WorldWideScience

Sample records for partial seizure frequency

  1. Photogenic partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, M J; Binnie, C D

    2000-01-01

    To establish the incidence and symptoms of partial seizures in a cohort of patients investigated on account of known sensitivity to intermittent photic stimulation and/or precipitation of seizures by environmental visual stimuli such as television (TV) screens or computer monitors. We report 43 consecutive patients with epilepsy, who had exhibited a significant EEG photoparoxysmal response or who had seizures precipitated by environmental visual stimuli and underwent detailed assessment of their photosensitivity in the EEG laboratory, during which all were questioned concerning their ictal symptoms. All patients were considered on clinical grounds to have an idiopathic epilepsy syndrome. Twenty-eight (65%) patients reported visually precipitated attacks occurring initially with maintained consciousness, in some instances evolving to a period of confusion or to a secondarily generalized seizure. Visual symptoms were most commonly reported and included positive symptoms such as coloured circles or spots, but also blindness and subjective symptoms such as "eyes going funny." Other symptoms described included nonspecific cephalic sensations, deja-vu, auditory hallucinations, nausea, and vomiting. No patient reported any clear spontaneous partial seizures, and there were no grounds for supposing that any had partial epilepsy excepting the ictal phenomenology of some or all of the visually induced attacks. These findings provide clinical support for the physiological studies that indicate that the trigger mechanism for human photosensitivity involves binocularly innervated cells located in the visual cortex. Thus the visual cortex is the seat of the primary epileptogenic process, and the photically triggered discharges and seizures may be regarded as partial with secondary generalization.

  2. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  3. Complex partial seizure, disruptive behaviours and the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complex partial seizure is an epileptic seizure which results in impairment of responsiveness or awareness such as altered level of consciousness. Complex partial seizures are often preceded by an aura such as depersonalization, feelings of de javu, jamais vu and fear. The ictal phase of complex partial ...

  4. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-01-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated

  5. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author)

  7. Oxidative Stress in Patients with Drug Resistant Partial Complex Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Lorigados Pedre

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS has been implicated as a pathophysiological mechanism of drug-resistant epilepsy, but little is known about the relationship between OS markers and clinical parameters, such as the number of drugs, age onset of seizure and frequency of seizures per month. The current study’s aim was to evaluate several oxidative stress markers and antioxidants in 18 drug-resistant partial complex seizure (DRPCS patients compared to a control group (age and sex matched, and the results were related to clinical variables. We examined malondialdehyde (MDA, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, advanced glycation end products (AGEs, nitric oxide (NO, uric acid, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione, vitamin C, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE and nitrotyrosine (3-NT. All markers except 4-HNE and 3-NT were studied by spectrophotometry. The expressions of 4-HNE and 3-NT were evaluated by Western blot analysis. MDA levels in patients were significantly increased (p ≤ 0.0001 while AOPP levels were similar to the control group. AGEs, NO and uric acid concentrations were significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.004, p ≤ 0.005, p ≤ 0.0001, respectively. Expressions of 3-NT and 4-HNE were increased (p ≤ 0.005 similarly to SOD activity (p = 0.0001, whereas vitamin C was considerably diminished (p = 0.0001. Glutathione levels were similar to the control group. There was a positive correlation between NO and MDA with the number of drugs. The expression of 3-NT was positively related with the frequency of seizures per month. There was a negative relationship between MDA and age at onset of seizures, as well as vitamin C with seizure frequency/month. We detected an imbalance in the redox state in patients with DRCPS, supporting oxidative stress as a relevant mechanism in this pathology. Thus, it is apparent that some oxidant and antioxidant parameters are closely linked with clinical variables.

  8. Complex partial seizure with severe depression and conduct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complex partial seizure complicated by psychiatric comorbidities like depression and conduct disorder presents management challenges for both the physician and parents. The etiology of such psychiatric comorbidities may be related to the seizure or to several other unrelated risk factors. The psychiatric comorbidities and ...

  9. Oxcarbazepine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for partial onset seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Polman, Susanne K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Partial onset seizures are often treated with the standard antiepileptic drug carbamazepine. Oxcarbazepine is a newer antiepileptic drug related to carbamazepine that is claimed to be better tolerated. Objectives To compare efficacy and tolerability of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine

  10. EEG and CT findings of infant partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajitani, Takashi; Kumanomido, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Makoto; Ueoka, Kiyotaka

    1981-01-01

    Examination of EEG and cranial CT were performed in 19 cases of partial seizures with elementary symptomatology (PSES), 6 cases of partial seizures with complex symptomatology (PSCS), and 17 cases of benign focal pilepsy of childhood with Rolandic spikes (BFECRS). The results were as follows. 1) In 16 of 19 cases of PSES (84%), various abnormal CT findings such as localized cerebral atrophy (7 cases), localized cerebral atrophy complicated with porencephaly (4 cases), porencephaly alone (2 cases), and diffuse cerebral atrophy (3 cases) were found. 2) Of 6 cases of PSCS localized cerebral atrophy was found in 3 cases, porencephaly in one case, and localized calcification in one case. Normal CT findings were obtained in one case. 3) In comparison of EEG findings with CT findings in 25 cases of partial seizures CT findings correlated with the basic waves rather than the paroxysmal ones. 4) The fact that CT findings in patients with BFECRS were mostly normal suggests the functional origin of the seizures. 5) CT was valuable in partial seizures for detecting underlying disorders and predicting the prognosis. (Ueda, J.)

  11. Usefulness of ketogenic diet in a girl with migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tatsuo; Imai, Katsumi; Oboshi, Taikan; Fujiwara, Yuh; Takeshita, Saoko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Inoue, Yushi

    2016-06-01

    Migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI) are an age-specific epilepsy syndrome characterized by migrating focal seizures, which are intractable to various antiepileptic drugs and cause severe developmental delay. We report a case of MPSI with heterozygous missense mutation in KCNT1, which was successfully managed by ketogenic diet. At age 2months, the patient developed epilepsy initially manifesting focal seizures with eye deviation and apnea, then evolving to secondarily generalized clonic convulsion. Various antiepileptic drugs including phenytoin, valproic acid, zonisamide, clobazam, levetiracetam, vitamin B6, and carbamazepine were not effective, but high-dose phenobarbital allowed discontinuation of midazolam infusion. Ictal scalp electroencephalogram showed migrating focal seizures. MPSI was suspected and she was transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Potassium bromide (KBr) was partially effective, but the effect was transient. High-dose KBr caused severe adverse effects such as over-sedation and hypercapnia, with no further effects on the seizures. At age 9months, we started a ketogenic diet, which improved seizure frequency and severity without obvious adverse effects, allowing her to be discharged from hospital. Ketogenic diet should be tried in patients with MPSI unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs. In MPSI, the difference in treatment response in patients with and those without KCNT1 mutation remains unknown. Accumulation of case reports would contribute to establish effective treatment options for MPSI. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Population dose-response analysis of daily seizure count following vigabatrin therapy in adult and pediatric patients with refractory complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jace C; Hutmacher, Matthew M; Wesche, David L; Tolbert, Dwain; Patel, Mahlaqa; Kowalski, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an irreversible inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) and is used as an adjunctive therapy for adult patients with refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS). The purpose of this investigation was to describe the relationship between vigabatrin dosage and daily seizure rate for adults and children with rCPS and identify relevant covariates that might impact seizure frequency. This population dose-response analysis used seizure-count data from three pediatric and two adult randomized controlled studies of rCPS patients. A negative binomial distribution model adequately described daily seizure data. Mean seizure rate decreased with time after first dose and was described using an asymptotic model. Vigabatrin drug effects were best characterized by a quadratic model using normalized dosage as the exposure metric. Normalized dosage was an estimated parameter that allowed for individualized changes in vigabatrin exposure based on body weight. Baseline seizure rate increased with decreasing age, but age had no impact on vigabatrin drug effects after dosage was normalized for body weight differences. Posterior predictive checks indicated the final model was capable of simulating data consistent with observed daily seizure counts. Total normalized vigabatrin dosages of 1, 3, and 6 g/day were predicted to reduce seizure rates 23.2%, 45.6%, and 48.5%, respectively. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  13. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondary seizures; Reactive seizures; Seizure - secondary; Seizure - reactive; Convulsions ... or kidney failure Very high blood pressure ( malignant hypertension ) Venomous bites and stings ( snake bite ) Withdrawal from ...

  14. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.T.; Cortes-Blanco, A.; Pourdehnad, M.; Desiderio, L.; Jang, S.; Alavi, A.; Levy-Reis, I.

    2001-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  15. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, P.T.; Cortes-Blanco, A.; Pourdehnad, M.; Desiderio, L.; Jang, S.; Alavi, A. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Levy-Reis, I. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Neurology

    2001-10-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  16. Oxcarbazepine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for partial onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus W; Polman, Susanne Kl

    2009-10-07

    Partial onset seizures are often treated with the standard antiepileptic drug carbamazepine. Oxcarbazepine is a newer antiepileptic drug related to carbamazepine that is claimed to be better tolerated. To compare efficacy and tolerability of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine monotherapy for partial onset seizures. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (4 August 2009), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library issue 3, 2009), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2008), reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field for published or unpublished data. Blinded and unblinded randomised controlled trials of carbamazepine versus oxcarbazepine monotherapy for partial onset seizures. Both authors independently assessed trial quality, according to the guidelines in the Cochrane Reviewer's Handbook, and extracted information about study population, type of intervention, outcome measures and study design. All analyses in this review are by intention-to-treat. We tested for statistical heterogeneity among the identified studies using the chi-squared test. Three trials (723 participants) were included. Only one trial used adequate outcome measures of efficacy; therefore, the results pertaining to efficacy are based on a single trial, whereas the results pertaining to adverse events are based on all three included trials. There was no overall difference in time to treatment withdrawal between the two drugs (hazard ratio (HR) of oxcarbazepine (OXC) versus carbamazepine (CBZ): 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78 to 1.39). Further analyses showed no significant difference in treatment withdrawal for unacceptable side effects (HR of OXC versus CBZ: 0.85, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.24) and in treatment withdrawal for inadequate seizure control (HR of OXC versus CBZ: 1.33, 95% CI 0.82 to 2.15). Oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine appeared to be similarly effective

  17. Temporal lobe dual pathology in malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Auricchio, Gianfranca; D'Amico, Alessandra; Fortunato, Delia; Pascotto, Antonio

    2007-06-01

    A child had the characteristic clinical and EEG pattern of migrating partial seizures in infancy with left temporal lobe atrophy, hippocampal sclerosis and cortical-subcortical blurring. Seizures were drug-resistant, with recurring episodes of status epilepticus. The child developed microcephaly with arrest of psychomotor development. Focal brain lesions, in the context of migrating partial seizures, have not been previously reported.[Published with video sequences].

  18. Dextromethorphan in the treatment of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizures in infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsuan Chien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst in electroencephalography (EEG can evolve into a few types of epileptic syndromes. We present here an unusual case of early myoclonic encephalopathy that evolved into migrating partial seizures in infancy. A female neonate initially had erratic myoclonus movements, hiccups, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG that was compatible with early myoclonic encephalopathy. The seizures were controlled with dextromethorphan (20 mg/kg, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG was reverted to relatively normal background activity. However, at 72 days of age, alternating focal tonic seizures, compatible with migrating partial seizures in infancy, were demonstrated by the 24-hour EEG recording. The seizures responded poorly to dextromethorphan. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizure in infancy. Whether it represents another age-dependent epilepsy evolution needs more clinical observation.

  19. Comparison of impact on seizure frequency and epileptiform discharges of children with epilepsy from topiramate and phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y-Y; Wang, M-G; Yao, D; Huang, X-X; Zhang, T; Deng, X-Q

    2016-03-01

    To study the impact on seizure frequency and epileptiform discharges of children with epilepsy from topiramate (TPM) and phenobarbital (PB). Two hundred cases children with epilepsy from August 2010 to August 2013 in our hospital were sampled and randomly divided into two groups. The observation group was treated with TPM while the control group with PB, and then comparing seizure frequency, efficiency, and adverse reactions of two groups. The reduced number of partial seizures, generalized seizures, and total seizures in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group, and the rate of cure, markedly effective and total efficiency in observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group. However, the adverse reactions in observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Thus, differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). Compared with PB, TPM showed a better effect on epilepsy treatment with less adverse reactions which were worthy of clinical recommendation.

  20. Feasibility of recording high frequency oscillations with tripolar concentric ring electrodes during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Liling; Zhu, Zhenghan; Taveras, Aristides; Troiano, Derek; Medvedev, Andrei V; Besio, Walter G

    2012-01-01

    As epilepsy remains a refractory condition in about 30% of patients with complex partial seizures, electrical stimulation of the brain has recently shown potential for additive seizure control therapy. Previously, we applied noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCREs) on the scalp of rats after inducing seizures with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). We developed a close-loop system to detect seizures and automatically trigger the stimulation and evaluated its effect on the electrographic activity recorded by TCREs in rats. In our previous work the detectors of seizure onset were based on seizure-induced changes in signal power in the frequency range up to 100 Hz, while in this preliminary study we assess the feasibility of recording high frequency oscillations (HFOs) in the range up to 300 Hz noninvasively with scalp TCREs during PTZ-induced seizures. Grand average power spectral density estimate and generalized likelihood ratio tests were used to compare power of electrographic activity at different stages of seizure development in a group of rats (n= 8). The results suggest that TCREs have the ability to record HFOs from the scalp as well as that scalp-recorded HFOs can potentially be used as features for seizure onset detection.

  1. Profile of perampanel and its potential in the treatment of partial onset seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheims S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sylvain Rheims,1,2 Philippe Ryvlin1,21Department of Functional Neurology and Epileptology and Institute for Children and Adolescent with Epilepsy, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; 2Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, INSERM U1028 / CNRS UMR 5292 Translational and Integrative Group in Epilepsy Research, Lyon, FranceAbstract: Perampanel (PER is a novel antiepileptic compound that decreases neuronal excitability by modulating glutamatergic transmission through selective noncompetitive blockade of AMPA receptors. PER has been evaluated in three pivotal placebo-controlled randomized trials as adjunctive therapy in adult drug-resistant partial epilepsy. In comparison to placebo, adjunctive PER effectively reduces seizure frequency. The relative risk of the responder rate (95% confidence interval [CI] was thus 1.60 (1.08–2.36, 1.79 (1.42–2.25 and 1.66 (1.24–2.23 for once-daily PER 4 mg/day, 8 mg/day and 12 mg/day, respectively. The most common adverse events associated with PER were nonspecific central nervous system side effects. Some concerns have been raised about risk of clinically significant weight gain and of psychiatric adverse events. Long-term open-label extensions of the three pivotal trials are underway. PER has recently been approved both in Europe and in the USA for the adjunctive treatment of partial onset seizures in patients aged 12 years and above. However, in the absence of a direct comparison between PER and other licensed antiepileptic drugs’ efficacy and tolerability, the clinical advantages of PER over the other drugs in intractable partial epilepsy remains to be determined.Keywords: perampanel, epilepsy, antiepileptic drug, partial seizures

  2. Genetics Home Reference: malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Epilepsy Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Seizures Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ...

  3. Functional MR imaging in the patients with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Il; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song, In Chan; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Chun Kee; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Sam Soo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of functional MR imaging (fMRI) for localization of the cerebral motor and sensory cortices and language center in patients with complex partial seizure. A total of 47 fMRIs were obtained in 14 patients (M:F = 9:5; age 15-50 years; 13 right handed and 1 ambidextrous) with complex partial seizure (6 temporal lobe epilepsy, 6 frontal lobe epilepsy, 1 occipitotemporal lobe epilepsy, 1 hemispheric epilepsy). Conventional MR imaging revealed no abnormality in four patients, localized cerebral atrophy in one, hippocampal sclerosis in four, and benign neoplasm in the remaining five. fMRI was performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon) using gradient-echo singleshot EPI. Nineteen fMRIs were obtained in eight patients who performed the language task, 16 fMRIs in ten who performed the motor task and 12 fMRIs in ten who performed the somatosensory task. The activation task consisted of three language tasks (silent picture naming , word generation from a character, categorical word generation), motor tasks (opposition of thumb and index finger for hand/dorsifexion or extension for foot), and sensory tasks (passive tactile stimulation of hand or foot using a toothbrush). The data were analyzed using z-score (p<0.05), clustering, and cross-correlation analysis based upon homemade software, IDL 5.1. The success rate for obtaining meaningful fMRI was evaluated and activated regions were assessed on the basis of each fMRI obtained during, language, motor, and somatosensory tasks. fMRI findings were compared with those of the Wada test (n = 7) for language lateralization and with invasive cortical mapping (n = 3) for the localization of eloquent cerebral cortex, especially around the central sulcus. The overall success rate of fMRI was 79 % (37/47); success rates of fMRI with language, sensory, and motor task were 89% (17/19), 83 % (10/12), and 63 % (10/16), respectively. Areas activated during language tasks (n=17) included the

  4. Behaviors induced or disrupted by complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L S; Ma, J; McLachlan, R S

    2000-09-01

    We reviewed the neural mechanisms underlying some postictal behaviors that are induced or disrupted by temporal lobe seizures in humans and animals. It is proposed that the psychomotor behaviors and automatisms induced by temporal lobe seizures are mediated by the nucleus accumbens. A non-convulsive hippocampal afterdischarge in rats induced an increase in locomotor activity, which was suppressed by the injection of dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist in the nucleus accumbens, and blocked by inactivation of the medial septum. In contrast, a convulsive hippocampal or amygdala seizure induced behavioral hypoactivity, perhaps by the spread of the seizure into the frontal cortex and opiate-mediated postictal depression. Mechanisms underlying postictal psychosis, memory disruption and other long-term behavioral alterations after temporal lobe seizures, are discussed. In conclusion, many of the changes of postictal behaviors observed after temporal lobe seizures in humans may be found in animals, and the basis of the behavioral change may be explained as a change in neural processing in the temporal lobe and the connecting subcortical structures.

  5. Studies on glucose metabolism and blood perfusion in childhood partial seizure by positron emission CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michihiro, Narumi

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the glucose metabolism and blood perfusion of the interictal epileptic focus, 15 positron emission tomography (PET) measurements were performed in 14 children with partial seizures (2 with simple partial seizures, 2 with complex partial seizures, and 10 with partial seizures evolving to secondary generalized seizures), comprising 7 males and 7 females aged 1 to 12 years old at the onset of the epileptic seizures. The intervals between the seizure onset and PET examinations were 1 month to 7 years (mean 3 1/4 years). Radiopharmaceuticals such as 11 C-glucose, 11 CO 2 and 11 CO were used as indicators of local cerebral glucose metabolism, blood perfusion and blood flow, respectively. Apart from 2 cases, none of the patients showed abnormal x-ray computed tomographic scans (X-CT). The abnormal X-CT findings included cortical atrophy of the cerebrum apart from the epiletic focus in one case and cavum vergae in the other. Hypometabolism and hypoperfusion at the epileptic focus were observed in 10 patients undergoing single examinations who had suffered from epileptic seizures for more than 1 year. Out of 4 patients who had suffered from epileptic seizures for 1 year or less, one revealed a zone of hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the epileptic focus and expanded region larger than that of the epileptic focus on the electroencephalogram. Two other patients revealed a zone of hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in an area contralateral to the epileptic focus. In the remaining one patient, PET examinations were performed twice. The initial PET pictures one year after seizure onset revealed a zone of hypermetabolism and hyperperfusion in the cerebellum ipsilateral to the epileptic focus, and the second PET at 6 months after the initial examination revealed hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the focus, similarly to the 10 cases mentioned above. (J.P.N.)

  6. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wake up between them. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  7. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be diagnosed with epilepsy , also known as seizure disorder. Seizure Basics Usually, electrical activity in the brain involves ... times. Fortunately, fainting rarely is a sign of epilepsy. Most kids recover very quickly (seconds to minutes) ...

  8. Association between NLPR1, NLPR3, and P2X7R Gene Polymorphisms with Partial Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Clinical and experimental evidence has clarified that the inflammatory processes within the brain play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of seizures and epilepsy. Inflammasomes and P2X7 purinergic receptor (P2X7R are important mediators during the inflammatory process. Therefore, we investigated the possible association between partial seizures and inflammasomes NLPR1, NLRP3, and P2X7R gene polymorphisms in the present study. Method. A total of 163 patients and 201 health controls were enrolled in this study and polymorphisms of NLPR1, NLRP3, and P2X7R genes were detected using polymerase chain reaction- (PCR- ligase detection reaction method. Result. The frequency of rs878329 (G>C genotype with C (CG + CC was significantly lower among patients with partial seizures relative to controls (OR = 2.033, 95% CI = 1.290–3.204, p=0.002 for GC + CC versus GG. Intriguingly, we found that the significant difference of rs878329 (G>C genotype and allele frequency only existed among males (OR = 2.542, 95% CI = 1.344–4.810, p=0.004 for GC + CC versus GG, while there was no statistically significant difference among females. However, no significant results were presented for the genotype distributions of rs8079034, rs4612666, rs10754558, rs2027432, rs3751143, and rs208294 polymorphisms between patients and controls. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated the potentially significant role of NLRP1 rs878329 (G>C in developing susceptibility to the partial seizures in a Chinese Han population.

  9. Efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy for partial-onset seizures: Experience from a multicenter, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Rafael; Jovel, Camilo Espinosa; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Bayarri, Pau Giner; Campos, Dulce; Gomariz, Elena López; Giráldez, Beatriz González; García-Morales, Irene; Falip, Mercé; Agredano, Paula Martínez; Palao, Susana; Prior, María José Aguilar Amat; Pascual, María Rosa Querol; Navacerrada, Francisco José; González, Francisco Javier López; Ojeda, Joaquín; Sáez, Aránzazu Alfaro; Bermejo, Pedro Emilio; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL, Aptiom™) is a once-daily anticonvulsant, approved as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures (POS). Historical-controlled trials investigating the use of ESL as monotherapy have demonstrated a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile in patients with POS. This prospective, non-interventional study recruited POS patients in 17 hospitals in Spain. After a 3-month baseline period, ESL therapy was initiated as 400mg QD and up-titrated to an optimal maintenance dose based on clinical response and tolerance. The incidence of seizures was assessed via seizure calendars and the nature and severity of adverse events (AEs) were also recorded. A total of 117 patients (aged 9-87years) enrolled in the study and were treated with ESL at either 400mg/day (3.4% patients), 800mg/day (61% patients), 1200mg/day (27.1% patients) or 1600mg/day (8.5% patients). At 3months, 82.0% (n=72) of patients achieved a ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency, compared to 79.7% (n=67) of patients at 6months and 83.0% (n=49) at 12months. Patients who suffered secondary generalized tonic-clonic (SGTC) seizures had seizure-free rates of 71% (n=27), 69.6% (n=29), and 72.7% (n=16) at 3, 6, and 12months, respectively. Overall, 18 patients (15.3%) reported AEs of instability and dizziness (n=9), somnolence (n=3), mild hyponatremia (n=3), headache (n=1), hypertriglyceridemia (n=1), and allergic reaction (n=1), which caused ESL discontinuation of ESL treatment. ESL is effective and well tolerated as monotherapy for patients with POS, which supports previous findings. Early use is supported by its frequent use as monotherapy in this study and lack of severe side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The utility of computed tomography for recent-onset partial seizures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine the diagnostic yield of computed tomography (CT) of the head in children presenting for the first time with partial seizures in a region with a high prevalence of tuberculosis and neurocysticercosis. Design. Prospective cohort study. Setting. The secondary-level ambulatory service of Red Cross ...

  11. Frequency of fever episodes related to febrile seizure recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); N.E. Jansen (Nichon); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to assess the number of fever episodes as a risk factor for febrile seizure recurrence during the first 6 months after the last previous febrile seizure. In a 6-month follow-up study of 155 children, aged 3 months to 5 y, with a first or a recurrent febrile

  12. Perampanel in the management of partial-onset seizures: a review of safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze-Bonhage A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Mandy Hintz Epilepsy Center, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Perampanel (PER is a novel antiepileptic drug recently introduced for the adjunctive treatment in epilepsy patients aged 12 years or older with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization in the US and Europe. Its antiepileptic action is based on noncompetitive inhibition of postsynaptic AMPA receptors, decreasing excitatory synaptic transmission. Evaluation of efficacy in three placebo-controlled randomized Phase III studies showed that add-on therapy of PER decreased seizure frequencies significantly compared to placebo at daily doses between 4 mg/day and 12 mg/day. PER’s long half-life of 105 hours allows for once-daily dosing that is favorable for patient compliance with intake. Long-term extension studies showed a 62.5%–69.6% adherence of patients after 1 year of treatment, comparing favorably with other second-generation antiepileptic drugs. Whereas these trials demonstrated an overall favorable tolerability profile of PER, nonspecific central nervous system adverse effects like somnolence, dizziness, headache, and fatigue may occur. In addition, neuropsychiatric disturbances ranging from irritability to suicidality were reported in several case reports; both placebo-controlled and prospective long-term extension trials showed a low incidence of such behavioral and psychiatric complaints. For early recognition of neuropsychiatric symptoms like depression, anxiety, and aggression, slow titration and close monitoring during drug introduction are mandatory. This allows on the one hand to recognize patients particularly susceptible to adverse effects of the drug, and on the other hand to render the drug’s full potential of seizure control available for the vast majority of patient groups tolerating the drug well. Keywords: epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs, AMPA receptor, structural epilepsy, partial

  13. Impact of sleep duration on seizure frequency in adults with epilepsy: a sleep diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobabe, Maurine M; Sessler, Daniel I; Nowacki, Amy S; O'Rourke, Colin; Andrews, Noah; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2015-02-01

    Prolonged sleep deprivation activates epileptiform EEG abnormalities and seizures in people with epilepsy. Few studies have addressed the effect of chronic partial sleep deprivation on seizure occurrence in populations with epilepsy. We tested the primary hypothesis that partial sleep deprivation over 24- and 72-hour periods increases seizure occurrence in adults with epilepsy. Forty-four subjects completed a series of self-reported instruments, as well as 1-month sleep and seizure diaries, to characterize their sleep and quality of life. Diaries were used to determine the relationship between seizure occurrence and total sleep time 24 and 72h before seizure occurrence using random effects models and a logistic regression model fit by generalized estimating equations. A total of 237 seizures were recorded during 1295 diary days, representing 5.5±7.0 (mean±SD) seizures per month. Random effects models for 24- and 72-hour total sleep times showed no clinically or statistically significant differences in the total sleep time between preseizure periods and seizure-free periods. The average 24-hour total sleep time during preseizure 24-hour periods was 8min shorter than that during seizure-free periods (p=0.51). The average 72-hour total sleep time during preseizure periods was 20min longer than that during seizure-free periods (p=0.86). The presence of triggers was a significant predictor of seizure occurrence, with stress/anxiety noted most often as a trigger. Mean total sleep time was 9h, and subjects took an average of 12±10 naps per month, having a mean duration of 1.9±1.2h. Daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and insomnia symptoms were commonly reported. Small degrees of sleep loss were not associated with seizure occurrence in our sample of adults with epilepsy. Our results also include valuable observations of the altered sleep times and frequent napping habits of adults with refractory epilepsy and the potential contribution of these habits to quality of life and

  14. Efficacy and safety of extended-release oxcarbazepine (Oxtellar XR™) as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, JA; Baroldi, P; Brittain, ST; Johnson, JK

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of once-daily 1200 mg and 2400 mg SPN-804 (Oxtellar XR™, Supernus Pharmaceuticals), an extended-release tablet formulation of oxcarbazepine (OXC), added to 1-3 concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Methods The Prospective, Randomized Study of OXC XR in Subjects with Partial Epilepsy Refractory (PROSPER) study was a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group Phase 3 study. The primary efficacy endpoint was median percent reduction from baseline in monthly (28-day) seizure frequency for the 16-week double-blind treatment period in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population with analyzable seizure data. Other efficacy analyses included proportion of patients with ≥ 50% seizure reduction, proportion of patients seizure free, and the relationship between clinical response and plasma concentration. Results Median percent reduction was -28.7% for placebo, −38.2% (P = 0.08 vs placebo) for once-daily SPN-804 1200 mg, and −42.9% (P = 0.003) for SPN-804 2400 mg. Responder rates were 28.1%, 36.1% (P = 0.08), and 40.7% (P = 0.02); 16-week seizure-free rates in a pragmatic ITT analysis were 3.3%, 4.9% (P = 0.59), and 11.4% (P = 0.008), respectively. When data were analyzed separately for study site clusters, a post hoc analysis demonstrated that both SPN-804 dosages were significantly superior to placebo in median percent seizure reduction (placebo: −13.3%; 1200 mg: −34.5%, P = 0.02; 2400 mg: −52.7%, P = 0.006) in the North American study site cluster. A concentration–response analysis also supported a clinically meaningful effect for 1200 mg. Adverse event types reflected the drug's established profile. Adverse event frequency was consistent with a pharmacokinetic profile in which SPN-804 produces lower peak plasma concentrations vs immediate-release OXC. Once-daily dosing was not

  15. Intravenous levetiracetam terminates refractory status epilepticus in two patients with migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilio, Maria Roberta; Bianchi, Roberto; Balestri, Martina; Onofri, Alfredo; Giovannini, Simona; Di Capua, Matteo; Vigevano, Federico

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of intravenous (IV) levetiracetam in refractory status epilepticus of migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI). IV levetiracetam was infused in two infants, first as a loading dose of 60mg/kg in 30min, then at 30mg/kg twice a day. Both infants were continuously monitored with video-EEG before, during and after the drug trial. Blood count, liver enzymes, serum creatinine, ammonia and lactate blood levels were performed repeatedly before and after the IV levetiracetam administration. Follow-up was of 16 and 10 months. EEG monitoring allowed the diagnosis of MPSI, showing the typical seizures pattern in both patients. IV levetiracetam was effective in stopping status epilepticus in both infants. Levetiracetam also prevented the recurrence of status epilepticus during follow-up. No adverse reactions were observed during the infusion phase or during follow-up. MPSI is a newly recognized epileptic syndrome characterized by early onset of intractable partial seizures arisingly independently and sequentially from both hemispheres, migrating from one region of the brain to another and from one hemisphere to another. We report the efficacy of intravenous levetiracetam in resolving refractory status epilepticus in two infants with this new epilepsy syndrome.

  16. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements

  17. Seizure frequency in pregnant women treated with lamotrigine monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Petrenaite, Vaiva

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the pharmacokinetics of the new antiepileptic drug (AED) lamotrigine (LTG) are substantially influenced by pregnancy and are more likely to be associated with seizure deterioration in pregnancy compared to other AEDs. This is of great concern, as LTG has de...

  18. Role of I-123-iomazenil SPEDT imaging in drug resistant epilepsy with complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeholm, H.; Rosen, I.; Elmqvist, D. [Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    Fifteen patients with therapy resistant partial complex seizures with no structural lesions were examined interictally with 123-I-IOMAXENIL SPECT for measurement of benzodiazepine receptor distribution and with 99m-Tc-HMPAO SPEDT for measurement of cerebral blood flow distribution. Regional abnormalities were correlated with the seizure onset patterns in EEG later recorded with implanted subdural strips. SPECT scans were made immediately after and at 1 and 2 h after intravenous injection of 123-I-Iomaxenil. During that time there was a continuous change from an immediate flow-related distribution toward a more specific receptor distribution. The decay of radioactivity of I-123 in the brain was linear over time. Two patients on benzodiazepine treatment showed much faster elimination and showed no focal abnormalities. Eight patients with clear-cut unifocal seizure onset showed concordant focal benzodiazepine defects. These patients showed a progressive focus/homotopic non-focus enhancement over time much larger than the HMPAO scans in the same patients. Also the estimated focal area of abnormality was more restricted in the Iomazenil scans than in HMPAO scans. Five patients had more complex seizure onset patterns. In these patients a mismatch between the locations of abnormalities in Iomaxenil and HMPAO scans were often found but benzodiazepine receptor abnormalities were more circumscribed also in these patients. The results suggest that 123-I-Iomazenil SPECT is more useful than 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT when applied interictally in patients with partial complex epilepsy, since in addition to demonstrate the hemispheric laterality of the epileptogenic zone, 123-I-Iomazenil appears to indicate its anatomical location with higher confidence, which could be of practical value for positioning of intracranial EEG electrodes. (au) 36 refs.

  19. Retention, dosing, tolerability and patient reported seizure outcome of Zonisamide as only add-on treatment under real-life conditions in adult patients with partial onset seizures: Results of the observational study ZOOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Hajo; Baulac, Michel; McMurray, Rob; Kockelmann, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Zonisamide is licensed for adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalisation in patients 6 years and older and as monotherapy for the treatment of partial seizures in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy, and shows a favourable pharmacokinetic profile with low interaction potential with other drugs. The aim of the present study was to gather real-life data on retention and modalities of zonisamide use when administered as only add-on treatment to a current AED monotherapy in adult patients with partial-onset seizures. This multicenter observational study was performed in 4 European countries and comprised three visits: baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Data on patients' retention, reported efficacy, tolerability and safety, and quality of life was collected. Of 100 included patients, 93 could be evaluated. After 6 months, the retention rate of zonisamide add-on therapy was 82.8%. At this time, a reduction of seizure frequency of at least 50% was observed in 79.7% of patients, with 43.6% reporting seizure freedom over the last 3 months of the study period. Adverse events were reported by 19.4% of patients, with fatigue, agitation, dizziness, and headache being most frequent. Approximately 25% of patients were older than 60 years, many of whom suffered from late-onset epilepsy. Compared to younger patients, these patients showed considerable differences with regard to their antiepileptic drug regimen at baseline, and slightly higher responder and retention rates at 6 months. Despite limitations due to the non-interventional open-label design and the low sample size, the results show that zonisamide as only add-on therapy is well retained, indicating effectiveness in the majority of patients under real-life conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A cost comparison of alternative regimens for treatment-refractory partial seizure disorder: an econometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Chan; Hoffmann, Marc S; Arcona, Steve; D'Souza, Joseph; Wang, Qin; Pashos, Chris L

    2005-10-01

    Partial seizure disorder is typically treated by monotherapy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, when the condition is refractory to the initial treatment regimen, patients may be switched to monotherapy with another AED or to combination therapy with the initial AED plus a second AED. The purpose of this study was to examine the economic costs associated with treatment-refractory partial seizure disorder and to compare the costs of 2 alternative approaches: a switch to oxcarbazepine (OXC) monotherapy or the addition to the regimen of another AED (AED add-on). Adult patients with a diagnosis of partial seizure disorder who received initial AED monotherapy between January 1, 2000, and March 31, 2003, were identified from the PharMetrics Patient-Centric Database, a health plan administrative claims database. The medical and pharmacy history of these patients was analyzed from 6 months before a change to either OXC monotherapy or AED add-on therapy through 12 months after the change in treatment. Total health care resource utilization and the associated costs were compared within each cohort before and after the change, as well as between cohorts, with statistical differences tested using Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Multivariate econometric analyses were performed to examine the impact of age, sex, geographic location, Charlson Comorbidity Index, and the presence of specific comorbidities. Demographic and clinical characteristics 102 were similar between the OXC monotherapy cohort (n = 259) and the AED add-on cohort (n = 795). Annual direct treatment costs increased in both groups in the period after the failure of initial monotherapy, increasing from 10,462 US dollars to 11,360 US dollars in the OXC cohort and from 10,137 US dollars to 12,201 US dollars in the AED add on cohort (P < 0.01). Increased pharmacy costs were the primary driver behind cost increases in both cohorts. Patients in the AED add-on cohort were significantly more likely to have an emergency

  1. The ROME (Retrospective Observational Multicenter study on Eslicarbazepine) study: Efficacy and behavioural effects of Eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive therapy for adults with partial onset seizures in real life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, G; Mecarelli, O; Lanzone, J; Assenza, F; Tombini, M; Di Lazzaro, V; Pulitano, P

    2018-05-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a third-generation member of the dibenzazepine family approved in 2009 by the European Medicines Agency with the indication of adjunctive therapy in adult people with partial-onset seizures (PPOS). We aimed at assessing the ESL impact on seizure frequency and quality of life in PPOS with a particular attention to sleepiness and depression. We evaluated 50 adult PPOS (>18 years; 48 ± 14 years-old; 23 males) treated with adjunctive ESL for ≥2months with a retrospective multi-centric design. Clinical files of the last 2 years were reviewed checking for monthly seizure frequency, treatment retention rate, adverse drug reactions (ADRs), concomitant anti-epileptic drugs and behavioural scales for sleepiness (Stanford Sleepiness Scale, SSS, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale, ESS), depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI) and overall quality of life (QOLIE-31). At the end of 96 ± 28 days of ESL treatment, the mean seizure reduction was 56%; 60% of patients had seizure reduction above 50%, with a 31% of the whole population becoming seizure free. We reported 16 ADRs with 4 hyponatremia. Retention rate was 76%. Patient reported less sleepiness after ESL (SSS, p = 0.031; ESS, p = 0.0000002). Before ESL, 38% of patients had pathologic BDI scores, which normalized in most of them (73%) after ESL (BDI improvement, p = 0.000012). These scores resulted in an amelioration of quality of life (QOLIE-31, p = 0.000002). ESL is a safe and effective anti-epileptic drug in a real life scenario, with an excellent behavioural profile for the overall quality of life and, in particular, for sleepiness and depression. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stereotyped high-frequency oscillations discriminate seizure onset zones and critical functional cortex in focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Gurses, Candan; Sha, Zhiyi; Quach, Michael M; Sencer, Altay; Bebek, Nerses; Curry, Daniel J; Prabhu, Sujit; Tummala, Sudhakar; Henry, Thomas R; Ince, Nuri F

    2018-01-30

    High-frequency oscillations in local field potentials recorded with intracranial EEG are putative biomarkers of seizure onset zones in epileptic brain. However, localized 80-500 Hz oscillations can also be recorded from normal and non-epileptic cerebral structures. When defined only by rate or frequency, physiological high-frequency oscillations are indistinguishable from pathological ones, which limit their application in epilepsy presurgical planning. We hypothesized that pathological high-frequency oscillations occur in a repetitive fashion with a similar waveform morphology that specifically indicates seizure onset zones. We investigated the waveform patterns of automatically detected high-frequency oscillations in 13 epilepsy patients and five control subjects, with an average of 73 subdural and intracerebral electrodes recorded per patient. The repetitive oscillatory waveforms were identified by using a pipeline of unsupervised machine learning techniques and were then correlated with independently clinician-defined seizure onset zones. Consistently in all patients, the stereotypical high-frequency oscillations with the highest degree of waveform similarity were localized within the seizure onset zones only, whereas the channels generating high-frequency oscillations embedded in random waveforms were found in the functional regions independent from the epileptogenic locations. The repetitive waveform pattern was more evident in fast ripples compared to ripples, suggesting a potential association between waveform repetition and the underlying pathological network. Our findings provided a new tool for the interpretation of pathological high-frequency oscillations that can be efficiently applied to distinguish seizure onset zones from functionally important sites, which is a critical step towards the translation of these signature events into valid clinical biomarkers.awx374media15721572971001. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on

  3. The impact of antidepressants on seizure frequency and depressive and anxiety disorders of patients with epilepsy: Is it worth investigating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribot, Ramses; Ouyang, Bichun; Kanner, Andres M

    2017-05-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders in patients with epilepsy (PWE) remain under-recognized and under-treated, despite being the most common psychiatric co-morbidities. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are considered first-line treatment for primary depression and anxiety disorders. We performed this study to investigate if SSRIs and SNRIs could affect the seizure frequency of PWE and to assess whether such effect is independent of the response of the mood and anxiety disorders to these drugs. This was a retrospective study of 100 consecutive PWE who were started on an SSRI or SNRI for the treatment of a depressive and/or anxiety disorder. Every patient underwent a psychiatric evaluation by one of the investigators using a semi-structured interview who also managed the pharmacologic treatment in all the patients. Patients were excluded if they had a diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures or if they had undergone epilepsy surgery or the implant of the vagal nerve stimulator six months before and after the start of the antidepressant therapy. The final analysis was conducted in 84 patients. For each type of seizure, an average and maximal monthly seizure frequency during the six months preceding and following the start of psychotropic drugs was extracted from the medical records. We identified the number of patients whose seizure frequency during treatment with antidepressants: (i) shifted from a seizure/month and vice-versa, (ii) increased beyond maximal/monthly baseline frequency, and (iii) patients who developed de-novo generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures. None of the patients with a baseline seizure frequency seizure/month went on to have ≥1seizure/month after initiating treatment with antidepressants, had an increase in frequency beyond baseline maximal counts or developed de-novo-GTC seizures. Furthermore, there was no seizure recurrence among patients that had been seizure

  4. Frequency of seizures and epilepsy in neurological HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellinghaus, C; Engbring, C; Kovac, S; Möddel, G; Boesebeck, F; Fischera, M; Anneken, K; Klönne, K; Reichelt, D; Evers, S; Husstedt, I W

    2008-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated both with infections of the central nervous system and with neurological deficits due to direct effects of the neurotropic virus. Seizures and epilepsy are not rare among HIV-infected patients. We investigated the frequency of acute seizures and epilepsy of patients in different stages of HIV infection. In addition, we compared the characteristics of patients who experienced provoked seizures only with those of patients who developed epilepsy. The database of the Department of Neurology, University of Münster, was searched for patients with HIV infection admitted between 1992 and 2004. Their charts were reviewed regarding all available sociodemographic, clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and laboratory data, therapy and outcome. Stage of infection according to the CDC classification and the epileptogenic zone were determined. Of 831 HIV-infected patients treated in our department, 51 (6.1%) had seizures or epilepsy. Three of the 51 patients (6%) were diagnosed with epilepsy before the onset of the HIV infection. Fourteen patients (27%) only had single or few provoked seizures in the setting of acute cerebral disorders (eight patients), drug withdrawal or sleep withdrawal (two patients), or of unknown cause (four patients). Thirty-four patients (67%) developed epilepsy in the course of their HIV infection. Toxoplasmosis (seven patients), progressive multifocal leukencephalopathy (seven patients) and other acute or subacute cerebral infections (five patients) were the most frequent causes of seizures. EEG data of 38 patients were available. EEG showed generalized and diffuse slowing only in 9 patients, regional slowing in 14 patients and regional slowing and epileptiform discharges in 1 patient. Only 14 of the patients had normal EEG. At the last contact, the majority of the patients (46 patients=90%) were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Twenty-seven patients (53%) were on

  5. Information theoretic measures of network coordination in high-frequency scalp EEG reveal dynamic patterns associated with seizure termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Schomer, Donald L; Chang, Bernard S

    2013-08-01

    How a seizure terminates is still under-studied and, despite its clinical importance, remains an obscure phase of seizure evolution. Recent studies of seizure-related scalp EEGs at frequencies >100 Hz suggest that neural activity, in the form of oscillations and/or neuronal network interactions, may play an important role in preictal/ictal seizure evolution (Andrade-Valenca et al., 2011; Stamoulis et al., 2012). However, the role of high-frequency activity in seizure termination, is unknown, if it exists at all. Using information theoretic measures of network coordination, this study investigated ictal and immediate postictal neurodynamic interactions encoded in scalp EEGs from a relatively small sample of 8 patients with focal epilepsy and multiple seizures originating in temporal and/or frontal brain regions, at frequencies ≤ 100 Hz and >100 Hz, respectively. Despite some heterogeneity in the dynamics of these interactions, consistent patterns were also estimated. Specifically, in several seizures, linear or non-linear increase in high-frequency neuronal coordination during ictal intervals, coincided with a corresponding decrease in coordination at frequencies interval, which continues during the postictal interval. This may be one of several possible mechanisms that facilitate seizure termination. In fact, inhibition of pairwise interactions between EEGs by other signals in their spatial neighborhood, quantified by negative interaction information, was estimated at frequencies ≤ 100 Hz, at least in some seizures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Personality and Psychopathology of Patients with Grandmal and Complex Partial Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najafi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epileptic patients have special mental profile and experience emotional and psychopathological problems. Some studies have reported that epilepsy and psychopathology occur together. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mental profile of Complex partial seizure (CPS and Grandmal seizure (GMS patients and compare them with the control group. Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was carried out in 2008 at the neurological clinics of Isfahan and included 40 Patients with CPS and GMS epilepsy selected conveniently and control group included relatives of the patients. Psychological and personality profile was measured with MMPI inventory. The obtained data was analyzed with SPSS software, mainly through the analysis of Chi Square and ANOVA. Results: The findings of this research showed that although the scores of clinical scales in MMPI are higher than control group, this psychopathology isn’t abnormal. Epileptic patients in hypochondria, depression and hysteria had more elevated levels in comparison with the control group, but this difference was significant only in CPS patients. Conclusion: The results showed that epileptic patients tend to have more psychological disorders than normal people. These findings emphasize the necessity for psychological treatment along with drug therapy.

  7. The cognitive effects of oxcarbazepine versus carbamazepine or valproate in newly diagnosed children with partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Filippo; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Campistol, Jaume; Rapatz, Guenter; Daehler, Maja; Sturm, Yvonne; Aldenkamp, Albert P

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the effect of oxcarbazepine against standard antiepileptic drug therapy (carbamazepine and valproate) on cognitive function in children and adolescents (aged 6 to effect (n=8). Mean CVST time decreased in all groups, indicating an improvement of mental processing speed and no cognitive impairment in any treatment group. No statistically significant difference was observed between oxcarbazepine and combined carbamazepine/valproate. Analysis of secondary variables did not show statistically significant differences between oxcarbazepine, carbamazepine and valproate. Analysis of intelligence test results showed that the number of correct answers increased at end point in all groups. The percentage of patients remaining seizure free throughout treatment was comparable across all groups (oxcarbazepine 58%; carbamazepine 46%; valproate 54%; carbamazepine/valproate 50%). The most common adverse events were fatigue and headache for oxcarbazepine, fatigue and rash for carbamazepine, and headache, increased appetite and alopecia for valproate. Oxcarbazepine treatment over 6 months does not display any differential effects on cognitive function and intelligence in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed partial seizures relative to standard antiepileptic drug therapy. No impairment in cognitive function was observed in any treatment group over a 6-month period.

  8. Investigation of obsessive-compulsive disorder and assessment of obsessionality as a personality trait in patients with complex partial seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banihashemian K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Behavioral changes in patients with epilepsy could cause comorbid psychiatric disorders such as anxiety disorders. This study is concerned with investigation of obsessive-compulsive disorders and assessment of obsessionality as a personality trait in patients with complex partial seizure. "n"nMethods: Seventy six patients with complex partial seizure, 74 patients with generalized epilepsy that referred to Shiraz psychiatric professional center during three month (from July to September 2009, and 76 matched healthy controls were randomly selected and evaluated using the Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (Y-BOCS, short form of Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory (MMPI and clinical interview. "n"nResults: Complex partial seizure and obsessive-compulsive disorder (%13.15 are significantly more prevalent than generalized seizure (%2.70 and than control groups (%1.31 (p<0.001, and mean of psychasthenia scale (Pt scale scores in patients with complex partial seizure is more than mean of Pt scores in generalized epilepsy and control groups (p<0.001. There is significant relationship between total score of Yale-Brown scale and Pt scale in MMPI (r=0.79, p<0.01."n"nConclusions: Patients with complex

  9. Regional blood perfusion in childhood partial seizure using N-isopropyl-p-[I-123]iodoamphetamine and single photon emission CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michihiro, Narumi; Kurosawa, Yumiko; Hibio, Shuichi; Ishihara, Hiroaki; Ariizumi, Motomizu

    1989-01-01

    Single photon emission CT (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[I-123]iodoamphetamine was performed in 20 pediatric patients with partial seizure to examine regional blood perfusion. In detecting location of abnormality, SPECT and EEG were concordant in 13 patients (65%) and discordant in 4 patients (20%). In 7 patients undergoing SPECT one to 4 years after seizure onset, decreased blood perfusion corresponded to focal abnormality on EEG. In other 9 patiets in whom SPECT was performed within one year, however, location of abnormality on SPECT did not necessarily concur with that on EEG. These findings suggest that brain lesions are not focal but extensive at the early stage of partial seizure and that they are becoming focal with the mature of the central nervous system. (Namekawa, K)

  10. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Emilio; Mumoli,Laura; Palleria,Caterina; Gasparini,Sara; Citraro,Rita; Labate,Angelo; Ferlazzo,Edoardo; Gambardella,Antonio; De Sarro,Giovambattista

    2015-01-01

    Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum] Mumoli L, Palleria C, Gasparini S, et al. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2015;9:5719–5725.   The authors advise several errors in the paper that are corrected in Corrigendum. View the original article by Mumoli et al.

  11. Budget impact analysis of adjunctive therapy with lacosamide for partial-onset epileptic seizures in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to compute the budget impact of lacosamide, a new adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in epilepsy patients from 16 years of age who are uncontrolled and having previously used at least three anti-epileptic drugs from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective. The budget impact analysis compared the 'world with lacosamide' to the 'world without lacosamide' and calculated how a change in the mix of anti-epileptic drugs used to treat uncontrolled epilepsy would impact drug spending from 2008 to 2013. Data on the number of patients and on the market shares of anti-epileptic drugs were taken from Belgian sources and from the literature. Unit costs of anti-epileptic drugs originated from Belgian sources. The budget impact was calculated from two scenarios about the market uptake of lacosamide. The Belgian target population is expected to increase from 5333 patients in 2008 to 5522 patients in 2013. Assuming that the market share of lacosamide increases linearly over time and is taken evenly from all other anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide increases from €5249 (0.1% of reference drug budget) in 2008 to €242,700 (4.7% of reference drug budget) in 2013. Assuming that 10% of patients use standard AED therapy plus lacosamide, the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide is around €800,000-900,000 per year (or 16.7% of the reference drug budget). Adjunctive therapy with lacosamide would raise drug spending for this patient population by as much as 16.7% per year. However, this budget impact analysis did not consider the fact that lacosamide reduces costs of seizure management and withdrawal. The literature suggests that, if savings in other healthcare costs are taken into account, adjunctive therapy with lacosamide may be cost saving.

  12. Exploring the time-frequency content of high frequency oscillations for automated identification of seizure onset zone in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Sha, Zhiyi; Sencer, Altay; Aydoseli, Aydin; Bebek, Nerse; Abosch, Aviva; Henry, Thomas; Gurses, Candan; Ince, Nuri Firat

    2016-04-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) in intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings are considered as promising clinical biomarkers of epileptogenic regions in the brain. The aim of this study is to improve and automatize the detection of HFOs by exploring the time-frequency content of iEEG and to investigate the seizure onset zone (SOZ) detection accuracy during the sleep, awake and pre-ictal states in patients with epilepsy, for the purpose of assisting the localization of SOZ in clinical practice. Ten-minute iEEG segments were defined during different states in eight patients with refractory epilepsy. A three-stage algorithm was implemented to detect HFOs in these segments. First, an amplitude based initial detection threshold was used to generate a large pool of HFO candidates. Then distinguishing features were extracted from the time and time-frequency domain of the raw iEEG and used with a Gaussian mixture model clustering to isolate HFO events from other activities. The spatial distribution of HFO clusters was correlated with the seizure onset channels identified by neurologists in seven patient with good surgical outcome. The overlapping rates of localized channels and seizure onset locations were high in all states. The best result was obtained using the iEEG data during sleep, achieving a sensitivity of 81%, and a specificity of 96%. The channels with maximum number of HFOs identified epileptogenic areas where the seizures occurred more frequently. The current study was conducted using iEEG data collected in realistic clinical conditions without channel pre-exclusion. HFOs were investigated with novel features extracted from the entire frequency band, and were correlated with SOZ in different states. The results indicate that automatic HFO detection with unsupervised clustering methods exploring the time-frequency content of raw iEEG can be efficiently used to identify the epileptogenic zone with an accurate and efficient manner.

  13. Why are seizures rare in rapid eye movement sleep? Review of the frequency of seizures in different sleep stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Marcus; Pavlova, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less). We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  14. Update on the mechanisms and roles of high-frequency oscillations in seizures and epileptic disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Alvarado-Rojas, C.; Schevon, C.A.; Staba, R.; Stacey, W.; Wendling, F.; Avoli, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2017), s. 1330-1339 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * epilepsy * ripples * fast ripples * ictogenesis * epileptogenesis * seizures * interneurons * computer models Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  15. Pre- and postoperative memory of dichotically presented words in patients with complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, S A; Nilsson, L G; Silfvenius, H

    1989-01-01

    Dichotic listening tests were used to determine cerebral hemisphere memory functions in patients with complex partial seizures before, 10 days after, and 1-3 yr after right (RTE) or left (LTE) temporal-lobe excisions. Control subjects were also tested on two occasions. The tests consisted of presenting a series of 12-word lists and 7-word lists alternately to the two ears while backward speech was presented to the other ear. Measures of immediate free recall, final free recall, final cued recall, and serial recall were employed. The results revealed: (a) that both groups of patients were inferior the control group in tests tapping long-term memory functions rather than short-term memory functions, (b) a right-ear advantage for RTE patients at postoperative testing, (c) that the LTE group was more affected by surgery than the RTE group, and (d) a general improvement in recall performance from early to late postoperative testing. Taken together, these results indicate that the present dichotic test can be used as a non-invasive hemisphere memory test to complement invasive techniques for diagnosis of patients considered for epilepsy surgery.

  16. Reduced GABAA receptor density contralateral to a potentially epileptogenic MRI abnormality in a patient with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwert, T.; Stodieck, S.R.G.; Puskas, C.; Diehl, B.; Puskas, Z.; Schuierer, G.; Vollet, B.; Schober, O.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging cerebral GABA A receptor density (GRD) with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and iodine-123 iomazenil is highly accurate in lateralizing epileptogenic foci in patients with complex partial seizures of temporal origin. Limited knowledge exists on how iomazenil SPET compares with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this regard. We present a patient with complex partial seizures in whom MRI had identified an arachnoid cyst anterior to the tip of the left temporal lobe. Contralaterally to this structural abnormality, interictal electroencephalography (EEG) performed after sleep deprivation disclosed an intermittent frontotemporal dysrhythmic focus with slow and sharp waves. On iomazenil SPET images GRD was significantly reduced in the right temporal lobe and thus contralaterally to the MRI abnormality, but ipsilaterally to the pathological EEG findings. These data suggest that iomazenil SPET may significantly contribute to the presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients even when MRI identifies potentialy epileptogenic structural lesions. (orig.)

  17. Safety and efficacy of levetiracetam for the treatment of partial onset seizures in children from one month of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Cormier, Catherine J ChuMassachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Programs in Child Neurology and Neurophysiology, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in the pediatric population, affecting up to one percent of children, and for which the mainstay of treatment is anticonvulsant medication. Despite the frequent use of anticonvulsant drugs, remarkably little is known about the safety and efficacy of most of these medications in the pediatric epilepsy population. Of 34 anticonvulsants currently approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, only 13 have been approved for use in children. Although infants and young children are disproportionately affected by epilepsy, there are currently only three anticonvulsant medications that have been specifically evaluated and approved for use in children younger than 2 years of age. In 2012, the FDA approved levetiracetam as an adjunctive treatment for partial onset seizures in infants and children from one month of age. Here we review the available data on levetiracetam in the pediatric epilepsy population. We first discuss the pharmacological profile of levetiracetam, including its mechanism of action, formulations and dosing, and pharmacokinetics in children. We then review the available efficacy, safety, and tolerability data in children from one month of age with partial onset seizures. We conclude that the current data leading to the approval of levetiracetam for use in infants and children with partial onset seizures is encouraging, although more work needs to be done before definitive conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy of levetiracetam across different pediatric age groups.Keywords: levetiracetam, anticonvulsant drug, partial seizures, pediatric epilepsy

  18. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumoli L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum] Mumoli L, Palleria C, Gasparini S, et al. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2015;9:5719–5725.   The authors advise several errors in the paper that are corrected in Corrigendum. View the original article by Mumoli et al.

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of topiramate as adjunctive drug in the treatment of refractory partial seizures with Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai LI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition characterized by paroxysm of seizures due to abnormal electrical discharge from central nervous system neurons. Several new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs were listed over the past two decades, and they were believed to be equally effective and have better tolerability and side effect profiles. This paper aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive topiramate in refractory partial seizures.  Methods Relevant research articles about randomized controlled trials of adjunctive topiramate in refractory partial seizures, with topiramate, Topamax, add-on treatment, adjunctive treatment, add-on therapy, adjunctive therapy, refractory partial seizure, refractory partial epilepsy both in Chinese and English as retrieval words, were retrieved from PubMed (1995-2014, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 1995-2014, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR, 1995-2014, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1995-2014 and Wanfang Data (1999-2014. Two reviewers independently evaluated the quality of the included articles and abstracted the data. A Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.0 software.  Results According to the enrollment criteria, 13 prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials with a total of 1622 patients were finally selected. The proportions of patients with reduction in seizure frequency ≥ 50% (OR = 3.710, 95% CI: 2.870-4.810; P = 0.000, ≥ 75% (OR = 7.220, 95% CI: 3.310-15.750; P = 0.000 and seizure free (OR = 3.380, 95%CI: 1.720-6.640; P = 0.000 in topiramate group were significantly higher than that in control group. The treatment withdrawal ratio was significantly higher compared to placebo in 600 mg/d and 800 mg/d subgroups, but not in 200 mg/d subgroup (200 mg/d: OR = 2.170, 95%CI: 0.470-9.950, P = 0.320; 600 mg/d: OR = 2.090, 95%CI: 1.020-4.270, P = 0.040; 800 mg/d: OR = 8.000, 95%CI: 1.390-46.140, P = 0.020. The common

  20. The appropriacy of fluency tests in assessing epileptic seizure lateralization in children with partial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Jasmina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluency tests are frequently used in clinical practice to asses executive functions. The literature data are not unequivocal although in a great number of papers is pointed out the importance of the left hemisphere, specially of the left frontal lobes in the mediation of phonological fluency and the right hemisphere in the mediation of nonverbal fluency. This paper considers the suitability of fluency tests for the detection of left versus right seizure laterality. The sample consisted of thirty-two epilepsy patients divided into two groups: LHF-participants with the seizure focus in the left hemisphere (n=16, and DHF-participants with the seizure focus in the right hemisphere (n=16, and K-the control group of t age-matched healthy children (n=50 aged 7-11 years. The qualitative and quantitative comparison of the phonological and nonverbal fluency performance was carried out in consideration of the seizure laterality as well as compared to the healthy controls. The results of phonological fluency performance revealed that the performance of the LHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both DHF and K group. The analysis of nonverbal fluency performance revealed that the performance of the DHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both LHF and K group The qualitative analysis obtained valuable data, which could additionally contribute to the neuropsychological evaluation of the left versus right seizure laterality.

  1. Abnormal binding and disruption in large scale networks involved in human partial seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomei Fabrice

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a marked increase in the amount of electrophysiological and neuroimaging works dealing with the study of large scale brain connectivity in the epileptic brain. Our view of the epileptogenic process in the brain has largely evolved over the last twenty years from the historical concept of “epileptic focus” to a more complex description of “Epileptogenic networks” involved in the genesis and “propagation” of epileptic activities. In particular, a large number of studies have been dedicated to the analysis of intracerebral EEG signals to characterize the dynamic of interactions between brain areas during temporal lobe seizures. These studies have reported that large scale functional connectivity is dramatically altered during seizures, particularly during temporal lobe seizure genesis and development. Dramatic changes in neural synchrony provoked by epileptic rhythms are also responsible for the production of ictal symptoms or changes in patient’s behaviour such as automatisms, emotional changes or consciousness alteration. Beside these studies dedicated to seizures, large-scale network connectivity during the interictal state has also been investigated not only to define biomarkers of epileptogenicity but also to better understand the cognitive impairments observed between seizures.

  2. Review of levetiracetam, with a focus on the extended release formulation, as adjuvant therapy in controlling partial-onset seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M Ulloa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carol M Ulloa, Allen Towfigh, Joseph SafdiehDepartment of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Levetiracetam is a second-generation antiepileptic drug (AED with a unique chemical structure and mechanism of action. The extended release formulation of levetiracetam (Keppra XR™; UCB Pharma was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients 16 years of age and older with epilepsy. This approval is based on a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational trial. Levetiracetam XR allows for once-daily dosing, which may increase compliance and, given the relatively constant plasma concentrations, may minimize concentration-related adverse effects. Levetiracetam’s mode of action is not fully elucidated, but it has been found to target high-voltage, N-type calcium channels as well as the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A. Levetiracetam has nearly ideal pharmacokinetics. It is rapidly and almost completely absorbed after oral ingestion, is ‹10% protein-bound, demonstrates linear kinetics, is minimally metabolized through a pathway independent of the cytochrome P450 system, has no significant drug–drug interactions, and has a wide therapeutic index. The most common reported adverse events with levetiracetam XR were somnolence, irritability, dizziness, nausea, influenza, and nasopharyngitis. Levetiracetam XR provides an efficacious and well-tolerated treatment option for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures.Keywords: levetiracetam, partial-onset seizures, antiepileptic drugs

  3. Right hemispheric reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in a patient with left hemispheric partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Gina S; McCaslin, Justin; Shamim, Sadat

    2017-04-01

    We report a right-handed 19-year-old girl who developed reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) lateralized to the right hemisphere with simultaneous new-onset left hemispheric seizures. RCVS, typically more diffuse, was lateralized to one of the cerebral hemispheres.

  4. PET and SPECT in medically non-refractory complex partial seizures. Temporal asymmetries of glucose consumption, Benzodiazepine receptor density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheja, P.; Kuwert, T.; Wolf, K.; Schober, O.; Stodieck, S.R.G.; Diehl, B.; Ringelstein, E.B.; Schuierer, G.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: In contrast to medically refractory complex partial seizures (CPS), only limited knowledge exists on cerebral perfusion and metabolism in medically non-refractory CPS. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of temporal asymmetries in regional cerebral glucose consumption (rCMRGlc), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral benzodiazepine receptor density (BRD) in this group of patients. Methods: The study included 49 patients with medically non-refractory cryptogenic CPS (age: 36.0±16.1 years). rCMRGlc was studied with F-18-FDG-PET (FDG), rCBF with Tc-99m-ECD-SPECT (ECD), and BRD with I-123-iomazenil-SPECT (IMZ). All studies were performed interictally and within four weeks in each patient. Duration of epilepsy ranged from 0.1 to 42 years (median 4.0 years). SPECT was performed with the triple-headed SPECT camera Multispect 3, PET with the PET camera ECAT EXACT 47. Using linear profiles, glucose consumption, as well as uptake of ECD and IMZ, were measured in four temporal regions of interest (ROIs), and asymmetry indices were calculated (ASY). The results were compared to 95% confidence intervals determined in control subjects. Results: Thirty-five of the 49 (71%) patients had at least one significantly elevated ASY; temporal rCMRGlc was asymmetrical in 41% of the patients, temporal BRD in 29%, and temporal rCBF in 24%. One patient had an asymmetry of all three variables, two of temporal rCMRGlc and BRD, three of temporal rCMRGlc and rCBF, and another four of rCBF and BRD. Fourteen patients had an isolated temporal asymmetry in rCMRGlc, seven in BRD, and four in rCBF. A discrepancy in lateralization between the three modalities was not observed. Conclusion: The majority of patients with medically non-refractory CPS have focal abnormalities of blood flow and metabolism in their temporal lobe. In this group of patients, FDG-PET demonstrates abnormalities with the highest frequency of the three modalities studied, followed by IMZ

  5. High-dose phenobarbital with intermittent short-acting barbiturates for acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takashi; Takayanagi, Masaru; Kitamura, Taro; Nishio, Toshiyuki; Numata, Yurika; Endo, Wakaba; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Ohura, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is characterized by repetitive seizures during the acute and chronic phases and has a poor neurological outcome. Burst-suppression coma via continuous i.v. infusion of a short-acting barbiturate is used to terminate refractory seizures, but the severe side-effects of short-acting barbiturates are problematic. We report on a 9-year-old boy with AERRPS who was effectively treated with very-high-dose phenobarbital (VHDPB) combined with intermittent short-acting barbiturates. VHDPB side-effects were mild, especially compared with those associated with continuous i.v. infusion of short-acting barbiturates (dosage, 40-75 mg/kg/day; maximum blood level, 290 μg/mL). Using VHDPB as the main treatment, short-acting barbiturates were used intermittently and in small amounts. This is the first report to show that VHDPB, combined with intermittent short-acting barbiturates, can effectively treat AERRPS. After treatment, convulsions were suppressed and daily life continued, but intellectual impairment and high-level dysfunction remained. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumoli L

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Laura Mumoli,1 Caterina Palleria,2 Sara Gasparini,1 Rita Citraro,2 Angelo Labate,1 Edoardo Ferlazzo,1 Antonio Gambardella,1 Giovambattista De Sarro,2 Emilio Russo2 1Institute of Neurology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, University Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: Brivaracetam (BRV, a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10–30-fold more potent than levetiracetam (LEV, is highly effective in a wide range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. BRV and LEV similarly bind to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, while differentiating for other pharmacological effects; in fact, BRV does not inhibit high voltage Ca2+ channels and AMPA receptors as LEV. Furthermore, BRV apparently exhibits inhibitory activity on neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. BRV is currently waiting for approval both in the United States and the European Union as adjunctive therapy for patients with partial seizures. In patients with photosensitive epilepsy, BRV showed a dose-dependent effect in suppressing or attenuating the photoparoxysmal response. In well-controlled trials conducted to date, adjunctive BRV demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability in patients with focal epilepsy. BRV has a linear pharmacokinetic profile. BRV is extensively metabolized and excreted by urine (only 8%–11% unchanged. The metabolites of BRV are inactive, and hydrolysis of the acetamide group is the mainly involved metabolic pathway; hepatic impairment probably requires dose adjustment. BRV does not seem to influence other antiepileptic drug plasma levels. Six clinical trials have so far been completed indicating that BRV is effective in controlling seizures when used at doses between 50 and 200 mg/d. The drug is generally well-tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects; this is confirmed by the low discontinuation rate observed in these clinical studies. The most common side effects are related to

  7. Study of inter-relationship of depression, seizure frequency and quality of life of people with epilepsy in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Mehta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that can have profound physical, social and psychological consequences. We aimed to assess the clinical predictors of quality of life of people with epilepsy. We recruited 31 patients suffering from epilepsy in this cross-sectional study. Their clinical profile was recorded. Quality Of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-31 was used to assess quality of life of our patients. Depression was screened by Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory in Epilepsy (NDDI-E. Among all the clinical variables, only seizure frequency significantly correlated with seizure worry (P=0.002, emotional well-being (P=0.026 and social functions (P=0.013 subscales of QOLIE-31. NDDI-E score showed a significant negative correlation with all the subscales of QOLIE-31 except medication effects (P=0.993. A significant positive correlation was also noted between seizure frequency and NDDI-E score (r=0.417, P=0.020. Seizure frequency and depression are the most important predictors of quality of life in epilepsy patients. The management of patients with epilepsy should not only be aimed at just preventing seizures but the treating clinicians should also be cognizant about depression which itself can significantly affect the quality of life of patients.

  8. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumoli, Laura; Palleria, Caterina; Gasparini, Sara; Citraro, Rita; Labate, Angelo; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gambardella, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Brivaracetam (BRV), a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10-30-fold more potent than levetiracetam (LEV), is highly effective in a wide range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. BRV and LEV similarly bind to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, while differentiating for other pharmacological effects; in fact, BRV does not inhibit high voltage Ca(2+) channels and AMPA receptors as LEV. Furthermore, BRV apparently exhibits inhibitory activity on neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. BRV is currently waiting for approval both in the United States and the European Union as adjunctive therapy for patients with partial seizures. In patients with photosensitive epilepsy, BRV showed a dose-dependent effect in suppressing or attenuating the photoparoxysmal response. In well-controlled trials conducted to date, adjunctive BRV demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability in patients with focal epilepsy. BRV has a linear pharmacokinetic profile. BRV is extensively metabolized and excreted by urine (only 8%-11% unchanged). The metabolites of BRV are inactive, and hydrolysis of the acetamide group is the mainly involved metabolic pathway; hepatic impairment probably requires dose adjustment. BRV does not seem to influence other antiepileptic drug plasma levels. Six clinical trials have so far been completed indicating that BRV is effective in controlling seizures when used at doses between 50 and 200 mg/d. The drug is generally well-tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects; this is confirmed by the low discontinuation rate observed in these clinical studies. The most common side effects are related to central nervous system and include fatigue, dizziness, and somnolence; these apparently disappear during treatment. In this review, we analyzed BRV, focusing on the current evidences from experimental animal models to clinical studies with particular interest on potential use in clinical

  9. Seizure frequency correlates with loss of dentate gyrus GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Paul S.; Abrams, Emily; Wen, Xiling

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy occurs in one of 26 people. Temporal lobe epilepsy is common and can be difficult to treat effectively. It can develop after brain injuries that damage the hippocampus. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms involving the hippocampal dentate gyrus have been proposed. This study evaluated a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy to test which pathological changes in the dentate gyrus correlate with seizure frequency and help prioritize potential mechanisms for further study. FVB mice (n = 127) that had experienced status epilepticus after systemic treatment with pilocarpine 31–61 days earlier were video-monitored for spontaneous, convulsive seizures 9 hr/day every day for 24–36 days. Over 4,060 seizures were observed. Seizure frequency ranged from an average of one every 3.6 days to one every 2.1 hr. Hippocampal sections were processed for Nissl stain, Prox1-immunocytochemistry, GluR2-immunocytochemistry, Timm stain, glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunocytochemistry, glutamic acid decarboxylase in situ hybridization, and parvalbumin-immunocytochemistry. Stereological methods were used to measure hilar ectopic granule cells, mossy cells, mossy fiber sprouting, astrogliosis, and GABAergic interneurons. Seizure frequency was not significantly correlated with the generation of hilar ectopic granule cells, the number of mossy cells, the extent of mossy fiber sprouting, the extent of astrogliosis, or the number of GABAergic interneurons in the molecular layer or hilus. Seizure frequency significantly correlated with the loss of GABAergic interneurons in or adjacent to the granule cell layer, but not with the loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. These findings prioritize the loss of granule cell layer interneurons for further testing as a potential cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:28425097

  10. Seizure frequency correlates with loss of dentate gyrus GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Paul S; Abrams, Emily; Wen, Xiling

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy occurs in one of 26 people. Temporal lobe epilepsy is common and can be difficult to treat effectively. It can develop after brain injuries that damage the hippocampus. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms involving the hippocampal dentate gyrus have been proposed. This study evaluated a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy to test which pathological changes in the dentate gyrus correlate with seizure frequency and help prioritize potential mechanisms for further study. FVB mice (n = 127) that had experienced status epilepticus after systemic treatment with pilocarpine 31-61 days earlier were video-monitored for spontaneous, convulsive seizures 9 hr/day every day for 24-36 days. Over 4,060 seizures were observed. Seizure frequency ranged from an average of one every 3.6 days to one every 2.1 hr. Hippocampal sections were processed for Nissl stain, Prox1-immunocytochemistry, GluR2-immunocytochemistry, Timm stain, glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunocytochemistry, glutamic acid decarboxylase in situ hybridization, and parvalbumin-immunocytochemistry. Stereological methods were used to measure hilar ectopic granule cells, mossy cells, mossy fiber sprouting, astrogliosis, and GABAergic interneurons. Seizure frequency was not significantly correlated with the generation of hilar ectopic granule cells, the number of mossy cells, the extent of mossy fiber sprouting, the extent of astrogliosis, or the number of GABAergic interneurons in the molecular layer or hilus. Seizure frequency significantly correlated with the loss of GABAergic interneurons in or adjacent to the granule cell layer, but not with the loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. These findings prioritize the loss of granule cell layer interneurons for further testing as a potential cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Clinical utility of adjunctive retigabine in partial onset seizures in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejdak K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Konrad Rejdak1, Jarogniew J Luszczki2,3, Barbara Blaszczyk4, Roman Chwedorowicz5, Stanislaw J Czuczwar2,51Department of Neurology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, 2Department of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, 3Isobolography Analysis Laboratory, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Lublin, 4Faculty of Health Sciences, High School of Economics and Law, Kielce, 5Department of Physiopathology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Lublin, PolandAbstract: In ~30% of epileptic patients, full seizure control is not possible, which is why the search for novel antiepileptic drugs continues. Retigabine exhibits a mechanism of action that is not shared by the available antiepileptic drugs. This antiepileptic enhances potassium currents via Kv7.2–7.3 channels, which very likely results from destabilization of a closed conformation or stabilization of the open conformation of the channels. Generally, the pharmacokinetics of retigabine are linear and the drug undergoes glucuronidation and acetylation. Results from clinical trials indicate that, in the form of an add-on therapy, retigabine proves an effective drug in refractory epileptic patients. The major adverse effects of the add-on treatment are dizziness, somnolence, and fatigue. This epileptic drug is also considered for other conditions – neuropathic pain, affective disorders, stroke, or even Alzheimer’s disease.Keywords: antiepileptic drugs, epilepsy, seizure control

  12. Early Seizure Frequency and Aetiology Predict Long-Term Medical Outcome in Childhood-Onset Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    In clinical practice, it is important to predict as soon as possible after diagnosis and starting treatment, which children are destined to develop medically intractable seizures and be at risk of increased mortality. In this study, we determined factors predictive of long-term seizure and mortality outcome in a population-based cohort of 102…

  13. Epileptic seizure detection from EEG signals with phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiang; Cai, Lihui; Chen, Yingyuan; Qin, Yingmei

    2018-03-01

    As a pattern of cross-frequency coupling (CFC), phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) depicts the interaction between the phase and amplitude of distinct frequency bands from the same signal, and has been proved to be closely related to the brain’s cognitive and memory activities. This work utilized PAC and support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the epileptic seizures from electroencephalogram (EEG) data. The entropy-based modulation index (MI) matrixes are used to express the strength of PAC, from which we extracted features as the input for classifier. Based on the Bonn database, which contains five datasets of EEG segments obtained from healthy volunteers and epileptic subjects, a 100% classification accuracy is achieved for identifying seizure ictal from healthy data, and an accuracy of 97.67% is reached in the classification of ictal EEG signals from inter-ictal EEGs. Based on the CHB-MIT database which is a group of continuously recorded epileptic EEGs by scalp electrodes, a 97.50% classification accuracy is obtained and a raising sign of MI value is found at 6s before seizure onset. The classification performance in this work is effective, and PAC can be considered as a useful tool for detecting and predicting the epileptic seizures and providing reference for clinical diagnosis.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in 120 patients with intractable partial seizures: a preoperative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkopoulos, A.; Haritanti, A.; Papadopoulou, E.; Karanikolas, D.; Fotiadis, N.; Dimitriadis, A.S. [AHEPA University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with medically intractable epilepsy and to compare different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to establish a dedicated and shorter scan time imaging protocol of choice. One hundred and twenty patients with seizures that were refractory to medical treatment were assessed by MRI with spin-echo (SE) T1, fast spin-echo (FSE) T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), inversion recovery (IR) and contrast-enhanced T1 SE sequences. Pathological scans were acquired in 78 patients. Hippocampal sclerosis was detected in 30 patients (25%), cerebral, tumoral, mass lesions in 12 patients (10%), vascular malformations in nine patients (7.5%), cortical infarcts in eight patients (6.7%), cerebral infections in four patients (4.2%) and developmental disorders in 15 patients (12.5%). The most common location of the lesions was the temporal lobe (60%). Coronal, thin (slice thickness 4-5 mm) images have proven to be the most useful in the assessment of the hippocampus. FLAIR and IR are particularly useful in the detection of lesions abutting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and developmental disorders, respectively, while T1 SE sequences before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium offer great facility in identifying space-occupying lesions and infections. MRI is the most important diagnostic tool for the assessment of epileptogenic foci, thus playing the primary role in indicating the type of treatment to be applied. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in 120 patients with intractable partial seizures: a preoperative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, A.; Haritanti, A.; Papadopoulou, E.; Karanikolas, D.; Fotiadis, N.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with medically intractable epilepsy and to compare different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to establish a dedicated and shorter scan time imaging protocol of choice. One hundred and twenty patients with seizures that were refractory to medical treatment were assessed by MRI with spin-echo (SE) T1, fast spin-echo (FSE) T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), inversion recovery (IR) and contrast-enhanced T1 SE sequences. Pathological scans were acquired in 78 patients. Hippocampal sclerosis was detected in 30 patients (25%), cerebral, tumoral, mass lesions in 12 patients (10%), vascular malformations in nine patients (7.5%), cortical infarcts in eight patients (6.7%), cerebral infections in four patients (4.2%) and developmental disorders in 15 patients (12.5%). The most common location of the lesions was the temporal lobe (60%). Coronal, thin (slice thickness 4-5 mm) images have proven to be the most useful in the assessment of the hippocampus. FLAIR and IR are particularly useful in the detection of lesions abutting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and developmental disorders, respectively, while T1 SE sequences before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium offer great facility in identifying space-occupying lesions and infections. MRI is the most important diagnostic tool for the assessment of epileptogenic foci, thus playing the primary role in indicating the type of treatment to be applied. (orig.)

  16. Combined sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and low-frequency stimulation effectively reduce seizures in amygdala-kindled rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Azam; Semnanian, Saeed; Atapour, Nafiseh; Shojaei, Amir; Moradi, Homeira; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2014-08-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is a potential therapy utilized in patients who do not achieve satisfactory control of seizures with pharmacological treatments. Here, we investigated the interaction between anticonvulsant effects of LFS and phenobarbital (a commonly used medicine) on amygdala-kindled seizures in rats. Animals were kindled by electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala in a rapid manner (12 stimulations/day). Fully kindled animals randomly received one of the three treatment choices: phenobarbital (1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 mg/kg; i.p.; 30 min before kindling stimulation), LFS (one or 4 packages contained 100 or 200 monophasic square wave pulses, 0.1-ms pulse duration at 1 Hz, immediately before kindling stimulation) or a combination of both (phenobarbital at 3 mg/kg and LFS). Phenobarbital alone at the doses of 1, 2 and 3 mg/kg had no significant effect on the main seizure parameters. LFS application always produced anticonvulsant effects unless applied with the pattern of one package of 100 pulses, which is considered as non-effective. All the seizure parameters were significantly reduced when phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) was administered prior to the application of the non-effective pattern of LFS. Phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) also increased the anticonvulsant actions of the effective LFS pattern. Our results provide an evidence of a positive cumulative anticonvulsant effect of LFS and phenobarbital, suggesting a potential combination therapy at sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and LFS to achieve a satisfactory clinical effect.

  17. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Doo Young; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Han-Sang; Jun, Jinsun; Kim, Dong-Yub; Kim, Man-Young; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Suh, Hong Il; Lee, Yoojin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Jin Ho; Choi, Woo Chan; Bae, Dae Woong; Shin, Jung-Won; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and new-onset seizure. Methods Adult (age ≥18 years) patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2–4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as “seizure remission”, “> 50% seizure reduction”, or “no change” based on the degree of its decrease. Results Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2–4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events. Conclusion AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE. PMID:26771547

  18. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ick Byun

    Full Text Available To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE and new-onset seizure.Adult (age ≥18 years patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2-4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as "seizure remission", "> 50% seizure reduction", or "no change" based on the degree of its decrease.Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2-4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events.AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE.

  19. Tantrums, Emotion Reactions and Their EEG Correlates in Childhood Benign Rolandic Epilepsy vs. Complex Partial Seizures: Exploratory Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potegal, Michael; Drewel, Elena H; MacDonald, John T

    2018-01-01

    We explored associations between EEG pathophysiology and emotional/behavioral (E/B) problems of children with two types of epilepsy using standard parent questionnaires and two new indicators: tantrums recorded by parents at home and brief, emotion-eliciting situations in the laboratory. Children with Benign Rolandic epilepsy (BRE, N = 6) reportedly had shorter, more angry tantrums from which they recovered quickly. Children with Complex Partial Seizures (CPS, N = 13) had longer, sadder tantrums often followed by bad moods. More generally, BRE correlated with anger and aggression; CPS with sadness and withdrawal. Scores of a composite group of siblings ( N = 11) were generally intermediate between the BRE and CPS groups. Across all children, high voltage theta and/or interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) correlated with negative emotional reactions. Such EEG abnormalities in left hemisphere correlated with greater social fear, right hemisphere EEG abnormalities with greater anger. Right hemisphere localization in CPS was also associated with parent-reported problems at home. If epilepsy alters neural circuitry thereby increasing negative emotions, additional assessment of anti-epileptic drug treatment of epilepsy-related E/B problems would be warranted.

  20. Tantrums, Emotion Reactions and Their EEG Correlates in Childhood Benign Rolandic Epilepsy vs. Complex Partial Seizures: Exploratory Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Potegal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We explored associations between EEG pathophysiology and emotional/behavioral (E/B problems of children with two types of epilepsy using standard parent questionnaires and two new indicators: tantrums recorded by parents at home and brief, emotion-eliciting situations in the laboratory. Children with Benign Rolandic epilepsy (BRE, N = 6 reportedly had shorter, more angry tantrums from which they recovered quickly. Children with Complex Partial Seizures (CPS, N = 13 had longer, sadder tantrums often followed by bad moods. More generally, BRE correlated with anger and aggression; CPS with sadness and withdrawal. Scores of a composite group of siblings (N = 11 were generally intermediate between the BRE and CPS groups. Across all children, high voltage theta and/or interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs correlated with negative emotional reactions. Such EEG abnormalities in left hemisphere correlated with greater social fear, right hemisphere EEG abnormalities with greater anger. Right hemisphere localization in CPS was also associated with parent-reported problems at home. If epilepsy alters neural circuitry thereby increasing negative emotions, additional assessment of anti-epileptic drug treatment of epilepsy-related E/B problems would be warranted.

  1. Absence seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM. Seizures (paroxysmal disorders). In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials ...

  2. Reduced GABA{sub A} receptor density contralateral to a potentially epileptogenic MRI abnormality in a patient with complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwert, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Stodieck, S.R.G. [Dept. of Neurology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Puskas, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Diehl, B. [Dept. of Neurology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Puskas, Z. [Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schuierer, G. [Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Vollet, B. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany); Schober, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster Univ. (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    Imaging cerebral GABA{sub A} receptor density (GRD) with single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and iodine-123 iomazenil is highly accurate in lateralizing epileptogenic foci in patients with complex partial seizures of temporal origin. Limited knowledge exists on how iomazenil SPET compares with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this regard. We present a patient with complex partial seizures in whom MRI had identified an arachnoid cyst anterior to the tip of the left temporal lobe. Contralaterally to this structural abnormality, interictal electroencephalography (EEG) performed after sleep deprivation disclosed an intermittent frontotemporal dysrhythmic focus with slow and sharp waves. On iomazenil SPET images GRD was significantly reduced in the right temporal lobe and thus contralaterally to the MRI abnormality, but ipsilaterally to the pathological EEG findings. These data suggest that iomazenil SPET may significantly contribute to the presurgical evaluation of epileptic patients even when MRI identifies potentialy epileptogenic structural lesions. (orig.)

  3. Benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS: clinical characteristics of seizures according to age at first seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miziara Carmen Silvia M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BECTS is characterized by the presence of simple partial motor seizures in the face and/or oropharynx, with or without sensory symptoms and often with secondary generalization. These seizures tend to occur more often during sleep or drowsiness. According to some authors, generalized seizures prevail over other types particularly among children aged five or less. The purpose of this study is to determine the characteristics of the first epileptic episode among children with BECTS, grouped by age as of their first epileptic seizure, as well as to analyze how such seizures change over the course of clinical evolution. A total of 61 children were examined, 16 of whom below the age of 5 and 45 above. With regard to the first and recurrent epileptic episodes, our final assessment showed that partial seizures occurred more frequently than generalized tonic-clonic seizures in both groups. Although no conclusive relation could be established between the type of partial seizure (i.e. simple versus complex and the children's age as of their first epileptic episode, it was possible to correlate the type of epileptic seizure with their clinical evolution, in which case simple partial seizures proved to be more frequent than complex partial seizures. It should be noted that the number of children under the age of five was relatively small, which evinces the need for further studies. It should also be borne in mind that the reported frequency of generalized seizures in these children's first epileptic episode may be due to their parents' lack of attention and familiarity with this pathology and their attendant difficulty in characterizing its clinical symptoms.

  4. Safety and tolerability of different titration rates of retigabine (ezogabine) in patients with partial-onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Victor; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Brodie, Martin J; Derossett, Sarah E; Nohria, Virinder

    2013-11-01

    Retigabine (RTG; international nonproprietary name)/ezogabine (EZG; US adopted name) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) that prolongs neuronal voltage-gated potassium-channel KCNQ2-5 (Kv 7.2-7.5) opening. This double-blind study evaluated different RTG/EZG dose-titration rates. Patients (N=73) with partial-onset seizures receiving concomitant AEDs were randomized to one of three titration groups, all of which were initiated at RTG/EZG 300mg/day divided into three equal doses. Fast-, medium-, and slow-titration groups received dose increments of 150mg/day every 2, 4, and 7 days, respectively, achieving the target dose of 1200mg/day after 13, 25, and 43 days, respectively. Safety assessments were performed throughout. Discontinuation rates due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were numerically higher in the fast- (10/23) and medium- (7/22) titration groups than in the slow-titration group (3/23) but statistical significance was achieved only for the high-titration group compared with the low-titration group (p=0.024). Stratified analysis, with concomitant AEDs divided into enzyme inducers (carbamazepine, phenytoin, oxcarbazepine) or noninducers, showed that the risk of discontinuation due primarily to TEAEs was significantly higher in the fast- (p=0.010) but not in the medium-titration group (p=0.078) when compared with the slow-titration group. Overall, the slow-titration rate appeared to be best tolerated and was used in further efficacy and safety studies with RTG/EZG. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Partial (focal) seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Instructions Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Abou-Khalil BW, ...

  6. Impact of ictal/postictal regional cerebral blood flow patterns on the management of patients with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borbely, K.; Toth, M.; Solyom, A.; Balogh, A.; Juhos, V.; Neuwirth, M.; Halasz, P.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: RCBF SPECT has been proved to be a sensitive and specific method in the pre-surgical evaluation of patients with complex partial seizures (CPS). Ictal minus interictal rCBF analysis is a routine part in the assessment of epileptogenic foci. During ictal/postictal rCBF studies changes might appear not only in the epileptogenic area. The precise note of the time of the tracer injection for SPECT is the key in interpreting the brain perfusion changes. We studied ictal/postictal rCBF patterns in the brain tissue within, adjacent to, and remote from the epileptogenic foci in 64 patients with CPS. Methods: The assessment included neurological examination, ictal semiology, interictal and ictal electrophysiological recording, MRI, and neuropsychological evaluation. Baseline, ictal and/or postictal SPECT studies were carried out with a standard technique for each patient. SPECT data were analysed visually and by a special region of interests (ROIs) program. Circular ROIs were placed over the basal ganglia, thalamus, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital cortex, and cerebellum. ROIs were normalized to the whole brain average. The statistical analysis was considered significant at P<0.05. MRI was positive in 46 patients, while in 18 cases there were no abnormalities. SPECT results were compared to electrophysiological and surgical findings. Results: The baseline SPECT demonstrated a significant hypoperfusion (P<0.05) in the epileptogenic area (EA) in 37/64 (57.81%) cases. 54/64 (84.38%) of the ictal studies showed a marked hyperperfusion (P<0.005) in the EA with low cerebellar tracer uptake (P<0.05). In 26/64 (40.63%) patients the early postictal studies demonstrated moderate or high tracer uptake in the EA (P<0.05) with diffuse perfusion abnormalities in the surrounding tissue. Late postictal studies (14/64, 21.88%) showed hypoperfusion (P<0.05) in the EA with moderate or high tracer uptake in the surrounding tissue. The results of the ictal/postictal studies

  7. Imepitoin withdrawal in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy well-controlled with imepitoin and phenobarbital and/or potassium bromide does not increase seizure frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stee, K; Martlé, V; Broeckx, B J G; Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-12-01

    Phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) add-on treatment decreases the average monthly seizure frequency in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy resistant to a maximum dose of imepitoin. The importance of continued administration of imepitoin in these dogs is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to assess whether imepitoin withdrawal would destabilize epileptic seizure control. In this prospective clinical trial epileptic seizure control was evaluated by comparing the monthly seizure frequency of 13 dogs with well-controlled idiopathic epilepsy receiving a combination of imepitoin and phenobarbital (n=4), imepitoin and KBr (n=7), and imepitoin, phenobarbital and KBr (n=2) during a period of 3-6 months (pre-withdrawal period), with a follow-up period of 9-12 months after withdrawal of imepitoin (post-withdrawal period). Adverse effects were also recorded before and after withdrawal of imepitoin. Imepitoin was tapered off over 3 months as follows: 20mg/kg twice daily for 1 month, then 10mg/kg twice daily for 1 month, then once daily for 1 month. Withdrawal of imepitoin did not increase monthly seizure frequency (P=0.9). Moreover, all owners reported improvement in the adverse effects experienced by their dog after withdrawal of imepitoin. Imepitoin withdrawal in epileptic dogs that were well-controlled with imepitoin and phenobarbital and/or KBr did not worsen epileptic seizure control, and possibly decreased antiepileptic treatment-related adverse effects. However, a worsening of seizure frequency could occur in individual cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julien; Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-10-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  9. Treatment Outcome Of Seizures Associated With Intracranial Cavernous Angiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nievera Conrad C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are among the typical presentations of intracranial cavernous angiomas (ICA. Twenty-one patients (age range: 2 to 53 years treated for seizures associated with ICA between 1983 and 1997 were restrospectively studied to evaluate their outcome following medical or surgical intervention. The mean interval between seizure onset and initial presentation at our institution was 7.6 years. Seizures were simple partial in 3 patients, complex partial in 15 and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic in 13. The commonest site of the lesion was the temporal lobe (52%. Multiple angiomas were observed in 5 (24% patients. Seven (32% patients were medically-managed with antiepileptic therapy and 14 (68% underwent either lesionectomy with resection of the epileptogenic zone (9 patients or temporal lobectomy (5 patients. Mean follow-up time was 4 years (range: 3 months to 14 years. Of the medically-managed patients, 3 (43% remained seizure-free whereas 4 (57% continued to have seizures with an average frequency of one per day. Of the surgically-managed patients, 12 (86% became seizure-free and 2 (14% had no more than two seizures per year. Surgery appears to be extremely effective in the management of seizures associated with ICA and should receive a strong and early consideration in patients who fail medical therapy.

  10. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  11. Seizure development after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misirli, H; Ozge, A; Somay, G; Erdoğan, N; Erkal, H; Erenoğlu, N Y

    2006-12-01

    Although there have been many studies on seizures following stroke, there is still much we do not know about them. In this study, we evaluated the characteristics of seizures in stroke patients. There were 2267 patients with a first-ever stroke, and after excluding 387 patients, 1880 were available for analysis. Of these 1880 patients, we evaluated 200 patients with seizures and 400 patients without seizures. We investigated the seizures according to age, gender, stroke type, the aetiology of ischaemic stroke and the localisation of the lesion. The seizures were classified as early onset and late onset and the seizure type as partial, generalised or secondarily generalised. Seizures occurred in 200 (10.6%) of 1880 strokes. The number of patients with seizures were 138 (10.6%) in ischaemic stroke group and 62 (10.7%) in haemorrhagic stroke group. Patients with ischaemic strokes had 41 embolic (29.7%) and 97 thrombotic (70.3%) origin, and these were not statistically significant in comparison with controls. Cortical involvement for the development of seizures was the most important risk factor (odds ratios = 4.25, p < 0.01). It was concluded that embolic strokes, being younger than 65 years old, and cortical localisation of stroke were important risks for developing seizures.

  12. Complex partial seizures and aphasia as initial manifestations of non-ketotic hyperglycemia: case report Crises parciais complexas e afasia como manifestações iniciais de hiperglicemia não cetótica: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCUS SABRY AZAR BATISTA

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of non-ketotic hyperglycemia (NKH, heralded by complex partial seizures and aphasia of epileptic origin, besides versive and partial motor seizures. This clinical picture was accompanied by left fronto-temporal spikes in the EEG. The seizures were controlled by carbamazepine only after the control of the diabetes. A month later, carbamazepine was discontinued. The patient remained without seizures, with normal language, using only glybenclamide. Complex partial seizures, opposed to simple partial seizures, are rarely described in association to NKH. Epileptic activity localized over language regions can manifest as aphasia.Descrevemos um caso de hiperglicemia não-cetótica (HNC cujas manifestações iniciais foram crises parciais complexas e afasia de origem epiléptica, além de crises versivas e parcias motoras. Este quadro clínico foi acompanhado por atividade epileptiforme na região fronto-temporal esquerda ao eletrencefalograma. As crises epilépticas foram controladas com carbamazepina (CBZ apenas após o controle do diabetes mellitus. Após um mês, a CBZ foi suspensa, permanecendo a paciente com linguagem normal, sem novas crises epilépticas, em uso apenas de glibenclamida. Crises parciais complexas, ao contrário de crises parciais simples, são raramente descritas como manifestação de HNC. Atividade epileptiforme nas regiões relacionadas a linguagem podem manifestar-se como afasia.

  13. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epileptic seizures in patients with a posterior circulation infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kaplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of seizures and the clinical features of patients with seizures related to a posterior circulation infarct (POCI. METHODS: We reviewed all ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic between January 2011 and January 2012. The patients’ database information was retrospectively analyzed. Fifty-five patients with a POCI were included in the study. We reviewed all patients with epileptic seizures related to a POCI. Age, gender, recurrent stroke, risk factors, etiology, radiographic localization, the seizure type and onset time, and the electroencephalographic findings of patients were evaluated. We excluded all patients who had precipitating conditions during seizures such as taking drugs, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, and history of epilepsy. RESULTS: Seizures were observed in four patients (3 male, 1 female with a POCI related epileptic seizures (7.2%. The etiology of strokes was cardiac-embolic in 3 patients and vertebral artery dissection in 1 patient. Seizures occurred in 2 patients as presenting finding, in 1 patient within 7 days, and 1 patient within 28 days. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 3 patients and simple partial seizures with secondary generalization in 1 patient. Three patients had cerebellum infarction at the left hemisphere. One patient had lateral medullary infarction at the right side. The electroencephalographic findings of patients were normal. CONCLUSION: Studies involving patients with seizures related to a POCI are novel and few in number. Three patients with seizure had cerebellum infarction. The cerebellum in these patients may contribute via different mechanisms over seizure activity.

  15. Characterization and comprehension of corona partial discharge in air under power frequency to very low frequency voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanxiang, ZHOU; Zhongliu, ZHOU; Ling, ZHANG; Yunxiao, ZHANG; Yajun, MO; Jiantao, SUN

    2018-05-01

    For the partial discharge test of electrical equipment with large capacitance, the use of low-frequency voltage instead of power frequency voltage can effectively reduce the capacity requirements of test power supply. However, the validity of PD test under low frequency voltage needs to be evaluated. In order to investigate the influence of voltage frequency on corona discharge in the air, the discharge test of the tip-plate electrode under the frequency from 50 to 0.1 Hz is carried out based on the impulse current method. The results show that some of the main features of corona under low frequency do not change. The magnitude of discharge in a positive half cycle is obviously larger than that in a negative cycle. The magnitude of discharge and interval in positive cycle are random, while that in negative cycle are regular. With the decrease of frequency, the inception voltage increases. The variation trend of maximum and average magnitude and repetition rate of the discharge in positive and negative half cycle with the variation of voltage frequency and magnitude is demonstrated, with discussion and interpretation from the aspects of space charge transportation, effective discharge time and transition of discharge modes. There is an obvious difference in the phase resolved pattern of partial discharge and characteristic parameters of discharge patterns between power and low frequency. The experimental results can be the reference for mode identification of partial discharge under low frequency tests. The trend of the measured parameters with the variation of frequency provides more information about the insulation defect than traditional measurements under a single frequency (usually 50 Hz). Also it helps to understand the mechanism of corona discharge with an explanation of the characteristics under different frequencies.

  16. High-frequency oscillations and seizure activity and in the human anterior nucleus of the thalamus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rektor, I.; Doležalová, I.; Chrastina, J.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Brázdil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, S1 (2015), s. 29-30 ISSN 0013-9580. [International Epilepsy Congress /31./. 05.09.2015-09.09.2015, Istanbul] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * anterior nucleus of the thalamus Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment

  17. Interictal high-frequency oscillations indicate seizure onset zone in patients with focal cortical dysplasia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdil, M.; Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel; Daniel, P.; Kuba, R.; Chrastina, J.; Novák, Z.; Rektor, I.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 90, 1-2 (2010), s. 28-32 ISSN 0920-1211 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : epilepsy * hgh-frequency oscillations * intracerebral EEG Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.302, year: 2010

  18. Evaluating subjective cognitive impairment in the adult epilepsy clinic: Effects of depression, number of antiepileptic medications, and seizure frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Lauren; Lapin, Brittany; Busch, Robyn M; Bautista, Jocelyn F

    2018-04-01

    Subjective cognitive complaints are a frequent concern of patients with epilepsy. The Aldenkamp-Baker Neuropsychological Assessment Schedule (ABNAS) is a patient-reported scale validated to measure adverse cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The goals of this study were to identify predictors of patient-reported cognitive dysfunction and to assess the relationship between subjective and objective cognitive impairment. The Cleveland Clinic Knowledge Program Data Registry was used to identify adult patients seen in outpatient epilepsy clinic from January to May 2015 and who completed the following scales: ABNAS for subjective cognitive impairment, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-10), and EuroQOL five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) for health-related quality of life. Topiramate (TPM) was considered a high-risk medication for cognitive impairment. Patients were categorized into groups based on total ABNAS score: subjective cognitive impairment (ABNAS>15; N=270) and no subjective cognitive impairment (ABNAS≤15; N=400). Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to identify independent predictors of subjective cognitive impairment. In a subset of patients who had neuropsychological testing within 6months of completing the ABNAS (N=60), Pearson correlations and multivariable logistic regression models, controlling for number of AEDs, depression, and anxiety, assessed the relationship between subjective cognitive impairment and objective cognitive performance on measures of intelligence, attention/working memory, verbal fluency, naming, processing speed, manual dexterity, visuomotor processing, and verbal memory. Forty percent of patients in the overall sample (N=270/670) reported cognitive impairment. The variables most strongly associated with subjective cognitive impairment were PHQ-9 score, number of AEDs, and seizure frequency. In

  19. Hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratio in patients with complex partial seizure: short TE and long TE techniques using single voxel proton MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Il; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Byung In; Lee, Seung Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho

    2000-01-01

    To compare hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratios using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy with different echo times in patients with complex partial seizure. Using a GE Signa 1.5T scanner with STEAM and PRESS sequences, automated single voxel proton MRS was used to determine metabolite ratio differences in the hippocampus and neocortex of nine complex partial seizure patients (mesial temporal sclerosis (n=3D5), status epilepticus (n=3D1), tumor (n=3D1), cortical dysplasia (n=3D1), occipital lobe epilepsy (n=3D1)). A total of 20 examinations were performed in the region of the hippocampus (n=3D17), temporal neocortex (n=3D1), and parieto-occipital gray matter (n=3D1). Voxel size range was 5.2-17.4 cm 3 . The calculated creatine (Cr) peak was employed as an internal reference and the relative ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) was calculated for both short and long echo times using an automated PROBE/SV (GE Medical Systems) package. Each NAA/Cho ratio obtained using both PRESS and STEAM techniques was compared by means of statistical analysis (paired Student t-test). Using PRESS (long TE, 272 ms), NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 16 of 20 examinations; in four this was not possible due to noise levels of the Cr and Cho peaks. Using STEAM (short TE, 30 ms) NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 19 of 20 examinations; in one, the Cho peak could not be measured. Using PRESS and STEAM, mean and standard deviations for the NAA/Cho ratio were 1.22±0.50 and 1.16±0.36, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in this ratio between the short and long TE method (p less than 0.01). In complex partial seizure patients, no significant metabolite differences were found between short and long echo times of single voxel proton MR spectroscopy. The metabolite ratio at different echo times can be reliably obtained using this simplified and automated PROBE/SV quantitation method. (author)

  20. Hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratio in patients with complex partial seizure: short TE and long TE techniques using single voxel proton MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Il; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Byung In; Lee, Seung Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho [Medical College, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-08-01

    To compare hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratios using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy with different echo times in patients with complex partial seizure. Using a GE Signa 1.5T scanner with STEAM and PRESS sequences, automated single voxel proton MRS was used to determine metabolite ratio differences in the hippocampus and neocortex of nine complex partial seizure patients (mesial temporal sclerosis (n=3D5), status epilepticus (n=3D1), tumor (n=3D1), cortical dysplasia (n=3D1), occipital lobe epilepsy (n=3D1)). A total of 20 examinations were performed in the region of the hippocampus (n=3D17), temporal neocortex (n=3D1), and parieto-occipital gray matter (n=3D1). Voxel size range was 5.2-17.4 cm{sup 3}. The calculated creatine (Cr) peak was employed as an internal reference and the relative ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) was calculated for both short and long echo times using an automated PROBE/SV (GE Medical Systems) package. Each NAA/Cho ratio obtained using both PRESS and STEAM techniques was compared by means of statistical analysis (paired Student t-test). Using PRESS (long TE, 272 ms), NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 16 of 20 examinations; in four this was not possible due to noise levels of the Cr and Cho peaks. Using STEAM (short TE, 30 ms) NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 19 of 20 examinations; in one, the Cho peak could not be measured. Using PRESS and STEAM, mean and standard deviations for the NAA/Cho ratio were 1.22{+-}0.50 and 1.16{+-}0.36, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in this ratio between the short and long TE method (p less than 0.01). In complex partial seizure patients, no significant metabolite differences were found between short and long echo times of single voxel proton MR spectroscopy. The metabolite ratio at different echo times can be reliably obtained using this simplified and automated PROBE/SV quantitation method. (author)

  1. Evaluating Annual Maximum and Partial Duration Series for Estimating Frequency of Small Magnitude Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlul Karim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of frequent floods is important for characterising channel morphology, riparian and aquatic habitat, and informing river restoration efforts. This paper presents results from an analysis on frequency estimates of low magnitude floods using the annual maximum and partial series data compared to actual flood series. Five frequency distribution models were fitted to data from 24 gauging stations in the Great Barrier Reef (GBR lagoon catchments in north-eastern Australia. Based on the goodness of fit test, Generalised Extreme Value, Generalised Pareto and Log Pearson Type 3 models were used to estimate flood frequencies across the study region. Results suggest frequency estimates based on a partial series are better, compared to an annual series, for small to medium floods, while both methods produce similar results for large floods. Although both methods converge at a higher recurrence interval, the convergence recurrence interval varies between catchments. Results also suggest frequency estimates vary slightly between two or more partial series, depending on flood threshold, and the differences are large for the catchments that experience less frequent floods. While a partial series produces better frequency estimates, it can underestimate or overestimate the frequency if the flood threshold differs largely compared to bankfull discharge. These results have significant implications in calculating the dependency of floodplain ecosystems on the frequency of flooding and their subsequent management.

  2. Long-term exposure and safety of lacosamide monotherapy for the treatment of partial-onset (focal) seizures: Results from a multicenter, open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossler, David G; Wechsler, Robert T; Williams, Paulette; Byrnes, William; Therriault, Sheila

    2016-10-01

    To assess long-term use and safety of lacosamide (LCM) ≤800 mg/day monotherapy in patients with partial-onset seizures (POS) enrolled previously in a historical-controlled, conversion-to-monotherapy study (SP902; NCT00520741). Patients completing or exiting SP902 with LCM as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy were eligible to enter this 2-year open-label extension (OLE) trial (SP904; NCT00530855) at a starting dose ±100 mg/day of their final SP902 dose. Investigators could adjust the LCM dose to 100-800 mg/day and add up to two antiepileptic drugs to optimize tolerability and seizure reduction. Three hundred twenty-two patients received LCM: 210 patients (65.2%) completed and 112 (34.8%) discontinued, most commonly owing to withdrawal of consent (9.3%). Two hundred fifty-eight patients (80.1%) had ≥1 year of and 216 (67.1%) had ≥2 years of LCM exposure, of whom 179/258 (69.4%) achieved LCM monotherapy lasting for any 12-month period, and 126/216 (58.3%) patients exposed for ≥24 months achieved LCM monotherapy for any 24-month period. Total exposure = 525.5 patient-years. The median modal dose was 500 mg/day. Two hundred ninety-two patients (90.7%) achieved LCM monotherapy at some point during the study. Sixty-five of 87 patients who exited and 193/235 who completed SP902 were exposed for ≥12 months, and 43.1% and 78.2%, respectively, achieved LCM monotherapy for ≥12 months. Median LCM monotherapy duration was 587.0 days (2-791 days); 91.0% of patients reported treatment-emergent adverse events, of which the most common were dizziness (27.3%), headache (17.1%), and nausea (14.3%). Compared with the SP902 study baseline, 74.2% of patients had a ≥50% seizure reduction and 5.6% were seizure-free at 24 months. The majority of patients were receiving LCM monotherapy at 0, 12, and 24 months in this OLE. Lacosamide monotherapy (median dose of 500 mg/day) had a safety profile similar to that of adjunctive therapy studies. These results support the use of

  3. Physics of the Brain. Prevention of the Epileptic Seizures by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS Team

    The novel study of the epileptogenesis mechanisms is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated (amplitude modulation) multi-photon (frequency modulation) fiber-laser interaction with the brain epilepsy-topion (the epilepsy onset area), so as to prevent the excessive electrical discharge (epileptic seizure) in the brain. The repetition frequency, Ω, matches the low frequency (epileptic) phonon waves in the brain. The laser repetition frequency (5-100 pulses per second) enables the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the phonon (possible epileptic-to-be) activity in the brain. The tunable fiber laser frequencies, Δω (multi photon operation), are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling monitoring of the electrical charge imbalance (within the 10s of milliseconds), and the DNA-corruption in the epilepsy-topion, as the possible cause of the disease. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  4. Numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations in the frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, G.; Por, G.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical problems during the noise simulation in a nuclear power plant are discussed. The solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations are studied in the frequency domain. Numerical methods by the transfer function method are applied. It is shown that the correctness of the numerical methods is limited for ordinary differential equations in the frequency domain. To overcome the difficulties, step-size selection is suggested. (author)

  5. Masking and Partial Masking in Listeners with a High-Frequency Hearing Loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.T.S.; Duifhuis, H.

    1982-01-01

    3 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss ranging from moderate to moderate-severe starting at frequencies higher than 1 kHz participated in two masking experiments and a partial masking experiment. In the first masking experiment, fM = 1 kHz and LM = 50 dB SPL, higher than normal masked

  6. Febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... proper care. Occasionally, a provider will prescribe a medicine called diazepam to prevent or treat febrile seizures that occur more than once. However, no drug is completely effective in preventing febrile seizures. Alternative Names Seizure - fever induced; Febrile convulsions Patient Instructions ...

  7. A functional polymorphism of the microRNA-146a gene is associated with susceptibility to drug-resistant epilepsy and seizures frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lili; Tao, Hua; Wang, Yan; Liu, Zhou; Xu, Zhien; Zhou, Haihong; Cai, Yujie; Yao, Lifen; Chen, Beichu; Liang, Wandong; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Wanwen; Liu, Tingting; Ma, Guoda; Li, You; Zhao, Bin; Li, Keshen

    2015-04-01

    Epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder and is characterized by an enduring predisposition for seizures. Recently, a growing body of evidence has suggested that microRNA-146a (miR-146a) is upregulated in the brains of epilepsy patients and of mouse models; furthermore, miR-146a may be involved in the development and progression of seizures through the regulation of inflammation and immune responses. In this report, we performed a case-control study to analyze the relationship between the two potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the miR-146a gene (rs2910464 and rs57095329) and the risk of epilepsy in a Chinese population comprising 249 cases and 249 healthy controls. Our study comprised 249 epilepsy patients and 249 healthy controls in two regions of China. The DNA was genotyped using the ABI PRISM SNapShot method. The statistical analysis was estimated using the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Our results indicated a significant association between the rs57095329 SNP of the miR-146a gene and the risk of drug resistant epilepsy (DRE) (genotypes, p = 0.0258 and alleles, p = 0.0108). Moreover, the rs57095329 A allele was found to be associated with a reduced risk of seizures frequency in DRE patients (all p epilepsy. Our data indicate that the rs57095329 polymorphism in the promoter region of miR-146a is involved in the genetic susceptibility to DRE and the seizures frequency. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk factor for febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalović Dragica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures are the most frequent neurological disorder in the childhood. According to American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, they have been defined as seizures provoked by high temperature in children aged between 6 months and 5 years, without previous history of afebrile seizures, intracranial infections and other possible causes of seizures. Seizures can be typical and atypical, according to the characteristics. Pathogenesis of this disorder has not been clarified yet, and it is believed to be a combination of genetic factors, high body temperature and brain maturation. The risk factors for recurrence of febrile seizures are: age in which seizures appeared for the first time, epilepsy in the first degree relative, febrile seizures in the first degree relative, frequent diseases with fever and low body temperature on the beginning of seizures. The frequency of recurrent seizures The risk for occurrence of epilepsy in children with simple seizures is about 1-1.5%, which is slightly higher compared to general population, while it increases to 4-15% in patients with complex seizures. However, there is no evidence that therapy prevents occurrence of epilepsy. When the prevention of recurrent seizures is considered, it is necessary to separate simple from complex seizures. The aim of this paper was to analyze the most important risk factors for febrile seizures, and to evaluate their impact on occurrence of recurrent seizures. Our study included 125 children with febrile seizures, aged from 6 months to 5 years. The presence of febrile seizures and epilepsy in the first degree relative has been noted in 22% of children. Typical febrile seizures were observed in 76% of cases, and atypical in 24%. Most patients had only one seizure (73.6%. Children, who had seizure earlier in life, had more frequent recurrences. Both risk factors were present in 25% of patients, while 68% of patients had only one risk factor. For the children with febrile disease

  9. Epileptic Seizure Detection based on Wavelet Transform Statistics Map and EMD Method for Hilbert-Huang Spectral Analyzing in Gamma Frequency Band of EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Behnam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seizure detection using brain signal (EEG analysis is the important clinical methods in drug therapy and the decisions before brain surgery. In this paper, after signal conditioning using suitable filtering, the Gamma frequency band has been extracted and the other brain rhythms, ambient noises and the other bio-signal are canceled. Then, the wavelet transform of brain signal and the map of wavelet transform in multi levels are computed. By dividing the color map to different epochs, the histogram of each sub-image is obtained and the statistics of it based on statistical momentums and Negentropy values are calculated. Statistical feature vector using Principle Component Analysis (PCA is reduced to one dimension. By EMD algorithm and sifting procedure for analyzing the data by Intrinsic Mode Function (IMF and computing the residues of brain signal using spectrum of Hilbert transform and Hilbert – Huang spectrum forming, one spatial feature based on the Euclidian distance for signal classification is obtained. By K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN classifier and by considering the optimal neighbor parameter, EEG signals are classified in two classes, seizure and non-seizure signal, with the rate of accuracy 76.54% and with variance of error 0.3685 in the different tests.

  10. Seizure ending signs in patients with dyscognitive focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvala, Jay R; Gerard, Elizabeth E; Macken, Mícheál; Schuele, Stephan U

    2015-09-01

    Signs indicating the end of a focal seizure with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness but without progression to focal or generalized motor symptoms are poorly defined and can be difficult to determine. Not recognizing the transition from ictal to postictal behaviour can affect seizure reporting accuracy by family members and may lead to delayed or a lack of examination during EEG monitoring, erroneous seizure localization and inadequate medical intervention for prolonged seizure duration. Our epilepsy monitoring unit database was searched for focal seizures without secondary generalization for the period from 2007 to 2011. The first focal seizure in a patient with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness and/or behavioural arrest, with or without automatisms, was included. Seizures without objective symptoms or inadequate video-EEG quality were excluded. A total of 67 patients were included, with an average age of 41.7 years. Thirty-six of the patients had seizures from the left hemisphere and 29 from the right. All patients showed an abrupt change in motor activity and resumed contact with the environment as a sign of clinical seizure ending. Specific ending signs (nose wiping, coughing, sighing, throat clearing, or laughter) were seen in 23 of 47 of temporal lobe seizures and 7 of 20 extra-temporal seizures. Seizure ending signs are often subtle and the most common finding is a sudden change in motor activity and resumption of contact with the environment. More distinct signs, such as nose wiping, coughing or throat clearing, are not specific to temporal lobe onset. A higher proportion of seizures during sleep went unexamined, compared to those during wakefulness. This demonstrates that seizure semiology can be very subtle and arousals from sleep during monitoring should alert staff. Patient accounts of seizure frequency appear to be unreliable and witness reports need to be taken into account. [Published with video sequences].

  11. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Anderson, William S

    2015-08-01

    The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone (SOZ) localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the [Formula: see text] Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. We showed that a directed transfer function (DTF) can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. We used seven complex partial seizures recorded from four patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a DTF measure. We showed that a DTF can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with a known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical SOZ and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2-10 s time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately [Formula: see text]. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined SOZ than inside. This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices.

  12. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone (SOZ) localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70-110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. We showed that a directed transfer function (DTF) can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. Approach. We used seven complex partial seizures recorded from four patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a DTF measure. Main results. We showed that a DTF can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with a known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical SOZ and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2-10 s time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9 m{{m}2}. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined SOZ than inside. Significance. This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices.

  13. Numerical Study of Frequency-dependent Seismoelectric Coupling in Partially-saturated Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuraev Ulugbek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The seismoelectric phenomenon associated with propagation of seismic waves in fluid-saturated porous media has been studied for many decades. The method has a great potential to monitor subsurface fluid saturation changes associated with production of hydrocarbons. Frequency of the seismic source has a significant impact on measurement of the seismoelectric effects. In this paper, the effects of seismic wave frequency and water saturation on the seismoelectric response of a partially-saturated porous media is studied numerically. The conversion of seismic wave to electromagnetic wave was modelled by extending the theoretically developed seismoelectric coupling coefficient equation. We assumed constant values of pore radius and zeta-potential of 80 micrometers and 48 microvolts, respectively. Our calculations of the coupling coefficient were conducted at various water saturation values in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 150 kHz. The results show that the seismoelectric coupling is frequency-dependent and decreases exponentially when frequency increases. Similar trend is seen when water saturation is varied at different frequencies. However, when water saturation is less than about 0.6, the effect of frequency is significant. On the other hand, when the water saturation is greater than 0.6, the coupling coefficient shows monotonous trend when water saturation is increased at constant frequency.

  14. Analysis of water hammer in pipelines by partial fraction expansion of transfer function in frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Wook Ryun; Oh, Ki Yong; Kim, Bong Ki

    2010-01-01

    Understanding water hammer is very important to the prevention of excessive pressure build-up in pipelines. Many researchers have studied this phenomenon, drawing effective solutions through the time- and frequency-domain approaches. For the purposes of enhancing the advantages of the frequency-domain approach and, thereby, rendering investigations of the dynamic characteristics of pipelines more effective, we propose partial fraction expansion of the transfer function between the unsteady flow source and a given section. We simulate the proposed approach using a vibration element inserted into a simple pipeline, deducing much useful physical information pertaining to pipeline design. We conclude that locating the resonance of the vibration element between the first and second resonances of the pipeline can mitigate the excessive pressure build-up attendant on the occurrence of water hammer. Our method of partial fraction expansion is expected to be useful and effective in analyses of unsteady flows in pipelines

  15. Partial and No Recovery from Delirium in Older Hospitalized Adults: Frequency and Baseline Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Martin G; Bailey, Robert; Bonnycastle, Michael; McCusker, Jane; Fung, Shek; Ciampi, Antonio; Belzile, Eric; Bai, Chun

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequency and baseline risk factors for partial and no recovery from delirium in older hospitalized adults. Cohort study with assessment of recovery status approximately 1 and 3 months after enrollment. University-affiliated, primary, acute-care hospital. Medical or surgical inpatients aged 65 and older with delirium (N = 278). The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Confusion Assessment Method (CAM), Delirium Index (DI), and activities of daily living (ADLs) were completed at enrollment and each follow-up. Primary outcome categories were full recovery (absence of CAM core symptoms of delirium), partial recovery (presence of ≥1 CAM core symptoms but not meeting criteria for delirium), no recovery (met CAM criteria for delirium), or death. Secondary outcomes were changes in MMSE, DI, and ADL scores between the baseline and last assessment. Potential risk factors included many clinical and laboratory variables. In participants with dementia, frequencies of full, partial, and no recovery and death at first follow-up were 6.3%, 11.3%, 74.6%, and 7.7%, respectively; in participants without dementia, frequencies were 14.3%, 17%, 50.9%, and 17.9%, respectively. In participants with dementia, frequencies at the second follow-up were 7.9%, 15.1%, 57.6%, and 19.4%, respectively; in participants without dementia, frequencies were 19.2%, 20.2%, 31.7%, and 28.8%, respectively. Frequencies were similar in participants with prevalent and incident delirium and in medical and surgical participants. The DI, MMSE, and ADL scores of many participants with partial and no recovery improved. Independent baseline risk factors for delirium persistence were chart diagnosis of dementia (odds ratio (OR) = 2.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.38, 4.56), presence of any malignancy (OR = 5.79, 95% CI = 1.51, 22.19), and greater severity of delirium (OR =9.39, 95% CI = 3.95, 22.35). Delirium in many older hospitalized adults appears to be much more protracted than previously

  16. Seizures Induced by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ogunyemi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  17. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Calibration of ultra-high frequency (UHF) partial discharge sensors using FDTD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Asnor Mazuan; Ishak, Mohd Taufiq

    2018-02-01

    Ultra-high frequency (UHF) partial discharge sensors are widely used for conditioning monitoring and defect location in insulation system of high voltage equipment. Designing sensors for specific applications often requires an iterative process of manufacturing, testing and mechanical modifications. This paper demonstrates the use of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique as a tool to predict the frequency response of UHF PD sensors. Using this approach, the design process can be simplified and parametric studies can be conducted in order to assess the influence of component dimensions and material properties on the sensor response. The modelling approach is validated using gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) calibration system. The use of a transient excitation source is particularly suitable for modeling using FDTD, which is able to simulate the step response output voltage of the sensor from which the frequency response is obtained using the same post-processing applied to the physical measurement.

  19. Common time-frequency analysis of local field potential and pyramidal cell activity in seizure-like events of the rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotic, M.; Chiu, A. W. L.; Jahromi, S. S.; Carlen, P. L.; Bardakjian, B. L.

    2011-08-01

    To study cell-field dynamics, physiologists simultaneously record local field potentials and the activity of individual cells from animals performing cognitive tasks, during various brain states or under pathological conditions. However, apart from spike shape and spike timing analyses, few studies have focused on elucidating the common time-frequency structure of local field activity relative to surrounding cells across different periods of phenomena. We have used two algorithms, multi-window time frequency analysis and wavelet phase coherence (WPC), to study common intracellular-extracellular (I-E) spectral features in spontaneous seizure-like events (SLEs) from rat hippocampal slices in a low magnesium epilepsy model. Both algorithms were applied to 'pairs' of simultaneously observed I-E signals from slices in the CA1 hippocampal region. Analyses were performed over a frequency range of 1-100 Hz. I-E spectral commonality varied in frequency and time. Higher commonality was observed from 1 to 15 Hz, and lower commonality was observed in the 15-100 Hz frequency range. WPC was lower in the non-SLE region compared to SLE activity; however, there was no statistical difference in the 30-45 Hz band between SLE and non-SLE modes. This work provides evidence of strong commonality in various frequency bands of I-E SLEs in the rat hippocampus, not only during SLEs but also immediately before and after.

  20. Flood Frequency Analysis For Partial Duration Series In Ganjiang River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    zhangli, Sun; xiufang, Zhu; yaozhong, Pan

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimation of flood frequency is key to effective, nationwide flood damage abatement programs. The partial duration series (PDS) method is widely used in hydrologic studies because it considers all events above a certain threshold level as compared to the annual maximum series (AMS) method, which considers only the annual maximum value. However, the PDS has a drawback in that it is difficult to define the thresholds and maintain an independent and identical distribution of the partial duration time series; this drawback is discussed in this paper. The Ganjiang River is the seventh largest tributary of the Yangtze River, the longest river in China. The Ganjiang River covers a drainage area of 81,258 km2 at the Wanzhou hydrologic station as the basin outlet. In this work, 56 years of daily flow data (1954-2009) from the Wanzhou station were used to analyze flood frequency, and the Pearson-III model was employed as the hydrologic probability distribution. Generally, three tasks were accomplished: (1) the threshold of PDS by percentile rank of daily runoff was obtained; (2) trend analysis of the flow series was conducted using PDS; and (3) flood frequency analysis was conducted for partial duration flow series. The results showed a slight upward trend of the annual runoff in the Ganjiang River basin. The maximum flow with a 0.01 exceedance probability (corresponding to a 100-year flood peak under stationary conditions) was 20,000 m3/s, while that with a 0.1 exceedance probability was 15,000 m3/s. These results will serve as a guide to hydrological engineering planning, design, and management for policymakers and decision makers associated with hydrology.

  1. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  2. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S. [Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States); Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi, E-mail: santhavi@njms.rutgers.edu [Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, Newark, New Jersey 07103 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (E{sub GABA}). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (g{sub GABA-extra}) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in g{sub GABA-extra} and E{sub GABA} influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40–100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30–40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing g{sub GABA-extra} reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when E{sub GABA} was shunting (−74 mV), but failed to alter average

  3. Seizure-induced alterations in fast-spiking basket cell GABA currents modulate frequency and coherence of gamma oscillation in network simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proddutur, Archana; Yu, Jiandong; Elgammal, Fatima S.; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Gamma frequency oscillations have been proposed to contribute to memory formation and retrieval. Fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) are known to underlie development of gamma oscillations. Fast, high amplitude GABA synapses and gap junctions have been suggested to contribute to gamma oscillations in FS-BC networks. Recently, we identified that, apart from GABAergic synapses, FS-BCs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus have GABAergic currents mediated by extrasynaptic receptors. Our experimental studies demonstrated two specific changes in FS-BC GABA currents following experimental seizures [Yu et al., J. Neurophysiol. 109, 1746 (2013)]: increase in the magnitude of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA currents and a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (E GABA ). Here, we use homogeneous networks of a biophysically based model of FS-BCs to examine how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA conductance (g GABA-extra ) and experimentally identified, seizure-induced changes in g GABA-extra and E GABA influence network activity. Networks of FS-BCs interconnected by fast GABAergic synapses developed synchronous firing in the dentate gamma frequency range (40–100 Hz). Systematic investigation revealed that the biologically realistic range of 30 to 40 connections between FS-BCs resulted in greater coherence in the gamma frequency range when networks were activated by Poisson-distributed dendritic synaptic inputs rather than by homogeneous somatic current injections, which were balanced for FS-BC firing frequency in unconnected networks. Distance-dependent conduction delay enhanced coherence in networks with 30–40 FS-BC interconnections while inclusion of gap junctional conductance had a modest effect on coherence. In networks activated by somatic current injections resulting in heterogeneous FS-BC firing, increasing g GABA-extra reduced the frequency and coherence of FS-BC firing when E GABA was shunting (−74 mV), but failed to alter average FS-BC frequency when E GABA

  4. Effects of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate on serum lipids in patients with partial-onset seizures: Impact of concomitant statins and enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzer, Scott; Wechsler, Robert T; Rogin, Joanne B; Gidal, Barry E; Schwab, Matthias; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Carreño, Mar; da Silva, Patrício Soares; Moreira, Joana; Li, Yan; Blum, David; Grinnell, Todd

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) on lipid metabolism and to determine whether reduced statin exposure during ESL therapy has clinical consequences. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of pooled data for serum lipids (laboratory values) from three phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive ESL therapy (400, 800, or 1200 mg once daily) in patients with treatment-refractory partial-onset seizures. Changes from baseline in serum lipid levels were analyzed according to use of statins and/or enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) during the baseline period. In total, 426 and 1021 placebo- and ESL-treated patients, respectively, were included in the analysis. With regard to the changes from baseline in serum concentrations, there were statistically significant differences between the placebo and ESL 1200 mg QD groups, for both total cholesterol (TC) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), but the effect sizes were small (+4.1 mg/dL and +1.8 mg/dL, respectively). A small but significant difference in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; -5.0 mg/dL) was observed between the ESL 400 mg QD group and the placebo group. In patients not taking a concomitant EIAED, there were no changes with ESL 400 mg QD, but modest and statistically significant increases in cholesterol fractions (TC, LDL-C and HDL-C) with ESL 800 mg QD (ESL 1200 mg QD (ESL had no consistent effect on lipids in patients taking a concomitant EIAED. In patients taking statins during baseline, there were no clinically relevant changes in serum lipids during use of ESL, although the subgroups were small. These results suggest that ESL does not appear to have clinically significant effects on serum lipids, nor does the pharmacokinetic interaction between ESL and statins have an impact on serum lipid concentrations. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychiatric and cognitive adverse events: A pooled analysis of three phase III trials of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate for partial-onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andermann, Eva; Biton, Victor; Benbadis, Selim R; Shneker, Bassel; Shah, Aashit K; Carreño, Mar; Trinka, Eugen; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Biraben, Arnaud; Rocha, Francisco; Gama, Helena; Cheng, Hailong; Blum, David

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the nature and incidence of psychiatric and cognitive adverse events (AEs) reported with eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) used as adjunctive treatment for refractory partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults. This was a post-hoc analysis of data pooled from three randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (BIA-2093-301, -302, -304). After an 8-week baseline period, patients received placebo or adjunctive ESL 400mg (studies 301 and 302 only), 800mg, or 1200mg once daily (QD) for 14weeks (2-week titration period, 12-week maintenance period). Psychiatric and cognitive AEs were identified from individual patient data. Suicidality was also evaluated using the Columbia-Classification Algorithm of Suicide Assessment (C-CASA), or the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). P-values were obtained using the chi-square test of independence or Fisher's exact test, without correcting for multiplicity. The analysis population included 1447 patients (ESL, n=1021; placebo, n = 426). Psychiatric treatment-emergent AEs (TEAEs) occurred in 10.8% of patients receiving ESL, and in a comparable proportion (10.3%) of patients receiving placebo (p=0.802). The incidence of depression and suicidality-related TEAEs was higher for ESL (7.4%) vs. placebo (3.8%) (p=0.009). The occurrence of these TEAEs differed between treatment groups (p = 0.010), but there was no notable trend between increasing ESL dose and increasing incidence of depression and suicidality-related TEAEs. Aggression/hostility-related TEAEs occurred in ESL vs. 0.9% taking placebo. The incidence of cognitive TEAEs was higher for ESL (7.1%) vs. placebo (4.0%) (p=0.023); incidences of memory impairment, attention disturbance, apathy, and aphasia were higher for ESL 1200mg than for other treatment groups. Incidences of psychiatric and cognitive serious AEs (SAEs) were 0.6% and 0.2% with ESL, and 0.5% and 0% with placebo, respectively. Psychiatric and cognitive TEAEs leading to discontinuation occurred in 1

  6. A descriptive analysis of drug treatment patterns and burden of illness for pediatric patients diagnosed with partial-onset seizures in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angalakuditi M

    2011-12-01

    comparator CAR cohort. Variation was also observed in brand or generic medication use. LAM and TOP had the highest annual pharmacy costs of all the drugs.Keywords: epilepsy, epidemiology, antiepileptic drugs, partial-onset seizure, pediatrics

  7. Natural Frequencies Evaluation on Partially Damaged Building using Ambient Vibration Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, A. F.; Zainal Abidin, M. H.; Daud, M. E.; Noh, M. S. Md; Madun, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Matarul, J.; Mokhatar, S. N.

    2018-04-01

    Severe damages observed on the school blocks, roads, retaining walls and drainage within the compound of SMK Kundasang Sabah possibly due to the ground movements triggered by the Ranau earthquake in 1991. Ambient vibration measurements were carried on the remaining demolished 3-storey building which partially damaged in order to measure the predominant building frequencies using tri-axial 1 Hz seismometer sensors. Popular methods of Horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) and Fourier amplitude spectra (FAS) were used to compute the ambient vibration wave fields of each building axes (Transverse or North-South (NS), Longitudinal or East-West (EW) and vertical) into Fourier spectra. Two main modes of translation and torsion were observed from the peaks frequencies obtained at 2.99 to 3.10 Hz (1st mode), 4.85 Hz (2nd mode) and 5.63 to 5.85 Hz (3rd mode). The building experiencing translation modes of bending and shear in the NS and EW directions. It could be seen when the amplitudes tends to increase when the floor are increased. Meanwhile, the torsional bending mode is expected to occur when the deformation amplitudes are found to be increasing horizontally, when moving into partially structural damaged section located on the East wing of building.

  8. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Copyright 1999 BEA Trading Ltd.

  9. Envenomation Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharal, Ghulam Abbas; Darby, Richard Ryan; Cohen, Adam B

    2018-01-01

    Insect sting-related envenomation rarely produces seizures. We present a patient with confusion and seizures that began 24 hours after a yellow jacket (wasp) sting. Given the rapid onset and resolution of symptoms, as well as accompanying dermatological and orbital features, and the lack of any infectious or structural abnormalities identified, the toxic effect of the wasp venom (and related anaphylaxis reaction) was believed to be the cause of his presentation.

  10. An Intelligent Sensor for the Ultra-High-Frequency Partial Discharge Online Monitoring of Power Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-frequency (UHF partial discharge (PD online monitoring is an effective way to inspect potential faults and insulation defects in power transformers. The construction of UHF PD online monitoring system is a challenge because of the high-frequency and wide-frequency band of the UHF PD signal. This paper presents a novel, intelligent sensor for UHF PD online monitoring based on a new method, namely a level scanning method. The intelligent sensor can directly acquire the statistical characteristic quantities and is characterized by low cost, few data to output and transmit, Ethernet functionality, and small size for easy installation. The prototype of an intelligent sensor was made. Actual UHF PD experiments with three typical artificial defect models of power transformers were carried out in a laboratory, and the waveform recording method and intelligent sensor proposed were simultaneously used for UHF PD measurement for comparison. The results show that the proposed intelligent sensor is qualified for the UHF PD online monitoring of power transformers. Additionally, three methods to improve the performance of intelligent sensors were proposed according to the principle of the level scanning method.

  11. Resonant Frequency Calculation and Optimal Design of Peano Fractal Antenna for Partial Discharge Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-frequency (UHF approaches have caught increasing attention recently and have been considered as a promising technology for online monitoring partial discharge (PD signals. This paper presents a Peano fractal antenna for UHF PD online monitoring of transformer with small size and multiband. The approximate formula for calculating the first resonant frequency of the Peano fractal antenna is presented. The results show that the first resonant frequency of the Peano fractal antenna is smaller than the Hilbert fractal antenna when the outer dimensions are equivalent approximately. The optimal geometric parameters of the antenna were obtained through simulation. Actual PD experiments had been carried out for two typically artificial insulation defect models, while the proposed antenna and the existing Hilbert antenna were both used for the PD measurement. The experimental results show that Peano fractal antenna is qualified for PD online UHF monitoring and a little more suitable than the Hilbert fractal antenna for pattern recognition by analyzing the waveforms of detected UHF PD signals.

  12. Regional frequency analysis of extreme rainfalls using partial L moments method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Zahrahtul Amani; Shabri, Ani

    2013-07-01

    An approach based on regional frequency analysis using L moments and LH moments are revisited in this study. Subsequently, an alternative regional frequency analysis using the partial L moments (PL moments) method is employed, and a new relationship for homogeneity analysis is developed. The results were then compared with those obtained using the method of L moments and LH moments of order two. The Selangor catchment, consisting of 37 sites and located on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia, is chosen as a case study. PL moments for the generalized extreme value (GEV), generalized logistic (GLO), and generalized Pareto distributions were derived and used to develop the regional frequency analysis procedure. PL moment ratio diagram and Z test were employed in determining the best-fit distribution. Comparison between the three approaches showed that GLO and GEV distributions were identified as the suitable distributions for representing the statistical properties of extreme rainfall in Selangor. Monte Carlo simulation used for performance evaluation shows that the method of PL moments would outperform L and LH moments methods for estimation of large return period events.

  13. Strain-dependent partial slip on rock fractures under seismic-frequency torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Seth; Bonner, Brian P.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of nonlinear modulus and attenuation of fractures provide the opportunity to probe their mechanical state. We have adapted a low-frequency torsional apparatus to explore the seismic signature of fractures under low normal stress, simulating low effective stress environments such as shallow or high pore pressure reservoirs. We report strain-dependent modulus and attenuation for fractured samples of Duperow dolomite (a carbon sequestration target reservoir in Montana), Blue Canyon Dome rhyolite (a geothermal analog reservoir in New Mexico), and Montello granite (a deep basement disposal analog from Wisconsin). We use a simple single effective asperity partial slip model to fit our measured stress-strain curves and solve for the friction coefficient, contact radius, and full slip condition. These observations have the potential to develop into new field techniques for measuring differences in frictional properties during reservoir engineering manipulations and estimate the stress conditions where reservoir fractures and faults begin to fully slip.

  14. Power absorption of high-frequency electromagnetic waves in a partially ionized magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Bin; Wang Xiaogang

    2005-01-01

    Power absorption of high-frequency electromagnetic waves in a uniformly magnetized plasma layer covering a highly conducting surface is studied under atmosphere conditions. It is assumed that the system consists of not only electrons and positive ions but negative ions as well. By a general formula derived in our previous work [B. Guo and X. G. Wang, Plasma Sci. Tech. 7, 2645 (2005)], the total power absorption in the plasma layer with multiple reflections between an air-plasma interface and the conducting surface is computed. The results show that although the existence of negative ions greatly reduces the total power absorption, the magnetization of the plasma can, however, partially enhance it. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed

  15. Directly assessing interpersonal RSA influences in the frequency domain: An illustration with generalized partial directed coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwei; Gates, Kathleen M; Blandon, Alysia Y

    2018-06-01

    Despite recent research indicating that interpersonal linkage in physiology is a common phenomenon during social interactions, and the well-established role of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in socially facilitative physiological regulation, little research has directly examined interpersonal influences in RSA, perhaps due to methodological challenges in analyzing multivariate RSA data. In this article, we aim to bridge this methodological gap by introducing a new method for quantifying interpersonal RSA influences. Specifically, we show that a frequency-domain statistic, generalized partial directed coherence (gPDC), can be used to capture lagged relations in RSA between social partners without first estimating RSA for each person. We illustrate its utility by examining the relation between gPDC and marital conflict in a sample of married couples. Finally, we discuss how gPDC complements existing methods in the time domain and provide guidelines for choosing among these different statistical techniques. © 2018 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. Decoherence of coupled Josephson charge qubits due to partially correlated low-frequency noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yong; Zhou, Zheng-Wei; Cai, Jian-Ming; Guo, Guang-Can

    2007-01-01

    Josephson charge qubits are promising candidates for scalable quantum computing. However, their performances are strongly degraded by decoherence due to low-frequency background noise, typically with a 1/f spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the decoherence process of two Cooper pair boxes (CPBs) coupled via a capacitor. Going beyond the common and uncorrelated noise models and the Bloch-Redfield formalism of previous works, we study the coupled system's quadratic dephasing under the condition of partially correlated noise sources. Based on reported experiments and generally accepted noise mechanisms, we introduce a reasonable assumption for the noise correlation, with which the calculation of multiqubit decoherence can be simplified to a problem on the single-qubit level. For the conventional Gaussian 1/f noise case, our results demonstrate that the quadratic dephasing rates are not very sensitive to the spatial correlation of the noises. Furthermore, we discuss the feasibility and efficiency of dynamical decoupling in the coupled CPBs

  17. Changes in Hippocampal Volume are Correlated with Cell Loss but Not with Seizure Frequency in Two Chronic Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Roberson S.; Malheiros, Jackeline M.; dos Santos, Renan; Hamani, Clement; Longo, Beatriz M.; Tannús, Alberto; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) or pilocarpine (PILO) have been used in rats to model human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) but the distribution and severity of structural lesions between these two models may differ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have used quantitative measurements of hippocampal T2 (T2HP) relaxation time and volume, but simultaneous comparative results have not been reported yet. The aim of this study was to compare the MRI T2HP and volume with histological data and frequency of seizures in both models. KA- and PILO-treated rats were imaged with a 2 T MRI scanner. T2HP and volume values were correlated with the number of cells, mossy fiber sprouting, and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) frequency over the 9 months following status epilepticus (SE). Compared to controls, KA-treated rats had unaltered T2HP, pronounced reduction in hippocampal volume and concomitant cell reduction in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3 at 3 months post SE. In contrast, hippocampal volume was unchanged in PILO-treated animals despite detectable increased T2HP and cell loss in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3. In the following 6 months, MRI hippocampal volume remained stable with increase of T2HP signal in the KA-treated group. The number of CA1 and CA3 cells was smaller than age-matched CTL group. In contrast, PILO group had MRI volumetric reduction accompanied by reduction in the number of CA1 and CA3 cells. In this group, T2HP signal was unaltered at 6 or 9 months after status. Reductions in the number of cells were not progressive in both models. Notably, the SRS frequency was higher in PILO than in the KA model. The volumetry data correlated well with tissue damage in the epileptic brain, suggesting that MRI may be useful for tracking longitudinal hippocampal changes, allowing the assessment of individual variability and disease progression. Our results indicate that the temporal changes in hippocampal morphology are distinct for both models of TLE and that

  18. Effect of low frequency electrical stimulation on seizure-induced short- and long-term impairments in learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilpour, Khadijeh; Sheibani, Vahid; Shabani, Mohammad; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Kindled seizures can impair learning and memory. In the present study the effect of low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFS) on kindled seizure-induced impairment in spatial learning and memory was investigated and followed up to one month. Animals were kindled by electrical stimulation of hippocampal CA1 area in a semi-rapid manner (12 stimulations per day). One group of animals received four trials of LFS at 30s, 6h, 24h, and 30h following the last kindling stimulation. Each LFS trial was consisted of 4 packages at 5min intervals. Each package contained 200 monophasic square wave pulses of 0.1ms duration at 1Hz. The Open field, Morris water maze, and novel object recognition tests were done 48h, 1week, 2weeks, and one month after the last kindling stimulation respectively. Kindled animals showed a significant impairment in learning and memory compared to control rats. LFS decreased the kindling-induced learning and memory impairments at 24h and one week following its application, but not at 2week or 1month after kindling. In the group of animals that received the same 4 trials of LFS again one week following the last kindling stimulation, the improving effect of LFS was observed even after one month. Obtained results showed that application of LFS in fully kindled animals has a long-term improving effect on spatial learning and memory. This effect can remain for a long duration (one month in this study) by increasing the number of applied LFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. POLARIZED LINE FORMATION WITH LOWER-LEVEL POLARIZATION AND PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supriya, H. D.; Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N.; Ravindra, B. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Stenflo, J. O. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-09-10

    In the well-established theories of polarized line formation with partial frequency redistribution (PRD) for a two-level and two-term atom, it is generally assumed that the lower level of the scattering transition is unpolarized. However, the existence of unexplained spectral features in some lines of the Second Solar Spectrum points toward a need to relax this assumption. There exists a density matrix theory that accounts for the polarization of all the atomic levels, but it is based on the flat-spectrum approximation (corresponding to complete frequency redistribution). In the present paper we propose a numerical algorithm to solve the problem of polarized line formation in magnetized media, which includes both the effects of PRD and the lower level polarization (LLP) for a two-level atom. First we derive a collisionless redistribution matrix that includes the combined effects of the PRD and the LLP. We then solve the relevant transfer equation using a two-stage approach. For illustration purposes, we consider two case studies in the non-magnetic regime, namely, the J {sub a} = 1, J {sub b} = 0 and J {sub a} = J {sub b} = 1, where J {sub a} and J {sub b} represent the total angular momentum quantum numbers of the lower and upper states, respectively. Our studies show that the effects of LLP are significant only in the line core. This leads us to propose a simplified numerical approach to solve the concerned radiative transfer problem.

  20. Changes of seizure susceptibility during benzodiazepine withdrawal in immature rats: comparison of clonazepam and partial benzodiazepine agonist Ro 19-8022

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. S4 (2006), s. 221-221 ISSN 0013-9580. [Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and Canadian League against Epilepsy. 01.12.2006-05.12.2006, San Diego, CA] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : PTZ-induced seizures * clonazepam * agonist Ro 19-8022 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  1. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Sun-Jung; Kim, Gyu Sik; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Won-Joo

    2010-09-01

    Central nervous system dysfunction, such as hyperexcitation, irritability, and disturbance of consciousness, may occur in patients with thyrotoxicosis. There are also a few case reports of seizures attributed to thyrotoxicosis. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of seizures that appeared to be related to the thyrotoxic state in patients with thyrotoxicosis. We retrospectively determined the prevalence and clinical features of seizures in 3382 patients with hyperthyroidism. Among patients with seizures, we excluded those with other causes of seizures or a history of epilepsy. We did not exclude two patients in whom later work-up showed an abnormal magnetic resonance imaging, as their seizures resolved after they became euthyroid. Among the 3382 patients with hyperthyroidism, there were seven patients (0.2%) with seizures who met our criteria. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in four patients (57%), complex partial seizures with secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in two patients (29%), and one patient had a focal seizure (14%). The initial electroencephalography (EEG) was normal in two patients (29%), had generalized slow activity in four patients (57%), and had diffuse generalized beta activity in one patient (14%). On magnetic resonance imaging, one patient had diffuse brain atrophy, and one had an old basal ganglia infarct. After the patients became euthyroid, the EEG was repeated and was normal in all patients. During follow-up periods ranging from 18 to 24 months, none of the patients had seizures. Hyperthyroidism is the precipitating cause of seizures in a small percentage of these patients. In these patients, the prognosis is good if they become euthyroid. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures reported here can be used in conjunction with the prevalence of thyrotoxicosis in the population to estimate the prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures in populations.

  2. Intraoperative seizures and seizures outcome in patients underwent awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Peizhi, Zhou; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2016-11-25

    Awake craniotomies (AC) could reduce neurological deficits compared with patients under general anesthesia, however, intraoperative seizure is a major reason causing awake surgery failure. The purpose of the study was to give a comprehensive overview the published articles focused on seizure incidence in awake craniotomy. Bibliographic searches of the EMBASE, MEDLINE,were performed to identify articles and conference abstracts that investigated the intraoperative seizure frequency of patients underwent AC. Twenty-five studies were included in this meta-analysis. Among the 25 included studies, one was randomized controlled trials and 5 of them were comparable studies. The pooled data suggested the general intraoperative seizure(IOS) rate for patients with AC was 8%(fixed effect model), sub-group analysis identified IOS rate for glioma patients was 8% and low grade patients was 10%. The pooled data showed early seizure rates of AC patients was 11% and late seizure rates was 35%. This systematic review and meta-analysis shows that awake craniotomy is a safe technique with relatively low intraoperative seizure occurrence. However, few RCTs were available, and the acquisition of further evidence through high-quality RCTs is highly recommended.

  3. In silico validation and structure activity relationship study of a series of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide derivatives as potential anticonvulsants in generalized and partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Reema; Sara, Udai Vir Singh; Khosa, Ratan Lal; Stables, James; Jain, Jainendra

    2013-06-01

    A series of twelve compounds (Compounds RNH1-RNH12) of acid hydrazones of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide or nicotinic acid hydrazide was synthesized and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity by MES, scPTZ, minimal clonic seizure and corneal kindling seizure test. Neurotoxicity was also determined for these compounds by rotarod test. Results showed that halogen substitution at meta and para position of phenyl ring exhibited better protection than ortho substitution. Compounds RNH4 and RNH12, were found to be the active analogs displaying 6Hz ED50 of 75.4 and 14.77 mg/kg while the corresponding MES ED50 values were 113.4 and 29.3 mg/kg respectively. In addition, compound RNH12 also showed scPTZ ED50 of 54.2 mg/kg. In the series, compound RNH12 with trifluoromethoxy substituted phenyl ring was the most potent analog exhibiting protection in all four animal models of epilepsy. Molecular docking study has also shown significant binding interactions of these two compounds with 1OHV, 2A1H and 1PBQ receptors. Thus, N-[(meta or para halogen substituted) benzylidene] pyridine-3-carbohydrazides could be used as lead compounds in anticonvulsant drug design and discovery.

  4. Seizure-related factors and non-verbal intelligence in children with epilepsy. A population-based study from Western Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høie, B; Mykletun, A; Sommerfelt, K; Bjørnaes, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Waaler, P E

    2005-06-01

    To study the relationship between seizure-related factors, non-verbal intelligence, and socio-economic status (SES) in a population-based sample of children with epilepsy. The latest ILAE International classifications of epileptic seizures and syndromes were used to classify seizure types and epileptic syndromes in all 6-12 year old children (N=198) with epilepsy in Hordaland County, Norway. The children had neuropediatric and EEG examinations. Of the 198 patients, demographic characteristics were collected on 183 who participated in psychological studies including Raven matrices. 126 healthy controls underwent the same testing. Severe non-verbal problems (SNVP) were defined as a Raven score at or Raven percentile group, whereas controls were highly over-represented in the higher percentile groups. SNVP were present in 43% of children with epilepsy and 3% of controls. These problems were especially common in children with remote symptomatic epilepsy aetiology, undetermined epilepsy syndromes, myoclonic seizures, early seizure debut, high seizure frequency and in children with polytherapy. Seizure-related characteristics that were not usually associated with SNVP were idiopathic epilepsies, localization related (LR) cryptogenic epilepsies, absence and simple partial seizures, and a late debut of epilepsy. Adjusting for socio-economic status factors did not significantly change results. In childhood epilepsy various seizure-related factors, but not SES factors, were associated with the presence or absence of SNVP. Such deficits may be especially common in children with remote symptomatic epilepsy aetiology and in complex and therapy resistant epilepsies. Low frequencies of SNVP may be found in children with idiopathic and LR cryptogenic epilepsy syndromes, simple partial or absence seizures and a late epilepsy debut. Our study contributes to an overall picture of cognitive function and its relation to central seizure characteristics in a childhood epilepsy population

  5. POLARIZED LINE FORMATION IN MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MEDIA. III. HANLE EFFECT WITH PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    In two previous papers, we solved the polarized radiative transfer (RT) equation in multi-dimensional (multi-D) geometries with partial frequency redistribution as the scattering mechanism. We assumed Rayleigh scattering as the only source of linear polarization (Q/I, U/I) in both these papers. In this paper, we extend these previous works to include the effect of weak oriented magnetic fields (Hanle effect) on line scattering. We generalize the technique of Stokes vector decomposition in terms of the irreducible spherical tensors T K Q , developed by Anusha and Nagendra, to the case of RT with Hanle effect. A fast iterative method of solution (based on the Stabilized Preconditioned Bi-Conjugate-Gradient technique), developed by Anusha et al., is now generalized to the case of RT in magnetized three-dimensional media. We use the efficient short-characteristics formal solution method for multi-D media, generalized appropriately to the present context. The main results of this paper are the following: (1) a comparison of emergent (I, Q/I, U/I) profiles formed in one-dimensional (1D) media, with the corresponding emergent, spatially averaged profiles formed in multi-D media, shows that in the spatially resolved structures, the assumption of 1D may lead to large errors in linear polarization, especially in the line wings. (2) The multi-D RT in semi-infinite non-magnetic media causes a strong spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles, which is more pronounced in the line wings. (3) The presence of a weak magnetic field modifies the spatial variation of the emergent (Q/I, U/I) profiles in the line core, by producing significant changes in their magnitudes.

  6. Hippocampal Abnormalities and Seizure Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry were performed on 84 consecutive patients (adolescents and adults with partial epilepsy submitted to antiepileptic drug (AED withdrawal after at least 2 years of seizure control, in a study at State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Brazil.

  7. Number and viability of parasite influence seizure frequency in children with neurocysticercosis Número e viabilidade do parasita influenciam a frequência de crises epilépticas em crianças com neurocisticercose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane S. Ferreira

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship between CT findings - number and the viability phase of the parasites - and the seizure frequency in children with neurocysticercosis before and short-term after antiepileptic drug (AED introduction. We only found a significant interaction between stage of parasitic infection and number of lesions on seizure frequency after AED treatment. Patients with more than five lesions on active or transitional stages had higher seizure frequency predicting a worse short-term prognosis.No presente estudo, investigou-se a relação entre os achados tomográficos - número e estágio de viabilidade dos parasitas - e a frequência de crises epilépticas em crianças com neurocisticercose antes e logo após a introdução do tratamento com drogas antiepilépticas. Encontramos que a interação entre o estágio do parasita e o número de lesões influenciam significativamente a frequência de crises somente após o tratamento. Pacientes com mais do que cinco lesões em fase ativa ou transicional tiveram maior frequência de crises predizendo um pior prognóstico.

  8. Specific features of early post-stroke seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Valeryevna Danilova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of examining 101 patients (68 men and 33 women aged 48 to 89 years with seizures in the first 7 days of stroke. A control group comprised 97 patients who had experienced ischemic stroke without seizures. Early seizures more frequently occurred in the cardioembolic subtype of stroke as simple partial seizures. The neuroimaging features of ischemic foci were revealed and the cerebrovascular responsiveness was evaluated in different vascular basins in these patients.

  9. Explicit solution for the natural frequency of structures with partial viscoelastic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2016-01-01

    The free vibration characteristics of structures with viscoelastic treatment are represented by the complex-valued natural frequencies. The assumed single mode representation associated with the low-frequency stiffness of the viscoelastic treatment is modified by a correction term representing the influence from residual vibration modes. The correction term is eliminated in terms of the corresponding natural frequency associated with the high-frequency stiffness of the viscoelastic treatment,...

  10. Pre-operative evaluation of medically intractable partial seizures using [sup 123]I-Iomazenil SPECT. Comparison with Video/EEG-monitoring and post-operative results. Praeoperative Bewertung pharmakoresistenter fokaler Epilepsien mit der [sup 123]J-Iomazenil-SPECT. Vergleich mit dem Video/EEG-Monitoring und postoperativen Ergebnissen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venz, S [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik und Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, FU Berlin (Germany); Cordes, M [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik und Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, FU Berlin (Germany); Straub, H B [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik und Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, FU Berlin (Germany); Hierholzer, J [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik und Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, FU Berlin (Germany); Schroeder, R [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik und Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, FU Berlin (Germany); Richter, W [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik und Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, FU Berlin (Germany); Schmitz, B [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik und Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, FU Ber

    1994-10-01

    SPECT with the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist [sup 123]I-Iomazenil was performed in 33 patients with intractable partial seizures for pre-operative evaluation. The results combined with MRI and [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO-SPECT findings were compared with the video-assisted EEG monitoring (gold standard'') which localised the focus in 25 patients. 11 patients underwent surgical resection of the epileptogenic area and became seizure-free for a period up to 13 months. The lomazenil SPECT had a significantly higher sensitivity compared to [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO in the visualization of an epileptogenic area and should be regularly used in the diagnostic of medically intractable partial seizures. (orig.)

  11. Sensitive high frequency hearing in earless and partially eared harlequin frogs ()

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Womack, Molly C; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Coloma, Luis A

    2018-01-01

    Harlequin frogs, genus Atelopus, communicate at high frequencies despite most species lacking a complete tympanic middle ear that facilitates high frequency hearing in most anurans and other tetrapods. Here we test whether Atelopus are better at sensing high frequency acoustic sound compared to o...

  12. Incidence of seizure exacerbation and seizures reported as adverse events during adjunctive treatment with eslicarbazepine acetate: A pooled analysis of three Phase III controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, Mar; Benbadis, Selim; Rocha, Francisco; Blum, David; Cheng, Hailong

    2017-12-01

    To investigate whether adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) could lead to exacerbation of seizures in some patients. Post-hoc analysis of data pooled from three Phase III trials of adjunctive ESL (studies 301, 302, and 304) for refractory partial-onset seizures (POS). Following an 8-week baseline period, patients were randomized to receive placebo or ESL 400, 800, or 1,200 mg once daily (2-week titration, 12-week maintenance, 2-4 week tapering-off periods). Patient seizure diary data and seizure treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) reports were pooled for analysis. The modified intent-to-treat and safety populations comprised 1,410 patients and 1,447 patients, respectively. Titration period : Compared with placebo (32/21%), significantly smaller proportions of patients taking ESL 800 mg (20/15%) and 1,200 mg (22/12%) had a ≥25/≥50% increase in standardized seizure frequency (SSF) from baseline; there was no significant difference between placebo and ESL 400 mg. Maintenance period : Compared with placebo (20%), significantly smaller proportions of patients taking ESL (400 mg, 12%; 800 mg, 12%; 1,200 mg, 14%) had an increase in SSF ≥25%. When evaluating ≥50% increases in SSF, only ESL 800 mg (7%) was significantly different from placebo (12%). Some patients had no secondarily generalized tonic-clonic (sGTC) seizures during baseline but had ≥1 sGTC seizure during maintenance treatment (placebo, 11%; ESL 400 mg, 5%; 800 mg, 10%; 1,200 mg, 5%). Fewer patients had a ≥25% increase in sGTC seizure frequency with ESL (400 mg, 11%; 800 mg, 9%; 1,200 mg, 14%) versus placebo (19%). The incidence of seizures reported as TEAEs was low in all treatment groups; incidences were generally lower with ESL versus placebo. Tapering-off period : Similar proportions of patients taking ESL and placebo had a ≥25/≥50% increase in SSF. Seizure TEAE incidence was numerically higher with ESL versus placebo. Treatment with adjunctive ESL does not appear to

  13. Multi-fluid Approach to High-frequency Waves in Plasmas. II. Small-amplitude Regime in Partially Ionized Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Gómez, David; Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume, E-mail: david.martinez@uib.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2017-03-01

    The presence of neutral species in a plasma has been shown to greatly affect the properties of magnetohydrodynamic waves. For instance, the interaction between ions and neutrals through momentum transfer collisions causes the damping of Alfvén waves and alters their oscillation frequency and phase speed. When the collision frequencies are larger than the frequency of the waves, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic approximations can accurately describe the effects of partial ionization, since there is a strong coupling between the various species. However, at higher frequencies, the single-fluid models are not applicable and more complex approaches are required. Here, we use a five-fluid model with three ionized and two neutral components, which takes into consideration Hall’s current and Ohm’s diffusion in addition to the friction due to collisions between different species. We apply our model to plasmas composed of hydrogen and helium, and allow the ionization degree to be arbitrary. By analyzing the corresponding dispersion relation and numerical simulations, we study the properties of small-amplitude perturbations. We discuss the effect of momentum transfer collisions on the ion-cyclotron resonances and compare the importance of magnetic resistivity, and ion–neutral and ion–ion collisions on the wave damping at various frequency ranges. Applications to partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere are performed.

  14. Monotherapy for partial epilepsy: focus on levetiracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gambardella

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Gambardella1,2, Angelo Labate1,2, Eleonora Colosimo1, Roberta Ambrosio1, Aldo Quattrone1,21Institute of Neurology, University Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy; 2Institute of Neurological Sciences, National Research Council, Piano Lago di Mangone, Cosenza, ItalyAbstract: Levetiracetam (LEV, the S-enantiomer of alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-1-pyrollidine acetamide, is a recently licensed antiepileptic drug (AED for adjunctive therapy of partial seizures. Its mechanism of action is uncertain but it exhibits a unique profile of anticonvulsant activity in models of chronic epilepsy. Five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials enrolling adult or pediatric patients with refractory partial epilepsy have demonstrated the efficacy of LEV as adjunctive therapy, with a responder rate (≥50% reduction in seizure frequency of 28%–45%. Long-term efficacy studies suggest retention rates of 60% after one year, with 13% of patients seizure-free for 6 months of the study and 8% seizure-free for 1 year. More recent studies illustrated successful conversion to monotherapy in patients with refractory epilepsy, and its effectiveness as a single agent in partial epilepsy. LEV has also efficacy in generalized epilepsies. Adverse effects of LEV, including somnolence, lethargy, and dizziness, are generally mild and their occurrence rate seems to be not significantly different from that observed in placebo groups. LEV also has no clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with other AEDs, or with commonly prescribed medications. The combination of effective antiepileptic properties with a relatively mild adverse effect profile makes LEV an attractive therapy for partial seizures.Keywords: levetiracetam, partial epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs

  15. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  16. Data on correlations between T cell subset frequencies and length of partial remission in type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Narsale

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial remission in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is a period of good glucose control that can last from several weeks to over a year. The clinical significance of the remission period is that patients might be more responsive to immunotherapy if treated within this period. This article provides clinical data that indicates the level of glucose control and insulin-secreting β-cell function of each patient in the study at baseline (within 3 months of diagnosis, and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months post-baseline. The relative frequency of immune cell subsets in the PBMC of each patient and the association between the frequency of immune cell subsets measured and length of remission is also shown. These data support the findings reported in the accompanying publication, “A pilot study showing associations between frequency of CD4+ memory cell subsets at diagnosis and duration of partial remission in type 1 diabetes” (Moya et al., 2016 [1], where a full interpretation, including biological relevance of the study can be found. Keywords: Type 1 diabetes, T cell subsets, Partial remission

  17. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    convulsive seizures tested. Another study was performed, involving quantitative parameters in the time and frequency domain. The study showed, that there are several differences between tonic seizures and the tonic phase of GTC seizures and furthermore revealed differences of the epileptic (tonic and tonic...... phase of GTC) and simulated seizures. This was valuable information concerning a seizure detection algorithm, and the findings from this research provided evidence for a change in the definition of these seizures by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Our final study presents a novel...

  18. Explicit solution for the natural frequency of structures with partial viscoelastic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2016-01-01

    The free vibration characteristics of structures with viscoelastic treatment are represented by the complex-valued natural frequencies. The assumed single mode representation associated with the low-frequency stiffness of the viscoelastic treatment is modified by a correction term representing...

  19. Online calibration of high-frequency partial discharge signals in three-phase belted power cables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, P.A.A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Partial discharge (PD) magnitudes from classical detection techniques are expressed in terms of apparent charges. Signals from HF/VHF/UHF techniques on substation components are often hard to express in this quantity because of complex signal excitation and propagation channels. A method to

  20. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If I have a seizure disorder, can it cause problems during pregnancy? • What risks are associated with having a seizure ... If I have a seizure disorder, can it cause problems during pregnancy? Seizure disorders can affect pregnancy in several ways: • ...

  1. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  2. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An investigation on the frequency of partial prosthesis classification in dental faculty, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zand S

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Tooth loss is a kind of handicap and losing a number of teeth makes an individual susceptible to this disability. Having knowledge about the prevalence of partial tooth loss, provides us with a better understanding of social hygiene. On the other hand, having access to such an information, students can be led properly to treat more prevalent cases. The goal of this retrospective study is to investigate the frequency of partial prosthesis classifications, among patients, referred to Shiraz dental faculty. Sexuality, tooth loss classification and its reason and the presence of additional space were studied about all patients (371 females, 205 males from (97-98 to the end of (99-2000. The results showed that females were more than males (64.4%, the lower jaw was treated more than the upper jaw (67.9%, dental caries were the most important reason for extraction (55.5%, class I among females (28.79% and class II mod I among males (29.73% had the most frequency, meaning that the most cases were free end, so more attention should be paid for the education of free end partial prosthesis, however, preventive steps should be taken to retain abutment teeth.

  4. Source and sink nodes in absence seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Abner C; Machado, Birajara S; Caboclo, Luis Otavio S F; Fujita, Andre; Baccala, Luiz A; Sameshima, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    As opposed to focal epilepsy, absence seizures do not exhibit a clear seizure onset zone or focus since its ictal activity rapidly engages both brain hemispheres. Yet recent graph theoretical analysis applied to absence seizures EEG suggests the cortical focal presence, an unexpected feature for this type of epilepsy. In this study, we explore the characteristics of absence seizure by classifying the nodes as to their source/sink natures via weighted directed graph analysis based on connectivity direction and strength estimation using information partial directed coherence (iPDC). By segmenting the EEG signals into relatively short 5-sec-long time windows we studied the evolution of coupling strengths from both sink and source nodes, and the network dynamics of absence seizures in eight patients.

  5. Predictors of seizure occurrence in children undergoing pre-surgical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harini, Chellamani; Singh, Kanwaljit; Takeoka, Masanori; Parulkar, Isha; Bergin, Ann Marie; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2013-10-01

    Long-Term-Monitoring (LTM) is a valuable tool for seizure localization/lateralization among children with refractory-epilepsy undergoing pre-surgical-monitoring. The aim of this study was to examine the factors predicting occurrence of single/multiple seizures in children undergoing pre-surgical monitoring in the LTM unit. Chart review was done on 95 consecutive admissions on 92 children (40 females) admitted to the LTM-unit for pre-surgical workup. Relationship between occurrence of multiple (≥ 3) seizures and factors such as home seizure-frequency, demographics, MRI-lesions/seizure-type and localization/AED usage/neurological-exam/epilepsy-duration was evaluated by logistic-regression and survival-analysis. Home seizure-frequency was further categorized into low (up-to 1/month), medium (up-to 1/week) and high (>1/week) and relationship of these categories to the occurrence of multiple seizures was evaluated. Mean length of stay was 5.24 days in all 3 groups. Home seizure frequency was the only factor predicting the occurrence of single/multiple seizures in children undergoing presurgical workup. Other factors (age/sex/MRI-lesions/seizure-type and localization/AED-usage/neurological-exam/epilepsy-duration) did not affect occurrence of single/multiple seizures or time-to-occurrence of first/second seizure. Analysis of the home-seizure frequency categories revealed that 98% admissions in high-frequency, 94% in the medium, and 77% in low-frequency group had at-least 1 seizure recorded during the monitoring. Odds of first-seizure increased in high vs. low-frequency group (p=0.01). Eighty-nine percent admissions in high-frequency, 78% in medium frequency, versus 50% in low-frequency group had ≥ 3 seizures. The odds of having ≥ 3 seizures increased in high-frequency (p=0.0005) and in medium-frequency (p=0.007), compared to low-frequency group. Mean time-to-first-seizure was 2.7 days in low-frequency, 2.1 days in medium, and 2 days in high-frequency group. Time-to-first-seizure

  6. Febrile Seizure Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Cisneros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation session is appropriate for medical students, community physicians, or residents in emergency medicine, neurology, pediatrics, or family medicine. Introduction: Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures in childhood; they are thought to occur in 2-5% of all children.1-3 Febrile seizures are defined as a seizure in association with a febrile illness in children without a central nervous system infection, previous afebrile seizure, known brain disorder, or electrolyte abnormalities. 1,2 They typically occur between 6 months and 18 months of age though they can occur up to 5 years of age.3 Febrile seizures are categorized as: simple (generalized seizure lasting less than 15 minutes in a child aged 6 months to 5 years, and less than 1 in a 24 hour period or complex (a focal seizure or generalized seizure lasting greater than 15 minutes, or multiple seizures in a 24 hour period. 1,3 Treatment for febrile seizures is based on treating the underlying cause of the fever and giving reassurance and education to the parents.2 Mortality is extremely rare, and there is no difference in the patient’s cognitive abilities after a febrile seizure, even when the seizure is prolonged.1 Objectives: At the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 discuss the management of febrile seizures 2 discuss when placement of an advanced airway is indicated in the management of a febrile seizure 3 list the risk factors for febrile seizures 4 prepare a differential diagnosis for the causes of febrile seizures 5 educate family members on febrile seizures. Methods: This educational session is a high-fidelity simulation.

  7. Kinetic models of partially ionized complex plasmas in the low frequency regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; Angelis, U. de

    2011-01-01

    The results from three kinetic models of complex plasmas taking into account collisions with neutrals are compared in the low-frequency regime: The ''full'' model which considers the absorption of plasma fluxes on dust particles and dust charge fluctuations, the ''multi-component'' model where both these effects are neglected, and the ''standard'' model which takes into account the dust charge perturbations but not the absorption of fluxes. We derive and numerically evaluate expressions of the low frequency responses of these models, also taking into account the modification of the capture cross-sections due to the effect of neutrals. The role of plasma sources and collisions with neutrals is assessed by computing the plasma permittivities and static permittivities for all the three models.

  8. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Aarts, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. New method A single-channel

  9. Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Seizure Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumnima Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Seizure occurs in up to 10% of the population, whereas epilepsy is a chronic disease characterized by recurrent seizures that may affect up to 2% of the population. Modern neuroimaging is useful in diagnosis of  abnormalities underlying the epilepsies, but the information provided by imaging techniques can also contribute to proper classification of certain epileptic disorders and can delineate the genetics of some underlying syndromes. Neuroimaging is even more important for those patients who have medically intractable seizures. This study was carried out to establish different etiologies of seizures, to correlate the clinical data and radiological findings in cases of seizure, and to identify the common etiologies in different types of seizures. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital-based study conducted in the Department of Radiodiagnosis of Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital. Records of patients of past two years, admitted in any department of the hospital with history of seizure disorder and underwent a Computed Tomography  (CT of brain were included. The CT patterns were assessed and the data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: There were a total of 480 cases out of which 263 (55% were male and 217 (45% were female with M:F ratio of 1.2:1. Generalized seizure was more frequent than partial seizure in both gender. In 274 cases of generalized seizures, CT scan findings were abnormal in 151 cases and normal finding observed in 123 cases. In 206 cases of partial seizures, 125 cases were abnormal and 81 having normal CT scan findings. Age wise distribution showed highest number (n=218 of cases in young group (60 yr. The most common cause of seizure  was  calcified granuloma (n=79, 16.5% followed by neurocysticercosis (NCC, n=64, 13%. Diffuse cerebral edema, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus was seen only in lower age group particularly among 1-20 years. Infarct and diffuse cortical

  10. Resonant frequencies in an elevated spherical container partially filled with water: FEM and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curadelli, O.; Ambrosini, D.; Mirasso, A.; Amani, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical-experimental study of the overall dynamical response of elevated spherical tanks subjected to horizontal base motion is presented. The main objective is to gain insight in the physical response of this particular structural typology widely used in the petrochemical industry as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) containers. In order to identify the natural frequencies of the modes that mainly contribute to the response, experimental free vibration tests on an elevated spherical tank model for different liquid levels were carried out. Next, a numerical model that takes into account the coupling between fluid and structure was developed and validated against the experimental results. A very good agreement between experimental and numerical results was obtained. The results obtained show the influence of liquid levels on natural frequencies and indicate that the sloshing has a significant effect on the dynamical characteristics of the analyzed system. In order to obtain a good representation of the overall dynamical behaviour of the system by means of a simplified lumped mass model, a minimum of three masses is suggested. Finally, appropriate names of these three masses are proposed in the present paper.

  11. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B A M; Aarts, Ronald M

    2017-10-01

    The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. A single-channel EEG signal can be mapped into visibility graphs (VGS), including basic visibility graph (VG), horizontal VG (HVG), and difference VG (DVG). These graphs were used to characterize different EEG seizure patterns. To demonstrate its effectiveness in identifying EEG seizure patterns and detecting generalized seizures, EEG recordings of 615h on one EEG channel from 29 epileptic patients with ID were analyzed. A novel feature set with discriminative power for seizure detection was obtained by using the VGS method. The degree distributions (DDs) of DVG can clearly distinguish EEG of each seizure pattern. The degree entropy and power-law degree power in DVG were proposed here for the first time, and they show significant difference between seizure and non-seizure EEG. The connecting structure measured by HVG can better distinguish seizure EEG from background than those by VG and DVG. A traditional EEG feature set based on frequency analysis was used here as a benchmark feature set. With a support vector machine (SVM) classifier, the seizure detection performance of the benchmark feature set (sensitivity of 24%, FD t /h of 1.8s) can be improved by combining our proposed VGS features extracted from one EEG channel (sensitivity of 38%, FD t /h of 1.4s). The proposed VGS-based features can help improve seizure detection for ID patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. GAUSS-SEIDEL AND SUCCESSIVE OVERRELAXATION METHODS FOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampoorna, M.; Bueno, J. Trujillo

    2010-01-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum that is produced by scattering processes contains a wealth of information on the physical conditions and magnetic fields of the solar outer atmosphere, but the modeling of many of its strongest spectral lines requires solving an involved non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer problem accounting for partial redistribution (PRD) effects. Fast radiative transfer methods for the numerical solution of PRD problems are also needed for a proper treatment of hydrogen lines when aiming at realistic time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar chromosphere. Here we show how the two-level atom PRD problem with and without polarization can be solved accurately and efficiently via the application of highly convergent iterative schemes based on the Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation (SOR) radiative transfer methods that had been previously developed for the complete redistribution case. Of particular interest is the Symmetric SOR method, which allows us to reach the fully converged solution with an order of magnitude of improvement in the total computational time with respect to the Jacobi-based local accelerated lambda iteration method.

  13. Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation Methods for Radiative Transfer with Partial Frequency Redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampoorna, M.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2010-04-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum that is produced by scattering processes contains a wealth of information on the physical conditions and magnetic fields of the solar outer atmosphere, but the modeling of many of its strongest spectral lines requires solving an involved non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer problem accounting for partial redistribution (PRD) effects. Fast radiative transfer methods for the numerical solution of PRD problems are also needed for a proper treatment of hydrogen lines when aiming at realistic time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar chromosphere. Here we show how the two-level atom PRD problem with and without polarization can be solved accurately and efficiently via the application of highly convergent iterative schemes based on the Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation (SOR) radiative transfer methods that had been previously developed for the complete redistribution case. Of particular interest is the Symmetric SOR method, which allows us to reach the fully converged solution with an order of magnitude of improvement in the total computational time with respect to the Jacobi-based local accelerated lambda iteration method.

  14. Neurodevelopmental comorbidities and seizure control 24 months after a first unprovoked seizure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Eva Åndell; Tomson, Torbjörn; Carlsson, Sofia; Tedroff, Kristina; Åmark, Per

    2018-07-01

    To follow children with newly diagnosed unprovoked seizures to determine (1) whether the prevalence of neurodevelopmental comorbidities and cerebral palsy (CP) changed after the initial seizure, and (2) the association between studied comorbidities and seizures 13-24 months after seizure onset or initiation of treatment. Analyses were based on 750 children (28 days-18 years) with a first unprovoked seizure (index) included in a population-based Incidence Registry in Stockholm between 2001 and 2006. The children were followed for two years and their medical records were examined for a priori defined neurodevelopmental/psychiatric comorbidities and CP and seizure frequency. Baseline information was collected from medical records from before, and up to six months after, the index seizure. Odds ratios (OR) of repeated seizures 13-24 months after the first seizure or after initiation of anti-epileptic drug treatment was calculated by logistic regression and adjusted for age and sex. At baseline, 32% of the children had neurodevelopmental/psychiatric comorbidities or CP compared to 35%, 24 months later. Children with such comorbidities more often experienced seizures 13-24 months after the index seizure (OR 2.87, CI 2.07-3.99) with the highest OR in those with CP or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children diagnosed at age neurodevelopmental comorbidities and CP in children with epilepsy tend to be present already at seizure onset and that such comorbidities are strong indicators of poor outcome regarding seizure control with or without treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Grand Mal Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grand mal seizures include: A family history of seizure disorders Any injury to the brain from trauma, a ... the risk of birth defects. If you have epilepsy and plan to become pregnant, work with your ...

  16. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause of frontal lobe epilepsy remains unknown. Complications Status epilepticus. Frontal lobe seizures tend to occur in clusters and may provoke a dangerous condition called status epilepticus — in which seizure activity lasts much longer than ...

  17. Evaluation of Seizure Attacks in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Koochaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common reason for seizure in elderly duration is the stroke. This study was conducted aiming to assess the frequency of seizure attack occurrence in those patients. Materials and Methods: This investigation was carried out through a cross-sectional method for one year on 330 patients admitted to the neurology ward as diagnosed with stroke. The required data was collected through the researcher-made questionnaire from the patients suffering from stoke which was diagnosed based on clinical findings, CT-Scan and MRI as required. Results: Among 330 patient suffering from stroke (162 men and 168 women, 48 cases (14.5% were suffering from seizure. Six percent of the patients had early seizure and another 8.5% had late seizure. Among 162 men suffering from the stroke, 32 ones were without seizures and 30 men were suffering the seizure. A number of 150 women out of total 168 ones suffering from the stroke, had no seizure and 18 others had seizures; frequency of seizure occurrence was more in male samples (p=0.044. In the people under 60 year, there were mostly early types of seizure (45% and in the age range above 60 year, it was mostly late type (89.3%. A 68.5% of the patients suffering from the seizure had experienced ischemic stroke. However, the frequency of seizure occurrence in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke was statistically greater (p=0.003. Conclusion: This examination showed that occurrence of seizure attacks in the people with stroke is 14.5% and it is seen more in the hemorrhagic strokes than ischemic ones. The frontoparietal area is the most common location involved and tonic clonic was the most common seizure in the patients suffering from it who have experienced the stroke

  18. Extended high-frequency partial liquid ventilation in lung injury: gas exchange, injury quantification, and vapor loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Allan; Al-Khadra, Eman; Tan, Puay; Watson, Kenneth F; Diesen, Diana L; Workman, Lisa J; Thompson, John E; Rose, Charles E; Arnold, John H

    2003-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation with perflubron (PFB) reportedly improves pulmonary mechanics and gas exchange and attenuates lung injury. We explored PFB evaporative loss kinetics, intrapulmonary PFB distribution, and dosing strategies during 15 h of high-frequency oscillation (HFO)-partial liquid ventilation (PLV). After saline lavage lung injury, 15 swine were rescued with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (n = 5), or in addition received 10 ml/kg PFB delivered to dependent lung [n = 5, PLV-compartmented (PLV(C))] or 10 ml/kg distributed uniformly within the lung [n = 5, PLV(U)]. In the PLV(C) group, PFB vapor loss was replaced. ANOVA revealed an unsustained improvement in oxygenation index in the PLV(U) group (P = 0.04); the reduction in oxygenation index correlated with PFB losses. Although tissue myeloperoxidase activity was reduced globally by HFO-PLV (P PFB distribution optimized gas exchange during HFO-PLV; additionally, monitoring PFB evaporative loss appears necessary to stabilize intrapulmonary PFB volume.

  19. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective...... on the amplitude of the signal. The other algorithm was based on information of the signal in the frequency domain, and it focused on synchronisation of the electrical activity in a single muscle during the seizure. Results: The amplitude-based algorithm reliably detected seizures in 2 of the patients, while...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  20. Stimulation of the nervous system for the management of seizures: current and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jerome V; Patil, Arunangelo

    2003-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of refractory epilepsy appears to have started from the theory that since VNS can alter the EEG, it may influence epilepsy. It proved effective in several models of epilepsy and was then tried in short-term, open-label and double-blind trials, leading to approval in Canada, Europe and the US. Follow-up observations in these patients demonstrated continued improvement in seizure control for up to 2 years. Close to 50% of treated patients have achieved at least a 50% reduction in seizure frequency. This therapy was also useful as rescue therapy for ongoing seizures in some patients; many patients are more alert. The initial trials were completed in patients >/=12 years of age with refractory partial seizures. Subsequently, similar benefits were shown in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, hypothalamic hamartomas and primary generalised seizures. Implanting the generator and leads is technically easy, and complications are few. The method of action is largely unknown, although VNS appears to alter metabolic activity in specific brain nuclei. Considering that improvement in mood is frequently found in patients using VNS, it has undergone trials in patients with depression. Other illnesses deserving exploration with this unusual therapy are Alzheimer's disease and autism. Some aspects of VNS have proven disappointing. Although patients have fewer seizures, the number of antiepileptic drugs they take is not significantly reduced. In addition, there is no way to accurately predict the end of life of the generator. Optimal stimulation parameters, if they exist, are unknown. Deep brain stimulation is a new method for controlling medically refractory seizures. It is based on the observation that thalamic stimulation can influence the EEG over a wide area. Several thalamic nuclei have been the object of stimulation in different groups of patients. Intraoperative brain imaging is essential for

  1. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, Ali, E-mail: ali.gholipour@childrens.harvard.edu; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Department of Radiology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aganj, Iman [Radiology Department, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sahin, Mustafa [Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  2. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K.; Aganj, Iman; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  3. [Skull vibratory test in partial vestibular lesions--influence of the stimulus frequency on the nystagmus direction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, G; Perrin, P; Morel, N; N'Guyen, D Q; Schmerber, S

    2005-01-01

    Results of the skull vibratory test (SVT) in partial unilateral vestibular peripheral lesions (PUVL) are different from the results in total vestibular lesions (TUVL). To reveal a correlation between the results of the analysis of the skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) horizontal component and the side of the lesion; to correlate these results with the stimulus frequency. To find out a predictive correlation between the SVN horizontal and vertical components and the topography of a vestibular lesion. To appreciate the degree of vestibular deafferentation (extended to high frequencies) provoked by gentamicin labyrinthectomy and its efficiency in Meniere's disease. 53 patients with a SVN and a PUVL were included and compared with 10 TUVL and 10 normal subjects. Protocol included a HST (2 Hz), a SVT at 30, 60 and 100 Hz and a caloric test. Recordings were performed with a 2D and 3D VNG device. In PUVL, SVN at 30, 60 and 100 Hz was obtained in 80, 90 and 90% of cases respectively. SVN is correlated with the side of the lesion at 30, 60 and 100 Hz respectively in 65%, 63%, 80% of cases. SVN is not correlated with the side of the lesion in 20% of Meniere's disease, in 8% of vestibular neuritis and in 6% of vestibular schwannoma. In PUVL HSN is correlated with the side of the lesion in 69% of cases. The direction of the HSN and of the SVN was different in 23% when the nystagmus attended at the same time for both tests. In PUVL the direction of the SVN is different at 100 Hz and 30 Hz in 16% of cases when they are concomittant on the same patient. After Gentamicine labyrinthectomy, the coherence of the results in caloric test, HSN and SVN (areflexy and lesional nystagmus beating toward the safe side) was correlated with the efficiency of the therapy. A SVN vertical component was met in 10% of PUVL (essentially in anterior canal dehiscence and few cases of partial labyrinthitis). The horizontal SVN SPV is significantly slower in PUVL than in TUVL patients (p=0.0004). The SVT

  4. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eGreyson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. 55% of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients’ reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  5. Multicenter clinical assessment of improved wearable multimodal convulsive seizure detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorati, Francesco; Regalia, Giulia; Caborni, Chiara; Migliorini, Matteo; Bender, Daniel; Poh, Ming-Zher; Frazier, Cherise; Kovitch Thropp, Eliana; Mynatt, Elizabeth D; Bidwell, Jonathan; Mai, Roberto; LaFrance, W Curt; Blum, Andrew S; Friedman, Daniel; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Mohammadpour-Touserkani, Fatemeh; Reinsberger, Claus; Tognetti, Simone; Picard, Rosalind W

    2017-11-01

    New devices are needed for monitoring seizures, especially those associated with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). They must be unobtrusive and automated, and provide false alarm rates (FARs) bearable in everyday life. This study quantifies the performance of new multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors. Hand-annotated video-electroencephalographic seizure events were collected from 69 patients at six clinical sites. Three different wristbands were used to record electrodermal activity (EDA) and accelerometer (ACM) signals, obtaining 5,928 h of data, including 55 convulsive epileptic seizures (six focal tonic-clonic seizures and 49 focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures) from 22 patients. Recordings were analyzed offline to train and test two new machine learning classifiers and a published classifier based on EDA and ACM. Moreover, wristband data were analyzed to estimate seizure-motion duration and autonomic responses. The two novel classifiers consistently outperformed the previous detector. The most efficient (Classifier III) yielded sensitivity of 94.55%, and an FAR of 0.2 events/day. No nocturnal seizures were missed. Most patients had seizure frequency. When increasing the sensitivity to 100% (no missed seizures), the FAR is up to 13 times lower than with the previous detector. Furthermore, all detections occurred before the seizure ended, providing reasonable latency (median = 29.3 s, range = 14.8-151 s). Automatically estimated seizure durations were correlated with true durations, enabling reliable annotations. Finally, EDA measurements confirmed the presence of postictal autonomic dysfunction, exhibiting a significant rise in 73% of the convulsive seizures. The proposed multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors provide seizure counts that are more accurate than previous automated detectors and typical patient self-reports, while maintaining a tolerable FAR for ambulatory monitoring. Furthermore, the multimodal system

  6. Effects of asynchrony and ear of presentation on the pitch of mistuned partials in harmonic and frequency-shifted complex tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, J M; Roberts, B

    2001-07-01

    When a partial of a periodic complex is mistuned, its change in pitch is greater than expected. Two experiments examined whether these partial-pitch shifts are related to the computation of global pitch. In experiment 1, stimuli were either harmonic or frequency-shifted (25% of F0) complexes. One partial was mistuned by +/- 4% and played with leading and lagging portions of 500 ms each, relative to the other components (1 s), in both monaural and dichotic contexts. Subjects indicated whether the mistuned partial was higher or lower in pitch when concurrent with the other components. Responses were positively correlated with the direction of mistuning in all conditions. In experiment 2, stimuli from each condition were compared with synchronous equivalents. Subjects matched a pure tone to the pitch of the mistuned partial (component 4). The results showed that partial-pitch shifts are not reduced in size by asynchrony. Similar asynchronies are known to produce a near-exclusion of a mistuned partial from the global-pitch computation. This mismatch indicates that global and partial pitch are derived from different processes. The similarity of the partial-pitch shifts observed for harmonic and frequency-shifted stimuli suggests that they arise from a grouping mechanism that is sensitive to spectral regularity.

  7. Meta-analysis of adjunctive levetiracetam in refractory partial sei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ying

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effects and tolerability of adjunctive levetiracetam (LEV in refractory partial seizures. Methods Relevant research articles about randomized controlled trials of adjunctive LEV in refractory partial seizures from January 1998 to December 2010 were retrieved from Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMbase, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI, VIP, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI database, China Biology Medicine (CBM. Two reviewers independently evaluated the quality of the included articles and abstracted the data. A Meta-analysis was conducted by using RevMan 5.0 software. Results According to the enrollment criteria, eleven prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials with a total of 1192 in LEV group and 789 in placebo group were finally selected. The reduction in three endpoints (a 50% or greater reduction of partial seizure frequency per week, a 75% or greater reduction of partial seizure frequency per week and seizure free was significant in LEV group than placebo group. There was no significance between LEV group and placebo group in the withdrawl rate (1000 mg/d: OR = 1.180, 95%CI: 0.690-2.010, P = 0.540; 2000 mg/d: OR = 1.530, 95%CI: 0.770-3.030, P = 0.230; 3000 mg/d: OR = 1.000, 95% CI: 0.620-1.600, P = 1.000. The following adverse events were associated with LEV: somnolence (OR = 1.720, 95%CI: 1.280-2.310, P = 0.000, dizziness (OR = 1.490, 95%CI: 1.000-2.220, P = 0.050, asthenia (OR = 1.670, 95%CI: 1.140-2.240, P = 0.008, nasopharyngitis (OR = 1.120, 95% CI: 0.710-1.760, P = 0.630, psychiatric and behavioral abnormalities (OR = 2.120, 95% CI: 1.370-3.280, P = 0.000. Conclusion LEV is effective and well tolerated when added to existing therapy in patients with refractory partial seizures compared with control drugs. Further studies are needed to identify the effects of monotherapy of LEV in partial seizures.

  8. Probability of detection of clinical seizures using heart rate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ivan; Manly, B F J

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate-based seizure detection is a viable complement or alternative to ECoG/EEG. This study investigates the role of various biological factors on the probability of clinical seizure detection using heart rate. Regression models were applied to 266 clinical seizures recorded from 72 subjects to investigate if factors such as age, gender, years with epilepsy, etiology, seizure site origin, seizure class, and data collection centers, among others, shape the probability of EKG-based seizure detection. Clinical seizure detection probability based on heart rate changes, is significantly (pprobability of detecting clinical seizures (>0.8 in the majority of subjects) using heart rate is highest for complex partial seizures, increases with a patient's years with epilepsy, is lower for females than for males and is unrelated to the side of hemisphere origin. Clinical seizure detection probability using heart rate is multi-factorially dependent and sufficiently high (>0.8) in most cases to be clinically useful. Knowledge of the role that these factors play in shaping said probability will enhance its applicability and usefulness. Heart rate is a reliable and practical signal for extra-cerebral detection of clinical seizures originating from or spreading to central autonomic network structures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Seizure precipitants (triggering factors) in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlisi, Monica; Shorvon, Simon

    2014-04-01

    adult epilepsy clinic population: (a) to identify the frequency of seizure precipitants (triggering factors) and their relative frequency in those with psychiatric disorders, and in those in remission or with active epilepsy, differences in frequency with regard to gender, seizure duration, number of drugs taken; (b) to determine which precipitants patients most commonly report; and (c) to identify differences in the distribution of precipitants among generalized, temporal, and extratemporal epilepsies. Consecutive patients attending a tertiary-care epilepsy clinic were prospectively and an open personal interview to identify and characterize seizure precipitants. Information about the epilepsy and clinical characteristics of patients was collected during the interview and from medical records. Of 104 patients, 97% cited at least one precipitant. Stress, sleep deprivation, and fatigue were the most frequently reported precipitants. Patients with psychological comorbidities reported a greater percentage of seizures with seizure precipitants. Patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy seemed to be more sensitive to seizures during awakening and sleep deprivation, patients with extratemporal epilepsy reported more frequent seizures during sleep. There were no differences in frequency or type of seizure precipitants with regard to gender, seizure duration or frequency, and the number of antiepileptic drugs taken. The findings may have implications for the better management of epilepsy by increasing a focus on nonpharmacological therapy. The implications of the findings for nosology and causation of epilepsy are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Seizure characteristics in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate seizure characteristic among multiple sclerosis patients with coexistent seizure activity compared to control group. Materials and Methods : This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted by reviewing the clinical records of patients with definite diagnosis of MS according to McDonald′s criteria from March 2007 to June 2011, who referred to the MS clinic of the university. Results : A total of 920 patients with a diagnosis of MS were identified, among whom 29 patients (3.15% with seizure activity (case due to MS with the mean age of 32.6 ± 6.23 years were analyzed. Also, fifty MS patients without any seizure occurrence with the mean age of 33.7 ± 7.4 years were used as our control group. In case group, seizure was general tonic clonic in 23 patients (79.3%, complex partial in four (13.8%, and simple partial in two (5.9%. The 26 available interictal EEGs in MS patients showed abnormal EEG pattern in 22 (84.6% of them, including focal epileptic form discharge or focal slowing in 10 (38.5%, generalized discharge (spike-wave, polyspike, or general paroxysmal fast activity in 10 (38.5%, and general slowing activity in 10 record (38.5%. MRI reviews of the 26 available brain MRIs showed subcortical white mater lesions in 22 (84.6% of patients with seizure. All MRIs were performed within one month after the first seizure episode. Amongst 48 available MRIs in our control group, 91.7% (44 cases showed periventricular lesions and in 8.3% (4 cases subcortical white matter lesions were reported. Conclusion : The result of this study demonstrated the higher rate of subcortical whit matter lesion in MS patients with seizure occurrence compared to control group.

  11. Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome: Characteristics and Comorbid Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Raspa, Melissa; Loggin-Hester, Lisa; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of caregivers of individuals with fragile X syndrome addressed characteristics of epilepsy and co-occurring conditions. Of the 1,394 individuals (1,090 males and 304 females) with the full mutation, 14% of males and 6% of females reported seizures. Seizures were more often partial, began between ages 4 and 10 years, and were…

  12. Study on the Application of an Ultra-High-Frequency Fractal Antenna to Partial Discharge Detection in Switchgears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguo Yao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ultra-high-frequency (UHF method is used to analyze the insulation condition of electric equipment by detecting the UHF electromagnetic (EM waves excited by partial discharge (PD. As part of the UHF detection system, the UHF sensor determines the detection system performance in signal extraction and recognition. In this paper, a UHF antenna sensor with the fractal structure for PD detection in switchgears was designed by means of modeling, simulation and optimization. This sensor, with a flat-plate structure, had two resonance frequencies of 583 MHz and 732 MHz. In the laboratory, four kinds of insulation defect models were positioned in the testing switchgear for typical PD tests. The results show that the sensor could reproduce the electromagnetic waves well. Furthermore, to optimize the installation position of the inner sensor for achieving best detection performance, the precise simulation model of switchgear was developed to study the propagation characteristics of UHF signals in switchgear by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method. According to the results of simulation and verification test, the sensor should be positioned at the right side of bottom plate in the front cabinet. This research established the foundation for the further study on the application of UHF technique in switchgear PD online detection.

  13. Frequent seizures are associated with a network of gray matter atrophy in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Coan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS have diffuse subtle gray matter (GM atrophy detectable by MRI quantification analyses. However, it is not clear whether the etiology and seizure frequency are associated with this atrophy. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of GM atrophy and the influence of seizure frequency in patients with TLE and either normal MRI (TLE-NL or MRI signs of HS (TLE-HS. METHODS: We evaluated a group of 172 consecutive patients with unilateral TLE-HS or TLE-NL as defined by hippocampal volumetry and signal quantification (122 TLE-HS and 50 TLE-NL plus a group of 82 healthy individuals. Voxel-based morphometry was performed with VBM8/SPM8 in 3T MRIs. Patients with up to three complex partial seizures and no generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the previous year were considered to have infrequent seizures. Those who did not fulfill these criteria were considered to have frequent seizures. RESULTS: Patients with TLE-HS had more pronounced GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral mesial temporal structures, temporal lobe, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Patients with TLE-NL had more subtle GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Both TLE-HS and TLE-NL showed increased GM volume in the contralateral pons. TLE-HS patients with frequent seizures had more pronounced GM atrophy in extra-temporal regions than TLE-HS with infrequent seizures. Patients with TLE-NL and infrequent seizures had no detectable GM atrophy. In both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, the duration of epilepsy correlated with GM atrophy in extra-hippocampal regions. CONCLUSION: Although a diffuse network GM atrophy occurs in both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, this is strikingly more evident in TLE-HS and in patients with frequent seizures. These findings suggest that neocortical atrophy in TLE is related to the ongoing seizures and epilepsy duration, while thalamic

  14. Quality of life after surgery for intractable partial epilepsy in children: a cohort study with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Mohamad A; Ataya, Nour; Ferzli, Jessica; Kurdi, Rana; El-Banna, Diana; Rahi, Amal; Shamseddine, Alhan; Sinno, Durriyah; Comair, Youssef

    2010-08-01

    Investigate if quality of life (QOL) normalizes on long-term follow-up after surgery for partial epilepsy in children. This is a cohort study with controls in which a consecutive cohort of nineteen 2-14-year-old children who underwent focal resections for intractable partial seizures between 1996 and 2006, were matched with 19 non-surgery intractable partial epilepsy patients, and with 19 healthy subjects. The two epilepsy groups were matched for age, sex, socio-economic status (SES), cognitive level, seizure type, and seizure frequency. The healthy group was matched with the two epilepsy groups for age, sex, SES, and cognitive level. QOL was assessed using the QOLCE (Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire). In the surgery group (follow-up 3.84+/-2.26 years), 78.9% had Engel class-I versus 21.1% in non-surgery (p=0.01) (follow-up 3.44+/-2.95 years). Surgery patients were similar to healthy subjects in the social, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and overall QOL (p>0.05) but had lower scores in the total QOL, physical, and health domains (p0.05, power>0.8). Our data indicate that epilepsy surgery for partial seizures in children is associated with better QOL as compared to children with intractable epilepsy who are not operated on, and suggest that in those who achieve seizure freedom normal QOL may at least potentially be possible.

  15. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  16. Seizures in dominantly inherited Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, Aline; Charbonnier, Camille; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Nicolas, Gaël; Rousseau, Stéphane; Borden, Alaina; Pariente, Jeremie; Le Ber, Isabelle; Pasquier, Florence; Formaglio, Maite; Martinaud, Olivier; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Sarazin, Marie; Croisile, Bernard; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Gabelle, Audrey; Chamard, Ludivine; Blanc, Frédéric; Sellal, François; Paquet, Claire; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David

    2016-08-30

    To assess seizure frequency in a large French cohort of autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) and to determine possible correlations with causative mutations. A national multicentric study was performed in patients with ADEOAD harboring a pathogenic mutation within PSEN1, PSEN2, APP, or a duplication of APP, and a minimal follow-up of 5 years. Clinical, EEG, and imaging data were systematically recorded. We included 132 patients from 77 families: 94 PSEN1 mutation carriers (MCs), 16 APP duplication carriers, 15 APP MCs, and 7 PSEN2 MCs. Seizure frequency was 47.7% after a mean follow-up of 8.4 years (range 5-25). After 5-year follow-up and using a Cox model analysis, the percentages of patients with seizures were respectively 19.1% (10.8%-26.7%) for PSEN1, 28.6% (0%-55.3%) for PSEN2, 31.2% (4.3%-50.6%) for APP duplications, and no patient for APP mutation. APP duplication carriers showed a significantly increased seizure risk compared to both APP MCs (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.55 [95% confidence interval 1.87-16.44]) and PSEN1 MCs (HR = 4.46 [2.11-9.44]). Among all PSEN1 mutations, those within the domains of protein hydrophilic I, transmembrane II (TM-II), TM-III, TM-IV, and TM-VII were associated with a significant increase in seizure frequency compared to other domains (HR = 4.53 [1.93-10.65], p = 0.0005). Seizures are a common feature of ADEOAD. In this population, risk was significantly higher in the APP duplication group than in all other groups. Within PSEN1, 5 specific domains were associated with a higher seizure risk indicating specific correlations between causative mutation and seizures. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Effect of epileptic seizures on the cerebrospinal fluid--A systematic retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Jobs, Catherine; Brettschneider, Johannes; Hoppner, Anselm C; Kerling, Frank; Fauser, Susanne

    2015-08-01

    Analyses of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are obligatory when epileptic seizures manifest for the first time in order to exclude life-threatening causes or treatable diseases such as acute infections or autoimmune encephalitis. However, there are only few systematic investigations on the effect of seizures themselves on CSF parameters and the significance of these parameters in differential diagnosis. CSF samples of 309 patients with epileptic and 10 with psychogenic seizures were retrospectively analyzed. CSF samples were collected between 1999 and 2008. Cell counts, the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels were determined. Findings were correlated with seizure types, seizure etiology (symptomatic, cryptogenic, occasional seizure), and seizure duration. Pathological findings were only observed in patients with epileptic but not with psychogenic seizures. The lactate concentration was elevated in 14%, the albumin quotient in 34%, and the Tau protein level in 36% of CSF samples. Cell counts were only slightly elevated in 6% of patients. Different seizure types influenced all parameters except for the cell count: In status epilepticus highest, in simple partial seizures lowest values were seen. Symptomatic partial and generalized epileptic seizures had significantly higher Tau-protein levels than cryptogenic partial seizures. In patients with repetitive and occasional epileptic seizures, higher Tau-protein levels were seen than in those with psychogenic seizures. Duration of epileptic seizures was positively correlated with the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels. High variability of investigated CSF parameters within each subgroup rendered a clear separation between epileptic and psychogenic seizures impossible. Elevated cell counts are infrequently observed in patients with epileptic seizures and should therefore not uncritically be interpreted as a postictal phenomenon. However, blood-CSF barrier disruption, increased glucose metabolism

  18. Daytime encopresis associated with gland mal epileptic seizures: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyatsi, D P

    2005-08-01

    Sphincteric incontinence of stool and urine are not unusual features of generalised epileptic seizures. Isolated secondary encopresis as a manifestation of an epileptic seizure is unusual. This report is of, a four year old boy, with daytime secondary non-retentive encopresis. The onset of encopresis was preceded by several episodes of nocturnal generalised tonic clonic epileptic seizures. An electroencephalogram showed features consistent with complex partial seizures. He was commenced on anti-epileptic treatment with phenytoin sodium, and by the third day of treatment, the patient had achieved stool control.

  19. A seizuring alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jomon Mathew John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder with incidence of one in 100,000 live births. This syndrome with seizure as a presentation has been rarely reported in Indian studies. We present a 3-month-old infant who presented to us with seizures was found to have a dysmorphic face, jaundice, hepatomegaly, and soft systolic murmur. Infant was stabilized and remained seizure free. A detailed clinical evaluation of a common presentation may reveal a rare syndrome.

  20. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate genetic associations of different febrile seizure subtypes. Results Histories of febrile seizures were validated in 1051 twins in 900 pairs. The febrile seizure type was classified as simple, complex, or febrile status epilepticus. There were 61% simple, 12% complex, and 7% febrile status...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...

  1. The Transfer of Resonance Line Polarization with Partial Frequency Redistribution in the General Hanle–Zeeman Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, E. Alsina; Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Belluzzi, L., E-mail: ealsina@iac.es [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland)

    2017-02-10

    The spectral line polarization encodes a wealth of information about the thermal and magnetic properties of the solar atmosphere. Modeling the Stokes profiles of strong resonance lines is, however, a complex problem both from a theoretical and computational point of view, especially when partial frequency redistribution (PRD) effects need to be taken into account. In this work, we consider a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary intensity (Hanle–Zeeman regime) and orientation, both deterministic and micro-structured. Working within the framework of a rigorous PRD theoretical approach, we have developed a numerical code that solves the full non-LTE radiative transfer problem for polarized radiation, in one-dimensional models of the solar atmosphere, accounting for the combined action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects, as well as for PRD phenomena. After briefly discussing the relevant equations, we describe the iterative method of solution of the problem and the numerical tools that we have developed and implemented. We finally present some illustrative applications to two resonance lines that form at different heights in the solar atmosphere, and provide a detailed physical interpretation of the calculated Stokes profiles. We find that magneto-optical effects have a strong impact on the linear polarization signals that PRD effects produce in the wings of strong resonance lines. We also show that the weak-field approximation has to be used with caution when PRD effects are considered.

  2. Polarized Line Formation in Arbitrary Strength Magnetic Fields Angle-averaged and Angle-dependent Partial Frequency Redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034 (India); Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere leave their fingerprints in the polarized spectrum of the Sun via the Hanle and Zeeman effects. While the Hanle and Zeeman effects dominate, respectively, in the weak and strong field regimes, both these effects jointly operate in the intermediate field strength regime. Therefore, it is necessary to solve the polarized line transfer equation, including the combined influence of Hanle and Zeeman effects. Furthermore, it is required to take into account the effects of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in scattering when dealing with strong chromospheric lines with broad damping wings. In this paper, we present a numerical method to solve the problem of polarized PRD line formation in magnetic fields of arbitrary strength and orientation. This numerical method is based on the concept of operator perturbation. For our studies, we consider a two-level atom model without hyperfine structure and lower-level polarization. We compare the PRD idealization of angle-averaged Hanle–Zeeman redistribution matrices with the full treatment of angle-dependent PRD, to indicate when the idealized treatment is inadequate and what kind of polarization effects are specific to angle-dependent PRD. Because the angle-dependent treatment is presently computationally prohibitive when applied to realistic model atmospheres, we present the computed emergent Stokes profiles for a range of magnetic fields, with the assumption of an isothermal one-dimensional medium.

  3. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tonic-clonic seizures have vision, taste, smell, or sensory changes, hallucinations, or dizziness before the seizure. This ... longer (called the post-ictal state) Loss of memory (amnesia) about the seizure episode Headache Weakness of ...

  4. Seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Polman, Susan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Seizures have long been recognized to be part of the disease spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS). While they occur in only a minority of patients with MS, epileptic seizures can have serious consequences. The treatment of MS can be epileptogenic, and antiepileptic treatment can conversely worsen the

  5. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  6. Epileptic seizure predictors based on computational intelligence techniques: a comparative study with 278 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre Teixeira, César; Direito, Bruno; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Valderrama, Mario; Schelter, Bjoern; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Navarro, Vincent; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2014-05-01

    The ability of computational intelligence methods to predict epileptic seizures is evaluated in long-term EEG recordings of 278 patients suffering from pharmaco-resistant partial epilepsy, also known as refractory epilepsy. This extensive study in seizure prediction considers the 278 patients from the European Epilepsy Database, collected in three epilepsy centres: Hôpital Pitié-là-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; Universitätsklinikum Freiburg, Germany; Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Portugal. For a considerable number of patients it was possible to find a patient specific predictor with an acceptable performance, as for example predictors that anticipate at least half of the seizures with a rate of false alarms of no more than 1 in 6 h (0.15 h⁻¹). We observed that the epileptic focus localization, data sampling frequency, testing duration, number of seizures in testing, type of machine learning, and preictal time influence significantly the prediction performance. The results allow to face optimistically the feasibility of a patient specific prospective alarming system, based on machine learning techniques by considering the combination of several univariate (single-channel) electroencephalogram features. We envisage that this work will serve as benchmark data that will be of valuable importance for future studies based on the European Epilepsy Database. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Unsupervised EEG analysis for automated epileptic seizure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which can, if not controlled, potentially cause unexpected death. It is extremely crucial to have accurate automatic pattern recognition and data mining techniques to detect the onset of seizures and inform care-givers to help the patients. EEG signals are the preferred biosignals for diagnosis of epileptic patients. Most of the existing pattern recognition techniques used in EEG analysis leverage the notion of supervised machine learning algorithms. Since seizure data are heavily under-represented, such techniques are not always practical particularly when the labeled data is not sufficiently available or when disease progression is rapid and the corresponding EEG footprint pattern will not be robust. Furthermore, EEG pattern change is highly individual dependent and requires experienced specialists to annotate the seizure and non-seizure events. In this work, we present an unsupervised technique to discriminate seizures and non-seizures events. We employ power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands that are informative features to accurately cluster seizure and non-seizure events. The experimental results tried so far indicate achieving more than 90% accuracy in clustering seizure and non-seizure events without having any prior knowledge on patient's history.

  8. Multi frequency phase fluorimetry (MFPF) for oxygen partial pressure measurement: ex vivo validation by polarographic clark-type electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Stefan; Duenges, Bastian; Klein, Klaus U; Hartwich, Volker; Mayr, Beate; Consiglio, Jolanda; Baumgardner, James E; Markstaller, Klaus; Basciani, Reto; Vogt, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) at high temporal resolution remains a technological challenge. This study introduces a novel PO2 sensing technology based on Multi-Frequency Phase Fluorimetry (MFPF). The aim was to validate MFPF against polarographic Clark-type electrode (CTE) PO2 measurements. MFPF technology was first investigated in N = 8 anaesthetised pigs at FIO2 of 0.21, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0. At each FIO2 level, blood samples were withdrawn and PO2 was measured in vitro with MFPF using two FOXY-AL300 probes immediately followed by CTE measurement. Secondly, MFPF-PO2 readings were compared to CTE in an artificial circulatory setup (human packed red blood cells, haematocrit of 30%). The impacts of temperature (20, 30, 40°C) and blood flow (0.8, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0 L min(-1)) on MFPF-PO2 measurements were assessed. MFPF response time in the gas- and blood-phase was determined. Porcine MFPF-PO2 ranged from 63 to 749 mmHg; the corresponding CTE samples from 43 to 712 mmHg. Linear regression: CTE = 15.59+1.18*MFPF (R(2) = 0.93; P0.05). MFPF response-time (monoexponential) was 1.48±0.26 s for the gas-phase and 1.51±0.20 s for the blood-phase. MFPF-derived PO2 readings were reproducible and showed excellent correlation and good agreement with Clark-type electrode-based PO2 measurements. There was no relevant impact of temperature and blood flow upon MFPF-PO2 measurements. The response time of the MFPF FOXY-AL300 probe was adequate for real-time sensing in the blood phase.

  9. Tranexamic acid-associated seizures: Causes and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian-Shi; Whissell, Paul D; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C David; Orser, Beverley A

    2016-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in-hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid-associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid-associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. © 2015 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  10. Tranexamic acid–associated seizures: Causes and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian‐Shi; Whissell, Paul D.; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C. David

    2015-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in‐hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid–associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid–associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:18–26 PMID:26580862

  11. A prospective observational longitudinal study of new-onset seizures and newly diagnosed epilepsy in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsø, N; Toft, Nils; Sabers, A.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are common in dogs and can be caused by non-epileptic conditions or epilepsy. The clinical course of newly diagnosed epilepsy is sparsely documented. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate causes for seizures (epileptic and non-epileptic) in a cohort of dogs with new...... structural epilepsy. A non-epileptic cause for seizures was identified in 13 dogs and suspected in 10 dogs. Four dogs in which no cause for seizures was identified experienced only one seizure during the study. In dogs with idiopathic epilepsy 60% had their second epileptic seizure within three months...... seizures motivated early treatment. In a few dogs with a high seizure frequency owners declined treatment against the investigators advice. Epilepsy is the most likely diagnosis in dogs presenting with new-onset seizures. The course of idiopathic epilepsy is highly individual and might not necessarily...

  12. Research of the serum level of neuron-specific enolase in children with various types of seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relevance between the level changes of serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE and neuronal damage in various seizure types of children with epilepsy. Methods According to the classification criteria of seizure types formulated by International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE in 1981, 190 children with epilepsy were enrolled including tonic-clonic seizure group (41 cases, tonic seizure group (34 cases, clonic seizure group (22 cases, myoclonic seizure group (12 cases, atonic seizure group (17 cases, absence seizure group (22 cases, simple partial seizure group (21 cases and complex partial seizure group (21 cases, and 64 healthy children were enrolled as control group. The long-range vedio-electroencephalogram (VEEG was operated and the blood samples were collected from these cases within 72 h after their seizures. Results The serum NSE levels of epileptic children were significantly higher than control group (P = 0.000. Among these seizure groups, serum NSE in myoclonic seizure group [(32.42 ± 6.62 ng/ml] was significantly higher than the other types, except for tonic-clonic seizure group (P = 0.062. There was no significant difference among the other types (P > 0.05, for all. According to rank correlation analysis, there was positive corrlation between serum NSE levels and VEEG abnormal intensity (rs = 0.613, P = 0.000. Conclusion The serum NSE were markedly increased in children with epilepsy after seizures, suggesting that a certain degree of neuronal damage may result from seizures; the higher NSE levels were, the more serious neuronal damage caused by epileptiform discharges was. The serum NSE levels in myoclonic seizure group and tonic-clonic seizure group were significantly higher than other seizure types, indicating the two kinds of seizures may result in greater neuronal damage.

  13. Multi Frequency Phase Fluorimetry (MFPF) for Oxygen Partial Pressure Measurement: Ex Vivo Validation by Polarographic Clark-Type Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Stefan; Duenges, Bastian; Klein, Klaus U.; Hartwich, Volker; Mayr, Beate; Consiglio, Jolanda; Baumgardner, James E.; Markstaller, Klaus; Basciani, Reto; Vogt, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurement of partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) at high temporal resolution remains a technological challenge. This study introduces a novel PO2 sensing technology based on Multi-Frequency Phase Fluorimetry (MFPF). The aim was to validate MFPF against polarographic Clark-type electrode (CTE) PO2 measurements. Methodology/Principal Findings MFPF technology was first investigated in N = 8 anaesthetised pigs at FIO2 of 0.21, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0. At each FIO2 level, blood samples were withdrawn and PO2 was measured in vitro with MFPF using two FOXY-AL300 probes immediately followed by CTE measurement. Secondly, MFPF-PO2 readings were compared to CTE in an artificial circulatory setup (human packed red blood cells, haematocrit of 30%). The impacts of temperature (20, 30, 40°C) and blood flow (0.8, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0 L min−1) on MFPF-PO2 measurements were assessed. MFPF response time in the gas- and blood-phase was determined. Porcine MFPF-PO2 ranged from 63 to 749 mmHg; the corresponding CTE samples from 43 to 712 mmHg. Linear regression: CTE = 15.59+1.18*MFPF (R2 = 0.93; PPO2 ranged from 20 to 567 mmHg and CTE samples from 11 to 575 mmHg. Linear regression: CTE = −8.73+1.05*MFPF (R2 = 0.99; PPO2 due to variations of temperature were less than 6 mmHg (range 0–140 mmHg) and less than 35 mmHg (range 140–750 mmHg); differences due to variations in blood flow were less than 15 mmHg (all P-values>0.05). MFPF response-time (monoexponential) was 1.48±0.26 s for the gas-phase and 1.51±0.20 s for the blood-phase. Conclusions/Significance MFPF-derived PO2 readings were reproducible and showed excellent correlation and good agreement with Clark-type electrode-based PO2 measurements. There was no relevant impact of temperature and blood flow upon MFPF-PO2 measurements. The response time of the MFPF FOXY-AL300 probe was adequate for real-time sensing in the blood phase. PMID:23565259

  14. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the people you work with about your seizure disorder. Driving your own car is generally safe and ... References Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy ...

  15. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions, including having odd feelings — such as euphoria, deja vu or fear. Temporal lobe seizures are sometimes called ... sudden sense of unprovoked fear or joy A deja vu experience — a feeling that what's happening has happened ...

  16. Widespread EEG changes precede focal seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Perucca

    Full Text Available The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal, and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline. Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples. At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development, but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures.

  17. Self‑perceived seizure precipitants among patients with epilepsy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-25

    Mar 25, 2014 ... triggers especially idiopathic generalized epilepsy with myoclonic seizures ... with complex interactions so that it can be difficult for both patients and ... for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer software (version 18). Frequency ...

  18. Role of biomarkers in differentiating new-onset seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Javali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Review of literature revealed very limited studies considering a combination of serum prolactin (PRL and serum creatine kinase (CK as markers for differentiating epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the role of serum PRL and serum CK, individually and in combination. Methodology: This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care medical teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. Patients aged over 15 years suspected to have new-onset seizures presenting within 5 h of ictus were included in this study. CK, serum PRL was measured at 0–1, 1–3, and 3–5 h after seizures. Results: Hundred subjects were studied for the role of serum PRL and serum CK in differentiating epileptic and PNES. The mean age was 42.24 years with a male:female ratio of 1.27:1. All patients of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS, who presented within 1 h, had elevated PRL, whereas 75% of patients with partial seizures had elevated PRL within 1 h of presentation. Nearly 91.66% of patients with GTCS who presented within 1 h had elevated CPK, whereas 70% of patients with partial seizures had elevated CPK. None of the patients diagnosed with PNES showed rise in either of the markers. Conclusion: In the present study, none of the patients with PNES showed raise in either serum PRL or CK. However, there was no correlation between the types of seizure and PRL or serum CK levels.

  19. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  20. HMPAO-SPECT during epileptic seizures: Early and late images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overbeck, B.; Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Reinke, U.; Gratz, K.F.

    1990-01-01

    For presurgical evaluation of epilepsy a 44-year old patient with complex-partial seizures underwent HMPAO-SPECT. The morphology of the seizures, the MRI-scan, psychometry and ictal as well as interictal EEGs showed a left temporal origin of the seizures. Early images were obtained 20 min and late images 24 h following injection. On both scans a marked hyperperfusion was observed in the left temporal area. A crossed cerebellar diaschisis was also seen on both SPECTs. It could be shown that during ictal examinations there is no bloodflow-dependent wash-out from brain tissue. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of a novel median power spectrogram for seizure detection by non-neurophysiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peter; Melman, Tamar; Yan, Sherry; Otgonsuren, Munkhzul; Grinspan, Zachary

    2017-08-01

    (1) To evaluate how well resident physicians use a novel EEG spectral analysis tool (the median power spectrogram; MPS) to detect seizures. (2) To assess the capability of the MPS to identify different seizure types. 120 EEG records from children with intractable seizures were converted to MPS by taking the median power across leads and using multi-taper spectral estimation. Twelve blinded neurology residents were trained to interpret the spectrogram with a five-minute video tutorial and post-test. Two residents independently assessed each set for presence of seizures. Their performance was compared to seizures identified using conventional EEG. Two blinded neurologists separately reviewed the EEGs and spectrograms to independently categorize the seizures. Their results were used to determine the spectrogram's capability to reveal seizures and visualize different seizure types for the user. Three key MPS features distinguished seizures from inter-ictal background: power difference relative to background, down-sloping resonance bands, and power in high frequencies. Using these features, residents identified seizures with 77% sensitivity and 72% specificity. 86% (51/59) of focal seizures and 81% (22/27) of generalized seizures were detected by at least one resident. Missed seizures included brief (seizures, tonic seizures, seizures with predominant delta (0-4Hz) activity, and seizures evident primarily in supplementary low temporal leads. The MPS is a novel qEEG modality that requires minimal training to interpret. It enables physicians without extensive neurophysiology training to identify seizures with sensitivity and specificity comparable to more complex multi-modal qEEG displays. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Paradoxical Seizure Response to Phenytoin in an Epileptic Heroin Addict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasagar, Brintha; Verma, Beni R; Dewberry, Robert G; Pula, Thaddeus

    2015-06-01

    Phenytoin has a narrow therapeutic window and seizures can occur at both ends of the spectrum. A 41-year-old man with a history of a seizure disorder and heroin addiction presented with dizziness following 2 generalized tonic-clonic seizures that occurred earlier that day. The patient had received a loading dose of phenytoin for seizures associated with a subtherapeutic level 5 days previously. Initial evaluation revealed an elevated phenytoin level of 32.6 mcg/mL and an opiate-positive toxicology screen. Levetiracetam was started on the day of presentation and phenytoin was held until the level returned to the therapeutic range. The patient's dizziness resolved and he had no additional seizures. Evaluation for reversible causes of seizure activity along with anticonvulsant administration is generally the standard of care for breakthrough seizures. Phenytoin blood levels, if supratherapeutic, may be at least partially responsible for breakthrough seizure activity; in this circumstance, holding phenytoin and temporarily adding another anticonvulsant may be indicated.

  3. [Brain lateralization and seizure semiology: ictal clinical lateralizing signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Réka; Kalmár, Zsuzsanna; Fehér, Nóra; Fogarasi, András; Gyimesi, Csilla; Janszky, József

    2008-07-30

    Clinical lateralizing signs are the phenomena which can unequivocally refer to the hemispheric onset of epileptic seizures. They can improve the localization of epileptogenic zone during presurgical evaluation, moreover, their presence can predict a success of surgical treatment. Primary sensory phenomena such as visual aura in one half of the field of vision or unilateral ictal somatosensory sensation always appear on the contralateral to the focus. Periictal unilateral headache, although it is an infrequent symptom, is usually an ipsilateral sign. Primary motor phenomena like epileptic clonic, tonic movements, the version of head ubiquitously appear contralateral to the epileptogenic zone. Very useful lateralization sign is the ictal hand-dystonia which lateralizes to the contralateral hemisphere in nearly 100%. The last clonus of the secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure lateralizes to the ipsilateral hemisphere in 85%. The fast component of ictal nystagmus appears in nearly 100% on the contralateral side of the epileptic focus. Vegetative symptoms during seizures arising from temporal lobe such as spitting, nausea, vomiting, urinary urge are typical for seizures originating from non-dominant (right) hemisphere. Ictal pallor and cold shivers are dominant hemispheric lateralization signs. Postictal unilateral nose wiping refers to the ipsilateral hemispheric focus compared to the wiping hand. Ictal or postictal aphasia refers to seizure arising from dominant hemisphere. Intelligable speech during complex partial seizures appears in non-dominant seizures. Automatism with preserved consciousness refers to the seizures of non-dominant temporal lobe.

  4. Versive seizures in occipital lobe epilepsy: lateralizing value and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Kondo, Akihiko; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2011-11-01

    To clarify the value of versive seizures in lateralizing and localizing the epileptogenic zone in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, we studied 13 occipital lobe epilepsy patients with at least one versive seizure recorded during preoperative noninvasive video-EEG monitoring, who underwent occipital lobe resection, and were followed postoperatively for more than 2 years with Engel's class I outcome. The videotaped versive seizures were analyzed to compare the direction of version and the side of surgical resection in each patient. Moreover, we examined other motor symptoms (partial somatomotor manifestations such as tonic and/or clonic movements of face and/or limbs, automatisms, and eyelid blinking) associated with version. Forty-nine versive seizures were analyzed. The direction of version was always contralateral to the side of resection except in one patient. Among accompanying motor symptoms, partial somatomotor manifestations were observed in only five patients. In conclusion, versive seizure is a reliable lateralizing sign indicating contralateral epileptogenic zone in occipital lobe epilepsy. Since versive seizures were accompanied by partial somatomotor manifestations in less than half of the patients, it is suggested that the mechanism of version in occipital lobe epilepsy is different from that in frontal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Regional estimation of rainfall intensity-duration-frequency curves using generalized least squares regression of partial duration series statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, H.; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2002-01-01

    A general framework for regional analysis and modeling of extreme rainfall characteristics is presented. The model is based on the partial duration series (PDS) method that includes in the analysis all events above a threshold level. In the PDS model the average annual number of exceedances...

  6. Precipitating factors and therapeutic outcome in epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Saher, M S; Burr, W; Elger, C E

    2000-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of precipitating factors and therapy on the outcome of epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Retrospective analysis of data from 34 patients (mean age at seizure onset 19 years; mean duration of follow-up 9.2 years) suffering from epilepsy of either cryptogenic or remote symptomatic (n = 19), or idiopathic (n = 15) etiology. The total number of seizures in all patients was 146. Without treatment 97 seizures manifested during 90.5 years without treatment (1.07 seizures/year), during treatment with carbamazepine or valproate 49 seizures occurred within 224 years (0.2 seizures/year). The frequency of seizures was significantly lower during treatment. Precipitating factors were found in relation to 31% of seizures in patients with remote symptomatic or cryptogenic epilepsy, and for 51% of seizures in patients with idiopathic epilepsy. There was a low frequency of seizures in patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Precipitating factors are common. Antiepileptic drug treatment is effective.

  7. Seizure recurrence after a first febrile seizure: a multivariate approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offringa, M.; Derksen-Lubsen, G.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Lubsen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented of a follow-up study of 155 Dutch children after the first febrile seizure. Of these initially untreated children 37 per cent had had at least one, 30 per cent at least two and 17 per cent at least three subsequent seizures. The vulnerable period for recurrent seizures

  8. GC-MS-Based metabolomics discovers a shared serum metabolic characteristic among three types of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dian; Wang, Xingxing; Kong, Jing; Wu, Jiayan; Lai, Minchao

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the overall and common metabolic changes of seizures can provide novel clues for their control and prevention. Here, we aim to investigate the global metabolic feature of serum for three types of seizures. We recruited 27 patients who had experienced a seizure within 48h (including 11 who had a generalized seizure, nine who had a generalized seizure secondary to partial seizure and seven who had a partial seizure) and 23 healthy controls. We analyzed the global metabolic changes of serum after seizures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Based on differential metabolites, the metabolic pathways and their potential to diagnose seizures were analyzed, and metabolic differences among three types of seizures were compared. The metabolic profiles of serum were distinctive between the seizure group and the controls but were not different among the three types of seizures. Compared to the controls, patients with seizures had higher levels of lactate, butanoic acid, proline and glutamate and lower levels of palmitic acid, linoleic acid, elaidic acid, trans-13-octadecenoic acid, stearic acid, citrate, cysteine, glutamine, asparagine, and glyceraldehyde in the serum. Furthermore, these differential metabolites had common change trends among the three types of seizures. Related pathophysiological processes reflected by these metabolites are energy deficit, inflammation, nervous excitation and neurotoxicity. Importantly, transamination inhibition is suspected to occur in seizures. Lactate, glyceraldehyde and trans-13-octadecenoic acid in serum jointly enabled a precision of 92.9% for diagnosing seizures. There is a common metabolic feature in three types of seizures. Lactate, glyceraldehyde and trans-13-octadecenoic acid levels jointly enable high-precision seizure diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Smoking prevalence and seizure control in Chinese males with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Sander, Josemir W; Du, Xudong; Chen, Jiani; Zhu, Cairong; Zhou, Dong

    2017-08-01

    Smoking has a negative effect on most diseases, yet it is under-investigated in people with epilepsy; thus its role is not clear in the general population with epilepsy. We performed a retrospective pilot study on males with epilepsy to determine the smoking rate and its relationship with seizure control using univariate analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and also used a multi-variate logistic regression model. The smoking rate in our sample of 278 individuals was 25.5%, which is lower than the general Chinese population smoking rate among males of 52.1%. We used two classifications: the first classified epilepsy as generalized, or by presumed topographic origin (temporal, frontal, parietal and occipital). The second classified the dominant seizure type of an individual as generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTCS), myoclonic seizure (MS), complex partial seizure (CPS), simple partial seizure (SPS), and secondary GTCS (sGTCS). The univariable analysis of satisfactory seizure control profile and smoking rate in both classifications showed a trend towards a beneficial effect of smoking although most were not statistically significant. Considering medication is an important confounding factor that would largely influence seizure control, we also conducted multi-variable analysis for both classifications with drug numbers and dosage. The result of our model also suggested that smoking is a protective factor. Our findings seem to suggest that smoking could have a potential role in seizure control although confounders need exploration particularly in view of the potential long term health effects. Replication in a much larger sample is needed as well as case control studies to elucidate this issue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Glioma-related seizures in relation to histopathological subtypes: a report from the glioma international case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Shala G; Merrell, Ryan T; Amirian, E Susan; Armstrong, Georgina N; Lachance, Daniel; Smits, Anja; Zhou, Renke; Jacobs, Daniel I; Wrensch, Margaret R; Olson, Sara H; Il'yasova, Dora; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Bondy, Melissa L; Melin, Beatrice S

    2018-04-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of glioma-related seizures and seizure control at the time of tumor diagnosis with respect to tumor histologic subtypes, tumor treatment and patient characteristics, and to compare seizure history preceding tumor diagnosis (or study enrollment) between glioma patients and healthy controls. The Glioma International Case Control study (GICC) risk factor questionnaire collected information on demographics, past medical/medication history, and occupational history. Cases from eight centers were also asked detailed questions on seizures in relation to glioma diagnosis; cases (n = 4533) and controls (n = 4171) were also asked about seizures less than 2 years from diagnosis and previous seizure history more than 2 years prior to tumor diagnosis, including childhood seizures. Low-grade gliomas (LGGs), particularly oligodendrogliomas/oligoastrocytomas, had the highest proportion of glioma-related seizures. Patients with low-grade astrocytoma demonstrated the most medically refractory seizures. A total of 83% of patients were using only one antiepileptic drug (AED), which was levetiracetam in 71% of cases. Gross total resection was strongly associated with reduced seizure frequency (p related seizures were most common in low-grade gliomas. Gross total resection was associated with lower seizure frequency. Additionally, having a history of childhood seizures is not a risk factor ***for developing glioma-related seizures or glioma.

  11. A prospective study of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in patients with cluster of seizures and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, S A; Cherukuri, Pavankumar; Mridula, Rukmini; Harshavardhana, K R; Gaddamanugu, Padmaja; Sarva, Sailaja; Meena, A K; Borgohain, Rupam; Jyotsna Rani, Y

    2017-04-01

    To study the frequency, imaging characteristics, and clinical predictors for development of periictal diffusion weighted MRI abnormalities. We prospectively analyzed electro clinical and imaging characteristic of adult patients with cluster of seizures or status epilepticus between November 2013 and November 2015, in whom the diffusion weighted imaging was done within 24h after the end of last seizure (clinical or electrographic). There were thirty patients who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twenty patients (66%) had periictal MRI abnormalities. Nine patients (34%) did not have any MRI abnormality. All the patients with PMA had abnormalities on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Hippocampal abnormalities were seen in nine (53%), perisylvian in two (11.7%), thalamic in five (30%), splenium involvement in two (11.7%) and cortical involvement (temporo-occipital, parieto-occipital, temporo-parietal, fronto-parietal and fronto-temporal) in sixteen (94.1%) patients. Complete reversal of DWI changes was noted in sixteen (80%) patients and four (20%) patients showed partial resolution of MRI abnormalities. Mean duration of seizures was significantly higher among patients with PMA (59.11+20.97h) compared to those without MRI changes (27.33+9.33h) (pstatus epilepticus and were highly concordant with clinical semiology and EEG activity. Patients with longer duration of seizures/status were more likely to have PMA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Longitudinal changes in seizure outcomes after resection of cerebral cavernous malformations in patients presenting with seizures: a long-term follow-up of 46 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2014-08-01

    Seizure is the most common presentation in patients with cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). Although many articles have documented seizure outcomes after resection of CCM, few have conducted long-term follow-ups; thus, the fluctuating seizure outcomes have been neglected. The purpose of this study is to describe long-term postoperative seizure outcomes in patients with CCM and to compare seizure outcomes between patients with sporadic seizures and those with chronic seizures. Forty-six patients with CCM presenting with seizures underwent surgery. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1, and the average age at initial seizure onset was 27.6 years. The mean preoperative seizure duration was 42.7 months. Patients were divided into two groups: a chronic group (N = 20) and a sporadic group (N = 26) according to seizure frequency and duration. The mean postoperative follow-up duration was 96.3 months, and the postoperative seizure outcomes were checked annually based upon Engel's classification. After the first year of follow-up, 80.8 % of the sporadic group and 75.0 % of the chronic group were evaluated as Engel class I. These rates increased to 100.0 % and 90.0 %, respectively, at the eighth year of follow-up. Overall, 29 (63.0 %) of the 46 patients experienced changes in seizure outcomes over the follow-up period. Despite their delayed improvements, the chronic group showed less favorable outcomes throughout follow-up (p = 0.025). Long-term follow-up is indispensable for accurately assessing postoperative seizure outcomes because these outcomes change continuously. We recommend earlier surgery to achieve seizure-free status in patients with CCM. However, even in the chronic group, surgery is recommended, considering the overall delayed improvement.

  13. Stress, anxiety, depression, and epilepsy: investigating the relationship between psychological factors and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapar, Ajay; Kerr, Michael; Harold, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the study described here was to examine the interrelationship between psychological factors (anxiety, stress, and depression) and seizures. In this longitudinal cohort study, data on anxiety, depression, perceived stress, and seizure recency (time since last seizure) and frequency were collected at two time points using standard validated questionnaire measures. Empirically based models with psychological factors explaining change in (1) seizure recency and (2) seizure frequency scores across time were specified. We then tested how these psychological factors acted together in predicting seizure recency and frequency. Our data were used to test whether these models were valid for the study population. Latent variable structural equation modeling was used for the analysis. Four hundred thirty-three of the 558 individuals who initially consented to participate provided two waves of data for this analysis. Stress (beta=0.25, Panxiety (beta=0.30, Pdepression (beta=0.30, Pdepression that mediated the relationship of both anxiety and stress with modeled change in seizure recency (beta=0.19, PDepression mediates the relationship between stress and anxiety and change in seizure recency and seizure frequency. These findings highlight the importance of depression management in addition to seizure management in the assessment and treatment of epilepsy in an adult population.

  14. The Effect of Rician Fading and Partial-Band Interference on Noise- Normalized Fast Frequency-Hopped MFSK Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    FSK 16. PmCI coot 17. SECURITY CLASSWsAI1OW IL SICUURW CLA$SIICATION SECURITY CLASSIICATION 20. LIMIATION Of ABSTRACT CW REPOW ? OF TiNS PAU OF ...hop k of a symbol when partial-band interference is present is obtained from (11) and the linear transformation of random variables given by (3) as...from (13) and the transformation of random variables indicated by (9) as [16] fzwjm(zwik) = f cTak!X. (Xmk, = ZmkOkI17) f~(0,kdo . -- (,.U(zk’ )fE2

  15. An improved partially interleaved transformer structure for high-voltage high-frequency multiple-output applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bin; Ouyang, Ziwei; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2017-01-01

    . The proposed structure features lower leakage inductance, smaller AC capacitance and lower rate of AC-DC resistance, which is suitable for high-frequency high-efficiency applications. A planar transformer with the proposed structure was built and tested in an LCLC resonant converter, where the input voltage...

  16. Refractory seizures due to a dural-based cavernoma masquerading as a meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianwei; Mahta, Ali; Kim, Ryan Y; Saad, Ali G; Kesari, Santosh

    2012-04-01

    A 37-year-old female presented with medically intractable complex partial seizures with secondary generalization. She was found to have a dural-based lesion with radiologic features of meningioma. A gross total resection was performed and pathology confirmed a diagnosis of cavernous angioma and she became seizure free after the surgical resection. Cavernous angioma should be considered in differential diagnosis of a dural-based lesion manifesting with refractory seizures.

  17. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    % from 16 cm2. The coherences of different frequency bands below 16 Hz all seem to have similar declines as a function of the Euclidean distance between channels. Frequencies between 16 and 30 Hz have a steeper decline and will only show coherent parts to cortical channels within 60 cm2....... There is no coherence for frequencies above 30 Hz at any distance. A lot of patients with epilepsy still struggle with a dreadful fear of suddenly having a seizure. The current PhD study identified topics where an EEG monitor could provide improvement in the patient’s quality of life. By algorithm development...

  18. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sigge N.; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design an algorithm for detection of tonic seizures based on surface electromyography signals from the deltoids. A successful algorithm has a future prospect of being implemented in a wearable device as part of an alarm system. This has already been done......, median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain...

  19. Prognosis of Partial Epilepsy Predicted by MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of cerebral glucose metabolism after partial seizure onset was studied in 38 children using PET scans over 3.0 +/- 1.3 years (and within a year after a third unprovoked partial seizure by researchers at the Clinical Epilepsy Section, NINDS, and Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC.

  20. How does imaging frequency and soft tissue motion affect the PTV margin size in partial breast and boost radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Poynter, Andrew; Rawlings, Christine; Wishart, Gordon C.; Evans, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates (i) the effect of verification protocols on treatment accuracy and PTV margins for partial breast and boost breast radiotherapy with short fractionation schema (15 fractions), (ii) the effect of deformation of the excision cavity (EC) on PTV margin size, (iii) the imaging dose required to achieve specific PTV margins. Methods and materials: Verification images using implanted EC markers were studied in 36 patients. Target motion was estimated for a 15 fraction partial breast regimen using imaging protocols based on on-line and off-line motion correction strategies (No Action Level (NAL) and the extended NAL (eNAL) protocols). Target motion was used to estimate a PTV margin for each protocol. To evaluate treatment errors due to deformation of the excision cavity, individual marker positions were obtained from 11 patients. The mean clip displacement and daily variation in clip position during radiotherapy were determined and the contribution of these errors to PTV margin calculated. Published imaging dose data were used to estimate total dose for each protocol. Finally the number of images required to obtain a specific PTV margin was evaluated and hence, the relationship between PTV margins and imaging dose was investigated. Results: The PTV margin required to account for excision cavity motion, varied between 10.2 and 2.4 mm depending on the correction strategy used. Average clip movement was 0.8 mm and average variation in clip position during treatment was 0.4 mm. The contribution to PTV margin from deformation was estimated to be small, less than 0.2 mm for both off-line and on-line correction protocols. Conclusion: A boost or partial breast PTV margin of ∼10 mm, is possible with zero imaging dose and workload, however, patients receiving boost radiotherapy may benefit from a margin reduction of ∼4 mm with imaging doses from 0.4 cGy to 25 cGy using an eNAL protocol. PTV margin contributions from deformation errors are likely

  1. Naloxone fails to prolong seizure length in ECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, K G; Pandurangi, A K

    1999-12-01

    Electroconvulsive shock (ECS) in animals has been shown to enhance endogenous opiate systems. The anticonvulsant effects of ECS are also partially blocked by the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone, leading some investigators to postulate that the anticonvulsant effects of ECS are mediated by activation of endogenous opiates. If such a phenomenon occurs in humans, then naloxone might prolong seizure length in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In the present study, nine patients were given 2.0 mg intravenous (i.v.) naloxone 2 minutes prior to one-half of their ECT treatments. Motor seizure length was measured via the cuff technique. EEG tracings were read by an investigator blind to naloxone status. There was no difference between the two groups in either EEG or nonblindly evaluated motor seizure length. It is concluded that a dose of 2 mg naloxone does not effectively increase seizure length in ECT.

  2. Levetiracetam for the Treatment of Refractor Neonatal Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül KELEŞ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Convulsions are observed commonly in newborns and especially in premature babies. The afety and efficiency of conventional antiepileptic drugs have been extensively investigated. But long term side effects like apoptosis are newly recognized even with the the most commonly used antiepilectic drug, phenobarbital. Much research is related to the safety and efficiency of levetiracetam, one of the recent antiepileptic drugs, used in partial onset idiopathic or generalized seizures of adults and children. However, research on newborns, especially premature newborns is limited. In this paper we present two cases involving seven day newborn premature twins treated with refractory seizures. Seizures were controlled only with levetiracetam therapy. We did not observe any long term side effects which can be related to levetiracetam or seizures in a long term follow up of both patients.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of seizure clusters in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Wong, Rebecca A; Jiang, Alfred; Kato, Kenneth; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-07-01

    In the current study, we explored the prevalence of physician-confirmed seizure clusters. We also investigated potential clinical factors associated with the occurrence of seizure clusters overall and by epilepsy type. We reviewed medical records of 4116 adult (≥16years old) outpatients with epilepsy at our centers for documentation of seizure clusters. Variables including patient demographics, epilepsy details, medical and psychiatric history, AED history, and epilepsy risk factors were then tested against history of seizure clusters. Patients were then divided into focal epilepsy, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), or symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), and the same analysis was run. Overall, seizure clusters were independently associated with earlier age of seizure onset, symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), central nervous system (CNS) infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, absence of 1-year seizure freedom, and having failed 2 or more AEDs (Pepilepsy (16.3%) and IGE (7.4%; all Pepilepsy type showed that absence of 1-year seizure freedom since starting treatment at one of our centers was associated with seizure clustering in patients across all 3 epilepsy types. In patients with SGE, clusters were associated with perinatal/congenital brain injury. In patients with focal epilepsy, clusters were associated with younger age of seizure onset, complex partial seizures, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, CNS infection, and having failed 2 or more AEDs. In patients with IGE, clusters were associated with presence of an aura. Only 43.5% of patients with seizure clusters were prescribed rescue medications. Patients with intractable epilepsy are at a higher risk of developing seizure clusters. Factors such as having SGE, CNS infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus or an early seizure onset, can also independently increase one's chance of having seizure clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Brain imaging during seizure: ictal brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottamasu, Sambasiva Rao

    1997-01-01

    The role of single photon computed tomography (SPECT) in presurgical localization of medically intractable complex partial epilepsy (CPE) in children is reviewed. 99m Technetium neurolite, a newer lipophylic agent with a high first pass brain extraction and little or no redistribution is injected during a seizure, while the child is monitored with a video recording and continuous EEG and SPECT imaging is performed in the next 1-3 hours with the images representing regional cerebral profusion at the time of injection. On SPECT studies performed with radiopharmaceutical injected during a seizure, ictal focus is generally hypervascular. Other findings on ictal brain SPECT include hypoperfusion of adjacent cerebral cortex and white matter, hyperperfusion of contralateral motor cortex, hyperperfusion of ipsilateral basal ganglia and thalamus, brain stem and contralateral cerebellum. Ictal brain SPECT is non-invasive, cost effective and highly sensitive for localization of epileptic focus in patients with intractable CPE. (author)

  5. Clinical Microbiological Aspects of Epileptic Seizures in the Tropical Countries with Specific Focus on Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijeoma Kanu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder; however, in Nigeria and other tropical regions, the causes of epileptic seizures differ greatly in etiology. This paper is an attempt to highlight some possible microbiological aspects of epileptic seizures. A literature review was carried out to identify the extent to which microbial infections were involved in the elicitation of epileptic seizures. Data were collected from several clinics in the community and hospitals in Nigeria and correlated with the evidence from the literature review. It was found that different microbial agents including viral, bacterial, protozoa, and fungal agents were involved in several aspects of epileptic seizures. Malaria was found to cause more than 88% of childhood epileptic seizures and 12% of adult seizures. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in more than 40% of adult patients. Partial seizures were uncommon. Cases of epileptic seizures associated with bacteria (e.g., brucellosis, viral, fungal, and protozoa infections were frequently reported. Malaria, tapeworm, and cysticercosis were some of the common infectious causes of epilepsy; however, in some cases, the cause remained unknown. From these findings, it was evident that microbiological aspects of epilepsies are possible research areas that might be developed. It is believed that the unraveling of the various microbiological factors in epileptic seizures would have important implications for understanding the underlying neurobiology, evaluating treatment strategies, and perhaps planning health-care resources for the affected. It will also help to improve the prognostic factors in initial seizure symptomatic etiology and presence of any structural cerebral abnormalities.

  6. [Oral loading dose of phenytoin in the treatment of serial seizures, prevention of seizure recurrence and rapid drug substitution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokić, D; Janković, S M

    1994-01-01

    Over a period of nine months twenty-five epileptic patients were treated with the oral loading dose of phenytoin. The dose ranged from 12 to 23 mg/kg body weight during 1 to 12 hours. In 20 patients with serial seizures or intolerance to other antiepileptic drugs this treatment was effective. Seizures also stopped in 2 of 4 patients with serial partial motor seizures. These 2 patients required both higher loading dose and faster rate of administration than the other patients. A patient with epilepsia partialis continua failed to respond to the treatment. Patients that received phenytoin through the naso-gastric tube, in respect to oral administration, required higher doses to obtain therapeutic plasma levels of phenytoin. One patient had mild nausea, 3 mild dizziness, and 1 tinitus on the first day of the treatment. There was no correlation between a given dose and the achieved phenytoin plasma levels. In our opinion the therapy with oral loading dose of phenytoin is highly effective in the treatment of serial generalized seizures and rapid antiepileptic drug substitution, and partially effective in the prevention of partial motor seizures. It produces only mild and transient side-effects.

  7. Cerebrovascular Diseases and Early Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Gündüz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cerebrovascular disease is one of the important causes of seizures and epilepsy among the advanced age group. Seziures are found to be associated with lesion localization and size in previous studies. METHODS: Here, we aimed to detect prevelance of seizure, relation of seizure and lesion localization, and observed seizure types. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy eight patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease or intraparenchymal hemorrhage who were followed in Cerrahpasa IVIedical School clinic were studied retrospectively and probability of seizure occurence within 1 month after stroke was evaluated. CONCLUSION: Among 378 patients hospitalized by acute stroke, 339 were diagnosed as ischemic cerebrovascular disease and 39 (10.3% had primary intraparenchymal hematoma. Seizures were observed in 16 patients (4.2%, 2 (%5.1 in intraparenchymal hematoma group and 14 (%4.1 in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Early seizures were detected in 33% of patients with anterior cerebral artery, in 6.8% of posterior cerebral artery and in 3.3% of middle cerebral artery infarcts and in three patients out of 12 who were known to have epilepsy. Seizure types were secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizure in nine cases (57%. Among whole group status epilepticus was observed in four patients (1.1%. Conclusion: Early seizure rates are found to be high among patients with anterior cerebral artery infarct and known epilepsy

  8. Profile of seizures in adult falciparum malaria and the clinical efficacy of phenytoin sodium for control of seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Ku Mohapatra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the profile of convulsion in adult severe falciparum malaria and efficacy of phenytoin sodium for its control. Methods: It comprised of two sub studies. Study-1 evaluated the pattern and risk factors of seizure in severe malaria and Study-2 investigated the efficacy of phenytoin sodium to control seizure in an open label trial. Patients of severe malaria were diagnosed as per WHO guideline. Clinical type and duration of convulsion were determined. Biochemical and haematological investigations including EEG and CT scan of brain were performed in all cases. All patients were treated with injection artesunate along with other supportive measures and patients with convulsions were treated with injection phenytoin sodium. Results: Out of 408 patients of severe malaria 118 (28.9% patients had seizure. Generalized tonic clonic seizure, partial seizure with secondary generalization, and status epilepticus was present in 89(75.4%, 25(21.2%, and 4(3.4% cases respectively. CT scan was abnormal in 16 (13.6% cases. EEG was abnormal in 108 (91.5% cases showing generalized seizure activity. Patients with convulsion (n=118 were treated with phenytoin sodium injection and convulsion was controlled within 12 hours [mean (6.2依2.1 hours] of treatment in 107 (90.6% patients. Recurrence of seizure occurred in 2 (1.7% patients and 11 (9.3% patients did not respond. The mortality and sequelae were more among patients with than without convulsion. Conclusions: Seizure is common in adult falciparum malaria and phenytoin is an effective drug for seizure control.

  9. Identifying seizure clusters in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Grayson L; Harlow, Lisa L; Machan, Jason T; Thomas, Dave; LaFrance, W C

    2017-08-01

    The present study explored how seizure clusters may be defined for those with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), a topic for which there is a paucity of literature. The sample was drawn from a multisite randomized clinical trial for PNES; seizure data are from participants' seizure diaries. Three possible cluster definitions were examined: 1) common clinical definition, where ≥3 seizures in a day is considered a cluster, along with two novel statistical definitions, where ≥3 seizures in a day are considered a cluster if the observed number of seizures statistically exceeds what would be expected relative to a patient's: 1) average seizure rate prior to the trial, 2) observed seizure rate for the previous seven days. Prevalence of clusters was 62-68% depending on cluster definition used, and occurrence rate of clusters was 6-19% depending on cluster definition. Based on these data, clusters seem to be common in patients with PNES, and more research is needed to identify if clusters are related to triggers and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of adherence to epilepsy quality standards with seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Mendez, Diego Yacaman; Jesus, Jonathan De; Andrade, Rogger A; Weissman, Joel S; Vickrey, Barbara G; Hoch, Daniel B

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the relationship between adherence to epilepsy quality measures (EQM) and seizure control over 2-3 years in a retrospective cohort study. 6150 patients were identified at two large academic medical centers with a primary or secondary diagnosis of epilepsy, were 18-85 years old and seen in outpatient general neurology or epilepsy units between June 2011 and May 2014. Patients were included if: their initial visit was between June 2011 and June 2012, treatment was with ≥1 anti-seizure drug, there was ≥1 visit per year during the timeframe, and seizure frequency was documented at initial and final visits, yielding 162 patients/1055 visits from which socio-demographic, clinical and care quality data were abstracted. Quality care was assessed as (1) percent adherence to up to 8 eligible EQM, and (2) defect-free care (DFC: adherence to all eligible EQM). Seizure control (SC) was defined as ≥50% reduction in average seizures/month between initial and final visits. Chi-square and t-test compared care quality with seizure control. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationships between SC, quality of care and subspecialist involvement. Care quality, reflected by documentation of seizure frequency, addressing therapeutic interventions, and referral to a comprehensive epilepsy center, all exceeded 80% adherence. Care quality as reflected by documentation of seizure type, etiology or syndrome; assessment of side effects, counseling about epilepsy safety and women's issues, and screening for psychiatric disorders ranged from 40 to 57%. Mean EQM adherence across all applicable measures was associated with greater seizure control (p=0.0098). DFC was low (=8%) and did not covary with seizure control (p=0.55). The SC and non-SC groups only differed on epilepsy etiology (p=0.04). Exploratory analysis showed that mean quality scores are associated with seizure control (OR=4.9 [1.3-18.5], p=0.017) while controlling for the effect of subspecialty involvement

  11. Evaluation of anticonvulsant actions of dibromophenyl enaminones using in vitro and in vivo seizure models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed G Qaddoumi

    Full Text Available Epilepsy and other seizure disorders are not adequately managed with currently available drugs. We recently synthesized a series of dibromophenyl enaminones and demonstrated that AK6 and E249 were equipotent to previous analogs but more efficacious in suppressing neuronal excitation. Here we examined the actions of these lead compounds on in vitro and in vivo seizure models. In vitro seizures were induced in the hippocampal slice chemically (zero Mg2+ buffer and picrotoxin and electrically using patterned high frequency stimulation (HFS of afferents. In vivo seizures were induced in rats using the 6 Hz and the maximal electroshock models. AK6 (10 µM and E249 (10 µM depressed the amplitude of population spikes recorded in area CA1 of the hippocampus by -50.5±4.3% and -40.1±3.1% respectively, with partial recovery after washout. In the zero Mg2+ model, AK6 (10 µM depressed multiple population spiking (mPS by -59.3±6.9% and spontaneous bursts (SBs by -65.9±7.2% and in the picrotoxin-model by -43.3±7.2% and -50.0±8.3%, respectively. Likewise, E249 (10 µM depressed the zero-Mg2+-induced mPS by -48.8±9.5% and SBs by -55.8±15.5%, and in the picrotoxin model by -37.1±5.5% and -56.5±11.4%, respectively. They both suppressed post-HFS induced afterdischarges and SBs. AK6 and E249 dose-dependently protected rats in maximal electroshock and 6 Hz models of in vivo seizures after 30 min pretreatment. Their level of protection in both models was similar to that obtained with phenytoin Finally, while AK6 had no effect on locomotion in rats, phenytoin significantly decreased locomotion. AK6 and E249, suppressed in vitro and in vivo seizures to a similar extent. Their in vivo activities are comparable with but not superior to phenytoin. The most efficacious, AK6 produced no locomotor suppression while phenytoin did. Thus, AK6 and E249 may be excellent candidates for further investigation as potential agents for the treatment of epilepsy syndromes

  12. Partial fast-to-slow conversion of regenerating rat fast-twitch muscle by chronic low-frequency stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pette, Dirk; Sketelj, Janez; Skorjanc, Dejan; Leisner, Elmi; Traub, Irmtrud; Bajrović, Fajko

    2002-01-01

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS) of rat fast-twitch muscles induces sequential transitions in myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression from MHCIIb --> MHCIId/x --> MHCIIa. However, the 'final' step of the fast-to-slow transition, i.e., the upregulation of MHCI, has been observed only after extremely long stimulation periods. Assuming that fibre degeneration/regeneration might be involved in the upregulation of slow myosin, we investigated the effects of CLFS on extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles regenerating after bupivacaine-induced fibre necrosis. Normal, non-regenerating muscles responded to both 30- and 60-day CLFS with fast MHC isoform transitions (MHCIIb --> MHCIId --> MHCIIa) and only slight increases in MHCI. CLFS of regenerating EDL muscles caused similar transitions among the fast isoforms but, in addition, caused significant increases in MHCI (to approximately 30% relative concentration). Stimulation periods of 30 and 60 days induced similar changes in the regenerating bupivacaine-treated muscles, indicating that the upregulation of slow myosin was restricted to regenerating fibres, but only during an early stage of regeneration. These results suggest that satellite cells and/or regenerating fast rat muscle fibres are capable of switching directly to a slow program under the influence of CLFS and, therefore, appear to be more malleable than adult fibres.

  13. Blockade of T-type calcium channels prevents tonic-clonic seizures in a maximal electroshock seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkaki, Sophie; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Lerat, Benoit; Françon, Dominique; Forichon, Luc; Chemin, Jean; Valjent, Emmanuel; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille; Lory, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    T-type (Cav3) calcium channels play important roles in neuronal excitability, both in normal and pathological activities of the brain. In particular, they contribute to hyper-excitability disorders such as epilepsy. Here we have characterized the anticonvulsant properties of TTA-A2, a selective T-type channel blocker, in mouse. Using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) as a model of tonic-clonic generalized seizures, we report that mice treated with TTA-A2 (0.3 mg/kg and higher doses) were significantly protected against tonic seizures. Although no major change in Local Field Potential (LFP) pattern was observed during the MES seizure, analysis of the late post-ictal period revealed a significant increase in the delta frequency power in animals treated with TTA-A2. Similar results were obtained for Cav3.1-/- mice, which were less prone to develop tonic seizures in the MES test, but not for Cav3.2-/- mice. Analysis of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and c-Fos expression revealed a rapid and elevated neuronal activation in the hippocampus following MES clonic seizures, which was unchanged in TTA-A2 treated animals. Overall, our data indicate that TTA-A2 is a potent anticonvulsant and that the Cav3.1 isoform plays a prominent role in mediating TTA-A2 tonic seizure protection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Termination of seizure clusters is related to the duration of focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferastraoaru, Victor; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Lipton, Richard B; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Legatt, Alan D; Blumberg, Julie; Haut, Sheryl R

    2016-06-01

    Clustered seizures are characterized by shorter than usual interseizure intervals and pose increased morbidity risk. This study examines the characteristics of seizures that cluster, with special attention to the final seizure in a cluster. This is a retrospective analysis of long-term inpatient monitoring data from the EPILEPSIAE project. Patients underwent presurgical evaluation from 2002 to 2009. Seizure clusters were defined by the occurrence of at least two consecutive seizures with interseizure intervals of <4 h. Other definitions of seizure clustering were examined in a sensitivity analysis. Seizures were classified into three contextually defined groups: isolated seizures (not meeting clustering criteria), terminal seizure (last seizure in a cluster), and intracluster seizures (any other seizures within a cluster). Seizure characteristics were compared among the three groups in terms of duration, type (focal seizures remaining restricted to one hemisphere vs. evolving bilaterally), seizure origin, and localization concordance among pairs of consecutive seizures. Among 92 subjects, 77 (83%) had at least one seizure cluster. The intracluster seizures were significantly shorter than the last seizure in a cluster (p = 0.011), whereas the last seizure in a cluster resembled the isolated seizures in terms of duration. Although focal only (unilateral), seizures were shorter than seizures that evolved bilaterally and there was no correlation between the seizure type and the seizure position in relation to a cluster (p = 0.762). Frontal and temporal lobe seizures were more likely to cluster compared with other localizations (p = 0.009). Seizure pairs that are part of a cluster were more likely to have a concordant origin than were isolated seizures. Results were similar for the 2 h definition of clustering, but not for the 8 h definition of clustering. We demonstrated that intracluster seizures are short relative to isolated seizures and terminal seizures. Frontal

  15. Seizure Prediction and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasemidis, Leon D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by intermittent, paroxysmal, hypersynchronous electrical activity, that may remain localized and/or spread and severely disrupt the brain’s normal multi-task and multi-processing function. Epileptic seizures are the hallmarks of such activity and had been considered unpredictable. It is only recently that research on the dynamics of seizure generation by analysis of the brain’s electrographic activity (EEG) has shed ample light on the predictability of seizures, and illuminated the way to automatic, prospective, long-term prediction of seizures. The ability to issue warnings in real time of impending seizures (e.g., tens of minutes prior to seizure occurrence in the case of focal epilepsy), may lead to novel diagnostic tools and treatments for epilepsy. Applications may range from a simple warning to the patient, in order to avert seizure-associated injuries, to intervention by automatic timely administration of an appropriate stimulus, for example of a chemical nature like an anti-epileptic drug (AED), electromagnetic nature like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial direct current (TDC) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and/or of another nature (e.g., ultrasonic, cryogenic, biofeedback operant conditioning). It is thus expected that seizure prediction could readily become an integral part of the treatment of epilepsy through neuromodulation, especially in the new generation of closed-loop seizure control systems. PMID:21939848

  16. Aborting Seizures by Painful Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Carasso

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established that serious consequences may result from allowing seizures to continue. The opportunities for early interruption of seizures by medication is often restricted to medical personnel, leaving non-trained bystanders unable to intervene. We were able to interrupt seizures (including status epilepticus by application of painful dorsiflexion. The mode of action that enables pain to elevate the seizure threshold remains to be elucidated, although the phenomenon is consistent with earlier laboratory studies in experimental epilepsy. The technique may be recommended as an effective and easily learned procedure that may have wide applicability.

  17. Nonseizure SUDEP: Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy without preceding epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhatoo, Samden D; Nei, Maromi; Raghavan, Manoj; Sperling, Michael; Zonjy, Bilal; Lacuey, Nuria; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-07-01

    To describe the phenomenology of monitored sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) occurring in the interictal period where death occurs without a seizure preceding it. We report a case series of monitored definite and probable SUDEP where no electroclinical evidence of underlying seizures was found preceding death. Three patients (two definite and one probable) had SUDEP. They had a typical high SUDEP risk profile with longstanding intractable epilepsy and frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). All patients had varying patterns of respiratory and bradyarrhythmic cardiac dysfunction with profound electroencephalography (EEG) suppression. In two patients, patterns of cardiorespiratory failure were similar to those seen in some patients in the Mortality in Epilepsy Monitoring Units Study (MORTEMUS). SUDEP almost always occur postictally, after GTCS and less commonly after a partial seizure. Monitored SUDEP or near-SUDEP cases without a seizure have not yet been reported in literature. When nonmonitored SUDEP occurs in an ambulatory setting without an overt seizure, the absence of EEG information prevents the exclusion of a subtle seizure. These cases confirm the existence of nonseizure SUDEP; such deaths may not be prevented by seizure detection-based devices. SUDEP risk in patients with epilepsy may constitute a spectrum of susceptibility wherein some are relatively immune, death occurs in others with frequent GTCS with one episode of seizure ultimately proving fatal, while in others still, death may occur even in the absence of a seizure. We emphasize the heterogeneity of SUDEP phenomena. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Early seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures and its surgical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2008-12-01

    Intracranial EEG documentation of seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures is relatively rare. We retrospectively analyzed intracranial EEG recorded with electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe in patients who underwent occipital lobe surgery. Four patients with occipital lesions, who underwent intracranial EEG monitoring with intracerebral electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe prior to occipital lobe surgery, were studied. Subdural electrodes were placed over the occipital lobe and adjacent areas. Intracerebral electrodes were implanted into bilateral hippocampi and the amygdala in three patients, and in the hippocampus and amygdala ipsilateral to the lesion in one. In light of the intracranial EEG findings, the occipital lobe was resected but the medial temporal lobe was spared in all patients. The follow-up period ranged from six to 16 years, and seizure outcome was Engel Class I in all patients. Sixty six seizures were analyzed. The majority of the seizures originated from the occipital lobe. In complex partial seizures, ictal discharges propagated to the medial temporal lobe. No seizures originating from the temporal lobe were documented. In some seizures, the ictal-onset zone could not be identified. In these seizures, very early propagation to the medial temporal lobe was observed. Interictal spikes were recorded in the medial temporal lobe in all cases. Intracranial EEG revealed very early involvement of the medial temporal lobe in some seizures. Seizure control was achieved without resection of the medial temporal structures.

  19. Neuropeptides and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, O C

    1986-11-01

    There are four lines of evidence for or against a role of neuropeptides in epilepsy: Administration of a variety of opiate agonists into the ventricles or brain of animals produces a constellation of electrical and behavioral changes, seemingly receptor-specific, both sensitive to the specific opiate antagonist naloxone as well as certain anticonvulsant drugs. The primary reservation concerning these data in terms of their relevance to epilepsy regards the fact that the peptides are exogenously administered in relatively high doses. Hence, these data may reflect neurotoxic effects of peptides rather than physiologic function. A variety of opiate agonists are anticonvulsant and naloxone shortens the postictal state in some experimental seizure models. One could attempt to reconcile these data with those in No. 1 by hypothesizing that the spikes and behavioral changes examined in the latter experimental parodynes represented a sort of isolated model of the postictal state. Naloxone has little effect in clinical epilepsy. These data are far from conclusive for two reasons. First, few patients have been studied. Second, because of the issue of opiate receptor heterogeneity and the high doses of naloxone needed experimentally to block non-mu opiate effects, the doses of naloxone used clinically to date are too low to rule out possible delta- or epsilon-mediated effects. The negative clinical data are illustrative of the dangers and difficulties of extrapolating data generated in animal models of seizures to the human condition. ACTH, a peptide that is derived from the same precursor molecule as beta-endorphin, is clearly an effective anticonvulsant in certain childhood seizure states. However, whether this is due to a direct or indirect (that is, cortisol) effect on brain is far from clear. Paradoxically, in contradistinction to other data concerning pro- and anticonvulsant properties of various opioid peptides, there is no animal model of infantile spasms to help

  20. Characteristics of the initial seizure in familial febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E. van Beijeren; N.H. Wils; G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractComplex seizure characteristics in patients with a positive family history were studied to define familial phenotype subgroups of febrile seizures. A total of 51 children with one or more affected first degree relatives and 177 without an affected first degree

  1. Multi-probe-based resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscopy for detection of suspicious breast lesions: improving performance using partial ROC optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xingwei; Wang, Xiao Hui; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a multi-probe resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscope (REIS) system to detect breast abnormalities. Based on assessing asymmetry in REIS signals acquired between left and right breasts, we developed several machine learning classifiers to classify younger women (i.e., under 50YO) into two groups of having high and low risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, we investigated a new method to optimize performance based on the area under a selected partial receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve when optimizing an artificial neural network (ANN), and tested whether it could improve classification performance. From an ongoing prospective study, we selected a dataset of 174 cases for whom we have both REIS signals and diagnostic status verification. The dataset includes 66 "positive" cases recommended for biopsy due to detection of highly suspicious breast lesions and 108 "negative" cases determined by imaging based examinations. A set of REIS-based feature differences, extracted from the two breasts using a mirror-matched approach, was computed and constituted an initial feature pool. Using a leave-one-case-out cross-validation method, we applied a genetic algorithm (GA) to train the ANN with an optimal subset of features. Two optimization criteria were separately used in GA optimization, namely the area under the entire ROC curve (AUC) and the partial area under the ROC curve, up to a predetermined threshold (i.e., 90% specificity). The results showed that although the ANN optimized using the entire AUC yielded higher overall performance (AUC = 0.83 versus 0.76), the ANN optimized using the partial ROC area criterion achieved substantially higher operational performance (i.e., increasing sensitivity level from 28% to 48% at 95% specificity and/ or from 48% to 58% at 90% specificity).

  2. Phenobarbital for Neonatal Seizures: Response Rate and Predictors of Refractoriness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Carlotta; Seri, Stefano; Pavlidis, Elena; Mazzotta, Silvia; Pelosi, Annalisa; Pisani, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Background Phenobarbital is the first-line choice for neonatal seizures treatment, despite a response rate of approximately 45%. Failure to respond to acute anticonvulsants is associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome, but knowledge on predictors of refractoriness is limited. Objective To quantify response rate to phenobarbital and to establish variables predictive of its lack of efficacy. Methods We retrospectively evaluated newborns with electrographically confirmed neonatal seizures admitted between January 1999 and December 2012 to the neonatal intensive care unit of Parma University Hospital (Italy), excluding neonates with status epilepticus. Response was categorized as complete (cessation of clinical and electrographic seizures after phenobarbital administration), partial (reduction but not cessation of electrographic seizures with the first bolus, response to the second bolus), or absent (no response after the second bolus). Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent predictors of refractoriness. Results Out of 91 newborns receiving phenobarbital, 57 (62.6%) responded completely, 15 (16.5%) partially, and 19 (20.9%) did not respond. Seizure type (p = 0.02), background electroencephalogram (EEG; p ≤ 0.005), and neurologic examination (p  ≤  0.005) correlated with response to phenobarbital. However, EEG (p  ≤  0.02) and seizure type (p  ≤  0.001) were the only independent predictors. Conclusion Our results suggest a prominent role of neurophysiological variables (background EEG and electrographic-only seizure type) in predicting the absence of response to phenobarbital in high-risk newborns. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based visible light communication systems using a modified partial transmit sequence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Deng, Honggui; Ren, Shuang; Tang, Chengying; Qian, Xuewen

    2018-01-01

    We propose an efficient partial transmit sequence technique based on genetic algorithm and peak-value optimization algorithm (GAPOA) to reduce high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) in visible light communication systems based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (VLC-OFDM). By analysis of hill-climbing algorithm's pros and cons, we propose the POA with excellent local search ability to further process the signals whose PAPR is still over the threshold after processed by genetic algorithm (GA). To verify the effectiveness of the proposed technique and algorithm, we evaluate the PAPR performance and the bit error rate (BER) performance and compare them with partial transmit sequence (PTS) technique based on GA (GA-PTS), PTS technique based on genetic and hill-climbing algorithm (GH-PTS), and PTS based on shuffled frog leaping algorithm and hill-climbing algorithm (SFLAHC-PTS). The results show that our technique and algorithm have not only better PAPR performance but also lower computational complexity and BER than GA-PTS, GH-PTS, and SFLAHC-PTS technique.

  4. Seizure disorders in 43 cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, A; Bellino, C; Bertone, I; Cagnotti, G; Iulini, B; Miniscalco, B; Casalone, C; Gianella, P; Cagnasso, A

    2015-01-01

    Large animals have a relatively high seizure threshold, and in most cases seizures are acquired. No published case series have described this syndrome in cattle. To describe clinical findings and outcomes in cattle referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Turin (Italy) because of seizures. Client-owned cattle with documented evidence of seizures. Medical records of cattle with episodes of seizures reported between January 2002 and February 2014 were reviewed. Evidence of seizures was identified based on the evaluation of seizure episodes by the referring veterinarian or 1 of the authors. Animals were recruited if physical and neurologic examinations were performed and if diagnostic laboratory test results were available. Forty-three of 49 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 8 months. Thirty-one animals were male and 12 were female. Piedmontese breed accounted for 39/43 (91%) animals. Seizures were etiologically classified as reactive in 30 patients (70%) and secondary or structural in 13 (30%). Thirty-six animals survived, 2 died naturally, and 5 were euthanized for reasons of animal welfare. The definitive cause of reactive seizures was diagnosed as hypomagnesemia (n = 2), hypocalcemia (n = 12), and hypomagnesemia-hypocalcemia (n = 16). The cause of structural seizures was diagnosed as cerebrocortical necrosis (n = 8), inflammatory diseases (n = 4), and lead (Pb) intoxication (n = 1). The study results indicate that seizures largely are reported in beef cattle and that the cause can be identified and successfully treated in most cases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Types of Seizures Affecting Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders Seizures remain one of the most common neurological ... TSC Brain and Neurological Function Brain Abnormalities Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders Infantile Spasms Epilepsy in Adults with TSC Epilepsy ...

  6. Diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Video-EEG monitoring, suggestive seizure induction and diagnostic certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Jungilligens, Johannes; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) can remain undiagnosed for many years, leading to unnecessary medication and delayed treatment. A recent report by the International League Against Epilepsy Nonepileptic Seizures Task Force recommends a staged approach to the diagnosis of PNES (LaFrance, et al., 2013). We aimed to investigate its practical utility, and to apply the proposed classification to evaluate the role of long-term video-EEG monitoring (VEEG) and suggestive seizure induction (SSI) in PNES workup. Using electronic medical records, 122 inpatients (mean age 36.0±12.9years; 68% women) who received the diagnosis of PNES at our epilepsy center during a 4.3-year time period were included. There was an 82.8% agreement between diagnostic certainty documented at discharge and that assigned retroactively using the Task Force recommendations. In a minority of cases, having used the Task Force criteria could have encouraged the clinicians to give more certain diagnoses, exemplifying the Task Force report's utility. Both VEEG and SSI were effective at supporting high level diagnostic certainty. Interestingly, about one in four patients (26.2%) had a non-diagnostic ("negative") VEEG but a positive SSI. On average, this subgroup did not have significantly shorter mean VEEG recording times than VEEG-positive patients. However, VEEG-negative/SSI-positive patients had a significantly lower habitual seizure frequency than their counterparts. This finding emphasizes the utility of SSI in ascertaining the diagnosis of PNES in patients who do not have a spontaneous habitual event during VEEG due to, for example, low seizure frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical profile of patients with nascent alcohol related seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to characterize the clinical profile of patients with alcohol related seizures (ARS and to identify the prevalence of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE in the same. Materials and Methods: 100 consecutive male patients presenting to a tertiary care center in South India with new onset ARS were analyzed with alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT score. All underwent 19 channel digital scalp electroencephalography (EEG and at least computed tomography (CT scan. Results: A total of 27 patients (27% who had cortical atrophy on CT had a mean duration of alcohol intake of 23.62 years compared with 14.55 years in patients with no cortical atrophy (P < 0.001. Twenty-two patients (22% had clustering in the current episode of whom 18 had cortical atrophy. Nearly, 88% patients had generalized tonic clonic seizures while 12% who had partial seizures underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which identified frontal focal cortical dysplasia in one. Mean lifetime duration of alcohol intake in patients presenting with seizures within 6 hours (6H-gp of intake of alcohol was significantly lower (P = 0.029. One patient in the 6H-gp with no withdrawal symptoms had EEG evidence for IGE and had a lower AUDIT score compared with the rest. Conclusion: CT evidence of cortical atrophy is related to the duration of alcohol intake and portends an increased risk for clustering. Partial seizures can be a presenting feature of ARS and those patients may benefit from MRI to identify underlying symptomatic localization related epilepsy (8.3% of partial seizures. IGE is more likely in patients presenting with ARS within first 6 hours especially if they do not have alcohol withdrawal symptoms and scalp EEG is helpful to identify this small subgroup (~1% who may require long-term anti-epileptic medication.

  8. Seizure clusters: characteristics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Sheryl R

    2015-04-01

    Many patients with epilepsy experience 'clusters' or flurries of seizures, also termed acute repetitive seizures (ARS). Seizure clustering has a significant impact on health and quality of life. This review summarizes recent advances in the definition and neurophysiologic understanding of clustering, the epidemiology and risk factors for clustering and both inpatient and outpatient clinical implications. New treatments for seizure clustering/ARS are perhaps the area of greatest recent progress. Efforts have focused on creating a uniform definition of a seizure cluster. In neurophysiologic studies of refractory epilepsy, seizures within a cluster appear to be self-triggering. Clinical progress has been achieved towards a more precise prevalence of clustering, and consensus guidelines for epilepsy monitoring unit safety. The greatest recent advances are in the study of nonintravenous route of benzodiazepines as rescue medications for seizure clusters/ARS. Rectal benzodiazepines have been very effective but barriers to use exist. New data on buccal, intramuscular and intranasal preparations are anticipated to lead to a greater number of approved treatments. Progesterone may be effective for women who experience catamenial clusters. Seizure clustering is common, particularly in the setting of medically refractory epilepsy. Clustering worsens health and quality of life, and the field requires greater focus on clarifying of definition and clinical implications. Progress towards the development of nonintravenous routes of benzodiazepines has the potential to improve care in this area.

  9. A Novel Partial Discharge Ultra-High Frequency Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Single-Channel Blind Source Separation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Wei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To effectively de-noise the Gaussian white noise and periodic narrow-band interference in the background noise of partial discharge ultra-high frequency (PD UHF signals in field tests, a novel de-noising method, based on a single-channel blind source separation algorithm, is proposed. Compared with traditional methods, the proposed method can effectively de-noise the noise interference, and the distortion of the de-noising PD signal is smaller. Firstly, the PD UHF signal is time-frequency analyzed by S-transform to obtain the number of source signals. Then, the single-channel detected PD signal is converted into multi-channel signals by singular value decomposition (SVD, and background noise is separated from multi-channel PD UHF signals by the joint approximate diagonalization of eigen-matrix method. At last, the source PD signal is estimated and recovered by the l1-norm minimization method. The proposed de-noising method was applied on the simulation test and field test detected signals, and the de-noising performance of the different methods was compared. The simulation and field test results demonstrate the effectiveness and correctness of the proposed method.

  10. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  11. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2014-01-13

    Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Forty-eight children who experienced their first unprovoked seizure with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They were randomly placed into treatment (n = 24) and control (n = 24) groups. Children in the treatment group listened to Mozart K.448 daily before bedtime for at least six months. Two patients in the treatment group were excluded from analysis due to discontinuation intervention. Finally, forty-six patients were analyzed. Most of these patients (89.1%) were idiopathic in etiology. Seizure recurrence rates and reduction of epileptiform discharges were compared. The average follow-up durations in the treatment and control groups were 18.6 ± 6.6 and 20.1 ± 5.1 months, respectively. The seizure recurrence rate was estimated to be significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group over 24 months (37.2% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.0109). Significant decreases in epileptiform discharges were also observed after 1, 2, and 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448 when compared with EEGs before listening to music. There were no significant differences in gender, mentality, seizure type, and etiology between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Although the case number was limited and control music was not performed in this study, the study revealed that listening to Mozart K.448 reduced the seizure recurrence rate and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures, especially of idiopathic etiology. We believe that Mozart K.448 could be a promising alternative treatment in patients with

  12. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  13. {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Seizure Disorder: Comparison Brain SPECT, MRI / CT and EEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyung In [Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ju Hyuk; Choi, Chang Woon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; No, Jae Kyu; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    We studied 115 patients with seizure who had been performed brain SPECT brain MRI of CT and EEG. To evaluate the pattern of brain SPECT in seizure patients 28 of them had secondary epilepsies, 87 had primary epilepsies. In primary epilepsies, 42 were generalized seizure and 45 were partial seizure. The causes of secondary epilepsies were congenital malformation, cerebromalacia, cerebral infarction ultiple sclerosis, AV-malformation. granuloma and etc, in order. In 28 secondary epilepsies, 25 of them, brain SPECT lesions was concordant with MRI or CT lesions. 3 were disconcordant. The brain SPECT findings of generalized seizure were normal in 22 patients, diffuse irregular decreased perfusion in 8, decreased in frontal cortex in 4. temporal in 5 and frontotemporal in 3. In 45 partial seizure, 19 brain SPECT were concordant with EEG (42.4%).

  14. 99mTc-HMPAO Brain SPECT in Seizure Disorder: Comparison Brain SPECT, MRI / CT and EEG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyung In; Im, Ju Hyuk; Choi, Chang Woon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; No, Jae Kyu; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon

    1994-01-01

    We studied 115 patients with seizure who had been performed brain SPECT brain MRI of CT and EEG. To evaluate the pattern of brain SPECT in seizure patients 28 of them had secondary epilepsies, 87 had primary epilepsies. In primary epilepsies, 42 were generalized seizure and 45 were partial seizure. The causes of secondary epilepsies were congenital malformation, cerebromalacia, cerebral infarction ultiple sclerosis, AV-malformation. granuloma and etc, in order. In 28 secondary epilepsies, 25 of them, brain SPECT lesions was concordant with MRI or CT lesions. 3 were disconcordant. The brain SPECT findings of generalized seizure were normal in 22 patients, diffuse irregular decreased perfusion in 8, decreased in frontal cortex in 4. temporal in 5 and frontotemporal in 3. In 45 partial seizure, 19 brain SPECT were concordant with EEG (42.4%).

  15. Outcome of Early Post-traumatic Seizure: An Experience in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the frequency, causes, risk factors and outcome following early posttraumatic seizure. Methods: A retrospective analysis of age, sex, mechanism of injury, type and onset of unprovoked seizure occurring within one week of injury, admission coma score, and Glasgow outcome score in patients with ...

  16. Role of Subdural Electrocorticography in Prediction of Long-Term Seizure Outcome in Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Eishi; Juhasz, Csaba; Shah, Aashit; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    Since prediction of long-term seizure outcome using preoperative diagnostic modalities remains suboptimal in epilepsy surgery, we evaluated whether interictal spike frequency measures obtained from extraoperative subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) recording could predict long-term seizure outcome. This study included 61 young patients (age…

  17. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  18. The semiology of febrile seizures: Focal features are frequent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Michihiko; Kubota, Tetsuo; Tsuji, Takeshi; Kurahashi, Hirokazu; Numoto, Shingo; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Akihisa

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the semiology of febrile seizures (FS) and to determine the frequency of FS with symptoms suggestive of focal onset. FS symptoms in children were reported within 24h of seizure onset by the parents using a structured questionnaire consisting principally of closed-ended questions. We focused on events at seizure commencement, including changes in behavior and facial expression, and ocular and oral symptoms. We also investigated the autonomic and motor symptoms developing during seizures. The presence or absence of focal and limbic features was determined for each patient. The associations of certain focal and limbic features with patient characteristics were assessed. Information was obtained on FS in 106 children. Various events were recorded at seizure commencement. Behavioral changes were observed in 35 children, changes in facial expression in 53, ocular symptoms in 78, and oral symptoms in 90. In terms of events during seizures, autonomic symptoms were recognized in 78, and convulsive motor symptoms were recognized in 68 children. Focal features were evident in 81 children; 38 children had two or more such features. Limbic features were observed in 44 children, 9 of whom had two or more such features. There was no significant relationship between any patient characteristic and the numbers of focal or limbic features. The semiology of FS varied widely among children, and symptoms suggestive of focal onset were frequent. FS of focal onset may be more common than is generally thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic and toxic causes of canine seizure disorders: A retrospective study of 96 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Christina; Jambroszyk, Melanie; Tipold, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    A wide variety of intoxications and abnormal metabolic conditions can lead to reactive seizures in dogs. Patient records of dogs suffering from seizure disorders (n=877) were reviewed, and 96 cases were associated with an underlying metabolic or toxic aetiology. These included intoxications by various agents, hypoglycaemia, electrolyte disorders, hepatic encephalopathy, hypothyroidism, uraemic encephalopathy, hypoxia and hyperglycaemia. The incidence of the underlying diseases was determined. The most common causes of reactive seizures were intoxications (39%, 37 dogs) and hypoglycaemia (32%, 31 dogs). Hypocalcaemia was the most frequent electrolyte disorder causing reactive seizures (5%) and all five of these dogs had ionised calcium concentrations ≤0.69 mmol/L. Eleven per cent of dogs with seizures had metabolic or toxic disorders and this relatively high frequency emphasises the importance of a careful clinical work-up of cases presented with seizures in order to reach a correct diagnosis and select appropriate treatment options. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, L.H.; Chalder, T.; Chigwedere, C.; Khondoker, M.R.; Moriarty, J.; Toone, B.K.; Mellers, J.D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and standard medical care (SMC) as treatments for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Methods: Our randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared CBT with SMC in an outpatient neuropsychiatric setting. Sixty-six PNES patients were randomized to either CBT (plus SMC) or SMC alone, scheduled to occur over 4 months. PNES diagnosis was established by video-EEG telemetry for most patients. Exclusion criteria included comorbid history of epilepsy, <2 PNES/month, and IQ <70. The primary outcome was seizure frequency at end of treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included 3 months of seizure freedom at 6-month follow-up, measures of psychosocial functioning, health service use, and employment. Results: In an intention-to-treat analysis, seizure reduction following CBT was superior at treatment end (group × time interaction p < 0.0001; large to medium effect sizes). At follow-up, the CBT group tended to be more likely to have experienced 3 months of seizure freedom (odds ratio 3.125, p = 0.086). Both groups improved in some health service use measures and on the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Mood and employment status showed no change. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that cognitive-behavioral therapy is more effective than standard medical care alone in reducing seizure frequency in PNES patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that CBT in addition to SMC, as compared to SMC alone, significantly reduces seizure frequency in patients with PNES (change in median monthly seizure frequency: baseline to 6 months follow-up, CBT group, 12 to 1.5; SMC alone group, 8 to 5). GLOSSARY AED = antiepileptic drug; CBT = cognitive-behavioral therapy; CI = confidence interval; DSM-IV = Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition; HADS = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IQR = interquartile range; ITT = intention-to-treat; OR = odds ratio; PNES

  1. Video game-related seizures: a report on 10 patients and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, W D; Chatrian, G E; Glass, S T; Knauss, T A

    1994-04-01

    To further describe the features, postulated pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome of seizures occurring while playing or watching video games (video game-related seizures (VGRS)). We evaluated retrospectively 10 patients with VGRS seen by us and reviewed 25 reported cases. The 35 patients ranged in age from 1 to 36 years (mean: 13.2); and 26 subjects (74%) were male. Eight individuals (29%) had prior infrequent nonfebrile seizures, 4 (11%) had febrile convulsions, and 2 (6%) had a family history of epilepsy. VGRS consisted of generalized tonic-clonic seizures in 22 of 35 individuals (63%); absences in 2 (6%); simple partial seizures in 6 (19%); complex partial seizures in 4 (11%); and other manifestations in 4. Neurologic examination and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were normal. Electroencephalograms demonstrated generalized or focal, interictal or ictal epileptic patterns in 11 of 21 patients (52%) and photoparoxysmal responses in 17 of 32 (53%). Eleven of 15 individuals (73%) treated with video game (VG) abstinence alone, 3 of 6 who received anticonvulsants but played VGs, and 7 of 12 treated with combined VG abstinence and anticonvulsants had no further seizures. We postulate that a special convulsive susceptibility of selected neurons in striate, peristriate, infratemporal, and posterior parietal cortices to particular visual stimuli plays a major role in VGRS. VG abstinence is the treatment of choice of VGRS. Anticonvulsant medication is suggested only for those individuals who continue to play VGs or suffer from seizures triggered by other, unavoidable visual stimuli, or from unprovoked attacks.

  2. Behavioral and electroencephalographic evaluation of the anticonvulsive activity of Moringa oleifera leaf non-polar extracts and one metabolite in PTZ-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Martínez-González, Claudia Lizbeth; Flores-Carrillo, Maricela; Luna-Nophal, Sara Ibeth; Contreras-Murillo, Gerardo; Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel

    2018-01-15

    Moringa oleifera Lamarck is a species that has long been used in high demand in folk medicine, including for the treatment of epilepsy. Nevertheless, scientific studies demonstrating its anticonvulsant properties and the nature of the bioactive constituents are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activities of the Moringa oleifera leaves in non-polar vs. polar extracts using behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) analyses in rodents. First, PTZ (80 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced tonic-clonic seizures were assayed via a dose-response (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p.) evaluation in mice. Then, a dosage of the extracts (100 or 300 mg/kg) and one metabolite (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was selected to evaluate its effect on PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced EEG paroxystic activities in rats compared to the effects of ethosuximide (reference anticonvulsant drug, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). Latent onset of the first paroxystic spike, first seizure and frequency as well as seizure severity, were determined using Racine's scale. Moringa oleifera ethanol and hexane extracts produced a delay in the seizure latency in mice and rats; this effect was improved in the presence of the hexane extract containing the active metabolite hexadecanoic acid. The anticonvulsant effects were corroborated in the spectral analysis by the potency of the EEG due to a reduction in the spike frequency and amplitude, as well as in the duration and severity of the seizures. The effects of the hexane extract resembled those observed in the reference antiepileptic drug ethosuximide. Moringa oleifera leaves possess anticonvulsant activities due to the complementary of the non-polar and polar constituents. However, the non-polar constituents appear to exert an important influence via the partial participation of fatty acids, providing evidence of the effects of this plant in epilepsy therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Seizure-related injuries in children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunju, IkeOluwa A; Oyinlade, Alexander O; Babatunde, Olubusayo D

    2016-01-01

    Children with epilepsy are reported to be at a greater risk of injuries compared with their peers who do not have epilepsy. We set out to determine the frequency and pattern of seizure-related injuries in children with epilepsy seen at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Consecutive cases of epilepsy seen at the pediatric neurology clinic of the UCH, Ibadan over a period of 6months were evaluated for injuries in the preceding 12months using a structured questionnaire. These were compared with age- and sex-matched controls. A total of 125 children with epilepsy and 125 age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Injuries occurred more frequently in children with epilepsy than in their peers (p=0.01, OR 1.935, 95% CI 1.142-3.280). Epilepsy was generalized in 80 (64.0%), and localization-related in 45 (36.0%). Idiopathic epilepsy accounted for 74 (59.2%), and the remaining 51 (40.8%) had remote symptomatic epilepsy. Fifty-seven (45.6%) children had suffered seizure-related injuries with multiple injuries in 31 (24.8%). The most frequent were skin/soft tissue lacerations (26.4%), injuries to the tongue and soft tissues of the mouth (19.2%), minor head injuries (15.2%), and dental injuries with tooth loss (8.0%). There was a statistically significant association between seizure frequency and seizure-related injuries (p=0.002). Children on polytherapy had a significantly higher frequency of seizure-related injuries (pEpilepsy is a major risk factor for injuries in childhood. High seizure frequency increases the risk of multiple injuries in children with epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Autonomic headache with autonomic seizures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Kaleagasi, Hakan; Yalçin Tasmertek, Fazilet

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the report is to present a case of an autonomic headache associated with autonomic seizures. A 19-year-old male who had had complex partial seizures for 15 years was admitted with autonomic complaints and left hemicranial headache, independent from seizures, that he had had for 2 years and were provoked by watching television. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed right hippocampal sclerosis and electroencephalography revealed epileptic activity in right hemispheric areas. Treatment with valproic acid decreased the complaints. The headache did not fulfil the criteria for the diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, and was different from epileptic headache, which was defined as a pressing type pain felt over the forehead for several minutes to a few hours. Although epileptic headache responds to anti-epileptics and the complaints of the present case decreased with antiepileptics, it has been suggested that the headache could be a non-trigeminal autonomic headache instead of an epileptic headache.

  5. Dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with exophthalmos and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Ponce, Lucido L; Patterson, Joel T; Von Ritschl, Rudiger H; Smith, Robert G

    2014-03-15

    Concomitant seizures and exophthalmos in the context of a temporal dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) has not been described before. Here, we report a 55-year-old-male who presented with an 8-month history of progressive painless exophthalmos of his left eye, conjunctival chemosis, reduced vision and new onset complex partial seizures. Cerebral angiography demonstrated Cognard Type IIa left cerebral dAVF fed by branches from the left occipital artery and an accessory meningeal artery, with drainage to the superior ophthalmic vein. Following surgical obliteration of dAVF feeding vessels, our patient had dramatic improvement in visual acuity, proptosis and chemosis along with cessation of clinical seizures. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinta Sri

    2008-01-01

    (82.4% either recovered completely or had more than 50% reduction in the frequency of their symptoms, after three to six months of initiation of therapy. Conclusions: Psychosocial stress is common among children with nonepileptic seizures. Confirmatory diagnosis by video EEG, along with prompt psychosocial intervention, often results in a favorable outcome for most children with nonepileptic seizures.

  7. Onset of action and seizure control in Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome: focus on rufinamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P Saneto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Russell P Saneto1, Gail D Anderson21Division of Pediatric Neurology, Seattle Children’s Hospital/University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USAAbstract: Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome is an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome characterized by the triad of electroencephalogram showing diffuse slow spike-and-wave discharges and paroxysmal fast activity, multiple intractable seizure types, and cognitive impairment. The intractability to seizure medications and cognitive impairment gives rise to eventual institutionalized patient care. Only a small subset of seizure medications has been shown to be helpful in seizure control. Most patients take up to 3 medications at high therapeutic dosing and are susceptible to medication-induced side effects. The lack of medication efficacy in seizure control has led one meta-analysis to conclude that there is no single medication that is highly efficacious in controlling seizures in this syndrome. On this background, a new and structurally novel seizure medication, rufinamide, has been found to be beneficial in the treatment of seizures in this syndrome. In a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study, rufinamide was found to reduce seizures by over 30%. More importantly, it reduced the frequency of the seizure type that induces most of the morbidity of this syndrome, the drop seizure, by over 40%. There were few side effects, the medication was well tolerated, and in the open labeled extension study, tolerance was not found. In this review, we describe the main electroclinical features of Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome and summarize the few controlled studies that have contributed to its rational treatment. Currently, there is no single agent or combination of agents that effectively treat the multiple seizure types and co-morbidities in this syndrome. Our focus will be on the role of the new medication rufinamide in

  8. Escitalopram causes fewer seizures in human overdose than citalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Ceschi, Alessandro; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Sauer, Oliver; Stedtler, Uwe; Prasa, Dagmar; Seidel, Carola; Hackl, Elisabeth; Hoffmann-Walbeck, Petra; Gerber-Zupan, Gabriela; Bauer, Kathrin; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd-Achim; Wilks, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Seizures are a recognized complication of acute overdose with the racemic (1:1 ratio of R- and S-enantiomers) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant citalopram. We tested the hypothesis that escitalopram (the therapeutically active S-enantiomer of citalopram) causes fewer seizures in overdose than citalopram at comparable doses of the S-enantiomer. Multicenter retrospective review of cases with citalopram and escitalopram overdose reported to German, Austrian, and Swiss Poisons Centers between 1997 and 2006. 316 citalopram and 63 escitalopram cases were analyzed. Somnolence, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, QT prolongation, and tremor occurred with similar frequency in both groups. There was a striking difference in the frequency of single and multiple seizures: 43 cases (13.5%) in the citalopram group and 1 case (1.6%) with a single seizure in the escitalopram group (p=0.0065). At comparable ingested doses of the S-enantiomer, the symptom profile for citalopram and escitalopram intoxications is similar except for seizures that occur more frequently in citalopram than in escitalopram poisoning.

  9. Characteristics of people with self-reported stress-precipitated seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privitera, Michael; Walters, Michael; Lee, Ikjae; Polak, Emily; Fleck, Adrienne; Schwieterman, Donna; Haut, Sheryl R

    2014-12-01

    Stress is the most common patient-reported seizure precipitant. We aimed to determine mood and epilepsy characteristics of people who report stress-precipitated seizures. Sequential patients at a tertiary epilepsy center were surveyed about stress as a seizure precipitant. We asked whether acute (lasting minutes-hours) or chronic (lasting days-months) stress was a seizure precipitant, whether stress reduction had been tried, and what effect stress reduction had on seizure frequency. We collected information on antiepileptic drugs, history of depression and anxiety disorder, prior or current treatment for depression or anxiety, and scores on the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory (NDDI-E) and Generalized Anxiety Disorders-7 (GAD-7) instruments, which are administered at every visit in our Epilepsy Center. We also asked whether respondents thought that they could predict their seizures to determine if stress as a seizure precipitant was correlated with seizure self-prediction. Two hundred sixty-six subjects were included: 219 endorsed stress as a seizure precipitant [STRESS (+)] and 47 did not [STRESS (-)]. Among STRESS (+) subjects, 85% endorsed chronic stress as a seizure precipitant, and 68% endorsed acute stress as a seizure precipitant. In STRESS (+) subjects, 57% had used some type of relaxation or stress reduction method (most commonly yoga, exercise and meditation), and, of those who tried, 88% thought that these methods improved seizures. Among STRESS (-) subjects, 25% had tried relaxation or stress reduction, and 71% thought that seizures improved. Although univariate analysis showed multiple associations with stress as a seizure precipitant, in the multivariable logistic regression, only the GAD-7 score was associated with STRESS (+) (OR = 1.18 [1.03-1.35], p = 0.017). Subjects who reported stress as a seizure precipitant were more likely to report an ability to self-predict seizures (p < 0.001). Stress-precipitated seizures are commonly reported

  10. HMPAO-SPECT in cerebral seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.; Reichmann, K.; Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Durwen, H.; Buelau, P.; Elger, C.E.; Rohde, A.; Penin, H.

    1988-01-01

    In nine patients with suspected psychogenic seizures and in three patients with proven epileptic seizures HMPAO-SPECT was performed prior to and during seizure. In the patients with lateron-proven psychogenic seizures no, or only slight, changes of regional cerebral blood flow were found. Patients with proven epilepsy revealed partly normal findings interictally but during seizure a markedly increased circumscript blood flow was found in all patients. Even though PET is superior to SPECT with respect to spatial resolution, in the diagnosis of seizures HMPAO-SPECT has the advantage of enabling injection of the tracer during the seizure and the performance of the SPECT study subsequently. (orig.) [de

  11. Partially hydrolyzed whey proteins prevent clinical symptoms in a cow's milk allergy mouse model and enhance regulatory T and B cell frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, Mensiena B. Gea; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Garssen, Johan; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Scope: Partially hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins are used to prevent cow's milk allergy in children. Here we studied the immunomodulatory mechanisms of partial cow's milk hydrolysates in vivo. Methods and results: Mice were sensitized with whey or partially hydrolyzed whey using cholera toxin.

  12. Partially hydrolyzed whey proteins prevent clinical symptoms in a cow's milk allergy mouse model and enhance regulatory T and B cell frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, Mensiena B. Gea; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Garssen, Johan; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    Scope: Partially hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins are used to prevent cow's milk allergy in children. Here we studied the immunomodulatory mechanisms of partial cow's milk hydrolysates in vivo. Methods and results: Mice were sensitized with whey or partially hydrolyzed whey using cholera toxin.

  13. Partially hydrolyzed whey proteins prevent clinical symptoms in a cow's milk allergy mouse model and enhance regulatory T and B cell frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, Mensiena B Gea; van Esch, Betty C A M; Garssen, Johan; Faas, Marijke M; Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    SCOPE: Partially hydrolyzed cow's milk proteins are used to prevent cow's milk allergy in children. Here we studied the immunomodulatory mechanisms of partial cow's milk hydrolysates in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS: Mice were sensitized with whey or partially hydrolyzed whey using cholera toxin.

  14. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  15. Association of Periodic and Rhythmic Electroencephalographic Patterns With Seizures in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Ruiz, Andres; Vlachy, Jan; Lee, Jong Woo; Gilmore, Emily J; Ayer, Turgay; Haider, Hiba Arif; Gaspard, Nicolas; Ehrenberg, J Andrew; Tolchin, Benjamin; Fantaneanu, Tadeu A; Fernandez, Andres; Hirsch, Lawrence J; LaRoche, Suzette

    2017-02-01

    Periodic and rhythmic electroencephalographic patterns have been associated with risk of seizures in critically ill patients. However, specific features that confer higher seizure risk remain unclear. To analyze the association of distinct characteristics of periodic and rhythmic patterns with seizures. We reviewed electroencephalographic recordings from 4772 critically ill adults in 3 academic medical centers from February 2013 to September 2015 and performed a multivariate analysis to determine features associated with seizures. Continuous electroencephalography. Association of periodic and rhythmic patterns and specific characteristics, such as pattern frequency (hertz), Plus modifier, prevalence, and stimulation-induced patterns, and the risk for seizures. Of the 4772 patients included in our study, 2868 were men and 1904 were women. Lateralized periodic discharges (LPDs) had the highest association with seizures regardless of frequency and the association was greater when the Plus modifier was present (58%; odds ratio [OR], 2.00, P rhythmic delta activity (LRDA) were associated with seizures in a frequency-dependent manner (1.5-2 Hz: GPDs, 24%,OR, 2.31, P = .02; LRDA, 24%, OR, 1.79, P = .05; ≥ 2 Hz: GPDs, 32%, OR, 3.30, P rhythmic delta activity compared with no periodic or rhythmic pattern (13%, OR, 1.18, P = .26). Higher prevalence of LPDs and GPDs also conferred increased seizure risk (37% frequent vs 45% abundant/continuous, OR, 1.64, P = .03 for difference; 8% rare/occasional vs 15% frequent, OR, 2.71, P = .03, vs 23% abundant/continuous, OR, 1.95, P = .04). Patterns associated with stimulation did not show an additional risk for seizures from the underlying pattern risk (P > .10). In this study, LPDs, LRDA, and GPDs were associated with seizures while generalized rhythmic delta activity was not. Lateralized periodic discharges were associated with seizures at all frequencies with and without Plus modifier, but LRDA and GPDs were associated with

  16. Fyodor Dostoevsky and his falling sickness: a critical analysis of seizure semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Udaya

    2010-08-01

    Fyodor Dostoevsky is a great Russian writer who had epilepsy. As a consequence, there are many references to seizure-related phenomena in his work. His epilepsy syndrome has been a focus of debate. The goal of this article is to delineate his epilepsy syndrome based on a semiological description of seizures, which could be considered one of the most reliable pieces of circumstantial evidence available. It was hypothesized that seizure-related descriptions in his books were based on his own personal experience. The semiology of seizures and related phenomena was compiled from Dostoevsky's own work, his letters to family and friends, and reminiscences of his wife and friend. Those descriptions were analyzed in detail to elicit localizing and lateralizing features of seizures. On the basis of this evidence, it was postulated that Dostoevsky had a partial epilepsy syndrome most probably arising from the dominant temporal lobe. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Change in illness perception is associated with short-term seizure burden outcome following video-EEG confirmation of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David K; Majmudar, Shirine; Ram, Aarthi; Rutherford, Holly C; Fadipe, Melissa; Dunn, Callie B; Collins, Robert L

    2018-04-27

    We aimed to evaluate whether potential changes in the patient's illness perception can significantly influence short-term seizure burden following video-electroencephalography (EEG) confirmation/explanation of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Patients with PNES were dichotomized to two groups based on a five-point Symptom Attribution Scale: (a) those who prior to diagnosis perceived their seizures to be solely ("5") or mainly ("4") physical in origin (physical group) and (b) the remainder of patients with PNES (psychological group). The physical group (n=32), psychological group (n=40), and group with epilepsy (n=26) also completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ) prior to diagnosis, and were followed up at 3months as well as at 6months postdiagnosis. At 3months postdiagnosis, the physical group experienced significantly greater improvement in seizure intensity (p=0.002) and seizure frequency (p=0.016) when compared with the psychological group. The physical group was significantly more likely to have modified their symptom attribution toward a greater psychological role to their seizures (p=0.002), and their endorsement on the BIPQ item addressing "consequences" (How much do your seizures affect your life?) was significantly less severe (p'=0.014) when compared with that of the psychological group and the group with epilepsy. At 6months postdiagnosis, the physical group continued to experience significantly greater improvement in seizure intensity (p=0.007) while their seizure frequency no longer reached significant difference (p=0.078) when compared with the psychological group. The physical group continued to be significantly more likely to have modified their symptom attribution toward a greater psychological role to their seizures (p=0.005), and their endorsement on the BIPQ item addressing "consequences" remained significantly less severe (p'=0.037) when compared with the psychological group and the group with epilepsy. Among

  18. Seizures in patients with acute pesticide intoxication, with a focus on glufosinate ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S; Kim, D E; Park, S Y; Gil, H W; Hong, S Y

    2018-04-01

    The incidence and clinical aspects of seizures remain to be elucidated in patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The present study included subjects who ingested pesticide with the intention of committing suicide and were treated at Soonchunhyang University Hospital (Cheonan, Korea) between January 2011 and December 2014. We analyzed the incidence and characterized the type and frequency of seizure, from the medical records of 464 patients with acute pesticide intoxication, according to the pesticide class. The effect of seizure on the clinical outcome was assessed. The incidence of seizure was 31.5% in patients who ingested glufosinate ammonium {2-amino-4-[hydroxyl (methyl) phosphinoyl] butyrate; ammonium DL-homoalanin-4-yl (methyl) phosphinate}, followed by those who ingested pyrethroid (5.9%) or glycine derivatives (5.4%). All of the seizures developed between 12 and 24 h of pesticide ingestion and had ceased by 72 h after seizure initiation, following treatment with antiseizure medication. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were the most commonly observed (85.7% of the cases). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that the effect of seizure on mortality was not statistically significant. In conclusion, glufosinate ammonium herbicide is the most common seizurogenic pesticide class. Seizure itself was not a risk factor for mortality in patients with acute glufosinate ammonium intoxication.

  19. Seizure control following radiotherapy in patients with diffuse gliomas: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudà, Roberta; Magliola, Umberto; Bertero, Luca; Trevisan, Elisa; Bosa, Chiara; Mantovani, Cristina; Ricardi, Umberto; Castiglione, Anna; Monagheddu, Chiara; Soffietti, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Little information is available regarding the effect of conventional radiotherapy on glioma-related seizures. Methods In this retrospective study, we analyzed the seizure response and outcome following conventional radiotherapy in a cohort of 43 patients with glioma (33 grade II, 10 grade III) and medically intractable epilepsy. Results At 3 months after radiotherapy, seizure reduction was significant (≥50% reduction of frequency compared with baseline) in 31/43 patients (72%) of the whole series and in 25/33 patients (76%) with grade II gliomas, whereas at 12 months seizure reduction was significant in 26/34 (76%) and in 19/25 (76%) patients, respectively. Seizure reduction was observed more often among patients displaying an objective tumor response on MRI, but patients with no change on MRI also had a significant seizure reduction. Seizure freedom (Engel class I) was achieved at 12 months in 32% of all patients and in 38% of patients with grade II tumors. Timing of radiotherapy and duration of seizures prior to radiotherapy were significantly associated with seizure reduction. Conclusions This study showed that a high proportion of patients with medically intractable epilepsy from diffuse gliomas derive a significant and durable benefit from radiotherapy in terms of epilepsy control and that this positive effect is not strictly associated with tumor shrinkage as shown on MRI. Radiotherapy at tumor progression seems as effective as early radiotherapy after surgery. Prospective studies must confirm and better characterize the response to radiotherapy. PMID:23897633

  20. Effect of Antiepileptic Drugs for Acute and Chronic Seizures in Children with Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Lin Lin

    Full Text Available Encephalitis presents with seizures in the acute phase and increases the risk of late unprovoked seizures and epilepsy. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs in pediatric patients with acute seizures due to encephalitis and epilepsy.Cases of acute pediatric encephalitis between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Clinical data, including onset at age, seizure type, seizure frequency, effects of antiepileptic drugs, and prognosis were analyzed.During the study period, 1038 patients (450 girls, 588 boys were enrolled. Among them, 44.6% (463 had seizures in the acute phase, 33% had status epilepticus, and 26% (251 developed postencephalitic epilepsy. At one year of follow-up, 205 of the 251 patients with postencephalitic epilepsy were receiving antiepileptic drugs while 18% were seizure free even after discontinuing the antiepileptic drugs. Among those with postencephalitic epilepsy, 67% had favorable outcomes and were using <2 anti-epileptic drugs while 15% had intractable seizures and were using ≥ 2 antiepileptic drugs. After benzodiazepines, intravenous phenobarbital was preferred over phenytoin as treatment of postencephalitic seizures in the acute phase. For refractory status epilepticus, high-dose topiramate combined with intravenous high-dose phenobarbital or high-dose lidocaine had less side effects.Children with encephalitis have a high rate of postencephalitic epilepsy. Phenobarbital and clonazepam are the most common drugs used, alone or in combination, for postencephalitic epilepsy.

  1. Patients' and neurologists' perception of epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kimberley; Kandler, Rosalind; Reuber, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Although differences in illness perceptions between neurologists and patients with epilepsy or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are likely to be clinically relevant, this is the first study to attempt a direct comparison. In addition, this study compares the illness perceptions of patients with epilepsy with those of patients with PNES. Thirty-four patients with epilepsy, 40 patients with PNES, and 45 neurologists were recruited. All patient participants completed versions of the illness perception questionnaire revised (IPQ-R) adapted for epileptic or nonepileptic seizure disorders, single-item symptom attribution question (SAQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 (QOLIE-31), and Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS). Participating neurologists completed two versions of the IPQ-R and two SAQs for epileptic and nonepileptic seizure disorders. Differences in illness perceptions between patients with epilepsy and patients with PNES were minor compared to those between patients with either seizure disorder and neurologists. Neurologists considered both seizure disorders more treatable and more amenable to personal control than did the patients themselves. Neurologists had much more polarized views of the etiology of both conditions; whereas patients mostly considered the causes of their seizure disorders as partially "physical" and partially "psychological," neurologists perceived epilepsy as an essentially "physical" and PNES as a clearly "psychological" problem. There are considerable differences between the illness perceptions of patients with seizure disorders and their doctors, which could represent barriers to successful clinical management. In particular, a discrepancy between neurologists' and patients' beliefs about the personal control that patients may be able to exert over PNES could contribute to the confusion or anger some patients report after the diagnosis has been explained to them. Furthermore

  2. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianfoni, A.; Caulo, M.; Cerase, A.; Della Marca, G.; Falcone, C.; Di Lella, G.M.; Gaudino, S.; Edwards, J.; Colosimo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention

  3. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianfoni, A., E-mail: acianfoni@hotmail.com [Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland–Ospedale regionale Lugano, Via Tesserete 46, Lugano, 6900, CH (Switzerland); Caulo, M., E-mail: caulo@unich.it [Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, University of Chieti, Via dei Vestini 33, 6610 Chieti. Italy (Italy); Cerase, A., E-mail: alfonsocerase@gmail.com [Unit of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention NINT, Department of Neurological and Sensorineural Sciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico “Santa Maria alle Scotte”, V.le Bracci 16, Siena (Italy); Della Marca, G., E-mail: dellamarca@rm.unicatt.it [Neurology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Falcone, C., E-mail: carlo_falc@libero.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Di Lella, G.M., E-mail: gdilella@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Gaudino, S., E-mail: sgaudino@sirm.org [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Edwards, J., E-mail: edwardjc@musc.edu [Neuroscience Dept., Medical University of South Carolina, 96J Lucas st, 29425, Charleston, SC (United States); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.

  4. Prevalence and Complications of Drug-induced Seizures in Baharloo Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Behnoush

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizure is a frequent and important finding in the field of clinical toxicology. Almost all poisons and drugs can produce seizure. We have evaluated frequency and complications of drug-induced seizure in present study. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was done on patients who were referred to Baharloo Hospital, Tehran, Iran, that had developed seizure before or after hospitalization following intoxication between 20 March 2010 and 20 March 2011. The exclusion criteria were a positive history of epilepsy, head trauma, or abnormal findings in EEG or brain CT scan. Results: Tramadol and tricyclic antidepressants were the most common causes of drug-induced seizure (31.5% and 14.7% of the cases, respectively. Overall, 6 patients (4.2% had developed persistent vegetative state in consequence of brain hypoxia, 16 patients (11.2% had died due to complications of seizure or the poisoning itself. Tramadol was the leading cause of drug-induced seizure and its morbidity and mortality. Tonic-colonic seizure was the most common type of drug-induced seizure. Seizure had occurred once in 58% of the patients, twice in 37.1% of the patients, and had been revolutionized to status epilepticus in 4.9% of them. Among the 7 patients who had developed status epilepticus, 3 cases had died. Conclusion: Appropriate measures for treatment of seizure and prevention of its complications should be taken when patients with drug poisoning are admitted into hospital, especially when the offending drug(s has a higher likelihood to induce seizure.

  5. The effects of classic ketogenic diet on serum lipid profile in children with refractory seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Gholam Reza; Mohammadi, Mahmoud; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Karimi, Parviz; Mahmoudi, Maryam; Badv, Reza Shervin; Tavassoli, Ali Reza; Azizi Malamiri, Reza

    2016-12-01

    More than 25 % of children with epilepsy develop refractory seizures unresponsive to both old and new generation anticonvulsants. Since such seizures have a serious negative impact on the quality of life, other treatment options are considered. The ketogenic diet is a well-known treatment for managing refractory seizures, although its mechanism of action is unknown. Studies have shown that this diet is as good as, or better than, any of the newer medications in reducing seizure frequency. However, concerns about adverse effects have been raised. We conducted an open label trial to show the effects of this diet on serum lipid profile. Thirty-three children with refractory epilepsy were treated with the ketogenic diet and were followed for 6 months. Their serum lipid profile was assessed at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after initiating the diet. Seizure frequency was reduced in 63 % of children (no seizures in 2/33 and reduced >50 % in 19/33). However, after 6 months of administering the diet, median triglyceride was significantly increased (from 84 to 180 mg/dl, P ketogenic diet in children with refractory seizures is effective in seizure reduction, but leads to development of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia.

  6. Forced eye closure-induced reflex seizure and non-ketotic hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiras, Raziye; Mutlu, Aytul; Ozben, Serkan; Aydemir Tuba; Ozerab, Feriha

    2009-01-01

    We report an uncommon case of 53-year-old female patient with partial seizure induced by forced voluntary eye closure due to non-ketotic hyperglycemia. The initial laboratory tests showed an elevated blood glucose level of 550 mg/dL but no evidence of ketosis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal. When the blood glucose levels decreased slowly to about 150 mg/dL in five days, the seizures ended completely. No anticonvulsants were used. Since seizures are generally refractory to antiepileptic medication, control of blood glucose is essential. (author)

  7. Hyponatraemia and seizures after ecstasy use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, S.; Banerjee, A.; Alexander, W.

    1999-01-01

    A patient presented to our unit with seizures and profound hyponatraemia after ingestion of a single tablet of ecstasy. The seizures proved resistant to therapy and ventilation on the intensive care unit was required. Resolution of the seizures occurred on correction of the metabolic abnormalities. The pathogenesis of seizures and hyponatraemia after ecstasy use is discussed. Ecstasy use should be considered in any young patient presenting with unexplained seizures and attention should be directed towards electrolyte levels, particularly sodium.


Keywords: ecstasy; seizures; hyponatraemia PMID:10396584

  8. About one-half of adults with active epilepsy and seizures have annual family incomes under $25,000: The 2010 and 2013 US National Health Interview Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us Centers For Disease Control And Prevention Epilepsy Program

    2016-05-01

    People with active epilepsy are those who reported being told that they have epilepsy or a seizure disorder and either take antiseizure medication or have had a seizure during the past 12months. We used combined 2010 and 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data on US adults with active epilepsy to examine whether taking medications and seizure frequency differed by sex, age, race/ethnicity, and reported or imputed annual family income. Of adults with active epilepsy, 45.5% reported taking medication and having at least one seizure, 41.3% reported taking medication and having no seizures, and 13.2% reported not taking any medication and having at least one seizure. About one-half of adults with active epilepsy and seizures have annual family incomes of less than $25,000. Promoting self-management supports and improved access to specialty care may reduce the burden of uncontrolled seizures in adults with epilepsy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Gamma knife treatment for refractory epilepsy in seizure focus localized by positron emission tomography/CT★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xia; Wang, Xuemei; Wang, Hongwei; Zhao, Shigang; Han, Xiaodong; Hao, Linjun; Wang, Xiangcheng

    2012-01-01

    A total of 80 patients with refractory epilepsy were recruited from the Inner Mongolia Medical College Affiliated Hospital. The foci of 60% of the patients could be positioned using a combined positron emission tomography/CT imaging modality. Hyper- and hypometabolism foci were examined as part of this study. Patients who had abnormal metabolism in positron emission tomography/CT imaging were divided into intermittent-phase group and the seizure-phase group. The intermittent-phase group was further divided into a single-focus group and a multiple-foci group according to the number of seizure foci detected by imaging. Following gamma knife treatment, seizure frequency was significantly lower in the intermittent-phase group and the seizure-phase group. Wieser’s classification reached Grade I or II in nearly 40% of patients. Seizure frequency was significantly lower following treatment, but Wieser’s classification score was significantly higher in the seizure-phase group compared with the intermittent-phase group. Seizure frequency was significantly lower following treatment in the single-focus group, but Wieser’s classification score was significantly higher in the single-focus group as compared with the multiple-foci group. PMID:25317147

  10. MANAGEMENT OF A REEVE'S MUNTJAC ( MUNTIACUS REEVESI) WITH SEIZURES USING LEVETIRACETAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Emily R; Seeley, Kathryn E; Lovett, Mathew C; Junge, Randall E

    2017-12-01

    This report describes the diagnosis and management of idiopathic epilepsy in a 4-yr-old intact female Reeve's muntjac ( Muntiacus reevesi). The patient was initially witnessed to have isolated paroxysmal events consistent with epileptic seizures (altered consciousness, lateral recumbency, tonic/clonic movement of limbs) lasting less than 3 min with an immediate return to normal consciousness. The seizure frequency increased to >3 seizures within 24 hr and phenobarbital 3 mg/kg orally every 12 hr was started. Because of continued epileptic seizures and low serum phenobarbital levels, the dose was increased until significant elevations of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were detected. Levetiracetam 40 mg/kg orally every 12 hr was initiated and the phenobarbital was weaned and discontinued. One breakthrough seizure has been witnessed in the 10 mo since starting levetiracetam.

  11. Electroencephalographic characterization of seizure activity in the synapsin I/II double knockout mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etholm, Lars; Lindén, Henrik; Eken, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of the behavioral and electrophysiological development of seizure activity in mice genetically depleted of synapsin I and synapsin II (SynDKO mice), based on combined video and surface EEG recordings. SynDKO mice develop handling-induced epileptic seizures...... at the age of 2months. The seizures show a very regular behavioral pattern, where activity is initially dominated by truncal muscle contractions followed by various myoclonic elements. Whereas seizure behavior goes through clearly defined transitions, cortical activity as reflected by EEG recordings shows...... a more gradual development with respect to the emergence of different EEG components and the frequency of these components. No EEG pattern was seen to define a particular seizure behavior. However, myoclonic activity was characterized by more regular patterns of combined sharp waves and spikes. Where...

  12. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Conradsen, I.; Moldovan, M.

    2014-01-01

    , median frequency (MF), coherence, and duration of the seizures, of the clonic EMG discharges, and of the silent periods between the cloni. Based on wavelet analysis, we distinguished between a low-frequency component (LF 2-8 Hz) and a high-frequency component (HF 64-256 Hz). Results: Duration...... without rhythmic clonic movements....

  13. Spectrum and immediate outcome of seizures in neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memon, S; Mohd, M; Hussain, A [Liaquat Univ. of Medical and Health Sciences, Hyderabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Paediatrics

    2006-11-15

    To determine the frequency, etiology, the clinical types, and outcome of seizures in neonates during the course of stay in the neonatal unit. All neonates (1-28 days) presented with seizures during that period were included in the study. Their detailed history, physical examination, and appropriate investigations were recorded on a study proforma. Out of a total 680 patients, 100 patients presented with the seizures; this comprises the frequency of 14.7%. Male to female ratio was 2.1:1. Regarding gestational age, 65% were full-term, 31% were pre-term, and 4% were post-term. Regarding etiology, 40% patients had birth asphyxia; 14% had hypoglycemia; 12% were due to hypocalcaemia, 5% were due to intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), 4% had malformation, 10 % had infection /neonatal sepsis, and in 12%, the etiology was kernicterus. Among the patients with seizures, 45% were completely recovered and discharged and 15% patients had neurological deficit at the time of discharge. From the hospitalized 100 patients, 22% expired. The critical factors for the outcome were etiology, gestational age, birth weight, APGAR score, and clinical characteristics. Generally, birth asphyxia had poor, while metabolic causes had good prognosis. (author)

  14. Spectrum and immediate outcome of seizures in neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, S.; Mohd, M.; Hussain, A.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the frequency, etiology, the clinical types, and outcome of seizures in neonates during the course of stay in the neonatal unit. All neonates (1-28 days) presented with seizures during that period were included in the study. Their detailed history, physical examination, and appropriate investigations were recorded on a study proforma. Out of a total 680 patients, 100 patients presented with the seizures; this comprises the frequency of 14.7%. Male to female ratio was 2.1:1. Regarding gestational age, 65% were full-term, 31% were pre-term, and 4% were post-term. Regarding etiology, 40% patients had birth asphyxia; 14% had hypoglycemia; 12% were due to hypocalcaemia, 5% were due to intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), 4% had malformation, 10 % had infection /neonatal sepsis, and in 12%, the etiology was kernicterus. Among the patients with seizures, 45% were completely recovered and discharged and 15% patients had neurological deficit at the time of discharge. From the hospitalized 100 patients, 22% expired. The critical factors for the outcome were etiology, gestational age, birth weight, APGAR score, and clinical characteristics. Generally, birth asphyxia had poor, while metabolic causes had good prognosis. (author)

  15. CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF NEW - ONSET EPILETIC SEIZURES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalapathi Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is one of the most familiar neurological disorders which can cause bodily injury and death from inadequately treated or untreated cases. The imaging and EEG of new onset seizures is done with different indications, to identify an acute illness as the underline course for the seizure and possible neurological deficit. To this purpose we have evaluated new onset seizures in adult patients in correlation with their clinical profile, Electroencephalography (EEG and Computerized tomography (CT imaging of brain. METHODS: This cro ss sectional study was studied in 100 adult patients, presenting with seizures attending the Emergency department, General Medicine and Neurology wards and OPD of Tertiary care teaching hospital during the period of March 2006 to March 2008. All the patien ts were examined clinically and subjected to CT imaging of brain and EEG. Other necessary blood investigations were also done. Correlation between various seizures and CT scan brain and EEG were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data . RESULTS: 63% of patients were in the age group of 20 - 39 years, 63% were males and 37% were females. 65% presented with GTCS, 35% with partial seizures. CT scan was found abnormal in 49.2% patients in GTCS, 71.4% in partial seizures. EEG showed abnormal p attern in 39% patients. 40% of the patients with partial seizures had epileptic form discharges. 33% patients had focal lesions on CT brain with normal EEG. CONCLUSION: Generalized Tonic clonic seizures were the commonest type of seizures was present, seen mostly in male patients. CT scan brain was abnormal in 57% of the patients. Neurocysticercosis and calcified granuloma were the commonest causes for seizures up to 3 rd decade of life. Majority of the patients with focal lesions on CT scan brain had epileptic form discharges on EEG which indicate a strong correlation of EEG with CT findings. Initiating the treatment with antiepileptic drugs was

  16. Comparing renal function preservation after laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for clinical T1a renal tumor: using a 3D parenchyma measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Huang, Jiwei; Wang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruiyun; Kong, Wen; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Chen, Yonghui; Zhang, Jin

    2017-05-01

    To compare the renal function preservation between laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Data were analyzed from 246 patients who underwent laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for solitary cT1a renal cell carcinoma from January 2013 to July 2015. To reduce the intergroup difference, we used a 1:1 propensity matching analysis. The functional renal parenchyma volume preservation were measured preoperative and 12 months after surgery. The total renal function recovery and spilt GFR was compared. Multivariable logistic analysis was used for predictive factors for renal function decline. After 1:1 propensity matching, each group including 100 patients. Patients in the laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation had a smaller decrease in estimate glomerular filtration rate at 1 day (-7.88 vs -20.01%, p renal parenchyma volume preservation (89.19 vs 84.27%, p renal parenchyma volume preservation, warm ischemia time and baseline renal function were the important independent factors in determining long-term functional recovery. The laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation technology has unique advantage and potential in preserving renal parenchyma without ischemia damage compared to conventional laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, and had a better outcome, thus we recommend this technique in selected T1a patients.

  17. Aminophylline increases seizure length during electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L; Dannon, P N; Hirschmann, S; Schriber, S; Amytal, D; Dolberg, O T; Grunhaus, L

    1999-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be one of the most effective treatments for patients with major depression and persistent psychosis. Seizure characteristics probably determine the therapeutic effect of ECT; as a consequence, short seizures are accepted as one of the factors of poor outcome. During most ECT courses seizure threshold increases and seizure duration decreases. Methylxanthine preparations, caffeine, and theophylline have been used to prolong seizure duration. The use of aminophylline, more readily available than caffeine, has not been well documented. The objective of this study was to test the effects of aminophylline on seizure length. Fourteen drug-free patients with diagnoses of affective disorder or psychotic episode receiving ECT participated in this study. Seizure length was assessed clinically and per EEG. Statistical comparisons were done using paired t tests. A significant increase (p < 0.04) in seizure length was achieved and maintained on three subsequent treatments with aminophylline. No adverse events were noted from the addition of aminophylline.

  18. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M.D. Epileptic seizures are more common in ... controlled with anti-seizure medication. With B Mark Keegan, M.D. Lund C, et al. Multiple sclerosis ...

  19. Etiology and Outcome of Neonatal Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The prognostic value of seizure etiology, neurologic examination, EEG, and neuroimaging in the neurodevelopmental outcome of 89 term infants with neonatal seizures was determined at the Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

  20. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen

  1. Seizures in E200K familial and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, S; Chapman, J; Cohen, O S; Rosenmann, H; Nitsan, Z; Blatt, I

    2015-03-01

    Although seizures (other than myoclonus) are frequently reported in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), their frequency, clinical manifestations, and effect on the disease course is unknown. To characterize the frequency of seizures in E200K familial and sporadic CJD, to describe its semiology, EEG and MRI findings. In this retrospective study, we reviewed all patients with CJD who were seen in the Sheba Medical Center between the years 2003-2012 and underwent clinical evaluation, genetic testing, EEG and MRI studies. The diagnosis of seizures was carried out based on documentation of episodes consistent with seizures or episode of unresponsiveness correlated with ictal activity in EEG. Sixty-four probable patients with CJD were included in the study, 57 (89%) with E200K familial (fCJD) and 7 (11%) with sporadic (sCJD). Seizures occurred in 8 patients: 3 of 7 (43%) in patients with sCJD compared to 5/57 (9%) in patients with E200K fCJD (P = 0.04, chi-square test). Two of E200K fCJD patients with seizures had other non-prion etiologies for seizures (brain metastasis, known history of temporal lobe epilepsy which started 44 years before the diagnosis of CJD). Seizures occurred late in the course of the disease with an average of 12 days between the onset of seizures and death. Seizures in E200K fCJD were infrequent and occurred late in the disease course. This difference suggests that E200K fCJD represents a separate subtype of the disease with distinct clinical characteristics. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Eslicarbazepine acetate add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xian-Chao; Yuan, Hai; Wang, Yi; Xu, Hui-Qin; Hong, Wen-Ke; Zheng, Rong-Yuan

    2017-10-25

    This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review published in the Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12.The majority of people with epilepsy have a good prognosis, but up to 30% of people continue to have seizures despite several regimens of antiepileptic drugs. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of ESL when used as an add-on treatment for people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. The searches for the original review were run in November 2011. Subsequently, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (6 December 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11) and MEDLINE (1946 to 6 December 2016). There were no language restrictions. We reviewed the reference lists of retrieved studies to search for additional reports of relevant studies. We also contacted the manufacturers of ESL and experts in the field for information about any unpublished or ongoing studies. Randomized placebo controlled double-blind add-on trials of ESL in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes investigated included 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency, seizure freedom, treatment withdrawal, adverse effects, and drug interactions. Primary analyses were by intention to treat (ITT). The dose-response relationship was evaluated in regression models. We included five trials (1799 participants) rated at low risk of bias; all studies were funded by BIAL. The overall risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency was 1.71 (95% CI 1.42 to 2.05). Dose regression analysis showed evidence that ESL reduced seizure frequency with an increase in efficacy with increasing doses of ESL. ESL was significantly associated with seizure freedom

  3. Predicting seizure by modeling synaptic plasticity based on EEG signals - a case study of inherited epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui; Su, Jianzhong; Wang, Qingyun; Liu, Yueming; Good, Levi; Pascual, Juan M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores the internal dynamical mechanisms of epileptic seizures through quantitative modeling based on full brain electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Our goal is to provide seizure prediction and facilitate treatment for epileptic patients. Motivated by an earlier mathematical model with incorporated synaptic plasticity, we studied the nonlinear dynamics of inherited seizures through a differential equation model. First, driven by a set of clinical inherited electroencephalogram data recorded from a patient with diagnosed Glucose Transporter Deficiency, we developed a dynamic seizure model on a system of ordinary differential equations. The model was reduced in complexity after considering and removing redundancy of each EEG channel. Then we verified that the proposed model produces qualitatively relevant behavior which matches the basic experimental observations of inherited seizure, including synchronization index and frequency. Meanwhile, the rationality of the connectivity structure hypothesis in the modeling process was verified. Further, through varying the threshold condition and excitation strength of synaptic plasticity, we elucidated the effect of synaptic plasticity to our seizure model. Results suggest that synaptic plasticity has great effect on the duration of seizure activities, which support the plausibility of therapeutic interventions for seizure control.

  4. Morphine potentiates seizures induced by GABA antagonists and attenuates seizures induced by electroshock in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, F; Gale, K

    1983-11-25

    In a naloxone-reversible, dose-dependent manner, morphine (10-50 mg/kg i.p.) protected against seizures induced by maximal electroshock and increased the incidence and severity of seizures induced by bicuculline, in rats. Morphine also potentiated seizures induced by isoniazid and by picrotoxin. Thus, opiate activity influences the expression of seizures in contrasting ways depending upon the mode of seizure induction. Since morphine consistently potentiated seizures induced by interference with GABA transmission, it appears that GABAergic systems may be of particular significance for the elucidation of the varied effects of morphine on seizure susceptibility.

  5. WITHDRAWN: Oxcarbazepine add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sergio M; Schmidt, Dieter B; White, Sarah; Shukralla, Arif

    2016-11-15

    Most people with epilepsy have a good prognosis and their seizures can be well controlled with the use of a single antiepileptic drug, but up to 30% develop refractory epilepsy, especially those with partial seizures. In this review we summarize the current evidence regarding oxcarbazepine when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. To evaluate the effects of oxcarbazepine when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (28 March 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2006). No language restrictions were imposed. We checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for additional reports of relevant studies. We also contacted Novartis (manufacturers of oxcarbazepine) and experts in the field. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, add-on trials of oxcarbazepine in patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and extracted the relevant data. The following outcomes were assessed : (a) 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency; (b) treatment withdrawal (any reason); (c) side effects. Primary analyses were intention-to-treat. Summary odds ratios were estimated for each outcome. Two trials were included representing 961 randomized patients.Overall Odds Ratio (OR) (95% Confidence Interval (CIs)) for 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency compared to placebo 2.96 (2.20, 4.00).Treatment withdrawal OR (95% CIs) compared to placebo 2.17 (1.59, 2.97).Side effects: OR (99% CIs) compared to placebo, ataxia 2.93 (1.72, 4.99); dizziness 3.05 (1.99, 4.67); fatigue 1.80 (1.02, 3.19); nausea 2.88 (1.77, 4.69); somnolence 2.55 (1.84, 3.55); diplopia 4.32 (2.65, 7.04), were significantly associated with oxcarbazepine. Oxcarbazepine has efficacy as an add-on treatment in patients with drug

  6. A new potential AED, carisbamate, substantially reduces spontaneous motor seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstatter, Heidi L.; Dudek, F. Edward

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Animal models with spontaneous epileptic seizures may be useful in the discovery of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of carisbamate on spontaneous motor seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. Methods Repeated, low-dose (5 mg/kg), intraperitoneal injections of kainate were administered every hour until each male Sprague-Dawley rat had experienced convulsive status epilepticus for at least 3 h. Five 1-month trials (n= 8–10 rats) assessed the effects of 0.3, 1, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg carisbamate on spontaneous seizures. Each trial involved six AED-versus-vehicle tests comprised of carisbamate or 10% solutol-HS-15 treatments administered as intraperitoneal injections on alternate days with a recovery day between each treatment day. Results Carisbamate significantly reduced motor seizure frequency at doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg, and caused complete seizure cessation during the 6-h post-drug epoch in 7 of 8 animals at 30 mg/kg. The effects of carisbamate (0.3–30 mg/kg) on spontaneous motor seizures appeared dose dependent. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that a repeated-measures, cross-over protocol in animal models with spontaneous seizures is an effective method for testing AEDs. Carisbamate reduced the frequency of spontaneous motor seizures in a dose-dependent manner, and was more effective than topiramate at reducing seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. PMID:18494790

  7. Trial of Cannabidiol for Drug-Resistant Seizures in the Dravet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Cross, J Helen; Laux, Linda; Marsh, Eric; Miller, Ian; Nabbout, Rima; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Wright, Stephen

    2017-05-25

    The Dravet syndrome is a complex childhood epilepsy disorder that is associated with drug-resistant seizures and a high mortality rate. We studied cannabidiol for the treatment of drug-resistant seizures in the Dravet syndrome. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 120 children and young adults with the Dravet syndrome and drug-resistant seizures to receive either cannabidiol oral solution at a dose of 20 mg per kilogram of body weight per day or placebo, in addition to standard antiepileptic treatment. The primary end point was the change in convulsive-seizure frequency over a 14-week treatment period, as compared with a 4-week baseline period. The median frequency of convulsive seizures per month decreased from 12.4 to 5.9 with cannabidiol, as compared with a decrease from 14.9 to 14.1 with placebo (adjusted median difference between the cannabidiol group and the placebo group in change in seizure frequency, -22.8 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -41.1 to -5.4; P=0.01). The percentage of patients who had at least a 50% reduction in convulsive-seizure frequency was 43% with cannabidiol and 27% with placebo (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% CI, 0.93 to 4.30; P=0.08). The patient's overall condition improved by at least one category on the seven-category Caregiver Global Impression of Change scale in 62% of the cannabidiol group as compared with 34% of the placebo group (P=0.02). The frequency of total seizures of all types was significantly reduced with cannabidiol (P=0.03), but there was no significant reduction in nonconvulsive seizures. The percentage of patients who became seizure-free was 5% with cannabidiol and 0% with placebo (P=0.08). Adverse events that occurred more frequently in the cannabidiol group than in the placebo group included diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue, pyrexia, somnolence, and abnormal results on liver-function tests. There were more withdrawals from the trial in the cannabidiol group. Among patients with

  8. Pretreatment seizure semiology in childhood absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Shinnar, Shlomo; Cnaan, Avital; Dlugos, Dennis; Conry, Joan; Hirtz, Deborah G; Hu, Fengming; Liu, Chunyan; Mizrahi, Eli M; Moshé, Solomon L; Clark, Peggy; Glauser, Tracy A

    2017-08-15

    To determine seizure semiology in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy and to evaluate associations with short-term treatment outcomes. For participants enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness trial, semiologic features of pretreatment seizures were analyzed as predictors of treatment outcome at the week 16 to 20 visit. Video of 1,932 electrographic absence seizures from 416 participants was evaluated. Median seizure duration was 10.2 seconds; median time between electrographic seizure onset and clinical manifestation onset was 1.5 seconds. For individual seizures and by participant, the most common semiology features were pause/stare (seizure 95.5%, participant 99.3%), motor automatisms (60.6%, 86.1%), and eye involvement (54.9%, 76.5%). The interrater agreement for motor automatisms and eye involvement was good (72%-84%). Variability of semiology features between seizures even within participants was high. Clustering analyses revealed 4 patterns (involving the presence/absence of eye involvement and motor automatisms superimposed on the nearly ubiquitous pause/stare). Most participants experienced more than one seizure cluster pattern. No individual semiologic feature was individually predictive of short-term outcome. Seizure freedom was half as likely in participants with one or more seizure having the pattern of eye involvement without motor automatisms than in participants without this pattern. Almost all absence seizures are characterized by a pause in activity or staring, but rarely is this the only feature. Semiologic features tend to cluster, resulting in identifiable absence seizure subtypes with significant intraparticipant seizure phenomenologic heterogeneity. One seizure subtype, pause/stare and eye involvement but no motor automatisms, is specifically associated with a worse treatment outcome. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Seizure control and improvement of neurological dysfunction in Lafora disease with perampanel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Dirani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lafora disease is a rare and fatal disease characterized by seizures, progressive cognitive and behavioral deterioration, as well as cerebellar dysfunction. Currently, there is no efficacious treatment that will control the seizures and improve the cognitive decline in this disease. We report a patient with Lafora disease who experienced a dramatic amelioration in her seizure frequency as well as the associated neurological and cognitive dysfunction following initiation of treatment with perampanel administered as monotherapy. Perampanel is the first potentially efficacious treatment for Lafora disease. We discuss a potential mechanism for the efficacy of perampanel in this disease.

  10. Towards Operational Definition of Postictal Stage: Spectral Entropy as a Marker of Seizure Ending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancor Sanz-García

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The postictal period is characterized by several neurological alterations, but its exact limits are clinically or even electroencephalographically hard to determine in most cases. We aim to provide quantitative functions or conditions with a clearly distinguishable behavior during the ictal-postictal transition. Spectral methods were used to analyze foramen ovale electrodes (FOE recordings during the ictal/postictal transition in 31 seizures of 15 patients with strictly unilateral drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. In particular, density of links, spectral entropy, and relative spectral power were analyzed. Partial simple seizures are accompanied by an ipsilateral increase in the relative Delta power and a decrease in synchronization in a 66% and 91% of the cases, respectively, after seizures offset. Complex partial seizures showed a decrease in the spectral entropy in 94% of cases, both ipsilateral and contralateral sides (100% and 73%, respectively mainly due to an increase of relative Delta activity. Seizure offset is defined as the moment at which the “seizure termination mechanisms” actually end, which is quantified in the spectral entropy value. We propose as a definition for the postictal start the time when the ipsilateral SE reaches the first global minimum.

  11. Seizure drawings: insight into the self-image of children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E; Havlena, Janice

    2003-02-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disorder that is associated with numerous psychological challenges, especially in children. Drawings have been underutilized as a method to obtain insight into psychological issues in children with epilepsy. We asked 105 children with epilepsy, ages 5 to 18 years, to draw a picture of what it is like to have a seizure. Across ages and epilepsy syndromes, the drawings showed evidence of impaired self-concept, low self-esteem, and a sense of helplessness and vulnerability. Overall, the drawings of human figures were less developed than expected for chronological age. In some drawings, indicators of underlying depression were found. When considered by epilepsy syndrome or seizure type, some specific artistic features were noted. Children with simple partial (motor) seizures drew distorted body parts, especially limbs. Those with complex partial seizures depicted sensory symptoms and mental status changes such as confusion. Children with generalized tonic-clonic seizures showed shaking extremities. Drawings by children with absence seizures illustrated mainly staring. In conclusion, drawings are a powerful method to examine the self-concept of children with epilepsy and gain insight into their feelings about themselves and their world.

  12. Absolute spike frequency as a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ly; Sperling, Michael R; Skidmore, Christopher; Mintzer, Scott; Nei, Maromi

    2017-04-01

    Frequent interictal epileptiform abnormalities may correlate with poor prognosis after temporal lobe resection for refractory epilepsy. To date, studies have focused on limited resections such as selective amygdalohippocampectomy and apical temporal lobectomy without hippocampectomy. However, it is unclear whether the frequency of spikes predicts outcome after standard anterior temporal lobectomy. Preoperative scalp video-EEG monitoring data from patients who subsequently underwent anterior temporal lobectomy over a three year period and were followed for at least one year were reviewed for the frequency of interictal epileptiform abnormalities. Surgical outcome for those patients with frequent spikes (>60/h) was compared with those with less frequent spikes. Additionally, spike frequency was evaluated as a continuous variable and correlated with outcome to determine if increased spike frequency correlated with worse outcome, as assessed by modified Engel Class outcome. Forty-seven patients (18 men, 29 women; mean age 40 years at surgery) were included. Forty-six patients had standard anterior temporal lobectomy (24 right, 22 left) and one had a modified left temporal lobectomy. There was no significant difference in seizure outcome between those with frequent (57% Class I) vs. those with less frequent (58% Class I) spikes. Increased spike frequency did not correlate with worse outcome. Greater than 20 complex partial seizures/month and generalized tonic-clonic seizures within one year of surgery correlated with worse outcome. This study suggests that absolute spike frequency does not predict seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy unlike in selective procedures, and should not be used as a prognostic factor in this population. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Electroencephalography after a single unprovoked seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debicki, Derek B

    2017-07-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation of seizure disorders. In particular, EEG is used as an additional investigation for a single unprovoked seizure. Epileptiform abnormalities are related to seizure disorders and have been shown to predict recurrent unprovoked seizures (i.e., a clinical definition of epilepsy). Thus, the identification of epileptiform abnormalities after a single unprovoked seizure can inform treatment options. The current review addresses the relationship between EEG abnormalities and seizure recurrence. This review also addresses factors that are found to improve the yield of recording epileptiform abnormalities including timing of EEG relative to the new-onset seizure, use of repeat studies, use of sleep deprivation and prolonged recordings. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Seizure control of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for non-hemorrhagic arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Y.J.; Lee, C.Y.; Koh, J.S.; Kim, T.S.; Kim, G.K.; Rhee, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    Although radiosurgery has been found to be a safe and effective alternative treatment, seizure outcome of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) radiosurgery has not been documented in detail. We report the effect of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) on seizures associated with AVMs and discuss the various factors that influence the prognosis. Between 1992 and 2001 246 patients were treated with GKRS for AVMs at Kyung-Hee medical center. Forty five (17.0 %) patients have non-hemorrhagic AVMs and presenting symptom was seizure. Two patients of all were excluded from this study due to loss of follow-up after radiosurgery. In this study retrospective analysis of clinical characteristics, radiological findings, radiosurgical seizure outcome were performed. There were 32 male and 11 female with age ranging from 10 to 74 years (mean 35 years). Type of seizure included: general tonic clonic (n = 28); focal motor or sensory (n = 7): partial complex (n = 8). The location of AVM was temporal (n = 18); frontal (n = 9): deep seated (n =7): parietal (n = 5); occipital (n = 4). Follow-up period was from 8 months to 12 years (mean 46 months). Mean volume was 6.2 cc (2.7-20), mean marginal and maximal dosage was 19.5 (17-26) and 36.6 Gy (13-50). During follow-up after radiosurgical treatment, 23 (53.5 %) of 43 patients were seizure-free. 10 (23.3 %) had significant improvement, were unchanged in 8 (18.6 %) and aggravated in 2 (4.6 %) patients. In 33 patients, follow-up angiography or MRI was performed. Complete obliteration was achieved in 16 (49.0 %) patients, partial obliteration in 13 (39.0 %). Four were unchanged (12.0 %). Of 33 patients with follow-up performed, 26 were followed for over 2 years. Eleven (84.6 %) of 13 patients with complete obliteration were seizure-free (p < 0.005). Four (36.3 %) of 13 with partial obliteration and unchanged remained seizure-free. Fifteen patients had experienced intractable seizure before radiosurgery. After radiosurgery, seizures disappeared in 8

  15. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui-Juan; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Cui, Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to discuss the clinical features of seizure semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Children with lesional TLE received presurgical evaluation for intractable epilepsy. They were followed up for more than one year after temporal lobectomy. We reviewed the medical history and video-EEG monitoring of children with TLE to analyze the semiology of seizures and EEG findings and compared the semiology of seizures and EEG findings of childhood TLE and adult TLE. A total of 84 seizures were analyzed in 11 children (aged 23-108 months). The age of seizure onset was from 1 month to 26 months (a mean of 17.6 months). All of the patients exhibited prominent motor manifestations including epileptic spasm, tonic seizure, and unilateral clonic seizure. Seven children manifested behavioral arrest similar to an automotor seizure in adult TLE but with a shorter duration and higher frequency. The automatisms were typically orofacial, whereas manual automatisms were rarely observed. The EEG recordings revealed that diffuse discharge patterns were more common in younger children, whereas focal or unilateral patterns were more typical in older children. All of the patients were seizure-free after temporal lobectomy with more than one-year follow-up. All of the children had a mental development delay or regression; however, there was improvement after surgery, especially in those with surgery performed early. In contrast to TLE in adults, young children with lesional TLE probably represent a distinct nosological and probably less homogeneous syndrome. Although they had generalized clinical and electrographic features, resective epilepsy surgery should be considered as early as possible to obtain seizure control and improvement in mental development. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Seizure-related hospital admissions, readmissions and costs: Comparisons with asthma and diabetes in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Michelle L; Barton, Christopher; McCaffrey, Nikki; Parker, Denise; Hutchinson, Claire

    2017-08-01

    Seizures are listed as an Ambulatory Care Sensitive Condition (ACSC), where, in some cases, hospitalisation may be avoided with appropriate preventative and early management in primary care. We examined the frequencies, trends and financial costs of first and subsequent seizure-related hospital admissions in the adult and paediatric populations, with comparisons to bronchitis/asthma and diabetes admissions in South Australia between 2012 and 2014. De-identified hospital separation data from five major public hospitals in metropolitan South Australia were analysed to determine the number of children and adults admitted for the following Australian Refined Diagnosis Related Groups: seizure related conditions; bronchitis/asthma; and diabetes. Additional data included length of hospital stay and type of admission. Demographic data were analysed to identify whether social determinants influence admission, and a macro costing approach was then applied to calculate the financial costs to the Health Care System. The rate of total seizure hospitalizations was 649 per 100,000; lower than bronchitis/asthma (751/100,000), yet higher than diabetes (500/100,000). The highest proportions of subsequent separations were recorded by children with seizures regardless of complexity (47% +CSCC; 17% -CSCC) compared with asthma (11% +CSCC; 14% -CSCC) or diabetes (14% +CSCC; 13% -CSCC), and by adults with seizures with catastrophic or severe complications/comorbidity (25%), compared with diabetes (22%) or asthma (14%). The mean cost per separation in both children and adults was highest for diabetes (AU$4438/$7656), followed by seizures (AU$2408/$5691) and asthma (AU$2084/$3295). Following the lead of well-developed and resourced health promotion initiatives in asthma and diabetes, appropriate primary care, community education and seizure management services (including seizure clinics) should be targeted in an effort to reduce seizure related hospitalisations which may be avoidable

  17. Laboratory findings in neurosyphilis patients with epileptic seizures alone as the initial presenting symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Man-Li; Liu, Li-Li; Zeng, Yan-Li; Zhang, Hui-Lin; Liu, Gui-Li; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Dong, Jie; Wu, Jing-Yi; Su, Yuan-Hui; Lin, Li-Rong; Yang, Tian-Ci

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective chart review was performed to characterize the clinical presentation, the characteristic combination of serologic and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormalities, and the neuroimaging findings of neurosyphilis (NS) patients who had epileptic seizures alone as an initial presenting symptom. In a 6.75-year period, 169 inpatients with NS were identified at Zhongshan Hospital (from June 2005 to February 2012). We demonstrated that 13 (7.7%) of the 169 NS patients had epileptic seizures alone as an initial presenting feature. Epileptic seizures occurred in NS patients with syphilitic meningitis (2 cases), meningovascular NS (5 cases), and general paresis (6 cases). The types of epileptic seizures included simple partial, complex partial with secondary generalization (including status epilepticus), and generalized seizures (no focal onset reported). Nine of NS patients with only epileptic seizures as primary symptom were misdiagnosed, and the original misdiagnosis was 69.23% (9/13). Ten (10/13, 76.9%) patients had an abnormal magnetic resonance imaging, and 7 (7/13 53.8%) patients had abnormal electroencephalogram recordings. In addition, the sera rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) from all 13 patients were positive. The overall positive rates of the CSF-RPR and CSF-TPPA were 61.5% and 69.2%, respectively. Three patients demonstrated CSF pleocytosis, and 9 patients exhibited elevated CSF protein levels. Therefore, NS with only epileptic seizures at the initial presentation exhibits a lack of specificity. It is recommended that every patient with clinically evident symptoms of epileptic seizures should have a blood test performed for syphilis. When the serology results are positive, all of the patients should undergo a CSF examination to diagnose NS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Seizures triggered by food intake in antimuscarinic-treated fasted animals: evaluation of the experimental findings in terms of similarities to eating-triggered epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye

    2010-07-01

    Food intake triggers convulsions in fasted mice and rats treated with antimuscarinic drugs, scopolamine or atropine. Bearing some similarities in triggering factor and manifestations of the seizures in patients with eating-evoked epilepsy, seizures in fasted animals may provide insight into the mechanism(s) of this rare and partially controlled form of reflex epilepsy.

  19. Deletions in 16p13 including GRIN2A in patients with intellectual disability, various dysmorphic features, and seizure disorders of the rolandic region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reutlinger, C.; Helbig, I.; Gawelczyk, B.; Subero, J.I.; Tonnies, H.; Muhle, H.; Finsterwalder, K.; Vermeer, S.; Pfundt, R.; Sperner, J.; Stefanova, I.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Spiczak, S. von; Baalen, A. van; Boor, R.; Siebert, R.; Stephani, U.; Caliebe, A.

    2010-01-01

    Seizure disorders of the rolandic region comprise a spectrum of different epilepsy syndromes ranging from benign rolandic epilepsy to more severe seizure disorders including atypical benign partial epilepsy/pseudo-Lennox syndrome,electrical status epilepticus during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner

  20. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  1. Temporal epilepsy seizures monitoring and prediction using cross-correlation and chaos theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Tahar; Ben-Hamida, Naim; Talbi, Larbi; Lakhssassi, Ahmed; Aouini, Sadok

    2014-01-01

    Temporal seizures due to hippocampal origins are very common among epileptic patients. Presented is a novel seizure prediction approach employing correlation and chaos theories. The early identification of seizure signature allows for various preventive measures to be undertaken. Electro-encephalography signals are spectrally broken down into the following sub-bands: delta; theta; alpha; beta; and gamma. The proposed approach consists of observing a high correlation level between any pair of electrodes for the lower frequencies and a decrease in the Lyapunov index (chaos or entropy) for the higher frequencies. Power spectral density and statistical analysis tools were used to determine threshold levels for the lower frequencies. After studying all five sub-bands, the analysis has revealed that the seizure signature can be extracted from the delta band and the high frequencies. High frequencies are defined as both the gamma band and the ripples occurring within the 60-120 Hz sub-band. To validate the proposed approach, six patients from both sexes and various age groups with temporal epilepsies originating from the hippocampal area were studied using the Freiburg database. An average seizure prediction of 30 min, an anticipation accuracy of 72%, and a false-positive rate of 0% were accomplished throughout 200 h of recording time.

  2. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Neonatal Seizure Models to Study Epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kasahara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current therapeutic strategies for epilepsy include anti-epileptic drugs and surgical treatments that are mainly focused on the suppression of existing seizures rather than the occurrence of the first spontaneous seizure. These symptomatic treatments help a certain proportion of patients, but these strategies are not intended to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the primary process of epilepsy development, i.e., epileptogenesis. Epileptogenic changes include reorganization of neural and glial circuits, resulting in the formation of an epileptogenic focus. To achieve the goal of developing “anti-epileptogenic” drugs, we need to clarify the step-by-step mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis for patients whose seizures are not controllable with existing “anti-epileptic” drugs. Epileptogenesis has been studied using animal models of neonatal seizures because such models are useful for studying the latent period before the occurrence of spontaneous seizures and the lowering of the seizure threshold. Further, neonatal seizure models are generally easy to handle and can be applied for in vitro studies because cells in the neonatal brain are suitable for culture. Here, we review two animal models of neonatal seizures for studying epileptogenesis and discuss their features, specifically focusing on hypoxia-ischemia (HI-induced seizures and febrile seizures (FSs. Studying these models will contribute to identifying the potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers of epileptogenesis.

  4. Controlled-release oxycodone-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Moti; Rudich, Zvia; Gurevich, Boris; Lifshitz, Matityahu; Brill, Silviu; Lottan, Michael; Weksler, Natan

    2005-11-01

    The use of the opioid oxycodone hydrochloride in the management of chronic pain is gaining popularity principally because of its tolerability. However, opioid-related seizure in patients with epilepsy or other conditions that may decrease seizure threshold has been described in the literature; in particular, oxycodone has been associated with seizure in a patient with acute renal failure. The aim of this article was to report a patient with a history of seizures but normal renal and hepatic function who developed seizure on 2 occasions after oxycodone ingestion. A 54-year-old male patient presented with a history of tonic-clonic seizures that developed immediately after intracranial surgery. Long-term treatment with carbamazepine 400 mg QD was started, and the patient was free of convulsions for approximately 7 years. The patient presented to us with severe headache that was nonresponsive to an NSAID and the opiate agonist tramadol. Treatment with controlled-release (CR) oxycodone and tramadol drops (50 mg QID if necessary) was started, and tonic-clonic seizures developed 3 days later. Based on laboratory analysis, the patient had normal renal and hepatic function. On discontinuation of oxycodone treatment, the seizures resolved. However, due to effective pain relief with oxycodone, the patient decided to continue treatment, and seizures recurred. Carbamazepine was then administered 4 hours before oxycodone dosing, which allowed continuation of treatment without seizure. A patient with a history of seizures controlled with long-term carbamazepine therapy developed seizures when he started treatment with oxycodone CR at recommended doses. Oxycodone CR should be used with extreme caution in patients with epilepsy or other conditions that may decrease seizure threshold.

  5. Soy infant formula and seizures in children with autism: a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara J Westmark

    Full Text Available Seizures are a common phenotype in many neurodevelopmental disorders including fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome and autism. We hypothesized that phytoestrogens in soy-based infant formula were contributing to lower seizure threshold in these disorders. Herein, we evaluated the dependence of seizure incidence on infant formula in a population of autistic children. Medical record data were obtained on 1,949 autistic children from the SFARI Simplex Collection. An autism diagnosis was determined by scores on the ADI-R and ADOS exams. The database included data on infant formula use, seizure incidence, the specific type of seizure exhibited and IQ. Soy-based formula was utilized in 17.5% of the study population. Females comprised 13.4% of the subjects. There was a 2.6-fold higher rate of febrile seizures [4.2% versus 1.6%, OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3-5.3], a 2.1-fold higher rate of epilepsy comorbidity [3.6% versus 1.7%, OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.1-4.7] and a 4-fold higher rate of simple partial seizures [1.2% versus 0.3%, OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.0-23] in the autistic children fed soy-based formula. No statistically significant associations were found with other outcomes including: IQ, age of seizure onset, infantile spasms and atonic, generalized tonic clonic, absence and complex partial seizures. Limitations of the study included: infant formula and seizure data were based on parental recall, there were significantly less female subjects, and there was lack of data regarding critical confounders such as the reasons the subjects used soy formula, age at which soy formula was initiated and the length of time on soy formula. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the use of soy-based infant formula may be associated with febrile seizures in both genders and with a diagnosis of epilepsy in males in autistic children. Given the lack of data on critical confounders and the retrospective nature of the study, a prospective study is

  6. Bipolar electrocoagulation on cortex after AVMs lesionectomy for seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong; Wang, Rong; Yang, Lijun; Bai, Qin; Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Jizong

    2011-01-01

    The findings of previous studies remain controversial on the optimal management required for effective seizure control after surgical excision of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We evaluated the efficacy of additional bipolar electrocoagulation on the electrically positive cortex guided by intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) for controlling cerebral AVMs-related epilepsy. Sixty consecutive patients with seizure due to cerebral AVMs, who underwent surgical excision of cerebral AVMs and intraoperative ECoG, were assessed. The AVMs and surrounding hemosiderin stained tissue were completely removed, and bipolar electrocoagulation was applied on the surrounding cerebral cortex where epileptic discharges were monitored via intraoperative ECoG. Patients were followed up at three to six months after the surgery and then annually. We evaluated seizure outcome by using Engel's classification and postoperative complications. Forty-nine patients (81.6%) were detected of epileptic discharges before and after AVMs excision. These patients underwent the removal of AVMs plus bipolar electrocoagulation on spike-positive site cortex. After electrocoagulation, 45 patients' epileptic discharges disappeared, while four obviously diminished. Fifty-five of 60 patients (91.7%) had follow-up lasting at least 22 months (mean 51.1 months; range 22-93 months). Determined by the Engel Seizure Outcome Scale, 39 patients (70.9%) were Class I, seven (12.7%) Class II, five (9.0%) Class III, and four (7.2%) Class IV. Even after the complete removal of AVM and surrounding gliotic and hemosiderin stained tissue, a high-frequency residual spike remained on the surrounding cerebral cortex. Effective surgical seizure control can be achieved by carrying out additional bipolar electrocoagulation on the cortex guided by the intraoperative ECoG.

  7. Seizure outcomes in non-resective epilepsy surgery: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Birk, Harjus; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    In approximately 30% of patients with epilepsy, seizures are refractory to medical therapy, leading to significant morbidity and increased mortality. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the benefit of surgical resection in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy, and in the present journal, we recently reviewed seizure outcomes in resective epilepsy surgery. However, not all patients are candidates for or amenable to open surgical resection for epilepsy. Fortunately, several non-resective surgical options are now available at various epilepsy centers, including novel therapies which have been pioneered in recent years. Ablative procedures such as stereotactic laser ablation and stereotactic radiosurgery offer minimally invasive alternatives to open surgery with relatively favorable seizure outcomes, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For certain individuals who are not candidates for ablation or resection, palliative neuromodulation procedures such as vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, or responsive neurostimulation may result in a significant decrease in seizure frequency and improved quality of life. Finally, disconnection procedures such as multiple subpial transections and corpus callosotomy continue to play a role in select patients with an eloquent epileptogenic zone or intractable atonic seizures, respectively. Overall, open surgical resection remains the gold standard treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy, although it is significantly under-utilized. While non-resective epilepsy procedures have not replaced the need for resection, there is hope that these additional surgical options will increase the number of patients who receive treatment for this devastating disorder - particularly individuals who are not candidates for or who have failed resection. PMID:27206422

  8. Absence of association between major vault protein (MVP) gene polymorphisms and drug resistance in Chinese Han patients with partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luo; Zhang, Mengqi; Long, Hongyu; Long, Lili; Xie, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhaoqian; Kang, Jin; Chen, Qihua; Feng, Li; Xiao, Bo

    2015-11-15

    Drug resistance in epilepsy is common despite many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available for treatment. The development of drug resistant epilepsy may be a result of multiple factors. Several previous studies reported that the major vault protein (MVP) was significantly increased in epileptogenic brain tissues resected from patients with partial-onset seizures, indicating the possible involvement of MVP in drug resistance. In this article, we aimed to identify the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MVP gene and drug resistance of partial epilepsy in a Chinese Han population. A total of 510 patients with partial-onset seizures and 206 healthy controls were recruited. Among the patients, 222 were drug resistant and 288 were responsive. The selection of tagging SNPs was based on the Hapmap database and Haploview software and the genotyping was conducted on the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX platform. For the selected loci rs12149746, rs9938630 and rs4788186 in the MVP gene, there was no significant difference in allele or genotype distribution between the drug resistant and responsive groups, or between all of the patients and healthy controls. Linkage disequilibrium between any two loci was detected but there was no significant difference in haplotype frequency between the drug resistant and responsive groups. Our results suggest that MVP genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes may not be associated with drug resistance of partial epilepsy in the Chinese Han population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...... of an automatic channel selection method. The characteristics of the seizures are extracted by the use of a wavelet analysis and classified by a support vector machine. The best channel selection method is based upon maximum variance during the seizure. Results: Using only three channels, a seizure detection...... sensitivity of 96% and a false detection rate of 0.14/h were obtained. This corresponds to the performance obtained when channels are selected through visual inspection by a clinical neurophysiologist, and constitutes a 4% improvement in sensitivity compared to seizure detection using channels recorded...

  10. Epidemiology of early stages of epilepsy: Risk of seizure recurrence after a first seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed; Ladino, Lady Diana; Hernandez-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2017-07-01

    A single unprovoked seizure is a frequent phenomenon in the general population and the rate of seizure recurrence can vary widely. Individual risk prognostication is crucial in predicting patient outcomes and guiding treatment decisions. In this article, we review the most important risk factors associated with an increased likelihood of seizure recurrence after a single unprovoked seizure. In summary, the presence of focal seizure, nocturnal seizure, history of prior brain injury, family history of epilepsy, abnormal neurological exam, epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography and neuroimaging abnormalities, portend increased risk of seizure recurrence. Elucidation of these risk factors in patient assessment will augment clinical decision-making and may help determine the appropriateness of instituting anti-epilepsy treatment. We also discuss the Canadian model of single seizure clinics and the potential use to assess these patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Why do seizures occur when they do? Situations perceived to be associated with increased or decreased seizure likelihood in people with epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Josephine L; Watson, Peter; Ring, Howard

    2014-10-01

    Seizure precipitants are commonly reported in the general population of people with epilepsy. However, there has been little research in this area in people with epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID). We conducted a survey of the situations associated with increased or decreased seizure likelihood in this population. The aim of the research was to identify situations of increased seizure likelihood (SISLs) and situations of decreased seizure likelihood (SDSLs) reported by carers of people with an ID and epilepsy. Three study groups were investigated: two groups comprising individuals with ID associated with a specific genetic diagnosis - Rett syndrome or fragile X syndrome - and one group consisting of individuals with a range of other etiologies. Responses relating to 100 people were received: 44 relating to people with Rett syndrome, 25 to people with fragile X syndrome, and 31 to people whose ID had some other etiologies. Ninety-eight percent of the respondents reported at least one SISL, and 60% reported at least one SDSL. Having more seizure types and greater seizure frequency were associated with a higher number of SISLs reported. The most commonly reported SISLs and SDSLs for each of the three groups are presented. The most common SISL overall was illness, which was reported as an SISL by 71% of the respondents. There was less consensus with regard to SDSLs. These findings provide a greater understanding of when seizures occur in those with ID and epilepsy, with possible implications for adjunctive behavioral management of seizures in those with treatment-refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Seizure Recognition and Observation: A Guide for Allied Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy Foundation of America, Landover, MD.

    Intended for allied health professionals, this guide provides information on seizure recognition and classification to help them assist the patient, the family, and the treating physician in obtaining control of epileptic seizures. A section on seizure recognition describes epilepsy and seizures, covering seizure classification and the causes of…

  13. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  14. SEIZURE PREDICTION: THE FOURTH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, Hitten P.; Frei, Mark G.; Arthurs, Susan; Osorio, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The recently convened Fourth International Workshop on Seizure Prediction (IWSP4) brought together a diverse international group of investigators, from academia and industry, including epileptologists, neurosurgeons, neuroscientists, computer scientists, engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who are conducting interdisciplinary research on the prediction and control of seizures. IWSP4 allowed the presentation and discussion of results, an exchange of ideas, an assessment of the status of seizure prediction, control and related fields and the fostering of collaborative projects. PMID:20674508

  15. Differential suppression of seizures via Y2 and Y5 neuropeptide Y receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David P D; Nanobashvili, Avtandil; Sørensen, Andreas Vehus

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) prominently inhibits epileptic seizures in different animal models. The NPY receptors mediating this effect remain controversial partially due to lack of highly selective agonists and antagonists. To circumvent this problem, we used various NPY receptor knockout mice with the...

  16. An Atypical Presentation of Subacute Encephalopathy with Seizures in Chronic Alcoholism Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kyoung; Jung, Eui Sung; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Lee, Woong-Woo; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2016-06-01

    Subacute encephalopathy with seizures in chronic alcoholism syndrome is a rare clinical manifestation in patients with chronic alcohol abuse. We report the case of a patient with chronic alcoholism who presented with partial nonconvulsive status epilepticus associated with a thalamic lesion.

  17. An Atypical Presentation of Subacute Encephalopathy with Seizures in Chronic Alcoholism Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae-Kyoung; Jung, Eui Sung; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Lee, Woong-Woo; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Subacute encephalopathy with seizures in chronic alcoholism syndrome is a rare clinical manifestation in patients with chronic alcohol abuse. We report the case of a patient with chronic alcoholism who presented with partial nonconvulsive status epilepticus associated with a thalamic lesion.

  18. Substantial and sustained seizure reduction with ketogenic diet in a patient with Ohtahara syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adithya Sivaraju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketogenic diet has been shown to be efficacious in some epileptic encephalopathies but rarely reported as being useful in children with Ohtahara syndrome. This could possibly be attributed to the rarity of the disease and associated short survival period. We report on a 5-year-old child with Ohtahara syndrome, whose seizures failed to improve with all known medications, continued to show persistent suppression-burst pattern on the electroencephalography (EEG and had substantial reduction in seizure frequency for one year post-initiation of ketogenic diet. He has not had a single visit to the emergency room because of seizures in the last one year, and more importantly, there has been a clear improvement noted in his level of interaction and temperament. Patients with Ohtahara syndrome invariably have medically intractable seizures and catastrophic neurodevelopmental outcome. Ketogenic diet is a treatment modality that might be worth considering even in this group of patients.

  19. Treating seizures in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Marcus C; Westover, M Brandon; Cole, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are known to occur in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In the setting of a rapidly progressive condition with no effective therapy, determining appropriate treatment for seizures can be difficult if clinical morbidity is not obvious yet the electroencephalogram (EEG) demonstrates a worrisome pattern such as status epilepticus. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old man with CJD and electrographic seizures, discuss how this case challenges conventional definitions of seizures, and discuss a rational approach toward treatment. Coincidentally, our case is the first report of CJD in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: benign familial neonatal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Epilepsy Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: My Child Has...Seizures and Epilepsy Centers ...

  1. Deletion of the betaine-GABA transporter (BGT1; slc6a12) gene does not affect seizure thresholds of adult mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehre, A C; Rowley, N M; Zhou, Y

    2011-01-01

    of the GAT1 by the clinically available anti-epileptic drug tiagabine has been an effective strategy for the treatment of some patients with partial seizures. Recently, the investigational drug EF1502, which inhibits both GAT1 and BGT1, was found to exert an anti-convulsant action synergistic...... to that of tiagabine, supposedly due to inhibition of BGT1. The present study addresses the role of BGT1 in seizure control and the effect of EF1502 by developing and exploring a new mouse line lacking exons 3-5 of the BGT1 (slc6a12) gene. The deletion of this sequence abolishes the expression of BGT1 mRNA. However......, homozygous BGT1-deficient mice have normal development and show seizure susceptibility indistinguishable from that in wild-type mice in a variety of seizure threshold models including: corneal kindling, the minimal clonic and minimal tonic extension seizure threshold tests, the 6Hz seizure threshold test...

  2. USE OF STRUCTURAL MRI IN PATIENTS WITH MEDICALLY REFRACTORY SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara G. Kaprelyan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Refractory epilepsy is common in patients with structural brain lesions including acquired disorders and genetic abnormalities. Recently, MRI is a precise diagnostic tool for recognition of different structural causes underlying medically intractable seizures.Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of MRI for detection of brain lesions associated with refractory epilepsy.Material and methods: 49 patients (20M and 29F; aged 48.6±24.7 years with refractory epilepsy were included in the study. They presented with partial (46.0%, secondary (31.0% or primary (23.0% generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Clinical diagnosis was based on the revised criteria of ILAE. Structural neuroimaging (MRI, EEG recording, and neurological examination were performed.Results: MRI detected different structural brain abnormalities totally in 36 (73.5% patients, including cerebral tumors (21p, cerebrovascular accidents (5p, hyppocampal sclerosis (3p, developmental malformations (2p, postencephalitic lesions (2p, arachnoid cysts (2p, and tuberous sclerosis (1p. Neuroimaging revealed normal findings in 13 (27.5% cases. EEG recordings showed focal epileptic activity in 38 (77.6% patients, including 33 cases with and 5 without structural brain abnormalities.Conclusion: This study revealed that structural brain lesions are commonly associated with refractory epilepsy. We suggested that MRI is a useful diagnostic method for assessment of patients with uncontrolled seizures or altered epileptic pattern.

  3. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for seizure detection and early seizure detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talathi, S. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Epilepsy is common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.6-0.8 % of world population. Epileptic patients suffer from chronic unprovoked seizures, which can result in broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Since seizures, in general, occur infrequently and are unpredictable, automated seizure detection systems are recommended to screen for seizures during long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In addition, systems for early seizure detection can lead to the development of new types of intervention systems that are designed to control or shorten the duration of seizure events. In this article, we investigate the utility of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in designing seizure detection and early seizure detection systems. We propose a deep learning framework via the use of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) RNNs for seizure detection. We use publicly available data in order to evaluate our method and demonstrate very promising evaluation results with overall accuracy close to 100 %. We also systematically investigate the application of our method for early seizure warning systems. Our method can detect about 98% of seizure events within the first 5 seconds of the overall epileptic seizure duration.

  4. Regression of stroke-like lesions in MELAS-syndrome after seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Barton, Peter

    2010-12-01

    There are some indications that seizure activity promotes the development of stroke-like episodes, or vice versa, in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome or other syndromic mitochondrial disorders. A 41-year-old Caucasian female with MELAS syndrome, presenting with short stature, microcytic anaemia, increased blood-sedimentation rate, myopathy, hyper-gammaglobulinaemia, an iron-metabolism defect, migraine-like headaches, and stroke-like episodes, developed complex partial and generalised seizures at age 32 years. Valproic acid was ineffective but after switching to lamotrigine and lorazepam, she became seizure-free for five years and stroke-like episodes did not recur. Cerebral MRI initially showed enhanced gyral thickening and a non-enhanced T2-hyperintensity over the left parieto-temporo-occipital white matter and cortex and enhanced caudate heads. After two years without seizures, the non-enhanced hyperintense parieto-temporo-occipital lesion had disappeared, being attributed to consequent seizure control. The caudate heads, however, remained hyperintense throughout the observational period. This case indicates that adequate seizure control in a patient with MELAS syndrome may prevent the recurrence of stroke-like episodes and may result in the disappearance of stroke-like lesions on MRI.

  5. Seizure reporting technologies for epilepsy treatment: A review of clinical information needs and supporting technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Jonathan; Khuwatsamrit, Thanin; Askew, Brittain; Ehrenberg, Joshua Andrew; Helmers, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    This review surveys current seizure detection and classification technologies as they relate to aiding clinical decision-making during epilepsy treatment. Interviews and data collected from neurologists and a literature review highlighted a strong need for better distinguishing between patients exhibiting generalized and partial seizure types as well as achieving more accurate seizure counts. This information is critical for enabling neurologists to select the correct class of antiepileptic drugs (AED) for their patients and evaluating AED efficiency during long-term treatment. In our questionnaire, 100% of neurologists reported they would like to have video from patients prior to selecting an AED during an initial consultation. Presently, only 30% have access to video. In our technology review we identified that only a subset of available technologies surpassed patient self-reporting performance due to high false positive rates. Inertial seizure detection devices coupled with video capture for recording seizures at night could stand to address collecting seizure counts that are more accurate than current patient self-reporting during day and night time use. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS IN CHILDREN PRESENTING WITH AFEBRILE SEIZURE: CLINICAL PROFILE, IMAGING AND SERODIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan Sahu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is one of the major causes of childhood seizures in developing countries including India and Latin America. In this study neurological pediatric cases presenting with afebrile seizures were screened for anti-Cysticercus antibodies (IgG in their sera in order to estimate the possible burden of cysticercal etiology. The study included a total of 61 pediatric afebrile seizure subjects (aged one to 15 years old; there was a male predominance. All the sera were tested using a pre-evaluated commercially procured IgG-ELISA kit (UB-Magiwell Cysticercosis Kit ™. Anti-Cysticercus antibody in serum was positive in 23 of 61 (37.7% cases. The majority of cases with a positive ELISA test presented with generalized seizure (52.17%, followed by complex partial seizure (26.08%, and simple partial seizure (21.73%. Headaches were the major complaint (73.91%. Other presentations were vomiting (47.82%, pallor (34.78%, altered sensorium (26.08%, and muscle weakness (13.04%. There was one hemiparesis case diagnosed to be NCC. In this study one child without any significant findings on imaging was also found to be positive by serology. There was a statistically significant association found between the cases with multiple lesions on the brain and the ELISA-positivity (p = 0.017. Overall positivity of the ELISA showed a potential cysticercal etiology. Hence, neurocysticercosis should be suspected in every child presenting with afebrile seizure especially with a radio-imaging supportive diagnosis in tropical developing countries or areas endemic for taeniasis/cysticercosis.

  7. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; p<0.001) and significantly more often lateralizing seizure phenomena pointing to bilateral seizure onset compared to patients with unilateral TLE (67% vs. 11%; p<0.001). The sensitivity of identical vs. different seizure semiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-Seizure Medications: Relief from Nerve Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti-seizure medications: Relief from nerve pain Anti-seizure drugs often are used to help control the type of ... by damaged nerves. By Mayo Clinic Staff Anti-seizure medications were originally designed to treat people with ...

  9. Seizure Disorders: A Review for School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Henry T.; Barrett, Rowland P.

    1995-01-01

    Recognizing possible seizure disorders, medication side-effects, behavioral and cognitive effects of seizures, and their treatments are important skills for school psychologists because they affect 500,000 United States school-aged children attending regular education. A knowledgeable school professional serves a critical role in integrating…

  10. A Neonate with persistent hypoglycemia and seizures.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBY

    disorder was diagnosed and managed with limited success as the episodes hydroglycemic seizures persisted. ... the presence of hyperinsulinemia as the cause of the hypoglycemic dependent seizures. Case Presentation. A three day old girl was admitted to the neonatal .... the Prader-Willi syndrome, has been reported.

  11. 43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on lands owned or controlled by the United States, without...

  12. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  13. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    testing of the brain revealed no structural abnormality. His blood examination findings were ... A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports ... seizures cause great personal distress and significantly affect marital relationships. Though ...

  14. Towards prognostic biomarkers from BOLD fluctuations to differentiate a first epileptic seizure from new-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit; Janssens, Rick; Vlooswijk, Mariëlle C G; Rouhl, Rob P W; de Louw, Anton; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Ulman, Shrutin; Besseling, René M H; Hofman, Paul A M; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne H; Hilkman, Danny M; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Backes, Walter H

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of epilepsy cannot be reliably made prior to a patient's second seizure in most cases. Therefore, adequate diagnostic tools are needed to differentiate subjects with a first seizure from those with a seizure preceding the onset of epilepsy. The objective was to explore spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in subjects with a first-ever seizure and patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and to find characteristic biomarkers for seizure recurrence after the first seizure. We examined 17 first-seizure subjects, 19 patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and 18 healthy controls. All subjects underwent clinical investigation and received electroencephalography and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The BOLD time series were analyzed in terms of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFFs). We found significantly stronger amplitudes (higher fALFFs) in patients with NOE relative to first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. The frequency range of 73-198 mHz (slow-3 subband) appeared most useful for discriminating patients with NOE from first-seizure subjects. The ReHo measure did not show any significant differences. The fALFF appears to be a noninvasive measure that characterizes spontaneous BOLD fluctuations and shows stronger amplitudes in the slow-3 subband of patients with NOE relative first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. A larger study population with follow-up is required to determine whether fALFF holds promise as a potential biomarker for identifying subjects at increased risk to develop epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...... with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...... restricting the analyses to people with no history of epilepsy. A history of both febrile seizures and epilepsy was associated with a 204% increased risk of schizophrenia (RR=3.04; 95% CI, 1.36-6.79) as compared with people with no such history. CONCLUSIONS: We found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia...

  16. Neuroimaging observations in a cohort of elderly manifesting with new onset seizures: Experience from a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occurrence of epilepsy is higher among elderly patients. The clinical manifestations of seizures, causes of epilepsy, and choice of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are different in elderly people with epilepsy compared to the young. Aim: To evaluate the imaging (CT/MRI observations in elderly patients manifesting with new-onset seizures. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and one elderly patients with new onset seizures, >60 years (age: 68.0 ± 7.5 years; M:F = 1.8:1 from Jan′ 07 to Jan′ 09, were prospectively recruited. Observations of cranial CT scan (n = 201 and MR imaging (n = 43 were analyzed. Results: The type of seizures included: Simple partial (42%, generalized tonic-clonic (30.3%, and complex partial (27.4%. The pattern of epilepsy syndromes were acute symptomatic (42.3%, remote symptomatic (18.4%, cryptogenic (37.8%, and idiopathic (1.5%. Seizures were controlled with monotherapy in 85%. The CT scan (n = 201 revealed cerebral atrophy (139, mild (79, moderate (43, and severe (18; focal lesions (98, infarcts (45, hemorrhages (18, granuloma (16, tumor (15 and gliosis (4, and hemispheric atrophy (1, white matter changes (75 and diffuse edema (21. An MRI (n = 43 showed variable degree of cerebral atrophy (31; white matter changes (20; focal cerebral lesions (24; - infarct (7; intracranial hemorrhage (6; granuloma (5; tumor (6; gliosis (1; hemispheric atrophy (1; and prominent Virchow-Robin spaces (7; and UBOs (12. Patients with focal lesions in neuroimaging more often had partial seizures, symptomatic epilepsy, past stroke, focal deficit, absence of diffuse atrophy, focal EEG slowing, abnormal CSF, seizure recurrence at follow-up (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Brain imaging observations in elderly patients with new-onset seizures revealed underlying symptomatic nature, hence the etiology and thereby assisted in deciding the specific therapy.

  17. Historical Risk Factors Associated with Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Drug-Resistant Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Nei, Maromi; Sharan, Ashwini; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the possible influence of risk factors on seizure outcome after surgery for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). This retrospective study recruited patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and were followed for a minimum of 1 year. Patients had been prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. After surgery outcome was classified into 2 groups: seizure-free or relapsed. The possible risk factors influencing long-term outcome after surgery were investigated. A total of 275 patients with MTS-TLE were studied. Two thirds of the patients had Engel's class 1 outcome and 48.4% of the patients had sustained seizure freedom, with no seizures since surgery. Patients with a history of tonic-clonic seizures in the year preceding surgery were more likely to experience seizure recurrence (odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval 1.19-4.80; P = 0.01). Gender, race, family history of epilepsy, history of febrile seizure, history of status epilepticus, duration of disease before surgery, intelligence quotient, and seizure frequency were not predictors of outcome. Many patients with drug-resistant MTS-TLE respond favorably to surgery. It is critical to distinguish among different types and etiologies of TLE when predicting outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential impact of contraceptive methods on seizures varies by antiepileptic drug category: Findings of the Epilepsy Birth Control Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Andrew G; Mandle, Hannah B; Cahill, Kaitlyn E; Fowler, Kristen M; Hauser, W Allen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether categories of contraception differ in their impact on seizures in women with epilepsy and whether the impact varies by antiepileptic drug category. Retrospective survey data came from 2712 contraceptive experiences reported by 1144 women with epilepsy. We compared risk ratios for reports of increase and decrease in seizure frequency on hormonal versus nonhormonal contraception, stratified by antiepileptic drug categories. More women with epilepsy reported a change in seizures on hormonal (28.2%) than on nonhormonal contraception (9.7%) (pcontraception (4.2%) was 4.47 (pcontraception (5.5%) was 1.71, pcontraception, the risk ratio for seizure increase was greater than for decrease (1.98, pmethod with a greater risk ratio for seizure decrease than combined pills. Seizure increase was greater for hormonal than nonhormonal contraception for each antiepileptic drug category (pcontraception, relative to the non-enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug category which had the lowest rate, each of the other categories had significantly greater risks for seizure increase, especially the enzyme-inhibiting (valproate) category (risk ratio=2.53, p=0.0002). The findings provide community-based, epidemiological survey evidence that contraceptive methods may differ in their impact on seizures and that this impact may vary by antiepileptic drug category. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Iron deficiency and acute seizures: results from children living in rural Kenya and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Idro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There are conflicting reports on whether iron deficiency changes susceptibility to seizures. We examined the hypothesis that iron deficiency is associated with an increased risk of acute seizures in children in a malaria endemic area.We recruited 133 children, aged 3-156 months, who presented to a district hospital on the Kenyan coast with acute seizures and frequency-matched these to children of similar ages but without seizures. We defined iron deficiency according to the presence of malarial infection and evidence of inflammation. In patients with malaria, we defined iron deficiency as plasma ferritin<30 µg/ml if plasma C-reactive protein (CRP was<50 mg/ml or ferritin<273 µg/ml if CRP≥50 mg/ml, and in those without malaria, as ferritin<12 µg/ml if CRP<10 mg/ml or ferritin<30 µg/ml if CRP≥10 mg/ml. In addition, we performed a meta-analysis of case-control studies published in English between January 1966 and December 2009 and available through PUBMED that have examined the relationship between iron deficiency and febrile seizures in children.In our Kenyan case control study, cases and controls were similar, except more cases reported past seizures. Malaria was associated with two-thirds of all seizures. Eighty one (30.5% children had iron deficiency. Iron deficiency was neither associated with an increased risk of acute seizures (45/133[33.8%] cases were iron deficient compared to 36/133[27.1%] controls, p = 0.230 nor status epilepticus and it did not affect seizure semiology. Similar results were obtained when children with malaria, known to cause acute symptomatic seizures in addition to febrile seizures were excluded. However, in a meta-analysis that combined all eight case-control studies that have examined the association between iron deficiency and acute/febrile seizures to-date, iron deficiency, described in 310/1,018(30.5% cases and in 230/1,049(21.9% controls, was associated with a significantly increased risk of seizures

  20. Identifying seizure onset zone from electrocorticographic recordings: A machine learning approach based on phase locking value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahian, Bahareh; Yeasin, Mohammed; Mudigoudar, Basanagoud; Wheless, James W; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2017-10-01

    Using a novel technique based on phase locking value (PLV), we investigated the potential for features extracted from electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings to serve as biomarkers to identify the seizure onset zone (SOZ). We computed the PLV between the phase of the amplitude of high gamma activity (80-150Hz) and the phase of lower frequency rhythms (4-30Hz) from ECoG recordings obtained from 10 patients with epilepsy (21 seizures). We extracted five features from the PLV and used a machine learning approach based on logistic regression to build a model that classifies electrodes as SOZ or non-SOZ. More than 96% of electrodes identified as the SOZ by our algorithm were within the resected area in six seizure-free patients. In four non-seizure-free patients, more than 31% of the identified SOZ electrodes by our algorithm were outside the resected area. In addition, we observed that the seizure outcome in non-seizure-free patients correlated with the number of non-resected SOZ electrodes identified by our algorithm. This machine learning approach, based on features extracted from the PLV, effectively identified electrodes within the SOZ. The approach has the potential to assist clinicians in surgical decision-making when pre-surgical intracranial recordings are utilized. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The anticonvulsant action of nafimidone on kindled amygdaloid seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Walby, W F

    1988-01-01

    The anticonvulsant effectiveness of nafimidone (1-[2-naphthoylmethyl]imidazole hydrochloride) was evaluated in the kindled amygdaloid seizure model in rats. Nafimidone (3.1-120 mg/kg i.p.) was evaluated at 30 min in previously kindled rats using both threshold (20 microA increments) and supranthreshold (400 microA) paradigms. Nafimidone (25-50 mg/kg) significantly reduced supranthreshold elicited afterdischarge length and seizure severity only at doses with some prestimulation toxicity. The maximum anticonvulsant effectiveness for the 25 mg/kg i.p. dose of nafimidone was seen between 15 and 30 min utilizing a suprathreshold kindling paradigm. Nafimidone did not significantly elevate seizure thresholds at the doses tested; however, nafimidone (3.1-50 mg/kg) reduced the severity and afterdischarge duration of threshold elicited seizures in a non-dose response manner. Drug-induced electroencephalographic spikes were seen in both cortex and amygdala in most kindled rats receiving 100-120 mg/kg i.p. within 30 min of dosing before electrical stimulation. The frequency of spike and wave complexes increased in most of these animals leading to drug-induced spontaneous seizures and death in approximately 25% before electrical stimulation. This study has demonstrated that although nafimidone can modify both threshold and suprathreshold elicited kindled amygdaloid seizures, it lacks significant specificity in this model of epilepsy.

  2. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure <6 months,

  3. Febrile seizures prior to sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stampe, Niels Kjær; Glinge, Charlotte; Jabbari, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Febrile seizure (FS) is a common disorder affecting 2-5% of children up to 5 years of age. The aim of this study was to determine whether FS in early childhood are over-represented in young adults dying from sudden cardiac death (SCD). Methods and results: We included all deaths (n = 4595...... with FS was sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (5/8; 62.5%). Conclusion: In conclusion, this study demonstrates a significantly two-fold increase in the frequency of FS prior to death in young SCD cases compared with the two control groups, suggesting that FS could potentially contribute in a risk......) nationwide and through review of all death certificates, we identified 245 SCD in Danes aged 1-30 years in 2000-09. Through the usage of nationwide registries, we identified all persons admitted with first FS among SCD cases (14/245; 5.7%) and in the corresponding living Danish population (71 027/2 369 785...

  4. Automatic seizure detection: going from sEEG to iEEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas; Remvig, Line Sofie; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2010-01-01

    Several different algorithms have been proposed for automatic detection of epileptic seizures based on both scalp and intracranial electroencephalography (sEEG and iEEG). Which modality that renders the best result is hard to assess though. From 16 patients with focal epilepsy, at least 24 hours...... of ictal and non-ictal iEEG were obtained. Characteristics of the seizures are represented by use of wavelet transformation (WT) features and classified by a support vector machine. When implementing a method used for sEEG on iEEG data, a great improvement in performance was obtained when the high...... frequency containing lower levels in the WT were included in the analysis. We were able to obtain a sensitivity of 96.4% and a false detection rate (FDR) of 0.20/h. In general, when implementing an automatic seizure detection algorithm made for sEEG on iEEG, great improvement can be obtained if a frequency...

  5. Seizure variables and their relationship to genotype and functional abilities in the CDKL5 disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Stephanie; Wong, Kingsley; Chin, Richard; Williams, Simon; de Klerk, Nick; Forbes, David; Krishnaraj, Rahul; Christodoulou, John; Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen

    2016-11-22

    To investigate seizure outcomes and their relationships to genotype and functional abilities in individuals with the cyclin-dependent kinase-like-5 (CDKL5) disorder. Using the International CDKL5 Disorder Database, we identified 172 cases with a pathogenic CDKL5 mutation. We categorized individual mutations into 4 groups based on predicted structural and functional consequences. Negative binomial regression was used to model the linear association between current seizure rate and mutation group, current level of assistance required to walk 10 steps, and the highest level of expressive communication used to convey refusal or request. All but 3 (169/172) patients had a history of epilepsy. The median age at seizure onset was 6 weeks (range 1 week-1.5 years) and the median seizure rate at ascertainment was 2 per day (range 0-20 per day). After adjusting for walking ability and confounders including use or otherwise of polytherapy, seizure rate was lower in those with truncating mutations between aa172 and aa781 compared to those with no functional protein (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-0.93). Ability to walk and use of spoken language were associated with lower rates of current seizures when compared to those with the least ability after adjusting for genotype (walking: IRR 0.62; 95% CI 0.39-0.99, communication: IRR 0.48; 95% CI 0.23-1.02). At a median age at questionnaire completion of 5 years, those previously treated with corticosteroids had more frequent seizures than those who have never been treated, whether or not there was a history of infantile spasms. Epilepsy is pervasive but not mandatory for the CDKL5 disorder. Genotype and functional abilities were related to seizure frequency, which appears refractory to antiepileptic drugs. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Excitation of higher radial modes of azimuthal surface waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range by rotating relativistic flow of electrons in cylindrical waveguides partially filled by plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girka, Igor O.; Pavlenko, Ivan V.; Thumm, Manfred

    2018-05-01

    Azimuthal surface waves are electromagnetic eigenwaves of cylindrical plasma-dielectric waveguides which propagate azimuthally nearby the plasma-dielectric interface across an axial external stationary magnetic field. Their eigenfrequency in particular can belong to the electron cyclotron frequency range. Excitation of azimuthal surface waves by rotating relativistic electron flows was studied in detail recently in the case of the zeroth radial mode for which the waves' radial phase change within the layer where the electrons gyrate is small. In this case, just the plasma parameters cause the main influence on the waves' dispersion properties. In the case of the first and higher radial modes, the wave eigenfrequency is higher and the wavelength is shorter than in the case of the zeroth radial mode. This gain being of interest for practical applications can be achieved without any change in the device design. The possibility of effective excitation of the higher order radial modes of azimuthal surface waves is demonstrated here. Getting shorter wavelengths of the excited waves in the case of higher radial modes is shown to be accompanied by decreasing growth rates of the waves. The results obtained here are of interest for developing new sources of electromagnetic radiation, in nano-physics and in medical physics.

  7. Do reflex seizures and spontaneous seizures form a continuum? - triggering factors and possible common mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmen, Friederike; Wehner, Tim; Lemieux, Louis

    2015-02-01

    Recent changes in the understanding and classification of reflex seizures have fuelled a debate on triggering mechanisms of seizures and their conceptual organization. Previous studies and patient reports have listed extrinsic and intrinsic triggers, albeit their multifactorial and dynamic nature is poorly understood. This paper aims to review literature on extrinsic and intrinsic seizure triggers and to discuss common mechanisms among them. Among self-reported seizure triggers, emotional stress is most frequently named. Reflex seizures are typically associated with extrinsic sensory triggers; however, intrinsic cognitive or proprioceptive triggers have also been assessed. The identification of a trigger underlying a seizure may be more difficult if it is intrinsic and complex, and if triggering mechanisms are multifactorial. Therefore, since observability of triggers varies and triggers are also found in non-reflex seizures, the present concept of reflex seizures may be questioned. We suggest the possibility of a conceptual continuum between reflex and spontaneous seizures rather than a dichotomy and discuss evidence to the notion that to some extent most seizures might be triggered. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving staff response to seizures on the epilepsy monitoring unit with online EEG seizure detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommens, Nicole; Geertsema, Evelien; Jansen Holleboom, Lisanne; Cox, Fieke; Visser, Gerhard

    2018-05-11

    User safety and the quality of diagnostics on the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) depend on reaction to seizures. Online seizure detection might improve this. While good sensitivity and specificity is reported, the added value above staff response is unclear. We ascertained the added value of two electroencephalograph (EEG) seizure detection algorithms in terms of additional detected seizures or faster detection time. EEG-video seizure recordings of people admitted to an EMU over one year were included, with a maximum of two seizures per subject. All recordings were retrospectively analyzed using Encevis EpiScan and BESA Epilepsy. Detection sensitivity and latency of the algorithms were compared to staff responses. False positive rates were estimated on 30 uninterrupted recordings (roughly 24 h per subject) of consecutive subjects admitted to the EMU. EEG-video recordings used included 188 seizures. The response rate of staff was 67%, of Encevis 67%, and of BESA Epilepsy 65%. Of the 62 seizures missed by staff, 66% were recognized by Encevis and 39% by BESA Epilepsy. The median latency was 31 s (staff), 10 s (Encevis), and 14 s (BESA Epilepsy). After correcting for walking time from the observation room to the subject, both algorithms detected faster than staff in 65% of detected seizures. The full recordings included 617 h of EEG. Encevis had a median false positive rate of 4.9 per 24 h and BESA Epilepsy of 2.1 per 24 h. EEG-video seizure detection algorithms may improve reaction to seizures by improving the total number of seizures detected and the speed of detection. The false positive rate is feasible for use in a clinical situation. Implementation of these algorithms might result in faster diagnostic testing and better observation during seizures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Rahal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES. A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX. During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI. After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES.

  10. Phenomenology and psychiatric origin of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Aleksandar J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Psychogenic nonepileptic seizure (PNES is a sudden change in a person's behavior, perception, thinking, or feeling that is usually time limited and resembles, or is mistaken for, epilepsy but does not have the characteristic electroencephalographic (EEG changes that accompanies a true epileptic seizure [1]. It is considered that PNES is a somatic manifestation of mental distress, in response to a psychological conflict or other Stressors [2]. A wide spectrum of clinical presentation includes syncope, generalized tonic-clonic seizure, simple and complex partial seizure, myoclonic seizure, frontal lobe seizures and status epilepticus [3]. Coexistence of epilepsy and PNES is seen in approximately 9% of cases [5]. Between 25-30% of patients referred to tertiary centers and initially diagnosed as refractory epilepsy were on further examination diagnosed as PNES [6,7]. In DSM-IV [12] PNES are usually categorized under conversion disorder with seizures or convulsions. However, psychiatric basis of PNES may be anxiousness (panic attack, somatization or factitious disorder, simulation, dissociative disorders and psychosis [1]. AIM The aim of the study was to establish clinical phenomenology and EEG characteristics as well as basic psychiatric disorder in patients with PNES. METHOD In a retrospective study covering the period from January 1st 1999 till April 31 st 2003, 24 patients (22 female, 2 male treated at the Institute of Neurology in Belgrade were analyzed. PNES were defined as sudden change in behavior incoherent with epileptiform activity registered on EEG. Possible PNES were determined on the basis of history data and clinical examination during the attack but definitive confirmation was established only by the finding of no ictal EEG changes during typical seizure of each patient. Patients with coexisting epilepsy were included in the study, too. At least two standard EEG (range 2-6, median 4 were performed at the beginning of

  11. Dentate gyrus mossy cells control spontaneous convulsive seizures and spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Anh D; Nguyen, Theresa M; Limouse, Charles; Kim, Hannah K; Szabo, Gergely G; Felong, Sylwia; Maroso, Mattia; Soltesz, Ivan

    2018-02-16

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is characterized by debilitating, recurring seizures and an increased risk for cognitive deficits. Mossy cells (MCs) are key neurons in the hippocampal excitatory circuit, and the partial loss of MCs is a major hallmark of TLE. We investigated how MCs contribute to spontaneous ictal activity and to spatial contextual memory in a mouse model of TLE with hippocampal sclerosis, using a combination of optogenetic, electrophysiological, and behavioral approaches. In chronically epileptic mice, real-time optogenetic modulation of MCs during spontaneous hippocampal seizures controlled the progression of activity from an electrographic to convulsive seizure. Decreased MC activity is sufficient to impede encoding of spatial context, recapitulating observed cognitive deficits in chronically epileptic mice. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. Seizure and electroencephalographic changes in the newborn period induced by opiates and corrected by naloxone infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, O; Alexandrou, D; Knoppert, D; Young, G B

    1999-03-01

    To describe the association between opioid administration in the newborn period and neurologic abnormalities. Case reports of two infants who presented with seizure activity and abnormal electroencephalograms associated with opiate administration, and reversed by naloxone. The first was a preterm infant who developed a burst-suppression pattern on the electroencephalogram while receiving a continuous infusion of morphine and muscle paralysis. Naloxone injection during the electroencephalogram recording reversed the burst-suppression pattern. The second was a term infant receiving fentanyl infusion for pain control following surgery, who presented with motor seizure that was only partially controlled with barbiturates. An abnormal electroencephalogram recording during the opiate infusion improved with naloxone administration. Our observations indicate a potential for neurologic abnormalities, including induction of seizure activity and electroencephalogram abnormalities, suggesting caution when opiates are used for sedation and/or pain control in the newborn period.

  13. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  14. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  15. Seizure control in patients with epilepsy: the physician vs. medication factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsell Christopher J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the relationship between types of healthcare providers and outcomes in patients with epilepsy. This study compares the relative effects of provider type (epileptologist vs. other neurologist and pharmacologic treatment (newer vs. older antiepileptic drugs on seizure control in patients with epilepsy. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of patients with medication-resistant epilepsy. Consecutive charts of 200 patients were abstracted using a standard case report form. For each patient, data included seizure frequency and medication use prior to, and while being treated by an epileptologist. Changes in seizure frequency were modeled using a generalized linear model. Results After transferring care from a general neurologist to specialized epilepsy center, patients experienced fewer seizures (p Conclusion Our findings suggest an association between subspecialty epilepsy care and improved seizure control in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy. Further research should prospectively determine whether patients with medication-resistant epilepsy would benefit from being routinely referred to an epilepsy specialist.

  16. Refractory epilepsy and basal ganglia: the role of seizure frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilleret, V.; Trebossen, R.; Mantzerides, M.; Semah, F.; Ribeiro, M.J. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, I2BM/DSV, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Bouilleret, V. [CHU Bicetre, Unite de Neurophysiologie et d' Epileptologie, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France); Chassoux, F. [Hopital Saint Anne, Service de Neurochirurgie, 75 - Paris (France); Biraben, A. [CHU, Service de Neurologie, Hopital Pontchaillou, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2008-02-15

    Objectives. - A decrease of [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA uptake in basal ganglia (B.G.) was recently reported in medically refractory epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the involvement of dopaminergic neurotransmission in refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (T.L.E.) and its relationship to glucose metabolism and morphological changes. Methods. - Twelve T.L.E. patients were studied using [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA PET and MRI and compared with healthy control volunteers. Morphological cerebral changes were assessed using Voxel-Based Morphometry (V.B.M.). Student t test statistical maps of functional and morphological differences between patients and controls were obtained using a general linear model. Results. - In T.L.E. patients, [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA uptake was reduced to the same extent in caudate and putamen in both cerebral hemispheres as well as in the substantia nigra (S.N.). These dopaminergic functional alterations occurred without any glucose metabolism changes in these areas. The only mild morphological abnormality was found in striatal regions without any changes in the S.N.. Conclusion. - The present study provides support for dopaminergic neurotransmission involvement in T.L.E.. The discrepancies between G.M.V. atrophy and the pattern of [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA suggest that B.G. involvement is not related to structural subcortical abnormalities. A functional decrease can be ruled out as there was no change of the glycolytic pathway metabolism in these areas. (authors)

  17. Surgical treatment of patients with single and dual pathology: relevance of lesion and of hippocampal atrophy to seizure outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L M; Cendes, F; Watson, C; Andermann, F; Fish, D R; Dubeau, F; Free, S; Olivier, A; Harkness, W; Thomas, D G; Duncan, J S; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Cook, M J; Arnold, D L

    1997-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging can disclose epileptogenic lesions in many patients with partial epilepsy and, at times, display the coexistence of hippocampal atrophy in addition to an extrahippocampal lesion (dual pathology). We studied the postoperative seizure outcome of 64 patients with lesional epilepsy (median follow-up, 30 months) and considered separately the surgical results in the 51 patients with a single lesion and in the 13 who had dual pathology. In patients with a single lesion, 85% were seizure free or significantly improved (Engel's class I-II) when the lesion was totally removed compared with only 40% when there was incomplete resection (p dual pathology who had both the lesion and the atrophic hippocampus removed became seizure free. In contrast, only 2 of the 10 patients with dual pathology undergoing surgery aimed at the lesion or at the hippocampus alone became seizure free (p dual pathology, surgery should, if possible, include resection of both the lesion and the atrophic hippocampus.

  18. Orthosiphon stamineus Leaf Extract Affects TNF-α and Seizures in a Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Kar Meng Choo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizures result from abnormal brain activity and can affect motor, autonomic and sensory function; as well as, memory, cognition, behavior, or emotional state. Effective anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are available but have tolerability issues due to their side effects. The Malaysian herb Orthosiphon stamineus, is a traditional epilepsy remedy and possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and free-radical scavenging abilities, all of which are known to protect against seizures. This experiment thus aimed to explore if an ethanolic leaf extract of O. stamineus has the potential to be a novel symptomatic treatment for epileptic seizures in a zebrafish model; and the effects of the extract on the expression levels of several genes in the zebrafish brain which are associated with seizures. The results of this study indicate that O. stamineus has the potential to be a novel symptomatic treatment for epileptic seizures as it is pharmacologically active against seizures in a zebrafish model. The anti-convulsive effect of this extract is also comparable to that of diazepam at higher doses and can surpass diazepam in certain cases. Treatment with the extract also counteracts the upregulation of NF-κB, NPY and TNF-α as a result of a Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ treated seizure. The anti-convulsive action for this extract could be at least partially due to its downregulation of TNF-α. Future work could include the discovery of the active anti-convulsive compound, as well as determine if the extract does not cause cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

  19. Seizure prognosis of patients with low-grade tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Fadul, Camilo E; Roberts, David W; Thadani, Vijay M; Bujarski, Krzysztof A; Scott, Rod C; Jobst, Barbara C

    2012-09-01

    Seizures frequently impact the quality of life of patients with low grade tumors. Management is often based on best clinical judgment. We examined factors that correlate with seizure outcome to optimize seizure management. Patients with supratentorial low-grade tumors evaluated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Using multiple regression analysis the patient characteristics and treatments were correlated with seizure outcome using Engel's classification. Of the 73 patients with low grade tumors and median follow up of 3.8 years (range 1-20 years), 54 (74%) patients had a seizure ever and 46 (63%) had at least one seizure before tumor surgery. The only factor significantly associated with pre-surgical seizures was tumor histology. Of the 54 patients with seizures ever, 25 (46.3%) had a class I outcome at last follow up. There was no difference in seizure outcome between grade II gliomas (astrocytoma grade II, oligodendroglioma grade II, mixed oligo-astrocytoma grade II) and other pathologies (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymomas, DNET, gangliocytoma and ganglioglioma). Once seizures were established seizure prognosis was similar between different pathologies. Chemotherapy (p=0.03) and radiation therapy (p=0.02) had a positive effect on seizure outcome. No other parameter including significant tumor growth during the follow up period predicted seizure outcome. Only three patients developed new-onset seizures after tumor surgery that were non-perioperative. Anticonvulsant medication was tapered in 14 patients with seizures and 10 had no further seizures. Five patients underwent additional epilepsy surgery with a class I outcome in four. Two patients received a vagal nerve stimulator with >50% seizure reduction. Seizures at presentation are the most important factor associated with continued seizures after tumor surgery. Pathology does not influence seizure outcome. Use of long term prophylactic anticonvulsants is unwarranted. Chemotherapy and

  20. 27 CFR 478.152 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.152 Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Any firearm or ammunition... demonstrated by clear and convincing evidence, shall be subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions...

  1. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of seizure. 162.92 Section 162.92 Customs... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a) Generally. Customs will send written notice of seizure as provided in this section to all known interested...

  2. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the... that its value is less than the amount of the fine which may be imposed. If seizure of an aircraft for...

  3. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of... than the amount of the fine which may be imposed. If seizure of an aircraft for violation of section...

  4. 50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Preliminary Requirements § 12.11 Notification of seizure. Except where the owner or consignee is personally notified or seizure is made pursuant to a search warrant, the...

  5. 50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES General Provisions § 12.5 Seizure by other agencies. Any authorized... the laws listed in § 12.2 will, if so requested, deliver such seizure to the appropriate Special Agent...

  6. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce eBeverlin II

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris-Lecar model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control.

  7. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis for epileptic patient in seizure and seizure free status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Dutta, Srimonti; Chakraborty, Sayantan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyze EEG of patients during seizure and in seizure free interval. • Data from different sections of the brain and seizure activity was analyzed. • Assessment of cross-correlation in seizure and seizure free interval using MF-DXA technique. - Abstract: This paper reports a study of EEG data of epileptic patients in terms of multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DXA). The EEG clinical data were obtained from the EEG Database available with the Clinic of Epileptology of the University Hospital of Bonn, Germany. The data sets (C, D, and E) were taken from five epileptic patients undergoing presurgical evaluations. The data sets consist of intracranial EEG recordings during seizure-free intervals (interictal periods) from within the epileptogenic zone (D) and from the hippocampal formation of the opposite hemisphere of the epileptic patients’ brain, respectively (C). The data set (E) was recorded during seizure activity (ictal periods). MF-DXA is a very rigorous and robust tool for assessment of cross-correlation among two nonlinear time series. The study reveals the degree of cross-correlation is more among seizure and seizure free interval in epileptogenic zone. These data are very significant for diagnosis, onset and prognosis of epileptic patients

  8. Influence of vigilance state on physiological consequences of seizures and seizure-induced death in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Michael A; Buchanan, Gordon F

    2016-05-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. SUDEP occurs more commonly during nighttime sleep. The details of why SUDEP occurs at night are not well understood. Understanding why SUDEP occurs at night during sleep might help to better understand why SUDEP occurs at all and hasten development of preventive strategies. Here we aimed to understand circumstances causing seizures that occur during sleep to result in death. Groups of 12 adult male mice were instrumented for EEG, EMG, and EKG recording and subjected to seizure induction via maximal electroshock (MES) during wakefulness, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Seizure inductions were performed with concomitant EEG, EMG, and EKG recording and breathing assessment via whole body plethysmography. Seizures induced via MES during sleep were associated with more profound respiratory suppression and were more likely to result in death. Despite REM sleep being a time when seizures do not typically occur spontaneously, when seizures were forced to occur during REM sleep, they were invariably fatal in this model. An examination of baseline breathing revealed that mice that died following a seizure had increased baseline respiratory rate variability compared with those that did not die. These data demonstrate that sleep, especially REM sleep, can be a dangerous time for a seizure to occur. These data also demonstrate that there may be baseline respiratory abnormalities that can predict which individuals have higher risk for seizure-induced death.

  9. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy after Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Francis, Andrew W; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-08-01

    To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female subject after lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. A 38-year-old woman presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery that was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately after witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal, and subretinal involvement. At 4-month follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy after lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted after episodes of seizure in adults.

  10. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Aging models of acute seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kevin M

    2010-01-01

    Aged animals have been used by researchers to better understand the differences between the young and the aged brain and how these differences may provide insight into the mechanisms of acute seizures and epilepsy in the elderly. To date, there have been relatively few studies dedicated to the modeling of acute seizures and epilepsy in aged, healthy animals. Inherent challenges to this area of research include the costs associated with the purchase and maintenance of older animals and, at times, the unexpected and potentially confounding comorbidities associated with aging. However, recent studies using a variety of in vivo and in vitro models of acute seizures and epilepsy in mice and rats have built upon early investigations in the field, all of which has provided an expanded vision of seizure generation and epileptogenesis in the aged brain. Results of these studies could potentially translate to new and tailored interventional approaches that limit or prevent the development of epilepsy in the elderly.

  12. Effect of prophylactic phenobarbital on seizures, encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cerebral metabolism and re-oxygenation, which lead to cerebral oedema .... their serum electrolytes and glucose, calcium and magnesium levels measured. ..... Dzhala V, Ben-Ari Y, Khazipov R. Seizures accelerate anoxia-induced neuronal.

  13. Counselling adults who experience a first seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Karen T; Newton, Mark

    2017-07-01

    A first seizure can result in significant uncertainty, fear and apprehension. One of the key roles of the clinician in the setting of first seizure is to provide accurate, timely information and counselling. We review the numerous components to be considered when counselling an adult patient after a first seizure. We provide a framework and manner to provide that counselling. We focus on an individualized approach and provide recommendations and information on issues of diagnosis, etiology, prognosis, the role and importance of medical testing, lifestyle considerations, driving, medication and other key counselling considerations. Accurate, timely counselling can allay fears and anxieties, remove misconceptions and reduce the risk for injury in seizure recurrence. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Epilepsies and Seizures: Hope Through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epilepticus and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) . Status Epilepticus Status epilepticus is a potentially life-threatening condition ... otherwise experience good seizure control with their medication. status epilepticus – a potentially life-threatening condition in which a ...

  15. Partial Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Partial Cancellation. Full Cancellation is desirable. But complexity requirements are enormous. 4000 tones, 100 Users billions of flops !!! Main Idea: Challenge: To determine which cross-talker to cancel on what “tone” for a given victim. Constraint: Total complexity is ...

  16. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  17. Predictors of acute symptomatic seizures after intracranial hemorrhage in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Seema; Kebede, Tewodros; Dean, Nathan P; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of acute symptomatic seizures in infants with supratentorial intracranial hemorrhage, to identify potential risk factors, and to determine the effect of acute seizures on long-term morbidity and mortality. Children less than 24 months with intracranial hemorrhage were identified from a neurocritical care database. All patients who received seizure prophylaxis beginning at admission were included in the study. Risk factors studied were gender, etiology, location of hemorrhage, seizure(s) on presentation, and the presence of parenchymal injury. Acute clinical and electrographic seizures were identified from hospital medical records. Subsequent development of late seizures was determined based on clinical information from patients' latest follow-up. Patients with idiopathic neonatal intracranial hemorrhage, premature infants, and those with prior history of seizures were excluded from analysis. Seventy-two infants met inclusion criteria. None. Forty percent of infants had acute symptomatic seizures. The prevalence was similar regardless of whether etiology of hemorrhage was traumatic or nontraumatic. Seizures on presentation and parenchymal injury were independent risk factors of acute seizures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006, respectively). Younger children and women were also at higher risk (p Acute seizures were not predictive of mortality, but nearly twice as many patients with acute seizures developed late seizures when compared with those without. Electrographic seizures and parenchymal injury were also predictive of development of late seizures (p hemorrhage are at high risk for acute symptomatic seizures. This is regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage. Younger patients, women, patients with parenchymal injury, and patients presenting with seizure are most likely to develop acute seizures. Although the benefits of seizure prophylaxis have not been studied in this specific population, these results suggest that it is an important component

  18. 15 CFR 904.501 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of seizure. 904.501 Section 904... Seizure and Forfeiture Procedures § 904.501 Notice of seizure. Within 60 days from the date of the seizure, NOAA will serve the Notice of Seizure as provided in § 904.3 to the owner or consignee, if known or...

  19. Ketogenic diet: Predictors of seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Arkilo, Dimitrios; Farooq, Osman; Gillogly, Cynthia; Kavak, Katelyn S; Weinstock, Arie

    2017-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is an effective non-pharmacologic treatment for medically resistant epilepsy. The aim of this study was to identify any predictors that may influence the response of ketogenic diet. A retrospective chart review for all patients with medically resistant epilepsy was performed at a tertiary care epilepsy center from 1996 to 2012. Patient- and diet-related variables were evaluated with respect to seizure reduction at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12-month intervals and divided into four possible outcome classes. Sixty-three patients met inclusion. Thirty-seven (59%) reported >50% seizure reduction at 3 months with 44% and 37% patients benefiting at 6-month and 12-month follow up, respectively. A trend toward significant seizure improvement was noted in 48% patients with seizure onset >1 year at 12-month (p = 0.09) interval and in 62% patients with >10 seizure/day at 6-month interval (p = 0.054). An ordinal logistic regression showed later age of seizure to have higher odds of favorable response at 1-month (p = 0.005) and 3-month (p = 0.013) follow up. Patients with non-fasting diet induction were more likely to have a favorable outcome at 6 months (p = 0.008) as do females (p = 0.037) and those treated with higher fat ratio diet (p = 0.034). Our study reports the effectiveness of ketogenic diet in children with medically resistant epilepsy. Later age of seizure onset, female gender, higher ketogenic diet ratio and non-fasting induction were associated with better odds of improved seizure outcome. A larger cohort is required to confirm these findings.

  20. Acute recurrent seizures in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed account is given, in question and answer format, of the diagnosis of meningioma in the left cerebral cortex of a 9-year-old male Shetland sheepdog with a history of sudden onset of seizures. The seizures were controlled by phenobarbital. Surgery was also performed to debulk the tumour. One year later the dog's neurological condition deteriorated again. Meningioma was confirmed by PM examination

  1. Administrative management of the soldier with seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, C H

    1991-07-01

    Based on improvement in our understanding of the prognosis of young adults with new onset seizures, and cumulative experience with the rules in effect for the last 30 years, a substantial change in the regulations affecting the fitness and profiling of these soldiers has been made. In general, these liberalize retention and profiling, set limits on the duration of trials of duty, provide for fitness determinations in soldiers with pseudo-seizures, and specify when neurologic consultation is required.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  3. Hungry Neurons: Metabolic Insights on Seizure Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzigaluppi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy afflicts up to 1.6% of the population and the mechanisms underlying the appearance of seizures are still not understood. In past years, many efforts have been spent trying to understand the mechanisms underlying the excessive and synchronous firing of neurons. Traditionally, attention was pointed towards synaptic (dysfunction and extracellular ionic species (dysregulation. Recently, novel clinical and preclinical studies explored the role of brain metabolism (i.e., glucose utilization of seizures pathophysiology revealing (in most cases reduced metabolism in the inter-ictal period and increased metabolism in the seconds preceding and during the appearance of seizures. In the present review, we summarize the clinical and preclinical observations showing metabolic dysregulation during epileptogenesis, seizure initiation, and termination, and in the inter-ictal period. Recent preclinical studies have shown that 2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG, a glycolysis blocker is a novel therapeutic approach to reduce seizures. Furthermore, we present initial evidence for the effectiveness of 2-DG in arresting 4-Aminopyridine induced neocortical seizures in vivo in the mouse.

  4. Intravenous Carbamazepine for Adults With Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, P Brittany; Tillery, Erika E; DeFalco, Alicia Potter

    2018-03-01

    To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, dosage and administration, potential drug-drug interactions, and place in therapy of the intravenous (IV) formulation of carbamazepine (Carnexiv) for the treatment of seizures in adult patients. A comprehensive PubMed and EBSCOhost search (1945 to August 2017) was performed utilizing the keywords carbamazepine, Carnexiv, carbamazepine intravenous, IV carbamazepine, seizures, epilepsy, and seizure disorder. Additional data were obtained from literature review citations, manufacturer's product labeling, and Lundbeck website as well as Clinicaltrials.gov and governmental sources. All English-language trials evaluating IV carbamazepine were analyzed for this review. IV carbamazepine is FDA approved as temporary replacement therapy for treatment of adult seizures. Based on a phase I trial and pooled data from 2 open-label bioavailability studies comparing oral with IV dosing, there was no noted indication of loss of seizure control in patients switched to short-term replacement antiepileptic drug therapy with IV carbamazepine. The recommended dose of IV carbamazepine is 70% of the patient's oral dose, given every 6 hours via 30-minute infusions. The adverse effect profile of IV carbamazepine is similar to that of the oral formulation, with the exception of added infusion-site reactions. IV carbamazepine is a reasonable option for adults with generalized tonic-clonic or focal seizures, previously stabilized on oral carbamazepine, who are unable to tolerate oral medications for up to 7 days. Unknown acquisition cost and lack of availability in the United States limit its use currently.

  5. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  6. Partial processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This discussion paper considers the possibility of applying to the recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors a particular method of partial processing based on the PUREX process but named CIVEX to emphasise the differences. The CIVEX process is based primarily on the retention of short-lived fission products. The paper suggests: (1) the recycle of fission products with uranium and plutonium in thermal reactor fuel would be technically feasible; (2) it would, however, take ten years or more to develop the CIVEX process to the point where it could be launched on a commercial scale; (3) since the majority of spent fuel to be reprocessed this century will have been in storage for ten years or more, the recycling of short-lived fission products with the U-Pu would not provide an effective means of making refabrication fuel ''inaccessible'' because the radioactivity associated with the fission products would have decayed. There would therefore be no advantage in partial processing

  7. Partial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.М. Karimova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A girl with partial gigantism (the increased I and II fingers of the left foot is being examined. This condition is a rare and unresolved problem, as the definite reason of its development is not determined. Wait-and-see strategy is recommended, as well as correcting operations after closing of growth zones, and forming of data pool for generalization and development of schemes of drug and radial therapeutic methods.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition ADLTE ADPEAF Autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy Epilepsy, partial, with auditory features ETL1 Related Information ... W, Nakken KO, Fischer C, Steinlein OK. Familial temporal lobe epilepsy with aphasic seizures and linkage to chromosome 10q22- ...

  9. Partial status epilepticus - rapid genetic diagnosis of Alpers' disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCoy, Bláthnaid

    2011-11-01

    We describe four children with a devastating encephalopathy characterised by refractory focal seizures and variable liver dysfunction. We describe their electroencephalographic, radiologic, genetic and pathologic findings. The correct diagnosis was established by rapid gene sequencing. POLG1 based Alpers\\' disease should be considered in any child presenting with partial status epilepticus.

  10. Anticonvulsive effect of paeoniflorin on experimental febrile seizures in immature rats: possible application for febrile seizures in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Hino

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures (FS is the most common convulsive disorder in children, but there have been no clinical and experimental studies of the possible treatment of FS with herbal medicines, which are widely used in Asian countries. Paeoniflorin (PF is a major bioactive component of Radix Paeoniae alba, and PF-containing herbal medicines have been used for neuromuscular, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we analyzed the anticonvulsive effect of PF and Keishikashakuyaku-to (KS; a PF-containing herbal medicine for hyperthermia-induced seizures in immature rats as a model of human FS. When immature (P5 male rats were administered PF or KS for 10 days, hyperthermia-induced seizures were significantly suppressed compared to control rats. In cultured hippocampal neurons, PF suppressed glutamate-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](i, glutamate receptor-mediated membrane depolarization, and glutamate-induced neuronal death. In addition, PF partially suppressed the elevation in [Ca(2+](i induced by activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5, but not that mediated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolpropionic acid (AMPA or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors. However, PF did not affect production or release of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in hippocampal neurons. These results suggest that PF or PF-containing herbal medicines exert anticonvulsive effects at least in part by preventing mGluR5-dependent [Ca(2+](i elevations. Thus, it could be a possible candidate for the treatment of FS in children.

  11. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  12. Towards an Online Seizure Advisory System—An Adaptive Seizure Prediction Framework Using Active Learning Heuristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppiah Ramachandran, Vignesh Raja; Alblas, Huibert J.; Le Viet Duc, Duc Viet; Meratnia, Nirvana

    2018-01-01

    In the last decade, seizure prediction systems have gained a lot of attention because of their enormous potential to largely improve the quality-of-life of the epileptic patients. The accuracy of the prediction algorithms to detect seizure in real-world applications is largely limited because the

  13. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This

  14. EPILAB: a software package for studies on the prediction of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C A; Direito, B; Feldwisch-Drentrup, H; Valderrama, M; Costa, R P; Alvarado-Rojas, C; Nikolopoulos, S; Le Van Quyen, M; Timmer, J; Schelter, B; Dourado, A

    2011-09-15

    A Matlab®-based software package, EPILAB, was developed for supporting researchers in performing studies on the prediction of epileptic seizures. It provides an intuitive and convenient graphical user interface. Fundamental concepts that are crucial for epileptic seizure prediction studies were implemented. This includes, for example, the development and statistical validation of prediction methodologies in long-term continuous recordings. Seizure prediction is usually based on electroencephalography (EEG) and electrocardiography (ECG) signals. EPILAB is able to process both EEG and ECG data stored in different formats. More than 35 time and frequency domain measures (features) can be extracted based on univariate and multivariate data analysis. These features can be post-processed and used for prediction purposes. The predictions may be conducted based on optimized thresholds or by applying classifications methods such as artificial neural networks, cellular neuronal networks, and support vector machines. EPILAB proved to be an efficient tool for seizure prediction, and aims to be a way to communicate, evaluate, and compare results and data among the seizure prediction community. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Specific imbalance of excitatory/inhibitory signaling establishes seizure onset pattern in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Curtis, Marco; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; Gotman, Jean; Köhling, Rüdiger; Lévesque, Maxime; Manseau, Frédéric; Shiri, Zahra; Williams, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Low-voltage fast (LVF) and hypersynchronous (HYP) patterns are the seizure-onset patterns most frequently observed in intracranial EEG recordings from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients. Both patterns also occur in models of MTLE in vivo and in vitro, and these studies have highlighted the predominant involvement of distinct neuronal network/neurotransmitter receptor signaling in each of them. First, LVF-onset seizures in epileptic rodents can originate from several limbic structures, frequently spread, and are associated with high-frequency oscillations in the ripple band (80–200 Hz), whereas HYP onset seizures initiate in the hippocampus and tend to remain focal with predominant fast ripples (250–500 Hz). Second, in vitro intracellular recordings from principal cells in limbic areas indicate that pharmacologically induced seizure-like discharges with LVF onset are initiated by a synchronous inhibitory event or by a hyperpolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potential barrage; in contrast, HYP onset is associated with a progressive impairment of inhibition and concomitant unrestrained enhancement of excitation. Finally, in vitro optogenetic experiments show that, under comparable experimental conditions (i.e., 4-aminopyridine application), the initiation of LVF- or HYP-onset seizures depends on the preponderant involvement of interneuronal or principal cell networks, respectively. Overall, these data may provide insight to delineate better therapeutic targets in the treatment of patients presenting with MTLE and, perhaps, with other epileptic disorders as well. PMID:27075542

  16. Seizure detection, seizure prediction, and closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Thome-Souza, Sigride; Jackson, Michele; Kadish, Navah Ester; Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Klehm, Jacquelyn; Bosl, William; Reinsberger, Claus; Schachter, Steven; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2014-08-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures despite optimal medication management. Systems employed to detect seizures may have the potential to improve outcomes in these patients by allowing more tailored therapies and might, additionally, have a role in accident and SUDEP prevention. Automated seizure detection and prediction require algorithms which employ feature computation and subsequent classification. Over the last few decades, methods have been developed to detect seizures utilizing scalp and intracranial EEG, electrocardiography, accelerometry and motion sensors, electrodermal activity, and audio/video captures. To date, it is unclear which combination of detection technologies yields the best results, and approaches may ultimately need to be individualized. This review presents an overview of seizure detection and related prediction methods and discusses their potential uses in closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauwecker Paula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure

  18. The effects of early-life seizures on hippocampal dendrite development and later-life learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J R; Nishimura, Masataka; Swann, John W

    2014-04-01

    Severe childhood epilepsy is commonly associated with intellectual developmental disabilities. The reasons for these cognitive deficits are likely multifactorial and will vary between epilepsy syndromes and even among children with the same syndrome. However, one factor these children have in common is the recurring seizures they experience - sometimes on a daily basis. Supporting the idea that the seizures themselves can contribute to intellectual disabilities are laboratory results demonstrating spatial learning and memory deficits in normal mice and rats that have experienced recurrent seizures in infancy. Studies reviewed here have shown that seizures in vivo and electrographic seizure activity in vitro both suppress the growth of hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. A simplification of dendritic arborization and a resulting decrease in the number and/or properties of the excitatory synapses on them could help explain the observed cognitive disabilities. There are a wide variety of candidate mechanisms that could be involved in seizure-induced growth suppression. The challenge is designing experiments that will help focus research on a limited number of potential molecular events. Thus far, results suggest that growth suppression is NMDA receptor-dependent and associated with a decrease in activation of the transcription factor CREB. The latter result is intriguing since CREB is known to play an important role in dendrite growth. Seizure-induced dendrite growth suppression may not occur as a single process in which pyramidal cells dendrites simply stop growing or grow slower compared to normal neurons. Instead, recent results suggest that after only a few hours of synchronized epileptiform activity in vitro dendrites appear to partially retract. This acute response is also NMDA receptor dependent and appears to be mediated by the Ca(+2)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. An understanding of the staging of seizure-induced growth suppression and the

  19. Animal Models of Seizures and Epilepsy: Past, Present, and Future Role for the Discovery of Antiseizure Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The identification of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy requires the use of seizure models. Except for some early treatments, including bromides and phenobarbital, the antiseizure activity of all clinically used drugs was, for the most part, defined by acute seizure models in rodents using the maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure tests and the electrically kindled rat. Unfortunately, the clinical evidence to date would suggest that none of these models, albeit useful, are likely to identify those therapeutics that will effectively manage patients with drug resistant seizures. Over the last 30 years, a number of animal models have been developed that display varying degrees of pharmacoresistance, such as the phenytoin- or lamotrigine-resistant kindled rat, the 6-Hz mouse model of partial seizures, the intrahippocampal kainate model in mice, or rats in which spontaneous recurrent seizures develops after inducing status epilepticus by chemical or electrical stimulation. As such, these models can be used to study mechanisms of drug resistance and may provide a unique opportunity for identifying a truly novel antiseizure drug (ASD), but thus far clinical evidence for this hope is lacking. Although animal models of drug resistant seizures are now included in ASD discovery approaches such as the ETSP (epilepsy therapy screening program), it is important to note that no single model has been validated for use to identify potential compounds for as yet drug resistant seizures, but rather a battery of such models should be employed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to discover novel, highly effective ASDs. The present review describes the previous and current approaches used in the search for new ASDs and offers some insight into future directions incorporating new and emerging animal models of therapy resistance.

  20. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures

  1. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB(9ed4)), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (sei(ts1)) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB(9ed4) flies was also assessed. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB(9ed4)/+ and sei(ts1) mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB(9ed4)/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB(9ed4)/+ became adults. These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. [Clinical and electrophysiologic studies on epileptic negative myoclonus in atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-xian; Liu, Xiao-yan; Qin, Jiong; Zhang, Yue-hua; Bao, Xin-hua; Chang, Xing-zhi; Wu, Ye; Xiong, Hui

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the clinical, neurophysiologic characteristics and therapeutic considerations of epileptic negative myoclonus (ENM) in atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood (ABPE). Video-EEG monitoring with outstretched arm tests were carried out in 17 patients, and 9 of them were examined with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). The ENM manifestations, electrophysiologic features and responses to antiepileptic drugs (AED) were analyzed. Seventeen patients were diagnosed as having benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECT) during the early course of the disease and were treated with AED. During the course of the disease, hand trembling, objects dropping, head nodding and instability during standing might be clues for ENM occurrence. ENM had been confirmed in our patients by outstretched arm tests during video-EEG recording. The ictal EEG showed that high-amplitude spikes followed by a slow wave over the contralateral motor areas. This was further confirmed by time-locked silent EMG in 9 patients. During ENM occurrence or recurrence, the habitual seizures and interictal discharges were exaggerated. Atypical absence seizures also occurred in 6 patients. The alteration of therapeutic options of AED relating to ENM appearance in some patients included the add-on therapy with carbamazepine (CBZ), oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, or withdrawal of valproate (VPA). ENM was controlled in most cases by using VPA, clonazepam (CZP) and corticosteroid with different combination. ENM could occur during the course of ABPE. Outstretching arm tests during video-EEG monitoring in combination with EMG was essential to confirm ENM. The ENM occurrence was always associated with the frequency increasing of habitual seizures and the aggravation of interictal discharges. Some AED such as CBZ might induce ENM. VPA, benzodiazepines and corticosteroid with different combination were relatively effective in treatment of ENM.

  3. Sex dimorphism in seizure-controlling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Fillippo Sean; Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Moshé, Solomon L

    2014-12-01

    Males and females show a different predisposition to certain types of seizures in clinical studies. Animal studies have provided growing evidence for sexual dimorphism of certain brain regions, including those that control seizures. Seizures are modulated by networks involving subcortical structures, including thalamus, reticular formation nuclei, and structures belonging to the basal ganglia. In animal models, the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) is the best studied of these areas, given its relevant role in the expression and control of seizures throughout development in the rat. Studies with bilateral infusions of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol have identified distinct roles of the anterior or posterior rat SNR in flurothyl seizure control, that follow sex-specific maturational patterns during development. These studies indicate that (a) the regional functional compartmentalization of the SNR appears only after the third week of life, (b) only the male SNR exhibits muscimol-sensitive proconvulsant effects which, in older animals, is confined to the posterior SNR, and (c) the expression of the muscimol-sensitive anticonvulsant effects become apparent earlier in females than in males. The first three postnatal days are crucial in determining the expression of the muscimol-sensitive proconvulsant effects of the immature male SNR, depending on the gonadal hormone setting. Activation of the androgen receptors during this early period seems to be important for the formation of this proconvulsant SNR region. We describe molecular/anatomical candidates underlying these age- and sex-related differences, as derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as by [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. These involve sex-specific patterns in the developmental changes in the structure or physiology or GABA(A) receptors or of other subcortical structures (e.g., locus coeruleus, hippocampus) that may affect the function of seizure-controlling networks

  4. Risk of seizures in transcranial magnetic stimulation: a clinical review to inform consent process focused on bupropion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobek CE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Christine E Dobek,1 Daniel M Blumberger,2 Jonathan Downar,3 Zafiris J Daskalakis,2 Fidel Vila-Rodriguez11Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Non-Invasive Neurostimulation Therapies (NINET Laboratory, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, 2Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 3Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaObjective: When considering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS for major depressive disorder, clinicians often face a lack of detailed information on potential interactions between rTMS and pharmacotherapy. This is particularly relevant to patients receiving bupropion, a commonly prescribed antidepressant with lower risk of sexual side effects or weight increase, which has been associated with increased risk of seizure in particular populations. Our aim was to systematically review the information on seizures occurred with rTMS to identify the potential risk factors with attention to concurrent medications, particularly bupropion.Data sources: We conducted a systematic review through the databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE between 1980 and June 2015. Additional articles were found using reference lists of relevant articles. Reporting of data follows Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement.Study selection: Two reviewers independently screened articles reporting the occurrence of seizures during rTMS. Articles reporting seizures in epilepsy during rTMS were excluded. A total of 25 rTMS-induced seizures were included in the final review.Data extraction: Data were systematically extracted, and the authors of the applicable studies were contacted when appropriate to provide more detail about the seizure incidents.Results: Twenty-five seizures were identified. Potential risk factors emerged such as sleep deprivation, polypharmacy, and neurological insult. High-frequency-rTMS was

  5. Seizures after intravenous tramadol given as premedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar Raiger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old, 50-kg female with a history of epilepsy was scheduled for elective breast surgery (fibroadenoma under general anaesthesia. She was given glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg, ondansetron 4 mg and tramadol 100 mg i.v. as premedication. Within 5 min, she had an acute episode of generalised tonic-clonic seizure that was successfully treated with 75 mg thiopentone i.v. and after 30 min, she was given general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Surgery, intra-operative period, extubation and post-operative period were uneventful. We conclude that tramadol may provoke seizures in patients with epilepsy even within the recommended dose range.

  6. Treating seizures and epilepsy with anticoagulants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola eMaggio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombin is a serine protease playing an essential role in the blood coagulation cascade. Recent work, however, has identified a novel role for thrombin-mediated signaling pathways in the central nervous system. Binding of thrombin to protease-activated receptors (PARs in the brain appears to have multiple actions affecting both health and disease. Specifically, thrombin has been shown to lead to the onset of seizures via PAR-1 activation. In this perspective article, we review the putative mechanisms by which thrombin causes seizures and epilepsy. We propose a potential role of PAR-1 antagonists and novel thrombin inhibitors as new, possible antiepileptic drugs.

  7. Seizure After Local Anesthesia for Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Jing Tsai

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a young male patient who experienced seizure after local injection of 3 mL 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:200,000 around a recurrent nasal angiofibroma. After receiving 100% oxygen via mask and thiamylal sodium, the patient had no residual neurologic sequelae. Seizure immediately following the injection of local anesthetics in the nasal cavity is probably due to injection into venous or arterial circulation with retrograde flow to the brain circulation. Further imaging study or angiography should be done before head and neck surgeries, especially in such highly vascular neoplasm.

  8. De-novo simple partial status epilepticus presenting as Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Bhimanagouda; Oware, Agyepong

    2012-04-01

    Language disturbances manifesting as brief periods of speech arrest occur with seizures originating in the frontal or temporal lobes. These language disturbances are usually present with other features of seizures or may occur in an episodic fashion suggesting their likely epileptic origin. Sustained but reversible aphasia as the sole manifestation of partial status epilepticus is rare, particularly without a history of prior seizures. A few cases have been described in the literature where Broca's or mixed aphasia seems to be more common than Wernicke's aphasia. Here we describe a patient who presented with Wernicke's aphasia secondary to simple partial status epilepticus but without any other features of seizures. The diagnosis was confirmed on EEG and the aphasia reversed after antiepileptic treatment. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Seizure severity in children with epilepsy is associated with their parents' perception of stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Sano, Fumikazu; Ohyama, Tetsuo; Sugita, Kanji; Aihara, Masao

    2016-10-01

    To develop and implement interventions to improve the quality of life (QOL) in children with epilepsy, it is important for clinicians and researchers to understand the effects of the children's parents' perception of stigma. The purpose of this study was to identify a relationship between patient clinical characteristics and perception of stigma in the parents of children with epilepsy. Parents of children with epilepsy were recruited from our university hospital between April 1, 2005 and March 31, 2012. Items for the Parent Stigma Scale were developed from the literature and open-ended interviews with parents of children with epilepsy about their concerns and fears, including those related to stigma. Parents were asked to respond to five items, each on a 5-point scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Assessments were performed for each clinical characteristic, such as child's sex, age at seizure onset, family history of epilepsy, seizure frequency, presence of status epilepticus (SE), presence of treatment-related adverse events, and the scores of each scale. A total of 52 parents of children with epilepsy and 10 parents of healthy children were enrolled in the study. Parents of children with epilepsy showed significantly higher scores on the questionnaire than parents of healthy children. In multiple regression analysis, greater perceptions of stigma were associated with a seizure frequency of more than one per month (p=0.0036, B=1.104, β=0.402). In contrast, the presence of prior febrile seizures (p=0.0034, B=-1.297, β=-0.308) and family history of epilepsy (p=0.0066, B=-1.613, β=-0.277) were associated with lower perceptions of stigma. Greater parental perceptions of stigma were seen with the presence of monthly seizures. Parents of children with epilepsy are at risk of significant perceptions of stigma. Seizure severity, indicated by the presence of monthly seizures, was associated with greater perceptions of stigma in parents. In addition

  10. A systematic review of suggestive seizure induction for the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Suggestive seizure induction is a widely used method for diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Despite seven decades of multidisciplinary research, however, there is still no unified protocol, no definitive agreement on the ethical framework and no consensus on diagnostic utility. This systematic review surveys the evidence at hand and addresses clinically relevant aspects of suggestive seizure induction. In addition to its use for facilitating the diagnostic process, its mechanism of action and utility in elucidating the psychopathology of PNES will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan. ... neuroimaging, it offers an opportunity to investigate structural lesions as a cause of seizures ... The presence of neurologic deficit increased the yield of abnormal CT features.

  12. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centre- based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were used for analysis of seizure incidence differences as per WHO Grades, histology, location ... Keywords: Brain tumour, Epilepsy, Glioma, Seizures, Levetiracetam, .... glioma patients. Characteristics. N (%). Gender. Male. Female. Histology.

  13. Puerperal seizures: not the usual suspects | Hayes | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We present a case of puerperal seizures and neonatal flaccidity due to abuse and abrupt withdrawal from zolpidem, following an elective Caesarean delivery at term. Keywords: zolpidem, puerperal seizures, withdrawal ...

  14. Epileptic seizure prediction based on a bivariate spectral power methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandarabadi, Mojtaba; Teixeira, Cesar A; Direito, Bruno; Dourado, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The spectral power of 5 frequently considered frequency bands (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Theta and Delta) for 6 EEG channels is computed and then all the possible pairwise combinations among the 30 features set, are used to create a 435 dimensional feature space. Two new feature selection methods are introduced to choose the best candidate features among those and to reduce the dimensionality of this feature space. The selected features are then fed to Support Vector Machines (SVMs) that classify the cerebral state in preictal and non-preictal classes. The outputs of the SVM are regularized using a method that accounts for the classification dynamics of the preictal class, also known as "Firing Power" method. The results obtained using our feature selection approaches are compared with the ones obtained using minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance (mRMR) feature selection method. The results in a group of 12 patients of the EPILEPSIAE database, containing 46 seizures and 787 hours multichannel recording for out-of-sample data, indicate the efficiency of the bivariate approach as well as the two new feature selection methods. The best results presented sensitivity of 76.09% (35 of 46 seizures predicted) and a false prediction rate of 0.15(-1).

  15. Psychogenic seizures and frontal disconnection: EEG synchronisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazeva, Maria G; Jalili, Mahdi; Frackowiak, Richard S; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2011-05-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are paroxysmal events that, in contrast to epileptic seizures, are related to psychological causes without the presence of epileptiform EEG changes. Recent models suggest a multifactorial basis for PNES. A potentially paramount, but currently poorly understood factor is the interplay between psychiatric features and a specific vulnerability of the brain leading to a clinical picture that resembles epilepsy. Hypothesising that functional cerebral network abnormalities may predispose to the clinical phenotype, the authors undertook a characterisation of the functional connectivity in PNES patients. The authors analysed the whole-head surface topography of multivariate phase synchronisation (MPS) in interictal high-density EEG of 13 PNES patients as compared with 13 age- and sex-matched controls. MPS mapping reduces the wealth of dynamic data obtained from high-density EEG to easily readable synchronisation maps, which provide an unbiased overview of any changes in functional connectivity associated with distributed cortical abnormalities. The authors computed MPS maps for both Laplacian and common-average-reference EEGs. In a between-group comparison, only patchy, non-uniform changes in MPS survived conservative statistical testing. However, against the background of these unimpressive group results, the authors found widespread inverse correlations between individual PNES frequency and MPS within the prefrontal and parietal cortices. PNES appears to be associated with decreased prefrontal and parietal synchronisation, possibly reflecting dysfunction of networks within these regions.

  16. Phenobarbital reduces EEG amplitude and propagation of neonatal seizures but does not alter performance of automated seizure detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Sean R; Livingstone, Vicki; Low, Evonne; Pressler, Ronit; Rennie, Janet M; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2016-10-01

    Phenobarbital increases electroclinical uncoupling and our preliminary observations suggest it may also affect electrographic seizure morphology. This may alter the performance of a novel seizure detection algorithm (SDA) developed by our group. The objectives of this study were to compare the morphology of seizures before and after phenobarbital administration in neonates and to determine the effect of any changes on automated seizure detection rates. The EEGs of 18 term neonates with seizures both pre- and post-phenobarbital (524 seizures) administration were studied. Ten features of seizures were manually quantified and summary measures for each neonate were statistically compared between pre- and post-phenobarbital seizures. SDA seizure detection rates were also compared. Post-phenobarbital seizures showed significantly lower amplitude (pphenobarbital reduces both the amplitude and propagation of seizures which may help to explain electroclinical uncoupling of seizures. The seizure detection rate of the algorithm was unaffected by these changes. The results suggest that users should not need to adjust the SDA sensitivity threshold after phenobarbital administration. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronically epileptic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kun; Hu, Ming; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammatory processes are pathologic hallmarks of both experimental and human epilepsy, and could be implicated in the neuronal hyperexcitability. Aspirin represents one of the non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with fewer side effects in long-term application. This study was carried out to assess the anti-epileptic effects of aspirin when administered during the chronic stage of temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE] in mice. The alteration of hippocampal neurogenesis was also examined for raising a possible mechanism underlying the protective effect of anti-inflammatory treatment in the TLE. Two months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the chronically epileptic mice were treated with aspirin (20 mg, 60 mg or 80 mg/kg) once a day for 10 weeks. Spontaneous recurrent seizures were monitored by video camera for 2 weeks. To evaluate the profile of hippocampal neurogenesis, the newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus were labeled by the proliferation marker BrdU. The newborn neurons that extended axons to CA3 area were visualized by cholera toxin B subunit retrograde tracing. Administration of aspirin with a dosage of 60 mg or 80 mg/kg initiated at 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus significantly reduced the frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Aspirin treatment also increased the number of newborn neurons with anatomic integration through improving the survival of the newly generated cells. Aspirin treatment during the chronic stage of TLE could attenuate the spontaneous recurrent seizures in mice. Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition of COX-PGE2 pathway might partly contribute to this anti-epileptic effect. Highlights • Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures of chronically epileptic mice • Aspirin increases neurogenesis of chronically epileptic hippocampus by improving the survival of newly generated cells • Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition

  18. Dictator Perpetuus: Julius Caesar--did he have seizures? If so, what was the etiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2004-10-01

    The "Dictator Perpetuus" of the Roman Empire, the great Julius Caesar, was not the one for whom the well-known cesarean operation was named; instead, this term is derived from a Latin word meaning "to cut." Caesar likely had epilepsy on the basis of four attacks that were probably complex partial seizures: (1) while listening to an oration by Cicero, (2) in the Senate while being offered the Emperor's Crown, and in military campaigns, (3) near Thapsus (North Africa) and (4) Corduba (Spain). Also, it is possible that he had absence attacks as a child and as a teenager. His son, Caesarion, by Queen Cleopatra, likely had seizures as a child, but the evidence is only suggestive. His great-great-great grandnephews Caligula and Britannicus also had seizures. The etiology of these seizures in this Julio-Claudian family was most likely through inheritance, with the possibility of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in his great grandfather and also his father. Our best evidence comes from the ancient sources of Suetonius, Plutarch, Pliny, and Appianus.

  19. Resource utilization in children with tuberous sclerosis complex and associated seizures: a retrospective chart review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennert, Barb; Farrelly, Eileen; Sacco, Patricia; Pira, Geraldine; Frost, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Seizures are a hallmark manifestation of tuberous sclerosis complex, yet data characterizing resource utilization are lacking. This retrospective chart review was performed to assess the economic burden of tuberous sclerosis complex with neurologic manifestations. Demographic and resource utilization data were collected for 95 patients for up to 5 years after tuberous sclerosis complex diagnosis. Mean age at diagnosis was 3.1 years, with complex partial and infantile spasms as the most common seizure types. In the first 5 years post-diagnosis, 83.2% required hospitalization, 30.5% underwent surgery, and the majority of patients (90.5%) underwent ≥3 testing procedures. In 79 patients with a full 5 years of data, hospitalizations, intensive care unit stays, diagnostic testing, and rehabilitation services decreased over the 5-year period. Resource utilization is cost-intensive in children with tuberous sclerosis complex and associated seizures during the first few years following diagnosis. Improving seizure control and reducing health care costs in this population remain unmet needs.

  20. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Aulich, A. [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Reifenberger, G. [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kiwit, J.C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[{sup 123}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  1. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J.; Aulich, A.; Reifenberger, G.; Kiwit, J.C.W.; Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D.

    2000-01-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[ 123 I]iodo-α-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  2. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Correlation between aberrant behaviors, EEG abnormalities and seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Elena Hartley-McAndrew

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between epilepsy, epileptiform discharges, cognitive, language and behavioral symptoms is not clearly understood. Since difficulties with socialization and maladaptive behaviors are found in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, we inquired whether epileptiform activity and seizures are associated with adverse behavioral manifestations in this population. We reviewed our EEG database between 1999-2006, and identified 123 children with ASD. EEG abnormalities were found in 39 children (31%. A control group of age and gender matched ASD children with normal EEG’s was obtained. Packets of questionnaires including the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale II (VABS, Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS were sent by mail. Out of 21 packets received, 11 had normal and 10 had abnormal EEG’s. There were no statistically significant differences in behavior between the two groups. Statistical analysis of discharge location and frequency did not reveal a significant trend. However, children with ASD and seizures had statistically significant lower scores in VABS daily living (P=0.009 and socialization (P=0.007 as compared to those without seizures. ASD children with seizures had higher ABC levels of hyperactivity and irritability. Differences in irritability scores nearly reached statistical significance (P=0.058. There was no significant difference in the degree of CARS autism rating between the groups. Our study did not reveal statistically significant differences in behaviors between ASD children with and without EEG abnormalities. However, ASD children with seizures revealed significantly worse behaviors as compared to counterparts without seizures.

  3. From here to epilepsy: the risk of seizure in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Nicolas; Assal, Frédéric; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-03-01

    To describe the association between Alzheimer's disease and seizures by reviewing epidemiological data from available literature and to assess the putative pathophysiological links between neurodegeneration and altered cortical excitability. We also discuss specific antiepileptic treatment strategies in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as transient epileptic amnesia as a possible crossroads between degeneration and epilepsy. Regarding epidemiology, we searched publications in Pubmed, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science (until September 2015) using the keywords "incidence", "prevalence" and "frequency", as well as "Alzheimer's disease" and "seizures". In addition, therapeutic aspects for seizures in Alzheimer's disease were searched using the key words "antiepileptic drugs", "seizure treatment" and "Alzheimer". The prevalence and incidence rates of seizures were found to be increased 2 to 6-fold in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared to age-adjusted control patients. Treatment strategies have mainly been extrapolated from elderly patients without dementia, except for one single randomised trial, in which levetiracetam, lamotrigine and phenobarbital efficacy and tolerance were investigated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mouse models appear to show a major role of amyloid precursor protein and its cleavage products in the generation of cortical hyperexcitability. A link between Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy has long been described and recent cohort studies have more clearly delineated risk factors associated with the genesis of seizures, such as early onset and possibly severity of dementia. As genetic forms of Alzheimer's disease and experimental mouse models suggest, beta-amyloid may play a prominent role in the propagation of synchronised abnormal discharges, perhaps more via an excitatory mode than a direct neurodegenerative effect.

  4. pre-hospital management of febrile seizures in children seen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. A febrile seizure refers to a seizure occurring in infancy or childhood usually between three months and five years of age as a result of elevated body temperature in the absence of pathology in the brain.1 Febrile seizures are commonly encountered in emergency paediatric practice and have been ...

  5. The determinants of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics | Imam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This assesses generalisation of seizures, falls, injuries, urinary incontinence, warning interval before loss of consciousness, automatisms and time of recovery on a graded scale. Results: The most frequent indices of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics is the generalisation of seizures in 85.7% of subjects, incontinence of ...

  6. 19 CFR 162.21 - Responsibility and authority for seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibility and authority for seizures. 162.21 Section 162.21 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... authority for seizures. (a) Seizures by Customs officers. Property may be seized, if available, by any...

  7. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  8. Patterns of antiepileptic drug use and seizure control among people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Epilepsy is characterized by episodic and unpredictable seizure recurrences which are often amenable to medical treatment. Simple and readily available medications can be used to control seizures in epilepsy. However, in many communities in developing countries seizure control among people living with ...

  9. 26 CFR 403.25 - Personal property subject to seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personal property subject to seizure. 403.25... AND ADMINISTRATION DISPOSITION OF SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY Seizures and Forfeitures § 403.25 Personal property subject to seizure. Personal property may be seized by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue or his...

  10. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or oral...

  11. 27 CFR 447.63 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture. 447.63 Section 447.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 447.63 Seizure and forfeiture. Whoever knowingly...

  12. 77 FR 11437 - Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 233 Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture AGENCY: Postal... Service's rules and regulations regarding the seizure and forfeiture of property into three sections, 39.... The proposed revision consolidates sections 233.8 and 233.9, and treats seizures involving personal...

  13. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... officer, or a Federal Aviation Administration safety inspector, authorized in an order of seizure issued...

  14. 9 CFR 118.4 - Seizure and condemnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure and condemnation. 118.4... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DETENTION; SEIZURE AND CONDEMNATION § 118.4 Seizure and condemnation. Any biological product which is prepared, sold, bartered...

  15. 27 CFR 555.166 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure or forfeiture. 555... EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Unlawful Acts, Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 555.166 Seizure or forfeiture. Any explosive materials involved or used or intended to be used...

  16. 26 CFR 301.7321-1 - Seizure of property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of property. 301.7321-1 Section 301... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Other Offenses § 301.7321-1 Seizure of property. Any property subject... director or assistant regional commissioner (alcohol, tobacco, and firearms). Upon seizure of property by...

  17. 19 CFR 12.101 - Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. 12.101...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.101 Seizure of prohibited... accordance with § 12.100(a) shall be seized under 19 U.S.C. 1595a(c). (b) Notice of seizure. Notice of...

  18. 76 FR 26660 - Consolidation of Seizure and Forfeiture Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... CFR Parts 8 and 9 [Docket No. OAG 127; AG Order No. 3263-2011] RIN 1105-AA74 Consolidation of Seizure... seizure and forfeiture regulations, to conform those regulations to the Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act..., Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives'' and generally transferred law enforcement functions, and seizure and...

  19. 8 CFR 274.1 - Seizure and forfeiture authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure and forfeiture authority. 274.1 Section 274.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE OF CONVEYANCES § 274.1 Seizure and forfeiture authority. Any officer of Customs and Border...

  20. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure or forfeiture. 555... Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain a detection agent in violation of 18 U.S.C. 842(l)-(n) is subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions of 19 U.S.C. 1595a...

  1. A Long Short-Term Memory deep learning network for the prediction of epileptic seizures using EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, Κostas Μ; Pezoulas, Vasileios C; Zervakis, Michalis; Konitsiotis, Spiros; Koutsouris, Dimitrios D; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2018-05-17

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is the most prominent means to study epilepsy and capture changes in electrical brain activity that could declare an imminent seizure. In this work, Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) networks are introduced in epileptic seizure prediction using EEG signals, expanding the use of deep learning algorithms with convolutional neural networks (CNN). A pre-analysis is initially performed to find the optimal architecture of the LSTM network by testing several modules and layers of memory units. Based on these results, a two-layer LSTM network is selected to evaluate seizure prediction performance using four different lengths of preictal windows, ranging from 15 min to 2 h. The LSTM model exploits a wide range of features extracted prior to classification, including time and frequency domain features, between EEG channels cross-correlation and graph theoretic features. The evaluation is performed using long-term EEG recordings from the open CHB-MIT Scalp EEG database, suggest that the proposed methodology is able to predict all 185 seizures, providing high rates of seizure prediction sensitivity and low false prediction rates (FPR) of 0.11-0.02 false alarms per hour, depending on the duration of the preictal window. The proposed LSTM-based methodology delivers a significant increase in seizure prediction performance compared to both traditional machine learning techniques and convolutional neural networks that have been previously evaluated in the literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Aura interruption: the Andrews/Reiter behavioral intervention may reduce seizures and improve quality of life - a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsas, S M; Gregory, W L; White, G; Navarro, G; Salinsky,