepilex Ag™ dominated (cheaper and more effective than) Acticoat™ and Acticoat™ with Mepitel™, respectively. This pattern of dominance was consistent across raw cost and effects, after a priori adjustments, and sensitivity analyses. There was an 82% probability that Acticoat™ with Mepitel dominated Acticoat™ in the primary analysis, although this probability was sensitive to the effect of skin graft procedures. This

  17. Random Pattern Vertically Oriented, Partial Thickness Buccinator Myomucosal Flap for Intraoral Reconstruction: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Rahpeyma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reconstruction of the oral cavity witha flap design containing the buccal mucosa and buccinator muscle but excluding the facial artery and vein is the topic of these case reports. Case Reports: This article uses random pattern vertically oriented partial thickness buccinator myomucosal flap for intraoral reconstruction in two cases. The first was for lining the mandibular anterior vestibule in a trauma patient. The second was for oral side coverage of bone graft in special cleft patient. In both patients, this flap survived and good bone coverage with non-keratinized mucosa was obtained. Conclusion:  Thin long buccal myomucosal flap not including facial artery and vein can survive.

  18. Ultrasound evaluation of arthroscopic full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff repair: single-row versus double-row suture bridge (transosseous equivalent) fixation. Results of a prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartsman, Gary M; Drake, Gregory; Edwards, T Bradley; Elkousy, Hussein A; Hammerman, Steven M; O'Connor, Daniel P; Press, Cyrus M

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the structural outcomes of a single-row rotator cuff repair and double-row suture bridge fixation after arthroscopic repair of a full-thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff tear. We evaluated with diagnostic ultrasound a consecutive series of ninety shoulders in ninety patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears at an average of 10 months (range, 6-12) after operation. A single surgeon at a single hospital performed the repairs. Inclusion criteria were full-thickness supraspinatus tears less than 25 mm in their anterior to posterior dimension. Exclusion criteria were prior operations on the shoulder, partial thickness tears, subscapularis tears, infraspinatus tears, combined supraspinatus and infraspinatus repairs and irreparable supraspinatus tears. Forty-three shoulders were repaired with single-row technique and 47 shoulders with double-row suture bridge technique. Postoperative rehabilitation was identical for both groups. Ultrasound criteria for healed repair included visualization of a tendon with normal thickness and length, and a negative compression test. Eighty-three patients were available for ultrasound examination (40 single-row and 43 suture-bridge). Thirty of 40 patients (75%) with single-row repair demonstrated a healed rotator cuff repair compared to 40/43 (93%) patients with suture-bridge repair (P = .024). Arthroscopic double-row suture bridge repair (transosseous equivalent) of an isolated supraspinatus rotator cuff tear resulted in a significantly higher tendon healing rate (as determined by ultrasound examination) when compared to arthroscopic single-row repair. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Dual insertion paths design characteristics and short-term clinical observation of rotational path removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Jiang, Ting; Li, Sai; Chen, Wei

    2013-02-18

    To investigate design methods of dual insertion paths and observe a short-term clinic overview of rotational path removable partial dentures (RPDs). In the study, 40 patients with partial edentulous arches were included and divided into two groups. The patients in group one were restored with rotational path RPDs (10 Kennedy class III and 10 Kennedy class IV respectively). The patients in group two (20 patients), whose edentulous area was matched with the patients' in group one, were restored with the linear path RPDs. After surveying and simulative preparation on diagnostic casts, the basic laws of designing rotational path RPDs were summarized. The oral preparation was accurately performed under the guidance of indices made on diagnostic casts after simulative preparation. The 40 dentures were recalled two weeks and one year after the insertion. The evaluations of the clinic outcome, including retention, stability, mastication function, esthetics and wearing convenience, were marked out as good, acceptable, and poor. The comparison of the evaluation results was performed between the two groups. In the rotational path design for Kennedy class III or IV RPDs, the angles (α) of dual insertion paths should be designed within a scope, approximate 10°-15°.When the angle (α) became larger, the denture retention turned to be better, but accordingly the posterior abutments needed more preparation. In the clinical application, the first insertions of the 40 dentures were all favorably accomplished. When the rotational path RPDs were compared to linear path RPDs, the time consuming on first insertion had no statistical difference[(32±8) min and (33±8) min respectively, P>0.05]. Recalled two weeks and one year after the insertion, in the esthetics evaluation, 20 rotational path RPDs were all evaluated as "A", but only 7(two weeks after) and 6 (one year after) linear path RPDs were evaluated as "A"(P<0.05). There was no significant difference in other evaluation results

  20. Semi-exact solution of non-uniform thickness and density rotating disks. Part II: Elastic strain hardening solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojjati, M.H.; Jafari, S.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical solutions for the elastic-plastic stress distribution in rotating annular disks with uniform and variable thicknesses and densities are obtained under plane stress assumption. The solution employs a technique called the homotopy perturbation method. A numerical solution of the governing differential equation is also presented based on the Runge-Kutta's method for both elastic and plastic regimes. The analysis is based on Tresca's yield criterion, its associated flow rule and linear strain hardening. The results of the two methods are compared and generally show good agreement. It is shown that, depending on the boundary conditions used, the plastic core may contain one, two or three different plastic regions governed by different mathematical forms of the yield criterion. Four different stages of elastic-plastic deformation occur. The expansion of these plastic regions with increasing angular velocity is obtained together with the distributions of stress and displacement

  1. Classical and modern optimization methods in minimum weight design of elastic rotating disk with variable thickness and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, S.; Hojjati, M.H.; Fathi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Rotating disks work mostly at high angular velocity and this results a large centrifugal force and consequently induce large stresses and deformations. Minimizing weight of such disks yields to benefits such as low dead weights and lower costs. This paper aims at finding an optimal disk profiles for minimum weight design using the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker method (KKT) as a classical optimization method, simulated annealing (SA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) as two modern optimization techniques. Some semi-analytical solutions for the elastic stress distribution in a rotating annular disk with uniform and variable thickness and density proposed by the authors in the previous works have been used. The von Mises failure criterion of optimum disk is used as an inequality constraint to make sure that the rotating disk does not fail. The results show that the minimum weight obtained for all three methods is almost identical. The KKT method gives a profile with slightly less weight (6% less than SA and 1% less than PSO) while the implementation of PSO and SA methods are easier and provide more flexibility compared with those of the KKT method. The effectiveness of the proposed optimization methods is shown. - Highlights: ► Karush-Kuhn-Tucker, simulated annealing and particle swarm methods are used. ► The KKT gives slightly less weight (6% less than SA and 1% less than PSO). ► Implementation of PSO and SA methods are easier and provide more flexibility. ► The effectiveness of the proposed optimization methods is shown.

  2. Classical and modern optimization methods in minimum weight design of elastic rotating disk with variable thickness and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, S. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, P.O. Box 484, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hojjati, M.H., E-mail: Hojjati@nit.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, P.O. Box 484, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, P.O. Box 484, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Rotating disks work mostly at high angular velocity and this results a large centrifugal force and consequently induce large stresses and deformations. Minimizing weight of such disks yields to benefits such as low dead weights and lower costs. This paper aims at finding an optimal disk profiles for minimum weight design using the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker method (KKT) as a classical optimization method, simulated annealing (SA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) as two modern optimization techniques. Some semi-analytical solutions for the elastic stress distribution in a rotating annular disk with uniform and variable thickness and density proposed by the authors in the previous works have been used. The von Mises failure criterion of optimum disk is used as an inequality constraint to make sure that the rotating disk does not fail. The results show that the minimum weight obtained for all three methods is almost identical. The KKT method gives a profile with slightly less weight (6% less than SA and 1% less than PSO) while the implementation of PSO and SA methods are easier and provide more flexibility compared with those of the KKT method. The effectiveness of the proposed optimization methods is shown. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Karush-Kuhn-Tucker, simulated annealing and particle swarm methods are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The KKT gives slightly less weight (6% less than SA and 1% less than PSO). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implementation of PSO and SA methods are easier and provide more flexibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effectiveness of the proposed optimization methods is shown.

  3. Finite-thickness effect on speed of a counter-rotating vortex pair at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibah, Ummu; Nakagawa, Hironori; Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2018-03-01

    We establish a general formula for the translational speed of a counter-rotating vortex pair, valid for thick cores, moving in an incompressible fluid with and without viscosity. We extend to higher order the method of matched asymptotic expansions developed by Ting and Tung (1965 Phys. Fluids 8 1039–51). The solution of the Euler or the Navier–Stokes equations is constructed in the form of a power series in a small parameter, the ratio of the core radius to the distance between the core centers. For a viscous vortex pair, the small parameter should be \\sqrt{ν /{{Γ }}} where ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid and Γ is the circulation of each vortex. A correction due to the effect of finite thickness of the vortices to the traveling speed makes its appearance at fifth order. A drastic simplification is achieved of expressing it solely in terms of the strength of the second-order quadrupole field associated with the elliptical deformation of the core. For a viscous vortex pair, we exploit the conservation law for the hydrodynamic impulse to derive the growth of the distance between the vortices, which is cubic in time.

  4. Comparison of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and clinical assessment in differentiating between superficial and deep partial thickness burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Saadia Nosheen; Khan, Farid Ahmed; Bashir, Muhammad Mustehsan; Nasir, Muneeb; Ansari, Hamid Hussain; Shami, Hussan Birkhez; Nazir, Umer; Hanif, Asif; Sohail, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    To compare the accuracy of Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) and clinical assessment in differentiating between superficial and deep partial thickness burns to decide whether early tangential excision and grafting or conservative management should be employed to optimize burn and patient management. March 2015 to November 2016. Ninety two wounds in 34 patients reporting within 5days of less than 40% burn surface area were included. Unstable patients, pregnant females and those who expired were excluded. The wounds were clinically assessed and LDI done concomitantly Plastic Surgeons blinded to each other's findings. Wound appearance, color, blanching, pain, hair follicle dislodgement were the clinical parameters that distinguished between superficial and deep partial thickness burns. On day 21, the wounds were again assessed for the presence of healing by the same plastic surgeons. The findings were correlated with the initial findings on LDI and clinical assessment and the results statistically analyzed. The data of 92 burn wounds was analyzed using SPSS (ver. 17). Clinical assessment correctly identified the depth of 75 and LDI 83 wounds, giving diagnostic accuracies of 81.52% and 90.21% respectively. The sensitivity of clinical assessment was 81% and of LDI 92.75%, whereas the specificity was 82% for both. The positive predictive value was 93% for clinical assessment and 94% for LDI while the negative predictive value was 59% and 79% respectively. Predictive accuracy of LDI was found to be better than clinical assessment in the prediction of wound healing, the gold standard for wound healing being 21 days. As such it can prove to be a reliable and viable cost effective alternative per se to clinical assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Bracing can partially limit tibial rotation during stressful activities after anterior crucial ligament reconstruction with a hamstring graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotis, D; Paschos, N K; Zampeli, F; Pappas, E; Mitsionis, G; Georgoulis, A D

    2016-09-01

    Hamstring graft has substantial differences with BPTB graft regarding initial mechanical strength, healing sequence, and vascularization, which may imply that a different approach during rehabilitation period is required. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of knee bracing on tibial rotation in ACL-reconstructed patients with a hamstring autograft during high loading activities. The hypothesis was that there would be a decrease in tibial rotation in the ACL-reconstructed braced knee as compared to the unbraced knee. Twenty male patients having undergone unilateral ACL reconstruction with a semitendinosus/gracilis autograft were assessed. Kinematic data were collected with an eight-camera optoelectronic system during two stressful tasks: (1) descending from a stair and subsequent pivoting; and (2) landing from a platform and subsequent pivoting. In each patient, three different experimental conditions were evaluated: (A) wearing a prophylactic brace (braced condition); (B) wearing a patellofemoral brace (sleeved condition); (C) without brace (unbraced condition). The intact knee without brace served as a control. Tibial rotation was significantly lower in the intact knee compared to all three conditions of the ACL-reconstructed knee (P≤0.01 for both tasks). Presence of a brace or sleeve resulted in lower tibial rotation than in the unbraced condition (p=0.003 for descending/pivot and P=0.0004 for landing/pivot). The braced condition resulted in lower rotation than the sleeved condition for descending/pivoting (P=0.031) while no differences were found for landing/pivoting (P=0.230). Knee bracing limited the excessive tibial rotation during pivoting under high loading activities in ACL-reconstructed knees with a hamstring graft. This partial restoration of normal kinematics may have a potential beneficial effect in patients recovering from ACL reconstruction with a hamstring autograft. Level III, case-control therapeutic study. Copyright

  6. Shoulder-specific outcomes 1 year after nontraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff repair: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnani, Navin; van Deurzen, Derek F P; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2017-10-01

    Nontraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears are commonly initially treated conservatively. If conservative treatment fails, rotator cuff repair is a viable subsequent option. The objective of the present meta-analysis is to evaluate the shoulder-specific outcomes one year after arthroscopic or mini-open rotator cuff repair of nontraumatic rotator cuff tears. A literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE within the period January 2000 to January 2017. All studies measuring the clinical outcome at 12 months after nontraumatic rotator cuff repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears were listed. We included 16 randomized controlled trials that met our inclusion criteria with a total of 1.221 shoulders. At 12 months after rotator cuff repair, the mean Constant score had increased 29.5 points; the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Score score increased by 38.6 points; mean Simple Shoulder Test score was 5.6 points; mean University of California Los Angeles score improved by 13.0 points; and finally, mean Visual Analogue Scale score decreased by 4.1 points. Based on this meta-analysis, significant improvements in the shoulder-specific indices are observed 12 months after nontraumatic arthroscopic or mini-open rotator cuff repair.

  7. Interference factors regarding the path of insertion of rotational-path removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chan-Te; Liu, Fang-Chun; Luk, Kwing-Chi

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of the location of the rotational center and the morphology of teeth resulting in interference with the rotational path of insertion and to estimate when an interference test should be performed. A total of 400 dental radiograms of maxillary and mandibular first and second molars (100 for each position) were selected. The radiograms were used to hand-sketch the outlines on tracing paper. Then, an interference test was simulated using calipers. Mesial long occlusal rest seats with three different lengths were designed. A curve-simulated rotational path was drawn on the tracing paper showing the outline of a molar. If the curve was intersected by the mesial outline, interference was occurred. A total of 1200 tests were performed. A significant number of interference cases (18.5%, N = 400) occurred when the rotational center was placed at the most distal margin of the occlusal surface. The interference was reduced (2.75%, N = 400) but still present at the distal fourth of the occlusal surface. At the distal one-third of the occlusal surface, interference did not occur (0%, N = 400). There was a significant difference between the results of the three rotational centers (p < 0.0001). The interference test was not required for a rotational center at the distal third to half of the occlusal surface. However, if the length of the long occlusal rest extends beyond the distal third, an interference test is recommended before final impression. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound measurement of rotator cuff thickness and acromio-humeral distance in the diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewinski, Jerzy J; Kusz, Damian J; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Cielinski, Lukasz S; Zoladz, Miroslaw P

    2008-04-01

    The usefulness of ultrasound measurements in the diagnosis of the subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder was evaluated. Fifty-seven patients with unilateral symptoms of the impingement syndrome underwent ultrasound examination of both shoulder joints, which included assessment of rotator cuff integrity, measurement of rotator cuff thickness and the distance between the infero-lateral edge of acromion and the apex of the greater tuberosity of humerus (AGT distance) in the standard ultrasonographic positions. As a control group, 36 volunteers (72 shoulders) with no history of shoulder pain were examined sonographically. Ultrasonographic assessment of humeral head elevation, measured as the AGT distance, proved to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of the subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder. A difference in rotator cuff thickness of more than 1.1 mm and a difference in the AGT distance of more than 2.1 mm between both shoulder joints may reflect dysfunction of rotator cuff muscles.

  9. Interference factors regarding the path of insertion of rotational-path removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Te Huang

    2017-02-01

    Conclusions: The interference test was not required for a rotational center at the distal third to half of the occlusal surface. However, if the length of the long occlusal rest extends beyond the distal third, an interference test is recommended before final impression.

  10. Partial slip effect in flow of magnetite-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles between rotating stretchable disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Tasawar [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Qayyum, Sumaira [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Imtiaz, Maria, E-mail: mi_qau@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Alzahrani, Faris; Alsaedi, Ahmed [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the flow of magnetic nanofluid (ferrofluid) between two parallel rotating stretchable disks with different rotating and stretching velocities. Water based fluid comprising magnetite-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is addressed. Velocity slip and temperature jump at solid–fluid interface are also taken into account. Appropriate transformations reduce the nonlinear partial differential system to ordinary differential system. Convergent series solutions are obtained. Effects of various pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles are shown and evaluated. Computations for skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are presented and examined for the influence of involved parameters. It is noted that tangential velocity of fluid decreases for larger velocity slip parameter. Fluid temperature also reduces for increasing value of thermal slip parameter. Surface drag force and heat transfer rate at lower disk are enhanced when magnetic field strength is increased. - Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by two stretchable rotating disks with velocity and thermal slips are explored. • Fluid temperature increases for larger solid volume fraction of nanofluid. • Heat transfer rate decreases for increasing values of thermal slip parameter.

  11. Full and Partial Thickness Burns from Spontaneous Combustion of E-Cigarette Lithium-Ion Batteries with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treitl, Daniela; Solomon, Rachele; Davare, Dafney L; Sanchez, Rafael; Kiffin, Chauniqua

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) has increased worldwide. Most electronic nicotine delivery systems use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are relatively safe, but in rare cases these batteries can spontaneously combust, leading to serious full and partial thickness burn injuries. Explosions from lithium-ion batteries can cause a flash fire and accelerant-related burn injuries. A retrospective chart review was conducted of 3 patients with lithium-ion battery burns seen at our Level I community-based trauma center. Clinical presentation, management, and outcome are presented. All 3 patients sustained burn injuries (total body surface area range 5-13%) from the spontaneous combustion of lithium-ion batteries used for e-cigarettes. All patients were treated with debridement and local wound care. All fully recovered without sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians can expect to treat burn cases due to spontaneous lithium-ion battery combustion as e-cigarette use continues to increase. The cases presented here are intended to bring attention to lithium-ion battery-related burns, prepare physicians for the clinical presentation of this burn mechanism, and facilitate patient education to minimize burn risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Topical silver sulfadiazine vs collagenase ointment for the treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlie, Daniel J; Juang, David; Aguayo, Pablo; Pettiford-Cunningham, Janine P; Erkmann, Erin A; Rash, Diane E; Sharp, Susan W; Sharp, Ronald J; St Peter, Shawn D

    2012-06-01

    The 2 most commonly used topical agents for partial thickness burns are silver sulfadiazine (SSD) and collagenase ointment (CO). Silver sulfadiazine holds antibacterial properties, and eschar separation occurs naturally. Collagenase ointment is an enzyme that cleaves denatured collagen facilitating separation but has no antibacterial properties. Currently, there are no prospective comparative data in children for these 2 agents. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized trial. After institutional review board approval, patients were randomized to daily debridement with SSD or CO. Primary outcome was the need for skin grafting. Patients were treated for 2 days with SSD with subsequent randomization. Polymyxin was mixed with CO for antibacterial coverage. Debridements were performed daily for 10 days or until the burn healed. Grafting was performed after 10 days if not healed. From January 2008 to January 2011, 100 patients were enrolled, with no differences in patient characteristics. There were no differences in clinical course, outcome, or need for skin grafting. Wound infections occurred in 7 patients treated with CO and 1 patient treated with SSD (P = .06). Collagenase ointment was more expensive than SSD (P burns results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic-Assisted Repair in Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Ruptures: Functional and Radiologic Results of Five-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriç Uğurlar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In our study, we evaluated the post-operative 5-year clinical and radiological results and the ratio of re­current ruptures under magnetic resonance imaging of the patients diagnosed as wide and massive, full-thick­ness rotator cuff rupture and arthroscopic-assisted mini-open rotator cuff repair is applied. Methods: We evaluated the pre-operative and post-op­erative clinical and radiological results of 38 patients with wide and massive, full-thickness rotator cuff rupture and arthroscopic-assisted rotator cuff repair is applied after failure of conservative treatment. Results: Mean post-operative follow-up period was 60.4 months. According to UCLA scoring there were excellent results in 26 patients, good results in 10, and moderate results in 2 patients. According to Constant scoring there were excellent results in 24 patients, good results in 12, and moderate results in 2 patients. 34 of the 38 patients indicated that they were satisfied with the results. The continuity of the rotator cuffs are evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging at the last visits of the patients and there was recurrent ruptures at the 8 patients. Conclusion: Although recurrent rotator cuff rupture rates varies depending on the age of the patients, moderate clinical results are obtained in elder patients. Neverthe­less, despite the rupture rates in the treatment of wide and massive, full-thickness ruptures, satisfactory clinical results can be obtained with arthroscopic-assisted mini-open rotator cuff repair.

  14. Arthroscopic Partial Repair of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Preoperative Factors Associated With Outcome Deterioration Over 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Kim, Won Ju; Kim, Kyung Cheon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial repair is a treatment option in irreparable large-to-massive rotator cuff tears without arthritic changes. However, there are indications that arthroscopic partial repair does not yield satisfactory outcomes. To report the clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic partial repairs in patients with irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears. In addition, an analysis was performed regarding preoperative factors that may influence patient outcomes and patient-rated satisfaction over time. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From 2005 to 2011, a total of 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic partial repair for irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears were retrospectively evaluated. Partial repair was defined as posterior cuff tissue repair with or without subscapularis tendon repair to restore the transverse force couple of the cuff. Pain visual analog scale (PVAS), questionnaire results (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] and Simple Shoulder Test [SST]), and radiographic changes (acromiohumeral distance and degenerative change) were assessed preoperatively, at first follow-up (roughly 1 year postoperatively), and at final follow-up (>2 years postoperatively). Patients rated their satisfaction level at each postoperative follow-up as well. Preoperative factors that might influence outcomes, such as patient demographics, tear size, and fatty infiltration, were investigated. The preoperative, first follow-up, and final follow-up results for mean PVAS (5.13, 2.13, and 3.16, respectively) and questionnaires (ASES: 41.97, 76.37, and 73.78; SST: 3.61, 6.33, and 6.07, respectively) improved significantly (all P .05) from the first to the final follow-up. Among preoperative factors, fatty infiltration of the teres minor was identified as the only statistically significant factor affecting patient-rated satisfaction (P = .007). This study showed that arthroscopic partial repair may produce initial improvement in selected outcomes at 2-year

  15. Clinical Outcomes and Safety of Partial Full-Thickness Myotomy versus Circular Muscle Myotomy in Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Achalasia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Here we aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety between partial full-thickness myotomy and circular muscle myotomy during POEM procedure in achalasia patients. Methods. Clinical data of achalasia of cardia (AC patients who underwent POEM in our center during January 2014 to January 2015 was collected (34 cases. 19 patients who received partial full-thickness myotomy were assigned to group A and 14 patients who received circular muscle myotomy were assigned to group B. The procedure-related parameters between the two groups were compared. Symptom relief rate and postprocedure manometry outcomes were compared to evaluate the efficacy. Procedure-related adverse events and complications were compared to evaluate the safety. Results. (1 Mean operation times were significantly shorter in group A than group B (62.42±23.17 vs 87.86±26.44 min, p0.05. (3 Comparison of procedure-related adverse events and complications had no statistical differences (all p>0.05. Conclusion. Partial full-thickness myotomy had no significant differences in efficacy or safety with circular myotomy, but partial full-thickness myotomy significantly reduced the procedure time.

  16. In-process tool rotational speed variation with constant heat input in friction stir welding of AZ31 sheets with variable thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Forcellese, Archimede; Fratini, Livan; Simoncini, Michela

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, friction stir welding experiments on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets, characterized by a variable thickness along the welding line, were carried out. The approach adapted during welding consisted in maintaining constant the heat input to the joint. To this purpose, the rotational speed of the pin tool was increased with decreasing thickness and decreased with increasing thickness in order to obtain the same temperatures during welding. The amount by which the rotational speed was changed as a function of the sheet thickness was defined on the basis of the results given by FEM simulations of the FSW process. Finally, the effect of the in-process variation of the tool rotational speed on the mechanical and microstructural properties of FSWed joints was analysed by comparing both the nominal stress vs. nominal strain curves and microstructure of FSWed joints obtained in different process conditions. It was observed that FSW performed by keeping constant the heat input to the joint leads to almost coincident results both in terms of the curve shape, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation values, and microstructure.

  17. Partial-thickness burn wounds healing by topical treatment: A randomized controlled comparison between silver sulfadiazine and centiderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidinia, Amin; Keihanian, Faeze; Lashkari, Ardalan Pasdaran; Lahiji, Hossein Ghavvami; Mobayyen, Mohammadreza; Heidarzade, Abtin; Golchai, Javad

    2017-03-01

    Burns are common event and associated with a high incidence of death, disability, and high costs. Centella asiatica (L.) is a medicinal herb, commonly growing in humid areas in several tropical countries that improve wound healing. On the basis of previous studies, we compared the efficacy of Centiderm versus silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in partial thickness burning patients. Study population comprised burn victims referred to Velayat Burning Hospital at Rasht, Iran. The intervention group received Centiderm and control group SSD cream. Burn wounds were treated once daily at home. All of the wounds were evaluated till complete healing occurred and at the admission, days 3, 7, 14 objective signs; visual acuity score (VAS) and subjective signs were recorded. Re-epithelialization time and complete healing days were recorded. We used random fixed block for randomization. The randomization sequence was created using the computer. Patients and burning specialist physician were blinded. Seventy-five patients randomized into 2 groups; (40 patients: Centiderm group; 35 patients: SSD group). The mean age of them was 30.67 ± 9.91 years and 19 of them were male (31.7%). Thirty patients in Centiderm and 30 patients in SSD group were analyzed. All of objective and subjective signs and mean of re-epithelialization and complete healing were significantly better in Centiderm group rather than SSD group (P < 0.05). There was no infection in Centiderm group. We showed that use of Centiderm ointment not only improved the objective and subjective signs in less than 3 days, but also the re-epithelialization and complete healing rather than SSD without any infection in the subjects.

  18. Continuous Arc Rotation of the Couch Therapy for the Delivery of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Treatment Planning Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We present a novel form of arc therapy: continuous arc rotation of the couch (C-ARC) and compare its dosimetry with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). C-ARC, like VMAT, uses a modulated beam aperture and dose rate, but with the couch, not the gantry, rotating. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients previously treated with APBI using 3D-CRT were replanned with (1) C-ARC, (2) IMRT, and (3) VMAT. C-ARC plans were designed with one medial and one lateral arc through which the couch rotated while the gantry was held stationary at a tangent angle. Target dose coverage was normalized to the 3D-CRT plan. Comparative endpoints were dose to normal breast tissue, lungs, and heart and monitor units prescribed. Results: Compared with 3D-CRT, C-ARC, IMRT, and VMAT all significantly reduced the ipsilateral breast V50% by the same amount (mean, 7.8%). Only C-ARC and IMRT plans significantly reduced the contralateral breast maximum dose, the ipsilateral lung V5Gy, and the heart V5%. C-ARC used on average 40%, 30%, and 10% fewer monitor units compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: C-ARC provides improved dosimetry and treatment efficiency, which should reduce the risks of toxicity and secondary malignancy. Its tangent geometry avoids irradiation of critical structures that is unavoidable using the en face geometry of VMAT.

  19. Comparison of anterior segment measurements using rotating Scheimpflug imaging and partial coherence interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Fotouhi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available METHODS:As part of the first phase of Shahroud Eye Cohort Study with 5 190 subjects of 40 to 64 years of age, CCT and ACD were measured using Scheimpflug imaging with the Pentacam (Oculus, Inc., Lynnwood, WA, USA and partial coherence interferometry with the Allegro BioGraph (Wavelight, Erlangen, Germany.RESULTS:After applying exclusion criteria, we had data of 4 387 subjects with a mean age of 50.7±6.2 years. Mean CCT with Pentacam and BioGraph were 528.6±33.2μm and 525.6±32μm respectively; the difference was statistically significant (PPCONCLUSION:For both CCT and ACD, the BioGraph gave significantly lower values than the Pentacam (P<0.05. Despite the high inter-device correlation, the 95% limits of agreements were wide, and this may limit their interchangeability in measuring the CCT and ACD.

  20. Linking partial and quasi dynamical symmetries in rotational nuclei and shell evolution in {sup 96}Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Christoph

    2016-01-27

    The first part of this thesis revolves around symmetries in the sd-IBA-1. A region of approximate O(6) symmetry for the ground-state band, a partial dynamical symmetry (PDS) of type III, in the parameter space of the extended consistent-Q formalism is identified through quantum number fluctuations. The simultaneous occurrence of a SU(3) quasi dynamical symmetry for nuclei in the region of O(6) PDS is explained via the β=1, γ=0 intrinsic state underlying the ground-state band. The previously unrelated concepts of PDS and QDS are connected for the first time and many nuclei in the rare earth region that approximately satisfy both symmetry requirements are identified. Ground-state to ground-state (p, t) transfer reactions are presented as an experimental signature to identify pairs of nuclei that both exhibit O(6) PDS. In the second part of this thesis inelastic electron scattering off {sup 96}Zr is studied. The experiment was performed at the high resolution Lintott spectrometer at the S-DALINAC and covered a momentum-transfer range of 0.28 - 0.59 fm{sup -1}. Through a relative analysis using Plane Wave Born Approximation (PWBA) the B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 2}→0{sup +}{sub 1}) value is extracted without incurring the additional model dependence of a Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). By combining this result with known multipole mixing ratios and branching ratios all decay strengths of the 2{sup +}{sub 2} state are determined. A mixing calculation establishes very weak mixing (V{sub mix}=76 keV) between states of the ground-state band and those of the band build on top of the 0{sup +}{sub 2} state which includes the 2{sup +}{sub 2} state. The occurrence of these two isolated bands is interpreted within the shell model in terms of type II shell evolution.

  1. What happens to patients when we do not repair their cuff tears? Five-year rotator cuff quality-of-life index outcomes following nonoperative treatment of patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorman, Richard S; More, Kristie D; Hollinshead, Robert M; Wiley, James P; Mohtadi, Nicholas G; Lo, Ian K Y; Brett, Kelly R

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine 5-year outcomes in a prospective cohort of patients previously enrolled in a nonoperative rotator cuff tear treatment program. Patients with chronic (>3 months), full-thickness rotator cuff tears (demonstrated on imaging) who were referred to 1 of 2 senior shoulder surgeons were enrolled in the study between October 2008 and September 2010. They participated in a comprehensive, nonoperative, home-based treatment program. After 3 months, the outcome in these patients was defined as "successful" or "failed." Patients in the successful group were essentially asymptomatic and did not require surgery. Patients in the failed group were symptomatic and consented to undergo surgical repair. All patients were followed up at 1 year, 2 years, and 5 or more years. At 5 or more years, all patients were contacted for follow-up; the response rate was 84%. Approximately 75% of patients remained successfully treated with nonoperative treatment at 5 years and reported a mean rotator cuff quality-of-life index score of 83 of 100 (SD, 16). Furthermore, between 2 and 5 years, only 3 patients who had previously been defined as having a successful outcome became more symptomatic and underwent surgical rotator cuff repair. Those in whom nonoperative treatment had failed and who underwent surgical repair had a mean rotator cuff quality-of-life index score of 89 (SD, 11) at 5-year follow-up. The operative and nonoperative groups at 5-year follow-up were not significantly different (P = .11). Nonoperative treatment is an effective and lasting option for many patients with a chronic, full-thickness rotator cuff tear. While some clinicians may argue that nonoperative treatment delays inevitable surgical repair, our study shows that patients can do very well over time. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Is the arthroscopic suture bridge technique suitable for full-thickness rotator cuff tears of any size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kweon, Seok Hyun; Kang, Hong Je; Kim, Se Jin; Park, Jin Sung

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes and tendon integrity between the suture bridge and modified tension band techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A consecutive series of 128 patients who underwent the modified tension band (MTB group; 69 patients) and suture bridge (SB group; 59 patients) techniques were enrolled. The pain visual analogue scale (VAS), Constant, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were determined preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Rotator cuff hypotrophy was quantified by calculating the occupation ratio (OR). Rotator cuff integrity and the global fatty degeneration index were determined by using magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. The average VAS, Constant, and ASES scores improved significantly at the final follow-up in both groups (p bridge groups (7.0 vs. 6.8%, respectively; p = n.s.). The retear rate of large-to-massive tears was significantly lower in the suture bridge group than in the modified tension band group (33.3 vs. 70%; p = 0.035). Fatty infiltration (postoperative global fatty degeneration index, p = 0.022) and muscle hypotrophy (postoperative OR, p = 0.038) outcomes were significantly better with the suture bridge technique. The retear rate was lower with the suture bridge technique in the case of large-to-massive rotator cuff tears. Additionally, significant improvements in hypotrophy and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff were obtained with the suture bridge technique, possibly resulting in better anatomical outcomes. The suture bridge technique was a more effective method for the repair of rotator cuff tears of all sizes as compared to the modified tension band technique. Retrospective Cohort Design, Treatment Study, level III.

  3. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J.; Jost, B.; Gerber, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings.Design and patients. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined.Results. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P=0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P>0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm).Conclusion. Small residual defects or retears (<1 cm) of the rotator cuff are not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms. Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant. (orig.)

  4. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, B.; Gerber, C. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-06-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings.Design and patients. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined.Results. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P=0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P>0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm).Conclusion. Small residual defects or retears (<1 cm) of the rotator cuff are not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms. Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant. (orig.)

  5. Friction Surface Cladding of AA1050 on AA2024-T351; influence of clad layer thickness and tool rotation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaojie; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    Friction Surfacing Cladding (FSC) is a recently developed solid state process to deposit thin metallic clad layers on a substrate. The process employs a rotating tool with a central opening to supply clad material and support the distribution and bonding of the clad material to the substrate. The

  6. Clinical outcomes and repair integrity after arthroscopic full-thickness rotator cuff repair: suture-bridge versus double-row modified Mason-Allen technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Won; Yang, Dae Suk; Lee, Gyu Sang; Ma, Chang Hyun; Choy, Won Sik

    2018-05-23

    This retrospective study compared the clinical and radiologic outcomes of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs by the suture-bridge and double-row modified Mason-Allen techniques. From January 2012 to May 2013, 76 consecutive cases of full-thickness rotator cuff tear, 1 to 4 cm in the sagittal plane, for which arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed, were included. The suture-bridge technique was used in 37 consecutive shoulders; and the double-row modified Mason-Allen technique, in 39 consecutive shoulders. Clinical outcomes at a minimum of 2 years (mean, 35.7 months) were evaluated postoperatively using the visual analog scale; University of California, Los Angeles Shoulder Scale; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale; and Constant score. Postoperative cuff integrity was evaluated at a mean of 17.7 months by magnetic resonance imaging. At the final follow-up, the clinical outcomes improved in both groups (all P  .05). The retear rate was 18.9% in the shoulders subjected to suture-bridge repair and 12.8% in the double-row modified Mason-Allen group; the difference was not significant (P = .361). Despite the presence of fewer suture anchors, the patients who underwent double-row modified Mason-Allen repair had comparable shoulder functional outcomes and a comparable retear rate with those who underwent suture-bridge repair. Therefore, the double-row modified Mason-Allen repair technique can be considered an effective treatment for patients with medium- to large-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears With and Without Acromioplasty: Randomized Prospective Trial With 2-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Geoffrey D; Gupta, Anil K; Hussey, Kristen E; Tetteh, Elizabeth S; Karas, Vasili; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2014-06-01

    Acromioplasty is commonly performed during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, but its effect on short-term outcomes is debated. To report the short-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with and without acromioplasty. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears were randomized into acromioplasty or nonacromioplasty groups. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and Short Form-12 (SF-12) health assessment were collected along with physical examination including range of motion and dynamometer strength testing. Intraoperative data including tear size, repair configuration, and concomitant procedures were recorded. Follow-up examination was performed at regular intervals up to 2 years. Preoperative imaging was reviewed to classify the acromial morphologic type, acromial angle, and lateral acromial angulation. A total of 114 patients were initially enrolled in the study, and 95 (83%; 43 nonacromioplasty, 52 acromioplasty) were available for a minimum 2-year follow-up. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, including number of tendons torn, repair configuration, concomitant procedures, and acromion type and angles. Within groups, there was a significant (P < .001) improvement in all functional outcome scores from preoperatively to all follow-up time points, including 2 years, for the nonacromioplasty and acromioplasty groups (ASES score: 55.1-91.5, 48.8-89.0; Constant score: 48.3-75.0, 51.9-78.7, respectively). There were no significant differences in functional outcomes between nonacromioplasty and acromioplasty groups or between subjects with different acromial features at any time point. The results of this study demonstrate no difference in clinical outcomes after rotator cuff repair

  8. Ceramic inlays and partial ceramic crowns: influence of remaining cusp wall thickness on the marginal integrity and enamel crack formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifka, Stephanie; Anthofer, Thomas; Fritzsch, Marcus; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried; Federlin, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    No information is currently available about what the critical cavity wall thickness is and its influence upon 1) the marginal integrity of ceramic inlays (CI) and partial ceramic crowns (PCC) and 2) the crack formation of dental tissues. This in vitro study of CI and PCC tested the effects of different remaining cusp wall thicknesses on marginal integrity and enamel crack formation. CI (n = 25) and PCC (n = 26) preparations were performed in extracted human molars. Functional cusps of CI and PCC were adjusted to a 2.5 mm thickness; for PCC, the functional cusps were reduced to a thickness of 2.0 mm. Non-functional cusps were adjusted to wall thicknesses of 1) 1.0 mm and 2) 2.0 mm. Ceramic restorations (Vita Mark II, Cerec3 System) were fabricated and adhesively luted to the cavities with Excite/Variolink II. The specimens were exposed to thermocycling and central mechanical loading (TCML: 5000 x 5 degrees C-55 degrees C; 30 seconds/cycle; 500000 x 72.5N, 1.6Hz). Marginal integrity was assessed by evaluating a) dye penetration (fuchsin) on multiple sections after TCML and by using b) quantitative margin analysis in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after TCML. Ceramic- and tooth-luting agent interfaces (LA) were evaluated separately. Enamel cracks were documented under a reflective light microscope. The data were statistically analyzed with the Mann Whitney U-test (alpha = 0.05) and the Error Rates Method (ERM). Crack formation was analyzed with the Chi-Square-test (alpha = 0.05) and ERM. In general, the remaining cusp wall thickness, interface, cavity design and TCML had no statistically significant influence on marginal integrity for both CI and PCC (ERM). Single pairwise comparisons showed that the CI and PCC of Group 2 had a tendency towards less microleakage along the dentin/LA interface than Group 1. Cavity design and location had no statistically significant influence on crack formation, but the specimens with 1.0 mm of remaining wall

  9. Topical petrolatum gel alone versus topical silver sulfadiazine with standard gauze dressings for the treatment of superficial partial thickness burns in adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuino, Glenn Angelo S; Baluyut-Angeles, Kathrina Victoria; Espiritu, Andre Paolo T; Lapitan, Marie Carmela M; Buckley, Brian S

    2014-11-01

    Non-extensive superficial partial thickness burns constitute a major proportion of burns. Conventional treatment involves regular changing of absorptive dressings including the application of a topical antimicrobial, commonly silver sulfadiazine. A systematic review has found insufficient evidence to support or refute such antimicrobial prophylaxis. Another review compared silver sulfadiazine dressings with other occlusive and non-antimicrobial dressings and found insufficient evidence to guide practice. Other research has suggested that dressings with petrolatum gel are as effective as silver sulfadiazine. Single-center, randomized, controlled parallel group trial comparing conventional silver sulfadiazine dressings with treatment with petrolatum gel alone. Consenting adults 18-45 years old with superficial partial thickness burns≤10% total body surface area seen within 24h of the injury were randomized to daily dressing either with petrolatum gel without top dressings or conventional silver sulfadiazine treatment with gauze dressings. Primary outcomes were blinded assessment of time to complete re-epithelialization, wound infection or allergic contact dermatitis. Secondary outcomes included assessment of ease, time and pain of dressing changes. 26 patients were randomized to petrolatum and 24 to silver sulfadiazine dressings. Follow up data available for 19 in each group. Mean time to re-epithelialization was 6.2 days (SD 2.8) in the petrolatum group and 7.8 days (SD 2.1) in the silver sulfadiazine group (p=0.050). No wound infection or dermatitis was observed in either group. Scores for adherence to wound, ease of dressing removal and time required to change dressings were significantly better in the petrolatum treatment arm (ptreatment of minor superficial partial thickness burns in adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. An Overview of the use of Bromelain-Based Enzymatic Debridement (Nexobrid®) in Deep Partial & Full Thickness Burns: Appraising the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Yew L; Goh, Benjamin K L; Jeffery, S

    2018-03-22

    Recent introduction of rapid bromelain-based enzymatic debridement has been increasingly popular in its use in non-surgical debridement in deep partial and full thickness burns. We designed this study to evaluate the evidence suggested by current studies on the perceived benefits of using Nexobrid® as compared to traditional surgical standard of care (SOC) in burns wound debridement. A comprehensive search on electronic databases Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science was done to identify studies published between 1986 to 2017 involving the use of Nexobrid in deep partial and full thickness burns. Studies were evaluated for proposed benefits and categorised under supporting evidence, contradicting evidence and anecdotal opinions. 7 well designed prospective studies met the inclusion comprising of 4 randomised controlled trials. 6 proposed benefits associated with the use of Nexobrid were extracted including reduced time to complete debridement, need for surgery, area of burns excised, need for autograft, time to wound closure and improved scar quality. Most proposed benefits have strong supporting evidences with minimal anecdotal opinions from controlled trials except the proposed improvement in scar quality and reduced time to wound healing that had at least 3 refuting evidence and 1 anecdotal evidence. Incidence of pain was also evaluated and were mainly anecdotal lacking formal objective assessment or cohort study. Despite the lack of literatures available, the benefits of Nexobrid is evident in published randomised and single arm studies. Large number of studies are needed to aid further evaluating the proposed benefits of Nexobrid.

  11. Clinical effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashaan, Zjir M; Krijnen, Pieta; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; van Baar, Margriet E; Vloemans, Adrianus F P; Dokter, Jan; Tempelman, Fenike R H; van der Vlies, Cees H; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-03-05

    Partial thickness burns are painful, difficult to manage and can have a negative effect on quality of life through scarring, permanent disfigurement and loss of function. The aim of burn treatment in partial thickness burns is to save lives, stimulate wound healing by creating an optimumly moist wound environment, to have debriding and analgesic effects, protect the wound from infection and be convenient for the patient and caregivers. However, there is no consensus on the optimal treatment of partial thickness wounds. Flaminal® and Flamazine® are two standard treatment options that provide the above mentioned properties in burn treatment. Nevertheless, no randomized controlled study has yet compared these two common treatment modalities in partial thickness burns. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns. In this two-arm open multi-center randomized controlled trial, 90 patients will be randomized between Flaminal® and Flamazine® and followed for 12 months. The study population will consist of competent or temporarily non-competent (because of sedation and/or intubation) patients, 18 years of age or older, with acute partial thickness burns and a total body surface area (TBSA) of less than 30 %. The main study outcome is time to complete re-epithelialization (greater than 95 %). Secondary outcome measures include need for grafting, wound colonization/infection, number of dressing changes, pain and anxiety, scar formation, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and costs. This study will contribute to the optimal treatment of patients with partial thickness burn wounds and will provide evidence on the (cost-)effectiveness and quality of life of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns. Netherlands Trial Register NTR4486 , registered on 2 April 2014.

  12. Correlation between the bending strength and the thickness interlayer of alumina-mild steel friction welded at lower rotational speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Zaky Noh; Luay Bakir Hussain; Zainal Arifin Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    The joining of ceramic-metal could be done through a few techniques: brazing, diffusion bonding, friction welding etc. However, the mechanism of ceramic-metal joining was still not properly understood. In this study, alumina rod was bonded to mild steel rod via friction welding technique by using Al 1100 sheet as interlayer. The diameter of the rods was 10 mm. Friction pressure of 20 MPa and forging pressure of 40 MPa were used. Rotational speeds were maintained at 900 rpm and friction times of 2 to 20 seconds were applied. The joining strength was determined through four point bending test. The maximum bending strength, 240 MPa was obtained at the friction times of 20 seconds. Under optical microscope and SEM observation, the deformation of the aluminum interface was clearly obtained. Mechanical interlocking and close contact between the alumina aluminum and aluminum-mild steel were observed at magnifications of 3000X. The strength of alumina-steel bonding is much dependent on the wettability of the alumina surface by the molten aluminum and the existing of mechanical interlocking between interlayer and sample materials. (Author)

  13. A thick-walled sphere rotating in a uniform magnetic field: The next step to de-spin a space object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Caracciolo, Ryan A.; Peck, Mason; Leve, Frederick A.

    2017-08-01

    Modeling the interaction between a moving conductor and a static magnetic field is critical to understanding the operation of induction motors, eddy current braking, and the dynamics of satellites moving through Earth's magnetic field. Here, we develop the case of a thick-walled sphere rotating in a uniform magnetic field, which is the simplest, non-trivial, magneto-statics problem that leads to complete closed-form expressions for the resulting potentials, fields, and currents. This solution requires knowledge of all of Maxwell's time independent equations, scalar and vector potential equations, and the Lorentz force law. The paper presents four cases and their associated experimental results, making this topic appropriate for an advanced student lab project.

  14. Are platelet-rich products necessary during the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelet-rich products (PRP are widely used for rotator cuff tears. However, whether platelet-rich products produce superior clinical or radiological outcomes is controversial. This study aims to use meta-analysis to compare clinical and radiological outcomes between groups with or without platelet-rich products. METHODS: The Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases were searched for relevant studies published before April 20, 2013. Studies were selected that clearly reported a comparison between the use or not of platelet-rich products. The Constant, ASES, UCLA, and SST scale systems and the rotator cuff retear rate were evaluated. The weighted mean differences and relative risks were calculated using a fixed-effects model. RESULTS: Seven studies were enrolled in this meta-analysis. No significant differences were found for the Constant scale (0.73, 95% CI, -1.82 to 3.27, P=0.58, ASES scale (-2.89, 95% CI, -6.31 to 0.53, P=0.1, UCLA scale (-0.79, 95% CI, -2.20 to 0.63, P=0.28, SST scale (0.34, 95% CI, -0.01 to 0.69, P=0.05, and the overall rotator cuff retear rate (0.71, 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.05, P=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to the initial tear size showed a lower retear rate in small- and medium-sized tears (0.33, 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.91, P=0.03 after platelet-rich product application but no difference for large- and massive-sized tears (0.86, 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.23, P=0.42. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the platelet-rich products have no benefits on the overall clinical outcomes and retear rate for the arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, a decrease occurred in the rate of retears among patients treated with PRP for small- and medium-sized rotator cuff tears but not for large- and massive-sized tears. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II.

  15. Semi-exact solution of elastic non-uniform thickness and density rotating disks by homotopy perturbation and Adomian's decomposition methods. Part I: Elastic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojjati, M.H.; Jafari, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, two powerful analytical methods, namely homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and Adomian's decomposition method (ADM), are introduced to obtain distributions of stresses and displacements in rotating annular elastic disks with uniform and variable thicknesses and densities. The results obtained by these methods are then compared with the verified variational iteration method (VIM) solution. He's homotopy perturbation method which does not require a 'small parameter' has been used and a homotopy with an imbedding parameter p element of [0,1] is constructed. The method takes the full advantage of the traditional perturbation methods and the homotopy techniques and yields a very rapid convergence of the solution. Adomian's decomposition method is an iterative method which provides analytical approximate solutions in the form of an infinite power series for nonlinear equations without linearization, perturbation or discretization. Variational iteration method, on the other hand, is based on the incorporation of a general Lagrange multiplier in the construction of correction functional for the equation. This study demonstrates the ability of the methods for the solution of those complicated rotating disk cases with either no or difficult to find fairly exact solutions without the need to use commercial finite element analysis software. The comparison among these methods shows that although the numerical results are almost the same, HPM is much easier, more convenient and efficient than ADM and VIM

  16. [Effects of seawater immersion on the inflammatory response and oxygen free radical injury of rats with superficial partial-thickness scald at early stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y X; Wang, J H; Liu, L; Zou, Q; Zhang, Y; Bai, Z

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To study the effects of seawater immersion on the inflammatory response and oxygen free radical injury of rats with superficial-thickness scald at early stage. Methods: Seventy Wistar rats were divided into healthy control group (HC, n =7), pure scald group (PS, n =21), scald+ fresh water immersion group (SF, n =21), and scald+ seawater immersion group (SS, n =21) according to the random number table. Rats in group HC did not receive any treatment, while 5% total body surface area superficial partial-thickness scald was made on the back of rats in the latter three groups. Rats in group PS lived freely immediately post burn, while wounds on the back of rats in groups SF and SS were immersed into fresh water and seawater, respectively. Serum and full-thickness skin tissue in the center of wounds on the back of 7 rats in groups PS, SF, and SS at post immersion (injury) hour (PIH) 2, 4, and 6 were collected, respectively, while serum and full-thickness skin tissue at the same position of the 7 rats in group HC were collected at PIH 6 of rats in other groups. Morphology of skin tissue was observed with HE staining; tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) content in serum and skin tissue was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; superoxide dismutase (SOD) content in serum and skin tissue was determined by hydroxylamine method; malondialdehyde content in serum and skin tissue was determined by thiobarbituric acid method. Data were processed with analysis of variance of factorial design, one-way analysis of variance, Welch test, LSD test, and Tamhane test. Results: (1) Epidermal cells of skin tissue of rats in group HC arranged in order and continuously, and the dermis tissue and accessory structures were clear and complete. The skin layer and epidermis of wounds of rats in group PS had no significant change, but the edema of epidermis and dermis and infiltration of inflammatory cells enhanced over time at PIH 2, 4, and 6. The horny layer of epidermis of

  17. Delaminated rotator cuff tear: extension of delamination and cuff integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Sagong, Seung-Yeob; Shin, John

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extension of delamination and the cuff integrity after arthroscopic repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Sixty-five patients with delaminated rotator cuff tears were retrospectively reviewed. The delaminated tears were divided into full-thickness delaminated tears and partial-thickness delaminated tears. To evaluate the medial extension, we calculated the coronal size of the delaminated portion. To evaluate the posterior extension, we checked the tendon involved. Cuff integrity was evaluated by computed tomography arthrography. The mean medial extension in the full-thickness and partial-thickness delaminated tears was 18.1 ± 6.0 mm and 22.7 ± 6.3 mm, respectively (P = .0084). The posterior extension into the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus was 36.9% and 32.3%, respectively, in the full-thickness delaminated tears, and it was 27.7% and 3.1%, respectively, in the partial-thickness delaminated tears (P = .0043). With regard to cuff integrity, 35 cases of anatomic healing, 10 cases of partial healing defects, and 17 cases of retear were detected. Among the patients with retear and partial healing of the defect, all the partially healed defects showed delamination. Three retear patients showed delamination, and 14 retear patients did not show delamination; the difference was statistically significant (P = .0001). The full-thickness delaminated tears showed less medial extension and more posterior extension than the partial-thickness delaminated tears. Delamination did not develop in retear patients, but delamination was common in the patients with partially healed defects. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K.; Imhoff, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  19. Rotator cuff tears: assessment with MR arthrography in 275 patients with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldt, S.; Bruegel, M.; Mueller, D.; Holzapfel, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, A.B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Sports Orthopedics, Munich (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    We assessed the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a large symptomatic population. MR arthrograms obtained in 275 patients including a study group of 139 patients with rotator cuff tears proved by arthroscopy and a control group of 136 patients with arthroscopically intact rotator cuff tendons were reviewed in random order. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0 T system (Magnetom Expert, Siemens). MR arthrograms were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for articular-sided partial-thickness and full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis tendons. At arthroscopy, 197 rotator cuff tears were diagnosed, including 105 partial-thickness (93 supraspinatus, nine infraspinatus, three subscapularis) and 92 full-thickness (43 supraspinatus, 20 infraspinatus, 29 subscapularis) tendon tears. For full-thickness tears, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96%, 99%, and 98%, respectively, and for partial tears 80%, 97%, and 95%, respectively. False negative and positive assessments in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears were predominantly [78% (35/45)] observed with small articular-sided (Ellman grade1) tendon tears. MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears and is accurate in the diagnosis of articular-sided partial-thickness tears. Limitations in the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears are mainly restricted to small articular-sided tears (Ellman grade 1) due to difficulties in differentiation between fiber tearing, tendinitis, synovitic changes, and superficial fraying at tendon margins. (orig.)

  20. Accelerated re-epithelialization of partial-thickness skin wounds by a topical betulin gel: Results of a randomized phase III clinical trials program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Juan P; Podmelle, Fred; Lipový, Břetislav; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Schumann, Hauke; Schwieger-Briel, Agnes; Zahn, Tobias R; Metelmann, Hans-Robert

    2017-09-01

    The clinical significance of timely re-epithelialization is obvious in burn care, since delayed wound closure is enhancing the risk of wound site infection and extensive scarring. Topical treatments that accelerate wound healing are urgently needed to reduce these sequelae. Evidence from preliminary studies suggests that betulin can accelerate the healing of different types of wounds, including second degree burns and split-thickness skin graft wounds. The goal of this combined study program consisting of two randomized phase III clinical trials in parallel is to evaluate whether a topical betulin gel (TBG) is accelerating re-epithelialization of split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor site wounds compared to standard of care. Two parallel blindly evaluated, randomised, controlled, multicentre phase III clinical trials were performed in adults undergoing STSG surgery (EudraCT nos. 2012-003390-26 and 2012-000777-23). Donor site wounds were split into two equal halves and randomized 1:1 to standard of care (a non-adhesive moist wound dressing) or standard of care plus TBG consisting of 10% birch bark extract and 90% sunflower oil (Episalvan, Birken AG, Niefern-Oeschelbronn, Germany). The primary efficacy assessment was the intra-individual difference in time to wound closure assessed from digital photographs by three blinded experts. A total of 219 patients were included and treated in the two trials. Wounds closed faster with TBG than without it (15.3 vs. 16.5 days; mean intra-individual difference=-1.1 days [95% CI, -1.5 to -0.7]; p<0.0001). This agreed with unblinded direct clinical assessment (difference=-2.1 days [95% CI, -2.7 to -1.5]; p<0.0001). Adverse events possibly related to treatment were mild or moderate and mostly at the application site. TBG accelerates re-epithelialization of partial thickness wounds compared to the current standard of care, providing a well-tolerated contribution to burn care in practice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  1. Aquacel(®) Ag dressing versus Acticoat™ dressing in partial thickness burns: a prospective, randomized, controlled study in 100 patients. Part 1: burn wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Heyneman, Alexander; Pirayesh, Ali; Monstrey, Stan

    2014-05-01

    Studies comparing contemporary silver dressings in burns are scarce. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study, counting 50 patients/research group, we compared two frequently used silver dressings, Acticoat™ and Aquacel(®) Ag, in the management of partial thickness burns with a predicted healing time between 7 and 21 days as assessed by laser Doppler imaging between 48 and 72h after burn. Variables investigated were related to baseline research group characteristics, wound healing, bacteriology, economics, nurse, and patient experience. Both research groups were comparably composed taking into account gender, age and burn characteristics. Similar results were obtained as to healing time and bacterial control with both silver dressings. A statistically significant difference in favor of the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing was found for average ease of use (p<0.001), average ease of application (p=0.001), patient pain (p<0.001), patient comfort with the dressing (p=0.017), silver staining (p<0.001), and cost effectiveness (p<0.001). Both silver dressings resulted in comparable healing times and bacterial control but the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing significantly increased comfort for patients as well as nurses and was significantly more cost-effective than the Acticoat™ dressing for the given indication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. An optimized animal model for partial and total skin thickness burns studies Um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras superficiais e profundas da pele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bomfim Soares Campelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Development of an improved animal model for studying skin burns in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n=6: G1-Control, G2- T100°C, G3-T150°C and G4-T200°C. Two 10 x 10 mm squares were outlined with a sterile surgical marker on each side and along the vertebral column using a prepared template positioned between the anterior and posterior limbs. G2-G4 rats were subjected to 100°C, 150°C and 200ºC thermal burns, respectively. G1 rats served as controls. Burns were inflicted by applying a copper plate connected to an electronic temperature controlling device to the dorsal skin of anesthetized rats. Four burns were produced on each animal (total area: 4 cm²/animal leaving about 1 cm of undamaged skin between burn areas. Analgesia was administered during 24 h after burn injury by adding 30 mg codeine phosphate hemihydrate to 500 ml tap water. RESULTS: The application of 100°C and 150ºC resulted in partial thickness skin burns with central reepithelialization of the burned area only at 100°C. In G4 group the whole thickness of the skin was injured without central reepithelialization. However, there was marginal reepithelialization in all groups. CONCLUSION: The model studied is inexpensive and easily reproducible, enabling the achievement of controlled burns with partial or total impairment of the skin in experimental animals.OBJETIVO: Desenvolvimento de um modelo animal aperfeiçoado para estudo de queimaduras cutâneas em ratos. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro ratos Wistar, machos, foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=6: G1-Controle, G2-T100°C, G3-T150°C e G4-T200°C. Dois quadrados medindo 10x10 mm foram delineados com um marcador cirúrgico estéril em cada lado e ao longo da coluna vertebral e posicionados entre os membros anteriores e posteriores, utilizando um molde previamente preparado. Os ratos dos grupos G2-G4 foram submetidos a queimaduras térmicas de 100

  3. MR Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation with Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Sudarshan; Khandige, Ganesh; Kabra, Utkarsh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rotator cuff tears are quite common and can cause significant disability. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has now emerged as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of patients with rotator cuff injuries, in view of its improved inherent soft tissue contrast and resolution. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine MRI in the detection and characterisation of rotator cuff tears, by correlating the findings with arthroscopy. Materials and Methods This prospective study was carried out between July 2014 and August 2016 at the AJ Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India. A total of 82 patients were diagnosed with rotator cuff injury on MRI during this period, out of which 45 patients who underwent further evaluation with arthroscopy were included in this study. The data collected was analysed for significant correlation between MRI diagnosis and arthroscopic findings using kappa statistics. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of full and partial thickness tears were calculated using arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Results There were 27 males and 18 females in this study. The youngest patient was 22 years and the oldest was 74 years. Majority of rotator cuff tears (78%) were seen in patients above the age of 40 years. MRI showed a sensitivity of 89.6%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 83.3% for the diagnosis of full thickness rotator cuff tears. For partial thickness tears, MRI showed a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 86.6%, positive predictive value of 78.9% and negative predictive value of 100%. The accuracy was 93.1% for full thickness tears and 91.1% for partial thickness tears. The p-value was less than 0.01 for both full and partial thickness tears. There was good agreement between the MRI and arthroscopic findings, with kappa value of 0.85 for full thickness tears and 0.81 for partial

  4. Comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings for patients with partial-thickness burns: study protocol of a systematic review and a Bayesian framework network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Zhao-Hong; Wang, Shun-Bin; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-22

    Selecting a suitable wound dressing for patients with partial-thickness burns (PTBs) is important in wound care. However, the comparative effectiveness of different dressings has not been studied. We report the protocol of a network meta-analysis designed to combine direct and indirect evidence of wound dressings in the management of PTB. We will search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the wound-healing effect of a wound dressing in the management of PTB. Searches will be conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register and CINAHL. A comprehensive search strategy is developed to retrieve articles reporting potentially eligible RCTs. Besides, we will contact the experts in the field and review the conference proceedings to locate non-published studies. The reference lists of articles will be reviewed for any candidate studies. Two independent reviewers will screen titles and abstracts of the candidate articles. All eligible RCTs will be obtained in full text to perform a review. Disagreement on eligibility of an RCT will be solved by group discussion. The information of participants, interventions, comparisons and outcomes from included RCTs will be recorded and summarised. The primary outcome is time to complete wound healing. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of burns completely healed at the end of treatment, change in wound surface area at the end of treatment, incidence of adverse events, etc. The result of this review will provide evidence for the comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings in the management of PTB. It will also facilitate decision-making in choosing a suitable wound dressing. We will disseminate the review through a peer-review journal and conference abstracts or posters. PROSPERO CRD42016041574; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  5. Partial rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy for the treatment of patients with massive cuff tears and retained overhead elevation: midterm outcomes with a minimum 5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Derek J; Pupello, Derek R; Santoni, Brandon G

    2016-11-01

    A subset of patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears present with retained overhead elevation and pain as their primary complaint. Our aim was to evaluate the outcomes of partial arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with biceps tenotomy and to report the failure rate of this procedure for patients with >5 years of follow-up. Thirty-four patients underwent partial rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy for treatment of a massive rotator cuff tear. Patients had preoperative active forward elevation >120° and no radiographic evidence of glenohumeral arthritis. Patients were followed up clinically and radiographically, and 28 patients had a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. Failure was defined as an American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score of 90°, or revision to reverse shoulder arthroplasty during the study period. Patients demonstrated improvements in average preoperative to postoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (46.6 to 79.3 [P rotation (38° to 39° [P = 1.0]), or internal rotation (84% to 80% [P = 1.0]) was identified; 36% of patients had progression of the Hamada stage. The failure rate was 29%; 75% of patients were satisfied with their index procedure. Partial rotator cuff repair and biceps tenotomy for patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears with retained overhead elevation and pain as the primary complaint produced reasonable outcomes at midterm follow-up of at least 5 years. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tratamento conservador das lesões parciais e completas do manguito rotador Conservative treatment of partial and complete tears of the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvandré Lech

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A lesão do manguito rotador é a mais freqüente patologia do ombro. Cerca de 180 pacientes foram tratados conservadoramente nos dois Serviços nos anos de 1996 e 1997. Este grupo recebeu uma ampla gama de tratamentos (apenas medicação, exercícios caseiros, infiltração, fisioterapia, etc.. Este estudo avaliou os resultados do tratamento conservador em 26 pacientes com rupturas parcial e total do manguito rotador. O protocolo consistiu de um programa com 6 meses de duração que incluiu terapia miofascial específica, exercícios ativos assistidos e de fortalecimento dos músculos do manguito rotador e da musculatura axioescapular. Os fatores de inclusão no estudo foram: 1 realizar todo o programa com apenas um reabilitador; 2 não ter recebido infiltração; 3 não ter tido cirurgia prévia; 4 não ter reumatopatia diagnosticada. Seis meses após a alta, dezoito pacientes (69,22% apresentavam resultado satisfatório, enquanto que os demais 08 casos (30,78% foram considerados insatisfatórios e tiveram indicação cirúrgica.The lesion of rotator cuff is the most frequent lesion of the shoulder. Circa 180 patients were conservatively treated in both Clinics during the years of 1976 and 1997. This group of patients received a wide range of treatments (only medication, home exercises, infiltration, physiotherapy, etc. This study evaluated the results of the conservative treatment in 26 patients with partial and total rupture of the rotator cuff. The protocol consisted of a program with duration of 6 months including specific miofascial therapy, assisted active exercises and of strengthening of the muscles of the rotator cuff and axioscapular musculature. The inclusion criteria of the study were: 1 to carry the program with just one reabilitator; 2 no previous infiltration; 3 no previous surgery; 4 absence of diagnosed rheumatopathy. Six months after the end of treatment, eighteen patients (69,22% presented with satisfactory results, while

  7. Comparative studies of MRI and operative findings in rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Seigo; Ichikawa, Norikazu; Itadera, Eichi; Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hajime

    2001-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with operative findings in the evaluation of patients associated with rotator cuff tears. Fifty-four of 60 shoulders (58 patients) examined by MRI were confirmed as full-thickness tears and 6 as partial-thickness tears at the time of surgery. The oblique coronal, oblique sagittal, and axial planes of T2-weighted images with the 0.5 tesla MRI system were obtained preoperatively and compared with operative findings. MRI correctly identified 46 of 54 full-thickness rotator cuff tears and 5 of 6 partial-thickness tears. A comparison of MRI and operative findings in full-thickness cuff tears showed a sensitivity of 85%, a specificity of 83%, and a positive prospective value (PPV) of 99%. A comparison of partial-thickness tears showed a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 85%, and PPV of 39%. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the MRI assessment and measurement at the time of surgery (r=0.90, P<0.01). MRI was useful in evaluating large and medium-sized rotator cuff tears, but less useful in distinguishing small full-thickness tears from partial-thickness tears. (author)

  8. MR arthrography gadolinium versus standard MR imaging in rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.; Brahme, S.K.; Karzel, R.; Cervilla, V.; Snyder, S.; Schweitzer, M.; Flannigan, B.; Resnick, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of MR imaging with and without intraarticular gadolinium in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology, using arthroscopy as the gold standard. The authors examined 36 patients, first with T2-weighted sequences and then with T1-weighted sequences after the injection of 15-20 mL of diluted gadolinium. The images were read blindly by three radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal MR imaging. The results were compared with those of arthroscopy. In 16 of 19 arthroscopically intact rotator cuffs, both sequences demonstrated no evidence of rotator cuff tear. The remaining three cases were interpreted as partial or full-thickness tears. Of 12 partial tears, T1-weighted images with intraarticular gadolinium demonstrated a partial tear in five, degeneration in four, a full thickness tear in two, and a normal rotator cuff in one

  9. Single-leaf partial meniscectomy in extensive horizontal tears of the discoid lateral meniscus: Does decreased peripheral meniscal thickness affect outcomes? (Mean four-year follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Won; Chun, Yong-Min; Choi, Chong-Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Min; Han, Joon-Woo; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate whether single-leaf partial meniscectomy in horizontal tears along the entire discoid lateral meniscus has any advantages in clinical and radiological results compared with other meniscectomies in discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 145 patients with a horizontal tear pattern in symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-seven patients had undergone full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy (group A), 60 had undergone conventional partial meniscectomy (saucerization) maintaining peripheral meniscal height (group B), and 58 patients had undergone total meniscectomy (group C). Each patient was evaluated with the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective grading, and modified Kellgren-Lawrence grade in plain radiography at their last follow-up. Group C had inferior functional results to groups A and B on the Lysholm knee score and IKDC subjective score. There was no significant difference between groups A and B. Group C fared significantly worse than groups A and B (p=0.003, pmeniscus tears, the full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy group had no adverse results compared with the total meniscectomy group and was not significantly different compared to the conventional partial meniscectomy group. Cohort study. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Is sonography performed by the rheumatologist as useful as arthrography executed by the radiologist for the assessment of full thickness rotator cuff tears?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swen, W. A.; Jacobs, J. W.; Neve, W. C.; Bal, D.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Sonography and arthrography are techniques used to detect rotator cuff tears (RCT). The diagnostic value of sonography executed by a rheumatologist versus that of arthrography performed by a radiologist for assessment of RCT was investigated among patients with unilateral chronic shoulder complaints

  11. Neotendon infilling of a full thickness rotator cuff foot print tear following ultrasound guided liquid platelet rich plasma injection and percutaneous tenotomy: favourable outcome up to one year [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arockia Doss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on excellent clinical outcome and neotendon infilling at one year follow up in a degenerative rotator cuff full thickness tear following percutaneous tenotomy and platelet rich plasma injection.

  12. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnumurthy H. Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS Thirty patients clinically suspected to have rotator cuff tear who underwent ultrasonography and arthroscopy of shoulder were included in the study. Duration of study was for two years. All ultrasonography examinations were conducted in ultrasound machine using GE Voluson 730 PRO high frequency (10-12 MHz linear array transducer done by two experienced radiologists. Arthroscopies were done by two experienced shoulder arthroscopic surgeons. RESULTS Age of the patients with rotator cuff tears ranged from 40 to 80 years. 57% were females and 43% were males among the patients who had rotator cuff tears. 71.43% of the rotator cuff tears were found in the dominant arm. 64.28% of patients with rotator cuff tear had given history of fall or trauma to the corresponding shoulder within 6 months prior to presentation. 39.28% of patients who had rotator cuff tears were known diabetics. Supraspinatus tendon was the most commonly affected tendon, followed by infraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. For overall detection of rotator cuff tears, ultrasonography in comparison with the arthroscopy has sensitivity and specificity of 92.85% and 100%. For detection of full thickness rotator cuff tear, its sensitivity and specificity was 94.73% and 100% and for partial thickness rotator cuff tears 76.92% and 100%. Ultrasonography has 100% sensitivity and specificity for detection of supraspinatus full thickness tear. For supraspinatus partial thickness tear, sensitivity and specificity was 88

  14. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H.; Maeder, Matthew E.; Salisbury, Shelia R.

    2014-01-01

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  15. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Maeder, Matthew E. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lenox Hill Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Salisbury, Shelia R. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  16. Role of ultrasound in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, H.A.; Mirza, T.

    2010-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound in rotator cuff tears and to compare it with MRI. Total number of patients was thirty. All of these were above thirty years of age and were referred by clinicians, with shoulder pain for diagnostic workup. Post operative patients were excluded. Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were performed on each patient. Same operator performed ultrasound in all patients. Ultrasound (US) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) detected equal number of full thickness tears while two partial thickness tears were missed on US. Hypoechoic defect was the most important primary sign while cortical irregularity and fluid in subacromial and subdeltroid busra were the most important secondary signs on US. US was equally effective to MRI in detection of rotator cuff tears. It should be the primary investigation because of its availability, cost effective and real time evaluation provided significant expertise is developed, as it is highly operator dependent. (author)

  17. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears using a microscopy coil. Noninvasive detection without intraarticular contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitachi, Shin; Takase, Kei; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Tanaka, Minoru; Tojo, Yuichi; Tabata, Shiro; Majima, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a microscopy coil for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears by comparing the method to conventional MRI and MRI arthrography. A total of 68 shoulders were prospectively studied using a 1.5-T MRI unit. Conventional MRI scans were obtained with a surface coil and high-resolution MRI scans with a microscopy coil. MRI arthrography was performed in 28 shoulders using a surface coil. MRI evaluation of tears of rotator cuff tendons was compared with arthroscopic findings and surgical results. The surgery revealed 40 full-thickness tears, 13 partial-thickness tears, and 15 intact cuffs. In all, 35 (88%) full-thickness tears were correctly diagnosed on conventional MRI and 40 (100%) on high-resolution MRI. MR arthrography delineated 11 of 12 (92%) full-thickness tears. Altogether, 5 (38%) of the partial-thickness tears were detected on conventional MRI, and 12 (92%) were clearly demonstrated on high-resolution MRI. MRI arthrography depicted three (60%) of five partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI showed higher sensitivity than conventional MRI (P<0.05) and had values equivalent to those of MRI arthrography for diagnosing partial-thickness tears. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil is a feasible, noninvasive technique for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. (author)

  18. Rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeau, I.; Doursounian, L.; Maigne, J.Y.; Guinet, C.; Meary, E.; Buy, J.N.; Touzard, R.C.; Vadrot, D.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen volunteers and 73 patients with suspected rotator cuff lesions were examined at 0.5 T with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging (700/33/30 degrees) (oblique coronal and sagittal 3 mm thick, surface coil). Results were compared with those of arthrography (all cases), T1-weighted GE imaging (400/20/90 degrees) (35 cases), surgery (28 cases), and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images (2,000/60-120) (17 cases). GE images demonstrated all tears (complete, 32, partial, 12) and was superior to arthrography in determining site and size and in displaying muscles (critical point in surgical planning). In 20 cases without tears on arthrography, GE imaging demonstrated five cases of tendinitis, five cases of bursitis, and six probable intratendinous or superficial partial tears. T2 * -weighted GE imaging was superior to T2-weighted SE and T1-weighted GE imaging, with higher fluid contrast and a low fat signal. Therefore, it might replace arthrography in the diagnosis and surgical approach to this pathology

  19. Ultrasonography of symptomatic rotator cuff tears compared with MR imaging and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia N.; Vlychou, Marianna; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Karataglis, Dimitrios S.; Palladas, Panagiotis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods: Ninety-six patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff pathology underwent ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder. The findings in 88 patients were compared with arthroscopy or open surgery. Results: Full-thickness tear was confirmed in 57 cases, partial-thickness tear in 30 cases and degenerative changes without tear in 1. In all 57 cases of full-thickness tear and in 28 out of 30 cases of partial-thickness tear the supraspinatus tendon was involved. The accuracy in the detection of full-thickness tears was 98 and 100% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The accuracy in the detection of bursal or articular partial-thickness tears was 87 and 90% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Conclusions: In experienced hands ultrasonography should be considered as an accurate modality for the initial investigation of rotator cuff, especially supraspinatus, tears

  20. Ultrasonography of symptomatic rotator cuff tears compared with MR imaging and surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotiadou, Anastasia N. [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece); Radiology Department, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: natfot@yahoo.gr; Vlychou, Marianna [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece)], E-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr; Papadopoulos, Periklis [University Orthopaedic Clinic, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: perpap@otenet.gr; Karataglis, Dimitrios S. [University Orthopaedic Clinic, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: dkarataglis@yahoo.gr; Palladas, Panagiotis [Radiology Department, G. Papanikolaou Hospital, Exochi 32100, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: palladaspan@in.gr; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [Radiology Department, University Hospital of Larissa, Mezourlo 41110, Larissa (Greece)], E-mail: oswestanast@yahoo.gr

    2008-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods: Ninety-six patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff pathology underwent ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder. The findings in 88 patients were compared with arthroscopy or open surgery. Results: Full-thickness tear was confirmed in 57 cases, partial-thickness tear in 30 cases and degenerative changes without tear in 1. In all 57 cases of full-thickness tear and in 28 out of 30 cases of partial-thickness tear the supraspinatus tendon was involved. The accuracy in the detection of full-thickness tears was 98 and 100% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The accuracy in the detection of bursal or articular partial-thickness tears was 87 and 90% for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Conclusions: In experienced hands ultrasonography should be considered as an accurate modality for the initial investigation of rotator cuff, especially supraspinatus, tears.

  1. Fast MR arthrography using VIBE sequences to evaluate the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, Jan E. [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Mahachie John, Jestinah M. [University of Hasselt, Centre for Statistics, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Gelin, Geert [Ziekenhuizen Oost-Limburg, Department of Radiology, Genk (Belgium)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate if short volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences can be used as a substitute for T1-weighted with fat saturation (T1-FS) sequences when performing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. Eighty-two patients underwent direct MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE (acquisition time of 13 s) and T1-FS (acquisition time of 5 min) sequences in the axial and paracoronal plane on a 1.0-T MR unit. Two radiologists scored rotator cuff tendons on VIBE and T1-FS images separately as normal, small/large partial thickness and full thickness tears with or without geyser sign. T1-FS sequences were considered the gold standard. Surgical correlation was available in a small sample. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of VIBE were greater than 92% for large articular-sided partial thickness and full thickness tears. For detecting fraying and articular-sided small partial thickness tears, these parameters were 55%, 94%, 94%, and 57%, respectively. The simple kappa value was 0.76, and the weighted kappa value was 0.86 for agreement between T1-FS and VIBE scores. All large partial and full thickness tears at surgery were correctly diagnosed using VIBE or T1-FS MR images. Fast MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using VIBE sequences showed good concordance with the classically used T1-FS sequences for the appearance of the rotator cuff, in particular for large articular-sided partial thickness tears and for full thickness tears. Due to its very short acquisition time, VIBE may be especially useful when performing MR arthrography in claustrophobic patients or patients with a painful shoulder. (orig.)

  2. Epidemiology, natural history, and indications for treatment of rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z

    2012-10-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff disease is likely multifactorial, including age-related degeneration and microtrauma and macrotrauma. The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with aging with more than half of individuals in their 80s having a rotator cuff tear. Smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and genetics have all been shown to influence the development of rotator cuff tearing. Substantial full-thickness rotator cuff tears, in general, progress and enlarge with time. Pain, or worsening pain, usually signals tear progression in both asymptomatic and symptomatic tears and should warrant further investigation if the tear is treated conservatively. Larger (>1-1.5 cm) symptomatic full-thickness cuff tears have a high rate of tear progression and, therefore, should be considered for earlier surgical repair in younger patients if the tear is reparable and there is limited muscle degeneration to avoid irreversible changes to the cuff, including tear enlargement and degenerative muscle changes. Smaller symptomatic full-thickness tears have been shown to have a slower rate of progression, similar to partial-thickness tears, and can be considered for initial nonoperative treatment due to the limited risk for rapid tear progression. In both small full-thickness tears and partial-thickness tears, increasing pain should alert physicians to obtain further imaging as it can signal tear progression. Natural history data, along with information on factors affecting healing after rotator cuff repair, can help guide surgeons in making appropriate decisions regarding the treatment of rotator cuff tears. The management of rotator cuff tears should be considered in the context of the risks and benefits of operative versus nonoperative treatment. Tear size and acuity, the presence of irreparable changes to the rotator cuff or glenohumeral joint, and patient age should all be considered in making this decision. Initial nonoperative care can be safely undertaken in older patients (>70

  3. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Subacromial Bursa Causing a Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Neumann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up.

  4. Predicting Retear after Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear: Two-Point Dixon MR Imaging Quantification of Fatty Muscle Degeneration-Initial Experience with 1-year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Tasaki, Atsushi; Horiuchi, Saya; Ochi, Junko; Starkey, Jay; Hara, Takeshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the degree of preoperative fatty degeneration within muscles, postoperative longitudinal changes in fatty degeneration, and differences in fatty degeneration between patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears who do and those who do not experience a retear after surgery. Materials and Methods This prospective study had institutional review board approval and was conducted in accordance with the Committee for Human Research. Informed consent was obtained. Fifty patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears (18 men, 32 women; mean age, 67.0 years ± 8.0; age range, 41-91 years) were recruited. The degrees of preoperative and postoperative fatty degeneration were quantified by using a two-point Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence; two radiologists measured the mean signal intensity on in-phase [S(In)] and fat [S(Fat)] images. Estimates of fatty degeneration were calculated with "fat fraction" values by using the formula S(Fat)/S(In) within the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis muscles at baseline preoperative and at postoperative 1-year follow-up MR imaging. Preoperative fat fractions in the failed-repair group and the intact-repair group were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The preoperative fat fractions in the supraspinatus muscle were significantly higher in the failed-repair group than in the intact-repair group (37.0% vs 19.5%, P muscle tended to progress at 1 year postoperatively in only the failed-repair group. Conclusion MR imaging quantification of preoperative fat fractions by using a two-point Dixon sequence within the rotator cuff muscles may be a viable method for predicting postoperative retear. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  5. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J.; Loon, Ton van; Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  6. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and HTA, Geert Grooteplein Noord 21, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for rotator cuff tears in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.O., E-mail: toby.smith@uea.ac.uk [Department of Physiotherapy, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Back, T. [Department of Physiotherapy, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Toms, A.P. [Department of Radiology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hing, C.B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound to detect partial and complete thickness rotator cuff tears based on all available clinical trials. Materials and methods: An electronic search of databases registering published and unpublished literature was conducted. All diagnostic accuracy studies that directly compared the accuracy of ultrasound (the index test) to either arthroscopic or open surgical findings (the reference test) for rotator cuff tear were included. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed using the QUADAS form. When appropriate, pooled sensitivity and specificity analysis was conducted, with an assessment of the summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each analysis. Results: Sixty-two studies assessing 6007 patients and 6066 shoulders were included. Ultrasonography had good sensitivity and specificity for the assessment of partial thickness (sensitivity 0.84; specificity 0.89), and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.93). However, the literature poorly described population characteristics, assessor blinding, and was based on limited sample sizes. The literature assessing transducer frequency was particularly small in size. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is an appropriate radiological technique for the assessment of rotator cuff tears with an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. The diagnostic test accuracy of ultrasound is superior for the detection of full-thickness compared to partial-thickness cuff tears. Further study assessing the effect of transducer frequency is warranted.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for rotator cuff tears in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.O.; Back, T.; Toms, A.P.; Hing, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound to detect partial and complete thickness rotator cuff tears based on all available clinical trials. Materials and methods: An electronic search of databases registering published and unpublished literature was conducted. All diagnostic accuracy studies that directly compared the accuracy of ultrasound (the index test) to either arthroscopic or open surgical findings (the reference test) for rotator cuff tear were included. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed using the QUADAS form. When appropriate, pooled sensitivity and specificity analysis was conducted, with an assessment of the summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for each analysis. Results: Sixty-two studies assessing 6007 patients and 6066 shoulders were included. Ultrasonography had good sensitivity and specificity for the assessment of partial thickness (sensitivity 0.84; specificity 0.89), and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (sensitivity 0.96; specificity 0.93). However, the literature poorly described population characteristics, assessor blinding, and was based on limited sample sizes. The literature assessing transducer frequency was particularly small in size. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is an appropriate radiological technique for the assessment of rotator cuff tears with an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. The diagnostic test accuracy of ultrasound is superior for the detection of full-thickness compared to partial-thickness cuff tears. Further study assessing the effect of transducer frequency is warranted.

  9. Excitation of higher radial modes of azimuthal surface waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range by rotating relativistic flow of electrons in cylindrical waveguides partially filled by plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girka, Igor O.; Pavlenko, Ivan V.; Thumm, Manfred

    2018-05-01

    Azimuthal surface waves are electromagnetic eigenwaves of cylindrical plasma-dielectric waveguides which propagate azimuthally nearby the plasma-dielectric interface across an axial external stationary magnetic field. Their eigenfrequency in particular can belong to the electron cyclotron frequency range. Excitation of azimuthal surface waves by rotating relativistic electron flows was studied in detail recently in the case of the zeroth radial mode for which the waves' radial phase change within the layer where the electrons gyrate is small. In this case, just the plasma parameters cause the main influence on the waves' dispersion properties. In the case of the first and higher radial modes, the wave eigenfrequency is higher and the wavelength is shorter than in the case of the zeroth radial mode. This gain being of interest for practical applications can be achieved without any change in the device design. The possibility of effective excitation of the higher order radial modes of azimuthal surface waves is demonstrated here. Getting shorter wavelengths of the excited waves in the case of higher radial modes is shown to be accompanied by decreasing growth rates of the waves. The results obtained here are of interest for developing new sources of electromagnetic radiation, in nano-physics and in medical physics.

  10. Factors predicting rotator cuff retears: an analysis of 1000 consecutive rotator cuff repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Brian T N; Wu, Xiao L; Lam, Patrick H; Murrell, George A C

    2014-05-01

    The rate of retears after rotator cuff repair varies from 11% to 94%. A retear is associated with poorer subjective and objective clinical outcomes than intact repair. This study was designed to determine which preoperative and/or intraoperative factors held the greatest association with retears after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study retrospectively evaluated 1000 consecutive patients who had undergone a primary rotator cuff repair by a single surgeon using an arthroscopic inverted-mattress knotless technique and who had undergone an ultrasound evaluation 6 months after surgery to assess repair integrity. Exclusion criteria included previous rotator cuff repair on the same shoulder, incomplete repair, and repair using a synthetic polytetrafluoroethylene patch. All patients had completed the modified L'Insalata Questionnaire and underwent a clinical examination before surgery. Measurements of tear size, tear thickness, associated shoulder injury, tissue quality, and tendon mobility were recorded intraoperatively. The overall retear rate at 6 months after surgery was 17%. Retears occurred in 27% of full-thickness tears and 5% of partial-thickness tears (P < .0001). The best independent predictors of retears were anteroposterior tear length (correlation coefficient r = 0.41, P < .0001), tear size area (r = 0.40, P < .0001), mediolateral tear length (r = 0.34, P < .0001), tear thickness (r = 0.29, P < .0001), age at surgery (r = 0.27, P < .0001), and operative time (r = 0.18, P < .0001). These factors produced a predictive model for retears: logit P = (0.039 × age at surgery in years) + (0.027 × tear thickness in %) + (1 × anteroposterior tear length in cm) + (0.76 × mediolateral tear length in cm) - (0.17 × tear size area in cm(2)) + (0.018 × operative time in minutes) -9.7. Logit P can be transformed into P, which is the chance of retears at 6 months after surgery. A rotator cuff retear is a multifactorial process

  11. Monitoring production target thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oothoudt, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Pion and muon production targets at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility consist of rotating graphite wheels. The previous target thickness monitoring Procedure scanned the target across a reduced intensity beam to determine beam center. The fractional loss in current across the centered target gave a measure of target thickness. This procedure, however, required interruption of beam delivery to experiments and frequently indicated a different fractional loss than at normal beam currents. The new monitoring Procedure compares integrated ups and downs toroid current monitor readings. The current monitors are read once per minute and the integral of readings are logged once per eight-hour shift. Changes in the upstream to downstream fractional difference provide a nonintrusive continuous measurement of target thickness under nominal operational conditions. Target scans are now done only when new targets are installed or when unexplained changes in the current monitor data are observed

  12. A biomechanical and histological comparison of the suture bridge and conventional double-row techniques of the repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Wenyong; Guo, Weichun

    2015-06-16

    The suture bridge (SB) technique and conventional double-row (DR) are both effective in repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears . However, increasing numbers of scholars believe that the SB technique produces better results than conventional DR because of the higher bone-tendon contact area and pressure. However, The clinical outcomes have been mixed and little direct evidence has been supplied in vivo. This study was designed using the SB and DR techniques to determine which is the better technique. Sixty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups, the SB group and DR group. SB and DR were then used to repair their rotator cuff tears. Rabbits were then sacrificed at the 2(nd), 4(th), or 8(th) week after surgery and a histological comparison was made. The biomechanical comparison was made at the 8(th) week. The load to failure of the SB group was 134.59 ± 17.69 N at the 8(th) postoperative week, and that was significantly higher than in the DR group (103.83 ± 6.62, P = 0.001), but both repair groups remained lower than in the control group (199.25 ± 14.81). Histological evaluation showed that both the SB and DR groups healed at the bone-tendon interface. But there were subtle differences between the two groups in the structure and morphology of collagen fibers and cartilage cells at bone-tendon interface. In general, the collagen fibers of the SB group were more compact than those of the DR group at all times tested. At the 4(th) and 8(th) weeks, the collagen fibers and cartilage cells in the SB group were arranged in a column modality, but those in the DR group were distributed horizontally. The SB technique facilitated healing more effectively than the conventional DR technique. The difference in morphology of collagen fibers and cartilage cells may be related to the difference in bone-tendon contact pressure.

  13. Thick Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in individuals with nail fungus (onychomycosis), psoriasis and hypothyroidism. Those who have problems with the thickness of their toenails should consult a foot and ankle surgeon for proper diagnosis and treatment. Find an ACFAS Physician Search Search Tools Find ...

  14. Faraday effect in hollow quantum cylinder of finite thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailov, T.G.; Jabrailova, G.G.

    2009-01-01

    The interband Faraday rotation in hollow quantum cylinder of finite thickness is theoretically investigated. Faraday rotation in the dependence on incident light energy for different values of cylinder thickness. It is seen that the resonance peaks appear on Faraday rotation curve. The roles of selection are obtained

  15. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical Center of Kurume University, 155-1 Kokubu-machi, Kurume City, Fukuoka 839-0862 (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  16. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  17. Rotator cuff injury: fat suppression MR image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Jong Yoon; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Yeon Hee; Kim, Yong Soo

    1994-01-01

    We performed the study prospectively to evaluate the advantage of fat suppression MR in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Ten symptomatic patients were studied with both conventional T2WI and FST2WI using chemical shift technique. Each image was analyzed for the assessment of injuries, conspicuity of the lesion, the presence of effusion in subacromical bursae and joint space, and presence of humeral head injury. Arthroscopy was done in 4 patients following MRI. We could made presumptive diagnoses on FSMR as identical as on conventional MR in six cases(1 normal, 2 tendinitis, 2 partial thickness tear, 1 full thickness tear), two of them were confirmed by arthroscopic procedures. Two cases of partial thickness tear proved by arthroscopy were detected on FST2WI, whereas they were considered tendinitis on conventional T2WI. There were another 2 cases who showed tendinitis on FSMR, but normal on conventional T2WI. They, however, were not confirmed by either arthroscopy or surgical procedure. We found the FSMR were superior to conventional T2WI in the conspicuity of lesions and detection of joint effusion and abnormalities on the humeral head. We think FSMR of the shoulder could have significant diagnostic advantages over the conventional spin-echo MR imaging

  18. Rotator cuff injury: fat suppression MR image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Yoon; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun; Lee, Yeon Hee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    We performed the study prospectively to evaluate the advantage of fat suppression MR in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injury. Ten symptomatic patients were studied with both conventional T2WI and FST2WI using chemical shift technique. Each image was analyzed for the assessment of injuries, conspicuity of the lesion, the presence of effusion in subacromical bursae and joint space, and presence of humeral head injury. Arthroscopy was done in 4 patients following MRI. We could made presumptive diagnoses on FSMR as identical as on conventional MR in six cases(1 normal, 2 tendinitis, 2 partial thickness tear, 1 full thickness tear), two of them were confirmed by arthroscopic procedures. Two cases of partial thickness tear proved by arthroscopy were detected on FST2WI, whereas they were considered tendinitis on conventional T2WI. There were another 2 cases who showed tendinitis on FSMR, but normal on conventional T2WI. They, however, were not confirmed by either arthroscopy or surgical procedure. We found the FSMR were superior to conventional T2WI in the conspicuity of lesions and detection of joint effusion and abnormalities on the humeral head. We think FSMR of the shoulder could have significant diagnostic advantages over the conventional spin-echo MR imaging.

  19. Rotator Cuff Repair in Adolescent Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Michael G; Dugas, Jeffrey R; Andrews, James R; Goldstein, Samuel R; Emblom, Benton A; Cain, E Lyle

    2018-04-01

    Rotator cuff tears are rare injuries in adolescents but cause significant morbidity if unrecognized. Previous literature on rotator cuff repairs in adolescents is limited to small case series, with few data to guide treatment. Adolescent patients would have excellent functional outcome scores and return to the same level of sports participation after rotator cuff repair but would have some difficulty with returning to overhead sports. Case series; Level of evidence 4. A retrospective search of the practice's billing records identified all patients participating in at least 1 sport who underwent rotator cuff repair between 2006 and 2014 with an age Rotator Cuff Index. Thirty-two consecutive adolescent athletes (28 boys and 4 girls) with a mean age of 16.1 years (range, 13.2-17.9 years) met inclusion criteria. Twenty-nine patients (91%) had a traumatic event, and 27 of these patients (93%) had no symptoms before the trauma. The most common single tendon injury was to the supraspinatus (21 patients, 66%), of which 2 were complete tendon tears, 1 was a bony avulsion of the tendon, and 18 were high-grade partial tears. Fourteen patients (56%) underwent single-row repair of their rotator cuff tear, and 11 (44%) underwent double-row repair. All subscapularis injuries were repaired in open fashion, while all other tears were repaired arthroscopically. Twenty-seven patients (84%) completed the outcome questionnaires at a mean 6.2 years after surgery (range, 2-10 years). The mean ASES score was 93 (range, 65-100; SD = 9); mean Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, 89% (range, 60%-100%; SD = 13%); and mean numeric pain rating, 0.3 (range, 0-3; SD = 0.8). Overall, 25 patients (93%) returned to the same level of play or higher. Among overhead athletes, 13 (93%) were able to return to the same level of play, but 8 (57%) were forced to change positions. There were no surgical complications, but 2 patients did undergo a subsequent operation. Surgical repair of high-grade partial-thickness

  20. The optical rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tandrup, T; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    1997-01-01

    further discuss the methods derived from this principle and present two new local volume estimators. The optical rotator benefits from information obtained in all three dimensions in thick sections but avoids over-/ underprojection problems at the extremes of the cell. Using computer-assisted microscopes......The optical rotator is an unbiased, local stereological principle for estimation of cell volume and cell surface area in thick, transparent slabs, The underlying principle was first described in 1993 by Kieu Jensen (T. Microsc. 170, 45-51) who also derived an estimator of length, In this study we...... the extra measurements demand minimal extra effort and make this estimator even more efficient when it comes to estimation of individual cell size than many of the previous local estimators, We demonstrate the principle of the optical rotator in an example (the cells in the dorsal root ganglion of the rat...

  1. Rotating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2010-01-01

    Rotating flow is critically important across a wide range of scientific, engineering and product applications, providing design and modeling capability for diverse products such as jet engines, pumps and vacuum cleaners, as well as geophysical flows. Developed over the course of 20 years' research into rotating fluids and associated heat transfer at the University of Sussex Thermo-Fluid Mechanics Research Centre (TFMRC), Rotating Flow is an indispensable reference and resource for all those working within the gas turbine and rotating machinery industries. Traditional fluid and flow dynamics titles offer the essential background but generally include very sparse coverage of rotating flows-which is where this book comes in. Beginning with an accessible introduction to rotating flow, recognized expert Peter Childs takes you through fundamental equations, vorticity and vortices, rotating disc flow, flow around rotating cylinders and flow in rotating cavities, with an introduction to atmospheric and oceanic circul...

  2. Rotational seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational seismology is an emerging study of all aspects of rotational motions induced by earthquakes, explosions, and ambient vibrations. It is of interest to several disciplines, including seismology, earthquake engineering, geodesy, and earth-based detection of Einstein’s gravitation waves.Rotational effects of seismic waves, together with rotations caused by soil–structure interaction, have been observed for centuries (e.g., rotated chimneys, monuments, and tombstones). Figure 1a shows the rotated monument to George Inglis observed after the 1897 Great Shillong earthquake. This monument had the form of an obelisk rising over 19 metres high from a 4 metre base. During the earthquake, the top part broke off and the remnant of some 6 metres rotated about 15° relative to the base. The study of rotational seismology began only recently when sensitive rotational sensors became available due to advances in aeronautical and astronomical instrumentations.

  3. The Repaired Rotator Cuff: MRI and Ultrasound Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan C; Williams, Danielle; Endo, Yoshimi

    2018-03-01

    The purposes of this review were to provide an overview of the current practice of evaluating the postoperative rotator cuff on imaging and to review the salient imaging findings of the normal and abnormal postoperative rotator cuff, as well as of postoperative complications. The repaired rotator cuff frequently appears abnormal on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US). Recent studies have shown that while the tendons typically normalize, they can demonstrate clinically insignificant abnormal imaging appearances for longer than 6 months. Features of capsular thickening or subacromial-subdeltoid bursal thickening and fluid distension were found to decrease substantially in the first 6-month postoperative period. MRI and US were found to be highly comparable in the postoperative assessment of the rotator cuff, although they had a lower sensitivity for partial thickness tears. Imaging evaluation of newer techniques such as patch augmentation and superior capsular reconstruction needs to be further investigated. MRI and US are useful in the postoperative assessment of the rotator cuff, not only for evaluation of the integrity of the rotator cuff, but also for detecting hardware complications and other etiologies of shoulder pain.

  4. Rotator cuff disease – basics of diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Boykin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff (RTC disease is a particularly prevalent cause of shoulder pain and weakness presenting to primary care physicians, internists, rheumatologists, and orthopedists. An understanding of the anatomy of the RTC tendons and the underlying pathogenesis aids in the diagnosis, which is based largely on history and specific physical examination tests. Imaging may further define the pathology and aid in the evaluation of other sources of shoulder pain. Injuries to the RTC range from tendonitis to partial thickness tears to full thickness tears. The majority of patients with impingement and some cases of partial thickness tears may be managed effectively with non-operative measures including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local injections, and physical therapy. Predictors of a good outcome with non-operative treatment include pre-injury strength, ability to raise the arm to the level of the shoulder, and a more acute presentation. Persistent symptoms may require operative intervention including debridement, subacromial decompression, and/or RTC repair. Acute full thickness tears in younger patients in addition to failed non-operative management of full thickness tears in older patients are the most likely to require surgery, which may be done open or arthroscopically. The majority of tears are amenable to the less invasive arthroscopic method, which yields good success rates and high patient satisfaction.

  5. Rotator cuff tears: should abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning be performed before image acquisition? A CT arthrography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, Hubert [Hopital Cardiologique du Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France); Couderc, Stephane; Pele, Eric; Moreau-Durieux, Marie-Helene; Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Bordeaux (France); Amoretti, Nicolas [CHU Archet, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Nice (France)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the impact of abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning performed before image acquisition on the assessment of rotator cuff tears. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent an initial CT arthrogram of the shoulder in neutral position, immediately followed by temporary ABER positioning, before a second CT acquisition in neutral position. Two observers blinded to potential pre-procedure ABER positioning independently analysed the randomly distributed images. Lesions were classified into partial-thickness (PT) and full-thickness (FT) tear subtypes. Lesion detection and measurements of pre- and post-ABER studies were compared. We found no influence of pre-test ABER positioning on FT detection or measurements. Every PT detected on pre-ABER study was also detected on post-ABER study (28/28 for reader 1, and 32/32 for reader 2). Seven and eight additional PT were found by readers 1 and 2, respectively, on post-ABER study. Lesion size increased after ABER in terms of area (P < 0.001 for both readers) and Ellman's grade (P = 0.02 and 0.002 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). ABER positioning before CT is associated with improved delineation of partial tears, a higher number of detected tears and modification of treatment planning. (orig.)

  6. Global rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosquist, K.

    1980-01-01

    Global rotation in cosmological models is defined on an observational basis. A theorem is proved saying that, for rigid motion, the global rotation is equal to the ordinary local vorticity. The global rotation is calculated in the space-time homogeneous class III models, with Godel's model as a special case. It is shown that, with the exception of Godel's model, the rotation in these models becomes infinite for finite affine parameter values. In some directions the rotation changes sign and becomes infinite in a direction opposite to the local vorticity. The points of infinite rotation are identified as conjugate points along the null geodesics. The physical interpretation of the infinite rotation is discussed, and a comparison with the behaviour of the area distance at conjugate points is given. (author)

  7. Radiation transmission pipe thickness measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Fuji Electric Systems can be measured from the outer insulation of the transmission Characteristics and radiation detection equipment had been developed that can measure pipe wall thinning in plant and running, the recruitment of another three-beam calculation method by pipe thickness measurement system was developed to measure the thickness of the pipe side. This equipment has been possible to measure the thickness of the circumferential profile of the pipe attachment by adopting automatic rotation. (author)

  8. Trabecular microstructure and surface changes in the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yebin; Zhao, Jenny; Ouyang, Xiaolong; Genant, Harry K.; Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van; Flynn, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective. When planning surgery in patients with rotator cuff tear, strength of bone at the tendon insertion and trabecular bone structure in the greater tuberosity are usually taken into consideration. We investigated radiographic changes in bone structure of the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears.Design. Twenty-two human cadaveric shoulders from subjects ranging from 55 to 75 years of age were obtained. The integrity of the rotator cuff was examined by sonography to determine if it is intact without any tear, or torn partially or completely. The humeral head was sectioned in 3 mm thick coronal slab sections and microradiographed. After digitization of the microradiographs and imaging processing with in-house semi-automated image processing software tools developed using software interfaces on a Sun workstation, the trabecular histomorphometrical structural parameters and connectivity in the greater tuberosity were quantified. The degenerative changes on the surface of the greater tuberosity were interpreted blindly by 2 independent readers.Results. Among the 22 shoulder specimens, the rotator cuff was found intact in 10 shoulders, partially in 7 and fully torn in 5. Statistically significant loss in apparent trabecular bone volume fraction, number of trabecular nodes, and number of trabecular branches, and a statistically significant increase in apparent trabecular separation and number of trabecular free ends were found in the greater tuberosity of the shoulders with tears. The loss was greater in association with full tear than in partial tear. Thickening of the cortical margin of the enthesis, irregularity of its surface, and calcification beyond the tidemark were observed in 2 (20%) shoulders with intact rotator cuff, in 6 (86%) shoulders with partial tear, and in 5 (100%) shoulders with full tear.Conclusions. Rotator cuff tears are associated with degenerative changes on the bone surface and with disuse osteopenia of the greater tuberosity

  9. Deltoid muscle and tendon tears in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Recht, Michael P.; Iannotti, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of tears of the deltoid muscle and tendon in patients with rotator cuff tears and without a prior history of shoulder surgery. Deltoid tears diagnosed on MR examinations were prospectively recorded between February 2003 through June 2004. The images of these patients were then retrospectively reviewed to determine the location of the deltoid tear, the presence of rotator cuff tears, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, degree of humeral head subluxation, bony erosive changes involving the undersurface of the acromion, and the presence of edema or fluid-like signal intensity in the deltoid muscle and overlying subcutaneous tissues. There were 24 (0.3%) patients with deltoid tears; nine men and 15 women. The age range was 54 to 87 (average 73) years. The right side was involved in 20 cases, and the left in four cases. Fifteen patients had full thickness and nine had partial thickness tears of the deltoid. Shoulder pain was the most common presenting symptom. The physical examination revealed a defect in the region of the deltoid in two patients. Nineteen patients had tears in the muscle belly near the musculotendinous junction, and five had avulsion of the tendon from the acromial origin. Full thickness rotator cuff tears were present in all of the patients, and 22 patients had associated muscle atrophy. Subcutaneous edema and fluid-like signal was present in 15 patients. Tears of the deltoid muscle or tendon is an unusual finding, but they can be seen in patients with chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Partial thickness tears tend to involve the undersurface of the deltoid muscle and tendon. Associated findings such as intramuscular cyst or ganglion in the deltoid muscle belly and subcutaneous edema or fluid-like signal overlying the deltoid in a patient with a rotator cuff tear should raise the suspicion of a deltoid tear. (orig.)

  10. Deltoid muscle and tendon tears in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Recht, Michael P. [Cleveland Clinic, Musculoskeletal Radiology/A21, Division of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Iannotti, Joseph P. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of tears of the deltoid muscle and tendon in patients with rotator cuff tears and without a prior history of shoulder surgery. Deltoid tears diagnosed on MR examinations were prospectively recorded between February 2003 through June 2004. The images of these patients were then retrospectively reviewed to determine the location of the deltoid tear, the presence of rotator cuff tears, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, degree of humeral head subluxation, bony erosive changes involving the undersurface of the acromion, and the presence of edema or fluid-like signal intensity in the deltoid muscle and overlying subcutaneous tissues. There were 24 (0.3%) patients with deltoid tears; nine men and 15 women. The age range was 54 to 87 (average 73) years. The right side was involved in 20 cases, and the left in four cases. Fifteen patients had full thickness and nine had partial thickness tears of the deltoid. Shoulder pain was the most common presenting symptom. The physical examination revealed a defect in the region of the deltoid in two patients. Nineteen patients had tears in the muscle belly near the musculotendinous junction, and five had avulsion of the tendon from the acromial origin. Full thickness rotator cuff tears were present in all of the patients, and 22 patients had associated muscle atrophy. Subcutaneous edema and fluid-like signal was present in 15 patients. Tears of the deltoid muscle or tendon is an unusual finding, but they can be seen in patients with chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Partial thickness tears tend to involve the undersurface of the deltoid muscle and tendon. Associated findings such as intramuscular cyst or ganglion in the deltoid muscle belly and subcutaneous edema or fluid-like signal overlying the deltoid in a patient with a rotator cuff tear should raise the suspicion of a deltoid tear. (orig.)

  11. Radioactive thickness gauge (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizerix, J.

    1962-01-01

    The author describes a thickness gauge in which the scintillating crystal detector alternately 'sees' a radioactive source through the material which is to be measured and then a control source of the same material; the radiations are separated in time by an absorbing valve whose sections are alternately full and hollow. The currents corresponding to the two sources are separated beyond the photomultiplier tube by a detector synchronized with the rotation of the valve. The quotient of these two currents is then obtained with a standard recording potentiometer. It is found that the average value of the response which is in the form G = f(I 1 /I 2 ) is not affected by decay of the radioactive sources, and that it is little influenced by variations of high tension, temperature, or properties of the air in the source detector interval. The performance of the gauge is given. (author) [fr

  12. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  13. Rotating dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, C.

    1984-01-01

    Products to dry are introduced inside a rotating tube placed in an oven, the cross section of the tube is an arc of spiral. During clockwise rotation of the tube products are maintained inside and mixed, during anticlockwise products are removed. Application is made to drying of radioactive wastes [fr

  14. Anterior versus posterior, and rim-rent rotator cuff tears: prevalence and MR sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, M.J.; Turnbull, J.R.; Orwin, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the relative distribution of the locations of rotator cuff tears, and the sensitivity of anterior versus posterior tears on MR images. Patients and methods. We identified 110 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR and either a partial-thickness or a small full-thickness rotator cuff tear diagnosed at arthroscopy. MR sensitivity and patient age were compared between patients with tears in the anterior and posterior halves of the cuff. In addition, in patients with partial tears less than 2 cm in diameter, an age comparison between those with tears in the critical zone and those with articular surface tears adjacent to the bony insertion (rim-rent tear) was performed. Results. The tear was centered in the anterior half of the rotator cuff in 79% of the patients younger than 36 years old, and in 89% of the patients 36 years old and over. The average age of the patients with tears in the anterior half (44 years) was not significantly different from the average age of those with posterior tears (40 years). The sensitivity of MR for anterior tears was 0.69, and for posterior tears it was 0.56. Five of the nine rim-rent tears (0.56) were interpreted correctly on the original MR report; two of the other tears were misinterpreted as intratendinous fluid but were diagnosable in retrospect. Conclusion. Even in patients less than 36 years old, most partial and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears are centered in the anterior half of the supraspinatus. Although our figure for MR sensitivity for these tears is lower than in recent articles, we found no significant difference between the sensitivity of MR for diagnosing posterior tears versus tears in the anterior half of the supraspinatus tendon. Rim-rent tears can be mistaken for intratendinous signal, and should be carefully looked for in younger patients with shoulder pain. (orig.)

  15. A prospective evaluation of survivorship of asymptomatic degenerative rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Jay D; Galatz, Leesa M; Teefey, Sharlene A; Middleton, William D; Steger-May, Karen; Stobbs-Cucchi, Georgia; Patton, Rebecca; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2015-01-21

    The purpose of this prospective study was to report the long-term risks of rotator cuff tear enlargement and symptom progression associated with degenerative asymptomatic tears. Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in one shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder enrolled as part of a prospective longitudinal study. Two hundred and twenty-four subjects (118 initial full-thickness tears, fifty-six initial partial-thickness tears, and fifty controls) were followed for a median of 5.1 years. Validated functional shoulder scores were calculated (visual analog pain scale, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES], and simple shoulder test [SST] scores). Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography and clinical evaluations. Tear enlargement was seen in 49% of the shoulders, and the median time to enlargement was 2.8 years. The occurrence of tear-enlargement events was influenced by the severity of the final tear type, with enlargement of 61% of the full-thickness tears, 44% of the partial-thickness tears, and 14% of the controls (p tear enlargement. One hundred subjects (46%) developed new pain. The final tear type was associated with a greater risk of pain development, with the new pain developing in 28% of the controls, 46% of the shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, and 50% of those with a full-thickness tear (p tear enlargement was associated with the onset of new pain (p muscle were associated with tear enlargement, with supraspinatus muscle degeneration increasing in 4% of the shoulders with a stable tear compared with 30% of the shoulders with tear enlargement (p tear showed increased infraspinatus muscle degeneration compared with 28% of those in which the tear had enlarged (p = 0.07). This study demonstrates the progressive nature of degenerative rotator cuff disease. The risk of tear enlargement and progression of muscle degeneration is greater for shoulders with a full-thickness tear, and tear

  16. MR imaging of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    A total of 115 patients with clinical symptoms and signs suggesting rotator cuff tears underwent MR imaging with a 1.5-Tesla system. The body coil was used as the receiver coil in 24 patients and a single 10 cm surface coil in 91. Arthrography or MR imaging with intra-articular Gd-DTPA (MR arthrography) was performed in 95 of the 115. T2-weighted images with the body coil showed high signal intensity lesions in rotator cuffs in only seven of the 10 patients who had tears demonstrated by arthrography or MR arthrography. On the other hand, T2-weighted images with the surface coil demonstrated high signal intensity lesions in cuffs in all 27 patients who were diagnosed to have tears by arthrography or MR arthrography. In 12 patietns, T2-wighted images with the surface coil showed high signal intensity lesions in cuffs, while arthrography and MR arthrography did not show tears. Surgery was performed in four of the 12 patients and partial tears were confirmed. A single 10 cm surface coil, 3 mm slice thickness and 2.5 second repetition time seem to account for the fine visualization of cuff tears by the T2-weighted images. These results suggest that T2-weighted images obtained with the surface coil are superior to arthrography and MR arthrography. (author)

  17. Structural Characteristics Are Not Associated With Pain and Function in Rotator Cuff Tears: The ROW Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Emily J; Matzkin, Elizabeth E; Dong, Yan; Higgins, Laurence D; Katz, Jeffrey N; Jain, Nitin B

    2015-05-01

    Structural characteristics of rotator cuff tears are used in surgical decision making. However, data on the association of tear size with patient-reported pain and function are sparse. To assess the association of tear size, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy with shoulder pain/function in patients with cuff tears undergoing operative and nonoperative treatment. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 67 patients with rotator cuff tears were recruited for this longitudinal cohort study. Patients were determined to have a cuff tear using clinical assessment and blinded magnetic resonance imaging review. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) was used as a measure of shoulder pain and function. Tear size and thickness were not significantly associated with pain (SPADI pain score, 60.6 [95% CI, 49.8-71.5] for partial-thickness tear; 56.8 [95% CI, 42.8-70.7] for tear; 60.4 [95% CI, 51.7-69.0] for ≥2 cm full-thickness tear). Tear size and thickness were not associated with function (SPADI disability score, 42.7 [95% CI, 29.8-55.6] for partial-thickness tear; 37.6 [95% CI, 23.9-51.4] for tear; 45.1 [95% CI, 35.4-54.8] for ≥2 cm full-thickness tear). Fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and tendon retraction were also not significantly associated with SPADI pain and disability scores. A Mental Health Index score of tears undergoing operative and nonoperative treatment, pain and functional status were not associated with tear size and thickness, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy. Conversely, factors unrelated to cuff anatomy such as mental health, comorbidities, age, and sex were associated with pain/function. These findings have clinical implications during surgical decision making and suggest that pain and functional disability in patients with rotator cuff tears is multifactorial and should not solely be attributed to structural characteristics.

  18. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  19. Snakes and spin rotators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The generalized snake configuration offers advantages of either shorter total snake length and smaller orbit displacement in the compact configuration or the multi-functions in the split configuration. We found that the compact configuration can save about 10% of the total length of a snake. On other hand, the spilt snake configuration can be used both as a snake and as a spin rotator for the helicity state. Using the orbit compensation dipoles, the spilt snake configuration can be located at any distance on both sides of the interaction point of a collider provided that there is no net dipole rotation between two halves of the snake. The generalized configuration is then applied to the partial snake excitation. Simple formula have been obtained to understand the behavior of the partial snake. Similar principle can also be applied to the spin rotators. We also estimate the possible snake imperfections are due to various construction errors of the dipole magnets. Accuracy of field error of better than 10 -4 will be significant. 2 refs., 5 figs

  20. The Spatiale Rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan

    2009-01-01

    it is embedded and sectioned. This has the unfortunate side effect that all information about positioning within the object is lost for blocks and sections. For complex tissue, like the mammalian brain, this information is of utmost importance to ensure measurements are performed in the correct region......The inherent demand for unbiasedness for some stereological estimators imposes a demand of not only positional uniform randomness but also isotropic randomness, i.e. directional uniform randomness. In order to comply with isotropy, one must perform a random rotation of the object of interest before...... is obeyed by randomizing the orientation of the virtual probe itself within the thick section. Overall, the benefit is that positional information is kept for any block and section of the specimen. As the Spatial Rotator is a 3D probe, data must be gathered from sections thicker than 25 micro meters to form...

  1. EXERCISE REHABILITATION IN THE NON-OPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Peter; Ebert, Jay; Joss, Brendan; Bhabra, Gev; Ackland, Tim; Wang, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with age, with full-thickness rotator cuff tears present in approximately 25% of individuals in their sixties, and more than 50% of those in their eighties. While surgery is considered an effective treatment, recurrent tears at the insertion site are common, especially with degenerative tears, which are frequent in the older population. More recently, there has been increasing interest in exercise rehabilitation and physical therapy as a means to manage partial and full thickness tears of the rotator cuff by addressing weakness and functional deficits. Recent studies have suggested that patients opting for physical therapy have demonstrated high satisfaction, an improvement in function, and success in avoiding surgery. When considering the increasing rate of shoulder surgery and the associated economic and social burden rotator cuff surgery places on both the patient and the health care system, non-surgical management such as physical therapy and exercise may, in selected cases, be a treatment alternative to surgical repair. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of rotator cuff pathology and pathogenesis, and to present an evidence-based case for the role of conservative rehabilitation in the management of rotator cuff injuries. Level of Evidence Level 5 PMID:27104061

  2. 16-slice MDCT arthrography of the shoulder: accuracy for detection of glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gang Deuk; Kim, Huoung Jun; Kim, Hye Won; Oh, Jung Taek; Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ah [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice MDCT arthrography (CTA) for glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. We enrolled forty-five patients who underwent arthroscopy after CTA for pain or instability of the shoulder joint. The CTA images were analyzed for the existence, sites and types of glenoid labral tears and the presence and severity of rotator cuff tears. We determined the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CTA for detecting glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears on the basis of the arthroscopy findings. At arthroscopy, there were 33 SLAP lesions (9 type I, 23 type II and 1 type III), 6 Bankart lesions and 31 rotator cuff lesions (21 supraspinatus, 9 infraspinatus and 1 subscapularis). On CTA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting 24 SLAP lesions, excluding the type I lesions, were 83%, 100% and 91%, the total rotator cuff tears were 90%, 100% and 98%, the full thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 100%, 94% and 96%, and the partial thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 29%, 100% and 89%, respectively. 16-slice MDCT arthrography has high accuracy for the diagnosis of abnormality of the glenoid labrum or rotator cuff tears and it can be a useful alternative to MRI or US.

  3. 16-slice MDCT arthrography of the shoulder: accuracy for detection of glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gang Deuk; Kim, Huoung Jun; Kim, Hye Won; Oh, Jung Taek; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Lee, Sung Ah

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice MDCT arthrography (CTA) for glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. We enrolled forty-five patients who underwent arthroscopy after CTA for pain or instability of the shoulder joint. The CTA images were analyzed for the existence, sites and types of glenoid labral tears and the presence and severity of rotator cuff tears. We determined the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CTA for detecting glenoid labral and rotator cuff tears on the basis of the arthroscopy findings. At arthroscopy, there were 33 SLAP lesions (9 type I, 23 type II and 1 type III), 6 Bankart lesions and 31 rotator cuff lesions (21 supraspinatus, 9 infraspinatus and 1 subscapularis). On CTA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting 24 SLAP lesions, excluding the type I lesions, were 83%, 100% and 91%, the total rotator cuff tears were 90%, 100% and 98%, the full thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 100%, 94% and 96%, and the partial thickness supraspinatus tendon tears were 29%, 100% and 89%, respectively. 16-slice MDCT arthrography has high accuracy for the diagnosis of abnormality of the glenoid labrum or rotator cuff tears and it can be a useful alternative to MRI or US

  4. Rotating preventers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs

  5. Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  6. A prospective, randomised study of a novel transforming methacrylate dressing compared with a silver-containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose dressing on partial-thickness skin graft donor sites in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadian, Ojan; Arnoldo, Brett; Purdue, Gary; Burris, Agnes; Skrinjar, Edda; Duschek, Nikolaus; Leaper, David J

    2015-06-01

    This prospective, randomised study compares a new transforming methacrylate dressing (TMD) with a silver-containing carboxymethylcellulose dressing (CMC-Ag) after application to split-thickness skin graft (STSG) donor sites. This was an unblinded, non-inferiority, between-patient, comparison study that involved patients admitted to a single-centre burn unit who required two skin graft donor sites. Each patient's donor sites were covered immediately after surgery: one donor site with TMD and the other with CMC-Ag. The donor sites were evaluated until healing or until 24 days post-application, whichever came first. Study endpoints were time to healing, daily pain scores, number of dressing changes, patient comfort and physicians' and patients' willingness to use the dressings in the future. Nineteen patients had both the dressings applied. No statistically significant difference was noted in time to healing between the two dressings (14·2 days using TMD compared with 13·2 days using CMC-Ag). When pain scores were compared, TMD resulted in statistically significantly less pain at three different time periods (2-5 days, 6-10 days and 11-15 days; P < 0·001 at all time periods). Patients also reported greater comfort with TMD (P < 0·001). Users rated TMD as being less easy to use because of the time and technique required for application. Reductions in pain and increased patient comfort with the use of the TMD dressing, compared with CMC-Ag, were seen as clinical benefits as these are the major issues in donor site management. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Through thickness property variations in a thick plate AA7050 friction stir welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaday, Clinton T.; Moore, Matthew A.; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, moderately thick (32 mm) AA7050 plates were joined by friction stir welding (FSW). Various methods were used to characterize the welded joints, including nugget grain size measurements at different locations through the thickness, micro-hardness indentation through nugget, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat affected zone (HAZ) at different cross section heights, and residual stress measurement using the cut compliance method with full thickness and partial thickness specimens. All testing results are consistent with the presence of a strong gradient in peak temperature through the plate thickness during FSW.

  8. Partial Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Partial Cancellation. Full Cancellation is desirable. But complexity requirements are enormous. 4000 tones, 100 Users billions of flops !!! Main Idea: Challenge: To determine which cross-talker to cancel on what “tone” for a given victim. Constraint: Total complexity is ...

  9. Longitudinal Long-term Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Follow-up After Single-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Clinical Superiority of Structural Tendon Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Smolen, Daniel; Pauzenberger, Leo; Plachel, Fabian; Salem, Sylvia; Laky, Brenda; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2017-05-01

    The number of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgeries is consistently increasing. Although generally considered successful, the reported number of retears after rotator cuff repair is substantial. Short-term clinical outcomes are reported to be rarely impaired by tendon retears, whereas to our knowledge, there is no study documenting long-term clinical outcomes and tendon integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To investigate longitudinal long-term repair integrity and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with suture anchors for a full-tendon full-thickness tear of the supraspinatus or a partial-tendon full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus were included. Two and 10 years after initial arthroscopic surgery, tendon integrity was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score and Constant score as well as subjective questions regarding satisfaction with the procedure and return to normal activity were used to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes. At the early MRI follow-up, 42% of patients showed a full-thickness rerupture, while 25% had a partial rerupture, and 33% of tendons remained intact. The 10-year MRI follow-up (129 ± 11 months) showed 50% with a total rerupture, while the other half of the tendons were partially reruptured (25%) or intact (25%). The UCLA and Constant scores significantly improved from preoperatively (UCLA total: 50.6% ± 20.2%; Constant total: 44.7 ± 10.5 points) to 2 years (UCLA total: 91.4% ± 16.0% [ P rotator cuff repair showed good clinical long-term results despite a high rate of retears. Nonetheless, intact tendons provided significantly superior clinical long-term outcomes, making the improvement of tendon healing and repair integrity important goals of future research efforts.

  10. Microstructural development in physical vapour-deposited partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Y. H. (Center for Intelligent Processing of Materials, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, MA 01609-2280 (United States)); Biederman, R.R. (Center for Intelligent Processing of Materials, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, MA 01609-2280 (United States)); Sisson, R.D. Jr. (Center for Intelligent Processing of Materials, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, MA 01609-2280 (United States))

    1994-10-01

    The effects of processing parameters of physical vapour deposition on the microstructure of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) thermal barrier coatings have been experimentally investigated. Emphasis has been placed on the crystallographic texture of the PSZ coatings and the microstructure of the top surface of the PSZ coatings as well as the metal-ceramic interface. The variations in the deposition chamber temperature, substrate thickness, substrate rotation and vapour incidence angle resulted in the observation of significant differences in the crystallographic texture and microstructure of the PSZ coatings. ((orig.))

  11. Partial processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This discussion paper considers the possibility of applying to the recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors a particular method of partial processing based on the PUREX process but named CIVEX to emphasise the differences. The CIVEX process is based primarily on the retention of short-lived fission products. The paper suggests: (1) the recycle of fission products with uranium and plutonium in thermal reactor fuel would be technically feasible; (2) it would, however, take ten years or more to develop the CIVEX process to the point where it could be launched on a commercial scale; (3) since the majority of spent fuel to be reprocessed this century will have been in storage for ten years or more, the recycling of short-lived fission products with the U-Pu would not provide an effective means of making refabrication fuel ''inaccessible'' because the radioactivity associated with the fission products would have decayed. There would therefore be no advantage in partial processing

  12. Comparative erythrocyte deformability investigations by filtrometry, slit-flow and rotational ektacytometry in a long-term follow-up animal study on splenectomy and different spleen preserving operative techniques: Partial or subtotal spleen resection and spleen autotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, Iren; Nemeth, Norbert; Sogor, Viktoria; Kiss, Ferenc; Toth, Eniko; Peto, Katalin; Furka, Andrea; Vanyolos, Erzsebet; Toth, Laszlo; Varga, Jozsef; Szigeti, Krisztian; Benkő, Ilona; Olah, Anna V; Furka, Istvan

    2017-01-01

    Partial or subtotal spleen resection or spleen autotransplantation can partly preserve/restore the splenic filtration function, as previous studies demonstrated. For better evaluation and follow-up of the various spleen-preserving operative techniques' effectiveness versus splenectomy, a composite methodological approach was applied in a canine experimental model. Beagle dogs were subjected to control (n = 6), splenectomy (SE, n = 4), partial and subtotal spleen resection (n = 4/each) or spleen autotransplantation groups (AU, Furka's spleen-chip method, n = 8). The follow-up period was 18 postoperative (p.o.) months. Erythrocyte deformability was determined in parallel by bulk filtrometry (Carat FT-1 filtrometer), slit-flow ektacytometry (RheoScan D-200) and rotational ektacytometry (LoRRca MaxSis Osmoscan). By filtrometry, relative cell transit time increased in the SE group (mostly in animal Nr. SE-3), showing the highest values on the 3rd, 9th and in 18th p.o. months. Elongation index values decreased in this group (both by slit-flow and rotational ektacytometers). In general, AU and two resection groups' values were lower versus control and higher than in SE. Forasmuch in the circulation both elongation by shear stress and filtration occur, these various erythrocyte deformability testing methods together may describe better the alterations. Considering the possible complications related to functional asplenic-hyposplenic conditions, individual analysis of cases is highly important.

  13. Partial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.М. Karimova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A girl with partial gigantism (the increased I and II fingers of the left foot is being examined. This condition is a rare and unresolved problem, as the definite reason of its development is not determined. Wait-and-see strategy is recommended, as well as correcting operations after closing of growth zones, and forming of data pool for generalization and development of schemes of drug and radial therapeutic methods.

  14. Rotational discontinuities in anisotropic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omidi, N.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetic structure of rotational discontinuities (RDs) in anisotropic plasmas with T perpendicular /T parallel > 1 is investigated by using a one-dimensional electromagnetic hybrid code. To form the RD, a new approach is used where the plasma is injected from one boundary and reflected from the other, resulting in the generation of a traveling fast shock and an RD. Unlike the previously used methods, no a priori assumptions are made regarding the initial structure (i.e. width or sense of rotation) of the rotational discontinuity. The results show that across the RD both the magnetic field strength and direction, as well as the plasma density change. Given that such a change can also be associated with an intermediate shock, the Rankine-Hugoniot relations are used to confirm that the observed structures are indeed RDs. It is found that the thickness of RDs is a few ion inertial lengths and is independent of the rotation angle. Also, the preferred sense of rotation is in the electron sense; however, RDs with a rotation angle larger than 180 degree are found to be unstable, changing their rotation to a stable ion sense

  15. chemical composition and sensory acceptability of partially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pasta products were produced from partially gelatinized blends of wheat, ... products were significantly different in height, thickness and expansion ratio but, not significantly different ... protein and no less than 30% of wet gluten (protein.

  16. Functional Outcomes and Predictors of Failure After Rotator Cuff Repair During Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesey, Michael; Horneff, John G; Sholder, Daniel; Lazarus, Mark; Williams, Gerald; Namdari, Surena

    2018-05-01

    A well-functioning rotator cuff is necessary for successful anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). This study evaluated patients who underwent concomitant TSA and rotator cuff repair (RCR) for functional outcomes, revision rates, and predictors of poor results. Retrospective chart review was conducted to identify patients who underwent TSA and RCR. Demographic data, rotator cuff tear and RCR characteristics, range of motion, and radiographs were recorded. Minimum 2-year functional outcomes were obtained. Predictors of reoperation and/or poor clinical results were determined. Forty-five patients met inclusion criteria (22 high-grade partial-thickness and 23 full-thickness tears). Fourteen (31%) patients were labeled as having a poor result; 8 (18%) patients required reoperation. There was a significant difference between the acromiohumeral interval preoperatively and immediately postoperatively (P=.013). However, at maximum radiographic follow-up, the acromiohumeral interval was not significantly different from preoperative values (P=.86). Patients with a preoperative acromiohumeral interval of less than 8 mm had an increased rate of cuff-related reoperation (P=.003). Although concomitant TSA and RCR is a reasonable consideration, 31% of patients had a poor clinical result. An acromiohumeral interval of less than 8 mm was a predictor of cuff-related reoperation and may be an indication to consider reverse arthroplasty in the setting of joint arthrosis with a rotator cuff tear. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(3):e334-e339.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Muscle Progenitor Cell Regenerative Capacity in the Torn Rotator Cuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Gretchen A.; Farris, Ashley L.; Sato, Eugene; Gibbons, Michael; Lane, John G.; Ward, Samuel R.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rotator cuff (RC) tears affect a large portion of the population and result in substantial upper extremity impairment, shoulder weakness, pain and limited range of motion. Regardless of surgical or conservative treatment, persistent atrophic muscle changes limit functional restoration and may contribute to surgical failure. We hypothesized that deficits in the skeletal muscle progenitor (SMP) cell pool could contribute to poor muscle recovery following tendon repair. Biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing arthroscopic RC surgery. The SMP population was quantified, isolated and assayed in culture for its ability to proliferate and fuse in-vitro and in-vivo. The SMP population was larger in muscles from cuffs with partial tears compared with no tears or full thickness tears. However, SMPs from muscles in the partial tear group also exhibited reduced proliferative ability. Cells from all cuff states were able to fuse robustly in culture and engraft when injected into injured mouse muscle, suggesting that when given the correct signals, SMPs are capable of contributing to muscle hypertrophy and regeneration regardless of tear severity. The fact that this does not appear to happen in-vivo helps focus future therapeutic targets for promoting muscle recovery following rotator cuff repairs and may help improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25410765

  18. Angled oblique sagittal MR imaging of rotator cuff tears: comparison with standard oblique sagittal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, M.J.; Asinger, D.; Orwin, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To compare the accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears of oblique coronal images supplemented with standard oblique sagittal images versus thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images.Design and patients. The study included 75 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR scan followed by arthroscopy. MR images included oblique coronal, oblique sagittal (4 mm thick, 1 mm interslice gap), and angled oblique sagittal (3 mm/0.2 mm) images perpendicular to the lateral cuff. A musculoskeletal staff radiologist and fellow separately evaluated the cuff for tears on the oblique coronal images supplemented with either the oblique sagittal or the angled sagittal images.Results. For distinguishing a cuff tear from no tear, the staff radiologist had an accuracy of 0.76 (95% confidence interval: 0.67, 0.85) with the standard sagittal set, and 0.88 (0.80, 0.95) with the angled set (P=0.04). There was a nonsignificant improvement in accuracy for the fellow, calculated as 0.73 (0.63, 0.83) on the standard sagittal set and 0.76 (0.67, 0.85) on the angled set. Both readers also improved their diagnostic accuracy for partial-thickness tears with the angled set, although the improvement was statistically significant only for the staff radiologist.Conclusion. There is a slight improvement in accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears, particularly partial-thickness tears, for the more experienced radiologist using thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images. These images may be useful as a supplemental sequence in patients where it is important to identify partial-thickness tears accurately. (orig.)

  19. Angled oblique sagittal MR imaging of rotator cuff tears: comparison with standard oblique sagittal images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J; Asinger, D; Orwin, J F [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Objective. To compare the accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears of oblique coronal images supplemented with standard oblique sagittal images versus thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images.Design and patients. The study included 75 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR scan followed by arthroscopy. MR images included oblique coronal, oblique sagittal (4 mm thick, 1 mm interslice gap), and angled oblique sagittal (3 mm/0.2 mm) images perpendicular to the lateral cuff. A musculoskeletal staff radiologist and fellow separately evaluated the cuff for tears on the oblique coronal images supplemented with either the oblique sagittal or the angled sagittal images.Results. For distinguishing a cuff tear from no tear, the staff radiologist had an accuracy of 0.76 (95% confidence interval: 0.67, 0.85) with the standard sagittal set, and 0.88 (0.80, 0.95) with the angled set (P=0.04). There was a nonsignificant improvement in accuracy for the fellow, calculated as 0.73 (0.63, 0.83) on the standard sagittal set and 0.76 (0.67, 0.85) on the angled set. Both readers also improved their diagnostic accuracy for partial-thickness tears with the angled set, although the improvement was statistically significant only for the staff radiologist.Conclusion. There is a slight improvement in accuracy for diagnosing rotator cuff tears, particularly partial-thickness tears, for the more experienced radiologist using thinner-section angled oblique sagittal images. These images may be useful as a supplemental sequence in patients where it is important to identify partial-thickness tears accurately. (orig.)

  20. Degree of tendon degeneration and stage of rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Chris Hyunchul; Shin, Won Hyoung; Park, Ji Wan; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Ji Eun

    2017-07-01

    While tendon degeneration has been known to be an important cause of rotator cuff disease, few studies have objectively proven the association of tendon degeneration and rotator cuff disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of tendon degeneration with respect to the stage of rotator cuff disease. A total of 48 patients were included in the study: 12 with tendinopathy, 12 with a partial-thickness tear (pRCT), 12 with a full-thickness tear (fRCT), and 12 as the control. A full-thickness supraspinatus tendon sample was harvested en bloc from the middle portion between the lateral edge and the musculotendinous junction of the tendon using a biopsy punch with a diameter of 3 mm. Harvested samples were evaluated using a semi-quantitative grading scale with 7 parameters after haematoxylin and eosin staining. There was no significant difference in age, gender, symptom duration, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade between the groups except for the global fatty degeneration index. All of the seven parameters were significantly different between the groups and could be categorized as follows: early responders (fibre structure and arrangement), gradual responder (rounding of the nuclei), after-tear responders (cellularity, vascularity, and stainability), and late responder (hyalinization). The total degeneration scores were not significantly different between the control (6.08 ± 1.16) and tendinopathy (6.67 ± 1.83) (n.s.). However, the score of pRCT group (10.42 ± 1.31) was greater than that of tendinopathy (P rotator cuff disease progresses from tendinopathy to pRCT, and then to fRCT. The degree of degeneration of tendinopathy was not different from that of normal but aged tendons, and significant tendon degeneration began from the stage of pRCT. The clinical relevance of the study is that strategies and goals of the treatment for rotator cuff disease should be specific to its stage, in order to prevent disease progression for tendinopathy and pRCT, as

  1. Early postoperative repair status after rotator cuff repair cannot be accurately classified using questionnaires of patient function and isokinetic strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliver, Jessica; Wang, Allan; Joss, Brendan; Ebert, Jay; Koh, Eamon; Breidahl, William; Ackland, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated if patients with an intact tendon repair or partial-thickness retear early after rotator cuff repair display differences in clinical evaluations and whether early tendon healing can be predicted using these assessments. We prospectively evaluated 60 patients at 16 weeks after arthroscopic supraspinatus repair. Evaluation included the Oxford Shoulder Score, 11-item version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, visual analog scale for pain, 12-item Short Form Health Survey, isokinetic strength, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Independent t tests investigated clinical differences in patients based on the Sugaya MRI rotator cuff classification system (grades 1, 2, or 3). Discriminant analysis determined whether intact repairs (Sugaya grade 1) and partial-thickness retears (Sugaya grades 2 and 3) could be predicted. No differences (P repair was intact. The ability to discriminate between groups was enhanced with up to 5 variables entered; however, only 87% of the partial-retear group and 36% of the intact-repair group were correctly classified. No differences in clinical scores existed between patients stratified by the Sugaya MRI classification system at 16 weeks. An intact repair or partial-thickness retear could not be accurately predicted. Our results suggest that correct classification of healing in the early postoperative stages should involve imaging. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polygons on a rotating fluid surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Thomas R.N.; Haspang, Martin P.; Jensen, Kåre H.

    2006-01-01

    We report a novel and spectacular instability of a fluid surface in a rotating system. In a flow driven by rotating the bottom plate of a partially filled, stationary cylindrical container, the shape of the free surface can spontaneously break the axial symmetry and assume the form of a polygon...... rotating rigidly with a speed different from that of the plate. With water, we have observed polygons with up to 6 corners. It has been known for many years that such flows are prone to symmetry breaking, but apparently the polygonal surface shapes have never been observed. The creation of rotating...

  3. From Newton's bucket to rotating polygons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, B.; Linnartz, E. C.; Vested, Malene Louise Hovgaard

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental study of 'polygons' forming on the free surface of a swirling water flow in a partially filled cylindrical container. In our set-up, we rotate the bottom plate and the cylinder wall with separate motors. We thereby vary rotation rate and shear strength independently...... and move from a rigidly rotating 'Newton's bucket' flow to one where bottom and cylinder wall are rotating oppositely and the surface is strongly turbulent but flat on average. Between those two extremes, we find polygonal states for which the rotational symmetry is spontaneously broken. We investigate...... the phase diagram spanned by the two rotational frequencies at a given water filling height and find polygons in a regime, where the two frequencies are sufficiently different and, predominantly, when they have opposite signs. In addition to the extension of the family of polygons found with the stationary...

  4. Polygons on a rotating fluid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Thomas R N; Haspang, Martin P; Jensen, Kåre H; Hersen, Pascal; Bohr, Tomas

    2006-05-05

    We report a novel and spectacular instability of a fluid surface in a rotating system. In a flow driven by rotating the bottom plate of a partially filled, stationary cylindrical container, the shape of the free surface can spontaneously break the axial symmetry and assume the form of a polygon rotating rigidly with a speed different from that of the plate. With water, we have observed polygons with up to 6 corners. It has been known for many years that such flows are prone to symmetry breaking, but apparently the polygonal surface shapes have never been observed. The creation of rotating internal waves in a similar setup was observed for much lower rotation rates, where the free surface remains essentially flat [J. M. Lopez, J. Fluid Mech. 502, 99 (2004). We speculate that the instability is caused by the strong azimuthal shear due to the stationary walls and that it is triggered by minute wobbling of the rotating plate.

  5. Modelo de estado para el estudio de las descargas parciales en el aislamiento principal de las máquinas eléctricas rotatorias de gran potencia; Big Rotating Machines State Model for Partial Discharges Studies in Main Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago A Dorrbercker Drake

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un modelo de estado que caracteriza la tensión de ignición de las descargas parciales (DP enel aislamiento principal de las máquinas eléctricas rotatorias de gran potencia (MERGP.  Los objetivos delmodelamiento se dirigieron en dos vertientes:  la primera a conocer el comportamiento del menor nivel detensión que produce DP y la segunda destinada al comportamiento del tamaño de las cavidades, en lasque puede aparecer DP, atendiendo al nivel instantáneo de la tensión de corriente alterna (CA aplicada alas mismas. El presente trabajo se propone, proveer de una herramienta capaz de modelar el comportamientode algunos parámetros característicos de las DP en el aislamiento principal de las MERGP, cuando elaislamiento principal es sometido a diferentes condiciones de trabajo.  This paper describes a state model for PD inception voltage in main insulation of big rotating machines(BRM.  Intends of the present paper were:  to show the behaviour of PD inception voltage under differentfactors; and to know the relationships between the size of cavities and the instantaneous value of ACapplied voltage to the insulation. The objective of this paper is offer a computational tool able to model theperformance of some PD characteristic parameters when main insulation is under operation conditions.

  6. Anterior versus posterior, and rim-rent rotator cuff tears: prevalence and MR sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, M J; Turnbull, J R; Orwin, J F [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-05-01

    Purpose. To determine the relative distribution of the locations of rotator cuff tears, and the sensitivity of anterior versus posterior tears on MR images. Patients and methods. We identified 110 consecutive patients who had a shoulder MR and either a partial-thickness or a small full-thickness rotator cuff tear diagnosed at arthroscopy. From the arthroscopy videotapes, we classified the tears as centered in the anterior or posterior half of the cuff, and as either in the critical zone or adjacent to the bony insertion. The original MR interpretation was compared with the arthroscopic findings. MR sensitivity and patient age were compared between patients with tears in the anterior and posterior halves of the cuff. In addition, in patients with partial tears less than 2 cm in diameter, an age comparison between those with tears in the critical zone and those with articular surface tears adjacent to the bony insertion (rim-rent tear) was performed. Results. The tear was centered in the anterior half of the rotator cuff in 79% of the patients younger than 36 years old, and in 89% of the patients 36 years old and over. The average age of the patients with tears in the anterior half (44 years) was not significantly different from the average age of those with posterior tears (40 years)(P=0.23). The sensitivity of MR for anterior tears was 0.69, and for posterior tears it was 0.56 (P=0.17). The average age of the 9 patients with rim-rent tears was 31 years, while that of the 28 patients with similarly-sized partial tears not involving the insertion was 40 years old (P=0.048). Five of the nine rim-rent tears (0.56) were interpreted correctly on the original MR report; two of the other tears were misinterpreted as intratendinous fluid but were diagnosable in retrospect. Conclusion. Even in patients less than 36 years old, most partial and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears are centered in the anterior half of the supraspinatus. Although our figure for MR sensitivity

  7. Motions on a rotating planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröer, H.

    In chapter 1 we want to describe the motion of a falling body on a rotating planet. The planet rotates with an arbitrary changable angular velocity and has a translational acceleration. We obtain 3 differential equations. For the general gravitational field an exact solution is possible, when the differential equation system is explicit solvable. Then we consider the case, if the angular velocity and the translational acceleration is constant. With a special transformation we get 3 partial differential equations of first order. Instead of a planet sphere we can choose a general body of rotation. Even general bodies are possible. Chapter 2 contains the motion in a local coordinate system on planet's surface. We have an inhomogeneous linear differential equation of first order. If the angular velocity is constant, we get a system with constant coefficients. There is an english and a german edition.

  8. Incidence of retear with double-row versus single-row rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chong; Tang, Zhi-Hong; Hu, Jun-Zu; Zou, Guo-Yao; Xiao, Rong-Chi

    2014-11-01

    Rotator cuff tears have a high recurrence rate, even after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Although some biomechanical evidence suggests the superiority of the double-row vs the single-row technique, clinical findings regarding these methods have been controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the double-row repair method results in a lower incidence of recurrent tearing compared with the single-row method. Electronic databases were systematically searched to identify reports of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) comparing single-row with double-row rotator cuff repair. The primary outcome assessed was retear of the repaired cuff. Secondary outcome measures were the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder score, the Constant shoulder score, and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score. Heterogeneity between the included studies was assessed. Six studies involving 428 patients were included in the review. Compared with single-row repair, double-row repair demonstrated a lower retear incidence (risk ratio [RR]=1.71 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.49]; P=.005; I(2)=0%) and a reduced incidence of partial-thickness retears (RR=2.16 [95% CI, 1.26-3.71]; P=.005; I(2)=26%). Functional ASES, Constant, and UCLA scores showed no difference between single- and double-row cuff repairs. Use of the double-row technique decreased the incidence of retears, especially partial-thickness retears, compared with the single-row technique. The functional outcome was not significantly different between the 2 techniques. To improve the structural outcome of the repaired rotator cuff, surgeons should use the double-row technique. However, further long-term RCTs on this topic are needed. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Long-Term MRI Findings in Operated Rotator Cuff Tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyroelae, K.; Niemitukia, L.; Jaroma, H.; Vaeaetaeinen, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at long-term follow-up after rotator cuff (RC) tear using standard MRI sequences without fat saturation. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients aged 55.8±7.6 underwent MRI examination 4.6±2.1 years after surgery for RC tear. Standard sequences in oblique coronal, oblique sagittal, and axial planes were obtained. The RC, including re-tears and tendon degeneration, was independently evaluated by two observers. Thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and narrowing of the subacromial space were measured. The clinical outcome was evaluated with the Constant score and compared with the MRI findings. Results: The RC tear was traumatic in 18 (64%) patients and degenerative in 10 (36%). At follow-up, 11 (39%) had normal RC tendons with good clinical outcome. Four (14%) patients had painful tendinosis without RC tear. A full-thickness RC tear was found in 7 (25%) patients and a partial tear in 6 (21%). In one patient with a full-thickness tear, and in two with partial tear, tendinosis was found in another of the RC tendons. The subacromial space was narrowed in 13 (46%) of the patients. A narrowing of the subacromial space correlated with re-tear (P<0.05). Conclusions: The RC may be evaluated with standard MRI sequences without fat saturation at long-term follow-up. A normal appearance of the RC is correlated with good clinical outcome, while re-tear and tendinosis are associated with pain

  10. Lead Thickness Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.

    1998-01-01

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in 3 , an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  11. Rotator cuff exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 25560729 . Read More Frozen shoulder Rotator cuff problems Rotator cuff repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder pain Patient Instructions Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your ...

  12. Partially molten magma ocean model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model

  13. Partial volume effect in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Munehiro; Yoshiya, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Eiji

    1989-01-01

    According to the direction and the thickness of the imaging slice in tomography, the border between the tissues becomes unclear (partial volume effect). In the present MRI experiment, we examined border area between fat and water components using phantom in order to investigate the partial volume effect in MRI. In spin echo sequences, the intensity of the border area showed a linear relationship with composition of fat and water. Whereas, in inversion recovery and field echo sequences, we found the parameters to produce an extremely low intensity area at the border region between fat and water. This low intensity area was explained by cancellation of NMR signals from fat and water due to the difference in the direction of magnetic vectors. Clinically, partial volume effect can cause of mis-evaluation of walls, small nodules, tumor capsules and the tumor invasion in the use of inversion recovery and field echo sequences. (author)

  14. Education and "Thick" Epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzee, Ben

    2011-01-01

    In this essay Ben Kotzee addresses the implications of Bernard Williams's distinction between "thick" and "thin" concepts in ethics for epistemology and for education. Kotzee holds that, as in the case of ethics, one may distinguish between "thick" and "thin" concepts of epistemology and, further, that this distinction points to the importance of…

  15. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  16. Continuous thickness control of extruded pipes with assistance of microcomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breil, J.

    1983-06-01

    Because of economic and quality securing reasons a constant wall thickness of extruded pipes in circumference and extrusion direction is an important production aim. Therefore a microcomputer controlled system was developed, which controls die centering with electric motors. The control of wall thickness distribution; was realized with two conceptions: a dead time subjected control with a rotating on line wall thickness measuring instrument and an adaptive control with sensors in the pipe die. With a PI-algorithm excentricities of 30% of the wall thickness could be controlled below a trigger level of 2% within three dead times. (orig.) [de

  17. Avaliação dos resultados da artroplastia parcial de ombro para tratamento da artropatia por lesão do manguito rotador Evaluating the results of partial shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of arthropathy due to rotator cuff lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Luiz Checchia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados obtidos com a artroplastia parcial de ombro para o tratamento da artropatia por lesão do manguito rotador. MÉTODOS: No período de junho de 1989 a março de 2004, 11 ombros de 11 pacientes foram submetidos a artroplastia parcial de ombro para o tratamento de artropatia por LMR. O tempo de seguimento variou de 27 a 183 meses, com média de 69 meses. A idade média foi de 69,1 anos, variando de 44 a 78 anos. Houve predomínio do sexo feminino em 90,9% dos casos (10 pacientes. O membro dominante foi acometido em 10 pacientes. Os métodos escolhidos para avaliação dos pacientes, no seguimento pós-operatório, basearam-se nos critérios da UCLA; no índice de satisfação dos pacientes em relação ao alívio da dor; e no método de avaliação de objetivos limitados, proposto por Neer et al. RESULTADOS: O índice de satisfação dos pacientes em relação ao alívio da dor foi de 81,8%. Com o método de avaliação da UCLA, observamos média de 22,7 pontos. Por meio do método de avaliação de objetivos limitados, proposto por Neer et al, obtivemos seis pacientes com resultados satisfatórios e cinco insatisfatórios. CONCLUSÃO: A artroplastia parcial de ombro para o tratamento da artropatia por lesão do manguito rotador promove alívio do quadro doloroso e permite alguma melhora na função do membro para realização das atividades diárias; entretanto, é uma técnica que leva a altos índices de resultados insatisfatórios.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results achieved with partial arthroplasty of the shoulder to treat arthropathy due to rotator cuff lesion. METHODS: From June 1989 to March 2004, 11 shoulders of 11 patients were submitted to partial arthroplasty of the shoulder to treat an arthropathy due to rotator cuff lesion. Follow-up time varied from 27 to 182 months, with a mean of 69 months. Mean age was 69.1 years, ranging from 44 to 78 years. There was a predominance of the female gender, in 90.9% of

  18. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, A.

    1977-01-01

    History is surveyed of the development of the theory of rotational states in nuclei. The situation in the 40's when ideas formed of the collective states of a nucleus is evoked. The general rotation theory and the relation between the single-particle and rotational motion are briefly discussed. Future prospects of the rotation theory development are indicated. (I.W.)

  19. Hypertrophic changes of the teres minor muscle in rotator cuff tears: quantitative evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Ide, Junji; Kikuchi, Ken; Morita, Makoto; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Ogata, Hiroomi

    2014-12-01

    Few reports have assessed the teres minor (TM) muscle in rotator cuff tears. This study aimed to quantitatively analyze the morphologic changes of the TM muscle in patients with or without rotator cuff tears by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study consisted of 279 subjects classified on the basis of interpretations of conventional MRI observations into 6 groups: no cuff tear; partial-thickness supraspinatus (SSP) tear; full-thickness SSP tear; SSP and subscapularis tears; SSP and infraspinatus (ISP) tears; and SSP, ISP, and subscapularis tears. With use of ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA) for oblique sagittal MRI, we measured the areas of ISP, TM, and anatomic external rotation (ISP + TM) muscles on the most lateral side in which the scapular spine was in contact with the scapular body. The occupational ratios of the TM muscle area to the anatomic external rotation muscle area were calculated. Ratios above the maximum of the 95% confidence intervals of the occupational ratio in the no-tear group were defined as hypertrophy of the TM muscle. Occupational ratios of the TM muscle in the no-tear group followed a normal distribution, and ratios >0.288 were defined as hypertrophic. Hypertrophic changes of the TM muscle were confirmed in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP tendon. A negative correlation was found between the occupational ratios of TM and ISP (P muscle appeared hypertrophic in rotator cuff tears involving the ISP, and the progression of ISP muscle atrophy seemed to induce the development of this compensatory hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, A.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear structure theories are reviewed concerned with nuclei rotational motion. The development of the deformed nucleus model facilitated a discovery of rotational spectra of nuclei. Comprehensive verification of the rotational scheme and a successful classification of corresponding spectra stimulated investigations of the rotational movement dynamics. Values of nuclear moments of inertia proved to fall between two marginal values corresponding to rotation of a solid and hydrodynamic pattern of an unrotating flow, respectively. The discovery of governing role of the deformation and a degree of a symmetry violence for determining rotational degrees of freedon is pointed out to pave the way for generalization of the rotational spectra

  1. Ocean Sediment Thickness Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean sediment thickness contours in 200 meter intervals for water depths ranging from 0 - 18,000 meters. These contours were derived from a global sediment...

  2. Heat transfer enhancement with condensation by surface rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, L L; Khrolenok, V V [A.V. Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Inst., Minsk (Belarus)

    1993-11-01

    Process intensification relies on many unit operations on enhanced heat transfer. One technique for the enhancement of condensation heat transfer is the use of surface rotation. This is particularly effective in reducing the condensate film thickness. The formulae and relationships given in this paper are concerned with rotating discs and tubes, and can be used for developing advanced heat exchanger concepts. (Author)

  3. Rotations in a Vertebrate Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Gin

    2003-05-01

    Rotational movements of the head are often considered to be measured in a single three dimensional coordinate system implemented by the semicircular canals of the vestibular system of the inner ear. However, the vertebrate body -- including the nervous system -- obeys rectangular symmetries alien to rotation groups. At best, nervous systems mimic the physical rotation group in a fragmented way, only partially reintegrating physical movements in whole organism responses. The vestibular canal reference frame is widely used in nervous systems, for example by eye movements. It is used to some extent even in the cerebrum, as evidenced by the remission of hemineglect -- in which half of space is ignored -- when the vestibular system is stimulated. However, reintegration of space by the organism remains incomplete. For example, compensatory eye movements (which in most cases aid visual fixation) may disagree with conscious self-motion perception. In addition, movement-induced nausea, illusions, and cue-free perceptions demonstrate symmetry breaking or incomplete spatial symmetries. As part of a long-term project to investigate rotation groups in nervous systems, we have analyzed the symmetry group of a primary vestibulo-spinal projection.

  4. CO2 capture by Condensed Rotational Separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benthum, van R.J.; Kemenade, van H.P.; Brouwers, J.J.H.; Golombok, M.

    2010-01-01

    Condensed Rotational Separation (CRS) technology is a patented method to upgrade gas mixtures. A novel application is thecapture of CO2 from coal-combustion fired power stations: Condensed Contaminant Centrifugal Separation in Coal Combustion(C5sep). CRS involves partial condensation of a gas

  5. Theory on a partially ionized gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.S. van den.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis contains a study of some flow processes occurring in the Gaswhirl experiments. In this apparatus a partially ionized gas is forced into rotation by an azimuthal electromagnetic force. After a short introduction in which a motivation is given of our research project, a comprehensive treatment is presented of the principle of rotating plasmas. Further, a historical review is given of rotating plasma systems. A derivation of the fundamental equations is given which describe the flow system mathematically and these are applied to rotating plasmas. The occurrence of secondary flows with radial and axial components is considered. This qualitative picture of secondary whirls is confirmed by measurements reported in the next chapter. The last chapter offers a possible explanation of the occurrence of the transition process in the Gaswhirl apparatus. (Auth.)

  6. Rotationally invariant correlation filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for analyzing and designing optical correlation filters that have tailored rotational invariance properties. The concept of a correlation of an image with a rotation of itself is introduced. A unified theory of rotation-invariant filtering is then formulated. The unified approach describes matched filters (with no rotation invariance) and circular-harmonic filters (with full rotation invariance) as special cases. The continuum of intermediate cases is described in terms of a cyclic convolution operation over angle. The angular filtering approach allows an exact choice for the continuous trade-off between loss of the correlation energy (or specificity regarding the image) and the amount of rotational invariance desired

  7. Magnetostrophic Rotating Magnetoconvection

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Planetary magnetic fields are generated by turbulent convection within their vast interior liquid metal cores. Although direct observation is not possible, this liquid metal circulation is thought to be dominated by the controlling influences of Coriolis and Lorentz forces. Theory famously predicts that local-scale convection naturally settles into the so-called magnetostrophic state, where the Coriolis and Lorentz forces partially cancel, and convection is optimally efficient. To date, no laboratory experiments have reached the magnetostrophic regime in turbulent liquid metal convection. Furthermore, computational dynamo simulations have as yet failed to produce a globally magnetostrophic dynamo, which has led some to question the existence of the magnetostrophic state. Here, we present results from the first turbulent magnetostrophic rotating magnetoconvection experiments using the liquid metal gallium. We find that turbulent convection in the magnetostrophic regime is, in fact, maximally efficient. The experimental results clarify these previously disparate results, suggesting that the fluid dynamics saturate in magnetostrophic balance within turbulent liquid metal, planetary cores. The authors thank the NSF Geophysics Program for financial support.

  8. Laparoscopic Partial Hepatectomy: Animal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiro Inoue

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available As a first step in firmly establishing laparoscopic hepatectomy, we introduce a porcine model of laparoscopic partial hepatectomy. This procedure has been successfully performed under the normal-pressure or low-pressure pneumoperitoneum condition supported by the full-thickness abdominal wall lifting technique. An ultrasonic dissector combined with electrocautery, newly developed by Olympus Optical Corporation (Japan was effectively utilized in facilitating safe and smooth incisions into the liver parenchyma. Although indications for this procedure seem to be limited only to peripheral lesions and not to central lesions, clinical application of this method may be useful for some patients in the near future.

  9. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E. M.; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Rotating convection is ubiquitous in the natural universe, and is likely responsible for planetary processes such magnetic field generation. Rapidly rotating convection is typically organized by the Coriolis force into tall, thin, coherent convection columns which are aligned with the axis of rotation. This organizational effect of rotation is thought to be responsible for the strength and structure of magnetic fields generated by convecting planetary interiors. As thermal forcing is increased, the relative influence of rotation weakens, and fully three-dimensional convection can exist. It has long been assumed that rotational effects will dominate convection dynamics when the ratio of buoyancy to the Coriolis force, the convective Rossby number, Roc, is less than unity. We investigate the influence of rotation on turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection via a suite of coupled laboratory and numerical experiments over a broad parameter range: Rayleigh number, 10310; Ekman number, 10-6≤ E ≤ ∞; and Prandtl number, 1≤ Pr ≤ 100. In particular, we measure heat transfer (as characterized by the Nusselt number, Nu) as a function of the Rayleigh number for several different Ekman and Prandtl numbers. Two distinct heat transfer scaling regimes are identified: non-rotating style heat transfer, Nu ~ Ra2/7, and quasigeostrophic style heat transfer, Nu~ Ra6/5. The transition between the non-rotating regime and the rotationally dominant regime is described as a function of the Ekman number, E. We show that the regime transition depends not on the global force balance Roc, but on the relative thicknesses of the thermal and Ekman boundary layers. The transition scaling provides a predictive criterion for the applicability of convection models to natural systems such as Earth's core.

  10. Coating thickness measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The standard specifies measurements of the coating thickness, which make use of beta backscattering and/or x-ray fluorescence. For commonly used combinations of coating material and base material the appropriate measuring ranges and radionuclides to be used are given for continuous as well as for discontinuous measurements

  11. Parameterization of rotational spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunmei; Liu Tong

    1992-01-01

    The rotational spectra of the strongly deformed nuclei with low rotational frequencies and weak band mixture are analyzed. The strongly deformed nuclei are commonly encountered in the rare-earth region (e. g., 150 220). A lot of rotational band knowledge are presented

  12. Rotating reactors : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, F.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.; Schouten, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    This review-perspective paper describes the current state-of-the-art in the field of rotating reactors. The paper has a focus on rotating reactor technology with applications at lab scale, pilot scale and industrial scale. Rotating reactors are classified and discussed according to their geometry:

  13. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  14. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergioulas Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on the equilibrium properties and on the nonaxisymmetric instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated and several new sections have been added on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity.

  15. Retear rate in the late postoperative period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hwa; Hong, In Tae; Ryu, Keun Jung; Bong, Sun Tae; Lee, Yoon Seok; Kim, Jang Hwan

    2014-11-01

    Few clinical studies have evaluated the integrity of repaired tendons and identified the timing of retears through the use of serial imaging. Retears after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair are uncommon in the late postoperative period (after 3 months). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Among 221 arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs that were performed at a single hospital between May 2010 and February 2012, 61 were involved in this study. Rotator cuff tears consisted of 12 small, 31 medium, 8 large, and 6 massive rotator cuff tears. Additionally, 4 isolated subscapularis tears were included. For clinical evaluation, all patients were assessed both preoperatively and postoperatively by use of the University of California-Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale, absolute and relative Constant scores, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; active range of motion was assessed as well. For radiological evaluation, all 61 patients had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation at 3 months postoperatively. Among them, 23 patients were evaluated for repaired tendon integrity on postoperative MRI at a minimum of 1 year after surgery (mean, 14.1 months; range, 12-19 months), and results were classified according to the Sugaya classification: type I, sufficient thickness with homogeneously low intensity on each image; type II, sufficient thickness, partial high-intensity area; type III, less than half the thickness without discontinuity; type IV, minor discontinuity; and type V, major discontinuity. The remaining 38 patients, who refused to undergo MRI again for financial reasons, were evaluated through ultrasound. Statistically significant clinical improvements were observed after surgery. The MRI conducted at 3 months postoperatively identified 9 patients with Sugaya type I, 28 patients with type II, and 24 patients with type III repairs. No patients showed Sugaya type IV or V repairs at postoperative 3 months. Thirty-seven patients who had shown Sugaya type I or II

  16. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belo...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion......In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...

  17. Coating thickness measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffe, B.B.; Sawyer, B.E.; Spongr, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A device especially adapted for measuring the thickness of coatings on small, complexly-shaped parts, such as, for example, electronic connectors, electronic contacts, or the like. The device includes a source of beta radiation and a radiation detector whereby backscatter of the radiation from the coated part can be detected and the thickness of the coating ascertained. The radiation source and detector are positioned in overlying relationship to the coated part and a microscope is provided to accurately position the device with respect to the part. Means are provided to control the rate of descent of the radiation source and radiation detector from its suspended position to its operating position and the resulting impact it makes with the coated part to thereby promote uniformity of readings from operator to operator, and also to avoid excessive impact with the part, thereby improving accuracy of measurement and eliminating damage to the parts

  18. Thick melanoma in Tuscany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarugi, Alessandra; Nardini, Paolo; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Brandani, Paola; Gerlini, Gianni; Rubegni, Pietro; Lamberti, Arianna; Salvini, Camilla; Lo Scocco, Giovanni; Cecchi, Roberto; Sirna, Riccardo; Lorenzi, Stefano; Gattai, Riccardo; Battistini, Silvio; Crocetti, Emanuele

    2017-03-14

    The epidemiologic trends of cutaneous melanoma are similar in several countries with a Western-type life style, where there is a progressive increasing incidence and a low but not decreasing mor- tality, or somewhere an increase too, especially in the older age groups. Also in Tuscany there is a steady rise in incidence with prevalence of in situ and invasive thin melanomas, with also an increase of thick melanomas. It is necessary to reduce the frequency of thick melanomas to reduce specific mortality. The objective of the current survey has been to compare, in the Tuscany population, by a case- case study, thin and thick melanoma cases, trying to find out those personal and tumour characteristics which may help to customize preventive interventions. RESULTS The results confirmed the age and the lower edu- cation level are associated with a later detection. The habit to perform skin self-examination is resulted protec- tive forward thick melanoma and also the diagnosis by a doctor. The elements emerging from the survey allow to hypothesize a group of subjects resulting at higher risk for a late diagnosis, aged over 50 and carrier of a fewer constitutional and environmental risk factors: few total and few atypical nevi, and lower sun exposure and burning. It is assumable that a part of people did not be reached from messages of prevention because does not recognize oneself in the categories of people at risk for skin cancers described in educational cam- paigns. If we want to obtain better results on diagnosis of skin melanoma we have to think a new strategy. At least to think over the educational messages discriminating people more at risk of incidence of melanoma from people more at risk to die from melanoma, and to renewed active involvement of the Gen- eral Practitioners .

  19. Thick brane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Minamitsuji, Masato; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a comprehensive review on thick brane solutions and related topics. Such models have attracted much attention from many aspects since the birth of the brane world scenario. In many works, it has been usually assumed that a brane is an infinitely thin object; however, in more general situations, one can no longer assume this. It is also widely considered that more fundamental theories such as string theory would have a minimal length scale. Many multidimensional field theories coupled to gravitation have exact solutions of gravitating topological defects, which can represent our brane world. The inclusion of brane thickness can realize a variety of possible brane world models. Given our understanding, the known solutions can be classified into topologically non-trivial solutions and trivial ones. The former class contains solutions of a single scalar (domain walls), multi-scalar, gauge-Higgs (vortices), Weyl gravity and so on. As an example of the latter class, we consider solutions of two interacting scalar fields. Approaches to obtain cosmological equations in the thick brane world are reviewed. Solutions with spatially extended branes (S-branes) and those with an extra time-like direction are also discussed.

  20. Contact problems of a rectangular block on an elastic layer of finite thickness: Part II: The thick layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alblas, J.B.; Kuipers, M.

    1970-01-01

    We consider a layer of finite thickness loaded in plane strain by a stamp with a straight horizontal base, which is smooth and rigid. The stamp is pressed vertically into the layer and is slightly rotated by an external moment load subsequently. Two cases are considered successively: the lower side

  1. Synchronization of coupled active rotators by common noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatova, Anastasiya V.; Goldobin, Denis S.; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2017-12-01

    We study the effect of common noise on coupled active rotators. While such a noise always facilitates synchrony, coupling may be attractive (synchronizing) or repulsive (desynchronizing). We develop an analytical approach based on a transformation to approximate angle-action variables and averaging over fast rotations. For identical rotators, we describe a transition from full to partial synchrony at a critical value of repulsive coupling. For nonidentical rotators, the most nontrivial effect occurs at moderate repulsive coupling, where a juxtaposition of phase locking with frequency repulsion (anti-entrainment) is observed. We show that the frequency repulsion obeys a nontrivial power law.

  2. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  3. Essays on partial retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarci, T.

    2012-01-01

    The five essays in this dissertation address a range of topics in the micro-economic literature on partial retirement. The focus is on the labor market behavior of older age groups. The essays examine the economic and non-economic determinants of partial retirement behavior, the effect of partial

  4. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  5. Rotations with Rodrigues' vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, E

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears to be a fundamental matrix that is used to express the components of the angular velocity, the rotation matrix and the angular momentum vector. The Hamiltonian formalism of rotational dynamics in terms of this vector uses the same matrix. The quantization of the rotational dynamics is performed with simple rules if one uses Rodrigues' vector and similar formal expressions for the quantum operators that mimic the Hamiltonian classical dynamics.

  6. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong ...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherent in the least squares estimation.......In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...

  7. Rotational discontinuities and the structure of the magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, D.W.; Lee, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Symmetric and asymmetric rotational discontinuities are studied by means of a one-dimensional computer simulation and by single-particle trajectory calculations. The numerical simulations show the symmetric rotation to be stable for both ion and electron senses of rotation with a thickness of the order of a few ion gyroradii when the rotation angle of the tangential field is 180 0 or less. Larger rotation angles tend to be unstable. In an expansive discontinuity, when the magnetic field on the downstream side of the discontinuity is larger, an expanding transition layer separating the high-field from a low-field region develops on the downstream side, and a symmetric rotational discontinuity forms at the upstream edge. The implication of these results for magnetopause structure and energy flow through the magnetopause is described

  8. Full reflector thickness and isolation thickness on neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Tomohiro; Naito, Yoshitaka; Komuro, Yuichi.

    1988-08-01

    A method to determine ''full reflector thickness'' and ''isolation thickness'', which is utilized for criticality safety evaluation on nuclear fuel facilities, was proposed in this paper. Firstly, a calculation was tryed to obtain the two kinds of thicknesses from the result of criticality calculations for a specific case. Then, two simple equations which calculates the two kinds of thicknesses were made from the relation between reflector (or isolator) thickness and k eff , and one-group diffusion theory. Finally, we proposed a new method to determine the thicknesses. From the method we proposed, ''full reflector thickness'' and ''isolation thickness'' can be obtain using the equations and migration length of the reflector (or isolator) and infinite and effective multiplication factor of the fuel. (author)

  9. Recurrent Partial Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Blanchet-Sadri

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Partial words are sequences over a finite alphabet that may contain wildcard symbols, called holes, which match or are compatible with all letters; partial words without holes are said to be full words (or simply words. Given an infinite partial word w, the number of distinct full words over the alphabet that are compatible with factors of w of length n, called subwords of w, refers to a measure of complexity of infinite partial words so-called subword complexity. This measure is of particular interest because we can construct partial words with subword complexities not achievable by full words. In this paper, we consider the notion of recurrence over infinite partial words, that is, we study whether all of the finite subwords of a given infinite partial word appear infinitely often, and we establish connections between subword complexity and recurrence in this more general framework.

  10. SPATIALLY RESOLVED GAS KINEMATICS WITHIN A Lyα NEBULA: EVIDENCE FOR LARGE-SCALE ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, Moire K. M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, Mail Code 9530, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Dey, Arjun, E-mail: mkmprescott@dark-cosmology.dk [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    We use spatially extended measurements of Lyα as well as less optically thick emission lines from an ≈80 kpc Lyα nebula at z ≈ 1.67 to assess the role of resonant scattering and to disentangle kinematic signatures from Lyα radiative transfer effects. We find that the Lyα, C IV, He II, and C III] emission lines all tell a similar story in this system, and that the kinematics are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation. First, the observed surface brightness profiles are similar in extent in all four lines, strongly favoring a picture in which the Lyα photons are produced in situ instead of being resonantly scattered from a central source. Second, we see low kinematic offsets between Lyα and the less optically thick He II line (∼100-200 km s{sup –1}), providing further support for the argument that the Lyα and other emission lines are all being produced within the spatially extended gas. Finally, the full velocity field of the system shows coherent velocity shear in all emission lines: ≈500 km s{sup –1} over the central ≈50 kpc of the nebula. The kinematic profiles are broadly consistent with large-scale rotation in a gas disk that is at least partially stable against collapse. These observations suggest that the Lyα nebula represents accreting material that is illuminated by an offset, hidden active galactic nucleus or distributed star formation, and that is undergoing rotation in a clumpy and turbulent gas disk. With an implied mass of M(

  11. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by a rotating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shuchao; Xie, Weiping; Cao, Jintao; Li, Ding

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze theoretically the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven by a rotating magnetic field. Slab configurations of finite thickness are treated both with and without using the Wenzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. Regardless of the slab thickness, the directional rotation of the driving magnetic field contributes to suppressing these instabilities. The two factors of the finite thickness and directional rotation of the magnetic field cooperate to enhance suppression, with the finite thickness playing a role only when the orientation of the magnetic field is time varying. The suppression becomes stronger as the driving magnetic field rotates faster, and all modes are suppressed, in contrast to the case of a non-rotating magnetic field, for which the vertical mode cannot be suppressed. This implies that the dynamically alternate configuration of a Theta-pinch and a Z-pinch may be applicable to the concept of Theta-Z liner inertial fusion.

  12. SPARSE FARADAY ROTATION MEASURE SYNTHESIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrecut, M.; Stil, J. M.; Taylor, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Faraday rotation measure synthesis is a method for analyzing multichannel polarized radio emissions, and it has emerged as an important tool in the study of Galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. The method requires the recovery of the Faraday dispersion function from measurements restricted to limited wavelength ranges, which is an ill-conditioned deconvolution problem. Here, we discuss a recovery method that assumes a sparse approximation of the Faraday dispersion function in an overcomplete dictionary of functions. We discuss the general case when both thin and thick components are included in the model, and we present the implementation of a greedy deconvolution algorithm. We illustrate the method with several numerical simulations that emphasize the effect of the covered range and sampling resolution in the Faraday depth space, and the effect of noise on the observed data.

  13. Uniform analytic approximation of Wigner rotation matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Scott E.

    2018-02-01

    We derive the leading asymptotic approximation, for low angle θ, of the Wigner rotation matrix elements, dm1m2 j(θ ) , uniform in j, m1, and m2. The result is in terms of a Bessel function of integer order. We numerically investigate the error for a variety of cases and find that the approximation can be useful over a significant range of angles. This approximation has application in the partial wave analysis of wavepacket scattering.

  14. The viscous dynamics of a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, B.W.; Simpson, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    The rotational velocity of a high-density, partially-ionized neon plasma has been calculated as a function of time using a dynamical model in which J x B and viscous forces act on the plasma. The calculation of appropriate transport coefficients is discussed in detail. The model is used to predict measured voltages in a plasma centrifuge experiment. Observations of neon isotope separation in this experiment have been reported in a previous paper (James and Simpson 1976). (author)

  15. The Use of Implants to Improve Removable Partial Denture Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Arréllaga, Juan Pablo; Bacchi, Ataís; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2014-12-01

    The oral rehabilitation with conventional removable partial dentures in Kennedy class I patients allows continuous bone resorption, dislodgment of the prosthesis during the mastication caused by the resilience of the mucosa, and rotation of the prosthesis. Thus, the associations of distal implants become an attractive modality of treatment for these patients. This case report presented an association of removable partial dentures, milled crowns and osseointegrated implants to rehabilitate a partial edentulous patient. A removable partial denture associated with implants and metal-ceramic milled crowns can offer excellent esthetics, and will improve function and biomechanics, at a reduced cost.

  16. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  17. Thick-Big Descriptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Signe Sophus

    The paper discusses the rewards and challenges of employing commercial audience measurements data – gathered by media industries for profitmaking purposes – in ethnographic research on the Internet in everyday life. It questions claims to the objectivity of big data (Anderson 2008), the assumption...... communication systems, language and behavior appear as texts, outputs, and discourses (data to be ‘found’) – big data then documents things that in earlier research required interviews and observations (data to be ‘made’) (Jensen 2014). However, web-measurement enterprises build audiences according...... to a commercial logic (boyd & Crawford 2011) and is as such directed by motives that call for specific types of sellable user data and specific segmentation strategies. In combining big data and ‘thick descriptions’ (Geertz 1973) scholars need to question how ethnographic fieldwork might map the ‘data not seen...

  18. Evolution of rotating stars. III. Predicted surface rotation velocities for stars which conserve total angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endal, A.S.; Sofia, S.

    1979-01-01

    Predicted surface rotation velocities are presented for Population I stars at 10, 7, 5, 3, and 1.5M/sub sun/. The surface velocities have been computed for three different cases of angular momentum redistribution: no radial redistribution (rotation on decoupled shells), complete redistribution (rigid-body rotation), and partial redistribution as predicted by detailed consideration of circulation currents in rotation stars. The velocities for these cases are compared to each other and to observed stellar rotation rates (upsilon sin i).Near the main sequence, rotational effects can substantially reduce the moment of inertia of a star, so nonrotating models consistently underestimate the expected velocities for evolving stars. The magnitude of these effects is sufficient to explain the large numbers of Be stars and, perhaps, to explain the bimodal distribution of velocities observed for the O stars.On the red giant branch, angular momentum redistribution reduces the surface velocity by a factor of 2 or more, relative to the velocity expected for no radial redistribution. This removes the discrepancy between predicted and observed rotation rates for the K giants and makes it unlikely that these stars lose significant amounts of angular momentum by stellar winds. Our calculations indicate that improved observations (by the Fourier-transform technique) of the red giants in the Hyades cluster can be used to determine how angular momentum is redistributed by convection

  19. Three dimensional rotating flow of Powell-Eyring nanofluid with non-Fourier's heat flux and non-Fick's mass flux theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Wubshet

    2018-03-01

    This article numerically examines three dimensional boundary layer flow of a rotating Powell-Eyring nanofluid. In modeling heat transfer processes, non-Fourier heat flux theory and for mass transfer non-Fick's mass flux theory are employed. This theory is recently re-initiated and it becomes the active research area to resolves some drawback associated with the famous Fourier heat flux and mass flux theory. The mathematical model of the flow problem is a system of non-linear partial differential equations which are obtained using the boundary layer analysis. The non-linear partial differential equations have been transformed into non-linear high order ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. Employing bvp4c algorithm from matlab software routine, the numerical solution of the transformed ordinary differential equations is obtained. The governing equations are constrained by parameters such as rotation parameter λ , the non-Newtonian parameter N, dimensionless thermal relaxation and concentration relaxation parameters δt and δc . The impacts of these parameters have been discussed thoroughly and illustrated using graphs and tables. The findings show that thermal relaxation time δt reduces the thermal and concentration boundary layer thickness. Further, the results reveal that the rotational parameter λ has the effect of decreasing the velocity boundary layer thickness in both x and y directions. Further examination pinpoints that the skin friction coefficient along x-axis is an increasing and skin friction coefficient along y-axis is a decreasing function of rotation parameter λ . Furthermore, the non-Newtonian fluid parameter N has the characteristic of reducing the amount of local Nusselt numbers -f″ (0) and -g″ (0) both in x and y -directions.

  20. Asteroid rotation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binzel, R.P.; Farinella, P.

    1989-01-01

    Within the last decade the data base of asteroid rotation parameters (rotation rates and lightcurve amplitudes) has become sufficiently large to identify some definite rends and properties which can help us to interpret asteroid collisional evolution. Many significant correlations are found between rotation parameters and diameter, with distinct changes occurring near 125 km. The size range, which is also the diameter above which self-gravity may become important, perhaps represents a division between surviving primordial asteroids and collisional fragments. A Maxwellian is able to fit the observed rotation rate distributions of asteroids with D>125 km, implying that their rotation rates may be determined by collisional evolution. Asteroids with D<125 km show an excess of slow rotators and their non-Maxwellian distributions suggests that their rotation rates are more strongly influenced by other processes, such as the distribution resulting from their formation in catastrophic disruption events. Other correlations observed in the data set include different mean rotation rates for C, S and M type asteroids implying that their surface spectra are indicative of bulk properties

  1. The spatial rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan; Hahn, Ute; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making...

  2. Superconducting rotating machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L. Jr.; Kirtley, J.L. Jr.; Thullen, P.

    1975-01-01

    The opportunities and limitations of the applications of superconductors in rotating electric machines are given. The relevant properties of superconductors and the fundamental requirements for rotating electric machines are discussed. The current state-of-the-art of superconducting machines is reviewed. Key problems, future developments and the long range potential of superconducting machines are assessed

  3. Fundamental Relativistic Rotator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staruszkiewicz, A.

    2008-01-01

    Professor Jan Weyssenhoff was Myron Mathisson's sponsor and collaborator. He introduced a class of objects known in Cracow as '' kreciolki Weyssenhoffa '', '' Weyssenhoff's rotating little beasts ''. The Author describes a particularly simple object from this class. The relativistic rotator described in the paper is such that its both Casimir invariants are parameters rather than constants of motion. (author)

  4. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  5. Units of rotational information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Hu, Qinheping

    2017-12-01

    Entanglement in angular momentum degrees of freedom is a precious resource for quantum metrology and control. Here we study the conversions of this resource, focusing on Bell pairs of spin-J particles, where one particle is used to probe unknown rotations and the other particle is used as reference. When a large number of pairs are given, we show that every rotated spin-J Bell state can be reversibly converted into an equivalent number of rotated spin one-half Bell states, at a rate determined by the quantum Fisher information. This result provides the foundation for the definition of an elementary unit of information about rotations in space, which we call the Cartesian refbit. In the finite copy scenario, we design machines that approximately break down Bell states of higher spins into Cartesian refbits, as well as machines that approximately implement the inverse process. In addition, we establish a quantitative link between the conversion of Bell states and the simulation of unitary gates, showing that the fidelity of probabilistic state conversion provides upper and lower bounds on the fidelity of deterministic gate simulation. The result holds not only for rotation gates, but also to all sets of gates that form finite-dimensional representations of compact groups. For rotation gates, we show how rotations on a system of given spin can simulate rotations on a system of different spin.

  6. Disentangling The Thick Concept Argument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2007-01-01

    Critics argue that non-cognitivism cannot adequately account for the existence and nature of some thick moral concepts. They use the existence of thick concepts as a lever in an argument against non-cognitivism, here called the Thick Concept Argument (TCA). While TCA is frequently invoked...

  7. Vibration of imperfect rotating disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the theoretical and numerical calculations of the flexural vibrations of a bladed disk. The main focus of this study is to elaborate the basic background for diagnostic and identification methods for ascertaining the main properties of the real structure or an experimental model of turbine disks. The reduction of undesirable vibrations of blades is proposed by using damping heads, which on the experimental model of turbine disk are applied only on a limited number of blades. This partial setting of damping heads introduces imperfection in mass, stiffness and damping distribution on the periphery and leads to more complicated dynamic properties than those of a perfect disk. Calculation of FEM model and analytic—numerical solution of disk behaviour in the limited (two modes frequency range shows the splitting of resonance with an increasing speed of disk rotation. The spectrum of resonance is twice denser than that of a perfect disk.

  8. Effect of rotating electric field on 3D complex (dusty) plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörner, L.; Nosenko, V.; Ivlev, A. V.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Kroll, M.; Schablinski, J.; Block, D.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of rotating electric field on 3D particle clusters suspended in rf plasma was studied experimentally. Spheroidal clusters were suspended inside a glass box mounted on the lower horizontal rf electrode, with gravity partially balanced by thermophoretic force. Clusters rotated in the horizontal plane, in response to rotating electric field that was created inside the box using conducting coating on its inner surfaces ("rotating wall" technique). Cluster rotation was always in the direction of applied field and had a shear in the vertical direction. The angular speed of rotation was 104-107 times lower than applied frequency. The experiment is compared to a recent theory.

  9. The rotating universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, G.; Treder, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    For a long time the question whether the universe rotates or not is discussed. Aspects of Huygens, Newton, Mach and other important historical scientists in this field are reported. The investigations of the mathematician Kurt Groedel in order to prove the rotation of the universe are illustrated. Kurt Groedel has shown that Einstein's gravitational equations of general relativity theory and the cosmological postulate of global homogeneity of cosmic matter (that is the Copernical principle) are not contradictionary to a rotating universe. Abberation measurements, position determination by means of radiointerferometry and methods for the determination of the rotation of the universe from the isotropy of the background radiation are presented. From these experiments it can be concluded that the universe seems not to rotate as already Einstein expected

  10. Rotation sensor switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevec, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops is comprised of a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal

  11. Rotating stars in relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  12. Semi-analytical Vibration Characteristics of Rotating Timoshenko Beams Made of Functionally Graded Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Ebrahimia

    Full Text Available AbstractFree vibration analysis of rotating functionally graded (FG thick Timoshenko beams is presented. The material properties of FG beam vary along the thickness direction of the constituents according to power law model. Governing equations are derived through Hamilton's principle and they are solved applying differential transform method. The good agreement between the results of this article and those available in literature validated the presented approach. The emphasis is placed on investigating the effect of several beam parameters such as constituent volume fractions, slenderness ratios, rotational speed and hub radius on natural frequencies and mode shapes of the rotating thick FG beam.

  13. Simvastatin reduces fibrosis and protects against muscle weakness after massive rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Max E; Korn, Michael A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Harning, Julie A; Saripalli, Anjali L; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rotator cuff tears are a common source of shoulder pain and disability, and patients with chronic cuff tears often have substantial weakness, fibrosis, inflammation, and fat accumulation. Identifying therapies to prevent the development of these pathologic processes will likely have a positive impact on clinical outcomes. Simvastatin is a drug with demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects in many tissues but had not previously been studied in the context of rotator cuff tears. We hypothesized that after the induction of a massive supraspinatus tear, simvastatin would protect muscles from a loss of force production and fibrosis. We measured changes in muscle fiber contractility, histology, and biochemical markers of fibrosis and fatty infiltration in rats that received a full-thickness supraspinatus tear and were treated with either carrier alone or simvastatin. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, simvastatin did not have an appreciable effect on muscle fiber size, but treatment did increase muscle fiber specific force by 20%. Simvastatin also reduced collagen accumulation by 50% but did not affect triglyceride content of muscles. Several favorable changes in the expression of genes and other markers of inflammation, fibrosis, and regeneration were also observed. Simvastatin partially protected muscles from the weakness that occurs as a result of chronic rotator cuff tear. Fibrosis was also markedly reduced in simvastatin-treated animals. Whereas further studies are necessary, statin medication could potentially help improve outcomes for patients with rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Translate rotate scanning method for X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, J.W.; Kwog Cheong Tam.

    1990-01-01

    Rapid x-ray inspection of objects larger than an x-ray detector array is based on a translate rotate scanning motion of the object related to the fan beam source and detector. The scan for computerized tomography imaging is accomplished by rotating the object through 360 degrees at two or more positions relative to the source and detector array, in moving to another position the object is rotated and the object or source and detector are translated. A partial set of x-ray data is acquired at every position which are combined to obtain a full data set for complete image reconstruction. X-ray data for digital radiography imaging is acquired by scanning the object vertically at a first position at one view angle, rotating and translating the object relative to the source and detector to a second position, scanning vertically, and so on to cover the object field of view, and combining the partial data sets. (author)

  15. Superior glenoid inclination and rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Peter N; Beck, Lindsay; Granger, Erin; Henninger, Heath; Tashjian, Robert Z

    2018-03-23

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether glenoid inclination (1) could be measured accurately on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using computed tomography (CT) as a gold standard, (2) could be measured reliably on MRI, and (3) whether it differed between patients with rotator cuff tears and age-matched controls without evidence of rotator cuff tears or glenohumeral osteoarthritis. In this comparative retrospective radiographic study, we measured glenoid inclination on T1 coronal MRI corrected into the plane of the scapula. We determined accuracy by comparison with CT and inter-rater reliability. We compared glenoid inclination between patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears and patients aged >50 years without evidence of a rotator cuff tear or glenohumeral arthritis. An a priori power analysis determined adequate power to detect a 2° difference in glenoid inclination. (1) In a validation cohort of 37 patients with MRI and CT, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.877, with a mean difference of 0° (95% confidence interval, -1° to 1°). (2) For MRI inclination, the inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.911. (3) Superior glenoid inclination was 2° higher (range, 1°-4°, P rotator cuff tear group of 192 patients than in the control cohort of 107 patients. Glenoid inclination can be accurately and reliably measured on MRI. Although superior glenoid inclination is statistically greater in those with rotator cuff tears than in patients of similar age without rotator cuff tears or glenohumeral arthritis, the difference is likely below clinical significance. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rotation, Stability and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, J. W.

    2007-07-01

    Tokamak plasmas can frequently exhibit high levels of rotation and rotation shear. This can usually be attributed to various sources: injection of momentum, e.g. through neutral beams, flows driven by plasma gradients or torques resulting from non-ambipolar particle loss; however, the source sometimes remains a mystery, such as the spontaneous rotation observed in Ohmic plasmas. The equilibrium rotation profile is given by the balance of these sources with transport and other losses; the edge boundary conditions can play an important role in determining this profile . Such plasma rotation, particularly sheared rotation, is predicted theoretically to have a significant influence on plasma behaviour. In the first place, sonic flows can significantly affect tokamak equilibria and neoclassical transport losses. However, the influence of rotation on plasma stability and turbulence is more profound. At the macroscopic level it affects the behaviour of the gross MHD modes that influence plasma operational limits. This includes sawteeth, the seeding of neoclassical tearing modes, resistive wall modes and the onset of disruptions through error fields, mode locking and reconnection. At the microscopic level it has a major effect on the stability of ballooning modes, both ideal MHD and drift wave instabilities such as ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes. In the non-linear state, as unstable drift waves evolve into turbulent structures, sheared rotation also tears apart eddies, thereby reducing the resulting transport. There is considerable experimental evidence for these effects on both MHD stability and plasma confinement. In particular, the appearance of improved confinement modes with transport barriers, such as edge H-mode barriers and internal transport barriers (ITBs) appears to correlate well with the presence of sheared plasma rotation. This talk will describe the theory underlying some of these phenomena involving plasma rotation, on both macroscopic and microscopic

  17. On Job Rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Metin M. Cosgel; Thomas J. Miceli

    1998-01-01

    A fundamental principle of economics with which Adam Smith begins The Wealth of Nations is the division of labor. Some firms, however, have been pursuing a practice called job rotation, which assigns each worker not to a single and specific task but to a set of several tasks among which he or she rotates with some frequency. We examine the practice of job rotation as a serious alternative to specialization, with three objectives. The first is to consider current and historical examples of job...

  18. Disguising Rotational Gain for Redirected Walking in Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan, Anders Glud; Elbaek, Jacob; Mortensen, Mathias Helmuth

    2016-01-01

    In virtual reality environments that allow users to walk freely, the area of the virtual environment (VE) is constrained to the size of the tracking area. By using redirection techniques, this problem can be partially circumvented; one of the techniques involves rotating the user more or less...... in the virtual world than in the physical world; this technique is referred to as rotational gain. This paper seeks to further investigate this area, examining the effect of visual density in the VE....

  19. Rotator cuff - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000358.htm Rotator cuff - self-care To use the sharing features on ... and shoulder exercises may help ease your symptoms. Rotator Cuff Problems Common rotator cuff problems include: Tendinitis , which ...

  20. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  1. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  2. Partial Cavity Flows at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiharju, Simo; Elbing, Brian; Wiggins, Andrew; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2009-11-01

    Partial cavity flows created for friction drag reduction were examined on a large-scale. Partial cavities were investigated at Reynolds numbers up to 120 million, and stable cavities with frictional drag reduction of more than 95% were attained at optimal conditions. The model used was a 3 m wide and 12 m long flat plate with a plenum on the bottom. To create the partial cavity, air was injected at the base of an 18 cm backwards-facing step 2.1 m from the leading edge. The geometry at the cavity closure was varied for different flow speeds to optimize the closure of the cavity. Cavity gas flux, thickness, frictional loads, and cavity pressures were measured over a range of flow speeds and air injection fluxes. High-speed video was used extensively to investigate the unsteady three dimensional cavity closure, the overall cavity shape and oscillations.

  3. ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES FOR M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Ramsey, L. W.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barnes, J. R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic rotation velocities (v sin i) for 56 M dwarf stars using high-resolution Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph red spectroscopy. In addition, we have also determined photometric effective temperatures, masses, and metallicities ([Fe/H]) for some stars observed here and in the literature where we could acquire accurate parallax measurements and relevant photometry. We have increased the number of known v sin i values for mid M stars by around 80% and can confirm a weakly increasing rotation velocity with decreasing effective temperature. Our sample of v sin is peak at low velocities (∼3 km s -1 ). We find a change in the rotational velocity distribution between early M and late M stars, which is likely due to the changing field topology between partially and fully convective stars. There is also a possible further change in the rotational distribution toward the late M dwarfs where dust begins to play a role in the stellar atmospheres. We also link v sin i to age and show how it can be used to provide mid-M star age limits. When all literature velocities for M dwarfs are added to our sample, there are 198 with v sin i ≤ 10 km s -1 and 124 in the mid-to-late M star regime (M3.0-M9.5) where measuring precision optical radial velocities is difficult. In addition, we also search the spectra for any significant Hα emission or absorption. Forty three percent were found to exhibit such emission and could represent young, active objects with high levels of radial-velocity noise. We acquired two epochs of spectra for the star GJ1253 spread by almost one month and the Hα profile changed from showing no clear signs of emission, to exhibiting a clear emission peak. Four stars in our sample appear to be low-mass binaries (GJ1080, GJ3129, Gl802, and LHS3080), with both GJ3129 and Gl802 exhibiting double Hα emission features. The tables presented here will aid any future M star planet search target selection to extract stars with low v

  4. Metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Daisuke; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Brook, Chris B.; Casagrande, Luca; Ciucă, Ioana; Gibson, Brad K.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Hayden, Michael R.; Hunt, Jason A. S.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo chemical 'painting' technique to explore possible radial and vertical metallicity gradients for the thick disc progenitor. In our analysis, we match an N-body simulation to the data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We assume that the thick disc has a constant scaleheight and has completed its formation at an early epoch, after which time radial mixing of its stars has taken place. Under these assumptions, we find that the initial radial metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor should not be negative, but either flat or even positive, to explain the current negative vertical metallicity gradient of the thick disc. Our study suggests that the thick disc was built-up in an inside-out and upside-down fashion, and older, smaller and thicker populations are more metal poor. In this case, star-forming discs at different epochs of the thick disc formation are allowed to have different radial metallicity gradients, including a negative one, which helps to explain a variety of slopes observed in high-redshift disc galaxies. This scenario helps to explain the positive slope of the metallicity-rotation velocity relation observed for the Galactic thick disc. On the other hand, radial mixing flattens the slope of an existing gradient.

  5. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EVALUATION OF ROTATOR CUFF IMPINGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakanth K. S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Shoulder pain is a common clinical problem. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder is believed to be the most common cause of shoulder pain. The term ‘impingement syndrome’ was first used by Neer to describe a condition of shoulder pain associated with chronic bursitis and partial thickness tear of Rotator Cuff (RC. The incidence of Rotator Cuff (RC tear is estimated to be about 20.7% in the general population. This study is intended to analyse various extrinsic and intrinsic causes of shoulder impingement. MATERIALS AND METHODS 110 consecutive patients referred for MRI with clinical suspicion of shoulder impingement were prospectively studied. All the patients were evaluated for Rotator Cuff (RC degeneration and various extrinsic factors that lead to degeneration like acromial shape, down-sloping acromion, Acromioclavicular (AC joint degeneration and acromial enthesophyte. Intrinsic factors like degeneration and its correlation with age of the patients were evaluated. RESULTS Of the total 110 patients, 19 (17.3% patients had FT RC tear and 31 (28.2% had PT (both bursal and articular surface tears. There was no statistically significant correlation (p=0.76 between acromion types and RC tear. Down-sloping acromion and enthesophytes had statistically significant association with RC tear (p=0.008 and 0.008, respectively. Statistically significant (0.008 correlation between the severity of AC joint degeneration and RC tears was noted. AC joint degeneration and RC pathologies also showed a correlation with the age of the patients with p values of <0.001 and 0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION No statistically significant correlation between RC pathologies with hooked acromion was found, that makes the role played by hooked acromion in FT RC tear questionable. AC joint degeneration association with RC tear is due to the association of both RC tear and AC joint degeneration with age of the patient. Down-sloping acromion, AC joint degeneration

  6. Rotating universe models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozini, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    A review is made of some properties of the rotating Universe models. Godel's model is identified as a generalized filted model. Some properties of new solutions of the Einstein's equations, which are rotating non-stationary Universe models, are presented and analyzed. These models have the Godel's model as a particular case. Non-stationary cosmological models are found which are a generalization of the Godel's metrics in an analogous way in which Friedmann is to the Einstein's model. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Rotation Invariance Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Rotation invariance and translation invariance have great values in image recognition tasks. In this paper, we bring a new architecture in convolutional neural network (CNN) named cyclic convolutional layer to achieve rotation invariance in 2-D symbol recognition. We can also get the position and orientation of the 2-D symbol by the network to achieve detection purpose for multiple non-overlap target. Last but not least, this architecture can achieve one-shot learning in some cases using thos...

  8. Radiography and partial tomography of wood with thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloh, K.; Fratzscher, D.; Schwabe, A.; Schillinger, B.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2011-09-01

    The effective high neutron scattering absorption coefficient of hydrogen (48.5 cm 2/g) due to the scattering allows neutrons to reveal hydrocarbon structures with more contrast than X-rays, but at the same time limits the sample size and thickness that can be investigated. Many planar shaped objects, particularly wood samples, are sufficiently thin to allow thermal neutrons to transmit through the sample in a direction perpendicular to the planar face but not in a parallel direction, due to increased thickness. Often, this is an obstacle that prevents some tomographic reconstruction algorithms from obtaining desired results because of inadequate information or presence of distracting artifacts due to missing projections. This can be true for samples such as the distribution of glue in glulam (boards of wooden layers glued together), or the course of partially visible annual rings in trees where the features of interest are parallel to the planar surface of the sample. However, it should be possible to study these features by rotating the specimen within a limited angular range. In principle, this approach has been shown previously in a study with fast neutrons [2]. A study of this kind was performed at the Antares facility of FRM II in Garching with a 2.6×10 7/cm 2 s thermal neutron beam. The limit of penetration was determined for a wooden step wedge carved from a 2 cm×4 cm block of wood in comparison to other materials such as heavy metals and Lucite as specimens rich in hydrogen. The depth of the steps was 1 cm, the height 0.5 cm. The annual ring structures were clearly detectable up to 2 cm thickness. Wooden specimens, i.e. shivers, from a sunken old ship have been subjected to tomography. Not visible from the outside, clear radial structures have been found that are typical for certain kinds of wood. This insight was impaired in a case where the specimen had been soaked with ethylene glycol. In another large sample study, a planar board made of glulam has

  9. Radiography and partial tomography of wood with thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Fratzscher, D.; Schwabe, A.; Schillinger, B.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2011-01-01

    The effective high neutron scattering absorption coefficient of hydrogen (48.5 cm 2 /g) due to the scattering allows neutrons to reveal hydrocarbon structures with more contrast than X-rays, but at the same time limits the sample size and thickness that can be investigated. Many planar shaped objects, particularly wood samples, are sufficiently thin to allow thermal neutrons to transmit through the sample in a direction perpendicular to the planar face but not in a parallel direction, due to increased thickness. Often, this is an obstacle that prevents some tomographic reconstruction algorithms from obtaining desired results because of inadequate information or presence of distracting artifacts due to missing projections. This can be true for samples such as the distribution of glue in glulam (boards of wooden layers glued together), or the course of partially visible annual rings in trees where the features of interest are parallel to the planar surface of the sample. However, it should be possible to study these features by rotating the specimen within a limited angular range. In principle, this approach has been shown previously in a study with fast neutrons . A study of this kind was performed at the Antares facility of FRM II in Garching with a 2.6x10 7 /cm 2 s thermal neutron beam. The limit of penetration was determined for a wooden step wedge carved from a 2 cmx4 cm block of wood in comparison to other materials such as heavy metals and Lucite as specimens rich in hydrogen. The depth of the steps was 1 cm, the height 0.5 cm. The annual ring structures were clearly detectable up to 2 cm thickness. Wooden specimens, i.e. shivers, from a sunken old ship have been subjected to tomography. Not visible from the outside, clear radial structures have been found that are typical for certain kinds of wood. This insight was impaired in a case where the specimen had been soaked with ethylene glycol. In another large sample study, a planar board made of glulam has been

  10. Hyperbolic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations III is a refereed journal issue that explores the applications, theory, and/or applied methods related to hyperbolic partial differential equations, or problems arising out of hyperbolic partial differential equations, in any area of research. This journal issue is interested in all types of articles in terms of review, mini-monograph, standard study, or short communication. Some studies presented in this journal include discretization of ideal fluid dynamics in the Eulerian representation; a Riemann problem in gas dynamics with bifurcation; periodic M

  11. Successful removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher D

    2012-03-01

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) remain a mainstay of prosthodontic care for partially dentate patients. Appropriately designed, they can restore masticatory efficiency, improve aesthetics and speech, and help secure overall oral health. However, challenges remain in providing such treatments, including maintaining adequate plaque control, achieving adequate retention, and facilitating patient tolerance. The aim of this paper is to review the successful provision of RPDs. Removable partial dentures are a successful form of treatment for replacing missing teeth, and can be successfully provided with appropriate design and fabrication concepts in mind.

  12. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous, yet accessible, introduction to partial differential equations-updated in a valuable new edition Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Second Edition provides a comprehensive introduction to partial differential equations (PDEs) with a special focus on the significance of characteristics, solutions by Fourier series, integrals and transforms, properties and physical interpretations of solutions, and a transition to the modern function space approach to PDEs. With its breadth of coverage, this new edition continues to present a broad introduction to the field, while also addres

  13. Control of fluid-containing rotating rigid bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Gurchenkov, Anatoly A

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the study of the dynamics of rotating bodies with cavities containing liquid. Two basic classes of motions are analyzed: rotation and libration. Cases of complete and partial filling of cavities with ideal liquid and complete filling with viscous liquid are treated. The volume presents a method for obtaining relations between angular velocities perpendicular to main rotation and external force momentums, which are treated as control. The developed models and methods of solving dynamical problems as well as numerical methods for solving problems of optimal control can be

  14. Static and dynamic through thickness lamina properties of thick laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahuerta, F.; Nijssen, R.P.L.; Van der Meer, F.P.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thick laminates are increasingly present in large composites structures such as wind turbine blades. Different factors are suspected to be involved in the decreased static and dynamic performance of thick laminates. These include the effect of self-heating, the scaling effect, and the manufacturing

  15. Comparative investigation of five nanoparticles in flow of viscous fluid with Joule heating and slip due to rotating disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Sumaira; Khan, Muhammad Ijaz; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    Present article addresses the comparative study for flow of five water based nanofluids. Flow in presence of Joule heating is generated by rotating disk with variable thickness. Nanofluids are suspension of Silver (Ag), Copper (Cu), Copper oxide (CuO), Aluminum oxide or Alumina (Al2O3), Titanium oxide or titania (TiO2) and water. Boundary layer approximation is applied to partial differential equations. Using Von Karman transformations the partial differential equations are converted to ordinary differential equations. Convergent series solutions are obtained. Graphical results are presented to examine the behaviors of axial, radial and tangential velocities, temperature, skin friction and Nusselt number. It is observed that radial, axial and tangential velocities decay for slip parameters. Axial velocity decays for larger nanoparticle volume fraction. Effect of nanofluids on velocities dominant than base material. Temperature rises for larger Eckert number and temperature of silver water nanofluid is more because of its higher thermal conductivity. Surface drag force reduces for higher slip parameters. Transfer of heat is more for larger disk thickness index.

  16. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  17. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    A broad introduction to PDEs with an emphasis on specialized topics and applications occurring in a variety of fields Featuring a thoroughly revised presentation of topics, Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Third Edition provides a challenging, yet accessible,combination of techniques, applications, and introductory theory on the subjectof partial differential equations. The new edition offers nonstandard coverageon material including Burger's equation, the telegraph equation, damped wavemotion, and the use of characteristics to solve nonhomogeneous problems. The Third Edition is or

  18. Thick or Thin Ice Shell on Europa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Scientists are all but certain that Europa has an ocean underneath its icy surface, but they do not know how thick this ice might be. This artist concept illustrates two possible cut-away views through Europa's ice shell. In both, heat escapes, possibly volcanically, from Europa's rocky mantle and is carried upward by buoyant oceanic currents. If the heat from below is intense and the ice shell is thin enough (left), the ice shell can directly melt, causing what are called 'chaos' on Europa, regions of what appear to be broken, rotated and tilted ice blocks. On the other hand, if the ice shell is sufficiently thick (right), the less intense interior heat will be transferred to the warmer ice at the bottom of the shell, and additional heat is generated by tidal squeezing of the warmer ice. This warmer ice will slowly rise, flowing as glaciers do on Earth, and the slow but steady motion may also disrupt the extremely cold, brittle ice at the surface. Europa is no larger than Earth's moon, and its internal heating stems from its eccentric orbit about Jupiter, seen in the distance. As tides raised by Jupiter in Europa's ocean rise and fall, they may cause cracking, additional heating and even venting of water vapor into the airless sky above Europa's icy surface. (Artwork by Michael Carroll.)

  19. Full thickness burn caused by exposure to giant hogweed: delayed presentation, histological features and surgical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2012-02-01

    We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with a full thickness chemical burn on his right pretibial area due to phytophotodermatitis (PPD) following contact with giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum). Although cutaneous burns due to plants are a well-established cause of chemical burn, previous reports described partial thickness burns that healed with conservative measures. This patient presented to our unit two weeks after the initial injury with an established full thickness burn. Debridement and split thickness skin grafting was required. We presented the histological features of the debrided skin specimen and discussed potential factors leading to this unexpected full thickness injury.

  20. Optimum target thickness for polarimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnik, I.M.

    2003-01-01

    Polarimeters with thick targets are a tool to measure the proton polarization. But the question about the optimum target thickness is still the subject of discussion. An attempt to calculate the most common parameters concerning this problem, in a few GeV region, is made

  1. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  2. Rotating positron tomographs revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.; Defrise, M.; Geissbuhler, A.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared the performance of a PET scanner comprising two rotating arrays of detectors with that of the more conventional stationary-ring design. The same total number of detectors was used in each, and neither scanner had septa. For brain imaging, we find that the noise-equivalent count rate is greater for the rotating arrays by a factor of two. Rotating arrays have a sensitivity profile that peaks in the centre of the field of view, both axially and transaxially. In the transaxial plane, this effect offsets to a certain extent the decrease in the number of photons detected towards the centre of the brain due to self-absorption. We have also compared the performance of a rotating scanner to that of a full-ring scanner with the same number of rings. We find that a full-ring scanner with an axial extent of 16.2 cm (24 rings) is a factor of 3.5 more sensitive than a rotating scanner with 40% of the detectors and the same axial extent. (Author)

  3. Proposal of cancer therapy system without rotating gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Masanobu

    2002-01-01

    Beam therapy is one of useful methods for cancer therapy. Many results in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) show many abilities of beam therapy for cancer therapy. In Japan, several beam therapy facilities are constructed or under construction. If its construction budget becomes to be smaller, beam therapy may be used as the general cancer therapy. But in the present beam therapy facilities, the budget of its construction is very large. One of the reasons of big budget is the construction of the big buildings equipped with thick shielding walls. Most of space of the facilities with thick shielding walls is devoted to the treatment equipments such as rotating gantries and beam transport lines. This proposal is that using oblique beam line and rotating treatment bed, multi-portal irradiation is realized without rotating gantry. At the same time, we designed adequate beam lines to minimize the total facilities. (author)

  4. Rotator cuff tear state modulates self-renewal and differentiation capacity of human skeletal muscle progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kelsey A; Gibbons, Michael C; Lane, John G; Singh, Anshuman; Ward, Samuel R; Engler, Adam J

    2017-08-01

    Full thickness rotator cuff tendon (RCT) tears have long-term effects on RC muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, with lasting damage even after surgical tendon repair. Skeletal muscle progenitor cells (SMPs) are critical for muscle repair in response to injury, but the inability of RC muscles to recover from chronic RCT tear indicates possible deficits in repair mechanisms. Here we investigated if muscle injury state was a crucial factor during human SMP expansion and differentiation ex vivo. SMPs were isolated from muscles in patients with no, partial-thickness (PT), or full-thickness (FT) RCT tears. Despite using growth factors, physiological niche stiffness, and muscle-mimetic extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, we found that SMPs isolated from human RC muscle with RCT tears proliferated slower but fused into myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotubes at higher rates than SMPs from untorn RCTs. Proteomic analysis of RC muscle tissue revealed shifts in muscle composition with pathology, as muscle from massive RCT tears had increased ECM deposition compared with no tear RC muscle. Together these data imply that the remodeled niche in a torn RCT primes SMPs not for expansion but for differentiation, thus limiting longer-term self-renewal necessary for regeneration after surgical repair. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1816-1823, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  6. Unsteady flow over a decelerating rotating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmazoglu, M.

    2018-03-01

    Unsteady flow analysis induced by a decelerating rotating sphere is the main concern of this paper. A revolving sphere in a still fluid is supposed to slow down at an angular velocity rate that is inversely proportional to time. The governing partial differential equations of motion are scaled in accordance with the literature, reducing to the well-documented von Kármán equations in the special circumstance near the pole. Both numerical and perturbation approaches are pursued to identify the velocity fields, shear stresses, and suction velocity far above the sphere. It is detected that an induced flow surrounding the sphere acts accordingly to adapt to the motion of the sphere up to some critical unsteadiness parameters at certain latitudes. Afterward, the decay rate of rotation ceases such that the flow at the remaining azimuths starts revolving freely. At a critical unsteadiness parameter corresponding to s = -0.681, the decelerating sphere rotates freely and requires no more torque. At a value of s exactly matching the rotating disk flow at the pole identified in the literature, the entire flow field around the sphere starts revolving faster than the disk itself. Increasing values of -s almost diminish the radial outflow. This results in jet flows in both the latitudinal and meridional directions, concentrated near the wall region. The presented mean flow results will be useful for analyzing the instability features of the flow, whether of a convective or absolute nature.

  7. Design of a rotating-hearth furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, H A [LOI Industrieofenanlagen G.m.b.H., Essen (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-09-01

    Part I of this paper is intended to present a review of the theory of heating round stock of a length considerably exceeding the diameter. It is permissible to neglect heating from the ends of the cylinders. With short and thick ingots as used in pilgrim mills, for instance, such simplification is not possible. The method for calculating the waste gas temperature can also be used for the remaining furnace sections provided certain conditions are allowed for and computational procedures observed. Part II of the paper will deal with this and with the major design features of rotating-hearth furnaces.

  8. Smoking and morphology of calcific deposits affect the outcome of needle aspiration of calcific deposits (NACD) for calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudelaar, Bart W; Ooms, Edwin M; Huis In 't Veld, Rianne M H A; Schepers-Bok, Relinde; Vochteloo, Anne J

    2015-11-01

    Although NACD has proven to be an effective minimal invasive treatment for calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff, little is known about the factors associated with treatment failure or the need for multiple procedures. Patients with symptomatic calcific tendinitis who were treated by NACD were evaluated in a retrospective cohort study. Demographic details, medical history, sonographic and radiographic findings were collected from patient files. Failure of NACD was defined as the persistence of symptoms after a follow-up of at least six months. NACD procedures performed within six months after a previous NACD procedure were considered repeated procedures. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with treatment failure and multiple procedures. 431 patients (277 female; mean age 51.4±9.9 years) were included. Smoking (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.7, p=0.04) was significantly associated with failure of NACD. Patients with Gärtner and Heyer (GH) type I calcific deposits were more likely to need multiple NACD procedures (AOR: 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.5, protator cuff tears were of no influence on the outcome of NACD or the number of treatments necessary. Smoking almost doubled the chance of failure of NACD and the presence of GH type I calcific deposits significantly increased the chance of multiple procedures. Partial thickness rotator cuff tears did not seem to affect the outcome of NACD. Based on the findings in this study, the importance of quitting smoking should be emphasized prior to NACD and partial thickness rotator cuff tears should not be a reason to withhold patients NACD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rotating quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambruş, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the definition of rotating thermal states for scalar and fermion fields in unbounded Minkowski space–time. For scalar fields such states are ill-defined everywhere, but for fermion fields an appropriate definition of the vacuum gives thermal states regular inside the speed-of-light surface. For a massless fermion field, we derive analytic expressions for the thermal expectation values of the fermion current and stress–energy tensor. These expressions may provide qualitative insights into the behaviour of thermal rotating states on more complex space–time geometries

  10. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  11. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lawrence C

    2010-01-01

    This text gives a comprehensive survey of modern techniques in the theoretical study of partial differential equations (PDEs) with particular emphasis on nonlinear equations. The exposition is divided into three parts: representation formulas for solutions; theory for linear partial differential equations; and theory for nonlinear partial differential equations. Included are complete treatments of the method of characteristics; energy methods within Sobolev spaces; regularity for second-order elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations; maximum principles; the multidimensional calculus of variations; viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations; shock waves and entropy criteria for conservation laws; and, much more.The author summarizes the relevant mathematics required to understand current research in PDEs, especially nonlinear PDEs. While he has reworked and simplified much of the classical theory (particularly the method of characteristics), he primarily emphasizes the modern interplay between funct...

  12. VMAT optimization with dynamic collimator rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Qihui; O'Connor, Daniel; Ruan, Dan; Yu, Victoria; Nguyen, Dan; Sheng, Ke

    2018-04-16

    Although collimator rotation is an optimization variable that can be exploited for dosimetric advantages, existing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) optimization uses a fixed collimator angle in each arc and only rotates the collimator between arcs. In this study, we develop a novel integrated optimization method for VMAT, accounting for dynamic collimator angles during the arc motion. Direct Aperture Optimization (DAO) for Dynamic Collimator in VMAT (DC-VMAT) was achieved by adding to the existing dose fidelity objective an anisotropic total variation term for regulating the fluence smoothness, a binary variable for forming simple apertures, and a group sparsity term for controlling collimator rotation. The optimal collimator angle for each beam angle was selected using the Dijkstra's algorithm, where the node costs depend on the estimated fluence map at the current iteration and the edge costs account for the mechanical constraints of multi-leaf collimator (MLC). An alternating optimization strategy was implemented to solve the DAO and collimator angle selection (CAS). Feasibility of DC-VMAT using one full-arc with dynamic collimator rotation was tested on a phantom with two small spherical targets, a brain, a lung and a prostate cancer patient. The plan was compared against a static collimator VMAT (SC-VMAT) plan using three full arcs with 60 degrees of collimator angle separation in patient studies. With the same target coverage, DC-VMAT achieved 20.3% reduction of R50 in the phantom study, and reduced the average max and mean OAR dose by 4.49% and 2.53% of the prescription dose in patient studies, as compared with SC-VMAT. The collimator rotation co-ordinated with the gantry rotation in DC-VMAT plans for deliverability. There were 13 beam angles in the single-arc DC-VMAT plan in patient studies that requires slower gantry rotation to accommodate multiple collimator angles. The novel DC-VMAT approach utilizes the dynamic collimator rotation during arc

  13. Recurrent rotator cuff tear: is ultrasound imaging reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Ron; Atoun, Ehud; Cohen, Ornit; Tsvieli, Oren; Rath, Ehud; Lakstein, Dror; Levy, Ofer

    2018-02-02

    The diagnostic workup of the painful shoulder after rotator cuff repair (RCR) can be quite challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of ultrasonography (US) for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears in patients with shoulder pain after RCR. We hypothesized that US for the diagnosis of recurrent rotator cuff tear after RCR would not prove to be reliable when compared with surgical arthroscopic confirmation (gold standard). In this cohort study (diagnosis), we retrospectively analyzed the data of 39 patients with shoulder pain after arthroscopic RCR who had subsequently undergone US, followed by revision arthroscopy. The rotator cuff was evaluated first using US for the presence of retears. Thereafter, revision arthroscopy was performed, and the diagnosis was either established or disproved. The sensitivity and specificity of US were assessed in reference to revision arthroscopy (gold standard). A rotator cuff retear was indicated by US in 21 patients (54%) and by revision arthroscopy in 26 patients (67%). US showed a sensitivity of 80.8% and specificity of 100% in the diagnosis of rotator cuff retears. Omission of partial rotator cuff retears resulted in a spike in sensitivity to 94.7%, with 100% specificity remaining. US imaging is a highly sensitive and specific test for the detection of recurrent rotator cuff tears, as confirmed by revision arthroscopy, in patients with a painful shoulder after primary RCR. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of partial search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korepin, Vladimir E

    2005-01-01

    A quantum Grover search algorithm can find a target item in a database faster than any classical algorithm. One can trade accuracy for speed and find a part of the database (a block) containing the target item even faster; this is partial search. A partial search algorithm was recently suggested by Grover and Radhakrishnan. Here we optimize it. Efficiency of the search algorithm is measured by the number of queries to the oracle. The author suggests a new version of the Grover-Radhakrishnan algorithm which uses a minimal number of such queries. The algorithm can run on the same hardware that is used for the usual Grover algorithm. (letter to the editor)

  15. Rotational glenohumeral adaptations are associated with shoulder pathology in professional male handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Cisowski, Pawel; Breborowicz, Ewa; Grygorowicz, Monika; Dzianach, Marcin; Krupecki, Tomasz; Laver, Lior; Romanowski, Leszek

    2018-01-01

    Glenohumeral range of motion adaptations may affect throwing athletes and contribute to shoulder injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shoulder rotation deficits among elite professional handball players and its correlation to the presence of shoulder pain and morphological changes. Eighty-seven elite professional handball players and 41 healthy non-athlete volunteers participated in the study. Evaluations included measurement of range of internal and external rotation, total arch of motion, identification of shoulder pain and ultrasound scan for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and internal impingement. Glenohumeral rotational deficits (>20-25°) were found among 11 players group (13%). The throwing shoulders in the players group showed a decrease in internal rotation and an increase in external rotation with significantly larger ranges among players compared to the non-athlete group. Internal rotation deficit >20° was associated with higher incidence of shoulder pain among players. Both internal rotation deficits (>25°) and total arch of motion deficit (>20°) co-existed with higher incidence of internal impingement. Shoulder pain was common (36/97-41%) and was associated with decreased external rotation and total arch of motion. Internal impingement (found in 13/87-15%) correlated with decreased rotation ranges and a greater deficit in total arch of motion, whereas higher gain in external rotation correlated with a partial rotator cuff tear (found in 12/87-14%). Shoulder pathologies and problems commonly affected the group of handball players. Greater glenohumeral rotational deficits in throwing shoulders of handball players correlate with shoulder pain and internal impingement, while increased external rotation with partial rotator cuff tears. Such deficits affect 13% of the athlete population. Major clinical relevance of the study is to monitor handball players' shoulders both clinically and by proper imaging. Evaluation of range of rotation seems

  16. Rotations and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyborg, P.; Froyland, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of rotational invariance and the properties of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. In particular, the problem of addition of angular momenta is treated in detail, and tables of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients are included

  17. Negative Rotation Cinch Strap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project discloses an improved unitary parachute torso harness, having a single fastening means, wherein an auxillary tightening strap is...attached to the groin straps of said harness. Said auxillary straps are used to prevent torso rotation or harness slippage and to prevent harness elongation

  18. A rotating string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B.

    1993-06-01

    The author presents a global solution of Einstein's equations which represents a rotating cosmic string with a finite coreradius. The importance of pressure for the generation of closed timelike curves outside the coreregion of such strings is clearly displayed in this model due to the simplicity of the source. 10 refs

  19. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  20. Rotational dynamics with Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eadkhong, T; Danworaphong, S; Rajsadorn, R; Jannual, P

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia (I) of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction (b) for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive I for a cylindrical plate rotated around its central axis from the other two experiments based on the relation between torque and angular acceleration of rotational motion and conservation of energy. Movies of the rotating plate and hung masses are recorded. As a result, we have the deviation of I from its theoretical value of 0.4% and 3.3%, respectively. Our setup is completely constructed from locally available inexpensive materials and the experimental results indicate that the system is highly reliable. This work should pave the way for those who prefer to build a similar setup from scratch at relatively low cost compared to commercial units. (paper)

  1. The Axial Curve Rotator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Walter M.

    This document contains detailed directions for constructing a device that mechanically produces the three-dimensional shape resulting from the rotation of any algebraic line or curve around either axis on the coordinate plant. The device was developed in response to student difficulty in visualizing, and thus grasping the mathematical principles…

  2. Can planetary nebulae rotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the inclination of spectral lines observed in a number of planetary nebulae when the spectrograph slit is placed along the major axis, which is presently ascribed to nonuniform expansion of the shells, actually may be due to rotation of the nebulae about their minor axes, as Campbell and Moore have suggested in their reports. It is assumed that the rotation of the central star (or, if the core is a binary system, circular motions of gas along quasi-Keplerian orbits) serves as the source of the original rotation of a protoplanetary nebula. The mechanism providing for strengthening of the original rotation in the process of expansion of the shell is the tangential pressure of L/sub α/ radiation due to the anisotropic properties of the medium and radiation field. The dynamic effect produced by them is evidently greatest in the epoch when the optical depth of the nebula in the L/sub c/ continuum becomes on the order of unity in the course of its expansion

  3. THICK-DISK EVOLUTION INDUCED BY THE GROWTH OF AN EMBEDDED THIN DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalobos, Alvaro; Helmi, Amina; Kazantzidis, Stelios

    2010-01-01

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the structural and kinematical properties of simulated thick disks induced by the growth of an embedded thin disk. The thick disks used in the present study originate from cosmologically common 5:1 encounters between initially thin primary disk galaxies and infalling satellites. The growing thin disks are modeled as static gravitational potentials and we explore a variety of growing-disk parameters that are likely to influence the response of thick disks. We find that the final thick-disk properties depend strongly on the total mass and radial scale length of the growing thin disk, and much less sensitively on its growth timescale and vertical scale height as well as the initial sense of thick-disk rotation. Overall, the growth of an embedded thin disk can cause a substantial contraction in both the radial and vertical direction, resulting in a significant decrease in the scale lengths and scale heights of thick disks. Kinematically, a growing thin disk can induce a notable increase in the mean rotation and velocity dispersions of thick-disk stars. We conclude that the reformation of a thin disk via gas accretion may play a significant role in setting the structure and kinematics of thick disks, and thus it is an important ingredient in models of thick-disk formation.

  4. Auxiliary partial liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B. Reuvers (Cornelis Bastiaan)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis studies on auxiliary partial liver transplantation in the dog and the pig are reported. The motive to perform this study was the fact that patients with acute hepatic failure or end-stage chronic liver disease are often considered to form too great a risk for successful

  5. Partial Remission Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marie Louise Max; Hougaard, Philip; Pörksen, Sven

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the partial remission (PR) definition based on insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1c). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The IDAA1c was developed using data in 251 children from the European Hvidoere cohort. For validation, 129 children from a Danish cohort were followed from the onset...

  6. Fundamental partial compositeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Strumia, Alessandro; Tesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We construct renormalizable Standard Model extensions, valid up to the Planck scale, that give a composite Higgs from a new fundamental strong force acting on fermions and scalars. Yukawa interactions of these particles with Standard Model fermions realize the partial compositeness scenario. Unde...

  7. Partially ordered models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, R.; Deveaux, V.

    2010-01-01

    We provide a formal definition and study the basic properties of partially ordered chains (POC). These systems were proposed to model textures in image processing and to represent independence relations between random variables in statistics (in the later case they are known as Bayesian networks).

  8. Partially Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren Otto; Rissanen, Jorma

    1996-01-01

    Partially Hidden Markov Models (PHMM) are introduced. They differ from the ordinary HMM's in that both the transition probabilities of the hidden states and the output probabilities are conditioned on past observations. As an illustration they are applied to black and white image compression where...

  9. Honesty in partial logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van der Hoek (Wiebe); J.O.M. Jaspars; E. Thijsse

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe propose an epistemic logic in which knowledge is fully introspective and implies truth, although truth need not imply epistemic possibility. The logic is presented in sequential format and is interpreted in a natural class of partial models, called balloon models. We examine the

  10. Corneal thickness: measurement and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Niels; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2004-03-01

    The thickness of the cornea was reported in more than 100-year-old textbooks on physiological optics (Helmholtz, Gullstrand). Physiological interest was revived in the 1950s by David Maurice, and over the next 50 years, this 'simple' biological parameter has been studied extensively. Several techniques for its measurement have been described and physiological and clinical significance have been studied. In this review, the different methods and techniques of measurement are briefly presented (optical, ultrasound). While the corneal thickness of many animals are the same over a considerable part of the surface, in the human cornea anterior and posterior curvature are not concentric giving rise to a problem of definition. Based on this the precision and accuracy of determining the central corneal thickness are discussed. Changes in corneal thickness reflects changes in function of the boundary layers, in particular the endothelial barrier. The absolute value of thickness is of importance for the estimation of IOP but also in diagnosis of corneal and systemic disorders. Finally it is discussed to what extent the thickness is a biometric parameter of significance, e.g. in the progression of myopia or in the development of retinal detachment.

  11. Differential detection for measurements of Faraday rotation by means of ac magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valev, V K; Wouters, J; Verbiest, T

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that by using a combination of a Wollaston prism and two photodiodes the accuracy in the measurements of Faraday rotation with ac magnetic fields can be greatly improved. Our experiments were performed on microscope cover glass plates with thicknesses between 0.13 and 0.16 mm. We show that our setup is capable of distinguishing between the Faraday rotation signals of glass plates having a difference in thickness of a few micrometers, corresponding to Faraday rotations of hundreds of microdegrees per Tesla only

  12. Algebraic partial Boolean algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Partial Boolean algebras, first studied by Kochen and Specker in the 1960s, provide the structure for Bell-Kochen-Specker theorems which deny the existence of non-contextual hidden variable theories. In this paper, we study partial Boolean algebras which are 'algebraic' in the sense that their elements have coordinates in an algebraic number field. Several of these algebras have been discussed recently in a debate on the validity of Bell-Kochen-Specker theorems in the context of finite precision measurements. The main result of this paper is that every algebraic finitely-generated partial Boolean algebra B(T) is finite when the underlying space H is three-dimensional, answering a question of Kochen and showing that Conway and Kochen's infinite algebraic partial Boolean algebra has minimum dimension. This result contrasts the existence of an infinite (non-algebraic) B(T) generated by eight elements in an abstract orthomodular lattice of height 3. We then initiate a study of higher-dimensional algebraic partial Boolean algebras. First, we describe a restriction on the determinants of the elements of B(T) that are generated by a given set T. We then show that when the generating set T consists of the rays spanning the minimal vectors in a real irreducible root lattice, B(T) is infinite just if that root lattice has an A 5 sublattice. Finally, we characterize the rays of B(T) when T consists of the rays spanning the minimal vectors of the root lattice E 8

  13. Evaluation of the Legibility of Broken Lines for Partial Sight

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 秀之

    2000-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the legibility of broken lines for persons with partial sight. The subjects were 10 persons with simulated partial sight, and 4 persons with partial sight. The simulation was obtained using filters and convex lenses. The 30 kind of broken lines was evaluated by the original test that the subjects were read directions of the broken lines in distinction from solid lines. The thickness of lines varied from 0.1mm. to 0.7mm. in 4 steps. The results...

  14. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  15. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  16. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Chungang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Chul [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  17. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jee Young; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  18. Standard sonography and arthrosonography in the study of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dalati, Ghassan; Martone, Enrico; Caffarri, Sabrina; Fusaro, Michele; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto; Castellarin, Gianluca; Ricci, Matteo; Vecchini, Eugenio

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of ultrasonography, integrating standard ultrasound and arthrosonography after injecting a saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity in cases of suspected rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods. We respectively examinated 40 patients awaiting shoulder arthroscopy for suspected or diagnosed tears of the rotator cuff. A radiologist, unaware of the pre-operative diagnosis, performed an ultrasound scan on all the patients before and after the injection of saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity. The parameters considered were presence or absence of a rotator cuff injury; type of injury according to Snyder and its extent along the longitudinal and transverse planes; presence or absence of effusion into the articular cavity; subacromial/subdeltoid bursal distension. All the patients underwent arthroscopy either the same day of the day after the ultrasound examination. Results. Standard sonography showed 26 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 2 partial tears (type B according to Snyder) and 12 intact rotator cuffs. Arthrosonography detected 31 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Arthroscopy identified 32 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Analysis of the results shows that, taking arthroscopy as the gold standard, the sensitivity of normal sonography is 81.2%, whereas that of arthosonography is 96.8% (p [it

  19. Diagnosis of rotator cuff tears using 3-Tesla MRI versus 3-Tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarvey, Ciaran; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian; Ajuied, Adil [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Health Partners, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Houghton, Russell [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Health Partners, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Corbett, Steven [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, King' s Health Partners, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Fortius Clinic, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 2-dimensional magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) and 3-dimensional isotropic MRA in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears when performed exclusively at 3-T. A systematic review was undertaken of the Cochrane, MEDLINE and PubMed databases in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Studies comparing 3-T MRI or 3-T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic surgical findings (reference test) were included. Methodological appraisal was performed using QUADAS 2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated and summary receiver-operating curves generated. Kappa coefficients quantified inter-observer reliability. Fourteen studies comprising 1332 patients were identified for inclusion. Twelve studies were retrospective and there were concerns regarding index test bias and applicability in nine and six studies respectively. Reference test bias was a concern in all studies. Both 3-T MRI and 3-T MRA showed similar excellent diagnostic accuracy for full-thickness supraspinatus tears. Concerning partial-thickness supraspinatus tears, 3-T 2D MRA was significantly more sensitive (86.6 vs. 80.5 %, p = 0.014) but significantly less specific (95.2 vs. 100 %, p < 0.001). There was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA showed similar accuracy to 3-T conventional 2D MRA. Three-Tesla MRI appeared equivalent to 3-T MRA in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness tears, although there was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA appears equivalent to 3-T 2D MRA for all types of tears. (orig.)

  20. Diagnosis of rotator cuff tears using 3-Tesla MRI versus 3-Tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarvey, Ciaran; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian; Ajuied, Adil; Houghton, Russell; Corbett, Steven

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 2-dimensional magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) and 3-dimensional isotropic MRA in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears when performed exclusively at 3-T. A systematic review was undertaken of the Cochrane, MEDLINE and PubMed databases in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Studies comparing 3-T MRI or 3-T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic surgical findings (reference test) were included. Methodological appraisal was performed using QUADAS 2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated and summary receiver-operating curves generated. Kappa coefficients quantified inter-observer reliability. Fourteen studies comprising 1332 patients were identified for inclusion. Twelve studies were retrospective and there were concerns regarding index test bias and applicability in nine and six studies respectively. Reference test bias was a concern in all studies. Both 3-T MRI and 3-T MRA showed similar excellent diagnostic accuracy for full-thickness supraspinatus tears. Concerning partial-thickness supraspinatus tears, 3-T 2D MRA was significantly more sensitive (86.6 vs. 80.5 %, p = 0.014) but significantly less specific (95.2 vs. 100 %, p < 0.001). There was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA showed similar accuracy to 3-T conventional 2D MRA. Three-Tesla MRI appeared equivalent to 3-T MRA in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness tears, although there was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA appears equivalent to 3-T 2D MRA for all types of tears. (orig.)

  1. Diagnosis of rotator cuff tears using 3-Tesla MRI versus 3-Tesla MRA: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Ciaran; Harb, Ziad; Smith, Christian; Houghton, Russell; Corbett, Steven; Ajuied, Adil

    2016-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 2-dimensional magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA) and 3-dimensional isotropic MRA in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears when performed exclusively at 3-T. A systematic review was undertaken of the Cochrane, MEDLINE and PubMed databases in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Studies comparing 3-T MRI or 3-T MRA (index tests) to arthroscopic surgical findings (reference test) were included. Methodological appraisal was performed using QUADAS 2. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated and summary receiver-operating curves generated. Kappa coefficients quantified inter-observer reliability. Fourteen studies comprising 1332 patients were identified for inclusion. Twelve studies were retrospective and there were concerns regarding index test bias and applicability in nine and six studies respectively. Reference test bias was a concern in all studies. Both 3-T MRI and 3-T MRA showed similar excellent diagnostic accuracy for full-thickness supraspinatus tears. Concerning partial-thickness supraspinatus tears, 3-T 2D MRA was significantly more sensitive (86.6 vs. 80.5 %, p = 0.014) but significantly less specific (95.2 vs. 100 %, p Tesla 3D isotropic MRA showed similar accuracy to 3-T conventional 2D MRA. Three-Tesla MRI appeared equivalent to 3-T MRA in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness tears, although there was a trend towards greater accuracy in the diagnosis of subscapularis tears with 3-T MRA. Three-Tesla 3D isotropic MRA appears equivalent to 3-T 2D MRA for all types of tears.

  2. Biomedical sensor for transcutaneous oxygen measurements using thick film technology

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Yu-Zhi (Liza)

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood is essential for the analysis of a patient's respiratory condition. There are several commercially available methods and systems to measure this parameter transcutaneously. However, they tend to be cumbersome and costly. To overcome the disadvantages presented, a new type of sensor for transcutaneous blood gas measurement was investigated, employing thick film technology, which is an excellent technique to produce sensors in ...

  3. Thick Filament Protein Network, Functions, and Disease Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Geist, Janelle; Grogan, Alyssa; Hu, Li-Yen R; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2018-03-13

    Sarcomeres consist of highly ordered arrays of thick myosin and thin actin filaments along with accessory proteins. Thick filaments occupy the center of sarcomeres where they partially overlap with thin filaments. The sliding of thick filaments past thin filaments is a highly regulated process that occurs in an ATP-dependent manner driving muscle contraction. In addition to myosin that makes up the backbone of the thick filament, four other proteins which are intimately bound to the thick filament, myosin binding protein-C, titin, myomesin, and obscurin play important structural and regulatory roles. Consistent with this, mutations in the respective genes have been associated with idiopathic and congenital forms of skeletal and cardiac myopathies. In this review, we aim to summarize our current knowledge on the molecular structure, subcellular localization, interacting partners, function, modulation via posttranslational modifications, and disease involvement of these five major proteins that comprise the thick filament of striated muscle cells. © 2018 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 8:631-709, 2018. Copyright © 2018 American Physiological Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic characterization through the thickness direction of a moving web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Theodore; Hall, Maclin S.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the caliper and/or the ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web of material using ultrasonic pulses generated by a rotatable wheel ultrasound apparatus. The apparatus includes a first liquid-filled tire and either a second liquid-filled tire forming a nip or a rotatable cylinder that supports a thin moving web of material such as a moving web of paper and forms a nip with the first liquid-filled tire. The components of ultrasonic transit time through the tires and fluid held within the tires may be resolved and separately employed to determine the separate contributions of the two tire thicknesses and the two fluid paths to the total path length that lies between two ultrasonic transducer surfaces contained within the tires in support of caliper measurements. The present invention provides the benefit of obtaining a transit time and caliper measurement at any point in time as a specimen passes through the nip of rotating tires and eliminates inaccuracies arising from nonuniform tire circumferential thickness by accurately retaining point-to-point specimen transit time and caliper variation information, rather than an average obtained through one or more tire rotations. Morever, ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web may be determined independent of small variations in the wheel axle spacing, tire thickness, and liquid and tire temperatures.

  5. Preliminary Test on Hydraulic Rotation Device for Neutron Transmutation Doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki-Jung; Kang, Han-Ok; Kim, Seong Hoon; Park, Cheol

    2014-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing a new Research Reactor (KJRR) which will be located at KIJANG in the south-eastern province of Korea. The KJRR will be mainly utilized for isotope production, NTD production, and the related research activities. During the NTD process, the irradiation rig containing the silicon ingot rotates at the constant speed to ensure precisely defined homogeneity of the irradiation. A new NTD Hydraulic Rotation Device (NTDHRD) is being developed to rotate the irradiation rigs at the required speed. In this study, the preliminary test and the analysis for the rotation characteristic of the NTDHRD, which is developed through the conceptual design, are described. A new NTD hydraulic rotation device is being developed for the purpose of application to the KIJANG research reactor (KJRR). The preliminary test and analysis for the rotation characteristic of the NTDHRD, which is developed through the conceptual design, are conducted in experimental apparatus. The film thickness by the thrust bearing is measured and the minimum required mass flow rate for stable rotation is determined

  6. Rotator Cuff Injuries - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Rotator Cuff Injuries URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Rotator Cuff Injuries - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  7. Asteroid rotation. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.; Young, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The results from the year 1979 of an ongoing program of asteroid photometry at Table Mountain Observatory are presented. The results for 53 asteroids are summarized in a table, showing the number, name, opposition date, taxonomic class, diameter, absolute magnitude, mean absolute magnitude at zero phase angle and values of the absolute magnitude and linear phase coefficient derived from it, the rotation period in hours, peak-to-peak amplitude of variation, difference between mean and maximum brightness, and reliability index. Another table presents data on aspect and comparison stars, including brightness and distance data. Reliable rotation periods are reported for 22 asteroids for which no previous values are known. For seven asteroids, periods are reported which are revisions of previously reported values

  8. Rotatable seal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibaldi, J.L.; Logan, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an oring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers

  9. Rotator cuff disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziatkin, M.B.; Iannotti, J.P.; Roberts, M.; Dalinka, M.K.; Esterhai, J.L.; Kressel, H.Y.; Lenkinski, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A dual-surface-coil array in a Helmholtz configuration was used to evaluate th rotator cuff in ten normal volunteers and 44 patients. Studies were performed with a General Electric 1.5-T MR imager. Thirty-two patients underwent surgery, 25 of whom also underwent arthrography. In comparison with surgery, MR imaging was more sensitive than arthrography for rotator cuff tears (91% vs 71%). The specificity and accuracy of MR imaging were 88% and 91%. The accuracy increased with use of an MR grading system. MR findings correlated with surgical findings with regard to the size and site of tears. MR findings of cuff tears were studied with multivariate analysis. Correlation was also found between a clinical score, the MR grade, and the clinical outcome

  10. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia, E-mail: maria.sanz@kcl.ac.uk; Cabezas, Carlos, E-mail: ccabezas@qf.uva.es; Mata, Santiago, E-mail: santiago.mata@uva.es; Alonso, Josè L., E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Parque Científico Uva, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  11. The Societal and Economic Value of Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Richard C.; Koenig, Lane; Acevedo, Daniel; Dall, Timothy M.; Gallo, Paul; Romeo, Anthony; Tongue, John; Williams, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although rotator cuff disease is a common musculoskeletal problem in the United States, the impact of this condition on earnings, missed workdays, and disability payments is largely unknown. This study examines the value of surgical treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tears from a societal perspective. Methods: A Markov decision model was constructed to estimate lifetime direct and indirect costs associated with surgical and continued nonoperative treatment for symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears. All patients were assumed to have been unresponsive to one six-week trial of nonoperative treatment prior to entering the model. Model assumptions were obtained from the literature and data analysis. We obtained estimates of indirect costs using national survey data and patient-reported outcomes. Four indirect costs were modeled: probability of employment, household income, missed workdays, and disability payments. Direct cost estimates were based on average Medicare reimbursements with adjustments to an all-payer population. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results: The age-weighted mean total societal savings from rotator cuff repair compared with nonoperative treatment was $13,771 over a patient’s lifetime. Savings ranged from $77,662 for patients who are thirty to thirty-nine years old to a net cost to society of $11,997 for those who are seventy to seventy-nine years old. In addition, surgical treatment results in an average improvement of 0.62 QALY. Societal savings were highly sensitive to age, with savings being positive at the age of sixty-one years and younger. The estimated lifetime societal savings of the approximately 250,000 rotator cuff repairs performed in the U.S. each year was $3.44 billion. Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears produces net societal cost savings for patients under the age of sixty-one years and greater QALYs for all patients. Rotator cuff repair is cost

  12. Applicability of spectral indices on thickness identification of oil slick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yanfei; Shen, Yonglin; Chen, Qihao; Liu, Xiuguo

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing technology has played a vital role in the identification and monitoring of oil spill events, and amount of spectral indices have been developed. In this paper, the applicability of six frequently-used indices is analyzed, and a combination of spectral indices in aids of support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is used to identify the oil slicks and corresponding thickness. The six spectral indices are spectral rotation (SR), spectral absorption depth (HI), band ratio of blue and green (BG), band ratio of BG and shortwave infrared index (BGN), 555nm and 645nm normalized by the blue band index (NB) and spectral slope (ND). The experimental study is conducted in the Gulf of Mexico oil spill zone, with Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) hyperspectral imagery captured in May 17, 2010. The results show that SR index is the best in all six indices, which can effectively distinguish the thickness of the oil slick and identify it from seawater; HI index and ND index can obviously distinguish oil slick thickness; BG, BGN and NB are more suitable to identify oil slick from seawater. With the comparison among different kernel functions of SVM, the classify accuracy show that the polynomial and RBF kernel functions have the best effect on the separation of oil slick thickness and the relatively pure seawater. The applicability of spectral indices of oil slick and the method of oil film thickness identification will in aids of oil/gas exploration and oil spill monitoring.

  13. Rotator cuff tendon connections with the rotator cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahu, Madis; Kolts, Ivo; Põldoja, Elle; Kask, Kristo

    2017-07-01

    The literature currently contains no descriptions of the rotator cuff tendons, which also describes in relation to the presence and characteristics of the rotator cable (anatomically known as the ligamentum semicirculare humeri). The aim of the current study was to elucidate the detailed anatomy of the rotator cuff tendons in association with the rotator cable. Anatomic dissection was performed on 21 fresh-frozen shoulder specimens with an average age of 68 years. The rotator cuff tendons were dissected from each other and from the glenohumeral joint capsule, and the superior glenohumeral, coracohumeral, coracoglenoidal and semicircular (rotator cable) ligaments were dissected. Dissection was performed layer by layer and from the bursal side to the joint. All ligaments and tendons were dissected in fine detail. The rotator cable was found in all specimens. It was tightly connected to the supraspinatus (SSP) tendon, which was partly covered by the infraspinatus (ISP) tendon. The posterior insertion area of the rotator cable was located in the region between the middle and inferior facets of the greater tubercle of the humerus insertion areas for the teres minor (TM), and ISP tendons were also present and fibres from the SSP extended through the rotator cable to those areas. The connection between the rotator cable and rotator cuff tendons is tight and confirms the suspension bridge theory for rotator cuff tears in most areas between the SSP tendons and rotator cable. In its posterior insertion area, the rotator cable is a connecting structure between the TM, ISP and SSP tendons. These findings might explain why some patients with relatively large rotator cuff tears can maintain seamless shoulder function.

  14. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  15. The rotational spectrum of IBr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiemann, E.; Moeller, T.

    1975-01-01

    The microwave spectrum of IBr was measured in the low rotational transition J = 3 → 2 in order to resolve the hyperfine structure as completely as possible. Rotational constants and quadrupole coupling constants were derived for both nuclei. The observation of the rotational spectrum in different vibrational states yields the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants as well as of the hyperfine parameters. The Dunham potential coefficients α 0 , α 1 , α 2 , α 3 are given. (orig.) [de

  16. Partially composite Higgs models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanne, Tommi; Buarque Franzosi, Diogo; Frandsen, Mads T.

    2018-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of partially composite-Higgs models where electroweak symmetry breaking is dynamically induced, and the Higgs is a mixture of a composite and an elementary state. The models considered have explicit realizations in terms of gauge-Yukawa theories with new strongly...... interacting fermions coupled to elementary scalars and allow for a very SM-like Higgs state. We study constraints on their parameter spaces from vacuum stability and perturbativity as well as from LHC results and find that requiring vacuum stability up to the compositeness scale already imposes relevant...... constraints. A small part of parameter space around the classically conformal limit is stable up to the Planck scale. This is however already strongly disfavored by LHC results. in different limits, the models realize both (partially) composite-Higgs and (bosonic) technicolor models and a dynamical extension...

  17. Photogenic partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, M J; Binnie, C D

    2000-01-01

    To establish the incidence and symptoms of partial seizures in a cohort of patients investigated on account of known sensitivity to intermittent photic stimulation and/or precipitation of seizures by environmental visual stimuli such as television (TV) screens or computer monitors. We report 43 consecutive patients with epilepsy, who had exhibited a significant EEG photoparoxysmal response or who had seizures precipitated by environmental visual stimuli and underwent detailed assessment of their photosensitivity in the EEG laboratory, during which all were questioned concerning their ictal symptoms. All patients were considered on clinical grounds to have an idiopathic epilepsy syndrome. Twenty-eight (65%) patients reported visually precipitated attacks occurring initially with maintained consciousness, in some instances evolving to a period of confusion or to a secondarily generalized seizure. Visual symptoms were most commonly reported and included positive symptoms such as coloured circles or spots, but also blindness and subjective symptoms such as "eyes going funny." Other symptoms described included nonspecific cephalic sensations, deja-vu, auditory hallucinations, nausea, and vomiting. No patient reported any clear spontaneous partial seizures, and there were no grounds for supposing that any had partial epilepsy excepting the ictal phenomenology of some or all of the visually induced attacks. These findings provide clinical support for the physiological studies that indicate that the trigger mechanism for human photosensitivity involves binocularly innervated cells located in the visual cortex. Thus the visual cortex is the seat of the primary epileptogenic process, and the photically triggered discharges and seizures may be regarded as partial with secondary generalization.

  18. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  19. Hierarchical partial order ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritisation of polluted sites is given. - Hierarchical partial order ranking of polluted sites has been developed for prioritization based on a large number of parameters

  20. Minimum weight design of inhomogeneous rotating discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahed, Hamid; Farshi, Behrooz; Bidabadi, Jalal

    2005-01-01

    There are numerous applications for gas turbine discs in the aerospace industry such as in turbojet engines. These discs normally work under high temperatures while subjected to high angular velocities. Minimizing the weight of such items in aerospace applications results in benefits such as low dead weights and lower costs. High speed of rotation causes large centrifugal forces in a disc and simultaneous application of high temperatures reduces disc material strength. Thus, the latter effects tend to increase deformations of the disc under the applied loads. In order to obtain a reliable disc analysis and arrive at the corresponding correct stress distribution, solutions should consider changes in material properties due to the temperature field throughout the disc. To achieve this goal, an inhomogeneous disc model with variable thickness is considered. Using the variable material properties method, stresses are obtained for the disc under rotation and a steady temperature field. In this paper this is done by modelling the rotating disc as a series of rings of different but constant properties. The optimum disc profile is arrived at by sequentially proportioning the thicknesses of each ring to satisfy the stress requirements. This method vis-a-vis a mathematical programming procedure for optimization shows several advantages. Firstly, it is simple iterative proportioning in each design cycle not requiring involved mathematical operations. Secondly, due to its simplicity it alleviates the necessity of certain simplifications that are common in so-called rigorous mathematical procedures. The results obtained, compared to those published in the literature show agreement and superiority. A further advantage of the proposed method is the independence of the end results from the initially assumed point in the iterative design routine, unlike most methods published so far

  1. Stock Selection, Style Rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, A.; van Dijk, R.; Prof. Kloek, T.

    2002-01-01

    Using US data from June 1984 to July 1999, we show that the impact of firm-specific characteristics like size and book-to-price on future excess stock returns varies considerably over time. The impact can be either positive or negative at different times. This time variation is partially

  2. Are galaxy discs optically thick?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, Michael; Davies, Jonathan; Phillipps, Steven

    1989-01-01

    We re-examine the classical optical evidence for the low optical depths traditionally assigned to spiral discs and argue that it is highly model-dependent and unconvincing. In particular, layered models with a physically thin but optically thick dust layer behave like optically thin discs. The opposite hypotheses, that such discs are optically thick is then examined in the light of modern evidence. We find it to be consistent with the near-infrared and IRAS observations, with the surface brightnesses, with the HI and CO column densities and with the Hα measurements. (author)

  3. Numerical simulation of VAWT on the effects of rotation cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shuda; Cao, Yang; Ren, Fuji

    2017-06-01

    Based on Finite Element Analysis Method, studying on Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) which is added rotating cylinder in front of its air foils, especially focusing on the analysis of NACA6 series air foils about variation of lift to drag ratio. Choosing the most suitable blades with rotary cylinder added on leading edge. Analysis indicates that the front rotating cylinders on the VAWT is benefit to lift rise and drag fall. The most suitable air foil whose design lift coefficient is 0.8, the blades relative thickness is 20%, and the optimistic tip speed ratio is about 7.

  4. Contribution to the study of rotating disc induced MHD flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, P.

    1983-01-01

    Influence of a magnetic field on electroconductor viscous fluid flow generated by disks in rotation is studied here. Flow in rectilinear conduct is first studied, together with velocity, force and current line repartition. Then a case more general is dealt with a toroidal conduct with disk drive. The influence of electric conductivity and of the thickness of the mobile disk are detailed. Couple study leads to think to a transmission by fluid variable by magnetic field variations. At last, a radial flow with a source in the middle of it is studied with a disk rotation. Analysis of velocity and pressure evolution shows a pump effect [fr

  5. CISM Course on Rotating Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents a comprehensive overview of rotation effects on fluid behavior, emphasizing non-linear processes. The subject is introduced by giving a range of examples of rotating fluids encountered in geophysics and engineering. This is then followed by a discussion of the relevant scales and parameters of rotating flow, and an introduction to geostrophic balance and vorticity concepts. There are few books on rotating fluids and this volume is, therefore, a welcome addition. It is the first volume which contains a unified view of turbulence in rotating fluids, instability and vortex dynamics. Some aspects of wave motions covered here are not found elsewhere.

  6. COMMISSIONING SPIN ROTATORS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKAY, W.W.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; COURANT, E.D.; FISCHER, W.; HUANG, H.; LUCCIO, A.; MONTAG, C.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VANZIEJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, eight superconducting helical spin rotators were installed into RHIC in order to control the polarization directions independently at the STAR and PHENIX experiments. Without the rotators, the orientation of polarization at the interaction points would only be vertical. With four rotators around each of the two experiments, we can rotate either or both beams from vertical into the horizontal plane through the interaction region and then back to vertical on the other side. This allows independent control for each beam with vertical, longitudinal, or radial polarization at the experiment. In this paper, we present results from the first run using the new spin rotators at PHENIX

  7. Quantitative assessment of fatty infiltration and muscle volume of the rotator cuff muscles using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Noboru; Oguro, Sota; Okuda, Shigeo; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Nagura, Takeo

    2017-10-01

    In patients with rotator cuff tears, muscle degeneration is known to be a predictor of irreparable tears and poor outcomes after surgical repair. Fatty infiltration and volume of the whole muscles constituting the rotator cuff were quantitatively assessed using 3-dimensional 2-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging. Ten shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, 10 shoulders with an isolated supraspinatus tear, and 10 shoulders with a massive tear involving supraspinatus and infraspinatus were compared with 10 control shoulders after matching age and sex. With segmentation of muscle boundaries, the fat fraction value and the volume of the whole rotator cuff muscles were computed. After reliabilities were determined, differences in fat fraction, muscle volume, and fat-free muscle volume were evaluated. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliabilities were regarded as excellent for fat fraction and muscle volume. Tendon rupture adversely increased the fat fraction value of the respective rotator cuff muscle (P tear group, muscle volume was significantly decreased in the infraspinatus (P = .035) and increased in the teres minor (P = .039). With subtraction of fat volume, a significant decrease of fat-free volume of the supraspinatus muscle became apparent with a massive tear (P = .003). Three-dimensional measurement could evaluate fatty infiltration and muscular volume with excellent reliabilities. The present study showed that chronic rupture of the tendon adversely increases the fat fraction of the respective muscle and indicates that the residual capacity of the rotator cuff muscles might be overestimated in patients with severe fatty infiltration. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Research on Free Vibration Frequency Characteristics of Rotating Functionally Graded Material Truncated Conical Shells with Eccentric Functionally Graded Material Stringer and Ring Stiffeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Van Dung

    Full Text Available Abstract In this research work, an exact analytical solution for frequency characteristics of the free vibration of rotating functionally graded material (FGM truncated conical shells reinforced by eccentric FGM stringers and rings has been investigated by the displacement function method. Material properties of shell and stiffeners are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction according to a simple power law distribution. The change of spacing between stringers is considered. Using the Donnell shell theory, Leckhnisky smeared stiffeners technique and taking into account the influences of centrifugal force and Coriolis acceleration the governing equations are derived. For stiffened FGM conical shells, it is difficult that free vibration equations are a couple set of three variable coefficient partial differential equations. By suitable transformations and applying Galerkin method, this difficulty is overcome in the paper. The sixth order polynomial equation for w is obtained and it is used to analyze the frequency characteristics of rotating ES-FGM conical shells. Effects of stiffener, geometrics parameters, cone angle, vibration modes and rotating speed on frequency characteristics of the shell forward and backward wave are discussed in detail. The present approach proves to be reliable and accurate by comparing with published results available in the literature.

  9. macula: Rotational modulations in the photometry of spotted stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Photometric rotational modulations due to starspots remain the most common and accessible way to study stellar activity. Modelling rotational modulations allows one to invert the observations into several basic parameters, such as the rotation period, spot coverage, stellar inclination and differential rotation rate. The most widely used analytic model for this inversion comes from Budding (1977) and Dorren (1987), who considered circular, grey starspots for a linearly limb darkened star. That model is extended to be more suitable in the analysis of high precision photometry such as that by Kepler. Macula, a Fortran 90 code, provides several improvements, such as non-linear limb darkening of the star and spot, a single-domain analytic function, partial derivatives for all input parameters, temporal partial derivatives, diluted light compensation, instrumental offset normalisations, differential rotation, starspot evolution and predictions of transit depth variations due to unocculted spots. The inclusion of non-linear limb darkening means macula has a maximum photometric error an order-of-magnitude less than that of Dorren (1987) for Sun-like stars observed in the Kepler-bandpass. The code executes three orders-of-magnitude faster than comparable numerical codes making it well-suited for inference problems.

  10. [Endoscopic full-thickness resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, B; Schmidt, A; Caca, K

    2016-08-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are powerful tools for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms. However, those techniques are limited to the superficial layers of the GI wall (mucosa and submucosa). Lesions without lifting sign (usually arising from deeper layers) or lesions in difficult anatomic positions (appendix, diverticulum) are difficult - if not impossible - to resect using conventional techniques, due to the increased risk of complications. For larger lesions (>2 cm), ESD appears to be superior to the conventional techniques because of the en bloc resection, but the procedure is technically challenging, time consuming, and associated with complications even in experienced hands. Since the development of the over-the-scope clips (OTSC), complications like bleeding or perforation can be endoscopically better managed. In recent years, different endoscopic full-thickness resection techniques came to the focus of interventional endoscopy. Since September 2014, the full-thickness resection device (FTRD) has the CE marking in Europe for full-thickness resection in the lower GI tract. Technically the device is based on the OTSC system and combines OTSC application and snare polypectomy in one step. This study shows all full-thickness resection techniques currently available, but clearly focuses on the experience with the FTRD in the lower GI tract.

  11. Partially ordered algebraic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Originally published in an important series of books on pure and applied mathematics, this monograph by a distinguished mathematician explores a high-level area in algebra. It constitutes the first systematic summary of research concerning partially ordered groups, semigroups, rings, and fields. The self-contained treatment features numerous problems, complete proofs, a detailed bibliography, and indexes. It presumes some knowledge of abstract algebra, providing necessary background and references where appropriate. This inexpensive edition of a hard-to-find systematic survey will fill a gap i

  12. Infinite partial summations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, D.W.L.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is a brief review of those aspects of the effective interaction problem that can be grouped under the heading of infinite partial summations of the perturbation series. After a brief mention of the classic examples of infinite summations, the author turns to the effective interaction problem for two extra core particles. Their direct interaction is summed to produce the G matrix, while their indirect interaction through the core is summed in a variety of ways under the heading of core polarization. (orig./WL) [de

  13. On universal partial words

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Herman Z. Q.; Kitaev, Sergey; Mütze, Torsten; Sun, Brian Y.

    2016-01-01

    A universal word for a finite alphabet $A$ and some integer $n\\geq 1$ is a word over $A$ such that every word in $A^n$ appears exactly once as a subword (cyclically or linearly). It is well-known and easy to prove that universal words exist for any $A$ and $n$. In this work we initiate the systematic study of universal partial words. These are words that in addition to the letters from $A$ may contain an arbitrary number of occurrences of a special `joker' symbol $\\Diamond\

  14. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovich, M S

    2002-01-01

    Mark Vishik's Partial Differential Equations seminar held at Moscow State University was one of the world's leading seminars in PDEs for over 40 years. This book celebrates Vishik's eightieth birthday. It comprises new results and survey papers written by many renowned specialists who actively participated over the years in Vishik's seminars. Contributions include original developments and methods in PDEs and related fields, such as mathematical physics, tomography, and symplectic geometry. Papers discuss linear and nonlinear equations, particularly linear elliptic problems in angles and gener

  15. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, Harold

    1997-01-01

    The subject matter, partial differential equations (PDEs), has a long history (dating from the 18th century) and an active contemporary phase. An early phase (with a separate focus on taut string vibrations and heat flow through solid bodies) stimulated developments of great importance for mathematical analysis, such as a wider concept of functions and integration and the existence of trigonometric or Fourier series representations. The direct relevance of PDEs to all manner of mathematical, physical and technical problems continues. This book presents a reasonably broad introductory account of the subject, with due regard for analytical detail, applications and historical matters.

  16. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sloan, D; Süli, E

    2001-01-01

    /homepage/sac/cam/na2000/index.html7-Volume Set now available at special set price ! Over the second half of the 20th century the subject area loosely referred to as numerical analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs) has undergone unprecedented development. At its practical end, the vigorous growth and steady diversification of the field were stimulated by the demand for accurate and reliable tools for computational modelling in physical sciences and engineering, and by the rapid development of computer hardware and architecture. At the more theoretical end, the analytical insight in

  17. Elliptic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Elliptic Partial Differential Equations by Qing Han and FangHua Lin is one of the best textbooks I know. It is the perfect introduction to PDE. In 150 pages or so it covers an amazing amount of wonderful and extraordinary useful material. I have used it as a textbook at both graduate and undergraduate levels which is possible since it only requires very little background material yet it covers an enormous amount of material. In my opinion it is a must read for all interested in analysis and geometry, and for all of my own PhD students it is indeed just that. I cannot say enough good things abo

  18. Generalized Partial Volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Sporring, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV). Their theoret...... of view as well as w.r.t. computational complexity. Finally, we present algorithms for both approaches for NMI which is comparable in speed to Sum of Squared Differences (SSD), and we illustrate the differences between PW and GPV on a number of registration examples....

  19. CONFERENCE: Muon spin rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Erik

    1986-11-15

    An international physics conference centred on muons without a word about leptons, weak interactions, EMC effects, exotic decay modes or any other standard high energy physics jargon. Could such a thing even have been imagined ten years ago? Yet about 120 physicists and chemists from 16 nations gathered at the end of June in Uppsala (Sweden) for their fourth meeting on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance, without worrying about the muon as an elementary particle. This reflects how the experimental techniques based on the muon spin interactions have reached maturity and are widely recognized by condensed matter physicists and specialized chemists as useful tools.

  20. Autonomous quantum rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Imparato, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    to a directed rotary motion. At variance with the classical case, the thermal fluctuations in the baths give rise to a non-vanishing average torque contribution; this is a genuine quantum effect akin to the Casimir effect. In the steady state the heat current flowing between the two baths is systematically......, the rotator cannot work either as a heat pump or as a heat engine. We finally use our exact results to extend an ab initio quantum simulation algorithm to the out-of-equilibrium regime. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2018...

  1. Rotating specimen rack repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.E.; Rogers, P.J.; Nabor, W.G.; Bair, H.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980, an operator at the UCI TRIGA Reactor noticed difficulties with the rotation of the specimen rack. Investigations showed that the drive bearing in the rack had failed and allowed the bearings to enter the rack. After some time of operation in static mode it was decided that installation of a bearing substitute - a graphite sleeve - would be undertaken. Procedures were written and approved for removal of the rack, fabrication and installation of the sleeve, and re-installation of the rack. This paper describes these procedures in some detail. Detailed drawings of the necessary parts may be obtained from the authors

  2. Rotational anomalies without anyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    A specific field theory is proposed in two spatial dimensions which has anomalous rotational properties. Although this might be expected to lead to a concrete realization of what Wilczek refers to as the anyon, it is shown by utilizing the transformation properties of the system and the statistics of the underlying charge fields that anyonic interpolations between bosons and fermions do not occur. This leads to the suggestion that anyons inferred from semiclassical considerations will not survive the transition to a fully relativistic field theory

  3. Rotating electrical machines

    CERN Document Server

    Le Doeuff, René

    2013-01-01

    In this book a general matrix-based approach to modeling electrical machines is promulgated. The model uses instantaneous quantities for key variables and enables the user to easily take into account associations between rotating machines and static converters (such as in variable speed drives).   General equations of electromechanical energy conversion are established early in the treatment of the topic and then applied to synchronous, induction and DC machines. The primary characteristics of these machines are established for steady state behavior as well as for variable speed scenarios. I

  4. Gammatography of thick lead vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, V.M.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Sundaram, V.M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiography, scintillation and GM counting and dose measurements using ionisation chamber equipment are commonly used for detecting flaws/voids in materials. The first method is mostly used for steel vessels and to a lesser extent thin lead vessels also and is essentially qualitative. Dose measuring techniques are used for very thick and large lead vessels for which high strength radioactive sources are required, with its inherent handling problems. For vessels of intermediate thicknesses, it is ideal to use a small strength source and a GM or scintillation counter assembly. At the Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam, such a system was used for checking three lead vessels of thicknesses varying from 38mm to 65mm. The tolerances specified were +- 4% variation in lead thickness. The measurements also revealed the non concentricity of one vessel which had a thickness varying from 38mm to 44mm. The second vessel was patently non-concentric and the dimensional variation was truly reproduced in the measurements. A third vessel was fabricated with careful control of dimensions and the measurements exhibited good concentricity. Small deviations were observed, attributable to imperfect bondings between steel and lead. This technique has the following advantages: (a) weaker sources used result in less handling problems reducing the personnel exposures considerably; (b) the sensitivity of the instrument is quite good because of better statistics; (c) the time required for scanning a small vessel is more, but a judicious use of a scintillometer for initial fast scan will help in reducing the total scanning time; (d) this method can take advantage of the dimensional variations themselves to get the calibration and to estimate the deviations from specified tolerances. (auth.)

  5. Thick resist for MEMS processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joe; Hamel, Clifford

    2001-11-01

    The need for technical innovation is always present in today's economy. Microfabrication methods have evolved in support of the demand for smaller and faster integrated circuits with price performance improvements always in the scope of the manufacturing design engineer. The dispersion of processing technology spans well beyond IC fabrication today with batch fabrication and wafer scale processing lending advantages to MEMES applications from biotechnology to consumer electronics from oil exploration to aerospace. Today the demand for innovative processing techniques that enable technology is apparent where only a few years ago appeared too costly or not reliable. In high volume applications where yield and cost improvements are measured in fractions of a percent it is imperative to have process technologies that produce consistent results. Only a few years ago thick resist coatings were limited to thickness less than 20 microns. Factors such as uniformity, edge bead and multiple coatings made high volume production impossible. New developments in photoresist formulation combined with advanced coating equipment techniques that closely controls process parameters have enable thick photoresist coatings of 70 microns with acceptable uniformity and edge bead in one pass. Packaging of microelectronic and micromechanical devices is often a significant cost factor and a reliability issue for high volume low cost production. Technologies such as flip- chip assembly provide a solution for cost and reliability improvements over wire bond techniques. The processing for such technology demands dimensional control and presents a significant cost savings if it were compatible with mainstream technologies. Thick photoresist layers, with good sidewall control would allow wafer-bumping technologies to penetrate the barriers to yield and production where costs for technology are the overriding issue. Single pass processing is paramount to the manufacturability of packaging

  6. Not all ultrasounds are created equal: general sonography versus musculoskeletal sonography in the detection of rotator cuff tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brandi; Twibill, Kristen; Lam, Patrick; Hackett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional analytic diagnostic accuracy study was designed to compare the accuracy of ultrasound performed by general sonographers in local radiology practices with ultrasound performed by an experienced musculoskeletal sonographer for the detection of rotator cuff tears. Methods In total, 238 patients undergoing arthroscopy who had previously had an ultrasound performed by both a general sonographer and a specialist musculoskeletal sonographer made up the study cohort. Accuracy of diagnosis was compared with the findings at arthroscopy. Results When analyzed as all tears versus no tears, musculoskeletal sonography had an accuracy of 97%, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 95%, whereas general sonography had an accuracy of 91%, a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 86%. When the partial tears were split with those ≥ 50% thickness in the tear group and those tear group, musculoskeletal sonography had an accuracy of 97%, a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% and general sonography had an accuracy of 85%, a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 87%. Conclusions Ultrasound in the hands of an experienced musculoskeletal sonographer is highly accurate for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. General sonography has improved subsequent to earlier studies but remains inferior to an ultrasound performed by a musculoskeletal sonographer. PMID:27660657

  7. MRI analysis of the rotator cuff pathology a new classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavernier, T.; Lapra, C.; Bochu, M.; Walch, G.; Noel, E.

    1995-01-01

    The different classifications use for the rotator cuff pathology seem to be incomplete. We propose a new classification with many advantages: (1) Differentiate the tendinopathy between less serious (grade 2A) and serious (grade 2B). (2) Recognize the intra-tendinous cleavage of the infra-spinatus associated with complete tear of the supra-spinatus. (3) Differentiate partial and complete tears of the supra-spinatus. We established this classification after a retrospective study of 42 patients operated on for a rotator cuff pathology. Every case had had a preoperative MRI. This classification is simple, especially for the associated intra tendinous cleavage. (authors). 24 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  8. PD-pulse characteristics in rotating machine insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim; Henriksen, Mogens; Jensen, A

    1994-01-01

    In this paper results are presented from investigations on partial discharges (PD) in insulation systems, resembling the stator insulation in high voltage rotating machines. A model, simulating a stator winding in a slot, has been developed, consisting of simple rotating machine insulation test...... bars with epoxy/mica insulation, mounted between steel sheets forming a dot, in order to investigate the fundamental behaviour of PD in insulation defects in epoxy/mica insulation and the characteristics of the resulting electrical pulses. Stator slot couplers (SSC) were used to detect pulses coming...

  9. Experimental analysis of flow structure in contra-rotating axial flow pump designed with different rotational speed concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Linlin; Watanabe, Satoshi; Imanishi, Toshiki; Yoshimura, Hiroaki; Furukawa, Akinori

    2013-08-01

    As a high specific speed pump, the contra-rotating axial flow pump distinguishes itself in a rear rotor rotating in the opposite direction of the front rotor, which remarkably contributes to the energy conversion, the reduction of the pump size, better hydraulic and cavitation performances. However, with two rotors rotating reversely, the significant interaction between blade rows was observed in our prototype contra-rotating rotors, which highly affected the pump performance compared with the conventional axial flow pumps. Consequently, a new type of rear rotor was designed by the rotational speed optimization methodology with some additional considerations, aiming at better cavitation performance, the reduction of blade rows interaction and the secondary flow suppression. The new rear rotor showed a satisfactory performance at the design flow rate but an unfavorable positive slope of the head — flow rate curve in the partial flow rate range less than 40% of the design flow rate, which should be avoided for the reliability of pump-pipe systems. In the present research, to understand the internal flow field of new rear rotor and its relation to the performances at the partial flow rates, the velocity distributions at the inlets and outlets of the rotors are firstly investigated. Then, the boundary layer flows on rotor surfaces, which clearly reflect the secondary flow inside the rotors, are analyzed through the limiting streamline observations using the multi-color oil-film method. Finally, the unsteady numerical simulations are carried out to understand the complicated internal flow structures in the rotors.

  10. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  11. Analytical solutions to orthotropic variable thickness disk problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet N. ERASLAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model is developed to estimate the mechanical response of nonisothermal, orthotropic, variable thickness disks under a variety of boundary conditions. Combining basic mechanical equations of disk geometry with the equations of orthotropic material, the elastic equation of the disk is obtained. This equation is transformed into a standard hypergeometric differential equation by means of a suitable transformation. An analytical solution is then obtained in terms of hypergeometric functions. The boundary conditions used to complete the solutions simulate rotating annular disks with two free surfaces, stationary annular disks with pressurized inner and free outer surfaces, and free inner and pressurized outer surfaces. The results of the solutions to each of these cases are presented in graphical forms. It is observed that, for the three cases investigated the elastic orthotropy parameter turns out to be an important parameter affecting the elastic behaviorKeywords: Orthotropic disk, Variable thickness, Thermoelasticity, Hypergeometric equation

  12. Evaluation of Repair Tension in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Does It Really Matter to the Integrity of the Rotator Cuff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Hoon; Jang, Young Hoon; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Hwa-Ryeong; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Repair tension of a torn rotator cuff can affect healing after repair. However, a measurement of the actual tension during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not feasible. The relationship between repair tension and healing of a rotator cuff repair remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repair tension on healing at the repair site. The hypothesis was that repair tension would be a major factor in determining the anatomic outcome of rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs (132 patients) for full-thickness rotator cuff tears were analyzed. An intraoperative model was designed for the estimation of repair tension using a tensiometer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed approximately 1 year (mean [±SD], 12.7 ± 3.2 months) postoperatively for the evaluation of healing at the repair site. Multivariable analysis was performed for tear size, amount of retraction, and fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles. The mean repair tension measured during the arthroscopic procedure was 28.5 ± 23.1 N. There was a statistically significant correlation between tension and tear size (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC], 0.529; P repair tension also showed a significant inverse correlation with healing at the repair site (SCC, 0.195; P = .025). However, when sex, age, tear size, amount of retraction, tendon quality, and FD of rotator cuff muscles were included for multivariable logistic regression analysis, only FD of the infraspinatus showed an association with the anatomic outcome of repair (Exp(B) = 0.596; P = .010). Our intraoperative model for the estimation of rotator cuff repair tension showed an inverse correlation of repair tension with healing at the repair site, suggesting that complete healing is less likely with high-tension repairs. A significant association was observed on MRI between a high level of FD of the infraspinatus and repaired tendon integrity. © 2016

  13. Tutorial on Online Partial Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Cook

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short tutorial introduction to online partial evaluation. We show how to write a simple online partial evaluator for a simple, pure, first-order, functional programming language. In particular, we show that the partial evaluator can be derived as a variation on a compositionally defined interpreter. We demonstrate the use of the resulting partial evaluator for program optimization in the context of model-driven development.

  14. The value of clinical tests in acute full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Klaus; Sørensen, Anne Kathrine Belling; Jørgensen, Uffe Viegh

    2010-01-01

    Early repair of rotator cuff tears leads to superior results. To detect symptomatic full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon at an early stage, we conducted a prospective study to evaluate the value of clinical examination with and without subacromial lidocaine within the first weeks after...

  15. Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Type-directed partial evaluation uses a normalization function to achieve partial evaluation. These lecture notes review its background, foundations, practice, and applications. Of specific interest is the modular technique of offline and online type-directed partial evaluation in Standard ML...

  16. Type-Directed Partial Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    1998-01-01

    Type-directed partial evaluation uses a normalization function to achieve partial evaluation. These lecture notes review its background, foundations, practice, and applications. Of specific interest is the modular technique of offline and online type-directed partial evaluation in Standard ML of ...

  17. Economical Fabrication of Thick-Section Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Jason; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian; Benander, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for producing thick-section [>2 in. (approx.5 cm)], continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Ultramet-modified fiber interface coating and melt infiltration processing, developed previously for thin-section components, were used for the fabrication of CMCs that were an order of magnitude greater in thickness [up to 2.5 in. (approx.6.4 cm)]. Melt processing first involves infiltration of a fiber preform with the desired interface coating, and then with carbon to partially densify the preform. A molten refractory metal is then infiltrated and reacts with the excess carbon to form the carbide matrix without damaging the fiber reinforcement. Infiltration occurs from the inside out as the molten metal fills virtually all the available void space. Densification to thick-section components required modification of the conventional process conditions, and the means by which the large amount of molten metal is introduced into the fiber preform. Modification of the low-temperature, ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process used to apply interface coatings to the fiber preform was also required to accommodate the high preform thickness. The thick-section CMC processing developed in this work proved to be invaluable for component development, fabrication, and testing in two complementary efforts. In a project for the Army, involving SiC/SiC blisk development, nominally 0.8 in. thick x 8 in. diameter (approx. 2 cm thick x 20 cm diameter) components were successfully infiltrated. Blisk hubs were machined using diamond-embedded cutting tools and successfully spin-tested. Good ply uniformity and extremely low residual porosity (41 ksi (approx. 283 MPa) flexural strength.

  18. Relativistic thick discs in the Kerr-de Sitter backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slany, Petr; StuchlIk, Zdenek

    2005-01-01

    Perfect fluid tori with a uniform distribution of the specific angular momentum, l(r, θ) = const, orbiting the Kerr-de Sitter black holes or naked singularities are studied. It is well known that the structure of equipotential surfaces of such marginally stable tori reflects the basic properties of any tori with a general distribution of the specific angular momentum. Closed equipotential surfaces corresponding to stationary thick discs are allowed only in the spacetimes admitting stable circular geodesics. The last closed surface crosses itself in the cusp(s) enabling the outflow of matter from the torus due to the violation of hydrostatic equilibrium. The inner cusp enables an accretion onto the central object. The influence of the repulsive cosmological constant, Λ > 0, on the equipotential surfaces lies in the existence of the outer cusp (with a stabilizing effect on the thick discs) and in the strong collimation of open equipotential surfaces along the rotational axis. Both the effects take place near a so-called static radius where the gravitational attraction is just balanced by the cosmic repulsion. The outer cusp enables excretion, i.e., the outflow of matter from the torus into the outer space. The plus-family discs (which are always co-rotating in the black-hole backgrounds but can be counter-rotating, even with negative energy of the fluid elements, in some naked-singularity backgrounds) are thicker and more extended than the minus-family ones (which are always counter-rotating in all backgrounds). For co-rotating discs in the naked-singularity spacetimes, the potential well between the centre of the disc and its edges at the cusps is usually much higher than in the black-hole spacetimes. If the parameters of naked-singularity spacetimes are very close to the parameters of extreme black-hole spacetimes, the family of possible disc-like configurations includes members with two isolated discs where the inner one is always a counter-rotating accretion

  19. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Flynn, R; Kim, Y [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  20. Return to Sport After Rotator Cuff Tear Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, Shahnaz; Lefevre, Nicolas; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Bohu, Yoann

    2016-07-01

    One of the most frequent demands from athletes after rotator cuff tear repair is to return to sport, if possible at the same level of play. The main goal of this study was to determine the rate of return to sport after treatment of rotator cuff tears. Meta-analysis and systematic review. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were followed to perform this systematic review and meta-analysis of the results in the literature, as well as for the presentation of results. A search of the literature was performed on the electronic databases MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the MINORS (Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies) checklist. Inclusion criteria were studies in English evaluating return to sport after treatment of traumatic, degenerative, partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears in patients practicing a sport regularly, whatever the level, all ages and sports included. The main judgment criterion was the number of patients who returned to a sports activity after treatment of a rotator cuff tear. The criterion was analyzed in 2 ways: return to sport (yes/no) and the level of play (identical or higher/lower level). Twenty-five studies were reviewed, including 859 patients (683 athletes), all treated surgically after a mean follow-up of 3.4 years (range, 0.3-13.4 years). The level of sports was recorded in 23 studies or 635 (93%) athletes and included 286 competitive or professional athletes and 349 recreational athletes. The most commonly practiced sports were baseball (224 participants), tennis (104 participants), and golf (54 participants). The overall rate of return to sport was 84.7% (95% CI, 77.6%-89.8%), including 65.9% (95% CI, 54.9%-75.4%) at an equivalent level of play, after 4 to 17 months. Of the professional and competitive athletes, 49.9% (95% CI, 35.3-64.6%) returned to the same level of play. Most

  1. Location of Rotator Cuff Tear Initiation: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of 191 Shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Min, Seul Ki; Park, Keun Min; Park, Yong Bok; Han, Kwang Joon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2018-03-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are generally thought to originate at the anterior margin of the supraspinatus tendon. However, a recent ultrasonography study suggested that they might originate more posteriorly than originally thought, perhaps even from the isolated infraspinatus (ISP) tendon, and propagate toward the anterior supraspinatus. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that this finding could be reproduced with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose was to determine the most common location of degenerative RCTs by using 3-dimensional multiplanar MRI reconstruction. It was assumed that the location of the partial-thickness tears would identify the area of the initiation of full-thickness tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective analysis was conducted including 245 patients who had RCTs (nearly full- or partial-thickness tears) at the outpatient department between January 2011 and December 2013. RCTs were measured on 3-dimensional multiplanar reconstruction MRI with OsiriX software. The width and distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear were measured on T2-weighted sagittal images. In a spreadsheet, columns of consecutive numbers represented the size of each tear (anteroposterior width) and their locations with respect to the biceps brachii tendon. Data were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of all tears. Frequency histograms of the columns were made to visualize the distribution of tears. The tears were divided into 2 groups based on width (group A, location related to size. The mean width of all RCTs was 11.9 ± 4.1 mm, and the mean length was 11.1 ± 5.0 mm. Histograms showed the most common location of origin to be 9 to 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. The histograms of groups A and B showed similar tear location distributions, indicating that the region approximately 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon is the most common site of tear initiation. These

  2. Applied partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Logan, J David

    2004-01-01

    This primer on elementary partial differential equations presents the standard material usually covered in a one-semester, undergraduate course on boundary value problems and PDEs. What makes this book unique is that it is a brief treatment, yet it covers all the major ideas: the wave equation, the diffusion equation, the Laplace equation, and the advection equation on bounded and unbounded domains. Methods include eigenfunction expansions, integral transforms, and characteristics. Mathematical ideas are motivated from physical problems, and the exposition is presented in a concise style accessible to science and engineering students; emphasis is on motivation, concepts, methods, and interpretation, rather than formal theory. This second edition contains new and additional exercises, and it includes a new chapter on the applications of PDEs to biology: age structured models, pattern formation; epidemic wave fronts, and advection-diffusion processes. The student who reads through this book and solves many of t...

  3. Inductance loop and partial

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Clayton R

    2010-01-01

    "Inductance is an unprecedented text, thoroughly discussing "loop" inductance as well as the increasingly important "partial" inductance. These concepts and their proper calculation are crucial in designing modern high-speed digital systems. World-renowned leader in electromagnetics Clayton Paul provides the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and calculate inductance." "With the present and increasing emphasis on high-speed digital systems and high-frequency analog systems, it is imperative that system designers develop an intimate understanding of the concepts and methods in this book. Inductance is a much-needed textbook designed for senior and graduate-level engineering students, as well as a hands-on guide for working engineers and professionals engaged in the design of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog systems."--Jacket.

  4. Fundamental partial compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Sannino, Francesco

    2016-11-07

    We construct renormalizable Standard Model extensions, valid up to the Planck scale, that give a composite Higgs from a new fundamental strong force acting on fermions and scalars. Yukawa interactions of these particles with Standard Model fermions realize the partial compositeness scenario. Successful models exist because gauge quantum numbers of Standard Model fermions admit a minimal enough 'square root'. Furthermore, right-handed SM fermions have an SU(2)$_R$-like structure, yielding a custodially-protected composite Higgs. Baryon and lepton numbers arise accidentally. Standard Model fermions acquire mass at tree level, while the Higgs potential and flavor violations are generated by quantum corrections. We further discuss accidental symmetries and other dynamical features stemming from the new strongly interacting scalars. If the same phenomenology can be obtained from models without our elementary scalars, they would reappear as composite states.

  5. Fundamental partial compositeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannino, Francesco; Strumia, Alessandro; Tesi, Andrea; Vigiani, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We construct renormalizable Standard Model extensions, valid up to the Planck scale, that give a composite Higgs from a new fundamental strong force acting on fermions and scalars. Yukawa interactions of these particles with Standard Model fermions realize the partial compositeness scenario. Under certain assumptions on the dynamics of the scalars, successful models exist because gauge quantum numbers of Standard Model fermions admit a minimal enough ‘square root’. Furthermore, right-handed SM fermions have an SU(2)_R-like structure, yielding a custodially-protected composite Higgs. Baryon and lepton numbers arise accidentally. Standard Model fermions acquire mass at tree level, while the Higgs potential and flavor violations are generated by quantum corrections. We further discuss accidental symmetries and other dynamical features stemming from the new strongly interacting scalars. If the same phenomenology can be obtained from models without our elementary scalars, they would reappear as composite states.

  6. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1–1.3 nm to 0.1–0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials. (paper)

  7. Theory of vortex flows in partially ionized magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K

    2004-06-07

    A complete theory for vortex flows in partially ionized magnetoplasmas is presented. Accurate analytical and numerical results are obtained concerning the structure of a Burger's vortex and a tripolar vortex. A novel type of rotating tripolar vortices with elliptic cores are found in the systems dominated by the convection in incompressible flows, but whose generation is triggered by the diffusive and compressible effects. Our vortex flow models successfully explain recent observations from laboratory magnetoplasmas and geophysical flows.

  8. Lunar Rotation, Orientation and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Boggs, D. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Moon is the most familiar example of the many satellites that exhibit synchronous rotation. For the Moon there is Lunar Laser Ranging measurements of tides and three-dimensional rotation variations plus supporting theoretical understanding of both effects. Compared to uniform rotation and precession the lunar rotational variations are up to 1 km, while tidal variations are about 0.1 m. Analysis of the lunar variations in pole direction and rotation about the pole gives moment of inertia differences, third-degree gravity harmonics, tidal Love number k2, tidal dissipation Q vs. frequency, dissipation at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and emerging evidence for an oblate boundary. The last two indicate a fluid core, but a solid inner core is not ruled out. Four retroreflectors provide very accurate positions on the Moon. The experience with the Moon is a starting point for exploring the tides, rotation and orientation of the other synchronous bodies of the solar system.

  9. A compact rotating dilution refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fear, M. J.; Walmsley, P. M.; Chorlton, D. A.; Zmeev, D. E.; Gillott, S. J.; Sellers, M. C.; Richardson, P. P.; Agrawal, H.; Batey, G.; Golov, A. I.

    2013-10-01

    We describe the design and performance of a new rotating dilution refrigerator that will primarily be used for investigating the dynamics of quantized vortices in superfluid 4He. All equipment required to operate the refrigerator and perform experimental measurements is mounted on two synchronously driven, but mechanically decoupled, rotating carousels. The design allows for relative simplicity of operation and maintenance and occupies a minimal amount of space in the laboratory. Only two connections between the laboratory and rotating frames are required for the transmission of electrical power and helium gas recovery. Measurements on the stability of rotation show that rotation is smooth to around 10-3 rad s-1 up to angular velocities in excess of 2.5 rad s-1. The behavior of a high-Q mechanical resonator during rapid changes in rotation has also been investigated.

  10. Partial multicanonical algorithm for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2008-09-28

    Partial multicanonical algorithm is proposed for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The partial multicanonical simulation samples a wide range of a part of the potential-energy terms, which is necessary to sample the conformational space widely, whereas a wide range of total potential energy is sampled in the multicanonical algorithm. Thus, one can concentrate the effort to determine the weight factor only on the important energy terms in the partial multicanonical simulation. The partial multicanonical, multicanonical, and canonical molecular dynamics algorithms were applied to an alanine dipeptide in explicit water solvent. The canonical simulation sampled the states of P(II), C(5), alpha(R), and alpha(P). The multicanonical simulation covered the alpha(L) state as well as these states. The partial multicanonical simulation also sampled the C(7) (ax) state in addition to the states that were sampled by the multicanonical simulation. In the partial multicanonical simulation, furthermore, backbone dihedral angles phi and psi rotated more frequently than those in the multicanonical and canonical simulations. These results mean that the partial multicanonical algorithm has a higher sampling efficiency than the multicanonical and canonical algorithms.

  11. Partial oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najjar, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for the production of gaseous mixtures comprising H/sub 2/+CO by the partial oxidation of a fuel feedstock comprising a heavy liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel having a nickel, iron, and vanadium-containing ash or petroleum coke having a nickel, iron, and vanadium-containing ash, or mixtures thereof. The feedstock includes a minimum of 0.5 wt. % of sulfur and the ash includes a minimum of 5.0 wt. % vanadium, a minimum of 0.5 ppm nickel, and a minimum of 0.5 ppm iron. The process comprises: (1) mixing together a copper-containing additive with the fuel feedstock; wherein the weight ratio of copper-containing additive to ash in the fuel feedstock is in the range of about 1.0-10.0, and there is at least 10 parts by weight of copper for each part by weight of vanadium; (2) reacting the mixture from (1) at a temperature in the range of 2200 0 F to 2900 0 F and a pressure in the range of about 5 to 250 atmospheres in a free-flow refactory lined partial oxidation reaction zone with a free-oxygen containing gas in the presence of a temperature moderator and in a reducing atmosphere to produce a hot raw effluent gas stream comprising H/sub 2/+CO and entrained molten slag; and where in the reaction zone and the copper-containing additive combines with at least a portion of the nickel and iron constituents and sulfur found in the feedstock to produce a liquid phase washing agent that collects and transports at least a portion of the vanadium-containing oxide laths and spinels and other ash components and refractory out of the reaction zone; and (3) separating nongaseous materials from the hot raw effluent gas stream

  12. Soliton models for thick branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyravi, Marzieh; Riazi, Nematollah; Lobo, Francisco S.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present new soliton solutions for thick branes in 4+1 dimensions. In particular, we consider brane models based on the sine-Gordon (SG), φ 4 and φ 6 scalar fields, which have broken Z 2 symmetry in some cases and are responsible for supporting and stabilizing the thick branes. The origin of the symmetry breaking in these models resides in the fact that the modified scalar field potential may have non-degenerate vacua. These vacua determine the cosmological constant on both sides of the brane. We also study the geodesic equations along the fifth dimension, in order to explore the particle motion in the neighborhood of the brane. Furthermore, we examine the stability of the thick branes, by determining the sign of the w 2 term in the expansion of the potential for the resulting Schroedinger-like equation, where w is the five-dimensional coordinate. It turns out that the φ 4 brane is stable, while there are unstable modes for certain ranges of the model parameters in the SG and φ 6 branes. (orig.)

  13. Soliton models for thick branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyravi, Marzieh [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Department of Physics, School of Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riazi, Nematollah [Shahid Beheshti University, Physics Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lobo, Francisco S.N. [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Astrofisica e Ciencias do Espaco, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2016-05-15

    In this work, we present new soliton solutions for thick branes in 4+1 dimensions. In particular, we consider brane models based on the sine-Gordon (SG), φ{sup 4} and φ{sup 6} scalar fields, which have broken Z{sub 2} symmetry in some cases and are responsible for supporting and stabilizing the thick branes. The origin of the symmetry breaking in these models resides in the fact that the modified scalar field potential may have non-degenerate vacua. These vacua determine the cosmological constant on both sides of the brane. We also study the geodesic equations along the fifth dimension, in order to explore the particle motion in the neighborhood of the brane. Furthermore, we examine the stability of the thick branes, by determining the sign of the w{sup 2} term in the expansion of the potential for the resulting Schroedinger-like equation, where w is the five-dimensional coordinate. It turns out that the φ{sup 4} brane is stable, while there are unstable modes for certain ranges of the model parameters in the SG and φ{sup 6} branes. (orig.)

  14. Wormholes immersed in rotating matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hoffmann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that rotating matter sets the throat of an Ellis wormhole into rotation, allowing for wormholes which possess full reflection symmetry with respect to the two asymptotically flat spacetime regions. We analyze the properties of this new type of rotating wormholes and show that the wormhole geometry can change from a single throat to a double throat configuration. We further discuss the ergoregions and the lightring structure of these wormholes.

  15. Internal rotation of the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvall, T.L. Jr.; Goode, P.R.; Gouch, D.O.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency difference between prograde and retrograde sectoral solar oscillations is analysed to determine the rotation rate of the solar interior, assuming no latitudinal dependence. Much of the solar interior rotates slightly less rapidly than the surface, while the innermost part apparently rotates more rapidly. The resulting solar gravitational quadrupole moment is J 2 = (1.7 +- 0.4) x 10 -7 and provides a negligible contribution to current planetary tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity. (author)

  16. Diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jee, Sukkyung

    2015-06-01

    Indirect magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is a non-invasive method for shoulder imaging. However, there are no studies that have examined the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears in a large patient population. To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect fast spin-echo (FSE) MR arthrography for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears at 3.0 T. A total of 149 patients who had undergone indirect shoulder MR arthrography followed by arthroscopic surgery were enrolled in this retrospective study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated images from each patient for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus (SSP-ISP) or subscapularis (SSC) tendon tears. Using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard, the overall diagnostic performance and detection rates for SSP-ISP and SSC tendon tears were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of readers I and II for the diagnosis of SSP-ISP tendon tears were 94% and 95%, 89% and 85%, and 93% and 93%, respectively. The sensitivity of imaging for detection of SSP-ISP tendon tears by readers I and II were 100% and 100% for full-thickness tears and 84% and 86% for partial-thickness tears, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of readers I and II for the diagnosis of SSC tendon tears were 80% and 76%, 89% and 93%, and 85% and 85%, respectively. Indirect MR arthrography is useful for the detection of SSP-ISP and SSC tendon tears. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Faraday rotation measures in 20 AGN jets at parsec scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchenko Evgeniya V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present multi wavelength parsec-scale Faraday rotation measure properties of twenty active galactic nuclei, observed with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneously at 1.4, 1.6, 2.2, 2.4, 4.6, 5.0, 8.1, 8.4 and 15.4 GHz in the full polarization mode. For the observed sources we construct Faraday rotation measure and Faraday-corrected linear polarization maps. Direction of electrical field in the optically thick core regions confirms bimodal distribution. No significant changes of a Faraday rotation measure transverse to the jet direction are found in any of the observed sources. We propose a new magnetic field spatial geometry reconstruction method based on core shift measurements. This technique is applied to the quasar 1004+141. Results indicate an existence of a large scale poloidal magnetic field in the jet of 1004+141.

  18. Earth's variable rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond; Dickey, Jean O.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in geodetic data and practical meteorology have advanced research on fluctuations in the earth's rotation. The interpretation of these fluctuations is inextricably linked with studies of the dynamics of the earth-moon system and dynamical processes in the liquid metallic core of the earth (where the geomagnetic field originates), other parts of the earth's interior, and the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Fluctuations in the length of the day occurring on decadal time scales have implications for the topographay of the core-mantle boundary and the electrical, magnetic, ande other properties of the core and lower mantle. Investigations of more rapid fluctuations bear on meteorological studies of interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal variations in the general circulation of the atmosphere and the response of the oceans to such variations.

  19. Sporcularda rotator cuff problemleri

    OpenAIRE

    Guven, Osman; Guven, Zeynep; Gundes, Hakan; Yalcin, Selim

    2004-01-01

    Rotator cuff tendinitinin etyolojisinde genellikle birden çok faktörün kombinasyonu görülür. Yüzme, raket sporları ve fırlatma sporlarının özellikle gelişmiş ülkelerde giderek yaygınlaşması bu konuya olan ilginin artmasına sebep olmuştur. Eski konseptlerde aktif bir sporcuda tedavinin başarısı genellikle eski atletik seviyesine dönmesi ile ölçülürdü. Son zamanlarda atletik tekniklerin analizi, atroskopik evaluasyon gibi yeni bir Iükse sahip olmamız ve Iiteratürün yeniden gözden geçirilmesi il...

  20. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  1. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  2. Relaxation in Thin Polymer Films Mapped across the Film Thickness by Astigmatic Single-Molecule Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Oba, Tatsuya

    2012-06-19

    We have studied relaxation processes in thin supported films of poly(methyl acrylate) at the temperature corresponding to 13 K above the glass transition by monitoring the reorientation of single perylenediimide molecules doped into the films. The axial position of the dye molecules across the thickness of the film was determined with a resolution of 12 nm by analyzing astigmatic fluorescence images. The average relaxation times of the rotating molecules do not depend on the overall thickness of the film between 20 and 110 nm. The relaxation times also do not show any dependence on the axial position within the films for the film thickness between 70 and 110 nm. In addition to the rotating molecules we observed a fraction of spatially diffusing molecules and completely immobile molecules. These molecules indicate the presence of thin (<5 nm) high-mobility surface layer and low-mobility layer at the interface with the substrate. (Figure presented) © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. An Examination of Exposure Control and Content Balancing Restrictions on Item Selection in CATs Using the Partial Credit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Laurie Laughlin; Pastor, Dena A.; Dodd, Barbara G.; Chiang, Claire; Fitzpatrick, Steven J.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of the Sympson-Hetter technique and rotated content balancing relative to no exposure control and no content rotation conditions in a computerized adaptive testing system based on the partial credit model. Simulation results show the Sympson-Hetter technique can be used with minimal impact on measurement precision,…

  4. Rotator cuff tear measurement by arthropneumotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcoyne, R.F.; Matsen, F.A. III

    1983-01-01

    Five years of experience with a method of shoulder arthrography using upright tomography in cases of suspected or known rotator cuff tears has demonstrated its effectiveness. The value of the procedure lies in its ability to demonstrate the size of the cuff tear and the thickness of the remaining cuff tissue. This information provides the surgeon with a preoperative estimate of the difficulty of the repair and the prognosis for a good functional recovery. In 33 cases, there was good correlation between the upright thin-section tomogram findings and the surgical results. The tomograms provided better information about the size of the tear and the quality of the remaining cuff than did plain arthrograms

  5. Surface dimpling on rotating work piece using rotation cutting tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhapkar, Rohit Arun; Larsen, Eric Richard

    2015-03-31

    A combined method of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece and a tool assembly that is capable of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece are disclosed. The disclosed method includes machining portions of an outer or inner surface of a work piece. The method also includes rotating the work piece in front of a rotating cutting tool and engaging the outer surface of the work piece with the rotating cutting tool to cut dimples in the outer surface of the work piece. The disclosed tool assembly includes a rotating cutting tool coupled to an end of a rotational machining device, such as a lathe. The same tool assembly can be used to both machine the work piece and apply a surface texture to the work piece without unloading the work piece from the tool assembly.

  6. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the Partial Derivative Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Roundy, David; Dorko, Allison; Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne A.; Weber, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Most notably, thermodynamics uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find confusing. As part of a collaboration with mathematics faculty, we are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. As a part of this project, we have performed a pilot study of expert understanding...

  7. Laminar boundary layer response to rotation of a finite diameter surface patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klewicki, J.C.; Hill, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The responses of the flat plate laminar boundary layer to perturbations generated by rotating a finite patch of the bounding surface are explored experimentally. The size of the surface patch was of the same order as the boundary layer thickness. The displacement thickness Reynolds number range of the boundary layers explored was 72-527. The rotation rates of the surface patch ranged from 2.14 to 62.8 s-1. Qualitative flow visualizations and quantitative molecular tagging velocimetry measurements revealed that rotation of a finite surface patch generates an asymmetric loop-like vortex. Significant features of this vortex include that, (i) the sign of the vorticity in the vortex head is opposite that of the boundary layer vorticity regardless of the sign of the input rotation, (ii) one leg of the vortex exhibits motion akin to solid body rotation while the other leg is best characterized as a spanwise shear layer, (iii) the vortex leg exhibiting near solid body rotation lifts more rapidly from the surface than the leg more like a shear layer, and (iv) the vortex leg exhibiting near solid body rotation always occurs on the side of the surface patch experiencing downstream motion. These asymmetries switch sides depending on the sign of the input rotation. The present results are interpreted and discussed relative to analytical solutions for infinite geometries. By way of analogy, plausible connections are drawn between the present results and the influences of wall normal vortices in turbulent boundary layer flows

  8. Simulating Lahars Using A Rotating Drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neather, Adam; Lube, Gert; Jones, Jim; Cronin, Shane

    2014-05-01

    A large (0.5 m in diameter, 0.15 m wide) rotating drum is used to investigate the erosion and deposition mechanics of lahars. To systematically simulate the conditions occurring in natural mass flows our experimental setup differs from the common rotating drum employed in industrial/engineering studies. Natural materials with their typical friction properties are used, as opposed to the frequently employed spherical glass beads; the drum is completely water-proof, so solid/air and solid/liquid mixtures can be investigated; the drum velocity and acceleration can be precisely controlled using a software interface to a micro-controller, allowing for the study of steady, unsteady and intermediate flow regimes. The drum has a toughened glass door, allowing high-resolution, high-speed video recording of the material inside. Vector maps of the velocities involved in the flows are obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The changes in velocity direction and/or magnitude are used to locate the primary internal boundaries between layers of opposite flow direction, as well as secondary interfaces between shear layers. A range of variables can be measured: thickness and number of layers; the curvature of the free surface; frequency of avalanching; position of the centre of mass of the material; and the velocity profiles of the flowing material. Experiments to date have focussed on dry materials, and have had a fill factor of approximately 0.3. Combining these measured variables allows us to derive additional data of interest, such as mass and momentum flux. It is these fluxes that we propose will allow insight into the erosion/deposition mechanics of a lahar. A number of conclusions can be drawn to date. A primary interface separates flowing and passive region (this interface has been identified in previous studies). As well as the primary interface, the flowing layer separates into individual shear layers, with individual erosion/deposition and flow histories. This

  9. The crustal thickness of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clitheroe, G.; Gudmundsson, O.; Kennett, B.L.N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Australian continent using the temporary broadband stations of the Skippy and Kimba projects and permanent broadband stations. We isolate near-receiver information, in the form of crustal P-to-S conversions, using the receiver function technique. Stacked receiver functions are inverted for S velocity structure using a Genetic Algorithm approach to Receiver Function Inversion (GARFI). From the resulting velocity models we are able to determine the Moho depth and to classify the width of the crust-mantle transition for 65 broadband stations. Using these results and 51 independent estimates of crustal thickness from refraction and reflection profiles, we present a new, improved, map of Moho depth for the Australian continent. The thinnest crust (25 km) occurs in the Archean Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia; the thickest crust (61 km) occurs in Proterozoic central Australia. The average crustal thickness is 38.8 km (standard deviation 6.2 km). Interpolation error estimates are made using kriging and fall into the range 2.5-7.0 km. We find generally good agreement between the depth to the seismologically defined Moho and xenolith-derived estimates of crustal thickness beneath northeastern Australia. However, beneath the Lachlan Fold Belt the estimates are not in agreement, and it is possible that the two techniques are mapping differing parts of a broad Moho transition zone. The Archean cratons of Western Australia appear to have remained largely stable since cratonization, reflected in only slight variation of Moho depth. The largely Proterozoic center of Australia shows relatively thicker crust overall as well as major Moho offsets. We see evidence of the margin of the contact between the Precambrian craton and the Tasman Orogen, referred to as the Tasman Line. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-08

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications.

  11. Stabilities of MHD rotational discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.

    1984-11-01

    In this paper, the stabilities of MHD rotational discontinuities are analyzed. The results show that the rotational discontinuities in an incompressible magnetofluid are not always stable with respect to infinitesimal perturbation. The instability condition in a special case is obtained. (author)

  12. Optical isolation by Faraday rotator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Takeshi; Matsushima, Isao; Nemoto, Fusashi; Yano, Masaaki

    1984-01-01

    Three Faraday rotators designed as optical isolators in a high power glass laser system are described. The spatial fluctuation of applied magnetic field is less than 1% throughout the Faraday glass rod. The Faraday rotators transmit more than 80% of the forward-going laser light and reject more than 96% of the backward-going light. (author)

  13. Ultrasound evaluation of muscle thickness changes in the external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles considering the influence of posture and muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Tomoaki; Abe, Yota; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate muscle thickness changes in the external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles between the neutral position and trunk rotation, under a state of rest without voluntary contractions, and isometric contractions to both sides with resistance of 50% of the maximum trunk rotation strength. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 21 healthy young men. [Methods] Muscle thickness changes in the EO, IO, and TrA in each position and state were evaluated by ultrasound. The range of motion at maximum trunk rotation and the maximum strength of trunk rotation were measured using a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] In the neutral position and at 50% trunk rotation to the right side, the thicknesses of the IO and TrA significantly increased with resistance. In both states, the thicknesses of the IO and TrA significantly increased at 50% trunk rotation to the right side. [Conclusion] The muscular contractions of the IO and TrA were stronger during ipsilateral rotation than in the neutral position and with resistance than at rest. Moreover, the muscular contraction was strongest in the resistive state during ipsilateral rotation.

  14. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body.

  15. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachbar, H.D.

    1992-01-01

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body. 5 figs

  16. Soft, Rotating Pneumatic Actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainla, Alar; Verma, Mohit S; Yang, Dian; Whitesides, George M

    2017-09-01

    This article describes a soft pneumatic actuator that generates cyclical motion. The actuator consists of several (three, four, or five) chambers (arranged around the circumference of a circle surrounding a central rod) that can be actuated independently using negative pressure (or partial vacuum). Sequential actuation of the four-chamber device using reduced pressure moves the central rod cyclically in an approximately square path. We characterize the trajectory of the actuator and the force exerted by it, as we vary the material used for fabrication, the number of chambers, and the size of the actuator. We demonstrate two applications of this actuator: to deliver fluid while stirring (by replacing the central rod with a needle) and for locomotion that mimics a reptilian gait (by combining four actuators together).

  17. Rotational superradiance in fluid laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Rotational superradiance has been predicted theoretically decades ago, and is the chief responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behaviour of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. By confining the superradiant modes near the rotating cylinder, an instability sets in. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and hence offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  18. Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Laughlin, Darren [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brune, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Rotational motion is increasingly understood to be a significant part of seismic wave motion. Rotations can be important in earthquake strong motion and in Induced Seismicity Monitoring. Rotational seismic data can also enable shear selectivity and improve wavefield sampling for vertical geophones in 3D surveys, among other applications. However, sensor technology has been a limiting factor to date. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding a multi-year project that is now entering Phase 2 to develop and deploy a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. Initial focus is on induced seismicity monitoring, particularly for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with fracturing. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, improved noise floors, robustness, and repeatability. This paper presents a summary of Phase 1 results and Phase 2 status.

  19. Flow past a rotating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sanjay; Kumar, Bhaskar

    2003-02-01

    Flow past a spinning circular cylinder placed in a uniform stream is investigated via two-dimensional computations. A stabilized finite element method is utilized to solve the incompressible Navier Stokes equations in the primitive variables formulation. The Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter and free-stream speed of the flow is 200. The non-dimensional rotation rate, [alpha] (ratio of the surface speed and freestream speed), is varied between 0 and 5. The time integration of the flow equations is carried out for very large dimensionless time. Vortex shedding is observed for [alpha] cylinder. The results from the stability analysis for the rotating cylinder are in very good agreement with those from direct numerical simulations. For large rotation rates, very large lift coefficients can be obtained via the Magnus effect. However, the power requirement for rotating the cylinder increases rapidly with rotation rate.

  20. Bidirectional optical rotation of cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyi Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Precise and controlled rotation manipulation of cells is extremely important in biological applications and biomedical studies. Particularly, bidirectional rotation manipulation of a single or multiple cells is a challenge for cell tomography and analysis. In this paper, we report an optical method that is capable of bidirectional rotation manipulation of a single or multiple cells. By launching a laser beam at 980 nm into dual-beam tapered fibers, a single or multiple cells in solutions can be trapped and rotated bidirectionally under the action of optical forces. Moreover, the rotational behavior can be controlled by altering the relative distance between the two fibers and the input optical power. Experimental results were interpreted by numerical simulations.

  1. Centrifuge in Free Fall: Combustion at Partial Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkul, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A centrifuge apparatus is developed to study the effect of variable acceleration levels in a drop tower environment. It consists of a large rotating chamber, within which the experiment is conducted. NASA Glenn Research Center 5.18-second Zero-Gravity Facility drop tests were successfully conducted at rotation rates up to 1 RPS with no measurable effect on the overall Zero-Gravity drop bus. Arbitrary simulated gravity levels from zero to 1-g (at a radius of rotation 30 cm) were produced. A simple combustion experiment was used to exercise the capabilities of the centrifuge. A total of 23 drops burning a simulated candle with heptane and ethanol fuel were performed. The effect of gravity level (rotation rate) and Coriolis force on the flames was observed. Flames became longer, narrower, and brighter as gravity increased. The Coriolis force tended to tilt the flames to one side, as expected, especially as the rotation rate was increased. The Zero-Gravity Centrifuge can be a useful tool for other researchers interested in the effects of arbitrary partial gravity on experiments, especially as NASA embarks on future missions which may be conducted in non-Earth gravity.

  2. Management of partial thickness burn of the dorsum skin in a 3-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ml Enrofloxacine, intramuscularly (I.M), 4ml Multivitamin I.M and 4ml Vitamin B complex as supportives. On the second day of presentation, Dermazin® cream was replaced with pure honey® (FUNAAB Consult) for wound dressing. 5ml Vitamin ...

  3. Partial Actions and Power Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Ávila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a partial action (X,α with enveloping action (T,β. In this work we extend α to a partial action on the ring (P(X,Δ,∩ and find its enveloping action (E,β. Finally, we introduce the concept of partial action of finite type to investigate the relationship between (E,β and (P(T,β.

  4. Algorithms over partially ordered sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Robert M.; Østerby, Ole

    1969-01-01

    in partially ordered sets, answer the combinatorial question of how many maximal chains might exist in a partially ordered set withn elements, and we give an algorithm for enumerating all maximal chains. We give (in § 3) algorithms which decide whether a partially ordered set is a (lower or upper) semi......-lattice, and whether a lattice has distributive, modular, and Boolean properties. Finally (in § 4) we give Algol realizations of the various algorithms....

  5. Hydrodynamics of rotating superfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis, a coarse grained hydrodynamics is developed from the exact description of Tkachenko. To account for the dynamics of the vortex lattice, the macroscopic vortex displacement field is treated as an independent degree of freedom. The conserved energy is written in terms of the coarse-grained normal fluid, superfluid, and vortex velocities and includes an elastic energy associated with deformations of the vortex lattice. Equations of motion consistent with the conservation of energy, entropy and vorticity and containing mutual friction terms arising from microscopic interactions between normal fluid excitations and the vortex lines are derived. When the vortex velocity is eliminated from the damping terms, this system of equations becomes essentially that of BK with added elastic terms in the momentum stress tensor and energy current. The dispersion relation and damping of the first and second sound modes and the two transverse modes sustained by the system are investigated. It is shown that mutual friction mixes the transverse modes of the normal and superfluid components and damps the transverse mode associated with the relative velocity of these components, making this wave evanescent in the plane perpendicular to the rotation axis. The wave associated with transverse motion of the total mass current is a generalized Tkachenko mode, whose dispersion relation reduces to that derived by Tkachenko wave when the wavevector lies in this plane

  6. Rotating quantum Gaussian packets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V V

    2015-01-01

    We study two-dimensional quantum Gaussian packets with a fixed value of mean angular momentum. This value is the sum of two independent parts: the ‘external’ momentum related to the motion of the packet center and the ‘internal’ momentum due to quantum fluctuations. The packets minimizing the mean energy of an isotropic oscillator with the fixed mean angular momentum are found. They exist for ‘co-rotating’ external and internal motions, and they have nonzero correlation coefficients between coordinates and momenta, together with some (moderate) amount of quadrature squeezing. Variances of angular momentum and energy are calculated, too. Differences in the behavior of ‘co-rotating’ and ‘anti-rotating’ packets are shown. The time evolution of rotating Gaussian packets is analyzed, including the cases of a charge in a homogeneous magnetic field and a free particle. In the latter case, the effect of initial shrinking of packets with big enough coordinate-momentum correlation coefficients (followed by the well known expansion) is discovered. This happens due to a competition of ‘focusing’ and ‘de-focusing’ in the orthogonal directions. (paper)

  7. Muscle gene expression patterns in human rotator cuff pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Alexander; McCarthy, Meagan; Pichika, Rajeswari; Sato, Eugene J; Lieber, Richard L; Schenk, Simon; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-09-17

    Rotator cuff pathology is a common source of shoulder pain with variable etiology and pathoanatomical characteristics. Pathological processes of fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis have all been invoked as causes for poor outcomes after rotator cuff tear repair. The aims of this study were to measure the expression of key genes associated with adipogenesis, myogenesis, and fibrosis in human rotator cuff muscle after injury and to compare the expression among groups of patients with varied severities of rotator cuff pathology. Biopsies of the supraspinatus muscle were obtained arthroscopically from twenty-seven patients in the following operative groups: bursitis (n = 10), tendinopathy (n = 7), full-thickness rotator cuff tear (n = 8), and massive rotator cuff tear (n = 2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to characterize gene expression pathways involved in myogenesis, adipogenesis, and fibrosis. Patients with a massive tear demonstrated downregulation of the fibrogenic, adipogenic, and myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle was not in a state of active change and may have difficulty responding to stimuli. Patients with a full-thickness tear showed upregulation of fibrotic and adipogenic genes; at the tissue level, these correspond to the pathologies most detrimental to outcomes of surgical repair. Patients with bursitis or tendinopathy still expressed myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle may be attempting to accommodate the mechanical deficiencies induced by the tendon tear. Gene expression in human rotator cuff muscles varied according to tendon injury severity. Patients with bursitis and tendinopathy appeared to be expressing pro-myogenic genes, whereas patients with a full-thickness tear were expressing genes associated with fatty atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, patients with a massive tear appeared to have downregulation of all gene programs except inhibition of myogenesis. These data highlight the

  8. Anatomic partial nephrectomy: technique evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Raed A; Metcalfe, Charles; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-03-01

    Partial nephrectomy provides equivalent long-term oncologic and superior functional outcomes as radical nephrectomy for T1a renal masses. Herein, we review the various vascular clamping techniques employed during minimally invasive partial nephrectomy, describe the evolution of our partial nephrectomy technique and provide an update on contemporary thinking about the impact of ischemia on renal function. Recently, partial nephrectomy surgical technique has shifted away from main artery clamping and towards minimizing/eliminating global renal ischemia during partial nephrectomy. Supported by high-fidelity three-dimensional imaging, novel anatomic-based partial nephrectomy techniques have recently been developed, wherein partial nephrectomy can now be performed with segmental, minimal or zero global ischemia to the renal remnant. Sequential innovations have included early unclamping, segmental clamping, super-selective clamping and now culminating in anatomic zero-ischemia surgery. By eliminating 'under-the-gun' time pressure of ischemia for the surgeon, these techniques allow an unhurried, tightly contoured tumour excision with point-specific sutured haemostasis. Recent data indicate that zero-ischemia partial nephrectomy may provide better functional outcomes by minimizing/eliminating global ischemia and preserving greater vascularized kidney volume. Contemporary partial nephrectomy includes a spectrum of surgical techniques ranging from conventional-clamped to novel zero-ischemia approaches. Technique selection should be tailored to each individual case on the basis of tumour characteristics, surgical feasibility, surgeon experience, patient demographics and baseline renal function.

  9. Partial order infinitary term rewriting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We study an alternative model of infinitary term rewriting. Instead of a metric on terms, a partial order on partial terms is employed to formalise convergence of reductions. We consider both a weak and a strong notion of convergence and show that the metric model of convergence coincides with th...... to the metric setting -- orthogonal systems are both infinitarily confluent and infinitarily normalising in the partial order setting. The unique infinitary normal forms that the partial order model admits are Böhm trees....

  10. Effects of fixture rotation on coating uniformity for high-performance optical filter fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Binyamin; George, Jason; Singhal, Riju

    2018-04-01

    Coating uniformity is critical in fabricating high-performance optical filters by various vacuum deposition methods. Simple and planetary rotation systems with shadow masks are used to achieve the required uniformity [J. B. Oliver and D. Talbot, Appl. Optics 45, 13, 3097 (2006); O. Lyngnes, K. Kraus, A. Ode and T. Erguder, in `Method for Designing Coating Thickness Uniformity Shadow Masks for Deposition Systems with a Planetary Fixture', 2014 Technical Conference Proceedings, Optical Coatings, August 13, 2014, DOI: 10.14332/svc14.proc.1817.]. In this work, we discuss the effect of rotation pattern and speed on thickness uniformity in an ion beam sputter deposition system. Numerical modeling is used to determine statistical distribution of random thickness errors in coating layers. The relationship between thickness tolerance and production yield are simulated theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. Production yields for different optical filters produced in an ion beam deposition system with planetary rotation are presented. Single-wavelength and broadband optical monitoring systems were used for endpoint monitoring during filter deposition. Limitations of thickness tolerances that can be achieved in systems with planetary rotation are shown. Paths for improving production yield in an ion beam deposition system are described.

  11. Thickly Syndetical Sensitivity of Topological Dynamical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider the surjective continuous map f:X→X, where X is a compact metric space. In this paper we give several stronger versions of sensitivity, such as thick sensitivity, syndetic sensitivity, thickly syndetic sensitivity, and strong sensitivity. We establish the following. (1 If (X,f is minimal and sensitive, then (X,f is syndetically sensitive. (2 Weak mixing implies thick sensitivity. (3 If (X,f is minimal and weakly mixing, then it is thickly syndetically sensitive. (4 If (X,f is a nonminimal M-system, then it is thickly syndetically sensitive. Devaney chaos implies thickly periodic sensitivity. (5 We give a syndetically sensitive system which is not thickly sensitive. (6 We give thickly syndetically sensitive examples but not cofinitely sensitive ones.

  12. three dimensional photoelastic investigations on thick rectangular

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1983-09-01

    Sep 1, 1983 ... Thick rectangular plates are investigated by means of three-dimensional photoelasticity ... a thin plate theory and a higher order thick plate theory. 1. ..... number of fringes lest the accuracy of the results will be considerably.

  13. Non-contact radiation thickness gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, T.; Okino, T.

    1983-01-01

    A noncontact thickness gauge system for measuring the thickness of a material comprising a source of radiation, a detector for detecting the amount of radiation transmitted through the material which is a function of the absorptance and thickness of the material, a memory for storing the output signals of the detector and curve-defining parameters for a plurality of quadratic calibration curves which correspond to respective thickness ranges, and a processor for processing the signals and curve defining parameters to determine the thickness of the material. Measurements are made after precalibration to obtain calibration curves and these are stored in the memory, providing signals representative of a nominal thickness and an alloy compensation coefficient for the material. The calibration curve corresponding to a particular thickness range is selected and the curve compensated for drift; the material is inserted into the radiation path and the detector output signal processed with the compensated calibration curve to determine the thickness of the material. (author)

  14. Toroidal rotation studies in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. G.; Lee, H. H.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Investigation of the toroidal rotation is one of the most important topics for the magnetically confined fusion plasma researches since it is essential for the stabilization of resistive wall modes and its shear plays an important role to improve plasma confinement by suppressing turbulent transport. The most advantage of KSTAR tokamak for toroidal rotation studies is that it equips two main diagnostics including the high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and charge exchange spectroscopy (CES). Simultaneous core toroidal rotation and ion temperature measurements of different impurity species from the XICS and CES have shown in reasonable agreement with various plasma discharges in KSTAR. It has been observed that the toroidal rotation in KSTAR is faster than that of other tokamak devices with similar machine size and momentum input. This may due to an intrinsically low toroidal field ripple and error field of the KSTAR device. A strong braking of the toroidal rotation by the n = 1 non-resonant magnetic perturbations (NRMPs) also indicates these low toroidal field ripple and error field. Recently, it has been found that n = 2 NRMPs can also damp the toroidal rotation in KSTAR. The detail toroidal rotation studies will be presented. Work supported by the Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning under the KSTAR project.

  15. [Rotator cuff tear athropathy prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Soriano, F; Encalada-Díaz, M I; Ruiz-Suárez, M; Valero-González, F S

    2017-01-01

    Glenohumeral arthritis secondary to massive rotator cuff tear presents with a superior displacement and femoralization of the humeral head with coracoacromial arch acetabularization. The purpose of this study was to establish prevalence of rotator cuff tear artropathy (CTA) at our institution. Four hundred electronic records were reviewed from which we identified 136 patients with rotator cuff tears. A second group was composed with patients with massive cuff tears that were analized and staged by the Seebauer cuff tear arthropathy classification. Thirty four patients with massive rotator cuff tears were identified, 8 male and 26 female (age 60.1 ± 10.26 years). Massive rotator cuff tear prevalence was 25%. CTA prevalence found in the rotator cuff group was 19 and 76% in the massive cuff tears group. Patients were staged according to the classification with 32% in stage 1a, 11% 1b, 32% 2a and 0% 2b. CTA prevalence in patients with rotator cuff tears and massive cuff tears is higher than the one reported in American population. We consider that a revision of the Seebauer classification to be appropriate to determine its reliability.

  16. Autonomous Sea-Ice Thickness Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    the conductivity of an infinitely thick slab of sea ice. Ice thickness, Hice, is then obtained by subtracting the height of the ...Thickness Survey of Sea Ice Runway” ERDC/CRREL SR-16-4 ii Abstract We conducted an autonomous survey of sea -ice thickness using the Polar rover Yeti...efficiency relative to manual surveys routinely con- ducted to assess the safety of roads and runways constructed on the sea ice. Yeti executed the

  17. Rotating relativistic neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1991-07-21

    Models of rotating neutron stars are constructed in the framework of Einstein's theory of general relativity. For this purpose a refined version of Hartle's method is applied. The properties of these objects, e.g. gravitational mass, equatorial and polar radius, eccentricity, red- and blueshift, quadrupole moment, are investigated for Kepler frequencies of 4000 s{sup {minus}1} {le} {Omega}{sub K} {le} 9000 s{sup {minus}1}. Therefore a self-consistency problem inherent in the determination of {Omega}{sub K} must be solved. The investigation is based on neutron star matter equations of state derived from the relativistic Martin-Schwinger hierarch of coupled Green's functions. By means of introducing the Hartree, Hartree-Fock, and ladder ({Lambda}) approximations, models of the equation of state derived. A special feature of the latter approximation scheme is the inclusion of dynamical two-particle correlations. These have been calculated from the relativistic T-matrix applying both the HEA and Bonn meson-exchange potentials of the nucleon-nucleon force. The nuclear forces of the former two treatments are those of the standard scalar-vector-isovector model of quantum hadron dynamics, with parameters adjusted to the nuclear matter data. An important aspect of this work consists in testing the compatibility of different competing models of the nuclear equation of state with data on pulsar periods. By this the fundamental problem of nuclear physics concerning the behavior of the equation of state at supernuclear densities can be treated.

  18. Cold-rolled steel strip X-ray thickness gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Jianmin; Cong Peng; Li Litao

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a cold-rolled steel strip X-ray thickness gauge. This gauge uses two-detector construction including penetrating ionization chamber and measuring ionization chamber. Standard magazine box is composed of three rotating plates driving by stepper motor, including 13 pieces of standard sample to build up 154 thickness value, obtaining standard sample curve covering thickness range of 0.1 mm to 5 mm. Automation system include Siemens S7-200 PLC as key controlling unit, embedded controlling system for data acquisition and computing, and PC as man-machine interface, and employ Ethernet (TCP/IP) or RS485/232 as communication protocol. Reversing Cold mill AGC closed-loop control operation test demonstrates that the gauge can adapt to the severe production environment, operate stably and reliably, measurement precision can reached to ±0.19%, reproducibility to ±0.09%, and stability to ±0.06%, response time range from 4 ms to 200 ms and be adjustable. So it can meet the high demanding of cold-rolled plate/strip production. (authors)

  19. The Effect Of Ceramic In Combination Of Two Sigmoid Functionally Graded Rotating Disks With Variable Thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, M.; Sahari, B. B.; Saleem, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the elastic solutions of a disk composed of FGM – Functionaly Graded Material, is presented.......In this paper the elastic solutions of a disk composed of FGM – Functionaly Graded Material, is presented....

  20. Effect of rotation on convective mass transfer in rotating channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharoah, J.G.; Djilali, N.

    2002-01-01

    Laminar flow and mass transfer in rotating channels is investigated in the context of centrifugal membrane separation. The effect of orientation with respect to the rotational axis is examined for rectangular channels of aspect ratio 3 and the Rossby number is varied from 0.3 to 20.9. Both Ro and the channel orientation are found to have a significant effect on the flow. Mass transfer calculations corresponding to reverse osmosis desalination are carried out at various operating pressures and all rotating cases exhibit significant process enhancements at relatively low rotation rates. Finally, while it is common in the membrane literature to correlate mass transfer performance with membrane shear rates this is shown not to be valid in the cases presented herein. (author)

  1. Mental rotation and working memory in musicians' dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erro, Roberto; Hirschbichler, Stephanie T; Ricciardi, Lucia; Ryterska, Agata; Antelmi, Elena; Ganos, Christos; Cordivari, Carla; Tinazzi, Michele; Edwards, Mark J; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2016-11-01

    Mental rotation of body parts engages cortical-subcortical areas that are actually involved in the execution of a movement. Musicians' dystonia is a type of focal hand dystonia that is grouped together with writer's cramp under the rubric of "occupational dystonia", but it is unclear to which extent these two disorders share common pathophysiological mechanisms. Previous research has demonstrated patients with writer's cramp to have deficits in mental rotation of body parts. It is unknown whether patients with musicians' dystonia would display similar deficits, reinforcing the concept of shared pathophysiology. Eight patients with musicians' dystonia and eight healthy musicians matched for age, gender and musical education, performed a number of tasks assessing mental rotation of body parts and objects as well as verbal and spatial working memories abilities. There were no differences between patients and healthy musicians as to accuracy and reaction times in any of the tasks. Patients with musicians' dystonia have intact abilities in mentally rotating body parts, suggesting that this disorder relies on a highly selective disruption of movement planning and execution that manifests only upon playing a specific instrument. We further demonstrated that mental rotation of body parts and objects engages, at least partially, different cognitive networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. doped ZnO thick film resistors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The characterization and ethanol gas sensing properties of pure and doped ZnO thick films were investigated. Thick films of pure zinc oxide were prepared by the screen printing technique. Pure zinc oxide was almost insensitive to ethanol. Thick films of Al2O3 (1 wt%) doped ZnO were observed to be highly sensitive to ...

  3. Macular thickness and volume in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Forshaw, Thomas; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    manifests in the macula of the elderly focusing on clinical relevant measures that are thicknesses and volumes of different macular areas. Ageing seems to increase center point foveal thickness. Ageing does not seem to change the center subfield thickness significantly. Ageing decreases the inner and outer...

  4. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  5. On the relativity of rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gron, O.

    2010-01-01

    The question whether rotational motion is relative according to the general theory of relativity is discussed. Einstein's ambivalence concerning this question is pointed out. In the present article I defend Einstein's way of thinking on this when he presented the theory in 1916. The significance of the phenomenon of perfect inertial dragging in connection with the relativity of rotational motion is discussed. The necessity of introducing an extended model of the Minkowski spacetime, in which a globally empty space is supplied with a cosmic mass shell with radius equal to its own Schwarzschild radius, in order to extend the principle of relativity to accelerated and rotational motion, is made clear.

  6. On Degenerate Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2010-01-01

    Some of recent developments, including recent results, ideas, techniques, and approaches, in the study of degenerate partial differential equations are surveyed and analyzed. Several examples of nonlinear degenerate, even mixed, partial differential equations, are presented, which arise naturally in some longstanding, fundamental problems in fluid mechanics and differential geometry. The solution to these fundamental problems greatly requires a deep understanding of nonlinear degenerate parti...

  7. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  8. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  9. Phase-shift and spin-rotation phenomena in neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badurek, G.; Rauch, H.; Zeilinger, A.; Bauspiess, W.; Bonse, U.

    1976-01-01

    The perfect-crystal neutron interferometer was used to study characteristic phenomena arising from simultaneous phase shift and spin rotation of neutron waves. In accordance with theoretical predictions, the beams leaving the interferometer became partially polarized, even with unpolarized incident neutrons. The intensity and the polarization as a function of phase shift and spin rotation have been found to oscillate with the same period, displaying a mutual beat pattern

  10. Partial twisting for scalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of imposing partially twisted boundary conditions is investigated for the scalar sector of lattice QCD. According to the commonly shared belief, the presence of quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams in the intermediate state generally hinders the use of the partial twisting. Using effective field theory techniques in a finite volume, and studying the scalar sector of QCD with total isospin I=1, we however demonstrate that partial twisting can still be performed, despite the fact that annihilation diagrams are present. The reason for this are delicate cancellations, which emerge due to the graded symmetry in partially quenched QCD with valence, sea and ghost quarks. The modified Lüscher equation in case of partial twisting is given

  11. DETERMINATION OF CRITICAL ROTATIONAL SPEED OF CIRCULAR SAWS FROM NATURAL FREQUENCIES OF ANNULAR PLATE WITH ANALOGOUS DIMENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ante Skoblar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is suitable to reduce thickness of circular saw when trying to enhance usability of wood raw material, but reducing thickness also causes reduction of permissible rotational speed which reduces sawing speed. If one increase circular saw rotational speed over permissible one the quality of machined surfaces will reduce because of enhanced vibrations. Permissible rotational speed can be calculated from critical rotational speed which can be defined from natural frequencies of the saw. In this article critical rotational speeds of standard clamped saws (with flat disk surface and without slots are calculated by using finite element method and classical theory of thin plates on annular plates. Mode shapes and natural frequencies of annular plates are determined by using Bessel functions and by using polynomial functions. Obtained results suggest that standard clamped circular saws without slots and with relatively small teeth can be determined from classical theory of thin plates for annular plates with accuracy depending on clamping ratio.

  12. Application of photostress method in stress analysis of a rotating disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Frankovský

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The presented article demonstrates the application of PhotoStressR method in stress analysis of a rotating disc of a constant thickness, which was made of a photoelastic material PS-1A. Isoclinic fringes were observed on the rotating disc using linear polarized light at revolutions 5 000 RPM. Observations were carried out under angle parameter 0 o to 90 o with 10 o increase. A set of isostatic lines of I and II set was made from the set of obtained isoclinic lines. During gradual increase of rotations of the rotating disc up to 17 000 RPM, and with circular polarized light, we observed the distribution of colourful isochromatic fringes on the rotating disc. The field of isochromatic fringes, gained experimentally, at 15 000 RPM was compared with the field which was gained by means of a numerical analysis.

  13. Liquid metal flow in a finite-length cylinder with a rotating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelfgat, Yu.M.; Gorbunov, L.A.; Kolevzon, V.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical container of finite height was investigated experimentally. It was demonstrated that the flow in a rotating magnetic field is similar to geophysical flows: the fluid rotates uniformly with depth and the Ekman layer exists at the container bottom. Near the vertical wall the flow is depicted in the form of a confined jet whose thickness determines the instability onset in a rotating magnetic field. It was shown that the critical Reynolds number can be found by using the jet velocity u 0 for Re cr =u 2 0 /ν∂u/∂r. The effect of frequency of a magnetic field on the fluid flow was also studied. An approximate theoretical model is presented for describing the fluid flow in a uniform rotating magnetic field. (orig.)

  14. Rotator cuff tear reduces muscle fiber specific force production and induces macrophage accumulation and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Davis, Max E; Bradley, Joshua R; Stafford, Patrick L; Schiffman, Corey J; Lynch, Evan B; Claflin, Dennis R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2012-12-01

    Full-thickness tears to the rotator cuff can cause severe pain and disability. Untreated tears progress in size and are associated with muscle atrophy and an infiltration of fat to the area, a condition known as "fatty degeneration." To improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a greater understanding of the changes in the contractile properties of muscle fibers and the molecular regulation of fatty degeneration is essential. Using a rat model of rotator cuff injury, we measured the force generating capacity of individual muscle fibers and determined changes in muscle fiber type distribution that develop after a full thickness rotator cuff tear. We also measured the expression of mRNA and miRNA transcripts involved in muscle atrophy, lipid accumulation, and matrix synthesis. We hypothesized that a decrease in specific force of rotator cuff muscle fibers, an accumulation of type IIb fibers, and an upregulation in fibrogenic, adipogenic, and inflammatory gene expression occur in torn rotator cuff muscles. Thirty days following rotator cuff tear, we observed a reduction in muscle fiber force production, an induction of fibrogenic, adipogenic, and autophagocytic mRNA and miRNA molecules, and a dramatic accumulation of macrophages in areas of fat accumulation. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Pulley lesions in rotator cuff tears: prevalence, etiology, and concomitant pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Nael; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Garving, Christina; Habermeyer, Peter; Tauber, Mark

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of lesions in the biceps pulley complex in a representative, consecutive series of rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff interval treatments. We also analyzed associated tear pattern of rotator cuff injuries and superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. We evaluated the relationships of these lesions to traumatic genesis and the prevalence of pulley lesions in revision cases. This retrospective study analyzed all pre- and intra-operative documentation on arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstructions and isolated pulley lesion treatments performed by a single surgeon over 2 consecutive years. According to Habermeyer et al., we classified cases into four groups, based on the presence of additional or related complete or partial rotator cuff tears, SLAP lesions, trauma, and primary or revision surgery. Among 382 patients with rotator cuff tears, 345 (90.3%) had an injured pulley system; 151 (43.8%) had partial tears of the rotator cuff; out of these, 106 (30.6%) were articular-sided. All of these articular-sided partial tears showed extension into the pulley complex. In 154 cases (44.6%), history of shoulder trauma was associated with the beginning of symptoms. In addition, concomitant SLAP lesions occurred in 25-62% of pulley lesions, correlating with the severity of pulley lesions. Among the 345 cases, there have been 32 (9.3%) revision cases where a pulley lesion was intra-operatively identified and addressed. Pulley complex lesions are present in 90.3% of surgically treated rotator cuff lesions, particularly in articular-sided injuries. In addition, we found a significant relationship between the incidence of SLAP lesions and the severity of pulley lesions. It seems reasonable to assume an important role of pulley system injuries in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff lesions.

  16. On rapid rotation in stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, Per

    2008-01-01

    The conditions under which rapid plasma rotation may occur in a three-dimensional magnetic field, such as that of a stellarator, are investigated. Rotation velocities comparable to the ion thermal speed are found to be attainable only in magnetic fields which are approximately isometric. In an isometric magnetic field the dependence of the magnetic field strength B on the arc length l along the field is the same for all field lines on each flux surface ψ. Only in fields where the departure from exact isometry, B=B(ψ,l), is of the order of the ion gyroradius divided by the macroscopic length scale are rotation speeds comparable to the ion thermal speed possible. Moreover, it is shown that the rotation must be in the direction of the vector ∇ψx∇B. (author)

  17. Spontaneous Rotational Inversion in Phycomyces

    KAUST Repository

    Goriely, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The filamentary fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus undergoes a series of remarkable transitions during aerial growth. During what is known as the stagea IV growth phase, the fungus extends while rotating in a counterclockwise manner when viewed from above (stagea IVa) and then, while continuing to grow, spontaneously reverses to a clockwise rotation (stagea IVb). This phase lasts for 24-48Ah and is sometimes followed by yet another reversal (stageAIVc) before the overall growth ends. Here, we propose a continuum mechanical model of this entire process using nonlinear, anisotropic, elasticity and show how helical anisotropy associated with the cell wall structure can induce spontaneous rotation and, under appropriate circumstances, the observed reversal of rotational handedness. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  18. Differential rotation in magnetic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, D.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility that large-scale magnetic fields in stars are the product of a contemporary dynamo situated in the convective stellar core, rather than being a fossil from an earlier stage in the history of the star, is investigated. It is demonstrated that then the envelope will almost inevitably be in a state of differential rotation. Some simple models are constructed to illustrate the magnitude of the effects on the structure of the envelope and magnetic field. It is found that, for models which are relatively rapidly rotating, a modest differential rotation at the surface of the core may increase considerably the ratio of internal to surface field, but only give rise to a small surface differential rotation. (author)

  19. Conjunct rotation: Codman's paradox revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian I; Fradet, Laetitia; Rettig, Oliver

    2009-05-01

    This contribution mathematically formalizes Codman's idea of conjunct rotation, a term he used in 1934 to describe a paradoxical phenomenon arising from a closed-loop arm movement. Real (axial) rotation is distinguished from conjunct rotation. For characterizing the latter, the idea of reference vector fields is developed to define the neutral axial position of the humerus for any given orientation of its long axis. This concept largely avoids typical coordinate singularities arising from decomposition of 3D joint motion and therefore can be used for postural (axial) assessment of the shoulder joint both clinically and in sports science in almost the complete accessible range of motion. The concept, even though algebraic rather complex, might help to get an easier and more intuitive understanding of axial rotation of the shoulder in complex movements present in daily life and in sports.

  20. Quantitative Microstructural Characterization of Thick Aluminum Plates Heavily Deformed Using Equal Channel Angular Extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishin, Oleg; Segal, V.M.; Ferrasse, S.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed quantitative analysis of the microstructure has been performed in three orthogonal planes of 15-mm-thick aluminum plates heavily deformed via two equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) routes. One route was a conventional route A with no rotation between passes. Another route involved...... sequential 90 deg rotations about the normal direction (ND) between passes. The microstructure in the center of these plates, and especially the extent of microstructural heterogeneity, has been characterized quantitatively and compared with that in bar samples extruded via either route A or route Bc with 90...... Bc. © The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2012...