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Sample records for partial molar argon

  1. Calculation of partial enthalpies in argon-krypton mixtures by NPT molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sindzingre, P.; Massobrio, C.; Ciccotti, G.; Frenkel, D.

    1989-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we have indicated how, by using a particle-insertion technique, partial molar enthalpies and related quantities can be evaluated from simulations on a single state point. In the present paper we apply this method to a Lennard-Jones argon-krypton mixture. For this particular

  2. Partial molar volumes and partial molar adiabatic compressibilities of a short chain perfluorosurfactant: Sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Elena; Ruso, Juan M.; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Felix

    2005-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements of sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at T = (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, and 323.15) K have been obtained. From these results partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibilities were calculated. Deviations from the Debye-Hueckel limiting law provide evidence for limited association at lower concentrations. The change of the partial molar volume and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation was calculated. Variations of the change of partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation are discussed in terms of temperature

  3. Partial molar volumes and partial molar adiabatic compressibilities of a short chain perfluorosurfactant: Sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Elena [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ruso, Juan M. [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: faruso@usc.es; Prieto, Gerardo [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sarmiento, Felix [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2005-12-15

    Density and ultrasound measurements of sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at T = (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, and 323.15) K have been obtained. From these results partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibilities were calculated. Deviations from the Debye-Hueckel limiting law provide evidence for limited association at lower concentrations. The change of the partial molar volume and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation was calculated. Variations of the change of partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation are discussed in terms of temperature.

  4. Partial Molar Volumes of Aqua Ions from First Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Julia; Bruneval, Fabien; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2017-08-08

    Partial molar volumes of ions in water solution are calculated through pressures obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The correct definition of pressure in charged systems subject to periodic boundary conditions requires access to the variation of the electrostatic potential upon a change of volume. We develop a scheme for calculating such a variation in liquid systems by setting up an interface between regions of different density. This also allows us to determine the absolute deformation potentials for the band edges of liquid water. With the properly defined pressures, we obtain partial molar volumes of a series of aqua ions in very good agreement with experimental values.

  5. Partial Molar Volume of Methanol in Water: Effect of Polarizability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2009), s. 559-563 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : water–methanol mixtures * partial molar volume * polarizability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  6. Determination of partial molar volumes from free energy perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-04-07

    Partial molar volume is an important thermodynamic property that gives insights into molecular size and intermolecular interactions in solution. Theoretical frameworks for determining the partial molar volume (V°) of a solvated molecule generally apply Scaled Particle Theory or Kirkwood-Buff theory. With the current abilities to perform long molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, more direct methods are gaining popularity, such as computing V° directly as the difference in computed volume from two simulations, one with a solute present and another without. Thermodynamically, V° can also be determined as the pressure derivative of the free energy of solvation in the limit of infinite dilution. Both approaches are considered herein with the use of free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations to compute the necessary free energies of solvation at elevated pressures. Absolute and relative partial molar volumes are computed for benzene and benzene derivatives using the OPLS-AA force field. The mean unsigned error for all molecules is 2.8 cm(3) mol(-1). The present methodology should find use in many contexts such as the development and testing of force fields for use in computer simulations of organic and biomolecular systems, as a complement to related experimental studies, and to develop a deeper understanding of solute-solvent interactions.

  7. Determination of partial molar volumes from free energy perturbation theory†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilseck, Jonah Z.; Tirado-Rives, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Partial molar volume is an important thermodynamic property that gives insights into molecular size and intermolecular interactions in solution. Theoretical frameworks for determining the partial molar volume (V°) of a solvated molecule generally apply Scaled Particle Theory or Kirkwood–Buff theory. With the current abilities to perform long molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, more direct methods are gaining popularity, such as computing V° directly as the difference in computed volume from two simulations, one with a solute present and another without. Thermodynamically, V° can also be determined as the pressure derivative of the free energy of solvation in the limit of infinite dilution. Both approaches are considered herein with the use of free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations to compute the necessary free energies of solvation at elevated pressures. Absolute and relative partial molar volumes are computed for benzene and benzene derivatives using the OPLS-AA force field. The mean unsigned error for all molecules is 2.8 cm3 mol−1. The present methodology should find use in many contexts such as the development and testing of force fields for use in computer simulations of organic and biomolecular systems, as a complement to related experimental studies, and to develop a deeper understanding of solute–solvent interactions. PMID:25589343

  8. Partial molar volume of anionic polyelectrolytes in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca, Constain; Contreras, Martín; Gamboa, Consuelo

    2007-05-15

    In this work the partial molar volumes (V) of different anionic polyelectrolytes and hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes (PHM) were measured. Polymers like polymaleic acid-co-styrene, polymaleic acid-co-1-olefin, polymaleic acid-co-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone, and polyacrylic acid (abbreviated as MAS-n, PA-n-K2, AMVP, and PAA, respectively) were employed. These materials were investigated by density measurements in highly dilute aqueous solutions. The molar volume results allow us to discuss the effect of the carboxylic groups and the contributions from the comonomeric principal chain. The PAA presents the smaller V, while the largest V value was for AMVP. The V of PHM shows a linear relationship with the number of methylene groups in the lateral chain. It is found that the magnitude of the contribution per methylene group decreases as the hydrophobic character of the environment increases.

  9. Infinitely dilute partial molar properties of proteins from computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A; Smith, Paul E

    2014-11-13

    A detailed understanding of temperature and pressure effects on an infinitely dilute protein's conformational equilibrium requires knowledge of the corresponding infinitely dilute partial molar properties. Established molecular dynamics methodologies generally have not provided a way to calculate these properties without either a loss of thermodynamic rigor, the introduction of nonunique parameters, or a loss of information about which solute conformations specifically contributed to the output values. Here we implement a simple method that is thermodynamically rigorous and possesses none of the above disadvantages, and we report on the method's feasibility and computational demands. We calculate infinitely dilute partial molar properties for two proteins and attempt to distinguish the thermodynamic differences between a native and a denatured conformation of a designed miniprotein. We conclude that simple ensemble average properties can be calculated with very reasonable amounts of computational power. In contrast, properties corresponding to fluctuating quantities are computationally demanding to calculate precisely, although they can be obtained more easily by following the temperature and/or pressure dependence of the corresponding ensemble averages.

  10. The unfolding effects on the protein hydration shell and partial molar volume: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Galdo, Sara; Amadei, Andrea

    2016-10-12

    In this paper we apply the computational analysis recently proposed by our group to characterize the solvation properties of a native protein in aqueous solution, and to four model aqueous solutions of globular proteins in their unfolded states thus characterizing the protein unfolded state hydration shell and quantitatively evaluating the protein unfolded state partial molar volumes. Moreover, by using both the native and unfolded protein partial molar volumes, we obtain the corresponding variations (unfolding partial molar volumes) to be compared with the available experimental estimates. We also reconstruct the temperature and pressure dependence of the unfolding partial molar volume of Myoglobin dissecting the structural and hydration effects involved in the process.

  11. The partial molar volume of BeSO4 in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuschel, F.; Seidel, J.

    1981-01-01

    The density of aqueous solutions of BeSO 4 has been measured as a function of the mole fraction in the range of 0.02487 x 10 -2 to 6.3082 x 10 -2 . From the results obtained the molar volume and partial molar volume have been calculated and the limiting value of the partial molar volume for Be 2+ was extrapolated in accordance with the Debye-Hueckel law

  12. Thermodynamic interrelation between excess limiting partial molar characteristics of a liquid nonelectrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Evgeniy V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Excess limiting molar volume may be regarded as a solvation-related characteristic. ► Volumetric and enthalpic effects of dissolution are interrelated thermodynamically. ► Possibility to estimate the partial change in solute compressibility is described. - Abstract: On the basis of thermodynamic analysis, it is concluded that the excess limiting partial molar volume, like the excess limiting partial molar enthalpy, can be considered as a solvation-related characteristic of a liquid nonelectrolyte. A thermodynamically grounded interrelation between standard volumetric and enthalpic effects of solution of a liquid nonelectrolyte (or series of nonelectrolytes) is suggested.

  13. Relationship between the partial molar and molar quantity of a thermodynamic state function in a multicomponent mixture – revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Näfe, H.

    2013-01-01

    As far as a multicomponent mixture is concerned, different versions exist in the literature for the relationship between the partial molar and molar quantity of a thermodynamic state function with the most prominent example of the two quantities being the activity coefficient of an arbitrary component and the excess Gibbs free energy of a mixture comprising this component. Since the relationships published so far have to a large degree been derived independently of each other and result from apparently conflicting approaches, they are still considered as separate subjects in the literature. It is demonstrated that despite this curious situation all relationships are equivalent to each other from a mathematical point of view

  14. On the thermal raleigh problem in partially ionized argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutten Mansfeld, A.C.B.

    1976-01-01

    A partially ionized gas is created by the reflection of a shock wave with incident Mach numbers in the range 7 to 10 and an initial pressure of 5 Torr against the cold end wall of a shock tube. Heat exchange between the plasma and this cold wall induces several relaxation processes in the thermal boundary layer. Of these, relaxation of i) the electron and heavy particles temperature and ii) the degree of ionization towards a local thermodynamic equilibrium state are considered. In the model, transport and relaxation processes are treated simultaneously. A classification on the basis of relaxation phenomena is performed, i.e., simplified sets of equations are obtained in a systematic way from the frozen or equilibrium limits of the relaxation processes. A finite difference numerical solution for the different models is obtained. Because the boundary conditions are of mixed type and the relaxation processes show aspects of stiffness, the application of a backward implicit discretization scheme is necessary. As a diagnostic tool, a two wavelength version of the laser schlieren method is used. The measurements provide time histories of both the electron and atom number density gradients

  15. Partial and apparent molar volumes of aqueous solutions of the 1:1 type electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klugman, I.Yu.

    2002-01-01

    Formulas for calculating partial and apparent molar volumes of MX (M=Li-Cs; X = Cl-I) electrolyte aqueous solutions in a wide range of concentrations from 0 to 4 mol/kg with error not in excess of 0.05% are suggested. It is shown that the previously employed formulas for calculating partial molar volumes of electrolytes give false indications of mutual effect of ions and actually they are fit solely for very small concentrations [ru

  16. Partial molar volumes of hydrogen and deuterium in niobium, vanadium, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.T.; Herro, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The partial molar volumes of hydrogen and deuterium were measured in vanadium, niobium, and tantalum by a differential pressure technique. One-half of an electrolytically charged sample plat was compressed between hardened steel blocks in a hydraulic press. The activity of hydrogen in the hig pressure region was raised and caused hydrogen to diffuse into the low pressure region. The partia molar volume was calculated from the ratio of the hydrogen concentrations in the high and low pressure regions of the sample. Small isotope effects were found in the partial molar volume. Hydrogen had the larger volume in niobium and tantalum, but the reverse was true in vanadium

  17. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH 4 H 2 O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H 2 O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH) 4 are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components

  18. Parsing partial molar volumes of small molecules: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Dubins, David N; Pomès, Régis; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2011-04-28

    We used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction with the Kirkwood-Buff theory to compute the partial molar volumes for a number of small solutes of various chemical natures. We repeated our computations using modified pair potentials, first, in the absence of the Coulombic term and, second, in the absence of the Coulombic and the attractive Lennard-Jones terms. Comparison of our results with experimental data and the volumetric results of Monte Carlo simulation with hard sphere potentials and scaled particle theory-based computations led us to conclude that, for small solutes, the partial molar volume computed with the Lennard-Jones potential in the absence of the Coulombic term nearly coincides with the cavity volume. On the other hand, MD simulations carried out with the pair interaction potentials containing only the repulsive Lennard-Jones term produce unrealistically large partial molar volumes of solutes that are close to their excluded volumes. Our simulation results are in good agreement with the reported schemes for parsing partial molar volume data on small solutes. In particular, our determined interaction volumes() and the thickness of the thermal volume for individual compounds are in good agreement with empirical estimates. This work is the first computational study that supports and lends credence to the practical algorithms of parsing partial molar volume data that are currently in use for molecular interpretations of volumetric data.

  19. Excess molar volumes and partial molar volumes for (propionitrile + an alkanol) at T = 298.15 K and p = 0.1 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deenadayalu, N.; Bhujrajh, P.

    2006-01-01

    The excess molar volumes and the partial molar volumes for (propionitrile + an alkanol) at T = 298.15 K and at atmospheric pressure are reported. The hydrogen bonding between the OH133;NC groups are discussed in terms of the chain length of the alkanol. The alkanols studied are (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol). The excess molar volume data was fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation The partial molar volumes were calculated from the Redlich-Kister coefficients

  20. Updated determination of the molar gas constant R by acoustic measurements in argon at UVa-CEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, J. J.; Lozano-Martín, D.; Martín, M. C.; Chamorro, C. R.; Villamañán, M. A.; Pérez, E.; García Izquierdo, C.; del Campo, D.

    2017-10-01

    A new determination of the molar gas constant was performed from measurements of the speed of sound in argon at the triple point of water and extrapolation to zero pressure. A new resonant cavity was used. This is a triaxial ellipsoid whose walls are gold-coated steel and which is divided into two identical halves that are bolted and sealed with an O-ring. Microwave and electroacoustic traducers are located in the northern and southern parts of the cavity, respectively, so that measurements of microwave and acoustic frequencies are carried out in the same experiment. Measurements were taken at pressures from 600 kPa to 60 kPa and at 273.16 K. The internal equivalent radius of the cavity was accurately determined by microwave measurements and the first four radial symmetric acoustic modes were simultaneously measured and used to calculate the speed of sound. The improvements made using the new cavity have reduced by half the main contributions to the uncertainty due to the radius determination using microwave measurements which amounts to 4.7 parts in 106 and the acoustic measurements, 4.4 parts in 106, where the main contribution (3.7 parts in 106) is the relative excess half-widths associated with the limit of our acoustic model, compared with our previous measurements. As a result of all the improvements with the new cavity and the measurements performed, we determined the molar gas constant R  =  (8.314 449  ±  0.000 056) J · K-1 · mol-1 which corresponds to a relative standard uncertainty of 6.7 parts in 106. The value reported in this paper lies  -1.3 parts in 106 below the recommended value of CODATA 2014, although still within the range consistent with it.

  1. Partial molar volumes of hydrogen and deuterium in niobium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herro, H.M.

    1979-01-01

    Lattice dilation studies and direct pressure experiments gave comparable values for the partial molar volumes of hydrogen and deuterium in niobium and vanadium. Small isotope effects in the partial molar volume of hydrogen were measured in both metals by the differential isotope method. Hydrogen had a larger partial molar volume than deuterium in niobium, but the reverse was true in vanadium. The isotope effect measured in niobium can be represented as being due to the larger amplitude of vibration of the hydrogen atom than the deuterium atom in the metal lattice. Since hydrogen has a larger mean displacement from the equilibrium position than does deuterium, the average force hydrogen exerts on the metal atoms is greater than the force deuterium exerts. The isotope effect in vanadium is likely a result of anharmonic effects in the lattice and local vibrational modes

  2. Determination of Partial Molar Volumes of EPA and DHA Ethyl Esters in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical-fluid chromatography for determining partial molar volumes of ethyl esters of cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and cis -4,7,10,13,16,19- docosa-hexaenoic acid (DHA) in supercritical carbon dioxide is presented and discussed. Partial molar volumes of EPA and DHA esters are obtained from the variation of the retention properties with the density of mobile phase at 313.15 K, 323.15 K, 333.15 K and in the pressure range from 9 MPa to 21 MPa.

  3. Effect of Molecular Size of Solutes on Their Partial Molar Volumes in Supercritical n-Pentane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The densities of n-pentane, methane-n-pentane, propane-n-pentane, n-heptane-n-pentane, and n-decane-n-pentane binary mixtures were determined at 476.5K in the pressure range from 2 to 5 MPa. The partial molar volumes of the solutes in n-pentane were calculated using the density data. It was found that the partial molar volumes of methane and propane are positive , while those of n-heptane and n-decane are negative.

  4. Deptermination of Partial Molar Volumes of EPA and DHA Ethyl Esters in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeiHUANG; XianDaWANG; 等

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical-fluid shromatogrphy for determining partial molar volumes of ethyl esters of cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosa-hexaenoic acid(DHA) in supercritical carbon dioxide is presented and discussed. Partial molar volumes of EPA and DHA esters are obtained from the variation of the retention properties with the density of mobile phase at 313.15K,323.15K,333.15K and in the pressure range from 9 MPa to 21 MPa.

  5. Standard partial molar volumes of some electrolytes in ethylene carbonate based mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jianji.; Lu, Hui; Lin, Ruisen

    2004-01-01

    Apparent molar volumes V 2,phi and standard partial molar volumes V 2,phi 0 of LiClO 4 , LiBr and three symmetrical tetraalkylammonium bromides R 4 NBr (R=ethyl, propyl, butyl) have been determined at 298.15 K from precise density measurements in solvent mixtures of ethylene carbonate with tetrahydrofuran (THF), acetonitrile (AN), ethyl acetate (EA) and dimethoxyethane (DME). It is shown that the V 2,phi 0 values of LiClO 4 and LiBr are dependent strongly on the nature of the solvents, whereas the contribution of CH 2 group to the partial molar volume of the tetraalkylammonium salts has nothing to do with the nature of the solvents and the composition of the solvent mixtures. This provided a helpful evidence for the unsolvation of large tetraalkylammonium cations in organic solvents. The results have been discussed from ion-solvent interactions and the dielectric effect of the solvents

  6. Ab initio calculations of partial molar properties in the single-site approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the application of the single-site approximation in calculations of partial molar quantities, e.g., impurity solution energy, segregation energy, and effective chemical potential, which are related to a variation of the composition of an alloy or its nonequivalent parts. We demonstrate...

  7. A study of partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid have been determined in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% by weight of ethanol) at different temperatures and acid concentrations from the solution density measurements. The data have been evaluated by using Masson equation and ...

  8. A principle to correlate extreme values of excess thermodynamic functions with partial molar quantities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉志武; 刘芸; 周蕊; 薛芳渝

    2001-01-01

    Excess thermodynamic properties are widely used quantitatively for fluids. It was found that at constant temperature and pressure a molar excess quantity of a mutually miscible binary mixture at the extreme points equals the excess partial molar quantities of the two components, i.e.F1E = F2E = FmE , forming a triple cross point. The relationship is hold for properties such as en-thalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy, and volume, and is applicable for excess functions with multi extreme points. Solutions at extreme points can be referred to as special mixtures. Particularly fora special mixture of Gibbs free energy, activity coefficients of the two components are identical.

  9. A principle to correlate extreme values of excess thermody-namic functions with partial molar quantities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Excess thermodynamic properties are widely used quantitatively for fluids. It was found that at constant temperature and pressure a molar excess quantity of a mutually miscible binary mixture at the extreme points equals the excess partial molar quantities of the two components, i.e. , forming a triple cross point. The relationship is hold for properties such as enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy, and volume, and is applicable for excess functions with multi extreme points. Solutions at extreme points can be referred to as special mixtures. Particularly for a special mixture of Gibbs free energy, activity coefficients of the two components are identical.

  10. Influence of relaxation processes on the structure of a thermal boundary layer in partially ionized argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongen, M.E.H. van; Eck, R.B. van P. van; Hagebeuk, H.J.L.; Hirschberg, A.; Hutten-Mansfeld, A.C.B.; Jager, H.J.; Willems, J.F.H.

    1981-01-01

    A model for the unsteady thermal boundary-layer development at the end wall of a shock tube, in partially ionized atmospheric argon, is proposed. Consideration is given to ionization and thermal relaxation processes. In order to obtain some insight into the influence of the relaxation processes on the structure of the boundary layer, a study of the frozen and equilibrium limits has been carried out. The transition from a near-equilibrium situation in the outer part of the boundary layer towards a frozen situation near the wall is determined numerically. Experimental data on the electron and atom density profiles obtained from laser schlieren and absorption measurements are presented. A quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is found for a moderate degree of ionization (3%). At a higher degree of ionization the structure of the boundary layer is dominated by the influence of radiation cooling, which has been neglected in the model. (author)

  11. Molar Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weeks of pregnancy Ovarian cysts Anemia Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) Causes A molar pregnancy is caused by an ... have this complication than a partial molar pregnancy. Prevention If you've had a molar pregnancy, talk ...

  12. Partial molar volume of n-alcohols at infinite dilution in water calculated by means of scaled particle theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2006-04-07

    The partial molar volume of n-alcohols at infinite dilution in water is smaller than the molar volume in the neat liquid phase. It is shown that the formula for the partial molar volume at infinite dilution obtained from the scaled particle theory equation of state for binary hard sphere mixtures is able to reproduce in a satisfactory manner the experimental data over a large temperature range. This finding implies that the packing effects play the fundamental role in determining the partial molar volume at infinite dilution in water also for solutes, such as n-alcohols, forming H bonds with water molecules. Since the packing effects in water are largely related to the small size of its molecules, the latter feature is the ultimate cause of the decrease in partial molar volume associated with the hydrophobic effect.

  13. Partial molar volume of proteins studied by the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-04-14

    The three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory is applied to the analysis of hydration effects on the partial molar volume of proteins. For the native structure of some proteins, the partial molar volume is decomposed into geometric and hydration contributions using the 3D-RISM theory combined with the geometric volume calculation. The hydration contributions are correlated with the surface properties of the protein. The thermal volume, which is the volume of voids around the protein induced by the thermal fluctuation of water molecules, is directly proportional to the accessible surface area of the protein. The interaction volume, which is the contribution of electrostatic interactions between the protein and water molecules, is apparently governed by the charged atomic groups on the protein surface. The polar atomic groups do not make any contribution to the interaction volume. The volume differences between low- and high-pressure structures of lysozyme are also analyzed by the present method.

  14. The (water + acetonitrile) mixture revisited: A new approach for calculating partial molar volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmen Grande, Maria del; Julia, Jorge Alvarez; Barrero, Carmen R.; Marschoff, Carlos M.; Bianchi, Hugo L.

    2006-01-01

    Density and viscosity of (water + acetonitrile) mixtures were measured over the whole composition range at the temperatures: (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K. A new mathematical approach was developed which allows the calculation of the derivatives of density with respect to composition avoiding the appearance of local discontinuities. Thus, reliable partial molar volumes and thermal expansion coefficients were obtained

  15. Quasifree electron mobility by the method of partial waves in liquid hydrocarbons and in fluid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.

    1983-01-01

    Applicability of the fluctuation model was tested in the case of n-hexane, n-pentane, c-hexane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane, iso-octane, and neopentane. In our model, the quasifree electrons have been assumed to be scattered by the conduction state energy fluctuations of the liquid. These fluctuations are, in turn, described as a consequence of density fluctuations. The scattering potential is supposed to be square well like and the cross section is calculated in terms of partial waves. Averages due to the density fluctuations and the electron kinetic energy distribution are determined numerically. Except for the first three materials, the calculation reproduced the experimental mobilities with reasonable values of the square well radius, which is the only fitting parameters. Further extension of the description concerning the density dependence of the low field mobility of fluid argon has been performed. The estimated fluctuation size as a function of density increases monotonically at the minimum of the mobility in accordance with the monotonic behavior of the isothermal compressibility in the same region

  16. Note: Nonpolar solute partial molar volume response to attractive interactions with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven M; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2014-01-07

    The impact of attractive interactions on the partial molar volumes of methane-like solutes in water is characterized using molecular simulations. Attractions account for a significant 20% volume drop between a repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and full Lennard-Jones description of methane interactions. The response of the volume to interaction perturbations is characterized by linear fits to our simulations and a rigorous statistical thermodynamic expression for the derivative of the volume to increasing attractions. While a weak non-linear response is observed, an average effective slope accurately captures the volume decrease. This response, however, is anticipated to become more non-linear with increasing solute size.

  17. Note: Nonpolar solute partial molar volume response to attractive interactions with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Steven M.; Ashbaugh, Henry S., E-mail: hanka@tulane.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States)

    2014-01-07

    The impact of attractive interactions on the partial molar volumes of methane-like solutes in water is characterized using molecular simulations. Attractions account for a significant 20% volume drop between a repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and full Lennard-Jones description of methane interactions. The response of the volume to interaction perturbations is characterized by linear fits to our simulations and a rigorous statistical thermodynamic expression for the derivative of the volume to increasing attractions. While a weak non-linear response is observed, an average effective slope accurately captures the volume decrease. This response, however, is anticipated to become more non-linear with increasing solute size.

  18. Partial molar volume and isentropic compressibility of symmetrical and asymmetrical quaternary ammonium bromides in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Nicolás; Buchner, Richard; Vargas, Edgar F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Structural effects of the cations on surrounding water molecules are discussed. • Alkyl-chain geometry determines the hydration of Bu 4 N + isomers. • The “compactness” in the hydration shells varies significantly among the isomers. - Abstract: Values of apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility of symmetric and asymmetric isomers of tetrabutylammonium bromide, namely tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, tetra-iso-butylammonium bromide, tetra-sec-butylammonium bromide, di-n-butyl-di-iso-butylammonium bromide and di-n-butyl-di-sec-butylammonium bromide, in aqueous solution were determined from density and speed of sound measurements. These properties were obtained as a function of molal concentration within the range of 0.01 < m/mol · kg −1 < 0.1 covering temperatures from 278.15 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 293.15. The partial molar volumes and the apparent isentropic molar compressibility at infinite dilution were calculated and their dependence on temperature examined. The results show that cations with sec-butyl chains have larger structural volumes compared to those with iso-butyl chains. In addition, cations with sec-butyl chains induce smaller structural changes in their hydration shell than the others

  19. Partial molar volumes of proteins: amino acid side-chain contributions derived from the partial molar volumes of some tripeptides over the temperature range 10-90 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häckel, M; Hinz, H J; Hedwig, G R

    1999-11-15

    The partial molar volumes of tripeptides of sequence glycyl-X-glycine, where X is one of the amino acids alanine, leucine, threonine, glutamine, phenylalanine, histidine, cysteine, proline, glutamic acid, and arginine, have been determined in aqueous solution over the temperature range 10-90 degrees C using differential scanning densitometry . These data, together with those reported previously, have been used to derive the partial molar volumes of the side-chains of all 20 amino acids. The side-chain volumes are critically compared with literature values derived using partial molar volumes for alternative model compounds. The new amino acid side-chain volumes, along with that for the backbone glycyl group, were used to calculate the partial specific volumes of several proteins in aqueous solution. The results obtained are compared with those observed experimentally. The new side-chain volumes have also been used to re-determine residue volume changes upon protein folding.

  20. Dilatometric measurement of the partial molar volume of water sorbed to durum wheat flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Ayako; Ogawa, Takenobu; Adachi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Moisture sorption isotherms were measured at 25 °C for untreated, dry-heated and pre-gelatinized durum wheat flour samples. The isotherms could be expressed by the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer equation. The amount of water sorbed to the untreated flour was highest for low water activity, with water sorbed to the pre-gelatinized and dry-heated flour samples following. The dry-heated and pregelatinized flour samples exhibited the same dependence of the moisture content on the partial molar volume of water at 25 °C as the untreated flour. The partial molar volume of water was ca. 9 cm(3)/mol at a moisture content of 0.03 kg-H2O/kg-d.m. The volume increased with increasing moisture content, and reached a constant value of ca. 17.5 cm(3)/mol at a moisture content of 0.2 kg-H2O/kg-d.m. or higher.

  1. Quadrupole terms in the Maxwell equations: Born energy, partial molar volume, and entropy of ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavchov, Radomir I; Ivanov, Tzanko I

    2014-02-21

    A new equation of state relating the macroscopic quadrupole moment density Q to the gradient of the field ∇E in an isotropic fluid is derived: Q = αQ(∇E - U∇·E/3), where the quadrupolarizability αQ is proportional to the squared molecular quadrupole moment. Using this equation of state, a generalized expression for the Born energy of an ion dissolved in quadrupolar solvent is obtained. It turns out that the potential and the energy of a point charge in a quadrupolar medium are finite. From the obtained Born energy, the partial molar volume and the partial molar entropy of a dissolved ion follow. Both are compared to experimental data for a large number of simple ions in aqueous solutions. From the comparison the value of the quadrupolar length LQ is determined, LQ = (αQ/3ɛ)(1/2) = 1-4 Å. Data for ion transfer from aqueous to polar oil solution are analyzed, which allowed for the determination of the quadrupolarizability of nitrobenzene.

  2. On a relationship between molecular polarizability and partial molar volume in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkova, Ekaterina L; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2011-12-28

    We reveal a universal relationship between molecular polarizability (a single-molecule property) and partial molar volume in water that is an ensemble property characterizing solute-solvent systems. Since both of these quantities are of the key importance to describe solvation behavior of dissolved molecular species in aqueous solutions, the obtained relationship should have a high impact in chemistry, pharmaceutical, and life sciences as well as in environments. We demonstrated that the obtained relationship between the partial molar volume in water and the molecular polarizability has in general a non-homogeneous character. We performed a detailed analysis of this relationship on a set of ~200 organic molecules from various chemical classes and revealed its fine well-organized structure. We found that this structure strongly depends on the chemical nature of the solutes and can be rationalized in terms of specific solute-solvent interactions. Efficiency and universality of the proposed approach was demonstrated on an external test set containing several dozens of polyfunctional and druglike molecules.

  3. Calculation of partial molar volume of components in supercritical ammonia synthesis system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cunwen WANG; Chuanbo YU; Wen CHEN; Weiguo WANG; Yuanxin WU; Junfeng ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    The partial molar volumes of components in supercritical ammonia synthesis system are calculated in detail by the calculation formula of partial molar volume derived from the R-K equation of state under different conditions. The objectives are to comprehend phase beha-vior of components and to provide the theoretic explana-tion and guidance for probing novel processes of ammonia synthesis under supercritical conditions. The conditions of calculation are H2/N2= 3, at a concentra-tion of NH3 in synthesis gas ranging from 2% to 15%, Concentration of medium in supercritical ammonia syn-thesis system ranging from 20% to 50%, temperature ran-ging from 243 K to 699 K and pressure ranging from 0.1 MPa to 187 MPa. The results show that the ammonia synthesis system can reach supercritical state by adding a suitable supercritical medium and then controlling the reaction conditions. It is helpful for the supercritical ammonia synthesis that medium reaches supercritical state under the conditions of the corresponding total pres-sure and components near the normal temperature or near the critical temperature of medium or in the range of tem-perature of industrialized ammonia synthesis.

  4. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R.; Miller, Benjamin T.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2015-01-01

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol V E as a function of ethanol mole fraction X E is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has “brittle” hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water

  5. Intrinsic alterations in the partial molar volume on the protein denaturation: surficial Kirkwood-Buff approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Isseki; Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2009-03-19

    The partial molar volume (PMV) of the protein chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) was calculated by all-atom MD simulation. Denatured CI2 showed almost the same average PMV value as that of native CI2. This is consistent with the phenomenological question of the protein volume paradox. Furthermore, using the surficial Kirkwood-Buff approach, spatial distributions of PMV were analyzed as a function of the distance from the CI2 surface. The profiles of the new R-dependent PMV indicate that, in denatured CI2, the reduction in the solvent electrostatic interaction volume is canceled out mainly by an increment in thermal volume in the vicinity of its surface. In addition, the PMV of the denatured CI2 was found to increase in the region in which the number density of water atoms is minimum. These results provide a direct and detailed picture of the mechanism of the protein volume paradox suggested by Chalikian et al.

  6. Infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chang Yi; Siratori, Tomoya; Funazukuri, Toshitaka; Wang, Guosheng

    2014-10-03

    The effects of temperature and density on retention of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical fluid chromatography were investigated at temperatures of 308.15-343.15K and pressure range from 8 to 40MPa by the chromatographic impulse response method with curve fitting. The retention factors were utilized to derive the infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide. The determined partial molar volumes were small and positive at high pressures but exhibited very large and negative values in the highly compressible near critical region of carbon dioxide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Partial molar volumes of (acetonitrile + water) mixtures over the temperature range (273.15 to 318.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeow, Y. Leong; Leong, Yee-Kwong

    2007-01-01

    Isothermal molar volume data of (acetonitrile + water) mixtures, between T = 273.15 K and T = 318.15 K, extracted from different sources are combined and treated as a single set to even out minor differences between sources and to increase the number of data points for each temperature. Tikhonov regularization is applied to compute the isothermal first and second derivatives of these data with respect to molar composition. For the reference temperature of 298.15 K, this computation is extended to the third derivative. Generalized Cross Validation is used to guide the selection of the regularization parameter that keeps noise amplification under control. The resulting first derivatives are used to construct the partial molar volume curves which are then checked against published results. Properties of the partial molar volumes are analysed by examining their derivatives. Finally the general shape of the second derivative curve of molar volume is explained qualitatively in terms of tripartite segmentation of the molar composition interval but quantitative comparisons are required to confirm this explanation

  8. Partial Molar Volumes of 15-Crown-5 Ether in Mixtures of N,N-Dimethylformamide with Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyczyńska, Magdalena; Jóźwiak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The density of 15-crown-5 ether (15C5) solutions in the mixtures of N,N -dimethylformamide (DMF) and water (H 2 O) was measured within the temperature range 293.15-308.15 K using an Anton Paar oscillatory U-tube densimeter. The results were used to calculate the apparent molar volumes ( V Φ ) of 15C5 in the mixtures of DMF + H 2 O over the whole concentration range. Using the apparent molar volumes and Redlich and Mayer equation, the standard partial molar volumes of 15-crown-5 were calculated at infinite dilution ([Formula: see text]). The limiting apparent molar expansibilities ( α ) were also calculated. The data are discussed from the point of view of the effect of concentration changes on interactions in solution.

  9. Thermodynamic study of (heptane + amine) mixtures. II. Excess and partial molar volumes at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepori, Luciano; Gianni, Paolo; Spanedda, Andrea; Matteoli, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Excess and partial molar volumes of primary (amines + heptane) mixtures. → Excess volumes are positive for small size amines and decrease as the size increases. → Group contributions to predict the partial molar volumes of amines in heptane. → The void volume is larger for branched than for linear amines in heptane. - Abstract: Excess molar volumes V E at 298.15 K were determined by means of a vibrating tube densimeter for binary mixtures of heptane + primary n-alkyl (C 3 to C 10 ) and branched amines (iso-propyl-, iso-, sec-, and tert-butyl-, iso-, tert-pentyl-, and pentan-3-amine) in the whole composition range. The apparent molar volumes of solid dodecyl- and tetradecylamine in heptane dilute solution were also determined. The V E values were found positive for mixtures involving C 3 to C 8 linear amines, with V E decreasing with chain lengthening. Heptane + nonyl and decylamine showed s-shaped, markedly asymmetric, curves. Mixtures with branched C 3 to C 5 amines displayed positive V E 's larger than those observed in the mixtures of the corresponding linear isomers. Partial molar volumes V o at infinite dilution in heptane were evaluated for the examined amines and compared with those of alkanes and alkanols taken from the literature. An additivity scheme, based on the intrinsic volume approach, was applied to estimate group (CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, C, NH 2 , and OH) contributions to V o . The effect of branching on V o and the limiting slope of the apparent excess molar volumes were evaluated and discussed in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions.

  10. The partial molar heat capacity, expansion, isentropic, and isothermal compressions of thymidine in aqueous solution at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedwig, Gavin R.; Jameson, Geoffrey B.; Hoiland, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Solution densities and sound speeds were measured for aqueous solutions of thymidine. → Partial molar volumetric properties at infinite dilution and T = 298.15 K were derived. → The partial molar isentropic and isothermal compressions are of opposite signs. → The partial molar heat capacity for thymidine at infinite dilution was determined. - Abstract: Solution densities have been determined for aqueous solutions of thymidine at T = (288.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 313.15) K. The partial molar volumes at infinite dilution, V 2 0 , obtained from the density data were used to derive the partial molar isobaric expansion at infinite dilution for thymidine at T = 298.15 K, E 2 0 {E 2 0 =(∂V 2 0 /∂T) p }. The partial molar heat capacity at infinite dilution for thymidine, C p,2 0 , at T = 298.15 K has also been determined. Sound speeds have been measured for aqueous solutions of thymidine at T = 298.15 K. The partial molar isentropic compression at infinite dilution, K S,2 0 , and the partial molar isothermal compression at infinite dilution, K T,2 0 {K T,2 0 =-(∂V 2 0 /∂P) T }, have been derived from the sound speed data. The V 2 0 , E 2 0 , C p,2 0 , and K S,2 0 results for thymidine are critically compared with those available from the literature.

  11. Partial molar volumes of some drug and pro-drug substances in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manin, Alex N.; Shmukler, Liudmila E.; Safonova, Liubov P.; Perlovich, German L.

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with measuring the densities of phenol, acetanilide, benzamide, benzoic acid, phenacetin, i-(acetylamino)-benzoic acid, i-hydroxy-benzamide, and i-acetaminophen (where i = 1, 2, 3) in 1-octanol in the wide concentration interval at T = 298.15 K. It also concerns the evaluation of apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes at infinite dilution, V 2 0 -bar as well as comparative analysis of the free volumes per molecule in the octanolic solutions, V 2 free , and in the crystal lattices, V 2 free (cr), from the nature and position of the substitutes. Also described is the evaluation of the increments of V 2 0 -bar andV 2 free for the unsubstituted molecules and isomers and the methods to obtain partial molar volumes for various functional groups at infinite dilution in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K. Also considered is the limiting partial molar volume of the solutes in terms of the scaled particle theory.

  12. Partial molar volumes of some drug and pro-drug substances in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manin, Alex N.; Shmukler, Liudmila E.; Safonova, Liubov P. [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Perlovich, German L., E-mail: glp@isc-ras.r [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 153045 Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    The article deals with measuring the densities of phenol, acetanilide, benzamide, benzoic acid, phenacetin, i-(acetylamino)-benzoic acid, i-hydroxy-benzamide, and i-acetaminophen (where i = 1, 2, 3) in 1-octanol in the wide concentration interval at T = 298.15 K. It also concerns the evaluation of apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes at infinite dilution, V{sub 2}{sup 0}-bar as well as comparative analysis of the free volumes per molecule in the octanolic solutions, V{sub 2}{sup free}, and in the crystal lattices, V{sub 2}{sup free} (cr), from the nature and position of the substitutes. Also described is the evaluation of the increments of V{sub 2}{sup 0}-bar andV{sub 2}{sup free} for the unsubstituted molecules and isomers and the methods to obtain partial molar volumes for various functional groups at infinite dilution in 1-octanol at T = 298.15 K. Also considered is the limiting partial molar volume of the solutes in terms of the scaled particle theory.

  13. Calculations on charge state and energy loss of argon ions in partially and fully ionized carbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Casas, David; Morales, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The energy loss of argon ions in a target depends on their velocity and charge density. At the energies studied in this work, it depends mostly on the free and bound electrons in the target. Here the random-phase approximation is used for analyzing free electrons at any degeneracy. For the plasma-bound electrons, an interpolation between approximations for low and high energies is applied. The Brandt-Kitagawa (BK) model is employed to depict the projectile charge space distribution, and the stripping criterion of Kreussler et al. is used to determine its equilibrium charge state Q(eq). This latter criterion implies that the equilibrium charge state depends slightly on the electron density and temperature of the plasma. On the other hand, the effective charge Q(eff) is obtained as the ratio between the energy loss of the argon ion and that of the proton for the same plasma conditions. This effective charge Q(eff) is larger than the equilibrium charge state Q(eq) due to the incorporation of the BK charge distribution. Though our charge-state estimations are not exactly the same as the experimental values, our energy loss agrees quite well with the experiments. It is noticed that the energy loss in plasmas is higher than that in the same cold target of about, ∼42-62.5% and increases with carbon plasma ionization. This confirms the well-known enhanced plasma stopping. It is also observed that only a small part of this energy loss enhancement is due to an increase of the argon charge state, namely only ∼2.2 and 5.1%, for the partially and the fully ionized plasma, respectively. The other contribution is connected with a better energy transfer to the free electrons at plasma state than to the bound electrons at solid state of about, ∼38.8-57.4%, where higher values correspond to a fully ionized carbon plasma.

  14. Partial Molar Volumes of Air-Component Gases in Several Liquid n-Alkanes and 1-Alkanols at 313.15 K

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Izák, Pavel; Cibulka, I.; Heintz, A.

    1995-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 2 (1995), s. 227-234 ISSN 0378-3812 Keywords : data density * partial molar volume * gas -liquid mixture Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.024, year: 1995

  15. Partial molar volume of mefenamic acid in alcohol at temperatures between T=293.15 and T=313.15 K

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Muhammad J.; Siddiquah, Mahrukh

    2006-01-01

    Apparent molar volume (Vphi), partial molar volume (V), solute-solute interaction parameter (Sv), partial molar expansivity (E(0)2) and isobaric thermal expansion coefficient (alpha2) of mefenamic acid in six different organic solvents namely, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 2-butanol, have been calculated from the measured solution densities over a temperature range of T=293.15 and T=313.15±0.1K. The solution densities were measured by an automated vibrating tube de...

  16. Fast Computation of Solvation Free Energies with Molecular Density Functional Theory: Thermodynamic-Ensemble Partial Molar Volume Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr P; Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2014-06-05

    Molecular density functional theory (MDFT) offers an efficient implicit-solvent method to estimate molecule solvation free-energies, whereas conserving a fully molecular representation of the solvent. Even within a second-order approximation for the free-energy functional, the so-called homogeneous reference fluid approximation, we show that the hydration free-energies computed for a data set of 500 organic compounds are of similar quality as those obtained from molecular dynamics free-energy perturbation simulations, with a computer cost reduced by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This requires to introduce the proper partial volume correction to transform the results from the grand canonical to the isobaric-isotherm ensemble that is pertinent to experiments. We show that this correction can be extended to 3D-RISM calculations, giving a sound theoretical justification to empirical partial molar volume corrections that have been proposed recently.

  17. Theoretical study of the partial molar volume change associated with the pressure-induced structural transition of ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Ohyama, Shusaku; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2007-09-01

    The partial molar volume (PMV) change associated with the pressure-induced structural transition of ubiquitin is analyzed by the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory of molecular solvation. The theory predicts that the PMV decreases upon the structural transition, which is consistent with the experimental observation. The volume decomposition analysis demonstrates that the PMV reduction is primarily caused by the decrease in the volume of structural voids in the protein, which is partially canceled by the volume expansion due to the hydration effects. It is found from further analysis that the PMV reduction is ascribed substantially to the penetration of water molecules into a specific part of the protein. Based on the thermodynamic relation, this result implies that the water penetration causes the pressure-induced structural transition. It supports the water penetration model of pressure denaturation of proteins proposed earlier.

  18. Aqueous partial molar heat capacities and volumes for NaReO4 and NaTcO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemire, R.J.; Saluja, P.P.S.; Campbell, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, data are required to model the equilibrium thermodynamic behavior of key radionuclides at temperatures above 25 degree C. A flow microcalorimeter/densimeter system has been commissioned to measure heat capacities and densities of solutions containing radioactive species. Measurements for solutions of aqueous NaReO 4 (a common analogue for NaTcO 4 ) were made at seven temperatures (15 to 100 degree C) over the concentration range 0.05 to 0.2 mol·kg -1 . Subsequently, measurements were made for NaTcO 4 solutions under similar conditions. The heat capacity and density data are analyzed using Pitzer's ion-interaction model, and values of the NaReO 4 partial molar heat capacities are compared to literature values based on integral heats of solution. The agreement between the two sets of NaReO 4 data is good below 75 degree C, but only fair at the higher temperatures. Values of the partial molar volumes have also been derived. The uncertainties introduced by using thermodynamic data for ReO 4 - , in the absence of data for TcO 4 - , are discussed

  19. The in vitro effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy on dental microcosm biofilms from partially erupted permanent molars: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fabiana Sodré; Cruvinel, Thiago; Cusicanqui Méndez, Daniela Alejandra; Dionísio, Evandro José; Rios, Daniela; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2018-03-01

    Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT) could enhance the prevention of dental caries lesions in pits and fissures of partially erupted molars, by killing microorganisms from complex dental biofilms. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT) on the viability of specific microorganism groups of dental microcosm biofilms from occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars in eruption. Dental microcosm biofilms grown on bovine enamel blocks, from dental plaque collected on occlusal surfaces of a partially erupted lower right first permanent molar, with McBain medium plus 1% sucrose in anaerobic condition at 37 °C for 72 h. The experiments were performed in eight groups: L-P- = no treatment (control), L18.75P- = 18.75 J/cm 2 LED, L37.5P- = 37.5 J/cm 2 LED, L75P- = 75 J/cm 2 LED, L-P+ = 200 mM TBO, L18.75P+ = 200 mM TBO + 18.75 J/cm 2 LED, L37.5P+ = 200 mM TBO + 37.5 J/cm 2 LED, and L75P+ = 200 mM TBO + 75 J/cm 2 LED. The counts of total microorganisms, total streptococci and mutans streptococci were determined on selective media agar plates by colony-forming units per mL. The log-transformed counts were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Dunn's test (P < 0.05). The counts of all microorganisms treated in the group L75P+ were statistically lower than those treated in L-P-. The aPDT promoted a significant reduction of microorganisms, with a trend of dose-dependent effect. TBO-mediated aPDT was effective in reducing the viability of specific microbial groups in dental microcosm biofilms originated from occlusal of permanent molars in eruption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular theory of partial molar volume and its applications to biomolecular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Imai

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The paial molar volume (PMV is a thermodynamic quantity which contains important information about the solute-solvent interactions as well as the solute structure in solution.Additionally, the PMV is the most essential quantity in the analysis of the pressure effect on chemical reactions. This aicle reviews the recent developments in molecular theories of the PMV, especially the reference interaction site model (RISMtheory of molecular liquids and its three-dimensional generalization version (3D-RISM, which are combined with the Kirkwood-Buff solution theory to calculate the PMV. This aicle also introduces our recent applications of the theory to some interesting issues concerning the PMV of biomolecules. In addition, theoretical representations of the effects of intramolecular fluctuation on the PMV, which are significant for biomacromolecules, are briefly discussed.

  1. Standard partial molar heat capacities and enthalpies of formation of aqueous aluminate under hydrothermal conditions from integral heat of solution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulier, Yohann; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Heats of solution of NaAlO 2 (s) were measured at five temperatures up to 250 °C. • Standard molar enthalpies of solution were determined from the measured heats of solution. • Standard molar enthalpies of solution were correlated with the density model. • The density model allows us to determine the standard molar heat capacities of reaction. - Abstract: Heats of solution of sodium aluminum oxide, NaAlO 2 (s), were measured in aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions using a Tian–Calvet heat-flow calorimeter (Setaram, Model C80) with high pressure “batch cells” made of hastelloy C-276, at five temperatures from (373.15 to 523.15) K, steam saturation pressure, and concentrations from (0.02 to 0.09) mol · kg −1 . Standard molar enthalpies of solution, Δ soln H ∘ , and relative standard molar enthalpies, [H ∘ (T) − H ∘ (298.15 K)], of NaAl(OH) 4 (aq) were determined from the measured heats of solution. The results were fitted with the “density” model. The temperature dependence of Δ soln H ∘ from the model yielded the standard molar heat capacities of reaction, Δ soln C p ∘ , from which standard partial molar heat capacities for aqueous aluminate, C p ∘ [A1(OH) 4 − ,aq], were calculated. Standard partial molar enthalpies of formation, Δ f H ∘ , and entropies, S ∘ , of A1(OH) 4 − (aq) were also determined. The values for C p ∘ [A1(OH) 4 − ,aq] agree with literature data determined up to T = 413 K from enthalpy of solution and heat capacity measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainties. They are consistent with differential heat capacity measurements up to T = 573 K from Schrödle et al. (2010) [29] using the same calorimeter, but this method has the advantage that measurements could be made at much lower concentrations in the presence of an excess concentration of ligand. To our knowledge, these are the first standard partial molar heat capacities measured under hydrothermal conditions by the

  2. Octanol-Water Partition Coefficient from 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Theory of Solvation with Partial Molar Volume Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, WenJuan; Blinov, Nikolay; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-30

    The octanol-water partition coefficient is an important physical-chemical characteristic widely used to describe hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of chemical compounds. The partition coefficient is related to the transfer free energy of a compound from water to octanol. Here, we introduce a new protocol for prediction of the partition coefficient based on the statistical-mechanical, 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation. It was shown recently that with the compound-solvent correlation functions obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation, the free energy functional supplemented with the correction linearly related to the partial molar volume obtained from the Kirkwood-Buff/3D-RISM theory, also called the "universal correction" (UC), provides accurate prediction of the hydration free energy of small compounds, compared to explicit solvent molecular dynamics [ Palmer , D. S. ; J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2010 , 22 , 492101 ]. Here we report that with the UC reparametrized accordingly this theory also provides an excellent agreement with the experimental data for the solvation free energy in nonpolar solvent (1-octanol) and so accurately predicts the octanol-water partition coefficient. The performance of the Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) and Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functionals of the solvation free energy, with and without UC, is tested on a large library of small compounds with diverse functional groups. The best agreement with the experimental data for octanol-water partition coefficients is obtained with the KH-UC solvation free energy functional.

  3. Hydration of alcohol clusters in 1-propanol-water mixture studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and an interpretation of anomalous excess partial molar volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, M; Inamura, Y; Hosaka, D; Yamamuro, O

    2006-08-21

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements have been made for 1-propanol-water mixtures in a range of alcohol concentration from 0.0 to 0.167 in mole fraction at 25 degrees C. Fraction alpha of water molecules hydrated to fractal surface of alcohol clusters in 1-propanol-water mixture was obtained as a function of alcohol concentration. Average hydration number N(ws) of 1-propanol molecule is derived from the value of alpha as a function of alcohol concentration. By extrapolating N(ws) to infinite dilution, we obtain values of 12-13 as hydration number of isolated 1-propanol molecule. A simple interpretation of structural origin of anomalous excess partial molar volume of water is proposed and as a result a simple equation for the excess partial molar volume is deduced in terms of alpha. Calculated values of the excess partial molar volumes of water and 1-propanol and the excess molar volume of the mixture are in good agreement with experimental values.

  4. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. Part II: a near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous Na-halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebe, Fumie; Nishikawa, Keiko; Koga, Yoshikata

    2012-04-07

    Our earlier thermodynamic studies suggested that F(-) and Cl(-) form hydration shells with the hydration number 14 ± 2 and 2.3 ± 0.6, respectively, and leave the bulk H(2)O away from hydration shells unperturbed. Br(-) and I(-), on the other hand, form hydrogen bonds directly with the momentarily existing hydrogen bond network of H(2)O, and retard the degree of entropy-volume cross fluctuation inherent in liquid H(2)O. The effect of the latter is stronger for I(-) than Br(-). Here we seek additional information about this qualitative difference between Cl(-) and (Br(-) and I(-)) pair by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. We analyze the ν(2) + ν(3) band of H(2)O in the range 4600-5500 cm(-1) of aqueous solutions of NaCl, NaBr and NaI, by a new approach. From observed absorbance, we calculate excess molar absorptivity, ε(E), excess over the additive contributions of solute and solvent. ε(E) thus contains information about the effect of inter-molecular interactions in the ν(2) + ν(3) spectrum. The spectrum of ε(E) shows three bands; two negative ones at 5263 and 4873 cm(-1), and the positive band at 5123 cm(-1). We then define and calculate the excess partial molar absorptivity of each salt, ε(E)(salt). From the behaviour of ε(E)(salt) we suggest that the negative band at 5263 cm(-1) represents free H(2)O without much hydrogen bonding under the influence of local electric field of ions. Furthermore, from a sudden change in the x(salt) (mole fraction of salt) dependence of ε(E)(salt), we suggest that there is an ion-pairing in x(salt) > 0.032, 0.036, and 0.04 for NaCl, NaBr and NaI respectively. The positive band of ε(E) at 5123 cm(-1) is attributed to a modestly organized hydrogen bond network of H(2)O (or liquid-likeness), and the x(salt) dependence of ε indicated a qualitative difference in the effect of Cl(-) from those of Br(-) and I(-). Namely, the values of ε(E)(salt) stay constant for Cl(-) but those for Br(-) and I(-) decrease smoothly on

  5. Apparent and partial molar volumes of long-chain alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides and bromides in aqueous solutions at T=15 deg. C and T=25 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Perez, A.; Ruso, J.M.; Nimo, J.; Rodriguez, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Density measurements of dodecyl- (C 12 DBACl), tetradecyl- (C 14 DBACl), hexadecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C 16 DBACl) and of decyl- (C 10 DBABr) and dodecyldimethylbenzylammonium bromide (C 12 DBABr) in aqueous solutions at T=15 deg. C and T=25 deg. C have been carried out. From these results, apparent and partial molar volumes were calculated. Positive deviations from the Debye-Hueckel limiting law provide evidence for limited association at concentrations below the critical micelle concentration. The change of the apparent molar volume upon micellization was calculated. The relevant parameters have been presented in function of the alkyl chain length. Apparent molar volumes of the present compounds in the micellar phase, V phi m , and the change upon micellization, ΔV phi m , have been discussed in terms of temperature and type of counterion

  6. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXIII. Cyclic ketones at T = (298 to 573) K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan; Simurka, Lukas; Hnedkovsky, Lubomir; Bolotov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → In this study we examine standard molar volumes of aqueous cyclic ketones. → State parameters of measurements were (298 to 573) K and pressures up to 30 MPa. → Differences in behavior of monoketones and cyclohexane-1,4-dione were observed. → Group contribution method was designed and examined. - Abstract: Density data for dilute aqueous solutions of four cyclic ketones (cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, cycloheptanone, and cyclohexane-1,4-dione) are presented together with standard molar volumes (partial molar volumes at infinite dilution) calculated from the experimental data. The measurements were performed at temperatures from T = 298 K up to T = 573 K. Experimental pressures were close to the saturated vapor pressure of water, and (15 and 30) MPa. The data were obtained using a high-temperature high-pressure flow vibrating-tube densimeter. Experimental standard molar volumes were correlated as a function of temperature and pressure using an empirical polynomial function. Contributions of the molecular structural segments (methylene and carbonyl groups) to the standard molar volume were also evaluated and analyzed.

  7. Effect of temperature on the partial molar volume, isentropic compressibility and viscosity of DL-2-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Carmen M.; Rodríguez, Diana M.; Ribeiro, Ana C.F.; Esteso, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Apparent volumes, apparent compressibilities, viscosities of DL-2-aminobutyric acid. • Effect of temperature on the values for these properties. • Hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and the effect of sodium chloride. - Abstract: Density, sound velocity and viscosity of DL-2-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions have been measured at temperatures of (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15) K. The experimental results were used to determine the apparent molar volume and the apparent molar compressibility as a function of composition at these temperatures. The limiting values of both the partial molar volume and the partial molar adiabatic compressibility at infinite dilution of DL-2-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous sodium chloride solutions were determined at each temperature. The experimental viscosity values were adjusted by a least-squares method to a second order equation as proposed by Tsangaris-Martin to obtain the viscosity B coefficient which depends on the size, shape and charge of the solute molecule. The influence of the temperature on the behaviour of the selected properties is discussed in terms of both the solute hydration and the balance between hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between the acids and water, and the effect of the sodium chloride concentration.

  8. Towards a universal method for calculating hydration free energies: a 3D reference interaction site model with partial molar volume correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David S; Frolov, Andrey I; Ratkova, Ekaterina L; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2010-12-15

    We report a simple universal method to systematically improve the accuracy of hydration free energies calculated using an integral equation theory of molecular liquids, the 3D reference interaction site model. A strong linear correlation is observed between the difference of the experimental and (uncorrected) calculated hydration free energies and the calculated partial molar volume for a data set of 185 neutral organic molecules from different chemical classes. By using the partial molar volume as a linear empirical correction to the calculated hydration free energy, we obtain predictions of hydration free energies in excellent agreement with experiment (R = 0.94, σ = 0.99 kcal mol (- 1) for a test set of 120 organic molecules).

  9. Towards a universal method for calculating hydration free energies: a 3D reference interaction site model with partial molar volume correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, David S; Frolov, Andrey I; Ratkova, Ekaterina L; Fedorov, Maxim V

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple universal method to systematically improve the accuracy of hydration free energies calculated using an integral equation theory of molecular liquids, the 3D reference interaction site model. A strong linear correlation is observed between the difference of the experimental and (uncorrected) calculated hydration free energies and the calculated partial molar volume for a data set of 185 neutral organic molecules from different chemical classes. By using the partial molar volume as a linear empirical correction to the calculated hydration free energy, we obtain predictions of hydration free energies in excellent agreement with experiment (R = 0.94, σ = 0.99 kcal mol -1 for a test set of 120 organic molecules). (fast track communication)

  10. Analysis of a Partial Male-Sterile Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana Isolated from a Low-Energy Argon Ion Beam Mutagenized Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Bian Po; Wu Yuejin; Yu Zengliang

    2008-01-01

    A screen for Arabidopsis fertility mutants, mutagenized by low-energy argon ion beam, yielded two partial male-sterile mutants tc243-1 and tc243-2 which have similar phenotypes. tc243-2 was investigated in detail. The segregation ratio of the mutant phenotypes in the M2 pools suggested that mutation behaved as single Mendelian recessive mutations. tc243 showed a series of mutant phenotypes, among which partial male-sterile was its striking mutant characteristic. Phenotype analysis indicates that there are four factors leading to male sterility. a. Floral organs normally develop inside the closed bud, but the anther filaments do not elongate sufficiently to position the locules above the stigma at anthesis. b. The anther locules do not dehisce at the time of flower opening (although limited dehiscence occurs later). c. Pollens of mutant plants develop into several types of pollens at the trinucleated stage, as determined by staining with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), which shows a variable size, shape and number of nucleus. d. The viability of pollens is lower than that of the wild type on the germination test in vivo and vitro.

  11. Thermodynamic study of (heptane + amine) mixtures. III: Excess and partial molar volumes in mixtures with secondary, tertiary, and cyclic amines at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepori, Luciano; Gianni, Paolo; Spanedda, Andrea; Matteoli, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → Excess volumes of (sec., tert., or cyclic amines + heptane) mixtures. → Excess volumes are positive for small size amines and decrease as the size increases. → Group contributions to predict the partial molar volumes of amines in heptane. → The void volume is larger for sec. and tert. than for linear amines in heptane. → The void volume is much smaller for cyclic than for linear amines in heptane. - Abstract: Excess molar volumes V E at 298.15 K were determined by means of a vibrating tube densimeter for binary mixtures of {heptane + open chain secondary (diethyl to dibutyl) and tertiary (triethyl to tripentyl) amines} as well as for cyclic imines (C 2 , C 3 , C 4 , C 6 , and C 7 ) and primary cycloalkylamines (C 5 , C 6 , C 7 , and C 12 ). The V E values were found positive for mixtures involving small size amines, with V E decreasing as the size increases. Negative V E 's were found for tributyl- and tripentylamine, heptamethylenimine, and cyclododecylamine. Mixtures of heptane with cycloheptylamine showed an s-shaped curve. Partial molar volumes V 0 of amines at infinite dilution in heptane were obtained from V E and compared with V 0 of hydrocarbons and other classes of organic compounds taken from literature. An additivity scheme, based on the intrinsic volume approach, was applied to estimate group (CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, C, NH 2 , NH, N, OH, O, CO, and COO) contributions to V 0 . These contributions, the effect of cyclization on V 0 , and the limiting slope of the apparent excess molar volumes were discussed in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions.

  12. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA genes identifies potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria and archaea in the plaque of partially erupted third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, J M; Campbell, J H; Bhandari, A R; Jesionowski, A M; Vickerman, M M

    2012-07-01

    Small subunit rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to identify cultivable and uncultivable microorganisms present in the dental plaque of symptomatic and asymptomatic partially erupted third molars to determine the prevalence of putative periodontal pathogens in pericoronal sites. Template DNA prepared from subgingival plaque collected from partially erupted symptomatic and asymptomatic mandibular third molars and healthy incisors was used in polymerase chain reaction with broad-range oligonucleotide primers to amplify 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal genes. Amplicons were cloned, sequenced, and compared with known nucleotide sequences in online databases to identify the microorganisms present. Two thousand three hundred two clones from the plaque of 12 patients carried bacterial sequences from 63 genera belonging to 11 phyla, including members of the uncultivable TM7, SR1, and Chloroflexi, and difficult-to-cultivate Synergistetes and Spirochaetes. Dialister invisus, Filifactor alocis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, which have been associated with periodontal disease, were found in significantly greater abundance in pericoronal compared with incisor sites. Dialister invisus and F nucleatum were found in greater abundance in sites exhibiting clinical symptoms. The archaeal species, Methanobrevibacter oralis, which has been associated with severe periodontitis, was found in 3 symptomatic patients. These findings have provided new insights into the complex microbiota of pericoronitis. Several bacterial and archaeal species implicated in periodontal disease were recovered in greater incidence and abundance from the plaque of partially erupted third molars compared with incisors, supporting the hypothesis that the pericoronal region may provide a favored niche for periodontal pathogens in otherwise healthy mouths. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and

  13. Apparent and standard partial molar heat capacities and volumes of aqueous tartaric acid and its sodium salts at elevated temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wei; Trevani, Liliana; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Apparent molar heat capacities and volumes have been determined for aqueous solutions of tartaric acid (H 2 Tar, Tar=C 4 H 4 O 6 ), two buffer solutions of (H 2 Tar/NaHTar) and (NaHTar/Na 2 Tar), and solutions of disodium tartrate (Na 2 Tar) at four temperatures in the range 283.15≤T/K≤328.15 at p=1 MPa. Apparent molar volumes for H 2 Tar(aq) and Na 2 Tar(aq) have been measured at temperatures 377.15≤T/K≤529.15 and p=10.4 MPa. The experimental results have been represented with a model to describe the molality and temperature dependence. Extrapolations to infinite dilution yielded standard partial molar heat capacities C p 0 and volumes V 0 for the species H 2 Tar(aq), HTar - (aq) and Tar 2- (aq) over the range of experimental measurements. The temperature dependence of V 0 for Na 2 Tar(aq) is consistent with other aqueous electrolytes, while that of H 2 Tar(aq) may be anomalous, in that it does not show divergence towards increasingly positive values with increasing temperature

  14. Buoyancy Effect of Ionic Vacancy on the Change of the Partial Molar Volume in Ferricyanide-Ferrocyanide Redox Reaction under a Vertical Gravity Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Oshikiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With a gravity electrode (GE in a vertical gravity field, the buoyancy effect of ionic vacancy on the change of the partial molar volume in the redox reaction between ferricyanide (FERRI and ferrocyanide (FERRO ions was examined. The buoyancy force of ionic vacancy takes a positive or negative value, depending on whether the rate-determining step is the production or extinction of the vacancy. Though the upward convection over an upward electrode in the FERRO ion oxidation suggests the contribution of the positive buoyancy force arising from the vacancy production, the partial molar volume of the vacancy was not measured. On the other hand, for the downward convection under a downward electrode in the FERRI ion reduction, it was not completely but partly measured by the contribution of the negative buoyancy force from the vacancy extinction. Since the lifetime of the vacancy is decreased by the collision between ionic vacancies during the convection, the former result was ascribed to the shortened lifetime due to the increasing collision efficiency in the enhanced upward convection over an upward electrode, whereas the latter was thought to arise from the elongated lifetime due to the decreasing collision efficiency by the stagnation under the downward electrode.

  15. Solubilities and partial molar volumes of N,N′-dibutyl-oxalamide, N,N′-dihexyl-oxalamide, N,N′-dioctyl-oxalamide in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Jie; Yang, Hai-Jian; Jin, Jing; Chang, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three new “CO 2 -philic” compounds were designed and synthesized. ► The tested solubility data were calculated and correlated with two models. ► Satisfactory agreements were obtained between the tested and calculated data. ► AARD was lower than 13% for Chrastil model correlation. ► The partial molar volumes V ¯ 2 for each compound were estimated. - Abstract: Three new potent CO 2 -philic compounds were synthesized and their structures were characterized by FT-IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. The solubility of the three compounds in supercritical CO 2 was determined at T = (313 to 353) K from 9.1 MPa to 15.0 MPa. The experimental data were correlated with two density-based models proposed by Bartle and Chrastil, and the calculated results showed good agreement with the tested data. The calculated data by Bartle model differed from the measured values by (6.76 to 9.60)%, and the average value of absolute relative deviations (AARD) with Chrastil model were observed to be between (7.42 to 12.27)%. Furthermore, solubility data were also utilized to estimate the partial molar volume V ¯ 2 for each compound in the supercritical phase using the theory developed by Kumar and Johnston.

  16. Experimental study of the density and derived volumetric (excess, apparent, and partial molar volumes) properties of aqueous 1-propanol mixtures at temperatures from 298 K to 582 K and pressures up to 40 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulagatov, I.M.; Azizov, N.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Density of (water + 1-propanol) mixtures. • Excess molar volumes of (water + 1-propanol) mixtures. • Apparent molar volumes of (water + 1-propanol) mixtures. -- Abstract: Densities of (water + 1-propanol) mixtures have been measured over the temperature range from 298 K to 582 K and at pressures up to 40 MPa using the constant-volume piezometer immersed in a precision liquid thermostat. The measurements were made for six compositions of (0.869, 2.465, 2.531, 7.407, 14.377, and 56.348) mol · kg −1 of 1-propanol. The expanded uncertainty of the density, pressure, temperature, and concentration measurements at the 95% confidence level with a coverage factor of k = 2 is estimated to be 0.06%, 0.05%, 15 mK, and 0.015%, respectively. The derived volumetric properties such as excess (V m E ), apparent (V Φ ), and partial (V ¯ 2 ∞ ) molar volumes were calculated using the measured values of density for the mixture and for pure components (water and 1-propanol). The concentration dependences of the apparent molar volumes were extrapolated to zero concentration to yield the partial molar volumes of 1-propanol at infinite dilution (V ¯ 2 ∞ ). The temperature, pressure, and concentration dependence of density and derived properties of the mixture were studied. All experimental and derived properties (excess, apparent, and partial molar volumes) were compared with the reported data by other authors. The small and negative values of excess molar volume for the mixtures were found at all experimental temperatures, pressures, and over the entire concentration range. The excess molar volume minimum is found at concentration about 0.4 mole fraction of 1-propanol. The concentration minimum of the derived apparent molar volumes V Φ near the 2.5 mol · kg −1 (dilute mixture) was observed

  17. Determinations of enthalpy and partial molar enthalpy in the alloys Bi–Cd–Ga–In–Zn, Bi–Cd–Ga–Zn and Au–Cu–Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the relations of thermodynamic associated with Chou's general solution model (GSM), the models of Muggianu and Toop have been used in order to calculate the mixing enthalpy and partial molar mixing enthalpy of mixing of Bi–Cd–Ga–In–Zn, Bi–Cd–Ga–Zn with equimolar section at a temperature of 730 K and Au–Cu–Sn with the section x Au /x Cu = 1/1 on the entire molar fraction range as a function of alloy composition at a temperature of 900 K. Some negativities are reported in the selected alloys mentioned above, particularly at high temperatures for the human health as well as difficulties in experimental measurement and high costs. Moreover, aim of us is to close the current article gap seen in the literature. In order to close the current gap seen in the literature, the article on the thermodynamic properties of the Bi–Cd–Ga–In–Zn alloys are presented in this study. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic properties of alloys in the study in given conditions were treated. • The activity of Bi seen in all models shows greatly positive deviation from ideality. • The enthalpy of Sn shows small negative values in x Au /x Cu = 1 at 900 K. • The activity of Sn shows negative deviation from ideality in the same conditions

  18. Influence of hydrostatic pressure on dynamics and spatial distribution of protein partial molar volume: time-resolved surficial Kirkwood-Buff approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Isseki; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Nakada, Kyoko; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2010-09-30

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on the partial molar volume (PMV) of the protein apomyoglobin (AMb) was investigated by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the time-resolved Kirkwood-Buff (KB) approach, the dynamic behavior of the PMV was identified. The simulated time average value of the PMV and its reduction by 3000 bar pressurization correlated with experimental data. In addition, with the aid of the surficial KB integral method, we obtained the spatial distributions of the components of PMV to elucidate the detailed mechanism of the PMV reduction. New R-dependent PMV profiles identified the regions that increase or decrease the PMV under the high pressure condition. The results indicate that besides the hydration in the vicinity of the protein surface, the outer space of the first hydration layer also significantly influences the total PMV change. These results provide a direct and detailed picture of pressure induced PMV reduction.

  19. The Partial Molar Volume and Compressibility of FeO in CaO-SiO2 Liquids: Systematic Variation with Fe2+ Coordination Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Iron is an important element in magmatic liquid, since its concentration can range up to 18% in some basaltic liquids, and it has two oxidation states. In order to model magmatic processes, thermodynamic descriptions of silicate melts must include precise information for both the FeO and Fe2O3 components. Currently, the partial molar volume of FeO is not as well known as that for Fe2O3 because of the difficulty of performing double-bob density measurements under reducing conditions. Yet these data are required in order to convert sound speed measurements on FeO-bearing liquids into compressibility data, which in turn are needed extend density models for magmatic liquids to elevated pressures. Moreover, there is growing evidence from the spectroscopic literature that Fe2+ occurs in 4, 5, and 6-fold coordination in silicate melts, and thus it is possible that the partial molar volume and compressibility of FeO may vary with Fe2+ coordination, and thus with melt composition. To explore these issues, we have conducted both density and relaxed sound speed measurements on liquids in the CaO-FeO-SiO2 system, where the CaO/SiO2 ratio was systematically varied at constant FeO concentration (40 mol%). Density was measured between 1594 and 1813K with the double-bob Archimedean method using molybdenum bobs and crucible in a reducing gas (1%CO-99%Ar) environment. The sounds speeds were measured under similar conditions with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer. The derived partial molar volume of FeO increases systematically from 13.7 to 15.2 cm3/mol at 1673 K as the CaO/SiO2 ratio increases and the Fe2+ coordination number decreases. From a comparison with the crystalline volume of FeO (halite structure; 12.06 cm3/mol), which serves as a lower limit for VFeO in silicate liquids when Fe2+ is in 6-fold coordination, we estimate that the average Fe2+ coordination in our experimental melts extends up to values between 5 and 4, consistent with the spectroscopic literature. The

  20. Partial molar volumes of L-alanine, DL-serine, DL-threonine, L-histidine, glycine, and glycylglycine in water, NaCl, and DMSO aqueous solutions at T 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Quan; Li Zhifen; Wang Baohuai

    2006-01-01

    The apparent molar volumes of L-alanine, DL-serine, DL-threonine, L-histidine, glycine, and glycylglycine in water and in the aqueous solutions of NaCl and DMSO with various concentrations at T = 298.15 K have been measured by the precise vibrating-tube digital densimeter. The calculated partial molar volumes at infinite dilution have been used to obtain corresponding transfer volumes from water to various solutions. The experimental results show that the standard partial molar volumes of the above amino acids and peptide at the dilute DMSO aqueous solutions are very close to those in water. However, the volumes show several types of variations with the increase of the concentrations of DMSO due to different types of side chain of amino acids, which should be discussed specifically. The NaCl changes considerably the infinite dilution standard partial molar volumes of the above amino acids and peptide in the aqueous solutions. The infinite dilution standard partial molar volumes of the each amino acids and peptide increase with the concentrations of NaCl. The experimental results have been rationalized by a cosphere overlap model

  1. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXIV. Selected alkane-α,ω-diols at temperatures T = 298 K to 573 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan; Hnědkovský, Lubomír

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Standard molar volumes of three alkane-α,ω-diols (C 5 , C 8 , C 9 ) in water are presented. • Data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Dependences on carbon atom number, temperature, and pressure are analysed. -- Abstract: Density data for dilute aqueous solutions of three alkane-α,ω-diols (pentane-1,5-diol, octane-1,8-diol, nonane-1,9-diol) are presented together with standard molar volumes (partial molar volumes at infinite dilution) calculated from the experimental data. The measurements were performed at temperatures from T = 298 K up to T = 573 K. Experimental pressures were slightly above the saturation vapour pressure of water, and (15 and 30) MPa. The data were obtained using a high-temperature high-pressure flow vibrating-tube densimeter. Measured standard molar volumes were combined with data previously published for other members of the homologous series and discussed. Experimental standard molar volumes were correlated as a function of temperature and pressure using an empirical polynomial function. Dependences of standard molar volumes on temperature and pressure were analysed. Contributions of the methylene group to the standard molar volume were also evaluated and discussed

  2. MOLAR UPRIGHTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Erwansyah

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The mesial tipping of molar is frequently found in orthodontic cases. This molar malposition must be corrected since it may cause periodontal disorders, occlusal interferences, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, and is often needed in planning a fixed bridge. This paper is a literature study to discuss about appliance designs, indication, and contraindications, and complication and treatment protocols of molar uprighting by fixed orthodontic appliances. By knowing the techniques of molar uprighting, the moments mentioned above can be avoided.

  3. The Partial Molar Volume and Thermal Expansivity of Fe2O3 in Alkali Silicate Liquids: Evidence for the Average Coordination of Fe3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Lange, R.

    2003-12-01

    Ferric iron is an important component in magmatic liquids, especially in those formed at subduction zones. Although it has long been known that Fe3+ occurs in four-, five- and six-fold coordination in crystalline compounds, only recently have all three Fe3+ coordination sites been confirmed in silicate glasses utilizing XANES spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge (Farges et al., 2003). Because the density of a magmatic liquid is largely determined by the geometrical packing of its network-forming cations (e.g., Si4+, Al3+, Ti4+, and Fe3+), the capacity of Fe3+ to undergo composition-induced coordination change affects the partial molar volume of the Fe2O3 component, which must be known to calculate how the ferric-ferrous ratio in magmatic liquids changes with pressure. Previous work has shown that the partial molar volume of Fe2O3 (VFe2O3) varies between calcic vs. sodic silicate melts (Mo et al., 1982; Dingwell and Brearley, 1988; Dingwell et al., 1988). The purpose of this study is to extend the data set in order to search for systematic variations in VFe2O3 with melt composition. High temperature (867-1534° C) density measurements were performed on eleven liquids in the Na2O-Fe2O3-FeO-SiO2 (NFS) system and five liquids in the K2O-Fe2O3-FeO-SiO2 (KFS) system using Pt double-bob Archimedean method. The ferric-ferrous ratio in the sodic and potassic liquids at each temperature of density measurement were calculated from the experimentally calibrated models of Lange and Carmichael (1989) and Tangeman et al. (2001) respectively. Compositions range (in mol%) from 4-18 Fe2O3, 0-3 FeO, 12-39 Na2O, 25-37 K2O, and 43-78 SiO2. Our density data are consistent with those of Dingwell et al. (1988) on similar sodic liquids. Our results indicate that for all five KFS liquids and for eight of eleven NFS liquids, the partial molar volume of the Fe2O3 component is a constant (41.57 ñ 0.14 cm3/mol) and exhibits zero thermal expansivity (similar to that for the SiO2 component). This value

  4. Partial molar volumes and viscosities of aqueous hippuric acid solutions containing LiCl and MnCl2 · 4H2O at 303.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Tawde, P. D.; Zinjade, A. B.; Shaikh, A. I.

    2015-09-01

    Density (ρ) and viscosity (η) of aqueous hippuric acid (HA) solutions containing LiCl and MnCl2 · 4H2O have been studied at 303.15 K in order to understand volumetric and viscometric behavior of these systems. Apparent molar volume (φv) of salts were calculated from density data and fitted to Massons relation and partial molar volumes (φ{v/0}) at infinite dilution were determined. Relative viscosity data has been used to determine viscosity A and B coefficients using Jones-Dole relation. Partial molar volume and viscosity coefficients have been discussed in terms of ion-solvent interactions and overall structural fittings in solution.

  5. Hydrophobic hydration and anomalous excess partial molar volume of tert-butyl alcohol-water mixture studied by quasielastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Masaru; Maruyama, Kenji; Misawa, Masakatsu; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate the hydration of alcohol clusters in tert-butyl alcohol-water mixture. The measurements were made in a range of alcohol concentration, x TBA , from 0.0 to 0.17 in mole fraction at 25degC. Fraction, α, of water molecules hydrated to fractal-surface of alcohol clusters in tert-butyl alcohol-water mixture was obtained as a function of alcohol concentration. Average hydration number N WS of tert-butyl alcohol molecule was derived from the value of α as a function of alcohol concentration. The value of N WS for an isolated alcohol molecule in water was 19-21. The anomalous excess partial molar volume of tert-butyl alcohol-water mixture was interpreted successfully by applying the same model with the same values of volume parameter as used for 1-propanol-water mixture, δ 1 (=-0.36 cm 3 ·mol -1 ) and δ 2 (=0.60 cm 3 ·mol -1 ). (author)

  6. Thermodynamic properties of peptide solutions 20. Partial molar volumes and isothermal compressions for some tripeptides of sequence gly-X-gly (X = gly, ala, leu, asn, thr, and tyr) in aqueous solution at T = 298.15 K and p = (10–120) MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedwig, Gavin R.; Høiland, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sound speeds were measured for aqueous solutions of some tripeptides at high pressures. • Partial molar volumes and isothermal compressions were derived for T = 298.15 K and p = (10–120) MPa. • The partial molar volumes for non-polar amino acid side-chains decrease with increasing pressure. • The partial molar volumes for polar side-chains do not change significantly with increasing pressure. - Abstract: Sound speeds have been measured for aqueous solutions of six tripeptides of sequence glycyl-X-glycine, where X is one of the amino acids glycine, alanine, leucine, asparagine, threonine, and tyrosine at T = 298.15 K and at the pressures p = (10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120) MPa. Using methods described in previous work, these sound speeds were used to derive the partial molar volumes at infinite dilution, V_2"o, the partial molar isentropic compressions at infinite dilution, K_S_,_2"o, and the partial molar isothermal compressions at infinite dilution, K"o_T_,_2 {K"o_T_,_2 = −(∂V_2"o/∂p)_T}, for the tripeptides in aqueous solution at the elevated pressures. The results were used to calculate the partial molar volumes and partial molar isothermal compressions for the various amino acid side-chains over the pressure range p = (10–120) MPa.

  7. Cul3-mediated Nrf2 ubiquitination and antioxidant response element (ARE) activation are dependent on the partial molar volume at position 151 of Keap1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggler, Aimee L; Small, Evan; Hannink, Mark; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2009-07-29

    Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) is a transcription factor that activates transcription of a battery of cytoprotective genes by binding to the ARE (antioxidant response element). Nrf2 is repressed by the cysteine-rich Keap1 (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) protein, which targets Nrf2 for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by a Cul3 (cullin 3)-mediated ubiquitination complex. We find that modification of Cys(151) of human Keap1, by mutation to a tryptophan, relieves the repression by Keap1 and allows activation of the ARE by Nrf2. The Keap1 C151W substitution has a decreased affinity for Cul3, and can no longer serve to target Nrf2 for ubiquitination, though it retains its affinity for Nrf2. A series of 12 mutant Keap1 proteins, each containing a different residue at position 151, was constructed to explore the chemistry required for this effect. The series reveals that the extent to which Keap1 loses the ability to target Nrf2 for degradation, and hence the ability to repress ARE activation, correlates well with the partial molar volume of the residue. Other physico-chemical properties do not appear to contribute significantly to the effect. Based on this finding, a structural model is proposed whereby large residues at position 151 cause steric clashes that lead to alteration of the Keap1-Cul3 interaction. This model has significant implications for how electrophiles which modify Cys(151), disrupt the repressive function of Keap1.

  8. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W; Garland, Marc V

    2013-12-28

    The partial molar volumes, V(i), of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. V(i) is determined with the direct method, while the composition of V(i) is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated V(i) deviate only 3.4 cm(3) mol(-1) (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental V(i) variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of V(i) variations. In all solutions, larger V(i) are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus V(i). Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the V(i) trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute movement. This wake behind

  9. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W.; Garland, Marc V.

    2013-12-01

    The partial molar volumes, bar V_i, of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. bar V_i is determined with the direct method, while the composition of bar V_i is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated bar V_i deviate only 3.4 cm3 mol-1 (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental bar V_i variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of bar V_i variations. In all solutions, larger bar V_i are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus bar V_i. Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the bar V_i trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute

  10. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXVII. Two aliphatic polyethers (triglyme, tetraglyme) at temperatures T = 298–573 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Standard molar volumes of two linear aliphatic polyethers in water are presented. • Data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Data combined with those obtained previously are analyzed and compared with standard molar volumes of cyclic ethers. - Abstract: Densities of dilute aqueous solutions of two linear aliphatic polyethers: 2,5,8,11-tetraoxadodecane (triethylene glycol dimethyl ether, triglyme) and 2,5,8,11,14-pentaoxapentadecane (tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether, tetraglyme), measured in the temperature range from (298 to 573) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa using an automated flow vibrating-tube densimeter are reported. Standard molar volumes were evaluated from the measured data. The present values complement previous measurements performed for the title polyethers at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range from (278 to 343) K and extend the knowledge to temperature and pressure ranges in which the data on standard molar volumes for lower members of the homologous series (monoglyme, diglyme) are already available.

  11. Solubility comparison and partial molar volumes of 1,2-hexanediol before and after end-group modification by methyl oxalyl chloride and ethyl oxalyl monochloride in supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Lu; Yang, Hai-Jian; Cai, Zhuofu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two new “CO 2 -philic” compounds were designed and synthesized. ► The tested solubility data were calculated and correlated with two models. ► Satisfactory agreements were obtained between the tested and calculated data. ► The partial molar volumes V ¯ 2 for three compounds were estimated. - Abstract: Bis(methoxy oxalic)-1,2-haxenediester and bis(ethoxy oxalic)-1,2-haxenediester were synthesized by modifying the end groups of 1,2-hexanediol with methyl oxalyl chloride and ethyl oxalyl monochloride. The solubilities of all three compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide were determined at different conditions of pressures (8.8 to 18.8) MPa and temperatures (313, 333, and 353) K. Then, the solubility data were correlated with the Bartle model and the Chrastil model. The average absolute relative deviation (AARD) for the Bartle model was in the range of (3.89 to 25.46)% which is within a good approximation. The Chrastil model also showed satisfactory agreement and the AARD was in the range of (3.70 to 16.92)%. Furthermore, the partial molar volumes of those compounds were estimated following the theory developed by Kumar and Johnston.

  12. Molar development in sheep: morphology, radiography, microhardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milhaud, G.; Nezit, J.

    1991-01-01

    The chronology of molar development is studied from radiographic and macroscopic observations on 48 south Pre-Alps were living under optimal nutritional conditions. It was found that the first molar started its development in utero, the second molar at one month after birth, and the third molar, at 9-10 months. The first molar emerged into the oral cavity at 3 months, the second at 9 months and the third molar at 18 months. The first molar began the development of its roots at 6-7 months, the second molar at 11-12 months and the third molar at 20-22 months. The first molar reached completion of the growth of its roots at 3.5-4 years, the second and the third molars at about 6 years. The molars show the particularity of being functional during the three months which follow their eruption although the development of the crown is not completed. Then the accelerated wear is only partially compensated by the growth of the roots. The study also shows how the combined effects of wear and dentine deposit in the pulp cavity affect the morphology of molars. It reveals the marked hardness of enamel (240 Vickers units) and the low resistance of dentine at the surface of attrition (30 Vickers units)

  13. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXVIII. Three aliphatic poly(ethylene glycols) at temperatures T = 298 K–573 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Standard molar volumes of three poly(ethylene glycols) in water are presented. • Data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Data are analyzed and compared with those of similar solutes. - Abstract: Densities of dilute aqueous solutions of three poly(ethylene glycols): 3-oxapentane-1,5-diol (diethylene glycol), 3,6-dioxaoctane-1,8-diol (triethylene glycol), and 3,5,9-trioxaundecane-1,11-diol (tetraethylene glycol) measured in the temperature range from (298 to 573) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa using an automated flow vibrating-tube densimeter are reported. Standard molar volumes were evaluated from the measured data. Present data complement both the previous measurements performed at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range from (278 to 343) K and the data already available for the first member of the homologous series (ethylene glycol). A comparison with data previously measured for the homologous series of linear aliphatic polyethers (poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers, glymes), diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (3,6-dioxaheptan-1-ol), and selected alkane-α,ω-diols is presented.

  14. Efficacy of orally administered prednisolone versus partial endodontic treatment on pain reduction in emergency care of acute irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kérourédan, Olivia; Jallon, Léonard; Perez, Paul; Germain, Christine; Péli, Jean-François; Oriez, Dominique; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Arrivé, Elise; Devillard, Raphaël

    2017-03-28

    Irreversible pulpitis is a highly painful inflammatory condition of the dental pulp which represents a common dental emergency. Recommended care is partial endodontic treatment. The dental literature reports major difficulties in achieving adequate analgesia to perform this emergency treatment, especially in the case of mandibular molars. In current practice, short-course, orally administered corticotherapy is used for the management of oral pain of inflammatory origin. The efficacy of intraosseous local steroid injections for irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars has already been demonstrated but resulted in local comorbidities. Oral administration of short-course prednisolone is simple and safe but its efficacy to manage pain caused by irreversible pulpitis has not yet been demonstrated. This trial aims to evaluate the noninferiority of short-course, orally administered corticotherapy versus partial endodontic treatment for the emergency care of irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars. This study is a noninferiority, open-label, randomized controlled clinical trial conducted at the Bordeaux University Hospital. One hundred and twenty subjects will be randomized in two 1:1 parallel arms: the intervention arm will receive one oral dose of prednisolone (1 mg/kg) during the emergency visit, followed by one morning dose each day for 3 days and the reference arm will receive partial endodontic treatment. Both groups will receive planned complete endodontic treatment 72 h after enrollment. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with pain intensity below 5 on a Numeric Scale 24 h after the emergency visit. Secondary outcomes include comfort during care, the number of injected anesthetic cartridges when performing complete endodontic treatment, the number of antalgic drugs and the number of patients coming back for consultation after 72 h. This randomized trial will assess the ability of short-term corticotherapy to reduce pain in irreversible

  15. Partial molar volume of paracetamol in water, 0.1 M HCl and 0.154 M NaCl at T = (298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 310.65) K and at 101.325 kPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Capital 54320 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: mjiqauchem@yahoo.com; Malik, Qaisar Mahmood [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Capital 54320 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: qaisar_@hotmail.com

    2005-12-15

    The apparent molar volume of paracetamol (4-acetamidophenol) in water, 0.1 M HCl and 0.154 M NaCl as solvents at (298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 310.65) K temperatures and at a pressure of 101.325 kPa were determined from the density data obtained with the help of a vibrating-tube Anton Paar DMA-48 densimeter. The partial molar volume, V {sub m}, of paracetamol in these solvents at different temperatures was evaluated by extrapolating the apparent molar volume versus molality plots to m = 0. In addition, the partial molar expansivity, E {sup .}, the isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, {alpha} {sub p}, and the interaction coefficient, S {sub v}, have also been computed. The expansivity data show dependence of E {sup .} values on the structure of the solute molecules.

  16. Partial molar volume of paracetamol in water, 0.1 M HCl and 0.154 M NaCl at T = (298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 310.65) K and at 101.325 kPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Malik, Qaisar Mahmood

    2005-01-01

    The apparent molar volume of paracetamol (4-acetamidophenol) in water, 0.1 M HCl and 0.154 M NaCl as solvents at (298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 310.65) K temperatures and at a pressure of 101.325 kPa were determined from the density data obtained with the help of a vibrating-tube Anton Paar DMA-48 densimeter. The partial molar volume, V m , of paracetamol in these solvents at different temperatures was evaluated by extrapolating the apparent molar volume versus molality plots to m = 0. In addition, the partial molar expansivity, E . , the isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, α p , and the interaction coefficient, S v , have also been computed. The expansivity data show dependence of E . values on the structure of the solute molecules

  17. Argon analytical procedures for potassium-argon dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabites, J.E.; Adams, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    A manual for the argon analytical methods involved in potassium-argon geochronology, including: i) operating procedures for the ultra-high vacuum argon extraction/purification equipment for the analysis of nanolitre quantities of radiogenic argon in rocks, minerals and gases; ii) operating procedures for the AEI-MS10 gas source mass spectrometer

  18. What is the fundamental ion-specific series for anions and cations? Ion specificity in standard partial molar volumes of electrolytes and electrostriction in water and non-aqueous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Virginia; Craig, Vincent S J

    2017-10-01

    The importance of electrolyte solutions cannot be overstated. Beyond the ionic strength of electrolyte solutions the specific nature of the ions present is vital in controlling a host of properties. Therefore ion specificity is fundamentally important in physical chemistry, engineering and biology. The observation that the strengths of the effect of ions often follows well established series suggests that a single predictive and quantitative description of specific-ion effects covering a wide range of systems is possible. Such a theory would revolutionise applications of physical chemistry from polymer precipitation to drug design. Current approaches to understanding specific-ion effects involve consideration of the ions themselves, the solvent and relevant interfaces and the interactions between them. Here we investigate the specific-ion effects trends of standard partial molar volumes and electrostrictive volumes of electrolytes in water and eleven non-aqueous solvents. We choose these measures as they relate to bulk properties at infinite dilution, therefore they are the simplest electrolyte systems. This is done to test the hypothesis that the ions alone exhibit a specific-ion effect series that is independent of the solvent and unrelated to surface properties. The specific-ion effects trends of standard partial molar volumes and normalised electrostrictive volumes examined in this work show a fundamental ion-specific series that is reproduced across the solvents, which is the Hofmeister series for anions and the reverse lyotropic series for cations, supporting the hypothesis. This outcome is important in demonstrating that ion specificity is observed at infinite dilution and demonstrates that the complexity observed in the manifestation of specific-ion effects in a very wide range of systems is due to perturbations of solvent, surfaces and concentration on the underlying fundamental series. This knowledge will guide a general understanding of specific

  19. Potassium-argon technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassignol, Charles; Cornette, Yves; David, Benjamin; Gillot, P.-Y.

    1978-04-01

    The main features of the method of processing rocks and minerals and measuring the extracted argon, for the purpose of potassium-argon dating are described. It differs in several respects from the conventional one, as described, f.i., in Dalrymple and Lanphere's monography. Principally it was established that the continual purification of the gases in the mass spectrometer cell during the measurement, stops the peaks of current drift, and renders them representative of the introduced argon. This allows on the one hand to improve the reliability and accuracy of measurements, on the other hand to get rid of the isotopic dilution method, with 38 A as a spike. Moreover the reliability of the radiogenic argon is improved by taking into account the mislinearness of the M.S. response. All this results in a higher performance of the K/Ar dating method, especially in the recent ages range. The technological side of the problem was only dealt with [fr

  20. Deciduous molar hypomineralization and molar incisor hypomineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfrink, M.E.C.; ten Cate, J.M.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Moll, H.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until young adulthood. This study focused on the relationship between Deciduous Molar Hypomineralization (DMH) and Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH). First permanent molars develop

  1. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziglo, M.J.; Nelson, A.E.; Heo, G.; Major, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2 ) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  2. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziglo, M.J. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Private Practice, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Nelson, A.E., E-mail: aenelson@dow.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Heo, G.; Major, P.W. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm{sup -2}) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  3. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziglo, M. J.; Nelson, A. E.; Heo, G.; Major, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation ( p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  4. 293.15 K到333.15 K温度下一些氨基酸及其相应基团水溶液中的偏摩尔体积研究%Studies on Partial Molar Volumes of Some Amino Acids and Their Groups in Aqueous Solutions from 293.15 K to 333.15 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵长伟; 马沛生; 夏淑倩

    2004-01-01

    Densities of aqueous solutions of eight amino acids, glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, L-isoleucine, L-serine,L-threonine, L-arginine and L-phenylalanine, are measured as a function of amino acid concentration from 293.15 K to 333.15K. These data are used to calculate the apparent molar volume V and infinite dilution apparent molar volume V0 (partial molar volume). Data of five amino acids are used to correlate partial molar volume V0 using group contribution method to estimate the contributions of the zwitterionic end groups (NH3+,COO-) and CH2group, OH group, CNHNHNH2 group and C6H5(phenyl) group of amino acids. The results show that V0 values for all kinds of groups of amino acids studied increase with increase of temperature except those for CH2 group,which are almost constant within the studied temperature range. Data of other amino acids, L-valine, L-isoleucine and L-threonine, are chosen for comparison with the predicted partial molar volume V0 using the group additivity parameters obtained. The results confirm that this group additivity method has excellent predictive utility.

  5. SLD liquid argon calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vella, E.

    1992-10-01

    The liquid argon calorimeter (LAC) of the SLD detector is a parallel plate -- liquid argon sampling calorimeter, used to measure particle energies in Z 0 decays at the Stanford Linear Collider. The LAC module design is based on a unique projective tower structure, in which lead plates and segmented lead tiles serve both as absorbers and electrodes. The LAC front end electronics incorporates several novel features, including extensive multiplexing and optical fiber readout, which take advantage of the low SLC beam crossing frequency. The operational performance of the LAC during the recently completed SLD physics run (which recorded over 10,000 Z 0 events) is discussed

  6. Argon in action

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few days, the SPS has been accelerating argon ions, which have started to be sent to the NA61/SHINE experiment. This operating mode, using a new type of ion, required a number of modifications to the accelerator.   Picture 1: a “super-cycle” of the SPS, featuring a proton cycle for the LHC, followed by an argon ion cycle for the North Area. Today, the accelerators are once again juggling particles and even performing completely new tricks. The SPS is supplying beams of argon ions for the first time, at energies never before achieved for this type of beam. They are destined for the NA61/SHINE experiment (see box) located in the North Area, which began receiving the beams on 11 February. Argon ions have a relatively large mass, as they consist of 40 nucleons, so they can be used in a similar way to lead ions. The main difficulty in accelerating them lies in the SPS, where the variation in acceleration frequency is limited. “The SPS was designed for a...

  7. 二氧化碳与2-丁醇二元体系在高压下的亨利系数和偏摩尔体积性质计算%Calculation of Henry's coefficient and partial molar volume of carbon dioxide in 2-butanol at elevated pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田爱琴; 孙洪博; 陈文涛; 王琳

    2012-01-01

    Based on vapor-liquid phase equilibria data for CO2+2-butanol binary system from 323K to 353K by constant-volume visual high-pressure cell, the solubility model of CO2 in 2-butanol was established with Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky equation. Henry's coefficients and partial molar volumes of CO2 at infinite dilution were calculated. Meanwhile, Partial molar volumes of CO2 and 2-butanol at equilibrium were calculated from partial molar volumes properties together with Peng-Robinson equation of state and Van der Waals-2 mixed rule. The results showed that Henry's coefficients and partial molar volumes of CO2 at infinite dilution were both the function of temperature, and Henry's coefficients decreased with temperature. The partial molar volumes of CO2 at infinite dilution were negative and the magnitudes decreased with temperature. The calculated effects of partial molar volumes of vapor and liquid phase at equilibrium showed that the partial molar volumes of CO2 and 2-butanol in liquid phase were positive, but in vapor the partial molar volumes of CO2 were negative and the partial molar volumes of 2-butanol were positive. The research provided theoretical basis for deciding supercritical extraction conditions and instructing industrial production.%利用固定体积可视高压釜测量出的在323 K~353 K温度范围内的CO2与2-丁醇二元体系在高压下的汽液相平衡数据,根据Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky方程建立了CO2在液相中的溶解度模型,得到了该二元体系在高压下的亨利系数和CO2在无限稀释溶液中的偏摩尔体积等性质.同时根据偏摩尔体积性质和Peng-Robinson状态方程及Van der Waals-2混合规则来计算该体系在平衡状态下的气、液相的偏摩尔体积.结果表明CO2在2-丁醇中的亨利系数和CO2在无限稀释溶液中的偏摩尔体积均为温度的函数,CO2在2-丁醇中的亨利系数随温度的升高而降低.CO2在无限稀释溶液中的偏摩尔体积(V)1∞在研究温度下均为

  8. Persistent trophoblast disease following partial molar pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielsma, S.; Kerkmeijer, L.G.W.; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Pyman, J.; Tan, J.; Quinn, M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) follow-up data were analysed retrospectively in all patients registered in the Hydatidiform Mole Registry at the Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne from January 1992 to January 2001 to determine the risk of persistent trophoblast disease following

  9. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  10. The argon excimer laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrobel, W.G.

    1981-02-01

    The electron-beam-pumped argon eximer laser is investigated and tuned for the first time. The electron beam is generated by means of an improved coaxial field emmision diode in which argon gas is excited with power densities of 0.3 GW/cm 3 for 18 ns. The processes in the excited gas of 20 to 65 bar are described in the context of a kinetic model as a sequence of stationary states. Investigations of the amplified spontaneous emission (superfluorescence) confirm the predictions of this model. Only the absorption due to the excited Ar atoms is anomalously high. Reproducible operation of the argon eximer laser was achieved in a wide pressure range with various resonator arrangements. The wavelength of this shortest wavelength of this shortest wavelength excimer laser is 126 nm, the laser line width approx. 1.7 nm, the pulse length 7 to 13 ns, and the laser power 250 kW. The laser emission is tuned from 123.2 nm to 128.4 nm by two different methods (diffraction grating and prism). This tunable laser is thus the one with the shortest wavelength at present. Its line width is 0.25 to 0.4 nm, and the power ue 1.7 kW. (orig.)

  11. [Hyperthyroidism in molar pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufettal, H; Mahdoui, S; Noun, M; Hermas, S; Samouh, N

    2014-03-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a rare complication of molar pregnancy. We report a 39-year-old woman who presented a thyrotoxic syndrome accompanying a molar pregnancy. Serum thyroid hormones were elevated and returned to normal level after uterine evacuation of a molar pregnancy. The authors detail the role of thyroid stimulating property of human gonadotropin chorionic hormone and its structural changes during the gestational trophoblastic diseases. These changes give the latter the thyroid stimulating properties and signs of hyperthyroidism. Molar pregnancy may be a cause of hyperthyroidism. The diagnosis of molar pregnancy should be a mention to thyrotoxicosique syndrome in a woman of childbearing age. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Limited mobility of argon in a metamorphic terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foland, K A [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia (USA). Dept. of Geology

    1979-06-01

    Excess /sup 40/Ar in biotite from some relatively anhydrous charnockitic rocks in the Appalachian Piedmont indicates limited mobility or argon. Biotite from the Arden pluton of the granulite-facies Wilmington Complex apparently formed as a retrograde product at the expense of pyroxene and K-feldspar Rb-Sr ages of biotite from all rocks are approximately 365 Myr. The same micas have apparent K-Ar ages which range from about 365-590 Mye, six of which clearly exceed the Sr isotope whole-rock date of 500 Myr. They contain variable amounts of excess /sup 40/Ar incorporated during crystallization or recrystallization of biotite at about 365 Myr ago. None of the other minerals appears to contain significant amounts of excess argon. The K-Ar apparent ages show strong, positive correlation with whole-rock K concentrations. These relations yield a correlation between excess argon in the biotite phase and rock potassium. This suggests that excess /sup 40/Ar in biotite is of local derivation and is due to an imprint of the local argon activity. If the amount incorporated is roughly proportional to the prevailing argon partial pressure then substantial differences in psub(Ar) existed. Argon did not have a uniform chemical potential over large rock volumes. Analysis of closely spaced samples suggests different argon activity over the scale of less than 10 m. This implies restricted transport of Ar and is probably due to very low effective permeability of the anhydrous assemblages.

  13. Partial molar volumes of organic solutes in water. XXVI. 15-Crown-5 and 18-crown-6 ethers at temperatures (298 to 573) K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cibulka, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Density data were obtained in the range T from (298 to 573) K and p up to 30 MPa. • Standard molar volumes of two crown ethers in water are presented. • Group contribution method was designed to estimate standard molar volumes of cyclic ethers. - Abstract: Densities of dilute aqueous solutions of two cyclic ethers, viz. 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6, measured over the temperature range from (298 to 573) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa using an automated flow vibrating-tube densimeter are reported. Standard molar volumes were evaluated from the measured data. Present data were combined with those obtained previously for several cyclic ethers and predictions of standard molar volumes based on group contribution approach were tested and analysed

  14. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  15. Liquid-argon calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabjan, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the viability of liquid-argon calorimetric techniques in the experimental environment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is briefly analyzed. The authors compare the required and achievable energy resolution with benchmark figures obtained using practical instruments. Comments on the desirable (i.e. required) temporal performance are made and compared with the state of the art. Some of the major engineering challenges are listed, for which solutions will have to be developed if such instruments are to find a place in an SSC experimental area

  16. In vitro comparative study of share bond of light cured composite resins with halogen light and argon laser, using stainless steel brackets on human premolars; Estudo comparativo in vitro da capacidade adesiva da resina fotoativada pela luz halogena e por laser de argonio, utilizando-se brackets metalicos em pre-molares humanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carillo, Vitoria Eugenia Bismarck

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study in vitro was to compare the share bond strength of the light-cured composite resins Transbond XT (Unitek), with halogen light and argon laser. The Adhesive Remmant Index (ARI) was also investigated. The brackets Dyna lock (3M-UNITEK) were bonded to 75 human premolars, divided into 5 groups (15 each) according to time and the polymerization: Group H20, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 20s (10s both sides); Group H40, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 40s (20s both sides); Group A40, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 40s (20s both sides); Group A20, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 20s (10s both sides); Group A10, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 10s (5s both sides). The pulpal temperature changes were determined during a polymerization, not exceeding 3,5 deg C. After bonding, the teeth were submitted to a thermo cycled of 700 cycles between 5 deg C and 55 deg C, to simulate the consuming that the light cured composite resin would have in a short space of time. The specimens were then placed in PVC ring and embedded in acrylic resin (Aero-Jet). The tensile bond strength test was performed on an Universal Machine set at a crosshead speed of 1,5 mm/min, and for each rupture we registered a graphic and the best load required in Newtons, was converted to MPa and kgf. The share bond strength showed bigger values for the exposure time of 20 seconds, for the Group bonded for halogen light (H20), 7,45 kgf (7,64 MPa) and for argon laser 7,50 kgf (7,69 MPa); lesser values for the exposure time of 40s for the Group with halogen light (H40), 6,15 kgf (6,30 MPa) and argon laser Group (A40), 6,20 kgf (6,35 MPa) 0; and A10, 4,85 kgf (4,97 MPa). In the ARI Index, only A40 Group showed the 1 Index, with statistical results. In this Group, less than half of the remainder adhesive stayed on the surface of the enamel, conferring specimens failed at the enamel-adhesive interface. The results of the in vitro study demonstrate that

  17. Removable molar power arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of force elements from the gingival hook of maxillary molar tubes during the retraction of the anterior teeth is very common in orthodontic practice. As the line of force passes below the center of resistance (CR of molar, it results its mesial tipping and also anchorage loss. To overcome this problem, the line of force should pass along the CR of molar. This article highlights a method to overcome this problem by attaching a removable power arm to the headgear tube of molar tube during the retraction of the anterior teeth.

  18. A Molar Pregnancy within the Fallopian Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Allen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Discussion of the incidence of molar pregnancy and ectopic pregnancy. Role of salpingostomy and special considerations for postoperative care. Case. The patient is a 29-year-old G7P4 who presented with vaginal bleeding in the first trimester and was initially thought to have a spontaneous abortion. Ultrasound was performed due to ongoing symptoms and an adnexal mass was noted. She underwent uncomplicated salpingostomy and was later found to have a partial molar ectopic pregnancy. Conclusion. This case illustrates the rare occurrence of a molar ectopic pregnancy. There was no indication of molar pregnancy preoperatively and this case highlights the importance of submitting and reviewing pathological specimens.

  19. Predicting pathology in impacted mandibular third molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aveek Mukherji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The rising incidence of the impacted mandibular third molars and their association with pathologies is now considered a public health problem. Aims and Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the position of impacted mandibular third molars that are prone to developing pathologies and to determine the frequency and type of pathological conditions associated with these impacted teeth to facilitate planning for their prophylactic removal. Materials and Methods: Consecutive panoramic radiographs and clinical examination of 300 patients with impacted mandibular third molars were collected. They were segregated according to Pell and Gregory’s classification, Winter’s classification, and according to their state of eruption. These were correlated with associated pathologies based on clinical and radiological criteria. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics included computation of percentages, mean, and standard deviations. The statistical test applied for the analysis was Pearson’s Chi-square test (χ2. For this test, confidence interval and P value were set at 93% and ≤0.03, respectively. Results: The pathology most commonly associated with impacted third molars was pericoronitis, which had the highest frequency of occurrence in partially erupted, distoangular, and IA positioned (as per Pell and Gregory classification impacted teeth. Impacted mandibular third molars, which were in IA position, placed mesially, and partially erupted, were prone to develop pathologies such as dental caries and periodontitis. Conclusion: The clinical and radiographical features of impacted third molar may be correlated to the development of their pathological complications. The partially impacted mandibular third molars with mesioangularly aligned in IA position have the highest potential to cause pathological complications.

  20. Argon solubility in liquid steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R; Dankert, O; Van Veen, A; Kamperman, AA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to establish the solubility of argon in liquid interstitial-free steel. The solubility appears to be lower than 0.1 at ppb, The results are in line with argon solubilities reported in the literature on liquid iron. Semiempirical theories and calculations based on the

  1. The Partial Molar Volume and Compressibility of the FeO Component in Model Basalts (Mixed CaAl2Si2O8-CaMgSi2O6-CaFeSi2O6 Liquids) at 0 GPa: evidence of Fe2+ in 6-fold coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Lange, R. A.; Ai, Y.

    2010-12-01

    FeO is an important component in magmatic liquids and yet its partial molar volume at one bar is not as well known as that for Fe2O3 because of the difficulty of performing double-bob density measurements under reducing conditions. Moreover, there is growing evidence from spectroscopic studies that Fe2+ occurs in 4, 5, and 6-fold coordination in silicate melts, and it is expected that the partial molar volume and compressibility of the FeO component will vary accordingly. We have conducted both density and relaxed sound speed measurements on four liquids in the An-Di-Hd (CaAl2Si2O8-CaMgSi2O6-CaFeSi2O6) system: (1) Di-Hd (50:50), (2) An-Hd (50:50), (3) An-Di-Hd (33:33:33) and (4) Hd (100). Densities were measured between 1573 and 1838 K at one bar with the double-bob Archimedean method using molybdenum bobs and crucibles in a reducing gas (1%CO-99%Ar) environment. The sound speeds were measured under similar conditions with a frequency-sweep acoustic interferometer, and used to calculate isothermal compressibility. All the density data for the three multi-component (model basalt) liquids were combined with density data on SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO-K2O-Na2O liquids (Lange, 1997) in a fit to a linear volume equation; the results lead to a partial molar volume (±1σ) for FeO =11.7 ± 0.3(±1σ) cm3/mol at 1723 K. This value is similar to that for crystalline FeO at 298 K (halite structure; 12.06 cm3/mol), which suggests an average Fe2+ coordination of ~6 in these model basalt compositions. In contrast, the fitted partial molar volume of FeO in pure hedenbergite liquid is 14.6 ± 0.3 at 1723 K, which is consistent with an average Fe2+ coordination of 4.3 derived from EXAFS spectroscopy (Rossano, 2000). Similarly, all the compressibility data for the three multi-component liquids were combined with compressibility data on SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO liquids (Ai and Lange, 2008) in a fit to an ideal mixing model for melt compressibility; the results lead to a partial molar

  2. Prevalence of missing and impacted third molars in adults aged 25 years and above

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yun-Hoa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of missing and impacted third molars in people aged 25 years and above. Materials and Methods The study sample of 3,799 patients was chosen randomly from patients who visited Pusan National University Dental Hospital and had panoramic radiographs taken. The data collected included presence and impaction state, angulation, and depth of impaction of third molars, and radiographically detected lesions of third molars and adjacent second molars. Results A greater percentage of men than women retained at least one third molar. The incidence of third molars decreased with increasing age. The incidence of partially impacted third molars greatly declined after the age of 30. Vertically impacted maxillary third molars and horizontally impacted mandibular third molars were most frequent in all age groups. Among the maxillary third molars, those impacted below the cervical line of the second molar were most frequent in all age groups, and among the mandibular third molars, deeply impacted third molars were most frequent in those aged over 40. Dental caries was the most common radiographic lesion of the third molars. Mesioangularly impacted third molars showed radiographic lesions in 13 (9.5%) adjacent maxillary second molars and 117 (27.4%) mandibular second molars. Conclusion The number of remaining third molars decreased and the percentage of Class C depth increased with age. Caries was the most frequent lesion in third molars. Partially impacted mesioangular third molars showed a high incidence of caries or periodontal bone loss of the adjacent second molar. Regular oral examination will be essential to keep asymptomatic third molars in good health. PMID:24380060

  3. Prevalence of missing and impacted third molars in adults aged 25 years and above

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of missing and impacted third molars in people aged 25 years and above. The study sample of 3,799 patients was chosen randomly from patients who visited Pusan National University Dental Hospital and had panoramic radiographs taken. The data collected included presence and impaction state, angulation, and depth of impaction of third molars, and radiographically detected lesions of third molars and adjacent second molars. A greater percentage of men than women retained at least one third molar. The incidence of third molars decreased with increasing age. The incidence of partially impacted third molars greatly declined after the age of 30. Vertically impacted maxillary third molars and horizontally impacted mandibular third molars were most frequent in all age groups. Among the maxillary third molars, those impacted below the cervical line of the second molar were most frequent in all age groups, and among the mandibular third molars, deeply impacted third molars were most frequent in those aged over 40. Dental caries was the most common radiographic lesion of the third molars. Mesioangularly impacted third molars showed radiographic lesions in 13 (9.5%) adjacent maxillary second molars and 117 (27.4%) mandibular second molars. The number of remaining third molars decreased and the percentage of Class C depth increased with age. Caries was the most frequent lesion in third molars. Partially impacted mesioangular third molars showed a high incidence of caries or periodontal bone loss of the adjacent second molar. Regular oral examination will be essential to keep asymptomatic third molars in good health.

  4. Prevalence of missing and impacted third molars in adults aged 25 years and above

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of missing and impacted third molars in people aged 25 years and above. The study sample of 3,799 patients was chosen randomly from patients who visited Pusan National University Dental Hospital and had panoramic radiographs taken. The data collected included presence and impaction state, angulation, and depth of impaction of third molars, and radiographically detected lesions of third molars and adjacent second molars. A greater percentage of men than women retained at least one third molar. The incidence of third molars decreased with increasing age. The incidence of partially impacted third molars greatly declined after the age of 30. Vertically impacted maxillary third molars and horizontally impacted mandibular third molars were most frequent in all age groups. Among the maxillary third molars, those impacted below the cervical line of the second molar were most frequent in all age groups, and among the mandibular third molars, deeply impacted third molars were most frequent in those aged over 40. Dental caries was the most common radiographic lesion of the third molars. Mesioangularly impacted third molars showed radiographic lesions in 13 (9.5%) adjacent maxillary second molars and 117 (27.4%) mandibular second molars. The number of remaining third molars decreased and the percentage of Class C depth increased with age. Caries was the most frequent lesion in third molars. Partially impacted mesioangular third molars showed a high incidence of caries or periodontal bone loss of the adjacent second molar. Regular oral examination will be essential to keep asymptomatic third molars in good health.

  5. The Argon Dark Matter Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071720

    2009-01-01

    The ArDM experiment, a 1 ton liquid argon TPC/Calorimeter, is designed for the detection of dark matter particles which can scatter off the spinless argon nucleus, producing nuclear recoils. These events will be discerned by their light to charge ratio, as well as the time structure of the scintillation light. The experiment is presently under construction and commissioning on surface at CERN. Cryogenic operation and light detection performance was recently confirmed in a test run of the full 1 ton liquid argon target under purely calorimetric operation and with a prototype light readout system. This note describes the experimental concept, the main detector components and presents some first results.

  6. Death during laparoscopy: can 1 gas push out another? Danger of argon electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezeur, Alain; Partensky, Christian; Chipponi, Jacques; Duron, Jean-Jacques

    2008-08-01

    We report the death of a young man during a laparoscopic partial splenectomy performed with an argon plasma coagulator to remove a benign cyst. The report analyzes the very particular mechanism of a gas embolism, which caused death here. This analysis leads us to recommend a close attention on the use of argon coagulators during laparoscopy. The aim of this article is to draw surgeons' attention to the conclusions of a court-ordered expert assessment intended to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the death of a 20-year-old man during a laparoscopic partial splenectomy performed with an argon plasma coagulator to remove a benign cyst.

  7. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  8. Mathematical identification of homogenisation processes in argon stirred ladle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Michalek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models processed results of experimental investigation obtained during ladle gas argon bubbling realized by stir elements situated in the ladle bottom. Exact theoretical description of processes occurring at argon bubbling into steel would be very complex and it would lead to a system of non-linear partial differential equations describing transfer of momentum, heat, components, and with excitation function in the form of equation of so called deterministic chaos (argon bubbling. On the basis of pouring ladle model diagram and concentrations courses, the simplified linear physically adequate model was proposed, which described behavior of steel concentration in pouring ladle during its bubbling. The analysed process was understood in the form of a cybernetic model.

  9. Association of the Mandibular Third Molar Position to the Pericoronitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetan Tsvetanov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pericoronitis is inflammation of the soft tissues surrounding the crown of a partially erupted tooth. Objective: To provide measurement of lower third molar angulation and determine relationship between mandibular third molar position and presence of pericoronitis. Material and methods: We studied 104 patients with lower third molar pericoronitis with clinical manifestations and measurement of lower third molar angulation. The mean age of patients was 25.7 years (range 18-35 years. Results: In this study was used the following statistical analysis, Pearson correlation coefficient and Spearman’s correlation coefficient (nonparametric version of the Pearson correlation coefficient for measure of the linear correlation between two variables - pericoronitis and angulation of the lower third molars. The chi-square test was used to assesses case incidences. The level of significance was p<0.05. 36.04% of partially impacted mandibular third molars were mesioangular followed by the vertical (25.47%, horizontal (18.97%, distoangular (9.21%, buccal (5.42% and lingual (3.79% position. The lowest part of the mandibular third molars is located in the ramus of mandible (1.08%. The present study was found in relation to mesioangular, distoangular, vertical impaction and pericoronitis (p<0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that the position of lower third molar may be able to be associated with presence of pericoronitis.

  10. Polarizability of Helium, Neon, and Argon: New Perspectives for Gas Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiser, Christof; Fellmuth, Bernd

    2018-03-01

    With dielectric-constant gas thermometry, the molar polarizability of helium, neon, and argon has been determined with relative standard uncertainties of about 2 parts per million. A series of isotherms measured with the three noble gases and two different experimental setups led to this unprecedented level of uncertainty. These data are crucial for scientists in the field of gas metrology, working on pressure and temperature standards. Furthermore, with the new benchmark values for neon and argon, theoretical calculations, today about 3 orders of magnitude larger in uncertainty, can be checked and improved.

  11. Modelling electroluminescence in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, D Y; Barker, G J; Bennieston, A J; Harrison, P F; McConkey, N; Morgan, B; Ramachers, Y A; Lightfoot, P K; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C; Thompson, L

    2010-01-01

    We present Monte-Carlo simulations of electron transport through liquid argon motivated by our recent observation of electroluminescence light emanating from a thick gaseous electron multiplier (THGEM) in a liquid argon volume. All known elastic and inelastic reaction cross-sections have been accounted for, providing electroluminescence light yield predictions for arbitrary electrostatic fields. This study concludes that the large field gradients needed to produce electroluminescence cannot be accounted for by straightforward electrostatic field calculations based on ideal THGEM holes, suggesting that further experimental investigations are required.

  12. Ruptured tubal molar pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-05-19

    May 19, 2011 ... In most instances, moles develop within the uterine cavity, but may occur at ... Patients with tubal molar pregnancy are very difficult to distinguish .... There was a left-sided adnexal mass, whose size could not be appreciated ...

  13. Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfrink, M.; Weerheijm, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (mih) wordt omschreven als een hypomineralisatie (van systemische oorsprong) van één tot vier blijvende eerste molaren, vaak in combinatie met aangedane incisieven. mih-molaren zijn fragieler en cariësgevoeliger dan gewone molaren. Een kenmerk van mih-molaren is een

  14. Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfrink, M.; Weerheijm, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) wordt gedefinieerd als een hypomineralisatie van systemische oorsprong van één tot vier blijvende eerste molaren, vaak in combinatie met aangedane incisieven. MIH-molaren zijn fragieler en cariësgevoeliger dan gewone molaren. Een kenmerk van MIH-molaren is een

  15. Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfrink, M.; Weerheijm, K.

    2011-01-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (mih ) wordt gedefinieerd als een hypomineralisatie van systemische oorsprong van één tot vier blijvende eerste molaren, vaak in combinatie met aangedane incisieven. mih -molaren zijn fragieler en cariësgevoeliger dan gewone molaren. Een kenmerk van mih -molaren is

  16. Geminate recombination in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The extended Onsager model for geminate neutralization is supported by the field dependence of the ionization yield in liquid argon irradiated by high energy electrons or x rays. Attempts to employ the model fail unless the distribution of initial separation distances between the thermalized electrons and their sibling ions (secondary electron thermalization ranges) is included. Data of Scalettar and co-workers are reanalyzed

  17. Data relative to (e, argon) and (e, ethane) interactions necessary for strong field transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florent, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Collisions between electrons and argon atoms and ethane molecules are studied in order to better understand phenomena occurring at each stage of detection in gas detectors used in nuclear and high energy physics. Elastic collisions between an electron and argon, those producing an electronic excitation of the atom, and those leading to its ionisation are reviewed. For the ethane collisions, vibrational excitation is considered. Photoionisation of argon and ethane is also examined. Total or partial cross sections, and differential cross sections are presented [fr

  18. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  19. What is the fundamental ion-specific series for anions and cations? Ion specificity in standard partial molar volumes of electrolytes and electrostriction in water and non-aqueous solvents† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc02691a Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    The importance of electrolyte solutions cannot be overstated. Beyond the ionic strength of electrolyte solutions the specific nature of the ions present is vital in controlling a host of properties. Therefore ion specificity is fundamentally important in physical chemistry, engineering and biology. The observation that the strengths of the effect of ions often follows well established series suggests that a single predictive and quantitative description of specific-ion effects covering a wide range of systems is possible. Such a theory would revolutionise applications of physical chemistry from polymer precipitation to drug design. Current approaches to understanding specific-ion effects involve consideration of the ions themselves, the solvent and relevant interfaces and the interactions between them. Here we investigate the specific-ion effects trends of standard partial molar volumes and electrostrictive volumes of electrolytes in water and eleven non-aqueous solvents. We choose these measures as they relate to bulk properties at infinite dilution, therefore they are the simplest electrolyte systems. This is done to test the hypothesis that the ions alone exhibit a specific-ion effect series that is independent of the solvent and unrelated to surface properties. The specific-ion effects trends of standard partial molar volumes and normalised electrostrictive volumes examined in this work show a fundamental ion-specific series that is reproduced across the solvents, which is the Hofmeister series for anions and the reverse lyotropic series for cations, supporting the hypothesis. This outcome is important in demonstrating that ion specificity is observed at infinite dilution and demonstrates that the complexity observed in the manifestation of specific-ion effects in a very wide range of systems is due to perturbations of solvent, surfaces and concentration on the underlying fundamental series. This knowledge will guide a general understanding of specific

  20. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  1. Prospects for photosensitive dopants in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.F.

    1990-12-01

    Evidence is presented that the addition of a few ppM of a photosensitive dopant to a U/liquid argon or Pb/liquid argon calorimeter will make a substantial reduction in the e/π ratio. Previous results indicating high voltage problems and no change in the e/π ratio in tests of photosensitive dopants with the Fermilab D0 experiment's U/liquid argon tests calorimeter are also explained. 13 refs., 3 figs

  2. A combined experimental and computational investigation of excess molar enthalpies of (nitrobenzene + alkanol) mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyband, Razieh Sadat; Zarei, Hosseinali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Excess molar enthalpies for the binary mixtures of nitrobenzene + alkanols mixtures were measured. • The infinite dilution excess partial molar enthalpies were calculated using the ab initio methods. • The PCM calculations were performed. • The computed excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution were compared to experimental results. - Abstract: Excess molar enthalpies (H m E ) for the binary mixtures of {(nitrobenzene + ethanol), 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol and 2-butanol} have been measured over the entire composition range at ambient pressure (81.5 kPa) and temperature 298 K using a Parr 1455 solution calorimeter. From the experimental results, the excess partial molar enthalpies (H i E ) and excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution (H i E,∞ ) were calculated. The excess molar enthalpies (H m E ) are positive for all {nitrobenzene (1) + alkanol (2)} mixtures over the entire composition range. A state-of-the-art computational strategy for the evaluation of excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution was followed at the M05-2X/6-311++G ∗∗ level of theory with the PCM model. The experimental excess partial molar enthalpies at infinite dilution have been compared to the computational data of the ab initio in liquid phase. Integrated experimental and computational results help to clarify the nature of the intermolecular interactions in {nitrobenzene (1) + alkanol (2)} mixtures. The experimental and computational work which was done in this study complements and extends the general research on the computation of excess partial molar enthalpy at infinite dilution of binary mixtures

  3. Dynamics of imploding argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.; Richardson, R.; Brannon, J.; Wilkinson, M.; Katzenstein, J.

    1982-01-01

    The BLACKJACK 5 pulse generator has been used to implode annular argon plasmas to form dense Z pinches. Visible streak photography, framing photography, and laser shadowgraphy were used to observe the radial position and velocity of the plasmas as they imploded. The measured position and velocity of the imploding plasmas have been compared with the results of calculations based on a one-dimensional snowplow model. Good agreement is obtained between the snowplow calculations and the optical measurements. Empirically determined optimum implosion parameters are also found to agree with those predicted by the model

  4. Fate of third molar in line of mandibular angle fracture - Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study fails to identify any concrete factors that would predict the failure of the retained third molar that were involved in the line of mandibular fractures. The proof presented here, especially with low complication rates indicate that all impacted third molar along the line of fracture be removed and unless necessary, the partially erupted teeth would also be extracted. In such a situation, the rate of infection and survival of the third molar would have been entirely different.

  5. Treatment of ectopically erupting maxillary permanent first molars with a distal extended stainless steel crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M W

    1986-01-01

    The exaggerated mesial eruption of the permanent first molar can result in the tooth becoming impacted, or the premature atypical resorption and exfoliation of the primary molar, with a resultant loss of space. A stainless steel crown with a distal guide plane was placed on a primary molar to correct the aberrant eruption angle of the permanent tooth. This procedure can be used successfully for both partially and totally tissue-impacted teeth, and is described in this report.

  6. Continuum radiation of argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Yachkov, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    A simple completely analytical method of the calculation of radiative continuum of plasmas is derived and an analysis of experimental data on continuum radiation of argon plasma is made. The method is based on the semiclassical quantum defect theory. To calculate radial matrix elements of dipole transitions the asymptotic expansion in powers of E c /ω 2/3 , with an accuracy to the linear term, where E, is the arithmetic mean of the initial and final energies of the transition, is used. This expansion has the same form for free-free, free-bound and bound-bound transitions. If the quantum defects are also approximated by a linear function of energy, the integration over the electron energy (the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is assumed) can be performed in analytical form. For Rydberg states the sum of photoionization continua can be replaced by an integral. We have calculated the absorption coefficient pf argon plasma. The photoionization cross section is calculated for all the states of 4s, 5s, 6s, 4p, 5p, 3d, 4d, 4s', 5s', 6s', 4p', 5p', 3d' and 4d' configurations taking into account P-coupling and multiplet splitting (56 states). Other excited states are allowed for by the integral formula together with free-free transitions

  7. Scattering of electrons from argon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Bhatia, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The scattering of electrons from argon atoms is studied by the method of polarized orbitals. The 3p→d perturbed orbital calculated using the Sternheimer approximation gives the polarizability 14.29a 0 3 . The perturbation of the orbitals 1s, 2s, 2p, and 3s is taken into account by renormalizing the 3p→d orbitals to give the experimental value 11.06a 0 3 . Using only the modified orbital in the total wave function, phase shifts for various partial waves have been calculated in the exchange, exchange-adiabatic, and polarized-orbital approximations. They are compared with the results of the previous calculations. The calculated total elastic, differential, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared with the experimental results. The elastic total cross sections obtained in the polarized-orbital approximation agree very closely with the recently measured cross sections by Jost et al. and Nickel et al. The critical point (the value of k 2 and theta at which the differential cross section is minimum) is at 0.306 eV and 80 0 , in good agreement with the measurements of Weyhreter et al

  8. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R ampersand D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R ampersand D program are described. 18 refs

  9. Vascular anastomosis by Argon Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, O.M.; Macruz, R.; Armelin, E.; Brum, J.M.G.; Ribeiro, M.P.; Mnitentog, J.; Verginelli, G.; Pileggi, F.; Zerbini, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty four mongrel dogs, wheighing 13 to 24 kilograms were studied. After anesthesia, intubation and controlled ventilation, they were submitted to three types of vascular anastomosis: Group I - eight dogs with saphenous vein inter-carotid arteries by-pass: Group II - eight dogs with left mammary artery - left anterior descending coronary artery by-pass; Group III - eight dogs with venovenous anastomosis. In all groups 0.8 to 15 watts of Argon Laser power was applied to a total time of 90 to 300 seconds. The lower power for venovenous anastomosis and the greater for the arterial ones. The mean valves of resistence of the Laser anastomosis to pressure induced rupture was 730 mmHg in the immediate post operative study, and superior to 2.500 mmHg 30 days after. No signs of occlusion was demonstrated at the anastomosis sites by the angiographic and anathomo-patological study performed. (Author) [pt

  10. Molar Incisiv Hypomineralisasjon - MIH Litteraturstudie

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Aisha Farnaz

    2017-01-01

    Introduksjon: MIH er definert som emaljehypomineralisering av systemisk opprinnelse der 1 til 4 av første permanente molarer er rammet. Incisiver er også ofte affiserte. Hensikten med denne litteraturstudien er å lage en oversikt over, og vurdere tilgjengelig litteratur om MIH, og bruke litteraturen som bakgrunn for å utarbeide en informasjonsbrosjyre om MIH. Materiale og metode: Det ble utført et elektronisk søk i PubMed med søkestrengene ”Molar incisor hypomineralization MIH” og ”Molar inci...

  11. Emissive spectra of shock-heated argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jingyou; Gu Yan; Peng Qixian; Bai Yulin; Li Ping

    2003-01-01

    To study the radiant properties of argon under weak shock compression, an aluminum target filled with gaseous argon at ambient states was impacted by a tungsten alloy projectile which was launched from a two-stage light gun to 2.00 km/s. The radiant signals of single shock-compressed argon were recorded by a six-channel pyrometer and oscilloscopes, which varied with time linearly for the five channels from 405 nm to 700 nm and exponentially for the channel 800 nm, and the corresponding velocity of shock wave was determined to be 4.10 ± 0.09 km/s. By the present experiment, it has been shown that the absorbability of the shock-heated argon is low for visual light and the optical depths of argon gas turn from thin to thick as wavelengths gradually increase. The time-resolved spectra in the rising-front of the radiant signal in the re-shocked argon were recorded by means of an OMA, and strong emissive spectrum bands near 450 nm light-wave length but no linear spectrum were found. The emissive spectrum properties of shock-compression argon were qualitatively explained by the state parameters and ionization degree

  12. Argon cover gas purity control on LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi [PNC (Japan); Ishiyama, Satoshi [Toshiba (Japan); Motonaga, Tetsuji [Hitachi (Japan)

    1987-07-01

    Various control methods on chemical impurities and radioactive materials (fission products) in the primary argon gas of LMFBRs' have been studied based on experiences in Joyo and results of research and development. These results are reflected on MONJU design. On-line gas chromatographs are installed both in the Primary and in the Secondary Argon Gas Systems in JOYO. Also, chemical analysis has been done by batch sampling in JOYO. Though the rise of impurity concentration had been measured after periodical fuel exchange operation, impurity concentration has been controlled sufficiently under target control limits. In MONJU detailed design, the Rare Gas Removal and Recovery System which consisted of cryogenic distillation equipment had been eliminated and the capacity of Charcoal Beds in the Primary Argon Gas System has been improved to keep the concentration of radioactive materials sufficient low levels. The necessity to control the impurities in fresh argon gas which is supplied to the Primary Argon Gas System is now considered to keep the concentration of Kr and Xe isotopes in specified level, because their isotopes may make background rise for the Tagging Gas Failed Fuel Detection and Location System. Based on various investigations performed on sodium vapor trapping to obtain its detailed characteristics, design specifications and operating conditions of MONJU's Vapor Traps have been decided. To keep the level of radioactivity in gaseous effluents to the environment as low as reasonably achievable, the following means are now adopted in MONJU: the Primary Argon Gas System is composed of a closed recirculating path, but the exhaust gas discharged has different path after the Charcoal Beds; fresh argon gas is blown down to prevent Primary Argon Gas from releasing to the circumference during opening of the primary argon gas boundary, such as fuel exchange operations. (author)

  13. Virial Coefficients for the Liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Micheal; Kim, Saesun

    2014-03-01

    We begin with a geometric model of hard colliding spheres and calculate probability densities in an iterative sequence of calculations that lead to the pair correlation function. The model is based on a kinetic theory approach developed by Shinomoto, to which we added an interatomic potential for argon based on the model from Aziz. From values of the pair correlation function at various values of density, we were able to find viral coefficients of liquid argon. The low order coefficients are in good agreement with theoretical hard sphere coefficients, but appropriate data for argon to which these results might be compared is difficult to find.

  14. Liquid-Vapor Argon Isotope Fractionation from the Triple Point to the Critical Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, J. T.; Linderstrøm-Lang, C. U.; Bigeleisen, J.

    1972-01-01

    are compared at the same molar volume. The isotope fractionation factor α for 36Ar∕40Ar between liquid and vapor has been measured from the triple point to the critical temperature. The results are compared with previous vapor pressure data, which cover the range 84–102°K. Although the agreement is within....... The fractionation factor approaches zero at the critical temperature with a nonclassical critical index equal to 0.42±0.02.〈∇2Uc〉/ρc in liquid argon is derived from the experimental fractionation data and calculations of 〈∇2Ug〉/ρg for a number of potential functions for gaseous argon....

  15. Low-pressure argon adsorption assessment of micropore connectivities in activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, T; Villieras, F; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2006-01-01

    Low-pressure argon adsorption has been used to study the energetic distribution of microporous activated carbons differing by their burn-off. The collected isotherms were analyzed using the derivative isotherm summation method. Some oscillations on the experimental curves for very low partial pressures were detected. The results are analyzed and discussed according to the literature and could be attributed to local overheating caused by spontaneous mass transfer of argon through constrictions between former pores and the new opening pore or deadend pores. We used the dynamic character of the experimental method and mainly the discrepancy of the quasi-equilibrium state to deduce key parameters related to the porosity topology.

  16. Broadband Ftmw Spectroscopy of the Urea-Argon and Thiourea-Argon Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medcraft, Chris; Bittner, Dror M.; Cooper, Graham A.; Mullaney, John C.; Walker, Nick

    2017-06-01

    The rotational spectra complexes of argon-urea, argon-thiourea and water-thiourea have been measured by chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy from 2-18.5 GHz. The sample was produced via laser vaporisation of a rod containing copper and the organic sample as a stream of argon was passed over the surface and subsequently expanded into the vacuum chamber cooling the sample. Argon was found to bind to π system of the carbonyl bond for both the urea and thiourea complexes.

  17. Negative corona current pulses in argon and in mixture argon with SF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoranova, A.; Zahoran, M.; Bucek, A.; Cernak, M.; Bosko, J.

    2004-01-01

    Waveforms of the first negative current pulses in a short negative point-to plane gap in pure argon and argon with SF 6 admixture have been investigated with a nanosecond time resolution at a gas pressure 50 kPa as a function of applied gap voltage and content of SF 6 in the mixture. We have made an attempt to explain the differences in the discharge development in pure argon and in argon with admixture of SF 6 based on the observed changes of the pulse shape. The experimental results obtained will be discussed in context with existing computer simulation models (Authors)

  18. Fusion of mandibular third molar with supernumerary fourth molar

    OpenAIRE

    López Carriches, C.; Leco Berrocal, I.; Baca Pérez-Bryan, R.

    2008-01-01

    La fusión dental es la unión de dos gérmenes dentales normalmente separados, mientras que la geminación se define como el intento de división de un único germen dental. La fusión y geminación de molares es poco frecuente en la dentición permanente. Describimos un caso clínico de un tercer molar inferior derecho fusionado a un cuarto molar supernumerario en un paciente varón de 36 años que ha presentado repetidos episodios de pericoronaritis. Tras el estudio radiológico se realiza la exodoncia...

  19. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization, Prevalence, and Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Mohammed Allazzam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the prevalence and possible etiological factors associated with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH among a group of children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A group of 8-12-year-old children were recruited (n=267  from the Pediatric Dental Clinics at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University. Children had at least one first permanent molar (FPM, erupted or partially erupted. Demographic information, children’s medical history, and pregnancy-related data were obtained. The crowns of the FPM and permanent incisors were examined for demarcated opacities, posteruptive breakdown (PEB, atypical restorations, and extracted FPMs. Children were considered to have MIH if one or more FPM with or without involvement of incisors met the diagnostic criteria. Results. MIH showed a prevalence of 8.6%. Demarcated opacities were the most common form. Maxillary central incisors were more affected than mandibular (P=0.01. The condition was more prevalent in children with history of illnesses during the first four years of life including tonsillitis (P=0.001, adenoiditis (P=0.001, asthma (P=0.001, fever (P=0.014, and antibiotics intake (P=0.001. Conclusions. The prevalence of MIH is significantly associated with childhood illnesses during the first four years of life including asthma, adenoid infections, tonsillitis, fever, and antibiotics intake.

  20. Ceramic onlay for endodontically treated mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopadevi Garlapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of endodontically treated teeth is important for the success of endodontic treatment. In full coverage restorations, maximum amount of tooth structure is compromised, so as to conserve the amount of tooth structure partial coverage restorations, can be preferred. This case report is on fabrication of a conservative tooth colored restoration for an endodontically treated posterior tooth. A 22-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular left first molar. After endodontic treatment, composite material was used as postendodontic restoration. The tooth was then prepared to receive a ceramic onlay and bonded with self-adhesive universal resin cement. Ceramic onlay restoration was periodically examined up to 2 years.

  1. Endodontic management of a mandibular third molar fused with a fourth molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turell, I L; Zmener, O

    1999-05-01

    Developmental anomalies in permanent molars frequently require surgical intervention. A case of a mandibular third molar fused with a fourth molar which was successfully treated with conservative endodontic therapy is reported.

  2. Elastic properties of liquid and solid argon in nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schappert, Klaus; Pelster, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    We have measured sorption isotherms and determined the intrinsic longitudinal elastic modulus β Ar,ads of nanoconfined material via ultrasonic measurements combined with a special effective medium analysis. In the liquid regime the adsorbate only contributes to the measured effective properties when the pores are completely filled and the modulus is bulklike. At partial fillings its contribution is cancelled out by the high compressibility of the vapour phase. In contrast, at lower temperatures frozen argon as well as underlying liquid surface layers cause a linear increase of the effective longitudinal modulus upon filling. During sorption the contribution of the liquid surface layers near the pore wall β Ar,surf increases with the thickness of the solid layers reaching the bulk value β Ar,liquid only in the limit of complete pore filling. We interpret this effect as due to the gradual stiffening of the solid argon membrane. The measurements and their analysis show that longitudinal ultrasonic waves are well suited to the study of the elastic properties and liquid–solid phase transitions in porous systems. This method should also help to detect the influence of nanoconfinement on elastic properties in further research. (paper)

  3. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  4. Sodium evaporation into a forced argon flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumada, Toshiaki; Kasahara, Fumio; Ishiguro, Ryoji

    1975-01-01

    Evaporation from a rectangular sodium free surface into an argon flow was measured. Tests were carried out with varying sodium temperature, argon velocity and argon temperature respectively under conditions of fog formation being possible. In order to clarify the enhancement of evaporation by fog formation, convection heat transfer from a plate of the same geometry into an air flow was also measured. The evaporation rate and Sherwood number were compared with those predicted by both the heat transfer experiment and the theory proposed by Hill and Szekely, and also a comparison was run with the previously reported experimental results of sodium evaporation. As a result it was shown that the sodium evaporation rate in this experiment is at least four times as large as that predicted by the heat transfer experiment and varies almost linearly with the heat transfer rate and the sodium vapour pressure. (auth.)

  5. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre-Barber, A.; Montiel-Company, J. M.; Boronat-Catalá, M.; Catalá-Pizarro, M.; Almerich-Silla, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9–86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6–88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9–17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47–0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39–35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH. PMID:27558479

  6. Two-photon excitation of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pindzola, P.S.; Payne, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    The authors calculate two photon excitation parameters for various excited states of argon assuming the absorption of near resonance broad-bandwidth laser radiation. Results are given for the case of two photons absorbed for the same laser beam as well as the case of absorbing photons of different frequency from each of two laser beams. The authors use multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock wave functions to evaluate the second-order sums over matrix elements. Various experimental laser schemes are suggested for the efficient excitation and subsequent ionization of argon

  7. Argon isotopes as recorders of magmatic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, P. W.; Gardner, J. E.; Mora Chaparro, J. C.; Arce, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Argon isotopic ratios vary enough between different reservoirs (atmosphere, crust, mantle) and diffuse fast enough through most minerals at magmatic temperatures (700-1200 C) to make them ideal for looking at magma chamber dynamics. Indeed, diffusion is sufficiently fast to allow short time scales to be deciphered, setting argon apart from many other isotopic methods. A mineral's ability to retain "excess" argon (40Ar/36Ar ratios greater than the atmospheric value and apparent ages older than the known eruption age) during post-eruption cooling is key to Ar studies. Previous work shows that both phenocrysts (crystallizing in the magma chamber; e.g. Mt St. Helens; Layer and Gardner, 2001) and xenocrysts (introduced into the magma chamber; e.g Toba; Gardner et al., 2002) preserve excess argon, which enables magma chamber processes to be deciphered through the variable diffusion rates between crystal phases. Single crystal 40Ar/39Ar step-heating of biotite from the 10.5 ka eruption of Nevado de Toluca volcano, Mexico indicates that they are xenocrystic and resided for only a short (< 1 year) time in the magma before it erupted. The biotite has reaction rims of hornblende, orthopyroxene and plagioclase, and failed to grow experimentally at pressure-temperature conditions of the magma, confirming the xenocrystic nature of this phase. Single-step fusion of plagioclase phenocrysts from eruptions of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, shows evidence of excess (mantle) argon, whereas hornblende from the same eruptions contains little or none. In this case, faster diffusion of Ar in plagioclase than in hornblende allow plagioclase to incorporate excess argon during magma recharge; hornblende does not. Combining such results with other isotopic systems may in fact better determine magma chamber processes. At El Chichon, Sr isotopes suggest magma recharges ocurred (Tepley et al., 2000), whereas the argon isotopes suggest such pulses occurred just before each eruption. The fast and

  8. Apparent molar volumes and compressibilities of lanthanum, gadolinium and lutetium trifluoromethanesulfonates in dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmińska, Dorota; Wawer, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sequence of volumes and compressibilities of Ln 3+ ions in DMSO is: La 3+ > Gd 3+ 3+ . ► Sequence of the partial molar volumes do not change with temperature. ► These results are the consequence of nature of the ion–solvent bonding. - Abstract: Temperature dependencies of the densities of dimethylsulfoxide solutions of lanthanum, gadolinium and lutetium trifluoromethanesulfonates have been determined over a wide range of concentrations. The apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes of the salts at infinite dilution, as well as the expansibilities of the salts, have been calculated from density data. Additionally, the apparent molar isentropic compressibilities of lanthanum, gadolinium and lutetium trifluoromethanesulfonates have been calculated from sound velocity data at 298.15 K. The data obtained have been interpreted in terms of ion−solvent interactions.

  9. Intrusion of an overerupted molar using orthodontic miniscrew implant: A preprosthodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indumathi Sivakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the use of orthodontic miniscrew implant in the intrusion of overerupted molar as a preprosthodontic therapy. A 37-year-old woman with an overerupted maxillary right first molar encroaching on the opposing mandibular edentulous space was successfully intruded using a single miniscrew implant and partial fixed orthodontic appliance. The prosthodontic clinician may adopt this conservative and cost-effective strategy in their routine practice and avoid clinical crown reduction.

  10. Fracture behavior of human molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keown, Amanda J; Lee, James J-W; Bush, Mark B

    2012-12-01

    Despite the durability of human teeth, which are able to withstand repeated loading while maintaining form and function, they are still susceptible to fracture. We focus here on longitudinal fracture in molar teeth-channel-like cracks that run along the enamel sidewall of the tooth between the gum line (cemento-enamel junction-CEJ) and the occlusal surface. Such fractures can often be painful and necessitate costly restorative work. The following study describes fracture experiments made on molar teeth of humans in which the molars are placed under axial compressive load using a hard indenting plate in order to induce longitudinal cracks in the enamel. Observed damage modes include fractures originating in the occlusal region ('radial-median cracks') and fractures emanating from the margin of the enamel in the region of the CEJ ('margin cracks'), as well as 'spalling' of enamel (the linking of longitudinal cracks). The loading conditions that govern fracture behavior in enamel are reported and observations made of the evolution of fracture as the load is increased. Relatively low loads were required to induce observable crack initiation-approximately 100 N for radial-median cracks and 200 N for margin cracks-both of which are less than the reported maximum biting force on a single molar tooth of several hundred Newtons. Unstable crack growth was observed to take place soon after and occurred at loads lower than those calculated by the current fracture models. Multiple cracks were observed on a single cusp, their interactions influencing crack growth behavior. The majority of the teeth tested in this study were noted to exhibit margin cracks prior to compression testing, which were apparently formed during the functional lifetime of the tooth. Such teeth were still able to withstand additional loading prior to catastrophic fracture, highlighting the remarkable damage containment capabilities of the natural tooth structure.

  11. Apparent molar volumes and compressibilities of electrolytes and ions in γ-butyrolactone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Wawer, Jarosław; Farmas, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Density and speed of sound for salts solutions in γ-butyrolactone were measured. ► The apparent molar volumes and compressibilities have been determined. ► The limiting molar quantities are split into independent ionic contributions. ► These data are used to describe ion–solvent interactions. - Abstract: The densities of tetraphenylphosphonium bromide, sodium tetraphenylborate, lithium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate and lithium bromide in γ-butyrolactone at (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15) K and speed of sound at 298.15 K have been measured. From these data apparent molar volumes V Φ at (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15) K and the apparent molar isentropic compressibility K S,Φ , at T = 298.15 K of the salts have been determined. The apparent molar volumes and the apparent molar isentropic compressibilities were fitted to the Redlich, Rosenfeld and Mayer equation as well as to the Pitzer and Masson equations yielding infinite dilution data. The obtained limiting values have been used to estimate the ionic data of the standard partial molar volume and the standard partial isentropic compressibility in γ-butyrolactone solutions.

  12. Apparent molar volumes and compressibilities of alkaline earth metal ions in methanol and dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warminska, Dorota; Wawer, Jaroslaw; Grzybkowski, Waclaw

    2010-01-01

    Temperature dependencies of density of magnesium (II), calcium (II), strontium (II), barium (II) perchlorates as well as beryllium (II), and sodium trifluoromethanesulfonates in methanol and dimethylsulfoxide have been determined over the composition range studied. From density data the apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes of the salts at infinite dilution as well as the expansibilities have been evaluated. The apparent molar isentropic compressibilities of alkaline earth metal perchlorates and beryllium (II) and sodium triflates in methanol and DMSO have been calculated from sound speed data obtained at T = 298.15 K.

  13. Contraction ionization waves in the argon contracted discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubovskij, Yu.B.; Kulikov, V.V.; Nekutchaev, V.O.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of ionization waves in the argon contracted discharge and a definition of their arising propagation mechanism accounting for the specificity of elementary pocesses characteristic of argon are presented. (author)

  14. Parametric Study of Hybrid Argon-Water Stabilized Electric Arc under Subsonic and Supersonic Regimes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeništa, Jiří; Hrabovský, Milan; Nishiyama, H.; Takana, H.; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2010), s. 63-76 ISSN 1093-3611 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/1084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : argon mass flow rate * divergence of radiation flux * partial characteristics * reabsorption * shock diamonds * water plasma torch Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.189, year: 2010

  15. Argon-ion contamination of the plasmasphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Y.T.; Cornwall, J.M.; Luhmann, J.G.; Schulz, M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper applies present observational and analytic knowledge on effects of plasma beam interaction wth the magnetosphere to the plasmasphere contamination problem of the argon ion engine exhaust expected to be deposited in the magnetosphere during the construction phase of the Satellite Power System. Effects of plasmasphere, ionosphere, and radiation belt modifications are discussed

  16. Silicon compounds of neon and argon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, J.; Schröder, Detlef

    -, č. 46 (2009), s. 8788-8790 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1223 Grant - others: ERC (XE) Adg HORIZOMS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : argon * bond formation * dications * neon Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.829, year: 2009

  17. Performance of a uranium liquid argon calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuts, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The author presents results on the performance of a uranium and liquid argon colorimeter in the NW test beam at Fermilab. This study describes the calorimeter, and discusses its performance with electrons, pions and muons from 10 GeV to 150 GeV. The performance parameters measure response, linearity, resolution, compensation, and e/π separation

  18. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses

  19. Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Mark S

    2009-01-01

    A selection of ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter commissioning studies are presented. These include a coherent noise study, a measurement of the quality of the physics pulse shape prediction, and energy and time reconstruction analyses with cosmic and single beam signals.

  20. Thermal decomposition of barium valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, P.; Norby, Poul; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of barium valerate (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2)/Ba-pentanoate) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage optical microscopy. Melting takes place in two different steps, at 200 degrees C and 280...

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25...

  2. CANINE ECTOPIC TREATMENT WITH FIRST MOLAR EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Margo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decision to extract or not and the type of tooth must be analyzed carefully in orthodontic treatment. Preferable tooth to be extracted was the tooth with large caries or restoration. Usually the type of tooth to be extracted was second molar (if the third molar appears, incisor, first molar, and combination of several teeth. Orthodontic treatment with molar extraction is more difficult to treat and the result is usually compromise. There are several considerations in extracting first molar such as tooth with large caries or restoration, hypoplasia, periapical disease, large discrepancy, high maxilla-mandibular plane angle, and cases with anterior open bite. Nowadays, orthodontic cases with molar extraction do not prolong the treatment time compared to premolar extraction case, but the anchorage system must be considered carefully. The present case was treated with extraction of first molar to solve anterior crowding with maximum anchorage at the upper jaw and using Nance Holding Appliance.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy: an evaluation of the use of nitrogen--argon admixtures as plasma discharge atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalewski, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of the use of nitrogen in either the plasma coolant or aerosol carrier gas flows on the physical and spectrochemical properties of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were examined. While the plasma operated with nitrogen in the coolant flow exhibited a stability comparable to that of the argon plasma, the use of nitrogen in the aerosol carrier gas flow resulted in a plasma that was less stable. The detection limits obtained for the three plasmas exhibited a similar trend. In addition, the use of nitrogen--argon admixtures in the plasma coolant gas flow yielded an increase in both the net analyte and the background emission intensities when the corresponding argon and nitrogen--argon plasmas were operated under various conditions. Furthermore, the effect of aluminum on the Ca II (393.4 nm) spectral line was reported for the 1000/1 Al/Ca molar ratio. At an observation height of 15 mm, the signal depressions were 4 and 14% for the nitrogen--argon and the argon plasmas, respectively. The above experimental evidence suggested that the operation of the ICP with an Ar--N 2 coolant gas might be hotter than the argon plasma currently in use in this laboratory. The demountable plasma torch designed in collaboration with K. Olson yielded detection limits for 15 elements and 19 spectral lines that were approximately within a factor of two of those obtained with the torch of fused quartz design. The design also appeared to offer a more readily initiated plasma discharge. The experimental evidence presented supports the utilization of nitrogen--argon admixtures in the plasma coolant gas flow as alternate discharge atmospheres for inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy. In contrast, the experimental evidence shows that there is a deterioration in both physical and spectrochemical properties of plasmas operated with a nitrogen aerosol carrier gas

  4. Preferential site occupancy observed in coexpanded argon-krypton clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundwall, M.; Bergersen, H.; Lindblad, A.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2006-01-01

    Free heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters have been produced by coexpansion and investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By examining cluster surface and bulk binding energy shifts, relative intensities, and peak widths, we show that in the mixed argon-krypton clusters the krypton atoms favor the bulk and argon atoms are pushed to the surface. Furthermore, we show that krypton atoms in the surface layer occupy high-coordination sites and that heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters produced by coexpansion show the same surface structure as argon host clusters doped with krypton. These observations are supported by site-dependent calculations of chemical shifts

  5. Expressly fabricated molar tube bases: enhanced adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tarun; Phull, Tarun Singh; Rana, Tarun; Kumar, Varun

    2014-06-01

    Clinicians, Orthodontists and their patients' parents often expect the best results in the shortest time span possible. Orthodontic bonding of molar tubes has been an acceptable risk in a modern era of refined biomaterials and instrumentation. Although many orthodontists still prefer banding to bonding, it is the failure rate of the tubes on molars which accounts to an impedance in molar bonding. One of the reasons for molar attachment failures is attributed to improper adaptation of the buccal tube base with or without increased thickness of composite. Merits of banding the second molars especially when these are the terminal teeth for anchorage have been overemphasized in the literature. The present article presents a simple and relatively less time consuming technique of preparing molar tubes to be bonded on tooth surfaces which may be quite difficult to isolate especially for bonding, for example, mandibular second molars. The increased surface area of the composite scaffold helps not only in enhanced bond strength but also serves to reduce the incidence of plaque accumulation given the dexterity of invitro preparation. The removal of the occlusal part of the molar tube scaffold helps in prevention of open / raised bite tendencies. The present innovation, therefore, is not merely serendipity but a structured technique to overcome a common dilemma for the clinical orthodontist. The present dictum of banding being superior to molar tube bonding may prove to be futile with trendsetting molar attachments. It is also an established fact that bonding proves to be a lesser expensive modality when compared to banding procedures.

  6. ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Module Zero

    CERN Multimedia

    1993-01-01

    This module was built and tested with beam to validate the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter design. One original design feature is the folding. 10 000 lead plates and electrodes are folded into an accordion shape and immersed in liquid argon. As they cross the folds, particles are slowed down by the lead. As they collide with the lead atoms, electrons and photons are ejected. There is a knock-on effect and as they continue on into the argon, a whole shower is produced. The electrodes collect up all the electrons and this signal gives a measurement of the energy of the initial particle. The M0 was fabricated by French institutes (LAL, LAPP, Saclay, Jussieu) in the years 1993-1994. It was tested in the H6/H8 beam lines in 1994, leading to the Technical Design Report in 1996.

  7. Diffusion of lithium ions in argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefansson, T.

    1983-01-01

    Published measurements of transport coefficients for Li + ions in argon seem to be limited to the mobility and the longitudinal diffusion coefficient in the field-to-density ratio range at and below 200 Td 1-5 . In this paper results are presented from measurements of the transverse diffusion coefficient to mobility ratio (Dsub(T)/μ) for Li + ions in argon in the field-to-density ratio range 10 < E/n < 800 Td. The measurements were made with a drift tube mass spectrometer at a gas temperature of 295 +- 1 K using the modified Townsend method of Skullerud. The experimental curve is compared to a calculation by H.R. Skullerud in the same proceedings. (G.Q.)

  8. Argon laser irradiation of the otolithic organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, T.; Nomura, Y.; Young, Y.H.; Hara, M. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    An argon laser was used to irradiate the otolithic organs of guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. After stapedectomy, the argon laser (1.5 W x 0.5 sec/shot) irradiated the utricle or saccule without touching the sensory organs. The stapes was replaced over the oval window after irradiation. The animals used for acute observation were killed immediately for morphologic studies; those used for long-term observation were kept alive for 2, 4, or 10 weeks. Acute observation revealed that sensory and supporting cells were elevated from the basement membrane only in the irradiated area. No rupture of the membranous labyrinth was observed. Long-term observation revealed that the otolith of the macula utriculi had disappeared in 2-week specimens. The entire macula utricili had disappeared in 10-week specimens. No morphologic changes were observed in cochlea, semicircular canals, or membranous labyrinth. The saccule showed similar changes.

  9. Argon plasma coagulation for rectal bleeding after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Stephen; Wallner, Kent; Dominitz, Jason A.; Han, Ben; True, Lawrence; Sutlief, Steven; Billingsley, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To better define the efficacy and safety of argon plasma coagulation (APC), specifically for brachytherapy-related proctitis, we reviewed the clinical course of 7 patients treated for persistent rectal bleeding. Approximately 2-10% of prostate cancer patients treated with 125 I or 103 Pd brachytherapy will develop radiation proctitis. The optimum treatment for patients with persistent bleeding is unclear from the paucity of available data. Prior reports lack specific dosimetric information, and patients with widely divergent forms of radiation were grouped together in the analyses. Methods and Materials: Seven patients were treated with APC at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System and the University of Washington from 1997 to 1999 for persistent rectal bleeding due to prostate brachytherapy-related proctitis. Four patients received supplemental external beam radiation, delivered by a four-field technique. A single gastroenterologist at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System treated 6 of the 7 patients. If the degree of proctitis was limited, all sites of active bleeding were coagulated in symptomatic patients. An argon plasma coagulator electrosurgical system was used to administer treatments every 4-8 weeks as needed. The argon gas flow was set at 1.6 L/min, with an electrical power setting of 40-45 W. Results: The rectal V100 (the total rectal volume, including the lumen, receiving the prescription dose or greater) for the 7 patients ranged from 0.13 to 4.61 cc. Rectal bleeding was first noticed 3-18 months after implantation. APC (range 1-3 sessions) was performed 9-22 months after implantation. Five patients had complete resolution of their bleeding, usually within days of completing APC. Two patients had only partial relief from bleeding, but declined additional APC therapy. No patient developed clinically evident progressive rectal wall abnormalities after APC, (post-APC follow-up range 4-13 months). Conclusions: Most

  10. Numerical simulation of nonequilibrium effects in an argon plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.H.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Departures from thermal (translational), ionization, and excitation equilibrium in an axisymmetric argon plasma jet have been studied by two-dimensional numerical simulations. Electrons, ions, and excited and ground states of neutral atoms are represented as separate chemical species in the mixture. Transitions between excited states, as well as ionization/recombination reactions due to both collisional and radiative processes, are treated as separate chemical reactions. Resonance radiation transport is represented using Holstein escape factors to simulate both the optically thin and optically thick limits. The optically thin calculation showed significant underpopulation of excited species in the upstream part of the jet core, whereas in the optically thick calculation this region remains close to local thermodynamic equilibrium, consistent with previous experimental observations. Resonance radiation absorption is therefore an important effect. The optically thick calculation results also show overpopulations (relative to equilibrium) of excited species and electron densities in the fringes and downstream part of the jet core. In these regions, however, the electrons and ions are essentially in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium with the excited state at the electron temperature, even though the ionized and excited states are no longer in equilibrium with the ground state. Departures from partial local thermodynamic equilibrium are observed in the outer fringes and far downstream part of the jet. These results are interpreted in terms of the local relative time scales for the various physical and chemical processes occurring in the plasma

  11. External and internal anatomy of third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerisoli, D M; de Souza, R A; de Sousa Neto, M D; Silva, R G; Pécora, J D

    1998-01-01

    The external and internal anatomy of 269 third molars (155 maxillary and 114 mandibular) were studied. The teeth were measured, classified according to their root number and shape and the internal anatomy was observed by the use of diaphanization. A great anatomical variability was found, with the presence of up to 5 roots in maxillary third molars and 3 roots in mandibular third molars. The number of root canals followed the same pattern.

  12. Pulpectomy procedures in primary molar teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Hany Mohamed Aly Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Premature loss of primary molars can cause a number of undesirable consequences including loss of arch length, insufficient space for erupting premolars and mesial tipping of the permanent molars. Pulpectomy of primary molar teeth is considered as a reasonable treatment approach to ensure either normal shedding or a long-term survival in instances of retention. Despite being a more conservative treatment option than extraction, efficient pulpectomy of bizarre and tortuous root canals encased ...

  13. Permanent molars: Delayed development and eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathi R

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Delayed development and eruption of all the permanent molars is a rare phenomenon, which can cause disturbance in the developing occlusion. The eruption of permanent first and second molars is very important for the coordination of facial growth and for providing sufficient occlusal support for undisturbed mastication. In the case described, the first permanent molars were delayed in their development and were seen erupting at the age of nine and a half years. Severe disparity between the left and the right side of the dentition with respect to the rate of development of molars were also present.

  14. Dental lesions and restorative treatment in molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghiu Irina-Maria

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article review specific clinical issues of the molar teeth, as well as the therapeutic approach of their pathology. The dental pathology we face in the group of molars is related to: dental caries, dental trauma (crown and crown-root fractures, dental wear phenomena. The therapeutic approach of the molar teeth is represented by: restoration of the loss of hard dental tissues; endodontic treatments of pulpal and periapical complications; surgical treatment. The restorative treatments in molars are: direct restorations, with or without supplementary anchorage for obturations; inlay, onlay; prosthetic crown.

  15. Incidence of root canal treatment of second molars following adjacent impacted third molar extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yener Oguz

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Although the incidence is minimal, iatrogenic subluxation injuries occurring during the surgical removal of impacted third molars can lead to pulpal complications and a requirement for root canal treatment of adjacent second molars.

  16. Charge transfer cross-sections of argon ions colliding on argon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, J.; Bliman, S.; Chan-Tung, N.; Geller, R.; Jacquot, B.; Van Houtte, D.

    1980-04-01

    A device has been built to measure charge changing cross-sections of Argon ions colliding on argon atoms. It consists of an E.C.R. ion source (Micromafios) that delivers argon ions up to charge + 13. The ion source potential may be varied from 1 up to 10 kVolts. A first magnet is used to charge analyze the extracted beam. For a given separated charge state, the ion beam is passed in a collision cell whose pressure may be varied. The ions undergoing collisions on the target are analyzed by a second magnet and collected. The pressure is varied in the collision cell in order to check that the single collision condition is satisfied. It is shown that the ions do two types of collisions: charge exchange and stripping whose cross-sections are measured. Interpretation of charge exchange is proposed along yet classic theoretical approaches. As to stripping no available theory allows interpretation

  17. Mini implant supported molar tubes: A novel method for attaching the molar tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin V Muralidhar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Banding or bonding procedures have been the only means of attaching molar tubes onto the permanent molar teeth till date in the field of orthodontics. This clinical innovation aims to include the use of mini implant for the purpose of attaching the molar tubes thereby eliminating the iatrogenic effects of banding and bonding of the teeth.

  18. Development of a low-cost inductively coupled argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripson, P.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to drastically reduce running costs of an inductively coupled plasma. This is done by reducing the argon consumption from 20 l/min to about 1 l/min. First, a sample introduction system operating on 0.1 l/min of carrier argon is described. This system ensures a high ratio of plasma argon and carrier argon even at the low total argon consumptions intended. Next, the developed low consumption plasma is presented. In the proposed design, air is blown perpendicularly against the outside of the torch. A different coil has been developed to make air-cooling efficient. Preliminary data on coupling efficiency for the air-cooled plasma are presented. A similarly low argon consumption has been achieved with water as an external coolant medium. It is concluded that a cheaper alternative to the current ICP has become available. (Auth.)

  19. Morphologic study of the maxillary molars. Part II: Internal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécora, J D; Woelfel, J B; Sousa Neto, M D; Issa, E P

    1992-01-01

    The internal anatomy of three hundred and seventy (370) decalcified and cleared human maxillary molars was studied. Seventy-five percent of the first molars, 58% of the second molars and 68% of the third molars studied presented three (3) root canals and 25% of the first molars, 42% of the second molars and 32% of the third molars presented four (4) root canals. The authors observed that the incidence of two root canals in the mesiobuccal root was higher in second maxillary molars than in first maxillary molars.

  20. Argon spill in the hall of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Peón-Hernández, G

    1998-01-01

    A hazard analysis is in progress to determine the operation mode of the ventilation system in the ATLAS hall in case of an Argon spill. Two risk scenarios have been investigated so far. In the first, the behaviour of an Argon gas pool is calculated for different ventilation strategies. In the second, the behaviour of Argon gas leaking from the bottom part of the detector is studied for different flows. The description of the study, results and conclusions are presented.

  1. Association between Peritonsillar Abscess and Molar Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shayani Nasab

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep neck infections that are related with periodontal disease which has the same pathogenesis. We determined the relationship between peritonsillar infection and molar caries. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 33 consecutive patients whom referred to Hamadan university clinic of otolaryngologic for peritonsillar abscess were examined by otolaryngologist and dentist who investigated relationship between peritonsillar infection and molar caries. Results: There were 27 males and 6 females with mean age 26.7+_7 years. The frequency caries on ipsilateral peritonsillar infection sides was in relation to molars caries on opposite sides (conterol group. This corrolation was significant with odds ratio 2.5. Conclusion: Molar caries were seen 2.5 times more likely to have peritonsillar infection compared with normal molar sides. Key Words: Peritonsillar abscess, Infection, Periodontal disease, Dental caries

  2. Study of argon-oxygen flowing afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon-oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon-oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  3. Argon laser treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting- Bing Fang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the efficacy of the argon laser photocoagulation treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy(CSC. METHODS: The treatment groups: 18 patients(18 eyes, argon laser photocoagulation and oral jolethin, vitamin B1, inosine and venoruton tablets. Control group: 18 patients(18 eyes, oral lecithin complex iodine, vitamin B1, inosine, venoruton tablets. Foveal thickness and neuroepithelial layer detachment range were measured by optical coherence tomography(OCTbefore treatment, after 1 month and 3 months post-operation to compare the decline in value of foveal thickness and neuroepithelial layer detachment range of the two groups. RESULTS: After 1 month of treatment, the decline in value of the center foveal thickness: the value of treatment group was 256±72μm; the value of the control group was 82±57μm, and the difference of the two groups, P <0.05; the decline in value of neuroepithelial layer detachment range: the value of the treatment group was 3 548±168μm, the value of the control group was 1 520±143μm, And the difference of the two groups, P<0.05. After three months of treatment, the decline in value of the center foveal thickness: the value of treatment group was 383±75μm, the value of the control group was 312±67 μm, and the difference of the two groups, P<0.05; decline in value of neuroepithelial layer detachment range: the value of the treatment group was 4 908±172μm, the value of the control group was 4 211±153μm, and the difference of the two groups, P <0.05. The differences were statistically significant between the treatment and the control groups(two independent samples t-test. CONCLUSION:Argon laser photocoagulation treatment of CSC is an effective treatment method and can significantly shorten the course.

  4. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  5. Gasdynamic structure of free argon plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunder, J.

    1973-01-01

    The paper deals with the experimental results of research conducted on the argon plasma jet. Special miniaturized water cooled Pitot probes (1.45 and 2.5 mm. dia.) were used for the measurement of the total head. The results correlate the length of the arc chamber and other main parameters of the plasma generator with the length of the core and maximum values of the total pressure and velocity in the core of the jet. For the plasma generator used for the experiments the axial and radial distributions of the pressure as well as the generalized volt-ampere dependence were obtained. (author)

  6. Sterile searches with Liquid Argon at FNAL

    CERN Document Server

    Raselli, Gian Luca

    2017-01-01

    A new Short Baseline Neutrino (SBN) experiment is in preparation at FNAL to definitely prove or exclude the existence of non-standard neutrino oscillations into sterile states. The program foresees the deployment along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) of three detectors, all based on the liquid-argon time projection chamber technique. This technology has been taken to full maturity with ICARUS T600, which will act as far detector after the completion of the overhauling at CERN and its transportation to FNAL. The program foresees the data taking for three years.

  7. Energy resolution in liquid argon doped with allene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, H.; Doke, T.; Masuda, K.; Shibamura, E.

    1989-01-01

    Studies have been made on liquid argon as detection medium with large volume and good energy and position resolution. It is advantageous to dope liquid argon with molecules with an ionization potential lower than the energy of scintillation light. In the present work, the energy resolution for 5.305MeV alpha particles is examined, and the effect of allene added to liquid argon is investigated. Some preliminary results for 976 KeV electrons are also presented. Allene is purified by two methods: (a) small-quantity purification and (b) mass purification. Three methods are tried for mixing allene with argon. Results concerning the allene purification methods, effect of allene concentration, and allene-argon mixing methods are presented. Discussion is made of the collected charge and energy resolution. It is concluded that the addition of allene to liquid argon greatly improves the energy resolution of 5.305 MeV alpha particles. The best intrinsic resolution is 1.4 percent FWHM obtained for 4 ppm allene doped liquid argon. In the case of 976 KeV electron radiation, energy resolution is not improved by adding allene to liquid argon. The best resolution is 31 KeV FWHM obtaiend for 65ppm allene doped liquid argon. (N.K.)

  8. Formation of carbon nanostructures using acetylene, argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinauskas, L.; Grigonis, A.; Minialga, V.; Marcinauskas, L.; Valincius, V.

    2013-01-01

    The films prepared in argon-acetylene plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. Addition of the hydrogen decreases growth rate and the surface roughness of the films and lead to the formation of nanocrystalline graphite. The carbon nanotubes were formed at low (≤ 450°C; p = 40 Pa) temperature in pure acetylene plasma. (authors)

  9. [Correlation between the lower first permanent molar axis and the premature loss of temporary molars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petcu, Ana; Maxim, A; Haba, Danisia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the impact of premature loss of temporary molars upon the longitudinal axis of the first permanent molar. The study sample was formed by 94 orthopanthomografies of child patients with premature loss of lower temporary molars (first or second) after clinical eruption of the first permanent molar. All panoramic radiographs have been realized with the same panoramic unit with 1.4% magnification coefficient and were analyzed using a standardized technique of tracing the images of teeth and bone on matte acetate paper. It was evaluated the angle between longitudinal axis of first permanent lower molar and occlusal plane. It was observed that premature loss of lower second deciduous molar modifies greater the vertical axis of first permanent molar (between 61 degrees and 79 degrees) then premature loss of first lower primary molar. This is perhaps because the loss of space in the case of premature exfoliation of first primary molar is due more to distal drift of canine then mesial drift of molars. The drift to mesial of first permanent molar is more accentuated proportional with the age at which appeared premature loss and so it is loss of leeway space.

  10. The influence of premature loss of temporary upper molars on permanent molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernei, E R; Maxim, Dana Cristiana; Zetu, Irina Nicoleta

    2015-01-01

    Premature loss of primary molars due to dental caries and their complications has been associated with space loss and eruptive difficulties, especially when the loss occurs early. The aim of our study was to determine the impact of premature loss of temporary upper molars upon the longitudinal axis of the first and second upper permanent molar. The study group included 64 patients 6-9 years old with premature loss of primary molars and a control group of 48 patients with intact temporary teeth. It was evaluated the angle between longitudinal axis of first and second upper permanent molars and occlusal plane. The sofware used is Easy Dent 4 Viewer®.The data were analyzed by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 20.0; SPSS, Chicago, III). It was observed that premature loss of upper second deciduous molars modifies greater the vertical axis of the permanent molars than the premature loss of first upper primary molar. First upper primary molar loss cause an acceleration eruption of first premolar, which will produce a distal inclintion of the both permanent molars. The use of space maintainers after premature loss of the second upper temporary molar is a last solution in preventing tridimensional lesions in the dental arch and occlusion.

  11. Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar: Report of five rare cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souki, Bernardo Q.; Cheib, Paula L.; de Brito, Gabriela M.; Pinto, Larissa S. M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar is a rare condition that practitioners might face in the field of pediatric dentistry and orthodontics. The early diagnosis and extraction of the adjacent ectopic third molar have been advocated, and prior research has reported a high rate of spontaneous eruption following third molar removal. However, some challenges in the daily practice are that the early diagnosis of this type of tooth impaction is difficult with conventional radiographic examination, and sometimes the early surgical removal of the maxillary third molar must be postponed because of the risks of damaging the second molar. The objective of this study is to report a case series of five young patients with maxillary second molar impaction and to discuss the difficulty of early diagnosis with the conventional radiographic examination, and unpredictability of self-correction. PMID:26321848

  12. Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar: Report of five rare cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Q Souki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar is a rare condition that practitioners might face in the field of pediatric dentistry and orthodontics. The early diagnosis and extraction of the adjacent ectopic third molar have been advocated, and prior research has reported a high rate of spontaneous eruption following third molar removal. However, some challenges in the daily practice are that the early diagnosis of this type of tooth impaction is difficult with conventional radiographic examination, and sometimes the early surgical removal of the maxillary third molar must be postponed because of the risks of damaging the second molar. The objective of this study is to report a case series of five young patients with maxillary second molar impaction and to discuss the difficulty of early diagnosis with the conventional radiographic examination, and unpredictability of self-correction.

  13. Treating Intraradicular Pockets of molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lotfizade

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available It appears that until bone graft has not achieved 100% success, intraradicular diseases remain controversial and therefore, different treatment plans are suggested for them. Treating intraradicular diseases depend on many factors: maxillary molars are more prone to bone loss and have worse prognosis. To assess prognosis more carefully these factors should be considered: 1 bone loss: its apical depth, local or generalized 2 bone condition: buccal, lingual, mesial and distal aspects 3 tooth mobility: grades 2 and 3 have not good prognosis. Crown root ratio is also important. 4 the angle of divergence of roots: the more the roots are divergent, the better the prognosis would be. 5adjacent teeth health 6tooth position in jaws 7 age and general health of the patients 8 oral hygiene In general, teeth with 2 roots can be treated more effectively than 3 root ones. Maxillary first premolars are exceptions that do not respond to the treatments positively. We should look forward to the future investigations and findings.

  14. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.; McEachran, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies

  15. The H1 liquid argon calorimeter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, B.; Babayev, A.; Ban, J.

    1993-06-01

    The liquid argon calorimeter of the H1 detector presently taking data at the HERA ep - collider at DESY, Hamburg, is described here. The main physics requirements and the most salient design features relevant to this calorimeter are given. The aim to have smooth and hermetic calorimetric coverage over the polar angular range 4 ≤ θ ≤ 154 is achieved by a single liquid argon cryostat containing calorimeter stacks structured in wheels and octants for easy handling. The absorber materials used are lead in the electromagnetic part and stainless steel in the hadronic part. The read-out system is pipelined to reduce the dead time induced by the high trigger rate expected at the HERA collider where consecutive bunches are separated in time by 96 ns. The main elements of the calorimeter, such as the cryostat, with its associated cryogenics, the stack modules, the read-out, calibration and trigger electronics as well as the data acquisition system are described. Performance results from data taken in calibration runs with full size H1 calorimeter stacks at a CERN test beam, as well as results from data collected with the complete H1 detector using cosmic rays during the initial phase of ep operations are presented. The observed energy resolutions and linearities are well in agreement with the requirements. (orig.)

  16. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville 4810 (Australia); McEachran, R. P. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  17. NBS measurement system for natural argon-37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, L.A.; Lindstrom, R.M.

    1973-01-01

    A project to determine the cosmic-ray production rate and the natural levels of 35-day half-life 37 Ar in the atmosphere has been underway at the National Bureau of Standards for about the past year. The prime objective of this project is to determine the spatial dependence of 37 Ar production in the atmosphere, and the spatial distribution of the naturally-produced 37 Ar (observed concentrations). The results of this study are to be used, in cooperation with L. Machta (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration), to derive information about atmospheric mixing. The purpose of this communication, however, is to present a general description of the various components of the measurement system. As the lowest concentrations of interest are but approximately equal to 10 -3 dpm ( 37 Ar)/l-Ar, very high sensitivity measurement techniques are required. Among the techniques which we have adopted are: quantitative separation of the noble gases from about 1 m 3 of air, using a CaC 2 reactor; gas chromatographic separation of the argon fraction; isotopic enrichment (by a factor of approximately equal to 100) of purified argon; use of specially selected low-level gas proportional counters together with massive shielding and anticoincidence meson cancellation; and the application of pulse discrimination based upon both amplitude (energy) and pulse shape. Finally, on-line computer techniques are being applied for data acquisition and system control

  18. Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rare occurrence of the left maxillary horizontal third molar impaction, the right maxillary third molar vertical impaction and the left mandibular third molar vertical impaction with inferior alveolar nerve proximity in a 30 year old female: a case report.

  19. Fusión de un tercer molar mandibular con un cuarto molar supernumerario Fusion of mandibular third molar with supernumerary fourth molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. López Carriches

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available La fusión dental es la unión de dos gérmenes dentales normalmente separados, mientras que la geminación se define como el intento de división de un único germen dental. La fusión y geminación de molares es poco frecuente en la dentición permanente. Describimos un caso clínico de un tercer molar inferior derecho fusionado a un cuarto molar supernumerario en un paciente varón de 36 años que ha presentado repetidos episodios de pericoronaritis. Tras el estudio radiológico se realiza la exodoncia del cordal semiincluido bajo anestesia local. Llevamos a cabo una revisión bibliográfica al respecto.Dental fusion is the union of two tooth buds that normally are separated, while gemination is defined as an attempt by a single tooth bud to divide. The fusion and gemination of molars is uncommon in permanent teeth. We report a clinical case of a right lower third molar fused to a supernumerary fourth molar in a 36-year-old male patient with repeated episodes of inflammation. After the radiologic study, the semi-impacted third molar was extracted under local anesthesia. The literature was reviewed.

  20. Differential Expression of p63 in Hydropic and Molar Gestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, S.; Kehar, S. I.; Shawana, S.; Aamir, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe the differential expression of p63 in hydropic and molar gestation. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Basic Medical Sciences Institute, Jinnah Postgraduate and Medical Centre, Karachi, from January 2006 to June 2013. Methodology: Ninety placental biopsies including 30 cases each of hydropic abortions, partial hydatidiform mole and complete hydatidiform mole were analyzed for morphological features and results of immunohistochemical staining. Results were described as frequency. Significance was determined using test of proportions with significance at p < 0.05. Results: Out of 30 cases of hydropic abortion, 6 were negative, 15 were weak, 4 were moderate and 5 showed strong degree of intensity for p63. Out of 30 cases of partial hydatidiform mole, 3 were negative, 2 showed weak, 4 showed moderate and 21 cases showed strong degree of intensity for p63. All 30 cases of complete hydatidiform mole strongly stained for p63. Conclusion: The intensity of staining of p63 was stronger in cases of molar pregnancy as compared to hydropic abortion. There was loss of p63 expression in cytotrophoblastic cells in all abortions. In limited resources settings, where facilities for PCR/FISH and DNA ploidy analysis is not available, the authors advocate p63 in routine clinical practice to provide the most refined diagnosis of hydatidiform moles. (author)

  1. Autogenous transplantation of maxillary and mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter P

    2008-11-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation has been used as a predictable surgical approach to correct malocclusion and replace edentulous areas. This article focuses on the surgical approach and technique for molar transplantation. Thirty-two patients aged between 11 and 25 years underwent 44 autogenous molar transplantations. The procedure involved transplantation of impacted or newly erupted third molars into the extraction sockets of nonrestorable molars and surgical removal and replacement of horizontally impacted molars into their proper vertical alignment. Five basic procedural concepts were applied: 1) atraumatic extraction, avoiding disruption of the root sheath and root buds; 2) apical contouring of bone at the transplantation site and maxillary sinus lift via the Summers osteotome technique, when indicated, for maxillary molars; 3) preparation of a 4-wall bony socket; 4) avoidance of premature occlusal interferences; and 5) stabilization of the tooth with placement of a basket suture. All 32 patients successfully underwent the planned procedure. To date, 2 patients have had localized infection that resulted in loss of the transplant. The remaining 42 transplants remain asymptomatic and functioning, with a mean follow-up period of 19 months. No infection, ankylosis, loss of the transplant, or root resorption has been noted. In addition, endodontic therapy has not been necessary on any transplanted teeth. Autogenous tooth transplantation has been discussed and described in the literature previously, with a primary focus on cuspid and bicuspid transplantation. The molar transplant is infrequently discussed in today's literature, possibly because of the preponderance of titanium dental implants. Autogenous molar transplantation is a viable procedure with low morbidity and excellent functional and esthetic outcomes. This report shows the successful transplantation of 42 of 44 molars in 32 patients with a mean follow-up period of 19 months.

  2. Treatment of ectopic first permanent molar teeth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, Joe

    2012-11-01

    Ectopic eruption of the first permanent molar is a relatively common occurence in the developing dentition. A range of treatment options are available to the clinician provided that diagnosis is made early. Non-treatment can result in premature exfoliation of the second primary molar, space loss and impaction of the second premolar. This paper will describe the management of ectopic first permanent molars, using clinical examples to illustrate the available treatment options. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This paper is relevant to every general dental practitioner who treats patients in mixed dentition.

  3. Mini-implant-supported Molar Distalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Goyal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporary anchorage devices popularly called mini-implants or miniscrews are the latest addition to an orthodontist′s armamentarium. The following case report describes the treatment of a 16-year-old girl with a pleasant profile, moderate crowding and Angle′s Class II molar relationship. Maxillary molar distalization was planned and mini-implants were used to preserve the anterior anchorage. After 13 months of treatment, Class I molar and canine relation was achieved bilaterally and there was no anterior proclination. Thus, mini-implants provide a viable option to the clinician to carry out difficult tooth movements without any side effects.

  4. Treatment of ectopic first permanent molar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Joe; Al-Awadhi, E A; Dwyer, Lian O; Leith, Rona

    2012-11-01

    Ectopic eruption of the first permanent molar is a relatively common occurence in the developing dentition. A range of treatment options are available to the clinician provided that diagnosis is made early. Non-treatment can result in premature exfoliation of the second primary molar, space loss and impaction of the second premolar. This paper will describe the management of ectopic first permanent molars, using clinical examples to illustrate the available treatment options. This paper is relevant to every general dental practitioner who treats patients in mixed dentition.

  5. Calculation of the mobility of electrons injected in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascarelli, G.

    1986-01-01

    A model calculation is carried out in which we evaluate the mobility of electrons injected in liquid argon. Scattering by both phonons and static density fluctuations is taken into account. The calculation for the mobility limited by phonon scattering differs from the usual calculation in crystals by considering both the local changes in the deformation potential and the changes of the amplitude of the phonons that are caused by the existence of density fluctuations. The calculation of the mobility limited by scattering from density fluctuations is carried out with the assumption that they give rise to a square-well (or barrier) potential that will scatter the electrons. The above perturbation ΔV 0 is related to a density fluctuation Δn by ΔV 0 = V 0 (n-bar+Δn)-V 0 (n-bar). The scattering volumes Ω, where the density fluctuation Δn is located, are weighted by exp(-r/xi) where xi is the correlation length and r is the radius of Ω. The magnitude of the different density fluctuations is weighted by exp[-(Δn) 2 Ω/2nS(0)], where S(0) = nk/sub B/TK/sub T/, K/sub T/ is the isothermal compressibility. The calculation of the mean free path is carried out using partial waves. Both scattering mechanisms, scattering by phonons and static density fluctuations, give comparable contributions to the mobility

  6. The premature loss of primary first molars: space loss to molar occlusal relationships and facial patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Stanley A; Askari, Marjan; Lewis, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    To investigate space changes with the premature loss of primary first molars and their relationship to permanent molar occlusion and facial forms. Two hundred twenty-six participants (ranging in age from 7 years 8 months to 8 years 2 months; 135 female, 91 male) met all inclusion criteria designed to study space loss as a result of the premature loss of the primary first molar. After 9 months, space loss was evaluated in relationship to molar occlusion and facial form. Statistical evaluation was performed with the paired t-test and with a two-way analysis of variance for independent groups. Patients with leptoprosopic facial form and end-on molar occlusions all exhibited a statistically significant difference when compared to controls in terms of space loss (P molar occlusion displayed space loss as well (P molar occlusion displayed space loss in the maxilla (P molar occlusions showed no significant difference in space loss. The relationship between the first permanent molar occlusion and facial form of the child has an influence on the loss of space at the primary first molar site.

  7. AXIAL MODIFICATIONS OF PERMANENT LOWER MOLARS AFTER PREMATURE LOSSES OF TEMPORARY MOLARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernei, E R; Mavru, R B; Zetu, Irina Nicoleta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the impact of premature loss of temporary lower molars upon the longitudinal axis of the first and second permanent molars. The study groups included 61 patients, 6-9 year olds with premature loss of primary molars and a control group of 24 patients with intact temporary teeth. We evaluated the angle between longitudinal axis of first and second lower permanent molars and occlusal plane. It was observed that premature loss of lower second deciduous molar modifies more the vertical axis of first and second permanent molars than the premature loss of first lower primary molar. Reducing space occurs mainly through mesial inclination of molars that separates the edentulous breach. Temporary loss of both lower first molars on the same quadrant causes an accelerated eruption of both premolars increasing the prevalence of eruption sequence: "4-5-3-7". The preservation of the occlusal morpho-functional complex using space maintainers mainly when the premature loss of the second primary molars occurs is the best interceptive treatment option.

  8. Fast sampling calorimetry with solid argon ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, E.; Linn, S.; Piekarz, H.; Wahl, H.; Womersley, J.; Hansen, S.; Hurh, P.; Rivetta, C.; Sanders, R.; Schmitt, R.; Stanek, R.; Stefanik, A.

    1992-01-01

    A proposal for the fast sampling calorimetry with solid argon as active medium and the preliminary results from the solid argon test cell are presented. The proposed test calorimeter module structure, the signal routing and the mechanical and cryogenic arrangements are also discussed

  9. Luminescence decay in condensed argon under high energy excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.J.; Klein, G.

    1978-01-01

    α and β particles were used to study the luminescence of condensed argon. The scintillation decay has always two components independently of the phase and the kind of the exciting particles. Decay time constants are given for solid, liquid and also gaseous argon. Changes in the relative intensity values of the two components are discussed in terms of track effects

  10. Thermal conductivity in an argon arc at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, L.; Timmermans, C.J.; Schram, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of an argon plasma has been determined in a phi 5 mm wall stabilized atmospheric argon arc in the temperature range from 10000 to 16000 K. The calculations are based on the energy balance, and include non-LTE effects like ambipolar diffusion and overpopulation of the ground

  11. WARP: a double phase argon programme for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, N

    2006-01-01

    WARP (Wimp ARgon Programme) is a double phase Argon detector for Dark Matter search under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. We present recent results obtained operating a prototype with a sensitive mass of 2.3 litres deep underground

  12. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  13. Application of argon-helium cryoablation in resection of intracranial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hao ZHOU

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the curative effect of argon-helium cryoablation in resection of intracranial tumors.  Methods and Results A total of 11 patients with primary intracranial tumors, including 7 cases of glioma and 4 cases of meningioma, were enrolled in this study. The tumor was located in left frontal lobe in 4 cases, left fronto-parietal lobe in 2 cases, left temporal lobe in 2 cases and right temporo-parietal lobe in 3 cases. Argon-helium cryoablation was used to assist intracranial tumor resection. Among 7 cases of glioma, 4 cases were totally removed and 3 cases were partially resected. Four cases of meningioma were totally removed. The average intraoperative blood loss was 80 ml, and average operation time was 80 min. Postoperative clinical symptoms were improved, and head CT or MRI showed no rebleeding. Patients were followed up for an average of 4 years, and none of them suffered from operation-related or postoperative complications such as intracranial infection, or tumor recurrence.  Conclusions Argon - helium cryoablation is suitable for intracranial tumors with different diameters and in different locations. It is safe and effective, with few operation-related or postoperative complications, less rebleeding and low risk of recurrence, which is a highly efficient and relatively low?cost assistant surgical method. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.06.011

  14. Cleaning of diffusion bonding surface by argon ion bombardment treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Airu; Ohashi, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Norio; Aoki, Masanori; Higashi, Yasuo; Hitomi, Nobuteru

    2003-01-01

    The specimens of oxygen-free high conductivity copper, SUS304L stainless steel and pure iron were treated by argon ion bombardment and then were bonded by diffusion bonding method. The effects of argon ion bombardment treatment on faying surface morphology, tensile strength of bonding joints and inclusions at the fracture surface were investigated. The results showed that argon ion bombardment treatment was effective to remove the oxide film and contamination at the faying surface and improve the quality of joints. The tensile strength of the bonded joints was improved, and minimum bonding temperature to make the metallic bonding at the interface was lowered by argon ion bombardment treatment. At the joints with argon ion bombardment treatment, ductile fractured surface was seen and the amount of inclusions was obviously decreased

  15. Hall effect in non-ideal plasma of argon and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilkin, N.S.; Dudin, S.V.; Gryaznov, V.K.; Mintsev, V.B.; Fortov, V.E.

    2003-01-01

    The first data on the measurement of the electron concentration (10 16 -10 20 cm -3 ) of the low-temperature (0.5-1 eV) non-ideal (0.01 -6 -10 -1 ) inert gases plasma are presented. The measurements of the Hall constant and electric conductivity in the non-ideal partially ionized plasma of argon and xenon are carried out through the sounding methods. The plasma generation was accomplished behind the shock waves front through the linear explosive generators. The obtained results are compared with a number of the plasma models [ru

  16. Endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, I; Moshonov, J; Cohenca, N

    1997-06-01

    Variations in tooth morphology present a clinical challenge when endodontic treatment is required. A case of conservative endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular second and third molar is presented.

  17. Argon activation analysis, application to dating by the potassium-argon method; Analyse par activation de l'argon. Application a la datation par la methode potassium-argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesnil, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    Activation analysis using radiogenic argon-40 has been applied to rock-dating by the K-Ar method. The argon is extracted from the sample, purified, activated to saturation in a flux of 2 X 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} sec{sup -1} and measured by gamma spectroscopy. The sensitivity obtained is such that it is possible to measure amounts of argon corresponding to age of a few thousand years only. However since it has not been possible to measure the amount of pollution of radiogenic argon by atmospheric argon with any accuracy, the measurable age limit is in fact of the order of MY. The method has been applied to basalts from the Mont-Dore region. The results obtained are in fairly good agreement with geological, stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data. (author) [French] L'analyse par activation de l'argon 40 radiogenique a ete appliquee a la datation des roches par la methode K-Ar. L'argon est extrait de l'echantillon, purifie, active a saturation dans un flux de 2.10{sup 13} neutrons.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} et mesure en spectrometrie gamma. La sensibilite obtenue est telle qu'il est possible de mesurer des quantites d'argon correspondant a des ages de quelques milliers d'annees seulement. Cependant la correction de pollution de l'argon radiogenique par l'argon atmospherique n'ayant pu etre etablie avec precision, la limite d'age mesurable pratique est de l'ordre de 1 Ma. La methode a ete appliquee aux basaltes de la region du Mont-Dore. Les ages obtenus sont en assez bon accord avec les donnees geologiques, stratigraphiques et paleomagnetiques. (auteur)

  18. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  19. Argon activation analysis, application to dating by the potassium-argon method; Analyse par activation de l'argon. Application a la datation par la methode potassium-argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumesnil, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    Activation analysis using radiogenic argon-40 has been applied to rock-dating by the K-Ar method. The argon is extracted from the sample, purified, activated to saturation in a flux of 2 X 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2} sec{sup -1} and measured by gamma spectroscopy. The sensitivity obtained is such that it is possible to measure amounts of argon corresponding to age of a few thousand years only. However since it has not been possible to measure the amount of pollution of radiogenic argon by atmospheric argon with any accuracy, the measurable age limit is in fact of the order of MY. The method has been applied to basalts from the Mont-Dore region. The results obtained are in fairly good agreement with geological, stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data. (author) [French] L'analyse par activation de l'argon 40 radiogenique a ete appliquee a la datation des roches par la methode K-Ar. L'argon est extrait de l'echantillon, purifie, active a saturation dans un flux de 2.10{sup 13} neutrons.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} et mesure en spectrometrie gamma. La sensibilite obtenue est telle qu'il est possible de mesurer des quantites d'argon correspondant a des ages de quelques milliers d'annees seulement. Cependant la correction de pollution de l'argon radiogenique par l'argon atmospherique n'ayant pu etre etablie avec precision, la limite d'age mesurable pratique est de l'ordre de 1 Ma. La methode a ete appliquee aux basaltes de la region du Mont-Dore. Les ages obtenus sont en assez bon accord avec les donnees geologiques, stratigraphiques et paleomagnetiques. (auteur)

  20. Argon Diffusion Measured in Rhyolite Melt at 100 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, N.; Edwards, P. M.; Watkins, J. M.; Lesher, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Argon diffusivity (D_{Ar} ) controls the rate and length scale of argon exchange between melt and gas phases and is used as a parameter to model noble gas fractionation during magma degassing. D_{Ar} may also be useful in geochronology to estimate the distribution of excess (non-radiogenic) atmospheric argon in lavas. Our measurements of D_{Ar} in molten anhydrous rhyolite near 1000 °C and 100 MPa add to the existing dataset. Using a rapid-quench cold seal pressure apparatus we exposed cylindrical charges drilled from a Miocene rhyolite flow near Buck Mtn., CA to a pure argon atmosphere resulting in a gradually lengthening argon concentration gradient between the saturated surface and the argon poor interior. Argon concentration was measured by electron microprobe along radial transects from the center to the surface of bisected samples. D_{Ar} was calculated for each transect by fitting relative argon concentration (as a function of distance from the surface) to Green's function (given each experiment's specific temperature, pressure and runtime). Variability (σ = 1.202{μm }^{2} /s) was smaller than in previous studies, but still greater than what is likely due to analytical or experimental uncertainty. We observed a symmetric geometric bias in the distribution of argon in our samples, possibly related to advective redistribution of argon accompanying the deformation of cylindrical charges into spheroids driven by surface tension. Average diffusivity, D_{Ar} = 4.791{μm }^{2} /s, is close to the predicted value, D_{Ar} = {μm }^{2} /s ( σ_{ \\bar{x} } = 1.576 {μm }^{2} /s), suggesting that Behrens and Zhang's (2001) empirical model is valid for anhydrous rhyolite melts to relatively higher temperatures and lower pressures. Behrens, H. and Y. Zhang (2001). "Ar diffusion in hydrous silicic melts: implications for volatile diffusion mechanisms and fractionation." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 192: 363-376.

  1. Management of large losses of substances molars

    OpenAIRE

    Reynal, Florence

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to compare the different coronary restorative materials used for large tooth losses in primary molars. The first part of this thesis is dedicated to a description of the four main materials used in coronary restorations of molars : amalgam, glass-ionomer cements, resin-based composite and pedodontic crown. The second part is a systematic review of the literature. The aim is to compare the long-term survival rates of different restoration techniques, in order to help the practit...

  2. Microstructure of a tribosphenic molar - comparative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    ŠPOUTIL, František

    2010-01-01

    The proposed thesis concerns in the study of tribosphenic molar, the key apomorphy of mammalian clade, mainly in structure and development of its enamel coat. As the main model species served us European vespertilionid bat Myotis myotis. The aims of this thesis are: (1) to describe structure and microstructure of enamel in tribosphenic molars in detail; (2) to compare it with unicuspid teeth of the same dentition; (3) to describe mineralization process and enamel maturation in insectivorous d...

  3. The (e,2e) spectrum of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; Amos, K.; Morrison, I.

    1983-01-01

    The Plane Wave Impulse Approximation is used to analyse the experimental cross-section for the Argon (e,2e) reaction (using the non-coplanar symmetric geometry). A series of Configuration Interaction calculations for the structure of Ar I and Ar II are reported demonstrating that correlation effects have only a minor effect on the momentum distributions (which are well described by the Target Hartree-Fock Approximation). Fair agreement between the theoretical and experimental spectroscopic factors for the separation energy spectrum is obtained, and in particular the distribution of strength amongst the 3s 2 3p 4 nd 2 S/sup e/ satellite states specified by the largest calculations is in better agreement with data than that obtained with simple structure models

  4. Paschen like behavior in argon RF discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jwaady, Y. I.

    2011-01-01

    A 13.56 MHz radio frequency inductively coupled discharge system is used in this work to study the relation between Argon gas pressure in the discharge chamber and the threshold breakdown RF power needed to create the discharge. Experimental results indicated that although the data involve some features related to the traditional Paschen relation used in Dc discharge, this relation cannot provide a quantitative description of experimental data. For such reason, a modified from Paschen relation is suggested. The modified relation provides good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, it seems that the Paschen relation will have significant reflections on the behavior of the transit process from capacitive to inductive discharge. This is demonstrated by studying the transit region. (author)

  5. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Study of Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoeld, K; Rowe, J M; Ostrowski, G [Solid State Science Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (US); Randolph, P D [Nuclear Technology Div., Idaho Nuclear Corporation, Idaho Falls, Idaho (US)

    1972-02-15

    The inelastic scattering functions for liquid argon have been measured at 85.2 K. The coherent scattering function was obtained from a measurement on pure A-36 and the incoherent function was derived from the result obtained from the A-36 sample and the result obtained from a mixture of A-36 and A-40 for which the scattering is predominantly incoherent. The data, which are presented as smooth scattering functions at constant values of the wave vector transfer in the range 10 - 44/nm, are corrected for multiple scattering contributions and for resolution effects. Such corrections are shown to be essential in the derivation of reliable scattering functions from neutron scattering data. The incoherent data are compared to recent molecular dynamics results and the mean square displacement as a function of time is derived. The coherent data are compared to molecular dynamics results and also, briefly, to some recent theoretical models

  6. Potassium-argon dating in archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, I. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Earth Sciences)

    1990-01-01

    The potassium-argon (K-Ar) isotopic dating method can provide precise and accurate numerical ages on suitable rocks, especially igneous rocks, over a wide range of age from less than 100,000 years old, with no older limit. Together with its variants, the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar technique, the K-Ar method is very useful for the numerical age calibration of stratigraphic sequences, including those containing archaeological or fossil material, in cases where appropriate rocks for dating are present. This brief review of the basis of the K-Ar dating method and the underlying assumptions, concludes with an example of its application to the Plio-Pleistocene stratigraphic sequence in the Turkana Basin, northern Kenya. By dating alkali feldspars separated from pumice blocks in tuffaceous beds, excellent age control has been obtained for the wealth of vertebrate fossils, including hominids, as well as archaeological materials that has been found in the sequence. (author).

  7. Effect of argon addition into oxygen atmosphere on YBCO thin films deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, P. B.; Borisenko, I. V.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Kuehle, A.; Bindslev-Hansen, J.; Johannes, L.; Skov, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Multicomponent nature of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O x (YBCO) high-temperature superconductor makes difficult fabrication of smooth thin films: every local deviation from stoichiometry can result in seeding of a non-superconducting oxide particle. High density of such particles on typical YBCO thin film surface, however, presumes overall non-stoichiometry of the film. Such an effect can result from (i) non-uniform material transport from target to substrate, and (ii) re-evaporation or re-sputtering from the growing film surface. The first reason is more usual for laser ablation deposition technique, the second is typical for long sputtering deposition processes. Substitution of oxygen with argon in the deposition atmosphere improves surface quality of YBCO thin films deposited both by laser ablation and DC-sputtering at high pressure techniques. In the first case, the ablated species are scattered different ways in the oxygen atmosphere. Addition of argon decreases the inelastic scattering of barium; the proper part of Ar in the deposition atmosphere makes scattering and, hence, transport of all atoms uniform. The YBCO films deposited by DC-sputtering at high pressure technique are Ba-deficient also, but the reason is re-sputtering of Ba from the growing film as a result of negative oxygen ions bombardment. Such bombardment can lead also to chemical interaction of the deposited material with the substrate, as in the case of deposition of YBCO thin film on the CeO 2 buffer layer on sapphire. Substitution of oxygen with argon not only suppresses ion bombardment of the film, but also increases discharge stability due to presence of positive Ar + ions. The limiting factor of argon substitution is sufficient oxygenation of the growing oxide film. When oxygen partial pressure is too small, the superconducting quality of the YBCO thin film decreases and such a decrease cannot be overcome by prolonged oxygenation after deposition. (Authors)

  8. Maxillary molar distalization with first class appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Namitha; Palukunnu, Biswas; Ravindran, Nidhi; Nair, Preeti P

    2014-02-27

    Non-extraction treatment has gained popularity for corrections of mild-to-moderate class II malocclusion over the past few decades. The distalization of maxillary molars is of significant value for treatment of cases with minimal arch discrepancy and mild class II molar relation associated with a normal mandibular arch and acceptable profile. This paper describes our experience with a 16-year-old female patient who reported with irregularly placed upper front teeth and unpleasant smile. The patient was diagnosed to have angles class II malocclusion with moderate maxillary anterior crowding, deep bite of 4 mm on a skeletal class II base with an orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible and normal growth pattern. She presented an ideal profile and so molar distalization was planned with the first-class appliance. Molars were distalised by 8 mm on the right and left quadrants and class I molar relation achieved within 4 months. The space gained was utilised effectively to align the arch and establish a class I molar and canine relation.

  9. ArgonCube: a Modular Approach for Liquid Argon TPC Neutrino Detectors for Near Detector Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, M; Sinclair, JR

    2017-01-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPCs) are an ideal detector candidate for future neutrino oscillation physics experiments, underground neutrino observatories and proton decay searches. A large international project based on this technology is currently under consideration at the future LBNF/DUNE facility in the United States. That particular endeavor would be on the very large mass scale of 40~kt. Following diverse and long standing R\\&D work conducted over several years, with contributions from international collaborators, we propose a novel LAr TPC based on a fully-modular, innovative design, ArgonCube. ArgonCube will demonstrate that LAr TPCs are a viable detector technology for high-energy and high-multiplicity environments, such as the DUNE near detector. Necessary R\\&D work is proceeding along two main pathways; the first, aimed at the demonstration of modular detector design and the second, at the exploration of new signal readout methods. This two-pronged approach has provided a hig...

  10. The drift velocity of excess electrons in fluid methane, argon and mixtures of methane and argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, J.M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of an experimental investigation of the drift velocity of excess electrons in fluid methane at temperatures between 91K and 215K, and at pressures up to 65X10 5 Pa. These measurements that have become possible especially due to the improved purification techniques of the liquids under investigation. The purification prevents the electron from being captured too soon by an electron-impurity. From the results of the measurements in methane it appeared that in some respects the behaviour of excess electrons in methane is qualitatively similar to that in argon. For this reason a number of measurements of the electron drift velocity have been carried out in argon and in mixtures of methane and argon as well. A detailed description of the experimental set-up is presented. The excess electrons are generated with a high-voltage electron gun, which produces a pulse of highly energetic electrons. A fraction of these electrons enters the liquid sample by passing through a thin metal foil which separates the liquid sample and the vacuum present in the electron gun. At the same time the foil is used as one of two plane-parallel electrodes of the measuring capacitor in which the drift velocity of the excess electrons is to be measured. (Auth.)

  11. Low energy collisions of spin-polarized metastable argon atoms with ground state argon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillandier-Loize, T.; Perales, F.; Baudon, J.; Hamamda, M.; Bocvarski, V.; Ducloy, M.; Correia, F.; Fabre, N.; Dutier, G.

    2018-04-01

    The collision between a spin-polarized metastable argon atom in Ar* (3p54s, 3P2, M = +2) state slightly decelerated by the Zeeman slower-laser technique and a co-propagating thermal ground state argon atom Ar (3p6, 1S0), both merged from the same supersonic beam, but coming through adjacent slots of a rotating disk, is investigated at the center of mass energies ranging from 1 to 10 meV. The duration of the laser pulse synchronised with the disk allows the tuning of the relative velocity and thus the collision energy. At these sub-thermal energies, the ‘resonant metastability transfer’ signal is too small to be evidenced. The explored energy range requires using indiscernibility amplitudes for identical isotopes to have a correct interpretation of the experimental results. Nevertheless, excitation transfers are expected to increase significantly at much lower energies as suggested by previous theoretical predictions of potentials 2g(3P2) and 2u(3P2). Limits at ultra-low collisional energies of the order of 1 mK (0.086 μeV) or less, where gigantic elastic cross sections are expected, will also be discussed. The experimental method is versatile and could be applied using different isotopes of Argon like 36Ar combined with 40Ar, as well as other rare gases among which Krypton should be of great interest thanks to the available numerous isotopes present in a natural gas mixture.

  12. Thermodynamics of aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and methyldiethanolammonium chloride (MDEAH+Cl-) over a wide range of temperature and pressure: Apparent molar volumes, heat capacities, and isothermal compressibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawrylak, B.; Palepu, R.; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    Apparent molar volumes of aqueous methyldiethanolamine and its salt were determined with platinum vibrating tube densitometers over a range of temperatures from 283K= o , heat capacities C p o , and isothermal compressibilities κ T o . The standard partial molar volumes V o for the neutral amine and its salt show increasingly positive and negative values, respectively, at high temperatures and pressures, as predicted by corresponding states and group additivity arguments. The density model and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) model have been used to represent the temperature and pressure dependence of the standard partial molar properties to yield a full thermodynamic description of the system

  13. Partial Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Partial Cancellation. Full Cancellation is desirable. But complexity requirements are enormous. 4000 tones, 100 Users billions of flops !!! Main Idea: Challenge: To determine which cross-talker to cancel on what “tone” for a given victim. Constraint: Total complexity is ...

  14. Molar volume and adsorption isotherm dependence of capillary forces in nanoasperity contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, David B; Kim, Seong H

    2007-11-20

    The magnitude of the capillary force at any given temperature and adsorbate partial pressure depends primarily on four factors: the surface tension of the adsorbate, its liquid molar volume, its isothermal behavior, and the contact geometry. At large contacting radii, the adsorbate surface tension and the contact geometry are dominating. This is the case of surface force apparatus measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments with micrometer-size spheres. However, as the size of contacting asperities decreases to the nanoscale as in AFM experiments with sharp tips, the molar volume and isotherm of the adsorbate become very important to capillary formation as well as capillary adhesion. This effect is experimentally and theoretically explored with simple alcohol molecules (ethanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol) which have comparable surface tensions but differing liquid molar volumes. Adsorption isotherms for these alcohols on silicon oxide are also reported.

  15. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-12-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the second molar. However, CBCT revealed that a third molar was fused to the second molar. Unexpectedly, the maxillary left third molar also was fused to the second molar, and the crown of an unerupted supernumerary fourth molar was possibly also fused to the apical root region of the second molar. Operative procedures should not be attempted without adequate radiographic investigation. CBCT allowed the precise location of the root canals of the right maxillary fused molar teeth to permit successful endodontic therapy, confirmed after 6 months.

  16. Shear viscosity of liquid argon and liquid rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiakwelu, O.

    1978-01-01

    A direct evaluation of the shear viscosity coefficient for models of liquid rubidium and liquid argon is presented by neglecting the cross-terms in the autocorrelation function of the transverse component of the momentum stress tensor. The time dependence of the shear viscosity for liquid argon is found to display a long decaying tail in qualitative agreement with a computer calculation of Levesque et al. However, the numerical values of the shear viscosity coefficients are smaller than the experimentally determined values of about 45% for liquid rubidium and 35% for liquid argon

  17. Pathological (late) fractures of the mandibular angle after lower third molar removal: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutilli, Tommaso; Bourelaki, Theodora; Scarsella, Secondo; Fabio, Desiderio Di; Pontecorvi, Emanuele; Cargini, Pasqualino; Junquera, Luis

    2013-04-30

    Pathological (late) fracture of the mandibular angle after third molar surgery is very rare (0.005% of third molar removals). There are 94 cases reported in the literature; cases associated with osseous pathologies such as osteomyelitis or any local and systemic diseases that may compromise mandibular bone strength have not been included. We describe three new cases of pathological (late) fracture of the mandibular angle after third molar surgery. The first patient was a 27-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone surgical removal of a 3.8, mesioangular variety, class II-C third molar 20 days before admission to our clinic. The fracture of his left mandibular angle, complete and composed, occurred during chewing. The second patient was a 32-year-old Caucasian man. He had undergone surgical removal of a 3.8, mesioangular variety, class II-B third molar 22 days before his admission. The fracture, which occurred during mastication, was studied by computed tomography that showed reparative tissue in the fracture site. The third patient was a 36-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone surgical removal of a 3.8, vertical variety, class II-C third molar 25 days before the observation. In this case the fracture of his mandibular angle was oblique (unfavorable), complete and composed. The fracture had occurred during chewing. We studied the fracture by optical projection tomography and computed tomography.All of the surgical removals of the 3.8 third molars, performed by the patients' dentists who had more than 10 years of experience, were difficult. We treated the fractures with open surgical reduction, internal fixation by titanium miniplates and intermaxillary elastic fixation removed after 6 weeks. The literature indicates that the risk of pathological (late) fracture of the mandibular angle after third molar surgery for total inclusions (class II-III, type C) is twice that of partial inclusions due to the necessity of ostectomies more generous than those for partial

  18. Oxygen from Hydrogen Peroxide. A Safe Molar Volume-Molar Mass Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenbaugh, John H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a molar volume-molar mass experiment for use in general chemistry laboratories. Gives background technical information, procedures for the titration of aqueous hydrogen peroxide with standard potassium permanganate and catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen, and a discussion of the results obtained in three…

  19. Does fixed retention prevent overeruption of unopposed mandibular second molars in maxillary first molar extraction cases?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Halazonetis, Demetrios J; Booij, Johan W; Katsaros, Christos; Ren, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to investigate whether multistranded fixed retainers prevented overeruption of unopposed mandibular second molars in maxillary first molar extraction cases. METHODS: The panoramic radiographs of 65 Class II Division 1 Caucasian Whites (28 females, 37

  20. SECOND MOLAR UPRIGHTING AFTER PREMATURE LOSS OF MANDIBULAR FIRST PERMANENT MOLAR--CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernei, E R; Mavru, R B; Zetui, Irina Nicoleta

    2015-01-01

    Uprighting a tipped molar by using an uprighting spring is a fundamental orthodontic treatment technique. Following a weak anchorage done only by the anterior teeth the permanent lower second molar will rotate around its center of resistance, and besides the distalizing movement will occur its extrusion. Following the reaction, the mandibular anterior teeth will have a movement of intrusion. All these elements will lead to anterior open bite. Correction of vertical problems has become easier with the advent of mini-implants. U.I patient aged 24 years presenting for aesthetic and functional disorders. Clinical examination reveals intraoral Class I molar malocclusion on the right sight, upper narrowing arch with a slight overbite, and the both permanent first molars on the left side lost prematurely. The tooth 37 is inclined at 600 degrees to the plane of occlusion. To avoid front opening occlusion we used an orthodontic miniscrew inserted between the canine and the first premolar on the same side to achieve the second molar up righting. Lower second molar uprighting was achieved without unwanted movements in anterior mandibular region and without molar extrusion. Using mini implants in uprighting a tipped molar will achieve the desired tooth movement and will reduce the number of unwanted side effects and eventually to improve patient's esthetics.

  1. Application of ERAS-model and Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory to excess molar volumes for ternary mixtures of (2-chlorobutane + butylacetate + isobutanol) at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanlarzadeh, K.; Iloukhani, H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Density of ternary and three binary mixtures of (2-chlorobutane + butylacetate + isobutanol) determined. → Excess molar volume, partial molar volume and apparent molar volume were calculated. → Excess molar volume was correlated as a function of mole fraction by using the Redlich-Kister and Cibulka equation for all mixtures. → The experimental results have been used to test the applicability of the ERAS-model and PFP theory. - Abstract: Densities of the ternary mixture consisting of {2-chlorobutane (1) + butylacetate (2) + isobutanol (3)} and related binary mixtures were measured over the whole range of composition at T = 298.15 K and ambient pressure. Excess molar volumes V m E for the mixtures were derived and correlated as a function of mole fraction by using the Redlich-Kister and the Cibulka equations for binary and ternary mixtures, respectively. From the experimental data, partial molar volumes, V-bar m,i excess partial molar volumes, V-bar i E partial molar volumes at infinite dilution V-bar m,i 0 and apparent molar volumes V-bar φ,i were also calculated. For all binary mixtures over the entire range of mole fractions V m E data are positive. The experimental results of the constituted binary mixtures have been used to test the applicability of the extended real associated solution (ERAS-model) and Prigogine-Flory-Paterson (PFP) theory.

  2. Molar volume of eutectic solvents as a function of molar composition and temperature☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farouq S. Mjalli

    2016-01-01

    The conventional Rackett model for predicting liquid molar volume has been modified to cater for the effect of molar composition of the Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES). The experimental molar volume data for a group of commonly used DES has been used for optimizing the improved model. The data involved different molar compositions of each DES. The validation of the new model was performed on another set of DESs. The average relative deviation of the model on the training and validation datasets was approximately 0.1%while the Rackett model gave a relative deviation of more than 1.6%. The modified model deals with variations in DES molar com-position and temperature in a more consistent way than the original Rackett model which exhibits monotonic performance degradation as temperature moves away from reference conditions. Having the composition of the DES as a model variable enhances the practical utilization of the predicting model in diverse design and process simulation applications.

  3. Experimental excess molar properties of binary mixtures of (3-amino-1-propanol + isobutanol, 2-propanol) at T = (293.15 to 333.15) K and modelling the excess molar volume by Prigogine–Flory–Patterson theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermanpour, F.; Niakan, H.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Density and viscosity of binary mixtures of propanol derivatives were measured at T = (293.15 to 333.15) K. ► The excess molar properties were calculated from these experimental data and correlated by Redlich–Kister equation. ► The PFP model was applied for correlating the excess molar volumes. - Abstract: Density and viscosity of binary mixtures of (x 1 3-amino-1-propanol + x 2 isobutanol) and (x 1 3-amino-1-propanol + x 2 2-propanol) were measured over the entire composition range and from temperatures (293.15 to 333.15) K at ambient pressure. The excess molar volumes and viscosity deviations were calculated and correlated by the Redlich–Kister (RK) equation. The thermal expansion coefficient and its excess value, isothermal coefficient of excess molar enthalpy, and excess partial molar volumes were determined by using the experimental values of density and are described as a function of composition and temperature. The excess molar volumes are negative over the entire mole fraction range for both mixtures and increase with increasing temperature. The excess molar volumes obtained were correlated by the Prigogine–Flory–Patterson (PFP) model. The viscosity deviations of the binary mixtures are negative over the entire composition range and decrease with increasing temperature.

  4. Partial processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This discussion paper considers the possibility of applying to the recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors a particular method of partial processing based on the PUREX process but named CIVEX to emphasise the differences. The CIVEX process is based primarily on the retention of short-lived fission products. The paper suggests: (1) the recycle of fission products with uranium and plutonium in thermal reactor fuel would be technically feasible; (2) it would, however, take ten years or more to develop the CIVEX process to the point where it could be launched on a commercial scale; (3) since the majority of spent fuel to be reprocessed this century will have been in storage for ten years or more, the recycling of short-lived fission products with the U-Pu would not provide an effective means of making refabrication fuel ''inaccessible'' because the radioactivity associated with the fission products would have decayed. There would therefore be no advantage in partial processing

  5. Partial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.М. Karimova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A girl with partial gigantism (the increased I and II fingers of the left foot is being examined. This condition is a rare and unresolved problem, as the definite reason of its development is not determined. Wait-and-see strategy is recommended, as well as correcting operations after closing of growth zones, and forming of data pool for generalization and development of schemes of drug and radial therapeutic methods.

  6. The contemporary management of third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyam, D M

    2018-03-01

    The management of third molars requires a significant assessment and decision process both for the patient and the clinician. The clinician must always identify the indication for third molar surgery, assess the risks of the proposed procedure, and then modify their plan to account for the patient's current and future health, their social and financial setting, and the patient's tolerance of risk. In doing this, the clinician can tailor a solution to meet the individual patient's needs. This decision to remove a third molar is made in the fluid setting of the patient's quality of life and requires regular review. This article gives the clinician the tools, the matrix, and the confidence to guide patients through this process, and outlines some of the pitfalls and common points of bias within the process. © 2018 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Recycling argon through metamorphic reactions: The record in symplectites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christopher S.; Regis, Daniele; Warren, Clare J.; Kelley, Simon P.; Sherlock, Sarah C.

    2018-02-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar ages of metamorphic micas that crystallized at high temperatures are commonly interpreted as cooling ages, with grains considered to have lost 40Ar via thermally-driven diffusion into the grain boundary network. Recently reported laser-ablation data suggest that the spatial distribution of Ar in metamorphic micas does not always conform to the patterns predicted by diffusion theory and that despite high metamorphic temperatures, argon was not removed efficiently from the local system during metamorphic evolution. In the Western Gneiss Region (WGR), Norway, felsic gneisses preserve microtextural evidence for the breakdown of phengite to biotite and plagioclase symplectites during near isothermal decompression from c. 20-25 to c. 8-12 kbar at 700 °C. These samples provide an ideal natural laboratory to assess whether the complete replacement of one K-bearing mineral by another at high temperatures completely 'resets' the Ar clock, or whether there is some inheritance of 40Ar in the neocrystallized phase. The timing of the high-temperature portion of the WGR metamorphic cycle has been well constrained in previous studies. However, the timing of cooling following the overprint is still much debated. In-situ laser ablation spot dating in phengite, biotite-plagioclase symplectites and coarser, texturally later biotite yielded 40Ar/39Ar ages that span much of the metamorphic cycle. Together these data show that despite residence at temperatures of 700 °C, Ar is not completely removed by diffusive loss or during metamorphic recrystallization. Instead, Ar released during phengite breakdown appears to be partially reincorporated into the newly crystallizing biotite and plagioclase (or is trapped in fluid inclusions in those phases) within a close system. Our data show that the microtextural and petrographic evolution of the sample being dated provides a critical framework in which local 40Ar recycling can be tracked, thus potentially allowing 40Ar/39Ar dates

  8. Liquid Argon Calorimeter performance at High Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Seifert, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at HL-LHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built and exposed to a high intensity proton beam of 50 GeV at IHEP/Protvino. The beam is extracted via the bent crystal technique, offering the unique opportunity to cover intensities ranging from $10^6$ p/s up to $3\\cdot10^{11}$ p/s. This exceeds the deposited energy per time expected at HL-LHC by more than a factor of 100. The correlation between beam intensity and the read-out signal has been studied. The data show clear indications of pulse shape distortion due to the high ionization build-up, in agreement with MC expectations. This is also confirmed from the dependence of the HV currents on beam intensity.

  9. Neutrino Event Reconstruction in a Liquid Argon TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Gary, E-mail: G.J.Barker@Warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-25

    We present some preliminary findings and results from activities in Europe and the USA working towards an automated, algorithmic, reconstruction of particle interactions in liquid argon time projection chambers.

  10. Improvement of helium characteristics using argon in cylindrical ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel salam, F.W.; El-Khabeary, H.; Abdel reheem, A.M.; Kassem, N.E.; Ahmed, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    the discharge characteristics of pure helium gas were measured at different pressures in the range of 10 -4 torr. in order o improve its characteristics, argon gas was added . different percentages of argon gas ,1%,2%,3%,4%,5%,10% and 20% were used at constant values of pressures . Measurements of the efficiency of the cylindrical ion source in case of adding different percentages of argon gas to pure helium gas were made . an optimum value of the output ion beam current was obtained when 2% argon gas was added to pure helium gas . an output ion beam current of 105 μA was obtained at a pressure of 7X10 -4 torr inside the vacuum chamber and discharge current of 0.6 m A

  11. Phenomenological modeling of argon Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, K.G.; Thornhill, J.W.; Deeney, C.; LePell, P.D.; Coulter, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    The authors investigate some of the effects of plasma turbulence on the K-shell emission dynamics of argon gas puff Z-pinch implosions. The increases that turbulence produces in the plasma viscosity, heat conductivity, and electrical resistivity are modeled phenomenologically using multipliers for these quantities in the MHD calculations. The choice of multipliers was made by benchmarking a 1-D MHD simulation of a Physics International Inc. argon gas puff experiment against the inferred densities and temperatures achieved in the experiment. These multipliers were then used to study the parametric dependence of the K-shell emission on the energy input to the argon plasma for a fixed mass loading. Comparisons between turbulent and non-turbulent argon implosions are made

  12. Characterization of DC argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jianhua; Ma Zengyi; Pan Xinchao; Cen Kefa; Bruno, C

    2006-01-01

    An original DC double anode plasma torch operating with argon at atmospheric pressure which provides a long time and highly stable plasma jet is analyzed through its electrical and optical signals. Effects of gas flow rate and current intensity on the arc dynamics behaviour are studied using standard diagnostic tools such as FFT and correlation function. An increasing current-voltage characteristic is reported for different argon flow rates. It is noted that the takeover mode is characteristic for argon plasma jet and arc fluctuations in our case are mainly induced by the undulation of torch power supply. Furthermore, the excitation temperatures and electron densities of the plasma jet inside and outside the arc chamber have been determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The criteria for the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in plasma is then discussed. The results show that argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure under our experimental conditions is close to LTE. (authors)

  13. Measurement and correlation of excess molar volumes for mixtures of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahlyan, Suman; Rani, Manju; Maken, Sanjeev Kumar [Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal (India); Lee, Inkyu; Moon, Il [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Excess molar volumes (V{sub m}{sup E} ) have been measured at 303.15 K for 1-propanol+benzene or toluene or o- or m- or p-xylene mixtures using V-shape dilatometer. The V{sub m}{sup E} values, for an equimolar composition, vary in the order: benzene>toluene-m-xylene>o-xylene>p-xylene. The V{sub m}{sup E} data have been used to calculate partial molar volumes, excess partial molar volumes, and apparent molar volumes of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons over the entire range of composition. The excess volume data have also been interpreted in terms of graph-theoretical approach and Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory (PFP). While PFP theory fails to predict the V{sub m}{sup E} values for systems with s-shaped V{sub m}{sup E} versus x{sub 1} graph, the V{sub m}{sup E} values calculated by graph theory compare reasonably well with the corresponding experimental values. This graph theory analysis has further yielded information about the state of aggregation of pure components as well as of the mixtures.

  14. Densities, molar volumes, and isobaric expansivities of (d-xylose+hydrochloric acid+water) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiufen; Yan Zhenning; Wang Jianji; Zhang Hucheng

    2006-01-01

    Densities of (d-xylose+HCl+water) have been measured at temperature in the range (278.15 to 318.15) K as a function of concentration of both d-xylose and hydrochloric acid. The densities have been used to estimate the molar volumes and isobaric expansivity of the ternary solutions. The molar volumes of the ternary solutions vary linearly with mole fraction of d-xylose. The standard partial molar volumes V 2,φ - bar for d-xylose in aqueous solutions of molality (0.2, 0.4, 0.7, 1.1, 1.6, and 2.1) mol.kg -1 HCl have been determined. In the investigated temperature range, the relation: V 2,φ - bar =c 1 +c 2 {(T/K)-273.15} 1/2 , can be used to describe the temperature dependence of the standard partial molar volumes. These results have, in conjunction with the results obtained in water, been used to deduce the standard volumes of transfer, Δ t V - bar , of d-xylose from water to aqueous HCl solutions. An increase in the transfer volume of d-xylose with increasing HCl concentrations has been explained by the stronger interactions of H + with the hydrophilic groups of d-xylose

  15. Measurement and correlation of excess molar volumes for mixtures of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahlyan, Suman; Rani, Manju; Maken, Sanjeev Kumar; Lee, Inkyu; Moon, Il

    2015-01-01

    Excess molar volumes (V m E ) have been measured at 303.15 K for 1-propanol+benzene or toluene or o- or m- or p-xylene mixtures using V-shape dilatometer. The V m E values, for an equimolar composition, vary in the order: benzene>toluene-m-xylene>o-xylene>p-xylene. The V m E data have been used to calculate partial molar volumes, excess partial molar volumes, and apparent molar volumes of 1-propanol and aromatic hydrocarbons over the entire range of composition. The excess volume data have also been interpreted in terms of graph-theoretical approach and Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory (PFP). While PFP theory fails to predict the V m E values for systems with s-shaped V m E versus x 1 graph, the V m E values calculated by graph theory compare reasonably well with the corresponding experimental values. This graph theory analysis has further yielded information about the state of aggregation of pure components as well as of the mixtures

  16. [Surgery of lower third molars and lesions of the lingual nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapasco, M; Pedrinazzi, M; Motta, J; Crescentini, M; Ramundo, G

    1996-11-01

    The authors describe a technical expedient applied during the removal of totally or partially impacted lower third molars, in order to prevent lingual nerve damage. EXPERIMENTAL ASSAY: Retrospective study. The sample includes 1835 extractions of totally or partially impacted lower third molars, performed on 1030 patients, 493 males and 537 females, aging between 12 and 72 years. All the operations were carried out under local anaesthesia with standardization of the surgical protocol. A mucoperiosteal paramarginal flap was used in case of germectomy, whereas a mucoperiosteal marginal flap with mesial releasing incision was used in case of fully mature teeth. Ostectomy and tooth sectioning were performed using a round and fissure bur respectively, assembled on a straight low-speed handpiece and under irrigation with sterile saline. The authors reported only one case of transient lingual nerve paresthesia (0.05%) which occurred in a 19-years old female presenting a totally impacted third molar mesial-lingual inclination. Symptoms disappeared spontaneously one week postoperatively. Therefore the overall incidence of permanent nerve damage was equal to 0%. The data reported in literature show a lingual nerve lesion incidence ranging between 0% and 22%. With this simple surgical expedient the incidence of permanent lingual damage was 0%. Thus, it is the authors' opinion that this simple expedient should be applied in all cases of impacted third molar removal.

  17. Studies on EOS of shock-generated argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fanhou; Jing Fuqian

    2001-01-01

    The equation of state for argon plasma, covering the thermodynamic states of 10000-30000 K in temperature and 0.0133-0.166 GPa in pressure, is computed using the Saha model and Debye-Huckel correction. Comparisons of the measured EOS with the calculated ones demonstrate the Saha model and Debye-Huckel correction can be used to well describe the essential behavior of argon plasma under the thermodynamic condition above-mentioned

  18. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  19. Theoretical investigation of thermophysical properties in two-temperature argon-helium thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip; Singh, Gurpreet

    2011-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of argon-helium thermal plasma have been studied in the temperature range from 5000 to 40 000 K at atmospheric pressure in local thermodynamic equilibrium and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Two cases of thermal plasma considered are (i) ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and (ii) excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The influence of electronic excitation and non-equilibrium parameter θ = T e /T h on thermodynamic properties (composition, degree of ionization, Debye length, enthalpy, and total specific heat) and transport properties (electrical conductivity, electron thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusion ratio) have been studied. Within the framework of Chapman-Enskog method, the higher-order contributions to transport coefficient and their convergence are studied. The influence of different molar compositions of argon-helium plasma mixture on convergence of higher-orders is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of different definitions of Debye length has also been examined for electrical conductivity and it is observed that electrical conductivity with the definition of Debye length (in which only electrons participate in screening) is less than that of the another definition (in which both the electrons and ions participate in screening) and this deviation increases with electron temperature. Finally, the effect of lowering of ionization energy is examined on electron number density, Debye length, and higher-order contribution to electrical conductivity. It is observed that the lowering of the ionization energy affects the electron transport-properties and consequently their higher-order contributions depending upon the value of the non-equilibrium parameter θ.

  20. Electron densities and energies of a guided argon streamer in argon and air environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hübner, S; Hofmann, S; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Bruggeman, P J

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report the temporally and spatially resolved electron densities and mean energies of a guided argon streamer in ambient argon and air obtained by Thomson laser scattering. The plasma is driven by a positive monopolar 3.5 kV pulse, with a pulse width of 500 ns and a frequency of 5 kHz which is synchronized with the high repetition rate laser system. This configuration enables us to use the spatial and temporal stability of the guided streamer to accumulate a multitude of laser/plasma shots by a triple grating spectrometer equipped with an ICCD camera and to determine the electron parameters. We found a strong initial n e -overshoot with a maximum of 7 × 10 19  m −3 and a mean electron energy of 4.5 eV. This maximum is followed by a fast decay toward the streamer channel. Moreover, a 2D distribution of the electron density is obtained which exhibits a peculiar mushroom-like shape of the streamer head with a diameter significantly larger than that of the emission profile. A correlation of the width of the streamer head with the expected pre-ionization channel is found. (paper)

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of argon ion velocities near the sheath boundary of an argon-xenon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dongsoo; Severn, Greg; Oksuz, Lutfi; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2006-01-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion in single- and two-ion species plasma is studied with laser-induced fluorescence using a diode laser. Xenon is added to a low pressure unmagnetized dc hot filament argon discharge confined by surface multidipole magnetic fields. The Ar II transition at 668.614 nm is adopted for optical pumping to detect the fluorescence from the plasma and to measure the argon ion velocity distribution functions with respect to positions relative to a negatively biased boundary plate. The structures of the plasma sheath and presheath are measured by an emissive probe. The ion concentrations of the two-species in the bulk plasma are calculated from ion acoustic wave experiments. Results are compared with previous experiments of Ar-He plasmas in which the argon ions were the heavier ion species. Unlike the previous results, the argon speed is slower than its own Bohm velocity near the sheath-presheath boundary in the Ar-Xe plasma where argon ions are the lighter ion species. We argue that this result is consistent with the behaviour of the helium ion required by the generalized Bohm criterion in the previous experiments with Ar-He plasmas. Further, our results suggest that the measured argon ion speed approaches the ion sound speed of the system

  2. External and internal anatomy of mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L F; Sousa Neto, M D; Fidel, S R; da Costa, W F; Pécora, J D

    1996-01-01

    The external and internal anatomy of 628 extracted, mandibular first and second molars was studied. The external anatomy was studied by measuring each tooth and by observing the direction of the root curvatures from the facial surface. The internal anatomy of the pulp cavity was studied by a method of making the teeth translucent.

  3. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEBNER, GREGORY A.; MILLER, PAUL A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s 5 and 1s 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s 5 level is metastable and the 1s 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s 5 and 1s 4 argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl 2 or BCl 3 increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl 2 or BCl 3 was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for argon excited states to dissociate some of the

  4. A notable difference between ideal gas and infinite molar volume limit of van der Waals gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. H.; Shen, Y.; Bai, R. L.; Wang, X.

    2010-05-01

    The van der Waals equation of state does not sufficiently represent a gas unless a thermodynamic potential with two proper and independent variables is simultaneously determined. The limiting procedures under which the behaviour of the van der Waals gas approaches that of an ideal gas are letting two van der Waals coefficients be zero rather than letting the molar volume become infinitely large; otherwise, the partial derivative of internal energy with respect to pressure at a fixed temperature does not vanish.

  5. A notable difference between ideal gas and infinite molar volume limit of van der Waals gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q H; Shen, Y; Bai, R L; Wang, X

    2010-01-01

    The van der Waals equation of state does not sufficiently represent a gas unless a thermodynamic potential with two proper and independent variables is simultaneously determined. The limiting procedures under which the behaviour of the van der Waals gas approaches that of an ideal gas are letting two van der Waals coefficients be zero rather than letting the molar volume become infinitely large; otherwise, the partial derivative of internal energy with respect to pressure at a fixed temperature does not vanish.

  6. New argon-argon (40Ar/39Ar) radiometric age dates from selected subsurface basalt flows at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K. V.; Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; Swisher, Carl C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected samples for 12 new argon-argon radiometric ages from eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiite basalt flows in the subsurface at the Idaho National Laboratory. The core samples were collected from flows that had previously published paleomagnetic data. Samples were sent to Rutgers University for argon-argon radiometric dating analyses.

  7. Human dental age estimation combining third molar(s) development and tooth morphological age predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, P W; Galiti, D; Willems, G

    2012-11-01

    In the subadult age group, third molar development, as well as age-related morphological tooth information can be observed on panoramic radiographs. The aim of present study was to combine, in subadults, panoramic radiographic data based on developmental stages of third molar(s) and morphological measurements from permanent teeth, in order to evaluate its added age-predicting performances. In the age range between 15 and 23 years, 25 gender-specific radiographs were collected within each age category of 1 year. Third molar development was classified and registered according the 10-point staging and scoring technique proposed by Gleiser and Hunt (1955), modified by Köhler (1994). The Kvaal (1995) measuring technique was applied on the indicated teeth from the individuals' left side. Linear regression models with age as response and third molar-scored stages as explanatory variables were developed, and morphological measurements from permanent teeth were added. From the models, determination coefficients (R (2)) and root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were calculated. Maximal-added age information was reported as a 6 % R² increase and a 0.10-year decrease of RMSE. Forensic dental age estimations on panoramic radiographic data in the subadult group (15-23 year) should only be based on third molar development.

  8. An innovative technique to distalize maxillary molar using microimplant supported rapid molar distalizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, enhancements in implants have made their use possible as a mode of absolute anchorage in orthodontic patients. In this paper, the authors have introduced an innovative technique to unilaterally distalize the upper left 1 st molar to obtain an ideal Class I molar relationship from a Class II existing molar relationship with an indigenous designed distalizer. Clinical Innovation: For effective unilateral diatalization of molar, a novel cantilever sliding jig assembly was utilized with coil spring supported by a buccally placed single micro implant. The results showed 3 mm of bodily distalization with 1 mm of intrusion and 2° of distal tipping of upper left 1 st molar in 1.5 months. Discussion: This appliance is relatively easy to insert, well-tolerated, and requires minimal patient cooperation compared to other present techniques of molar distalization. Moreover, it is particularly useful in cases that are Class II on one side and Class I on the other, with a minor midline discrepancy and nominal overjet. Patient acceptance level was reported to be within patients physiological and comfort limits.

  9. Mandibular molar crown-topography, a biological predisposing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mandibular molar crown-topography, a biological predisposing factor to development of caries – a post-mortem analysis of 2500 extracted lower permanent molars at the dental centre, University of Benin teaching hospital.

  10. Prevention of alveolar osteitis after third molar surgery: Comparative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevention of alveolar osteitis after third molar surgery: Comparative study of the ... for surgical extraction of lower third molar were prospectively, consecutively, and ... Information on demographic, types and level of impaction, indications for ...

  11. Variant Root Morphology of Third Mandibular Molar in Normal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    isaac kipyator

    2017-11-12

    Nov 12, 2017 ... ABSTRACT. The mandibular third molar poses a challenge to dental surgeons due to it's unpredictable morphology ... treatment in the School of Dental Sciences since 2010. ... mandibular third molar include presence of three.

  12. Characterisation of GERDA Phase-I detectors in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnabe Heider, Marik; Schoenert, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Gusev, Konstantin [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    GERDA will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge by submerging bare enriched HPGe detectors in liquid argon. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, and reprocessed natural-Ge detectors from Genius-TF, will be redeployed. We have tested the operation and performance of bare HPGe detectors in liquid nitrogen and in liquid argon over more than three years with three non-enriched p-type prototype detectors. The detector handling and mounting procedures have been defined and the Phase-I detector technology, the low-mass assembly and the long-term stability in liquid argon have been tested successfully. The Phase-I detectors were reprocessed by Canberra Semiconductor NV, Olen, according to their standard technology but without the evaporation of a passivation layer. After their reprocessing, the detectors have been mounted in their low-mass holders and their characterisation in liquid argon performed. The leakage current, the counting characteristics and the efficiency of the detectors have been measured. The testing of the detectors was carried out in the liquid argon test stand of the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory (GDL) at LNGS. The detectors are now stored underground under vacuum until their operation in GERDA.

  13. Crystallization of sol-gel derived lead zirconate titanate thin films in argon and oxygen atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    Electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopic techniques are applied to reveal the mechanisms of crystallization of 75 nm thin films of ferroelectric lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT). Sol-gel methods, followed by pyrolysis at 350 deg C, were used to provide a common starting point after which a variety of rapid-thermal annealing (RTA) experiments in the temperature range 400-700 deg C were made in argon, oxygen and nitrogen/hydrogen atmospheres. The results are interpreted in terms of the crystal chemical analysis, which points out that partial pressure of oxygen and heating rate are important experimental parameters which must be controlled if ferroelectric perovskite-type Pb 2 ZrTiO 6 , rather than pyrochlore-type Pb 2 ZrTiO 6+x , where O < X < 1 or -1 < X < O, is to be obtained after the RTA step. Thus significant improvements in the crystallization of perovskite-type PZT were clearly demonstrated by using argon atmospheres for the RTA step. The results have significance for the production of high-quality ferroelectric thin films, with improved switching and fatigue characteristics, since even small amounts of the pyrochlore phase prove detrimental for these properties. 18 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs

  14. Crystallization of sol-gel derived lead zirconate titanate thin films in argon and oxygen atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bursill, L A [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Brooks, K G [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    Electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopic techniques are applied to reveal the mechanisms of crystallization of 75 nm thin films of ferroelectric lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT). Sol-gel methods, followed by pyrolysis at 350 deg C, were used to provide a common starting point after which a variety of rapid-thermal annealing (RTA) experiments in the temperature range 400-700 deg C were made in argon, oxygen and nitrogen/hydrogen atmospheres. The results are interpreted in terms of the crystal chemical analysis, which points out that partial pressure of oxygen and heating rate are important experimental parameters which must be controlled if ferroelectric perovskite-type Pb{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 6}, rather than pyrochlore-type Pb{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 6+x}, where O < X < 1 or -1 < X < O, is to be obtained after the RTA step. Thus significant improvements in the crystallization of perovskite-type PZT were clearly demonstrated by using argon atmospheres for the RTA step. The results have significance for the production of high-quality ferroelectric thin films, with improved switching and fatigue characteristics, since even small amounts of the pyrochlore phase prove detrimental for these properties. 18 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  15. Low-energy positron-argon collisions by using parameter-free positron correlation polarization potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.

    1990-01-01

    We report differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections and the scattering length (A 0 ) for positron (e + )-argon scattering at low energies below the positronium formation threshold. An optical-potential approach is employed in which the repulsive Coulombic interaction is calculated exactly at the Hartree-Fock level and the attractive polarization and correlation effects are included approximately via a parameter-free positron correlation polarization (PCP) potential recently proposed by us. The PCP model is based on the correlation energy var-epsilon corr of one positron in a homogeneous electron gas; in the outside region, the var-epsilon corr is joined smoothly with the correct asymptotic form of the polarization interaction (-α 0 /2r 4 , where α 0 is the target polarizability) where they cross each other for the first time. The total optical potential of the e + -argon system is treated exactly in a partial-wave analysis to extract the scattering parameters. It is found that the PCP potential gives much better qualitative results, particularly for the differential cross sections and the scattering length, than the corresponding results obtained from an electron polarization potential used as such for the positron case. We also discuss the ''critical'' points (representing the minima in the differential scattering) in the low-energy e + -Ar scattering. The present results involve no fitting procedure

  16. Molar incisor hypomineralization: current research evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manikandan Ekambaram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH is a condition of systemic origin that involves one to four first permanent molar teeth and often associated with affected incisors. Although several associations to prenatal/perinatal childhood medical conditions have been reported, the etiology of MIH still remains unclear. The degree of enamel hypomineralization in the affected teeth can vary and the clinical problems associated with the teeth include increased susceptibility to caries, rapid wear, and post-eruptive enamel breakdown. Affected teeth are extremely challenging to treat as the enamel is porous, sensitive and treating clinicians might encounter great difficulty in achieving profound anaesthesia. The first part of thispresentation will give an update on prevalence, potential etiological factors, and management strategies of this condition. The second part of the presentation will cover a systematic review results on bonding strategies to hypomineralized enamel.

  17. [Delayed wound healing post molar extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, R H; De Visscher, J G A M

    2009-02-01

    One month post extraction of the second left maxillary molar the alveolar extraction site showed no signs of healing and was painful. The patient had been using an oral bisphosphonate during 3 years. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as bisphosphonate-induced maxillary osteonecrosis. Treatment was conservative. Since one month later the pain had increased and the wound healing had decreased, a biopsy was carried out. Histopathologic examination revealed a non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  18. Enamel micromorphology of the tribosphenic molar

    OpenAIRE

    Hanousková, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    The tribosphenic molar is an ancestral type of mammalian teeth and a phy- lotypic stage of the mammalian dental evolution. Yet, in contrast to derived teeth types, its enamel microarchitecture attracted only little attention and the information on that subject is often restricted to statements suggesting a simple homogenous arrangement of a primitive radial prismatic enamel. The present paper tests this prediction with aid of comparative study of eight model species representing the orders Ch...

  19. Incidence of lower second permanent molar impaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of lower second molar impaction was investigated, comparing the records of two samples of 200 orthodontic patients referred consecutively, in 1976 and 1986. A further study compared 50 cases showing both bilateral and unilateral impactions, with a non-impacted control group. This allowed possible causes of the impactions to be examined, particularly concerning the effect of premature loss of deciduous teeth on the distribution of crowding.

  20. Features of copper etching in chlorine-argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, A.M.; Svettsov, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Chlorine mixtures with inert gases including argon exhibit promise as plasma feed gases for etching metals and semiconductors in the microelectronics industry. It was shown that even strong dilution of reactive gas with an inert gas (up to 80-90% of the latter) has virtually no effect in decreasing the rate of plasma etching of materials such as silicon and gallium arsenide, compared to etching in pure chlorine. The principal reactive species responsible for etching these substrates are chlorine atoms therefore, a possible explanation of the effect is an increase in the rate of bulk generation of chlorine atoms in the presence of argon. In this work the authors studied the influence of argon on the rate of copper etching in chlorine, because copper, unlike the above substrates, reacts effectively not only with the atoms but with the ground-state molecules of chlorine

  1. Pressure regulation in the dry-boxes. Argon purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascard, R.; Fabre, R.

    1958-01-01

    Each dry-box is equipped with an autonomous installation for circulation and purification of argon and for pressure regulation. This installation consists essentially of a ballast tank, a compressor and two valves electromagnetically controlled by a contact manometer. The compressor and the valves are enclosed in the tank to form a system as compact as possible. The argon is purified by passing it over a furnace filled with titanium-zirconium turnings brought to about 800 deg. C, branching off the main system. With this set-up as well as the automatic maintenance of a constant depression in the box, a quality of argon is obtained whose oxygen contact is undetectable by the manganous hydroxide method. (author) [fr

  2. Developing Detectors for Scintillation Light in Liquid Argon for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Bruce [Fermilab

    2016-12-22

    The Deep Underground Neutrino experiment will conduct a broad program of physics research by studying a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab, atmospheric neutrinos, neutrinos from potential supernovae, and potential nucleon decay events. In pursuit of these studies, the experiment will deploy four 10kt fiducial mass liquid argon time projection chambers underground in Lead, South Dakota. Liquid argon time projection chambers allow high-resolution tracking and energy measurements. A precise timing signal is needed to provide the necessary time stamp to localize events in the drift direction. As liquid argon is a natural scintillator, a photon detection system will be deployed to provide such a signal, especially for non-beam events. In the baseline design for the single-phase time projection chamber, the detectors are contained within the anode plane assemblies. The design of two prototypes utilizing wavelength shifters and light guides are presented, and aspects of the research and development program are discussed.

  3. Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-3 Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications \\\\ \\\\Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. Among the techniques used so far, or under development, the liquid argon sampling calorimetry offers high radiation resistence, good energy resolution (electromagnetic and hadronic), excellent calibration stability and response uniformity. Its rate capabilities, however, do not yet match the requirements for LHC. \\\\ \\\\The aim of this proposal is to improve the technique in such a way that high granularity, good hermiticity and adequate rate capabilities are obtained, without compromising the above mentioned properties. To reach this goal, we propose to use a novel structure, the $^{\\prime\\prime}$accordion$^{\\prime\\prime}$, coupled to fast preamplifiers working at liquid argon temperature. Converter and readout electrodes are no longer planar and perpendicular to particles, as usual, but instead they are wiggled around a plane containing particles. ...

  4. Three-dimensional primate molar enamel thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejniczak, Anthony J; Tafforeau, Paul; Feeney, Robin N M; Martin, Lawrence B

    2008-02-01

    Molar enamel thickness has played an important role in the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and dietary assessments of fossil primate teeth for nearly 90 years. Despite the frequency with which enamel thickness is discussed in paleoanthropological discourse, methods used to attain information about enamel thickness are destructive and record information from only a single plane of section. Such semidestructive planar methods limit sample sizes and ignore dimensional data that may be culled from the entire length of a tooth. In light of recently developed techniques to investigate enamel thickness in 3D and the frequent use of enamel thickness in dietary and phylogenetic interpretations of living and fossil primates, the study presented here aims to produce and make available to other researchers a database of 3D enamel thickness measurements of primate molars (n=182 molars). The 3D enamel thickness measurements reported here generally agree with 2D studies. Hominoids show a broad range of relative enamel thicknesses, and cercopithecoids have relatively thicker enamel than ceboids, which in turn have relatively thicker enamel than strepsirrhine primates, on average. Past studies performed using 2D sections appear to have accurately diagnosed the 3D relative enamel thickness condition in great apes and humans: Gorilla has the relatively thinnest enamel, Pan has relatively thinner enamel than Pongo, and Homo has the relatively thickest enamel. Although the data set presented here has some taxonomic gaps, it may serve as a useful reference for researchers investigating enamel thickness in fossil taxa and studies of primate gnathic biology.

  5. The determination of molar volumes of uranous nitrate and nitric acid in systems of U(NO3)4-HNO3-H2O and U(NO3)4-HNO3-30% TBP kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Chengying

    1986-01-01

    The data of molar volumes of uranous nitrate and nitric acid are necessary for the calculation of the changes in phase volume during the extraction in U(NO 3 ) 4 -HNO 3 /30%TBP-kerosene system. However, the data of the partial molar volume of U(NO 3 ) 4 are not available in literature. In the present work, the molar volumes of U(NO 3 ) 4 and HNO 3 are calculated by linear fitting of the experimental data. The result of the molar volume of HNO 3 is consistent with those in literature

  6. Electrical Measurements on a Moving Argon Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, A. A.M.; Howatson, A. M. [Oxford University (United Kingdom)

    1966-10-15

    Experimental current-voltage characteristic curves were obtained for a moving argon plasma at two stations in an electrically-driven 5 cm shock tube. The standard energy was 1 kj and the base pressure 10 torr, giving a shock of about Mach 4. The measurements were made on the highly-ionized driver gas which followed the shock at speeds between 800 and 1100 m/sec. Two types of electrode were used. One comprised circular solid electrodes of aluminium, molybdenum or stainless steel so machined as to be quite flush with the tube wall; the other comprised filaments of tungsten wire which were immersed in the free stream and could be used cold or heated for thermionic emission. Characteristics were obtained both for applied voltages and for MHD-generated voltages; for the latter a magnetic field of good uniformity up to 0.9 Wb/m{sup 2} was used. The results were always markedly dependent on the surface condition of the electrodes. For consistent results the flush electrodes had to be cleaned carefully by hand after every third discharge, while the filament electrodes were thermionically cleaned before every discharge. In general the cold electrode characteristics for applied voltage showed three distinct regions: a current increase such as would be expected from a double probe; a saturation region; and a linear increase, in order of increasing voltage. For the flush electrodes another apparent saturation was found before, finally, the transition to an arc-type discharge. The first saturation current for flush electrodes corresponded to a random ion current much less than that estimated to exist away from the tube walls, as is expected from a consideration of diffusion through a boundary layer. The value of the current varied somewhat with the electrode material. For the cold filaments, the saturation current density was of the same order as for the flush electrodes. From the linear region of the curves, an effective plasma conductivity was obtained. For comparison, the

  7. Influence of unilateral maxillary first molar extraction treatment on second and third molar inclination in Class II subdivision patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos; Booij, Johan Willem; Halazonetis, Demetrios J.; Katsaros, Christos; Ren, Yijin

    Objective: To assess the maxillary second molar (M2) and third molar (M3) inclination following orthodontic treatment of Class II subdivision malocclusion with unilateral maxillary first molar (M1) extraction. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of 21 Class II subdivision adolescents (eight

  8. Cover gases in nuclear reactors with special reference to argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, C.J.; Shah, G.C.; Prabhu, L.H.; Vartak, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the specifications of an ideal cover gas for the smooth operation of a nuclear reactor. The advantages of using helium as cover gas, the sources of impurities in helium cover gas and the methods of purification of helium are given in detail. Various problems associated with the use of argon as cover gas and methods to purify and decontaminate argon cover gas are discussed on the basis of experimental data collected. A laboratory model of the system which can be used to evaluate the performance of the gas purification adsorbents is also described. (author)

  9. Optical spectroscopy of high-L Rydberg states of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, L. E.; Snow, E. L.; Lundeen, S. R.; Sturrus, W. G.

    2007-01-01

    High-L fine structure patterns in n=9 and n=17 Rydberg levels of argon have been studied using a Doppler-tuned CO 2 laser and a fast beam of argon atoms. Analysis of the measured pattern using the polarization model yields the scalar dipole polarizability and quadrupole moment of the 2 P 3 at ∼sol∼ at 2 Ar + ion. The results are α S =6.83(8)a 0 3 and Q=-0.5177(15)ea 0 2 . Within the precision of this study, no vector component of the structure was observed

  10. One year Survival Rate of Ketac Molar versus Vitro Molar for Occlusoproximal ART Restorations: a RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PACHECO Anna Luisa de Brito

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Good survival rates for single-surface Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART restorations have been reported, while multi-surface ART restorations have not shown similar results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival rate of occluso-proximal ART restorations using two different filling materials: Ketac Molar EasyMix (3M ESPE and Vitro Molar (DFL. A total of 117 primary molars with occluso-proximal caries lesions were selected in 4 to 8 years old children in Barueri city, Brazil. Only one tooth was selected per child. The subjetcs were randomly allocated in two groups according to the filling material. All treatments were performed following the ART premises and all restorations were evaluated after 2, 6 and 12 months. Restoration survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Log-rank test, while Cox regression analysis was used for testing association with clinical factors (α = 5%. There was no difference in survival rate between the materials tested, (HR = 1.60, CI = 0.98–2.62, p = 0.058. The overall survival rate of restorations was 42.74% and the survival rate per group was Ketac Molar = 50,8% and Vitro Molar G2 = 34.5%. Cox regression test showed no association between the analyzed clinical variables and the success of the restorations. After 12 months evaluation, no difference in the survival rate of ART occluso-proximal restorations was found between tested materials.

  11. Radiologic study of mandibular third molar of Korean youths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1982-01-01

    The author has made a study on the classification of the mandibular 3rd molars of Korean youths through dental radiography by means of Pell and Gregory's classification and on the prevalence of the dental caries of distal surface of the mandibular 2nd molar adjacent to the mandibular 3rd molars turned anteriorly. The results are as follow; 1. It was found that the largest case number was class I (272 cases, 52.9%) in the relation of the tooth to the ramus of the mandible and 2nd molar. 2. The mesio-angular position was the largest number (239 cases, 46.5%) in the relation of the long axis of the impacted mandibular 3rd molar to the long axis of the 2nd molar. 3. The mesio-angular position of class I was the largest number (140 cases, 27.2%) in the relation of the tooth to the ramus of the mandible and 2nd molar and the long axis of the impacted mandibular 3rd moral to the long axis of the 2nd molar. 4. The average angle of the long axis of mandibular 3rd molar in mesioangular position or horizontal position to the occlusal plane was 143 W 5. Mandibular 3rd molar with lesion such as dental cries or pericoronitis was 73 cases (14.2). 6. The caries incidence rate of the distal surface of the 2nd molar was about 3.1%.

  12. Bilateral lower second molar impaction in teenagers: An emergent problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinohara Elio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of simultaneously impacted second and third molars in teenagers is increasing and becoming a common occurrence in adolescent oral surgery practice. The traditional treatment is the removal of the third molar by conventional access but repositioning of the surgical flap to the distal face of the first molar can predispose to complications such as pericoronitis and delayed healing of the attached gingiva. We present a case in which we use the germectomy approach to remove the impacted third molar for the eruption of the second molar through a vestibular incision. This incision offers excellent bone exposure and exit route for the third molar without disturbing the gingiva attached architecture on the distal face of the first molar providing good healing environment.

  13. Phase equilibria and excess molar volumes of tetrahydrofuran (1) + deuterium oxide (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejcek, P.; Matous, J.; Novak, J.P.; Pick, J.

    1975-01-01

    Vapour + liquid equilibrium at 313.15 and 333.15K, liquid + liquid equilibrium throughout the whole region of limited miscibility, and excess molar volumes at 298.15K have been studied for tetrahydrofuran + deuterium oxide. The mixtures show large positive deviations from Raoult's law and a closed loop of limited miscibility. The modified Redlich-Kister equation has been used for the correlation of the vapour + liquid equilibrium. The computation has been carried out according to a recently proposed procedure which makes it possible to obtain such constants of the correlation relation which are not inconsistent with physical reality, i.e. with the complete miscibility (partial delta 2 G/deltax 1 2 >0) under experimental conditions. Thermodynamic consistency was checked by the classical Redlich-Kister test and the one proposed by Ulrichson and Stevenson. Excess molar volumes are negative at all compositions with a point of inflexion in the water-rich region which indicates the extremes in partial molar volumes. (author)

  14. Third molar development: measurements versus scores as age predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, P W; Fieuws, S; Willems, G

    2011-10-01

    Human third molar development is widely used to predict chronological age of sub adult individuals with unknown or doubted age. For these predictions, classically, the radiologically observed third molar growth and maturation is registered using a staging and related scoring technique. Measures of lengths and widths of the developing wisdom tooth and its adjacent second molar can be considered as an alternative registration. The aim of this study was to verify relations between mandibular third molar developmental stages or measurements of mandibular second molar and third molars and age. Age related performance of stages and measurements were compared to assess if measurements added information to age predictions from third molar formation stage. The sample was 340 orthopantomograms (170 females, 170 males) of individuals homogenously distributed in age between 7 and 24 years. Mandibular lower right, third and second molars, were staged following Gleiser and Hunt, length and width measurements were registered, and various ratios of these measurements were calculated. Univariable regression models with age as response and third molar stage, measurements and ratios of second and third molars as predictors, were considered. Multivariable regression models assessed if measurements or ratios added information to age prediction from third molar stage. Coefficients of determination (R(2)) and root mean squared errors (RMSE) obtained from all regression models were compared. The univariable regression model using stages as predictor yielded most accurate age predictions (males: R(2) 0.85, RMSE between 0.85 and 1.22 year; females: R(2) 0.77, RMSE between 1.19 and 2.11 year) compared to all models including measurements and ratios. The multivariable regression models indicated that measurements and ratios added no clinical relevant information to the age prediction from third molar stage. Ratios and measurements of second and third molars are less accurate age predictors

  15. Nitrogen and argon doping of niobium for superconducting radio frequency cavities: a pathway to highly efficient accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassellino, A.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D.; Melnychuk, O.; Trenikhina, Y.; Crawford, A.; Rowe, A.; Wong, M.; Khabiboulline, T.; Barkov, F.

    2013-10-01

    We report a surface treatment that systematically improves the quality factor of niobium radio frequency cavities beyond the expected limit for niobium. A combination of annealing in a partial pressure of nitrogen or argon gas and subsequent electropolishing of the niobium cavity surface leads to unprecedented low values of the microwave surface resistance, and an improvement in the efficiency of the accelerating structures up to a factor of 3, reducing the cryogenic load of superconducting cavities for both pulsed and continuous duty cycles. The field dependence of the surface resistance is reversed compared to standardly treated niobium.

  16. Are Hypomineralized Primary Molars and Canines Associated with Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Figueiredo Sé, Maria Jose; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; de Cassia Loiola Cordeiro, Rita; Cabral, Renata Nunes; Leal, Soraya Coelho

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of and relationship between hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM) and hypomineralized primary canines (HPC) with molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in 1,963 schoolchildren. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) criterion was used for scoring HSPM/HPC and MIH. Only children with four permanent first molars and eight incisors were considered in calculating MIH prevalence (n equals 858); for HSPM/HPC prevalence, only children with four primary second molars (n equals 1,590) and four primary canines (n equals 1,442) were considered. To evaluate the relationship between MIH/HSPM, only children meeting both criteria cited were considered (n equals 534), as was true of MIH/HPC (n equals 408) and HSPM/HPC (n equals 360; chi-square test and logistic regression). The prevalence of MIH was 14.69 percent (126 of 858 children). For HSPM and HPC, the prevalence was 6.48 percent (103 of 1,592) and 2.22 percent (32 of 1,442), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between MIH and both HSPM/HPC (PMIH based on HSPM was 6.31 (95 percent confidence interval [CI] equals 2.59 to 15.13) and for HPC was 6.02 (95 percent CI equals 1.08 to 33.05). The results led to the conclusion that both hypomineralized second primary molars and hypomineralized primary canines are associated with molar-incisor hypomineralization, because children with HSPM/HPC are six times more likely to develop MIH.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF MANDIBULAR THIRD MOLAR SURGERY TO PRESERVE PERIODONTAL HEALTH OF SECOND MOLAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elitsa G. Deliverska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extraction of impacted third molar violates surrounding soft and bony tissues. Various surgical approaches and surgical technics have an important impact on the periodontal health of the adjacent second molar. Purpose: The aim of this review is to analyse the causes that can affect postoperative periodontal outcomes for the mandibular second molars (LM2 adjacent to the impacted/ semi impacted mandibular third molars (LM3. Material and Methods: Electronic searches were conducted through the MEDLINE (PubMed, Scopus, etc. databases to screen all relevant articles published from inception to April 2017. Results: Different flap techniques had no significant impact on the probing depth reduction or on the clinical attachment level of LM2. Szmyd and paramarginal flap designs may be the most effective in reducing the probing depth after third molar surgery, and the envelope flap may be the least effective. Use of bone substitutes and guided tissue regeneration therapy has been proposed, to eliminate or prevent these periodontal defects, but there is still no consensus on their predictability or clinical benefit. Higher costs and the risk of postoperative inflammatory complications should also be taken into proper account, as with any surgical procedure. “Orthodontic extraction” is indicated for that impacted M3 that present a high risk of postoperative periodontal defects at the distal aspect of adjacent M2. Conclusion: Risk factors associated with bone loss following lower third molar extraction includes age, the direction of the eruption, preoperative bone defects, and resorbtion of the LM2 root surface. Prevention of such periodontal defects continues to challenge clinicians.

  18. A finite element analysis of the stress distribution to the mandible from impact forces with various orientations of third molars*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-feng; Wang, Russell; Baur, Dale A.; Jiang, Xian-feng

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stress distribution to the mandible, with and without impacted third molars (IM3s) at various orientations, resulting from a 2000-Newton impact force either from the anterior midline or from the body of the mandible. Materials and methods: A 3D mandibular virtual model from a healthy dentate patient was created and the mechanical properties of the mandible were categorized to 9 levels based on the Hounsfield unit measured from computed tomography (CT) images. Von Mises stress distributions to the mandibular angle and condylar areas from static impact forces (Load I-front blow and Load II left blow) were evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA). Six groups with IM3 were included: full horizontal bony, full vertical bony, full 450 mesioangular bony, partial horizontal bony, partial vertical, and partial 450 mesioangular bony impaction, and a baseline group with no third molars. Results: Von Mises stresses in the condyle and angle areas were higher for partially than for fully impacted third molars under both loading conditions, with partial horizontal IM3 showing the highest fracture risk. Stresses were higher on the contralateral than on the ipsilateral side. Under Load II, the angle area had the highest stress for various orientations of IM3s. The condylar region had the highest stress when IM3s were absent. Conclusions: High-impact forces are more likely to cause condylar rather than angular fracture when IM3s are missing. The risk of mandibular fracture is higher for partially than fully impacted third molars, with the angulation of impaction having little effect on facture risk. PMID:29308606

  19. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisel, Mark

    2011-01-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76 Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m 3 of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m 3 (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10 3 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10 -2 cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural 42 Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  20. Study of a microwave discharge in argon/helium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saada, Serge

    1983-01-01

    A discharge created by a surface wave in Argon-Helium mixture is studied. First, the helium influence on plasma parameters has been studied (electron density, electric field, effective collision frequency, etc...), then, on excitation processes in the discharge. Relations between plasma lines, electron density and electric field have been established. [fr

  1. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... thermal conductivity. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...

  2. DWBA calculation of positron impact ionization of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campeanu, R I; Alam, M, E-mail: campeanu@yorku.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2011-01-01

    The ionization of the 3p and 3s orbitals of argon by 200 eV incident positrons is studied with the DWBA approximation. Our TDCS results for the 3p orbital ionization are found to be in good agreement with recent CDW-EIS data.

  3. Plasma flow in a pressure pulsed argon cascade arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, J.C.M.; Bol, L.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Timmermans, C.J.; Timmermans, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Flowing thermal plasmas are frequently used e . g. in welding, cutting, plasma deposition and testing materials at high temperatures . In most of the applications the geometry is complex . In the cascade arc the argon plasma flows through a straight circular channel with a constant area. The study

  4. Emission spectroscopy on a supersonically expanding argon/silane plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeusen, G.J.; Ershov-Pavlov, E.A.; Meulenbroeks, R.F.G.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Schram, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Results from emission spectroscopy measurements on an Ar/SiH/sub 4/ plasma jet which is used for fast deposition of amorphous hydrogenated silicon are presented. The jet is produced by allowing a thermal cascaded arc plasma in argon (I=60 A, V=80 V, Ar flow=60 scc/s and pressure 4*10/sup 4/ Pa) to

  5. An integrated calibration system for liquid argon calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Marschalkowski, E; Mense, T; Nürnberger, H A; Schäfer, U

    1999-01-01

    A novel technical solution for an integrated version of the pulse generator of a calibration system for liquid argon calorimeters is presented. It consists of a differential amplifier with automatic offset compensation, a current mirror and a switching logic. These components are integrated on an ASIC chip in CMOS technology. The technical realisation as well as results on the performance are presented. (author)

  6. Aging tests of ethylene contaminated argon/ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atac, M.; Bauer, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report on aging tests of argon/ethane gas with a minor (1800 ppM) component of ethylene. The measurements were first conducted with the addition of alcohol to test the suppression of aging by this additive, with exposure up to ∼1.5 C/cm. Tests have included: a proportional tube with ethanol, another with isopropyl alcohol, and for comparison a tube has also been run with ethanol and argon/ethane from CDF's old (ethylene-free) ethane supply. The aging test with ethanol showed no difference between the ethylene-free and the ethylene tube. Furthermore, raw aging rates of argon/ethane and argon/ethane/ethylene were measured by exposing tubes without the addition of alcohol to about 0.1 C/cm. Again, no significant difference was observed. In conclusion, we see no evidence that ethylene contamination up to 1800 ppM has any adverse effect on wire aging. However, this level of ethylene does seem to significantly suppress the gas gain

  7. Risk assessment for Argon-41 in RP-10 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas C, J.; Alarcon V, P.

    1987-01-01

    An evaluation of the radiological risk during normal operations of the Peruvian 10 Mw research reactor was performed. The noble gas, Argon-41 produced from activation of Ar-40 from the air contained in the irradiation tubes, thermal column and coolant, is analyzed as the major source of risk

  8. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Suarez Guevara, Maria Josefina; Attique, Fahmida

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate (Y(C5H11CO2)3)·xH2O in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction at a laboratory Cu-tube source and in-situ experiments at a synchrotron radiation source as well as hot...

  9. Thermal decomposition of Yttrium(III) isovalerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of yttrium(III) isovalerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, FTIR-spectroscopy, hot-stage optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction with a laboratory Cu-tube source as well as with a synchrotron radiation source...

  10. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, in-situ synchrotron diffraction and hot-stage microscopy as well as room temperature optical microscopy. Melting...

  11. Characterising argon-bomb balloons for high-speed photography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olivier, M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A method to optimise the geometry, explosive charge mass and volume of an argon bomb for specific lighting requirements has been proposed. The method is specifically aimed at applications that require photographic diagnostics with ultra-high speed...

  12. Measurement of the argon plasma temperature by use of pyrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fanhou; Jing Fuqian

    2002-01-01

    The author describes in detail how to use pyrometer to measure the plasma temperature. The temperatures of shock-generated argon plasmas are given in the present work. Measured results of temperature-pressure curve are compared with calculated results using Saha-Debye-Huckel model, which are in good agreement

  13. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...

  14. Enhanced high-order harmonic generation from Argon-clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Yin; Hagmeijer, Rob; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Goh, S.J.; van der Slot, P.J.M.; Biedron, S.; Milton, S.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2017-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in clusters is of high promise because clusters appear to offer an increased optical nonlinearity. We experimentally investigate HHG from Argon clusters in a supersonic gas jet that can generate monomer-cluster mixtures with varying atomic number density and

  15. Study of Hydrogen Pumping through Condensed Argon in Cryogenic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K A; Bhatt, S B

    2012-01-01

    In ultra high vacuum (UHV) range, hydrogen is a dominant residual gas in vacuum chamber. Hydrogen, being light gas, pumping of hydrogen in this vacuum range is limited with widely used UHV pumps, viz. turbo molecular pump and cryogenic pump. Pre condensed argon layers in cryogenic pump create porous structure on the surface of the pump, which traps hydrogen gas at a temperature less than 20° K. Additional argon gas injection in the cryogenic pump, at lowest temperature, generates multiple layers of condensed argon as a porous frost with 10 to 100 A° diameters pores, which increase the pumping capacity of hydrogen gas. This pumping mechanism of hydrogen is more effective, to pump more hydrogen gas in UHV range applicable in accelerator, space simulation etc. and where hydrogen is used as fuel gas like tokamak. For this experiment, the cryogenic pump with a closed loop refrigerator using helium gas is used to produce the minimum cryogenic temperature as ∼ 14° K. In this paper, effect of cryosorption of hydrogen is presented with different levels of argon gas and hydrogen gas in cryogenic pump chamber.

  16. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hebner, G A

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s sub 5 and 1s sub 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s sub 5 level is metastable and the 1s sub 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the disch...

  17. Turbulence and transport in a magnetized argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pots, B.F.M.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study on turbulence and transport in the highly ionized argon plasma of a hollow cathode discharge is described. In order to determine the plasma parameters three standard diagnostics have been used, whilst two diagnostics have been developed to study the plasma turbulence. (Auth.)

  18. Study of Liquid Argon Dopants for LHC Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron calorimetry based on the Liquid Argon Ionisation Chamber technique is one of the choice techniques for LHC-experimentation. A systematic study of the effect of selected dopants on Liquid Argon (LAr) will be carried out with the aim to achieve an improvement on: \\item (i)~``Fast Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the drift velocity. It has been already shown that CH&sub4. added at a fraction of one percent increases the drift velocity by a factor of two or more. \\item (ii)~``Compensated Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the response to densely ionising particles, resulting in improved compensation, such as photosensitive dopants. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Monitoring of the parameters involved in understanding the response of a calorimeter is essential. In case of doped LAr, the charge yield, the non-saturated drift velocity and the electron lifetime in the liquid should be precisely and simultaneously monitored as they all vary with the level of dopant concentrati...

  19. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisel, Mark

    2011-04-13

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m{sup 3} (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  20. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksa, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps.The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read-out channels after cool down will be reported. End 2004 the ATLAS barrel electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter was installed in the ATLAS cavern and since summer 2005 the front-end electronics are being connected and tested. Results of this first commissioning phase will be shown to demonstrate the high standards of quality control for our detectors

  1. Apparatus to measure vapor pressure, differential vapor pressure, liquid molar volume, and compressibility of liquids and solutions to the critical point. Vapor pressures, molar volumes, and compressibilities of protiobenzene and deuteriobenzene at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooner, Z.S.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure differences between two similar liquids, such as isotopic isomers, or between a solution and its reference solvent at temperatures and pressures extending to the critical point is described. Vapor-phase volume is minimized and pressure is transmitted to the transducer through the liquid, thereby avoiding several experimental difficulties. Liquid can be injected into the heated part of the system by volumetrically calibrated screw injectors, thus permitting measurements of liquid molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity. The addition of a high-pressure circulating pump and injection valve allows the apparatus to be employed as a continuous dilution differential vapor pressure apparatus for determining partial molar free energies of solution. In the second part of the paper data on the vapor pressure, molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity and their isotope effects for C 6 H 6 and C 6 D 6 from room temperature to near the critical temperature are reported

  2. Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar heat capacities of aqueous D-lactose · H2O at temperatures from (278.15 to 393.15) K and at the pressure 0.35 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, J.D.; Niederhauser, T.L.; Woolley, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Apparent molar volumes V phi and apparent molar heat capacities C p,phi were determined for aqueous solutions of D-lactose · H 2 O at molalities (0.01 to 0.34) mol · kg -1 at temperatures (278.15 to 393.15) K, and at the pressure 0.35 MPa. Our V phi values were calculated from densities obtained using a vibrating tube densimeter, and our C p,phi values were obtained using a twin fixed-cell, power-compensation, differential-output, temperature-scanning calorimeter. Our results for D-lactose(aq) and for D-lactcose · H 2 O were fitted to functions of m and T and compared with the literature results for aqueous D-glucose and D-galactose solutions. Infinite dilution partial molar volumes V 2 compfn and heat capacities C p,2 compfn are given over the range of temperatures

  3. Mandibular molar with five root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Fernando Branco; Dotto, Sidney Ricardo; Reis, Magda de Sousa; Ferreira, Ronise; Travassos, Rosana Maria Coelho

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the importance of knowledge of the internal anatomy of root canals for the success of endodontic treatment. Lack of knowledge of anatomic variations and their characteristics in different teeth has been pointed out as one of the main causes of endodontic therapy failure. In this report, the authors describe the endodontic treatment of a mandibular first molar with five root canals, evaluate the rate of occurrence of this number of canals, and discuss the importance of their identification and treatment.

  4. Observations of acoustic-wave-induced superluminescence in an argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramyan, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that in an argon discharge plasma it is possible to obtain overpopulation of certain electronic levels of atomic argon under the influence of acoustic waves. When the specified threshold is exceeded, then a superluminescence (in the form of light flashes) from the overpopulated electronic levels of atomic argon is observed

  5. Root growth during molar eruption in extant great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jay; Dean, Christopher; Ross, Sasha

    2009-01-01

    While there is gradually accumulating knowledge about molar crown formation and the timing of molar eruption in extant great apes, very little is known about root formation during the eruption process. We measured mandibular first and second molar root lengths in extant great ape osteological specimens that died while either the first or second molars were in the process of erupting. For most specimens, teeth were removed so that root lengths could be measured directly. When this was not possible, roots were measured radiographically. We were particularly interested in the variation in the lengths of first molar roots near the point of gingival emergence, so specimens were divided into early, middle and late phases of eruption based on the number of cusps that showed protein staining, with one or two cusps stained equated with immediate post-gingival emergence. For first molars at this stage, Gorilla has the longest roots, followed by Pongo and Pan. Variation in first molar mesial root lengths at this stage in Gorilla and Pan, which comprise the largest samples, is relatively low and represents no more than a few months of growth in both taxa. Knowledge of root length at first molar emergence permits an assessment of the contribution of root growth toward differences between great apes and humans in the age at first molar emergence. Root growth makes up a greater percentage of the time between birth and first molar emergence in humans than it does in any of the great apes. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Taking advantage of an unerupted third molar: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Figueiredo Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Treatments with dental surgery seek to displace tooth to the correct position within the dental arch. Objective: To report a clinical case that took advantage of an unerupted third molar. Case history: A male patient, 18 years of age, was referred by his dentist to evaluate the third molars. The clinical exam revealed no visible lower third molars. The computed tomography (CT exam showed the presence of a supernumerary tooth in the region of the mandibular ramus, on the left side, and impaction of the third molar, which was causing root resorption on the second molar, thus making it impossible to remain in the buccal cavity. The preferred option, therefore, was to remove both second molar and the supernumerary tooth, in addition to attaching a device to the third molar during surgery for further traction. Results: After 12 months, the third molar reached the proper position. Conclusion: When a mandibular second permanent molar shows an atypical root resorption, an impacted third molar can effectively substitute the tooth by using an appropriate orthodontic-surgical approach.

  7. Onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagrell, Tobias G; Salmon, Phil; Melin, Lisa; Norén, Jörgen G

    2013-01-01

    The etiological factors and timing of the onset of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) are still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine ground radial and sagittal sections from teeth diagnosed with MIH using light microscopy, polarized light microscopy and X-ray micro-computed tomography (XMCT) and to estimate the onset and timing of the MIH and to relate the hypomineralized enamel to the incremental lines. Thirteen extracted permanent first molars diagnosed MIH, were analyzed with light microscopy and XMCT. The hypomineralized areas were mainly located in the mesio-buccal cusps, starting at the enamel-dentin-junction and continuing towards the enamel surface. In a relative gray scale analysis the values decreased from the EDJ towards the enamel surface. The findings indicate that the ameloblasts in the hypomineralized enamel are capable of forming an enamel of normal thickness, but with a substantial reduction of their capacity for maturation of enamel. Chronologically, it is estimated that the timing of the disturbance is at a period during the first 6-7 months of age.

  8. Sealing Occlusal Dentin Caries in Permanent Molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Vibeke; Borum, Mette Kit; Møller, Kirsten Dynes

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of postponing restorative intervention of manifest occlusal caries in young, permanent dentition by non-invasive sealing. This RCT-designed study included 521 occlusal lesions in 521 patients aged 6 to 17 y. Based on clinical and radiog......The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of postponing restorative intervention of manifest occlusal caries in young, permanent dentition by non-invasive sealing. This RCT-designed study included 521 occlusal lesions in 521 patients aged 6 to 17 y. Based on clinical...... longevity of sealings and restorations until retreatments, and 3) compare effectiveness of sealings and restorations to halt caries progression in sealed lesions and beneath restorations. Furthermore, we aimed to identify factors influencing longevity and the effectiveness of sealings and restorations.......001). The median survival time for sealings not replaced by restorations was 7.3 y (CI, 6.4 y to NA). Survival of sealings was increased in patients with low caries risk and/or excellent oral hygiene, second molars compared with first molars, and lesions not extending the middle one-third of the dentin. Survival...

  9. Extrações de molares na Ortodontia Molar extractions in orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antônio Schroeder

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento ortodôntico com extração de molares em pacientes adultos é tecnicamente mais complexo, devido a inúmeros fatores. Em geral, o espaço a ser fechado é maior do que o espaço dos pré-molares e, por isso, a ancoragem é crítica e o tempo de tratamento mais longo. É comum esses casos apresentarem algum grau de comprometimento periodontal por causa da idade dos pacientes e, portanto, necessitam de maior controle da mecânica ortodôntica para reduzir os efeitos colaterais do fechamento do espaço. Por isso, bons resultados de finalização são mais difíceis de ser alcançados. Sendo assim, este artigo tem como objetivo apresentar as razões para a indicação de extração de molares nos tratamentos ortodônticos, as contraindicações, as diferentes fases da mecânica ortodôntica, esclarecer os fatores envolvidos nesse tipo de planejamento e tratamento e apresentar casos clínicos tratados com extração de molares.Orthodontic treatment with extraction of molars in adult patients is technically more complex due to a number of factors. In general, the space to be closed is greater than premolar spaces rendering critical anchorage and longer treatment time. Often such cases exhibit some degree of periodontal involvement due to patient age. Hence, the need for greater control over orthodontic mechanics to reduce the side effects of space closure. Therefore, good finishing results can be more difficult to achieve. Thus, the purpose of this article is to determine the reasons for molar extraction indications, describe different stages of orthodontic mechanics, and explain the issues involved in this kind of planning and treatment. Additionally, it aims at describing some treatments with molar extractions.

  10. Autotransplantation of Mandibular Third Molar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabbati Ravi kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous transplantation is a feasible, fast, and economical option for the treatment of nonsalvageable teeth when a suitable donor tooth is available. This paper presents successful autotransplantation of a mature mandibular left third molar (38 without anatomical variances is used to replace a mandibular left second molar (37. The mandibular second molar was nonrestorable due to extensive root caries and resorption of distal root. After extraction of mandibular second and third molars, root canal therapy was done for the third molar extraorally, and the tooth was reimplanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. After one year, clinical and radiographic examination revealed satisfactory outcome with no signs or symptoms suggestive of pathology. In selected cases, autogenous tooth transplantation, even after complete root formation of the donor tooth, may be considered as a practical treatment alternative to conventional prosthetic rehabilitation or implant treatment.

  11. Survival of sealants in molars affected by molar-incisor hypomineralization: 18-month follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Maria Bullio FRAGELLI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical survival of sealants applied in first permanent molars (FPMs affected by molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH, at 18 months of follow-up. Forty-one first permanent molars were selected from 21 children, 6–8 years of age. MIH was classified by one calibrated examiner (kappa = 0.80 according to EAPD criteria. The inclusion criteria were fully erupted FPMs with MIH or sound FPMs (without MIH for which sealant treatment was indicated. The FPMs were assigned to two groups: CG (control group and HG (MIH group. Both groups were treated with sealant (FluroShield. Clinical follow-up was performed from baseline to 18 months to assess anatomical form, marginal adaptation, retention and presence of caries, according to criteria set by the United States Public Health Service-Modified, and was conducted by a blinded examiner (kappa = 0.80. The actuarial method was used to evaluate the survival of the sealants. The survival rates for the groups were compared using Fisher’s exact test (α = 5%. The cumulative survival rates were 81% at 1 month, 68.8% at 6 months, 68.8% at 12 months, and 62.6% at 18 months for CG, and 88% at 1 month, 84% at 6 months, 76% at 12 months, and 72% at 18 months for HG. No significant difference was found between the groups. The sealants in molars affected by MIH presented a survival rate similar to the sealants in the control, suggesting that sealants may be an adequate approach for preventing carious lesions in MIH-affected molars.

  12. Molar concentration-depth profiles at the solution surface of a cationic surfactant reconstructed with angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chuangye; Morgner, Harald

    2011-01-01

    In the current work, we first reconstructed the molar fraction-depth profiles of cation and anion near the surface of tetrabutylammonium iodide dissolved in formamide by a refined calculation procedure, based on angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. In this calculation procedure, both the transmission functions of the core levels and the inelastic mean free paths of the photoelectrons have been taken into account. We have evaluated the partial molar volumes of surfactant and solvent by the densities of such solutions with different bulk concentrations. With those partial molar volumes, the molar concentration-depth profiles of tetrabutylammonium ion and iodide ion were determined. The surface excesses of both surfactant ions were then achieved directly by integrating these depth profiles. The anionic molar concentration-depth profiles and surface excesses have been compared with their counterparts determined by neutral impact ion scattering spectroscopy. The comparisons exhibit good agreements. Being capable of determining molar concentration-depth profiles of surfactant ions by core levels with different kinetic energies may extend the applicable range of ARXPS in investigating solution surfaces.

  13. Unusal canal configuration in maxillary and mandibular second molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Ragunathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical article describes three different case reports of maxillary and mandibular second molars with the unusual anatomy of single root with a single canal and their endodontic management. An unusual case of bilateralism is observed in the first two cases in the form of single-rooted second mandibular molars in both the quadrant of the same patient. The presence of maxillary second molar with single root and single canal in the third case is unusual.

  14. [Orthodontic Management of the Impacted Mandibular Second Molar Tooth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Michael; Takada, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    When the mandibular permanent second molar becomes impacted, it is identified as a malocclusion that needs treatment as it often leads to unwanted complications such as caries and periodontitis of the adjacent permanent first molar. Other less common complications include root resorption of the adjacent first molar root or continued root development to be in close proximity to the inferior dental alveolar nerve. This paper seeks to differentiate various levels of severity of impaction and review treatment options that are considered clinically available for the proper management of the impacted mandibular permanent second molar. Treatment options that will be discussed in this article include timing of second molar removal for replacement by the third molar, relief of impaction via second premolar removal, surgical repositioning and the combination of third molar removal, surgical exposure and orthodontic uprighting of the impacted tooth. Depending on the severity of the impaction, most impactions can be easily and predictably corrected with nickel titanium archwires or auxillary open coil springs or uprighting springs. Uncommonly, the mandibular permanent second molar can become severely impacted and in close proximity to the inferior dentoalveolar nerve. In these instances, the use of temporary anchorage devices such as microimplants has shown to be successful in uprighting the severely impacted mandibular permanent second molars. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  15. Epidemiological Status of Third Molars in an Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Sheikhi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Impaction of third molars is a common phenomenon. The incidence of impacted third molars varies in different populations. Objectives The aim of this study is to assess radiographic status (root development degree, angulation, and eruption level of the third molar in Iranian population via panoramic radiographs. Patients and Methods 647 patients, ranging in age from 17 - 25, were selected from three regions of Iran. Based on their panoramic radiographs, their root development degree, angulation, and eruption levels were analyzed. Results The angulation of upper third molars were vertical (44.6%, distoangular (44.1%, mesioangular (10.7%, and horizontal (0.6%. For lower third molars, the angulation was mesioangular (44.5%, vertical (33.8%, distoangular (12.2%, and horizontal (9.5%. The eruption levels of maxillary third molars were C > A> B, and for mandibular third molars they were A > B> C. The order of root development prevalence of the maxillary and mandibular third molars was complete > 2/3 > 1/3. Conclusions The most common status of impaction of the third molars in the maxilla was vertical angulation, level C of eruption, and complete root formation. In the mandible it was mesioangular, level A of eruption, and complete root formation. Since the study sample consists of patients from the north, middle, and south of Iran, the sample can represent the whole population of Iran.

  16. Apparent molar volumes and compressibilities of selected electrolytes in dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warminska, Dorota; Grzybkowski, Waclaw

    2010-01-01

    Densities at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K and sound velocities at T = 298.15 K of tetraphenylphosphonium bromide, sodium tetraphenylborate, sodium bromide, and sodium perchlorate in dimethylsulfoxide have been measured over the composition range from (0 to 0.3) mol . kg -1 . From these data, apparent molar volumes and apparent molar isentropic compressibilities at infinite dilution as well as the expansibilities have been evaluated. The results have been discussed in terms of employing tetraphenylphosphonium tetraphenylborate as a reference electrolyte in splitting the limiting apparent molar volumes and apparent molar isentropic compressibilities into ionic contributions.

  17. Excess molar volumes and isentropic compressibility of binary systems {trioctylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethysulfonyl)imide + methanol or ethanol or 1-propanol} at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibiya, P.N.; Deenadayalu, N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of densities for the binary systems of an ionic liquid and an alkanol at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 313.15) K. The IL is trioctylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [OMA] + [Tf 2 N] - and the alkanols are methanol, or ethanol, or 1-propanol. The speed of sound at T = 298.15 K for the same binary systems was also measured. The excess molar volumes and the isentropic compressibilities for the above systems were then calculated from the experimental densities and the speed of sound, respectively. Redlich-Kister smoothing polynomial equation was used to fit the excess molar volume and the deviation in isentropic compressibility data. The partial molar volumes were determined from the Redlich-Kister coefficients. For all the systems studied, the excess molar volumes have both negative and positive values, while the deviations in isentropic compressibility are negative over the entire composition range

  18. Application of the PFV EoS correlation to excess molar volumes of (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate + alkanols) at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deenadayalu, N.; Sen, S.; Sibiya, P.N.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental densities for the binary systems of an ionic liquid and an alkanol {1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate [EMIM] + [EtSO 4 ] - + methanol or 1-propanol or 2-propanol} were determined at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 313.15) K. The excess molar volumes for the above systems were then calculated from the experimental density values for each temperature. The Redlich-Kister smoothing polynomial was used to fit the experimental results and the partial molar volumes were determined from the Redlich-Kister coefficients. For all the systems studied, the excess molar volume results were negative over the entire composition range for all the temperatures. The excess molar volumes were correlated with the pentic four parameter virial (PFV) equation of state (EoS) model

  19. Readiness of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter for LHC Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D.C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barros, N.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bastos, J.; Bates, R.L.; Bathe, S.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; 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Caputo, R.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G D; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chren, D.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clements, D.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C.D.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Coluccia, R.; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Silva, P V M; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J.W.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Castro Faria Salgado, P E; De Cecco, S; de Graat, J; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Cruz Burelo, E; De La Taille, C; De Mora, L; De Oliveira Branco, M; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dean, S.; Deberg, H.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D.V.; Defay, P.O.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M; della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Dennis, C.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Domenico, A; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K; Dingfelder, D.J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M A B; Do Valle Wemans, A; Dobbs, M.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O.B.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen ,.M.; 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Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinovskaya, L.V.; Kalinowski, A.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V.A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A.N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R.D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M.S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V.A.; Kazarinov, M.Y.; Kazi, S.I.; Keates, J.R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P.T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Kelly, M.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Kholodenko, A.G.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kilvington, G.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.S.; Kim, P.C.; Kim, S.H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B.T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G.P.; Kirsch, L.E.; Kiryunin, A.E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E.B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P.F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E-E; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N.S.; Kneringer, E.; Ko, B.R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Köneke, K.; König, A.C.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kokott, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S.D.; Komar, A.A.; Komaragiri, J.R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A.I.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S.P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Koreshev, V.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E.V.; Korotkov, V.A.; Kortner, O.; Kostka, P.; Kostyukhin, V.V.; Kotamäki, M.J.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V.M.; Kotov, K.Y.; Koupilova, Z.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Koutsman, A.; 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Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solfaroli-Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V.V.; Sospedra-Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St Denis, R D; Stahl, T.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Strong, J.A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Suchkov, S.I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sviridov, Yu M; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G.P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P.K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Tevlin, C.M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thomas, T.L.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Tipton, P.; Tique-Aires-Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Tovey, S.N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D.G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; van der Poel, E; Van Der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Kesteren, Z; van Vulpen, I; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J.J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M; Villate, J.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaques, F; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A.P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.C.; Wang, S.M.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S.J.; Whitaker, S.P.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P.F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V.V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along eta (averaged over phi) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained u...

  20. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Montanari, D; Nessi, M; Norris, B

    2015-01-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these...

  1. The Liquid Argon Calorimeter system for the SLC Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, G.M.; Fox, J.D.; Smith, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    In this paper the physical packaging and the logical organization of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) electronics system for the Stanford Linear Collider Large Detector (SLD) at SLAC are described. This system processes signals from approximately 44,000 calorimeter towers and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged within the detector itself as opposed to an external electronics support rack. The signal path from the towers in the liquid argon through the vacuum to the outside of the detector is explained. The organization of the control logic, analog electronics, power regulation, analog-to-digital conversion circuits, and fiber optic drivers mounted directly on the detector are described. Redundancy considerations for the electronics and cooling issues are discussed. 12 refs., 5 figs

  2. Ionization relaxation in shock-heated krypton-argon mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezumi, Hiromichi; Kawamura, Masahiko; Yokota, Toshiaki.

    1977-01-01

    The ionization relaxation processes behind shock waves in pure krypton and krypton-argon mixtures have been investigated using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer technique. The incident shock velocity was fixed in the neighborhood of Us=2800 m/sec, and the initial pressure was fixed at 0.95 Torr. The experimental results were compared with theoretical values based on the two-step collisional ionization model taking into account of the wall boundary-layer effect. The slope constants of excitation cross section against relative kinetic energy between krypton atom-atom collisions, krypton atom-electron collisions, and krypton-argon atom-atom collisions were determined to be 4.2 x 10 -19 cm 2 /eV, 1.2 x 10 -17 cm 2 /eV, and 4.2 x 10 -19 cm 2 /eV, respectively. (auth.)

  3. Experimental investigations of helium cryotrapping by argon frost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, A.; Perinic, D.; Murdoch, D.; Boissin, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    At the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) cryopumping techniques are being investigated by which the gaseous exhausts from the NET/ITER reactor can be pumped out during the burn-and dwell-times. Cryosorption and cryotrapping are techniques which are suitable for this task. It is the target of the investigations to test the techniques under NET/ITER conditions and to determine optimum design data for a prototype. They involve measurement of the pumping speed as a function of the gas composition, gas flow and loading condition of the pump surfaces. The following parameters are subjected to variations: Ar/He ratio, specific helium volume flow rate, cryosurface temperature, process gas composition, impurities in argon trapping gas, three-stage operation and two-stage operation. This paper is a description of the experiments on argon trapping techniques started in 1990. Eleven tests as well as the results derived from them are described

  4. Opacity measurements in shock-generated argon plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D.

    1993-07-01

    Dense plasmas having uniform and constant density and temperature are generated by passage of a planar shock wave through gas. The opacity of the plasma is accurately measured versus wavelength by recording the risetime of emitted light. This technique is applicable to a wide variety of species and plasma conditions. Initial experiments in argon have produced plasmas with 2 eV temperatures, 0.004--0.04 g/cm{sup 3} densities, and coupling parameters {Gamma} {approximately}0.3--0.7. Measurements in visible light are compared with calculations using the HOPE code. An interesting peak in the capacity at 400 nm is observed for the first time and is identified with the 4s-5p transition in excited neutral argon atoms.

  5. The Erosion of Frozen Argon by Swift Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Graversen, O.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore unequivo......The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore...... unequivocally associated with electronic processes generated by the bombarding particle. In the present energy region, it is found that Y scales approximately as the electronic stopping power squared, depends on the charge state of the incoming helium ions, and perhaps more important, is independent...

  6. PERBEDAAN TOPICAL FLUORIDE APPLICATION DAN FISSURE SEALANT DALAM MENCEGAH KARIES PADAGIGI MOLAR SATU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawarti Pawarti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Topical Fluoride Application And Fissure Sealant To Prevent Dental Caries Permanent First Molars. Anatomy pits and fissures of teeth are caries initiation vulnerable areas of the permanent molars that grow at the age of 6 years where children can not perform oral hygiene. Caries prevention can be done by closing the pits and fissures or application of fluoride (topical fluoride application on the surface of the teeth. The purpose of this study was to analyze the difference fissure sealants and topical application of fluoride to prevent dental caries of first permanent molars. This study was a quasi-experimental study with time series, a sample was taken by purposive 117-second grade students of SDN District of North Pontianak. Data were analyzed using t-test. The result showed that fissure sealant more effective in caries prevention of first permanent molar than topical fluoride application where there were none caries teeth after and month fissure sealant, 25% sealant partially off and 11% fully off. Teeth that have done fluoride after 6 months of 3.9% of dental caries, the eighth month of 5.4% of dental caries. There was a significant difference between the effectiveness of fissure sealants with topical application of fluoride to prevent dental caries in first permanent molars p-value < 0.05, after 6-month p-value: 0.004 and after 8-month p-value: 0.001. Abstrak: Topical Fluoride Application Dan Fissure Sealant Untuk Mencegah Karies Pada Gigi Molar Satu Permanen. Anatomi pit dan fisura gigi merupakan daerah rentan inisiasi karies gigi molar satu permanen yang tumbuh pada usia 6 tahun anak belum bisa melakukan kebersihan mulutnya. Pencegahan karies dapat dilakukan dengan cara menutup pit dan fissure atau pengolesan fluor (topical fluoride application pada permukaan gigi. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk menganalisis perbedaan efektivitas fissure sealant dan topical fluoride application untuk mencegah karies gigi molar satu permanen anak

  7. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.

    2002-01-01

    ) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement......The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH2O2), acetic acid (C2H4O2), propionic acid (C3H6O2), butyric acid (C4H8O2), n-hexanoic acid (C6H12O2), n-caprylic acid (C8H16O2), lauric acid (C12H24O2), myristic acid (C14H28O2), palmitic acid (C16H32O2), oleic acid (C18H34O2...

  8. STATUS OF THE ATLAS LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER AND ITS PERFORMANCE

    CERN Document Server

    Berillari, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The liquid argon (LAr) calorimeters are used in ATLAS for all electromagnetic and for hadron calorimetry. The LAr calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two endcaps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The latest status of the detector as well as problems and solutions addressed during the last years will be presented. Aspects of operation of a large detector over a long time period will be summarized and selected topics showing the performance of the detector will be shown.

  9. Thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) butyrate in argon atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Xiao, Tang

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of La(C3H7CO2)3·xH2O (x≈0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5K/min. After the loss of bound H2O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135°C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180°C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate...

  10. Argon laser photocoagulation of cyclodialysis clefts after cataract surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, B. [Univ. of Lund, Dept. of Ophthalmology, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-06-01

    Three patients with cyclodialysis clefts, hypotony and hypotonic retinopathy subsequent to cataract surgery were treated with argon laser photocoagulation. The hypotony was reversed in each patient and their visual acuity was normalized. Laser photocoagulation is a noninvasive treatment that can be repeated easily and safely. The complications of the treatment are minor. A hypertensive episode commonly occurs in the early postoperative period. (au) 8 refs.

  11. Salving Distribution Information System on PT. Anugerah Argon Medica

    OpenAIRE

    Yunus, Halimah

    2015-01-01

    Medica's Argon godsend constitute moving firm at salving sell area filing system and its reporting is still utilize archives and ledger before utilizes.Data collecting on observational it utilizes to methodic observation, interview and `studi` is library.Meanwhile software development methods that is utilized is model Waterfall. Implementation of model Waterfall this was worded utilize `document`'s flowing charts, diagram context, `flow`'s data diagramdesignoutput` is input design databasedat...

  12. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters: integration, installation and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, Yu.

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end-caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters positioned in three cryostats. Since May 2006 the LAr barrel calorimeter records regular calibration runs and takes cosmic muon data together with tile hadronic calorimeter in the ATLAS cavern. The cosmic runs with end-cap calorimeters started in April 2007. First results of these combined runs are presented

  13. Presence of third molars in orthodontic patients from northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barka G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Georgia Barka,1 Georgios Tretiakov,1 Theodosios Theodosiou,2 Ioulia Ioannidou-Marathiotou31School of Dentistry, 2Biostatistics, Department of Informatics, School of Natural Sciences, 3Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, GreeceObjective: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the frequency of presence of third molar teeth and their distribution in each jaw and each side, according to sex, in a group of orthodontic patients with permanent dentition from northern Greece.Methods: The sample included panoramic radiographs from 220 patients with permanent dentition (mean age 13.62 ± 1.81. The Χ2 test was used to assess the relationships between the variables, and the Fisher's exact test was used in cases where the expected frequencies in each cell were <5.Results: The frequency of third molar presence was 79.1%, and 20.9% was the frequency of third molar agenesis. Intersexual differences in the number of third molars was not statistically significant. There was a correlation between the distribution of third molars on the right and the left side (Fisher's exact test = 100.788; P = 0. The two sides showed the same tendency toward the presence or absence of third molars. A correlation was also found between the distribution of maxillary and mandibular third molars (Fisher's exact test = 24.372; P = 0. In each jaw, the presence or absence of third molars was highly related to the number of third molars found in the other jaw.Conclusion: The present results showed that in this orthodontic group of northern Greek patients, presence accounted for 79.1% and agenesis for 20.9%. No significant difference was found between the frequencies of third molar presence on the left and right sides in either the maxilla or mandible.Keywords: third molars, presence, orthodontic population, Greeks

  14. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Barillari, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used in ATLAS for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region |eta|<3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry from |eta|=1.4 to |eta|=4.8. The calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two endcaps with electromagnetic (EMEC), hadronic (HEC) and forward (FCAL) calorimeters. The lead-liquid argon sampling technique with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the endcap (EMEC). This geometry allows a uniform acceptance over the whole azimuthal range without any gap. The hadronic endcap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with plate geometry and is subdivided into two wheels in depth per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules featuring cylindrical electrodes ...

  15. Muonium formation in xenon and argon up to 60 atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempton, J.R.; Senba, M.; Arseneau, D.J.; Gonzalez, A.C.; Pan, J.J.; Tempelmann, A.; Garner, D.M.; Fleming, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    Results of muon polarization studies in xenon and argon up to 60 atm are reported. In argon for pressures up to 10 atm, the muon polarization is best explained by an epithermalcharge exchange model. Above this pressure, the decrease in P D and increase in P L are ascribed to charge neutralization and spin exchange reactions, respectively, in the radiolysis track. Measurements with Xe/He mixtures with a xenon pressure of 1 atm indicate that the lost polarization in the pure xenon at this pressure is due to inefficient moderation of the muon. As the pressure in pure xenon is increased above 10 atm, we find that P L remains roughly constant and P D begins to increase. The lost fraction may be due to the formation of a XeMu Van der Waals type complex, while P D is ascribed to XeMu + formation. This suggests that spur processes appear to be less important in xenon that in argon. (orig.)

  16. Sodium evaporation into a forced argon flow, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumada, Toshiaki; Kasahara, Fumio; Ishiguro, Ryoji

    1976-01-01

    Measurements were made on the rate of evaporation from a rectangular-shaped free surface of liquid sodium into argon flow. Tests were carried out at various levels of sodium temperature, of argon velocity and of argon temperature, under conditions where fog formation could be expected. To gain information on the enhancement of evaporation occasioned by fog formation, a supplementary experiment was performed on convection heat transfer into flowing air from a heated plate of the same geometry as the free surface of the sodium in the preceding measurements. The values obtained for the rate of evaporation and Sherwood number were compared with those predicted by the heat transfer experiment and by the theory by Hill and Szekely. The overall results revealed that the rate of sodium evaporation can amount to as much as three times that predicted by the heat transfer experiment, and that it varies roughly linearly with the heat transfer rate and with the sodium vapor pressure prevailing at the free surface. (auth.)

  17. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, A.A.; Segreto, E.

    2016-01-01

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R and D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm 2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm 2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors

  18. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  19. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kočišek, J.; Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M.; Slavíček, P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H 2 O) n clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar + and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar + * and water opens leading to new products Ar n H + and (H 2 O) n H + . On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H 2 O) n H 2 2+ and (H 2 O) n 2+ ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent

  20. Properties of high pressure nitrogen-argon and nitrogen-xenon gas scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, W.; Huck, H.; Koeber, H.J.; Mertens, G.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations of scintillation light output and energy resolution have been made at pressures up to 90 atm in gaseous mixtures of nitrogen with both argon and xenon by stopping of 210 Po-alpha particles. In the absence of a wavelength shifter, the N 2 -Ar mixtures gave a maximum pulse height at a ratio of nitrogen to argon partial pressures rsub(N 2 /Ar) approximately =0.2. However, when using the wavelength shifter diphenyl stilbene (DPS), the measured light output was much larger at lower values of rsub(N 2 /Ar), whereas for rsub(N 2 /Ar)>0.2 pulse height and energy resolution of the studied N 2 -Ar mixtures were roughly indentical with and without DPS. The N 2 -Xe gas mixtures exhibited a similar dependence of pulse height and energy resolution to that of the N 2 -Ar mixtures employing DPS, but the pulse height was larger by a factor of about 7. A 40 atm 50% N 2 -50% Xe gas scintillator showed an energy resolution ΔE/E=0.25, while an 80 atm 75% N 2 -25% Xe scintillator gave ΔE/E=0.6. The pulse height from the 80 atm N 2 -Xe scintillator was smaller by a factor of about 240 than the pulse height from a 20 atm pure Xe gas scintillator, but larger by a factor of about 20 than the pulse height from a 75 atm pure N 2 gas scintillator. The N 2 -Xe mixtures showed a remarkable increase of light output as the temperature of the gas was descreased. (Auth.)

  1. Sealing versus partial caries removal in primary molars: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesse, D.; Bonifácio, C.C.; Mendes, F.M.; Braga, M.M.; Imparato, J.C.P.; Raggio, D.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The resin-based pit and fissure sealant is considered a successful tool in caries prevention, however there is a growing evidence of its use in controlling already established caries in posterior teeth. The aim of this clinical trial is to verify the efficacy of pit and fissure sealants

  2. Microleakage of different adhesive systems in primary molars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and aim: This study aimed to examine the microleakage of class V cavities of primary molars prepared by either a conventional dental bur or Er:YAG laser and one of two different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 50 tooth samples from primary molars were used in this study. They were randomly assigned ...

  3. Changes in heart rate during third molar surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, M. H. J.; Schortinghuis, J.; Vissink, A.

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety is an undesirable psychological phenomenon. Patients are usually anxious when subjected to third molar surgery, but the pattern of anxiety is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the intensity and course of anxiety during third molar surgery. This study included 48 consecutive

  4. Taurodont molars: Review of literature and radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, T.; Wilson, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Taurodontic molar teeth are present as a clinical entity in modem man. This is a suggestion that the occurrence has a racial bias. The importance of the differential diagnosis of teeth with enlarged pulp is discussed, and the possible influence of taurodontic molars on treatment planning is outlined. (author)

  5. Management of inflammatory complications in third molar surgery: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pain, swelling and trismus are common complications associated with third molar surgery. These complications have been reported to have an adverse effect on the quality of life of patients undergoing third molar surgery. Objective: To review the different modalities of minimizing inflammatory complications in ...

  6. Excess molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities of binary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Excess molar volumes (E) and deviation in isentropic compressibilities (s) have been investigated from the density and speed of sound measurements of six binary liquid mixtures containing -alkanes over the entire range of composition at 298.15 K. Excess molar volume exhibits inversion in sign in one binary ...

  7. Molar incisor hypomineralisation: clinical management of the young patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Dympna

    2009-04-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) is a common developmental condition resulting in enamel defects in first permanent molars and permanent incisors. It presents at eruption of these teeth. Early diagnosis is essential since rapid breakdown of tooth structure may occur, giving rise to acute symptoms and complicated treatment. The purpose of this article is to review MIH and illustrate its clinical management in young children.

  8. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shembish, F.A.; Tong, H.; Kaizer, M.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava

  9. Variant root morphology of third mandibular molar in normal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mandibular third molar poses a challenge to dental surgeons due to it's unpredictable morphology which leads to increased difficulty during its extraction. The root morphology of the third molar is considered to be the most variable in the human dentition. The study aims to document these variations which will be useful ...

  10. Mass balance at partial run of quartzite carbothermal reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Węgrzyn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mass balance for the process of incomplete carbothermal reduction of SiO2 to SiC thermogravimetric studies was presented. Tests were performed for the molar ratio of C/SiO2 = 3 at a temperature of 1 500 °C under an argon flow in the range from 0,1 to 3,4 dm3/min. Mass balance includes the loss due to escape of SiO and the mass of reactants C and SiO2 due to stopping the reaction. The weight gain of Al2O3 crucible was found and also the formation of crust layer on the surface of the samples. The crucible weight gain and the weight of crust layer created were taken into account in mass balance.

  11. Prevalent of root resorption of second molar adjustment the impacted third molar in prepiacal and panoramic radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ebrahimi Saravi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Impacted third molar reduces the bone level in the distal aspect of second molar, and sometimes it can lead to root resorption of the adjacent tooth. The purpose of this study was to determine this resorption using panoramic and periapical radiographs.   Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study 54 patient (28 men, 26 women above 15 years old with the average of 22 years in Oral and Maxillofacial Department of Tehran University were studied. A periapical radiography from the third molar and a panoramic radiograph were taken from each patient (Because of their routine use and evaluation of accuracy of panoramic compared with periapical, and the magnitude of the root resorption for the second molar was determined by 2 observers and written in a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Fisher test.   Results: The prevalence of the root resorption of the second molar adjacent to the impacted third molar in the panoramic and the periapical radiographies, with respect to the limitation of the sample size were 46.3% and 31.5%, respectively, with 95% confidence(P>0.05. Most of these resorptions were in the cervical third of the second molar roots and in cases in which the third molars were mesially oriented or horizontal. There was also no significant difference between panoramic and periapical radiographs.   Conclusion: Due to the increased risk of the resorption of the second molar adjacent to the third molar, extraction of the impacted third molars, especiall y mesially oriented or horizontal ones are recommended.

  12. Argon-41 production and evolution at the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor (OSTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anellis, L.G.; Johnson, A.G.; Higginbotham, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, argon-41 concentrations were measured at various locations within the reactor facility to assess the accuracy of models used to predict argon-41 evolution from the reactor tank, and to determine the relationship between argon gas evolution from the tank and subsequent argon-41 concentrations throughout the reactor room. In particular, argon-41 was measured directly above the reactor tank with the reactor tank lids closed, at other accessible locations on the reactor top with the tank lids both closed and open, and at several locations on the first floor of the reactor room. These measured concentrations were then compared to values calculated using a modified argon-41 production and evolution model for TRIGA reactor tanks and ventilation values applicable to the OSTR facility. The modified model was based in part on earlier TRIGA models for argon-41 production and release, but added features which improved the agreement between predicted and measured values. The approximate dose equivalent rate due to the presence of argon-41 in reactor room air was calculated for several different locations inside the OSTR facility. These dose rates were determined using the argon-41 concentration measured at each specific location, and were subsequently converted to a predicted quarterly dose equivalent for each location based on the reactor's operating history. The predicted quarterly dose equivalent values were then compared to quarterly doses measured by film badges deployed as dose-integrating area radiation monitors at the locations of interest. The results indicate that the modified production and evolution model is able to predict argon-41 concentrations to within a factor of ten when compared to the measured data. Quarterly dose equivalents calculated from the measured argon-41 concentrations and the reactor's operating history seemed consistent with results obtained from the integrating area radiation monitors. Given the argon-41 concentrations measured

  13. Impacted third molar transplantation on the malpracticed extraction socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soung Min; Amponsah, Emmanuel K

    2017-12-01

    Autotransplantation with or without endodontic therapy is regarded as an alternative treatment option for the replacement of missing teeth. A primary responsibility of a maxillofacial surgeon is to reverse any malpractice to promote successful outcomes and improve the patient's quality of life. This paper presents a malpractice case of incorrect extraction of the lower second molar instead of the impacted third molar. A simple technique of transplanting the impacted third molar to the site of the extracted second molar is introduced by a maxillofacial specialist in Ghana. By making an intentional root socket and fixation without using additional appliances, a novel second molar was achieved with complete recovery. This patient was followed after transplant for a four-year period with the best satisfaction. A grant of the Korean Health Technology R&D Project, Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea. (HI15C0689).

  14. PULPOTOMIES WITH PORTLAND CEMENT IN HUMAN PRIMARY MOLARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Taísa Regina; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Fornetti, Ana Paula Camolese; Moretti, Ana Beatriz Silveira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Lourenço, Natalino; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Abdo, Ruy Cesar Camargo

    2009-01-01

    Two clinical cases in which Portland cement (PC) was applied as a medicament after pulpotomy of mandibular primary molars in children are presented. Pulpotomy using PC was carried out in two mandibular first molars and one mandibular second molar, which were further followed-up. At the 3, 6 and 12-month follow-up appointments, clinical and radiographic examinations of the pulpotomized teeth and their periradicular area revealed that the treatments were successful in maintaining the teeth asymptomatic and preserving pulpal vitality. Additionally, the formation of a dentin bridge immediately below the PC could be observed in the three molars treated. PC may be considered as an effective alternative for primary molar pulpotomies, at least in a short-term period. Randomized clinical trials with human teeth are required in order to determine the suitability of PC before unlimited clinical use can be recommended. PMID:19148409

  15. Angulation change of the third molar tooth in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiansyah S. Pawinru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Impaction of the third molar tooth mandibular is often found in patients with orthodontic treatment. In orthodontic treatment, extraction cases of impaction of the third molar tooth are usually performed, but the patients often refuse this extraction. Extraction of premolar has a good effect on the third molar mandibular angulation during treatment. Material and Methods : This study is a retrospective clinical study with descriptive analytic to find out the effect of the first mandibular premolar tooth extraction to angulation change of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with a standard edgewise method. Angulation change was performed by comparing the third molar mandibular angulation before and after orthodontic treatment with panoramic radiographs. Angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular was calculated from the angle formed between the long axis of the tooth with the reference line infraorbita. Results : The sample comprised 60 of impacted mandibular third molar region of the left and right regions of 30 patients who had been treated declared cured in clinic of orthodontic specialist of Dentistry Faculty Padjadjaran University. The sample was divided into three (3 groups of patients before treatment angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular under 300, 300 to 600 and above 60o, then measured change of angulation and observed whether it increased, fixed or decreased. Results were analyzed by T- test and Wilcoxon test showed that there was a significant change in angulation of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction. Conclusion : This study is that the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction affects the angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular after orthodontic treatment.

  16. Dynamic study of the thermal stability of impure Ti3SiC2 in argon and air by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oo, Z.; Low, I.M; O'Connor, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic thermal stability and topotactic phase transition of impure Ti 3 SiC 2 in air and argon have been investigated by neutron diffraction (ND). In the presence of a low oxygen partial pressure as in argon, Ti 3 SiC 2 underwent a surface dissociation and TiC and/or Ti 5 Si 3 C were detected at 1200 deg. C. In contrast, oxide layers of rutile (TiO 2 ), TiO and cristobalite (SiO 2 ) were detected at ∼1000, 1250 and 1300 deg. C respectively when exposed to an oxygen-rich environment. Near-surface depth profiling of Ti 3 SiC 2 oxidized in air at 1200 deg. C by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) has revealed a distinct gradation in phase composition at the interface of homogeneous rutile and heterogeneous cristobalite-rutile layers

  17. Dynamic study of the thermal stability of impure Ti 3SiC 2 in argon and air by neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Z.; Low, I. M.; O'Connor, B. H.

    2006-11-01

    The dynamic thermal stability and topotactic phase transition of impure Ti 3SiC 2 in air and argon have been investigated by neutron diffraction (ND). In the presence of a low oxygen partial pressure as in argon, Ti 3SiC 2 underwent a surface dissociation and TiC and/or Ti 5Si 3C were detected at 1200 °C. In contrast, oxide layers of rutile (TiO 2), TiO and cristobalite (SiO 2) were detected at ∼1000, 1250 and 1300 °C respectively when exposed to an oxygen-rich environment. Near-surface depth profiling of Ti 3SiC 2 oxidized in air at 1200 °C by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) has revealed a distinct gradation in phase composition at the interface of homogeneous rutile and heterogeneous cristobalite-rutile layers.

  18. Tooth Wear Inclination in Great Ape Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sadler, Jordan; Fiorenza, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Primate dietary diversity is reflected in their dental morphology, with differences in size and shape of teeth. In particular, the tooth wear angle can provide insight into a species' ability to break down certain foods. To examine dietary and masticatory information, digitized polygon models of dental casts provide a basis for quantitative analysis of wear associated with tooth attrition. In this study, we analyze and compare the wear patterns of Pongo pygmaeus, Gorilla gorillagorilla and Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii lower molars, focusing on the degree of inclination of specific wear facets. The variation in wear angles appears to be indicative of jaw movements and the specific stresses imposed on food during mastication, reflecting thus the ecology of these species. Orangutans exhibit flatter wear angles, more typical of a diet consisting of hard and brittle foods, while gorillas show a wear pattern with a high degree of inclination, reflecting thus their more leafy diet. Chimpanzees, on the other hand, show intermediate inclinations, a pattern that could be related to their highly variable diet. This method is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for better understanding the relationship between food, mastication and tooth wear processes in living primates, and can be potentially used to reconstruct the diet of fossil species. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Densities, excess molar volumes, speeds of sound and isothermal compressibilities for {2-(2-hexyloxyethoxy)ethanol + n-alkanol} systems at temperatures between (288.15 and 308.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Amalendu; Gaba, Rekha

    2008-01-01

    The densities, ρ and the speeds of sound, u, for {2-(2-hexyloxyethoxy)ethanol (C 6 E 2 ) + methanol, +1-propanol, +1-pentanol, and +1-heptanol} have been measured as a function of composition using an Anton-Paar DSA 5000 densimeter at temperatures (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K and atmospheric pressure over the whole concentration range. The ρ and u values were used to calculate excess molar volumes, V E , and excess molar isentropic compressibility, K S,m E , respectively. Also, thermal expansivity, α, partial molar volume, V-bar i , and partial molar volume of the components at infinite dilution, V-bar i 0 , have been calculated. The variation of these properties with composition and temperature of the mixtures are discussed in terms of molecular interactions

  20. Ionizing Shocks in Argon. Part 2: Transient and Multi-Dimensional Effects (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    stability in ionizing monatomic gases. Part 1. Argon ,” J. Fluid Mech., 84, 55 (1978). 2M. P. F. Bristow and I. I. Glass, “ Polarizability of singly...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Ionizing Shocks in Argon . Part 2: Transient...Physics. 14. ABSTRACT We extend the computations of ionizing shocks in argon to unsteady and multi-dimensional, using a collisional-radiative

  1. The not-so-harmless maxillary primary first molar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, W M

    2000-12-01

    Premature loss of primary molars has been associated with space loss and eruptive difficulties, especially when the loss occurs to the primary second molars and when it occurs early. This has not been thought to be the case for primary first molars. The author revisited 13 cases from an earlier study on the effects of premature loss of maxillary primary molars. These longitudinal cases were scrutinized, using serial panoramic radiographs, to explain the irregular response in terms of dental migration. The author presents two case reports. In the earlier study, the author used digitized study casts and the concept of D + E space--the space occupied by the primary first and second molars--to describe the dental migration that occurred after premature tooth loss. Using analysis of variance on data generated using an instrument capable of measuring in tenths of millimeters, the author produced findings regarding the amount of space loss, rate of space loss, effect of age at loss, amount of space regained at the time of replacement by the permanent tooth and effect on Angle's classification. Finally, the author created a simulation describing directional change; this revealed that the maxillary primary first molar loss resulted in a mesial displacement of the permanent canine during eruption. When the maxillary primary first molar is lost prematurely, the first premolar erupts in a more mesial direction than normal, as a result of the mesial incline of the primary second molar, and consumes the space of the permanent canine, which becomes blocked out. Rather than use a space maintainer after the premature loss of the maxillary primary first molar, the author suggests, clinicians can choose from a number of other options for preventing the first premolar from erupting too far in a mesial direction.

  2. Study of a novel electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter - the TGT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Braunschweig, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Geulig, E. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Schoentag, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Siedling, R. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Wlochal, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Putzer, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Wotschack, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Cheplakov, A. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Feshchenko, A. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kazarinov, M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kukhtin, V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Ladygin, E. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Obudovskij, V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Geweniger, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Hanke, P. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Kluge, E.E. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Krause, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Schmidt, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Stenzel, H. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Tittel, K. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Wunsch, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Zerwas, D. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik; Bruncko, D. [Slovenska Akademia Vied, Kosice (Slovakia). Ustav Experimentalnej Fyziky; Jusko, A. [Slovenska Akademia Vied, Kosice (Slovakia). Ustav Experimentalnej Fyziky; Kocper, B.; RD33 Collaboration

    1994-11-01

    The concept and the basic design of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter are described. This novel calorimeter offers uniform energy response and constant energy resolution independent of the production angle of an impinging particle and of its impact position at the calorimeter. An example of a calorimeter with full rapidity coverage in an application in a collider detector is given. An important aspect of the concept is the electronics for fast signal processing matched to the short charge collection time. We report on the experience with the realization of a prototype calorimeter module and on its performance in a testbeam exposure. (orig.)

  3. Performance of the TGT liquid argon calorimeter and trigger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, W.; Geulig, E.; Schöntag, M.; Siedling, R.; Wlochal, M.; Wotschack, J.; Cheplakov, A.; Feshchenko, A.; Kazarinov, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Ladygin, E.; Obudovskij, V.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Kluge, E.-E.; Krause, J.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Zerwas, D.; Ban, J.; Bruncko, D.; Jusko, A.; Kocper, B.; Aderholz, M.; Brettel, H.; Dulny, B.; Dydak, F.; Fent, J.; Huber, J.; Jakobs, K.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Bogolyubsky, M. Y.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Levitsky, M. S.; Maksimov, V. V.; Minaenko, A. A.; Moiseev, A. M.; Semenov, P. A.; Tikhonov, V. V.

    1996-02-01

    A novel concept of a liquid argon calorimeter, the "Thin Gap Turbine" (TGT) calorimeter, is presented. A TGT test module, equipped with specially developed cold front-end electronics in radiation hard GaAs technology, has been operated in a particle beam. Results on its performance are given. A 40 MHz FADC system with a "circular data store" and standalone readout and play-back capability has been developed to test the properties of the TGT detector for trigger purposes. Results on trigger efficiency, response and energy resolution are given.

  4. Performance of the TGT liquid argon calorimeter and trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, W.; Geuling, E.; Schoentag, M.

    1996-03-01

    A novel concept of a liquid argon calorimeter, the thin gap turbine (TGT) calorimeter, is presented. A TGT test module, equipped with specially developed cold front-end electronics in radiation hard GaAs technology, has been operated in a particle beam. Results on its performance are given. A 40 MHz FADC system with a circular data store and standalone readout and playback capability has been developed to test the properties of the TGT detector for trigger purposes. Results on trigger efficiency, response and energy resolution are given. (orig.)

  5. Performance of the TGT liquid argon calorimeter and trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braunschweig, W.; Geulig, E.; Schoentag, M.; Siedling, R.; Wlochal, M.; Wotschack, J.; Cheplakov, A.; Feshchenko, A.; Kazarinov, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Ladygin, E.; Obudovskij, V.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Kluge, E.-E.; Krause, J.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Zerwas, D.; Ban, J.; Bruncko, D.; Jusko, A.; Kocper, B.; Aderholz, M.; Brettel, H.; Dulny, B.; Dydak, F.; Fent, J.; Huber, J.; Jakobs, K.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Bogolyubsky, M.Y.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Kiryunin, A.E.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Levitsky, M.S.; Maksimov, V.V.; Minaenko, A.A.; Moiseev, A.M.; Semenov, P.A.; Tikhonov, V.V. [Tech. Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Phys. Inst.]|[CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)]|[Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)]|[Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)]|[Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-21

    A novel concept of a liquid argon calorimeter, the ``thin gap turbine`` (TGT) calorimeter, is presented. A TGT test module, equipped with specially developed cold front-end electronics in radiation hard GaAs technology, has been operated in a particle beam. Results on its performance are given. A 40 MHz FADC system with a ``circular data store`` and standalone readout and play-back capability has been developed to test the properties of the TGT detector for trigger purposes. Results on trigger efficiency, response and energy resolution are given. (orig.).

  6. Performance of the TGT liquid argon calorimeter and trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, W.; Geulig, E.; Schoentag, M.

    1996-01-01

    A novel concept of a liquid argon calorimeter, the 'Thin Gap Turbine' (TGT) calorimeter, is presented. A TGT test module, equipped with specially developed cold front-end electronics in radiation hard GaAs technology, has been operated in a particle beam. Results on its performance are given. A 40 MHz FADC system with a 'circular data store' and standalone readout and playback capability has been developed to test the properties of the TGT detector for trigger purposes. Results on trigger efficiency, response and energy resolution are given. 12 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Study of a novel electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter TGT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Braunschweig, W.; Geulig, E.

    1994-01-01

    The concept and the basic design of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter are described. This novel calorimeter offers uniform energy response and constant energy resolution independent of the production angle of an impinging particle and of its impact position at the calorimeter. An example of a calorimeter with full rapidity coverage in an application in a collider detector is given. An important aspect of the concept is the electronics for fast signal processing matched to the short charge collection time. We report on the experience with the realization of a prototype calorimeter module and on its performance in a test beam exposure. 15 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Study of a novel electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter - the TGT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Braunschweig, W.; Geulig, E. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.] [and others

    1995-04-21

    The concept and the basic design of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter are described. This novel calorimeter offers uniform energy response and constant energy resolution independent of the production angle of an impinging particle and of its impact position at the calorimeter. An example of a calorimeter with full rapidity coverage in an application in a collider detector is given. An important aspect of the concept is the electronics for fast signal processing matched to the short charge collection time. We report on the experience with the realization of a prototype calorimeter module and on its performance in a testbeam exposure. ((orig.)).

  9. Study of a novel electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter - the TGT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Braunschweig, W.; Geulig, E.

    1995-01-01

    The concept and the basic design of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter are described. This novel calorimeter offers uniform energy response and constant energy resolution independent of the production angle of an impinging particle and of its impact position at the calorimeter. An example of a calorimeter with full rapidity coverage in an application in a collider detector is given. An important aspect of the concept is the electronics for fast signal processing matched to the short charge collection time. We report on the experience with the realization of a prototype calorimeter module and on its performance in a testbeam exposure. ((orig.))

  10. Performance of the TGT liquid argon calorimeter and trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, W.; Geulig, E.; Schoentag, M.; Siedling, R.; Wlochal, M.; Wotschack, J.; Cheplakov, A.; Feshchenko, A.; Kazarinov, M.; Kukhtin, V.; Ladygin, E.; Obudovskij, V.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Kluge, E.-E.; Krause, J.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Zerwas, D.; Ban, J.; Bruncko, D.; Jusko, A.; Kocper, B.; Aderholz, M.; Brettel, H.; Dulny, B.; Dydak, F.; Fent, J.; Huber, J.; Jakobs, K.; Oberlack, H.; Schacht, P.; Bogolyubsky, M.Y.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Kiryunin, A.E.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Levitsky, M.S.; Maksimov, V.V.; Minaenko, A.A.; Moiseev, A.M.; Semenov, P.A.; Tikhonov, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    A novel concept of a liquid argon calorimeter, the ''thin gap turbine'' (TGT) calorimeter, is presented. A TGT test module, equipped with specially developed cold front-end electronics in radiation hard GaAs technology, has been operated in a particle beam. Results on its performance are given. A 40 MHz FADC system with a ''circular data store'' and standalone readout and play-back capability has been developed to test the properties of the TGT detector for trigger purposes. Results on trigger efficiency, response and energy resolution are given. (orig.)

  11. Diffraction experiments of argon or helium on polluted surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, J.P.; Constans, A.; Daury, G.; Lostis, P.

    1975-01-01

    Scattering patterns of molecular beams of argon or helium from metal surfaces (bulk metal or thin films) are reported. The pressure in the scattering chamber is about 10 -6 torr. So, the surfaces are polluted. Diffraction peaks are observed which can be interpreted very well by assuming that nitrogen, oxygen or carbon atoms are adsorbed of the surface. On the other hand, diffraction peaks from a silicon crystal have been observed which can be reproduced very well by using silicon crystal lattice. These experiments are not interpreted accurately, but show that molecular reflection can be used for some surface studies [fr

  12. Relaxation rates studies in an argon cylindrical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, M.A.; Dengra, A.; Colomer, V.

    1986-01-01

    The single Langmuir probe method has been used to determine the relaxation rates of the electron density and temperature in an argon afterglow dc cylindrical plasma. The ion-electron recombination was found to be the fundamental mechanism of density decay during the early afterglow while the ambipolar diffusion controlles the density decay for later afterglow. Electron temperature cooling curves have been interpreted via electron-neutral collisons. Measurements of the electron-ion recombination and the ambipolar diffusion coefficients have been made, as well as of the electron-neutral collision frequency and the momentum transfer cross sections. Good agreement is obtained with previously published data. (author)

  13. Energy dependences of absorption in beryllium windows and argon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantler, C.T.; Staudenmann, J-P.

    1994-01-01

    In part of an ongoing work on x-ray form factors, new absorption coefficients are being evaluated for all elements, across the energy range from below 100 eV to above 100 keV. These new coefficients are applied herein to typical problems in synchrotron radiation stations, namely the use of beryllium windows and argon gas detectors. Results are compared with those of other authors. The electron-ion pair production process in ionization chambers is discussed, and the effects of 3d-element impurities are indicated. 15 refs., 6 figs

  14. High rate amplifier-digitizer system for liquid argon calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, T.F.; Lobkowicz, F.; Fukushima, Y.

    1978-01-01

    A low-cost charge amplifier for a liquid argon photon detector and a new method for pulse height analysis are described. This scheme is suitable for high-energy photon detection with high counting rate. Samples of preamplifer output are taken just before and just after the arrival of the charge from the detector. The difference of these samples provides a stable pedestal and rejects low frequency noise. Short two-pulse resolving time (approximately equal to 200ns) is achieved. 6 refs

  15. Electrical and spectroscopic characterization of a surgical argon plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Sandra; Neugebauer, Alexander; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    For electrosurgical procedures, the argon plasma coagulation (APC) discharge is a well-established atmospheric-pressure plasma tool for thermal haemostasis and devitalization of biological tissue. To characterize this plasma source, voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy and numerical simulation are applied. Two discharge modes are established during the operation of the APC plasma source. A short transient spark discharge is ignited within the positive half period of the applied high voltage after a streamer channel connects the APC probe and the counter-electrode. During the second phase, which continues under negative high voltage, a glow discharge is stabilized in the plasma channel.

  16. Study of a Novel Concept for a Liquid Argon Calorimeter \

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD33 \\\\ \\\\ The development of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter prototype is proposed as a generic R\\&D project for a novel concept of calorimetry in proton-proton and electron-positron collider detectors: the $^{\\prime$Thin Gap Turbine$^{\\prime}$ (TGT). The TGT calorimeter has a modular construction, is flexible in its longitudinal and transverse granularity, and offers a uniform energy response and resolution, independent of the production angle of incident particles. An important aspect of the project is the development of fast, radiation-hard front-end electronics which is operating in the cold.

  17. Argon laser choroidotomy for drainage of subretinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, J A; Marcus, D F; Nelsen, P T

    1985-03-01

    We used the argon laser to perforate the choroid and drain subretinal fluid during retinal detachment surgery in 24 consecutive patients. The procedure was successful in 23 of 24 patients (95.8%). The laser settings required for perforation ranged from 0.02 to 0.2 s and from 200 mW to 2.0 W. Because it is not necessary to enter the subretinal space with a solid, pointed object, laser choroidotomy may reduce the incidence of retinal perforation. In addition, the laser has the advantage of cauterizing small vessels during choroidal puncture, which may reduce bleeding at the time of drainage.

  18. Electron drift velocity in argon-methane mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakeem, N.El; Mathieson, E.

    1978-01-01

    Described are the results of a series of measurements of electron drift velocity taken with samples of chemically pure grade gas mixture of Ar-10% CH 4 (N 2 2 2 2 O<2 ppm). The measured drift velocity is plotted as a function of the ratio of electric field to pressure in the range from 0.05 to 0.8 V/cmxtorr. The measurements are reproducible only to within 4%. The results of numerical calculations employing the well-established argon elastic and methane elastic and inelastic cross sections are also included. The disagreement from the present experimental results, and from those obtained elsewhere, is rather puzzling

  19. Scintillation trigger system of the liquid argon neutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belikov, S.V.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Gutnikov, Yu.E.; Denisov, A.G.; Kochetkov, V.I.; Matveev, M.Yu.; Mel'nikov, E.A.; Usachev, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the organization of the Scintillation Trigger System (STS) for the Liquid Argon Neutrino Detector of the Tagged Neutrino Facility. STS is aimed at the effective registration of the needed neutrino interaction type and production of a fast trigger signal with high time resolution. The fast analysis system of analog signal from the trigger scintillation planes for rejection of the trigger signals from background processes is described. Real scintillation trigger planes characteristics obtained on the basis of the presented data acquisition system are shown. 10 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Penning transfer in argon-based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, O; Tapan, I; Ozmutlu, E N

    2010-01-01

    Penning transfers, a group of processes by which excitation energy is used to ionise the gas, increase the gas gain in some detectors. Both the probability that such transfers occur and the mechanism by which the transfer takes place, vary with the gas composition and pressure. With a view to developing a microscopic electron transport model that takes Penning transfers into account, we use this dependence to identify the transfer mechanisms at play. We do this for a number of argon-based gas mixtures, using gain curves from the literature.

  1. HARP: high-pressure argon readout for calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco-Luque, M.; Fabjan, C.W.; Frandsen, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Steel tubes of approximately 8 mm O.D., filled with Argon gas to approx. 200 bar, are considered as the active element for a charge collecting sampling calorimeter readout system. The tubes are permanently sealed and operated in the ion chamber mode, with the charge collection on a one-millimeter concentric anode. We present the motivation for such a device, including Monte Carlo predictions of performance. The method of construction and signal collection are discussed, with initial results on leakage and ageing of the filling gas. A prototype electromagnetic calorimeter is described

  2. Rabi oscillations in extreme ultraviolet ionization of atomic argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flögel, Martin; Durá, Judith; Schütte, Bernd; Ivanov, Misha; Rouzée, Arnaud; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate Rabi oscillations in nonlinear ionization of argon by an intense femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser field produced by high-harmonic generation. We monitor the formation of A r2 + as a function of the time delay between the XUV pulse and an additional near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser pulse, and show that the population of an A r+* intermediate resonance exhibits strong modulations both due to an NIR laser-induced Stark shift and XUV-induced Rabi cycling between the ground state of A r+ and the A r+* excited state. Our experiment represents a direct experimental observation of a Rabi-cycling process in the XUV regime.

  3. Liquid Argon TPC Signal Formation, Signal Processing and Hit Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baller, Bruce [Fermilab

    2017-03-11

    This document describes the early stage of the reconstruction chain that was developed for the ArgoNeuT and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermilab. These experiments study accelerator neutrino interactions that occur in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. Reconstructing the properties of particles produced in these interactions requires knowledge of the micro-physics processes that affect the creation and transport of ionization electrons to the readout system. A wire signal deconvolution technique was developed to convert wire signals to a standard form for hit reconstruction, to remove artifacts in the electronics chain and to remove coherent noise.

  4. Sodium aerosol formation in an argon flow over hot sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.F.; Dolias, M.J.; UKAEA Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell. Thermal Hydraulics Div.)

    1987-01-01

    Vapour evaporation, which partly forms aerosol, occurs when a cold gas flows over a hot liquid. A previous well-mixed model is extended to predict the final vapour plus aerosol content of such a flow in terms of its initial and final temperatures. The predictions are compared to results of the Copacabana II experiment in which argon passed over a sodium pool. Agreement is obtained for the final sodium density at moderate flow rates, and physical reasons are given as to why deviations occur at low and high flow rates. (author)

  5. The adsorption of argon, krypton and xenon on activated charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    Charcoal adsorption beds are commonly used to remove radioactive noble gases from contaminated gas streams. The design of such beds requires the adsorption coefficient for the noble gas. Here an extension of the Dubinin-Radushkevich theory of adsorption is developed to correlate the effects of temperature, pressure, concentration, and carrier gas on the adsorption coefficients of krypton, xenon, and argon on activated carbon. This model is validated with previously published adsorption measurements. It accurately predicts the equilibrium adsorption coefficient at any temperature and pressure if the potential energies of adsorption, the micropore volume, and the van der Waals constants of the gases are known. 18 refs., 4 figs

  6. Endobronchial Electrocautery and Argon Plasma Coagulation: A Practical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Tremblay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review covers the technical and practical aspects of endobronchial electrocautery, including argon plasma coagulation, which have great potential for widespread use by pulmonologists around the world. The various electrocautery modes, power settings and electrode probes are described in detail, and the authors' clinical and technical approach is demonstrated with a narrative description and brief case presentations. Malignant airway obstruction, hemoptysis, web-like stenosis, stent related granulation tissue and early lung carcinomas are the most common indications for treatment. Advantages of electrocautery, such as low cost, rapid effect, safety and ease of use, are contrasted to other endobronchial therapeutic modalities. Published experience with electrocautery is reviewed.

  7. The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter--status and expected performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schacht, Peter

    2004-01-01

    For the ATLAS detector at the LHC, the liquid argon technique is exploited for the electromagnetic calorimetry in the central part and for the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry in the forward and backward regions. The construction of the calorimeter is well advanced with full cold tests of the barrel calorimeter and first endcap calorimeter only months away. The status of the project is discussed as well as the related results from beam test studies of the various calorimeter subdetectors. The results show that the expected performance meets the ATLAS requirements as specified in the ATLAS Technical Design Report

  8. Use of the big liquid argon spectrometer BARS for neutrino and cosmic-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeev, V.B.; Belikov, S.N.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Denisov, A.G.; Denisov, S.P.; Fedjakin, N.N.; Kochetkov, V.I.; Korablev, V.M.; Koreshev, V.I.; Lipaev, V.V.; Los, S.V.; Mikhailin, V.N.; Rybin, A.M.; Sytin, A.N.; Bogdanov, A.G.; Kirina, T.M.; Kokoulin, R.P.; Reznikov, M.A.; Petrukhin, A.A.; Yanson, E.E.; Alexeyev, E.N.; Chernyaev, A.B.; Petkov, V.B.; Smirnov, D.V.; Tsyabuk, A.L.; Voevodsky, A.V.; Gennaro, G.; Sergiampietri, F.; Spandre, G.; Lanfranchi, M.; Marchionni, A.; Conforto, G.; Martelli, F.

    1998-01-01

    The design of the fine grained 300 t liquid argon calorimeter BARS is described. The BARS electronics include about 30 K channels of low noise amplifiers and ADCs. The DAQ system makes it possible to select channels with signals above the chosen threshold. 48 scintillation horoscopes placed inside the liquid argon are used to form the first level trigger. The total number of scintillation counters in liquid argon is 384. Sums of ionization signals are used to produce the second level trigger. Results of the first use of liquid argon calorimetry for the measurements of tagged neutrino interactions, cosmic-ray muon spectra and composition of extensive atmospheric showers are discussed. (author)

  9. Modeling of inhomogeneous mixing of plasma species in argon-steam arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeništa, J.; Takana, H.; Uehara, S.; Nishiyama, H.; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.; Murphy, A. B.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulation of mixing of argon- and water-plasma species in an argon-steam arc discharge generated in a thermal plasma generator with the combined stabilization of arc by axial gas flow (argon) and water vortex. The diffusion of plasma species itself is described by the combined diffusion coefficients method in which the coefficients describe the diffusion of argon ‘gas,’ with respect to water vapor ‘gas.’ Diffusion processes due to the gradients of mass density, temperature, pressure, and an electric field have been considered in the model. Calculations for currents 150-400 A with 15-22.5 standard liters per minute (slm) of argon reveal inhomogeneous mixing of argon and oxygen-hydrogen species with the argon species prevailing near the arc axis. All the combined diffusion coefficients exhibit highly nonlinear distribution of their values within the discharge, depending on the temperature, pressure, and argon mass fraction of the plasma. The argon diffusion mass flux is driven mainly by the concentration and temperature space gradients. Diffusions due to pressure gradients and due to the electric field are of about 1 order lower. Comparison with our former calculations based on the homogeneous mixing assumption shows differences in temperature, enthalpy, radiation losses, arc efficiency, and velocity at 400 A. Comparison with available experiments exhibits very good qualitative and quantitative agreement for the radial temperature and velocity profiles 2 mm downstream of the exit nozzle.

  10. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of molar distalization with a palatal plate, pendulum, and headgear according to molar eruption stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju-Man; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Oh, Moonbee; Park, Chong Ook; Mo, Sung-Seo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effects of maxillary second and third molar eruption status on the distalization of first molars with a modified palatal anchorage plate (MPAP), and (2) compare the results to the outcomes of the use of a pendulum and that of a headgear using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Methods Three eruption stages were established: an erupting second molar at the cervical one-third of the first molar root (Stage 1), a fully erupted second molar (Stage 2), and an erupting third molar at the cervical one-third of the second molar root (Stage 3). Retraction forces were applied via three anchorage appliance models: an MPAP with bracket and archwire, a bone-anchored pendulum appliance, and cervical-pull headgear. Results An MPAP showed greater root movement of the first molar than crown movement, and this was more noticeable in Stages 2 and 3. With the other devices, the first molar showed distal tipping. Transversely, the first molar had mesial-out rotation with headgear and mesial-in rotation with the other devices. Vertically, the first molar was intruded with an MPAP, and extruded with the other appliances. Conclusions The second molar eruption stage had an effect on molar distalization, but the third molar follicle had no effect. The application of an MPAP may be an effective treatment option for maxillary molar distalization. PMID:27668192

  11. Autotransplantation of a mandibular third molar: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Najafi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tooth autotransplantation defines as transition of one tooth from one position to another, in same individual. It is a biological procedure in which teeth have the potential to induce alveolar bone growth. It can be applied in patients before adolescence growth is finished. It significantly reduces time and cost compared to implants. Healing rapidly occurs and function is regained almost immediately. Our case was a 15-year-old male that his left mandibular third molar transplanted to the second molar sight after extraction of second molar because of unrestorable crown. During 9 month follow up transplanted tooth was asymptomatic, functional and responsive to sensibility tests. (Cold test, EPT.

  12. Maxillary First Molars with 2 Distobuccal Canals: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Howard M; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2017-11-01

    An appreciation of the anatomic complexity of the root canal system is essential at every step of endodontic treatment. Endodontic treatment of teeth with unusual root canal anatomy presents a unique challenge. Eight patients underwent nonsurgical root canal treatment of 3-rooted maxillary first molars in a specialty endodontic private practice. Four cases of Weine type II and 4 cases of Weine type III canal configurations in the distobuccal root of maxillary first molars were presented.This article highlighted an uncommon anatomic variation of 2 canals in the distobuccal root of the maxillary first molar. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An aegialodontid upper molar and the evolution of mammal dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatin, Alexey V; Averianov, Alexander O

    2006-08-25

    The most obvious key synapomorphy of the therian mammals is the tribosphenic pattern of their molars. Tribosphenic teeth are capable of both shearing and grinding, which substantially increase effectiveness of food processing and, in turn, permit evolution of a wide range of dietary specializations. Functional tribospheny developed repeatedly during mammalian evolution but was successful only in the Boreosphenida. The earliest stage in the development of boreosphenidan tribospheny has remained poorly understood, being documented only by lower molars of aegialodontids. Here, we report a known upper molar of an aegialodontid mammal, Kielantherium, from the Early Cretaceous of Mongolia.

  14. Radiographic evaluation of bone regeneration after the application of plasma rich in growth factors in a lower third molar socket: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A 42-year-old Mediterranean male presented complaining of inability to sustain good oral care at the posterior aspect of the lower right jaw. The main problems were food impaction in the area and the subsequent malodor. The patient reported remarkable medical history. Clinical examination revealed local erytherma with noticeable bone defect distal to the second molar with obvious defect in the mesial wall of the third molar; the penetration depth was found to be up to 6 mm. Radiological evaluation confirmed the defect and it was attributed to the mesioangularly partially impacted lower third molar. It was decided that third molar should be extracted and concentrate of the patient's growth factors (PRGF) to be applied into the bony defect to stimulate bone regeneration and promote healing. The third molar tooth was, then, removed surgically and the PRGF, which was prepared preoperatively, was implanted in the socket. At the first postoperative day, moderate pain was the main complaint and was controlled by NSAIDs. One week postoperatively, the sutures were removed and there was good tissue healing on examination. On the fiftieth postoperative day, radiographic evaluation took place and showed noticeable enhancement of density and radio-opacity in the third molar socket area, in comparison with the baseline image. Further, clinical examination showed significant reduction of periodontal pocketing and evidence of new bone formation. In conclusion, PRGF was very successful in stimulating bone regeneration and promote healing following dental extraction. PMID:20062651

  15. Má oclusão de Classe I com biprotrusão e ausência dos primeiros molares inferiores Angle Class I malocclusion with bimaxillary dental protrusion and missing mandibular first molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldino Puppin Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente relato de caso descreve o tratamento ortodôntico de uma paciente de 24 anos de idade, portadora de má oclusão de Classe I de Angle, com protrusão dos incisivos superiores e inferiores, além de perda recente dos primeiros molares inferiores. O tratamento idealizado envolveu a exodontia dos primeiros pré-molares superiores, aliada ao fechamento dos espaços presentes na arcada inferior. O resultado obtido demonstra a necessidade de planos de tratamento individualizados e a importância dos conceitos biomecânicos para movimentar adequadamente os dentes. Esse caso clínico foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria livre escolha, como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a 24-year-old patient presenting with Angle Class I malocclusion, bimaxillary dental protrusion and recent loss of mandibular molars. Treatment involved extraction of the maxillary first premolars and closing of mandibular first molar spaces. Treatment outcomes demonstrate the need for individualized treatment planning and highlight the key role played by biomechanical concepts in achieving proper orthodontic tooth movement. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as representative of the free choice category in partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Diploma.

  16. Preformed crowns for decayed primary molar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Nicola P T; Ricketts, David; Chong, Lee Yee; Keightley, Alexander J; Lamont, Thomas; Santamaria, Ruth M

    2015-12-31

    Crowns for primary molars are preformed and come in a variety of sizes and materials to be placed over decayed or developmentally defective teeth. They can be made completely of stainless steel (know as 'preformed metal crowns' or PMCs), or to give better aesthetics, may be made of stainless steel with a white veneer cover or made wholly of a white ceramic material. In most cases, teeth are trimmed for the crowns to be fitted conventionally using a local anaesthetic. However, in the case of the Hall Technique, PMCs are pushed over the tooth with no local anaesthetic, carious tissue removal or tooth preparation. Crowns are recommended for restoring primary molar teeth that have had a pulp treatment, are very decayed or are badly broken down. However, few dental practitioners use them in clinical practice. This review updates the original review published in 2007. Primary objectiveTo evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of all types of preformed crowns for restoring primary teeth compared with conventional filling materials (such as amalgam, composite, glass ionomer, resin modified glass ionomer and compomers), other types of crowns or methods of crown placement, non-restorative caries treatment or no treatment. Secondary objectiveTo explore whether the extent of decay has an effect on the clinical outcome of primary teeth restored with all types of preformed crowns compared with those restored with conventional filling materials. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 21 January 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 12), MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 21 January 2015) and EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 21 January 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials and Open Grey for grey literature (to

  17. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  18. Empleo racional de la coronectomía en la extracción de terceros molares incluidos Rational application of coronectomy when treating lower impacted third molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Recio Lora

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Los terceros molares son los dientes que, con más frecuencia, sufren el fracaso de su erupción y quedan incluidos o retenidos dentro de los maxilares. Un gran porcentaje de nuestros pacientes presentan los cordales incluidos y, de ellos, una parte importante se acompaña de patología que hace aconsejable su tratamiento quirúrgico. La técnica de la coronectomía aplicada al tercer molar incluido fue descrita por primera vez por Ecuyer y Debien en 1984 como la eliminación parcial de dicho diente, dejando deliberadamente parte de su raíz en el interior de la mandíbula. Fue propuesta para evitar la lesión del nervio dentario inferior (NDI en aquéllos casos en los que existía una íntima relación entre ambas estructuras anatómicas. Aunque el objetivo de la técnica es muy claro, no está libre de controversia, ya que el cirujano debe valorar la posibilidad de una complicación infecciosa de origen pulpar. Presentamos un caso clínico exitoso de esta técnica, junto al análisis de la postura ante la técnica de los distintos autores, así como sus ventajas e inconvenientes.Third molars are the teeth that most frequently fail to erupt and remain impacted or retained inside the bone. A large percentage of our patients have impacted wisdom teeth and many of these patients also have pathologies that require surgical treatment. Applied coronectomy technique of the impacted third molar was first described by Ecuyer and Debien in 1984. The described it as partial elimination of the tooth in question, deliberately leaving part of the root inside the bone. This was proposed to avoid injuring the inferior dental nerve in cases where there was a close relationship between the two anatomical structures. Although the objective of the procedure is very clear, it is still controversial. Therefore, the surgeon should evaluate the possibility of an infectious complication of pulpar origin. We present the successful clinical case that uses this technique

  19. Trapping of deuterium in argon-implanted nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, R.C.; Rehn, L.E.; Baldo, P.

    1985-01-01

    Argon ions with energy 250 keV were implanted at fluences of 2 x 10 16 cm -2 at temperatures of 500, 250, and 21 0 C, in the specimen of relatively pure polycrystalline nickel. Deuterium was introduced into the surface and implanted regions by making the specimen the negative electrode of an electrolytic cell containing 1-N pure deuterated sulfuric acid. Deuterium trapped in the vacancy complexes of the implanted regions was analyzed as a function of temperature using the vacancy complexes of the implanted regions was analyzed as a function of temperature using the 2 H( 3 He, 1 H) 4 He nuclear reaction during an isochronal annealing process. The results indicate that the types of traps and trap densities found in the regions implanted at 21 and 250 0 C were essentially identical while the trap density found in the region implanted at 500 0 C was approximately 40% of that found in the other regions. Math model comparison with the experimental results suggests the existence of at least two types of traps in each region. Trap binding enthalpies used in the math model to fit the experimental data were slightly higher for the region implanted with argon at 500 0 C than for the regions implanted at the lower temperatures. TEM studies revealed the presence of small voids in the region implanted at 500 0 as well as dislocation loops similar to those found in the regions implanted at the lower temperatures. 20 references, 2 figures

  20. A liquid argon scintillation veto for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegmann, Anne [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gerda is an experiment to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. Results of Phase I have been published in summer 2013. Currently Gerda is being upgraded to a second phase. To reach the aspired background index of ≤ 10{sup -3} cts/(keV . kg . yr) for Phase II active background-suppression techniques will be applied, including an active liquid argon veto (LAr veto). It has been demonstrated by the LArGe test facility that the detection of argon scintillation light can be used to effectively suppress background events in the germanium, which simultaneously deposit energy in LAr. This talk focusses on the light instrumentation which is being installed in GERDA. Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and wavelength-shifting fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are combined to maximize the photoelectron-yield with respect to various background sources. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to optimize the design for background suppression and low self-induced background. First results of the prototypes and the progress of installation are reported.

  1. Argon laser trabeculoplasty as primary therapy in open angle glaucoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, P.S.; Jamali, K.K.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the effect of Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty (ALT) as a primary mode of therapy in reducing the intraocular Pressure (IOP) of patients diagnosed with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG). A total of 35 eyes of 35 patients with the gender distribution of 27 men and 8 women who were newly diagnosed with POAG, were included in this study. Mean age of the patients was 55.2 years with the range of 32 to 76 years. All of them were treated with argon laser trabeculoplasty as a primary mode of therapy. Intra ocular pressure was measured objectively using Goldman applanation tonometer, pre-and-post laser therapy. The pre-laser mean IOP was 27.63 mmHg (range 21-40 mmHg). The post-laser mean IOP measured at 6 months follow up was 15.5 mmHg (range 11 - 33 mmHg) with mean decrease of 12.1 mmHg. The decrease in IOP was seen in 32 eyes (95%) with no change observed in 3 (5%) eyes. The result shows a marked decline in IOP in patients with POAG who underwent ALT as a primary mode of treatment. Further studies with large sample size and longer follow-up will help in making future recommendations. (author)

  2. Study of straw chamber lifetime with argon ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cheu, E.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Odian, A.; Pitman, D.; Stockhausen, W.; Toki, W.; Wadley, W.; Wood, C.; Mir, R.

    1989-01-01

    We present detailed laboratory measurements of the lifetime of a small test chamber, simulating the Mark III straw vertex chamber conditions. The tests were carried out with an argon-ethane 50/50 gas mixture at 3 atm absolute pressure and 3.9 kV applied to the wires. After the accumulation of ≅ 0.02 C/cm on a single straw, continuous discharges began. The addition of alcohol or water vapor to the gas mixture was found to extend the lifetime of the straws. Continuous flow of the gas mixture with water vapor through the straws prolonged the lifetime significantly. We present results on the effects of changing the gas mixture inside the straws at regular time intervals. Adding a small percentage of water vapor to the argon-ethane gas and flowing the gas mixture in the straws can improve the lifetime by more than an order of magnitude. An accumulated charge of 1.0 C/cm on a single straw has been obtained. (orig.)

  3. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, F.

    1993-01-01

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4to 12), np(n=4to8) and nd(n=3to8)of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p5 ns (n=4 to 7), np (n=4 to 7) and nd (n=3 to 8). 3.- comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author) 35 refs

  4. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutro argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Ramos, F.

    1993-01-01

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 12), np(n=4 to 8) and nd(n=3 to 8) of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 7), np(n=4 to 7) and nd(n=3 to 8). 3.- Comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author)

  5. Shock velocity in weakly ionized nitrogen, air, and argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine the principal mechanism(s) for the shock velocity increase in weakly ionized gases. This paper reports experimental data on the propagation of spark-generated shock waves (1< Mach<3) into weakly ionized nitrogen, air, and argon glow discharges (1 < p<20 Torr). In order to distinguish between effects due solely to the presence of electrons and effects due to heating of the background gas via elastic collisions with electrons, the weakly ionized discharge was pulsed on/off. Laser deflection methods determined the shock velocity, and the electron number density was collected using a microwave hairpin resonator. In the afterglow of nitrogen, air, and argon discharges, the shock velocity first decreased, not at the characteristic time for electrons to diffuse to the walls, but rather at the characteristic time for the centerline gas temperature to equilibrate with the wall temperature. These data support the conclusion that the principal mechanism for the increase in shock velocity in weakly ionized gases is thermal heating of the neutral gas species via elastic collisions with electrons

  6. Prediction of postoperative pain after mandibular third molar surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudin, Asa; Eriksson, Lars; Liedholm, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the predictive potential of preoperative psychological and psychophysiological variables in estimating severity of postoperative pain following mandibular third molar surgery (MTMS). Methods: Following ethical committee approval and informed consent, 40 consecutive patients scheduled...

  7. Excess molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities of binary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Excess molar volume; binary liquid mixtures; isentropic compressibility; intermolecular interactions. ... mixtures are essential for fluid flow, mass flow and heat transfer processes in chemical ... Experimentally determined values of density(ρ).

  8. Evaluation of radiographic features of embedded primary molar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Key words: Ankylosis, panoramic radiography, primary molar root ... coverage of the jaws is needed for diagnosis. ... and direct continuity of the bone, called as bony ankylosis. .... Floating retained root lesion mimicking.

  9. Cementoblastoma Relating to Right Mandibular Second Primary Molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cementoblastoma is a benign lesion of the odontogenic ectomesenchymal origin. It rarely occurs in primary dentition. This report describes a case of a cementoblastoma relating to the right mandibular second primary molar in a 7-year-old girl. Her panoramic radiograph revealed a well-defined radiopaque lesion with a radiolucent border extending from the distal surface of the mandibular right first primary molar to the distal surface of mandibular second primary molar. The tumor was attached to the mesial root of primary second molar and was excised along with the teeth involved and sent for histopathological evaluation, which showed irregular trabeculae of mineralized tissue interspersed with fibrovascular connective tissue, trabeculae of mineralized tissue with prominent reversal lines, and peripheral rimming of the mineralized tissue with blast cells. On a six-month follow-up, there has been no recurrence of the lesion.

  10. Study of Kissing Molars in Turkish Population Sample

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... unerupted teeth; retention of the mandibular second molar is ... and November 2014 for surgical treatment retrospectively were evaluated. The cases of ... and treatment. Results: Of the 6570 radiographs included in the study,.

  11. Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: Review of Literature and a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were screened, and 50 articles were included in the review. Causes of ... impaction rate is higher for third molars when compared with other teeth. The mandibular .... Hence, the surgical extraction of these impacted teeth has become the most ...

  12. Essays on partial retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarci, T.

    2012-01-01

    The five essays in this dissertation address a range of topics in the micro-economic literature on partial retirement. The focus is on the labor market behavior of older age groups. The essays examine the economic and non-economic determinants of partial retirement behavior, the effect of partial

  13. Local effects of ECRH on argon transport at ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sertoli, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants will most probably rely an high-Z Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) such as tungsten. This choice is determined by the necessity of low erosion of the first wall materials (to guarantee a long lifetime of the wall components) and by the need to avoid the too high tritium wall retention of typical carbon based PFCs. The experience gathered at the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak has demonstrated the possibility of reliable and high performance plasma operation with a full tungsten-coated first wall. The observed accumulation of tungsten which can lead to excessive radiation losses is mitigated with the use of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). Although this impurity control method is routinely performed at AUG, the underlying physics principles are still not clear. This thesis aims an providing further knowledge an the effects of ECRH an the transport of impurities inside the core plasma. The transport of argon has been therefore investigated in-depth in purely ECR heated L-mode (low-confinement) discharges. Studies an impurity transport in centrally ECR heated nitrogen-seeded H-mode (high-confinement) discharges have also been performed. To this scope, a new crystal X-ray spectrometer of the Johann type has been installed an AUG for argon concentration and ion temperature measurements. New methods for the experimental determination of the total argon density through the integrated use of this diagnostic and of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) diode arrays have been developed. This gives the possibility of evaluating the full profiles of the argon transport coefficients from the linear flux-gradient dependency of local argon density. In comparison to classical χ 2 -minimization methods, the approach proposed here delivers transport coefficients intrinsically independent of the modelling of periodic relaxation mechanisms such as those Lied to sawtooth MHD (Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic) activity. Moreover, the good

  14. Fusion or gemination? An unusual mandibular second molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Jordão Camargo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusion and gemination is not an uncommon finding and affected most primary dentition and the permanent maxillary incisors. These changes can develop a series of complication. A 11-year-old male presented radiography finding: an unusual mandibular second molar. A well-documented case brings a challenge for radiologists classify between fusion and gemination. In conclusion, this alteration although common in other regions, there are no case in the literature involving “second and third” molar.

  15. Managing molar-incisor hypomineralization: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawy, Karim; Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-12-01

    We systematically reviewed treatment modalities for MIH-affected molars and incisors. Trials on humans with ≥1 MIH molar/incisor reporting on various treatments were included. Two authors independently searched and extracted records. Sample-size-weighted annual failure rates were estimated where appropriate. The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, Google Scholar) were screened, and hand searches and cross-referencing performed. Fourteen (mainly observational) studies were included. Ten trials (381 participants) investigated MIH-molars, four (139) MIH-incisors. For molars, remineralization, restorative or extraction therapies had been assessed. For restorative approaches, mean (SD) annual failure rates were highest for fissure sealants (12[6]%) and glass-ionomer restorations (12[2]%), and lowest for indirect restorations (1[3]%), preformed metal crowns (1.3 [2.1]%) and composite restorations (4[3]%). Ony study assessed extraction of molars in young patients (median age 8.2 years), the majority of them without malocclusions, but third molars in development. Spontaneous alignment of second molars was more frequent in the maxilla (55%) than the mandible (47%). For incisors, desensitizing agents successfully managed hypersensitivity. Micro-abrasion and composite veneers improved aesthetics. Few, mainly moderate to high-risk-studies investigated treatment of MIH. Remineralization or sealants seem suitable for MIH-molars with limited severity and/or hypersensitivity. For severe cases, restorations with composites or indirect restorations or preformed metal crowns seem suitable. Prior to tooth extraction as last resort factors like the presence of a general malocclusion, patients' age and the status of neighboring teeth should be considered. No recommendations can be given for MIH-incisors. Dentists need to consider the specific condition of each tooth and the needs and expectations of

  16. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the secon...

  17. Elongational viscosity of narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Almdal, Kristoffer; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2003-01-01

    Transient and steady elongational viscosity has been measured for two narrow molar mass distribution polystyrene melts of molar masses 200 000 and 390 000 by means of a filament stretching rheometer. Total Hencky strains of about five have been obtained. The transient elongational viscosity rises...... above the linear viscoelastic prediction at intermediate strains, indicating strain hardening. The steady elongational viscosities are monotone decreasing functions of elongation rate. At elongation rates larger than the inverse reptation time, the steady elongational viscosity scales linearly...

  18. Subcutaneous emphysema during third molar surgery: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Romeo, Umberto; Galanakis, Alexandros; Lerario, Francesco; Daniele, Gabriele Maria; Tenore, Gianluca; Palaia, Gaspare

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of third molars is the most common surgical procedure performed in oral surgery on a daily basis and, despite surgical skills and expertise, complications may occur. Complications observed during or after third molar removal may include pain, swelling, bleeding, infection, sinus perforation and nerve damage. Fortunately, with a proper management and a good surgical technique, the incidence of such events is low. Subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental extraction occurs when t...

  19. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritts, Andy Charles; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated by using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various durations. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using FTIR/ATR and an increase in carbonyl groups on dentin surfaces was detected with plasma treated dentin. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for tensile test. Student Newman Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of peripheral dentin surface up to 100 s gave an increase in interfacial bonding strength, while a prolong plasma treatment of dentin surfaces, e.g., 5 min treatments, showed a decrease in interfacial bonding strength. PMID:20831586

  20. Molar exergy and flow exergy of pure chemical fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanchini, Enzo; Terlizzese, Tiziano

    2009-01-01

    Expressions of the molar exergy and of the molar flow exergy of a pure chemical fuel are deduced rigorously from the basic principles of thermodynamics. It is shown that molar exergy and molar flow exergy coincide when the temperature T and the pressure p of the fuel are equal to the temperature T B and the pressure p B of the environment; a general relation between exergy and flow exergy is proved as a consequence. The deduction of the expression of the molar exergy of a chemical fuel for non-standard values of T B and p B is clarified. For hydrogen, carbon dioxide and several hydrocarbons, tables are reported to allow a simple calculation of the molar exergy of the fuel for any value of the temperature T B and the relative humidity φ B of the environment, in the range 268.15 K ≤ T B ≤ 313.15 K and 0.1 ≤ φ B ≤ 1, with reference to the standard atmospheric pressure. Additional tables are provided to evaluate the difference between the exergy or the flow exergy of the fuel in its given initial state and the exergy at T = T B and p = p B . In these tables, it is assumed that fuel and environment have the same temperature and that the fuel pressure varies in the range 1.01325 bar ≤ p ≤ 200 bar; the fuel may be gas or liquid.

  1. Standard molar enthalpy of formation of methoxyacetophenone isomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Luísa M.P.F.; Morais, Victor M.F.; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental and computational energetic study of methoxyacetophenone isomers. • Enthalpies of formation and phase transition determined by calorimetric techniques. • Quantum chemical calculations allowed estimation of enthalpies of formation. • Structure and energy correlations were established. - Abstract: Values of the standard (p o = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation of 2′-, 3′- and 4′-methoxyacetophenones were derived from their standard molar energy of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, measured by static bomb combustion calorimetry. The Calvet high temperature vacuum sublimation technique was used to measure the enthalpies of sublimation/vaporization of the compounds studied. The standard molar enthalpies of formation of the three compounds, in the gaseous phase, at T = 298.15 K, have been derived from the corresponding standard molar enthalpies of formation in the condensed phase and the standard molar enthalpies for the phase transition. The results obtained are −(232.0 ± 2.5), −(237.7 ± 2.7) and −(241.1 ± 2.1) kJ · mol −1 for 2′-, 3′- and 4′-methoxyacetophenone, respectively. Standard molar enthalpies of formation were also estimated from different methodologies: the Cox scheme as well as two different computational approaches using density functional theory-based B3LYP and the multilevel G3 methodologies

  2. Middle mesial canals in mandibular molars: incidence and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Ali; Deschenes, Raney J; Tordik, Patricia A; Hicks, M Lamar; Fouad, Ashraf F

    2015-01-01

    Although the internal anatomy of mandibular molars has been extensively studied, information about middle mesial (MM) canals is limited. The primary aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence of MM canals in mandibular first and second molars. The secondary aim was to correlate the incidence of MM canals with variables of molar type, sex, age, ethnicity, and presence of a second distal canal. All mature permanent first and second mandibular molars treated from August 2012 to May 2014 were included in the analysis. After completion of root canal instrumentation in all main canals, the clinician inspected the isthmus area of the mesial root using the dental operating microscope. If there was a catch point in this area with a file or explorer, the operator spent more time attempting to negotiate an MM canal. Seventy-five mandibular first and second molars were treated during the specified period. Fifteen (20%) teeth had negotiable MM canals. The incidence of MM canals was 32.1% in patients ≤ 20 years old, 23.8% in patients 21-40 years old, and 3.8% in patients > 40 years. Analysis of data revealed a significant difference in the distribution of MM canals among different age groups (P molar type, and presence of a second distal canal were not significant. The incidence of negotiable MM canals overall and their frequency of identification in younger patients were higher than in previous reports. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cuartos molares supernumerarios: relato de caso clínico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nascimento Silva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Los dientes supernumerarios se diagnostican mediante exámenes radiográficos de rutina, pues generalmente son asintomáticos. Los cuartos molares representan el segundo grupo de dientes supernumerarios con más frecuencias; ocurren en posición distal a los terceros molares, especialmente en el maxilar superior, y en la mayoría de casos, estos están incluidos. El objetivo de este artículo es realizar la presentación de un caso, de una mujer de 30 anos con los cuartos molares incluidos en el maxilar inferior y describir la técnica para su remoción.Supernumerary teeth are generally asymptomatic and are diagnosed by routine X-ray tests. The fourth molar teeth represent the second group of the most frequent supernumerary teeth, occur in distal position to the third molar teeth, specially in the superior maxilla and, in most of the cases, they are included. The aim of this paper is to comment on the case of a 30-year-old woman with the fourth molar teeth included in the inferior maxilla and to describe the technique used for their removal.

  4. Part 2: Limiting apparent molar volume of organic and inorganic 1:1 electrolytes in (water + ethylammonium nitrate) mixtures at 298 K - Thermodynamic approach using Bahe-Varela pseudo-lattice theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouguerra, Sabbah; Bou Malham, Ibrahim; Letellier, Pierre; Mayaffre, Alain; Turmine, Mireille

    2008-01-01

    Values of partial molar volumes at infinite dilution of 9 inorganic and 4 organic 1:1 electrolytes have been determined in (water + ethylammonium nitrate) (EAN) binary at 298.15 K throughout the composition scale. Our theoretical analysis shows that the values of partial molar volumes at infinite dilution of a solute in a binary are linked to those of the partial molar volumes of the components of mixed solvent. This applies to mixtures of molecular solvents as well as (water + ionic liquid) media. The use of the 'pseudo-lattice theory' of Bahe recently supplemented Varela can be used for calculations and to obtain information about the interactions between 1:1 electrolytes as solutes at infinite dilution and their concentrated saline environment. We show that the 'pseudo-lattice theory' allows accurate description of the behaviours of symmetrical tetraalkylammoniums bromide between the infinitely dilute state and concentrations higher than 2 mol . L -1

  5. Towards a liquid Argon TPC without evacuation filling of a 6$m^3$ vessel with argon gas from air to ppm impurities concentration through flushing

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A; Gendotti, A; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Coleman, J; Lewis, M; Mavrokoridis, K; McCormick, K; Touramanis, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a successful experimental test of filling a volume of 6 $m^3$ with argon gas, starting from normal ambient air and reducing the impurities content down to few parts per million (ppm) oxygen equivalent. This level of contamination was directly monitored measuring the slow component of the scintillation light of the Ar gas, which is sensitive to $all$ sources of impurities affecting directly the argon scintillation.

  6. Recurrent Partial Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Blanchet-Sadri

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Partial words are sequences over a finite alphabet that may contain wildcard symbols, called holes, which match or are compatible with all letters; partial words without holes are said to be full words (or simply words. Given an infinite partial word w, the number of distinct full words over the alphabet that are compatible with factors of w of length n, called subwords of w, refers to a measure of complexity of infinite partial words so-called subword complexity. This measure is of particular interest because we can construct partial words with subword complexities not achievable by full words. In this paper, we consider the notion of recurrence over infinite partial words, that is, we study whether all of the finite subwords of a given infinite partial word appear infinitely often, and we establish connections between subword complexity and recurrence in this more general framework.

  7. Evolution of subsurface nanocavities in copper under argon bombardment and annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulikov, D.V.; Kurnosikov, O.; Kharlamov, V.S.; Trushin, Yu.V.

    2013-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical studies of evolution of nanocavities in argon-irradiated copper under annealing are presented. The subsurface argon-filled nanocavities are formed during a short annealing at a temperature around 1000 K by migration and interaction of complexes of the simplest

  8. Study of electron recombination in liquid argon with the ICARUS TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoruso, S.; Antonello, M.; Aprili, P.; Arneodo, F.; Badertscher, A.; Baiboussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bekman, B.; Benetti, P.; Bischofberger, M.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Brunetti, R.; Bruzzese, R.; Bueno, A.; Buzzanca, M.; Calligarich, E.; Campanelli, M.; Carbonara, F.; Carpanese, C.; Cavalli, D.; Cavanna, F.; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, D.; Chen, D.B.; Chen, Y.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.; Cocco, A.G.; Dai, Z.; De Vecchi, C.; Dabrowska, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Dolfini, R.; Ereditato, A.; Felcini, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferri, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galli, S.; Ge, Y.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gil-Botella, I.; Graczyk, K.; Grandi, L.; Guglielmi, A.; He, K.; Holeczek, J.; Huang, X.; Juszczak, C.; Kielczewska, D.; Kisiel, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Laffranchi, M.; Lagoda, J.; Li, Z.; Lu, F.; Ma, J.; Mangano, G.; Markiewicz, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Matthey, C.; Mauri, F.; Meng, G.; Messina, M.; Montanari, C.; Muraro, S.; Navas-Concha, S.; Otwinowski, S.; Ouyang, Q.; Palamara, O.; Pascoli, D.; Periale, L.; Piano Mortari, G.B.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Polopek, W.; Rancati, T.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rico, J.; Rondio, E.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R.; Santorelli, R.; Scannicchio, D.; Segreto, E.; Seo, Y.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sobczyk, J.; Spinelli, N.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Terrani, M.; Velotta, R.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Woo, J.; Xu, G.; Xu, Z.; Zalewska, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Q.; Zhen, S.; Zipper, W.

    2004-01-01

    Electron recombination in liquid argon (LAr) is studied by means of charged particle tracks collected in various ICARUS liquid argon TPC prototypes. The dependence of the recombination on the particle stopping power has been fitted with a Birks functional dependence. The simulation of the process of electron recombination in Monte Carlo calculations is discussed. A quantitative comparison with previously published data is carried out

  9. Role of metastable atoms in argon-diluted silane Rf plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansonnens, L.; Howling, A.A.; Hollenstein, C.; Dorier, J.L.; Kroll, U.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the argon metastable density has been studied by absorption spectroscopy in power-modulated plasmas of argon and a mixture of 4% silane in argon. A small concentration of silane suppresses the argon metastable density by molecular quenching. This molecular quenching adds to the electronic collisional dissociation to increase the silane dissociation rate as compared with pure silane plasmas. Using time-resolved emission spectroscopy, the role of metastables in excitation to the argon 2P 2 state has been determined in comparison with production from the ground state. In silane plasmas, emission from SiH* is due essentially to electron impact dissociation of silane, whereas in 4% silane-in-argon plasmas, emission from SiH* seems to be due to electron impact excitation of the SiH ground state. These studies demonstrate that argon is not simply a buffer gas but has an influence on the dissociation rate in the plasma-assisted deposition of amorphous silicon using argon-diluted silane plasmas. (author) 7 figs., 30 refs

  10. Calibration of a large volume argon-41 gas-effluent monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, William E.; Lovas, Thomas A.

    1976-01-01

    In September of 1975, a large volume Argon-41 sampler was calibrated using a series connected calibration chamber of known sensitivity and a constant flow of activated Argon gas. The calibration included analysis of the effects of flow rate through the large volume sampler and yielded a calibration constant of 2.34 x 10 -8 μc/cm 3 /CPM. (author)

  11. The ICARUS Front-end Preamplifier Working at Liquid Argon Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Baibussinov, B; Casagrande, F; Cennini, P; Centro, S; Curioni, A; Meng, G; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Sergiampietri, F; Ventura, S

    2011-01-01

    We describe characteristics and performance of the low-noise front-end preamplifier used in the ICARUS 50-litre liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber installed in the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility during the 1997-98 neutrino runs. The preamplifiers were designed to work immersed in ultra-pure liquid Argon at a temperature of 87K.

  12. Characterising the light output from Argon bombs by two simultaneous diagnostic techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olivier, M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The light output from Argon-bombs was investigated by means of ultra high speed photography (Cordin Model 550-32 camera) and locally developed photodiode sensors. Tubes of various sizes were inflated with Argon gas, and were detonated on one side...

  13. Pressure regulation in the dry-boxes. Argon purification; Regulation de pression dans les boites a gants. Purification d'argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascard, R; Fabre, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Each dry-box is equipped with an autonomous installation for circulation and purification of argon and for pressure regulation. This installation consists essentially of a ballast tank, a compressor and two valves electromagnetically controlled by a contact manometer. The compressor and the valves are enclosed in the tank to form a system as compact as possible. The argon is purified by passing it over a furnace filled with titanium-zirconium turnings brought to about 800 deg. C, branching off the main system. With this set-up as well as the automatic maintenance of a constant depression in the box, a quality of argon is obtained whose oxygen contact is undetectable by the manganous hydroxide method. (author) [French] Chaque boite a gants est munie d'une installation autonome de circulation purification d'argon et de regulation de pression. Cette installation comprend essentiellement un reservoir tampon, un compresseur et deux vannes electromagnetiques commandees par un manometre a contact. Le compresseur et les vannes sont enfermes dans le reservoir de maniere a realiser un ensemble aussi compact que possible. L'argon est purifie par passage dans un four en derivation charge de tournure de titane-zirconium, porte a environ 800 deg. C. Avec ce dispositif, on obtient, outre le maintien automatique d'une depression constante dans la boite, un argon dont la teneur en oxygene est indecelable par la methode a l'hydrate manganeux. (auteur)

  14. Retrospective analysis for detecting seismic precursors in groundwater argon content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Biagi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the groundwater Argon content data sampled from 1988 to 2001 at two wells in Kamchatka (Russia and anomalous increases appeared clearly during June-July 1996. On 21 June, a shallow (1km earthquake with M=7.1 occurred at a distance less than 250km from the wells and so the previous increases could be related to this earthquake and, in particular, could be considered premonitory anomalies. In order to support this raw interpretation, we analysed the data collected in details. At first we smoothed out the high frequency fluctuations arising from the errors in a single measurement. Next we considered the known external effects on the water of a well that are the slow tectonic re-adjustment processes, the meteorology and the gravity tides and we separated these effects applying band-pass filters to the Argon content raw trends. Then we identified the largest fluctuations in these trends applying the 3 σ criterion and we found three anomalies in a case and two anomalies in other case. Comparing the time occurrence of the anomalies at the two wells we found out that a coincidence exists only in the case of the premonitory anomalies we are studying. The simultaneous appearance of well definite anomalies in the residual trends of the same parameter at two different sites supports their meaning and the possibility that they are related to some large scale effect, as the occurrence of a strong earthquake. But, other earthquakes similar to the June 1996 event took place during the Argon content measurements time and no anomaly appeared in this content. In the past, some of the authors of this paper studied the Helium content data collected in three natural springs of the Caucasus during seven years. A very similar result, that is the simultaneous appearance of clear premonitory anomalies only on the occasion of a strong (M=7.0 but shallow (2–4km earthquake, was obtained. The correspondence with the case of the Caucasus validates the

  15. High capacity argon extraction and purification system. [Suitable for age estimation of rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balogh, K; Morik, Gy [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia Atommag Kutato Intezete, Debrecen

    1979-01-01

    A high capacity metal-glass argon extraction and purification system has been developed for K/Ar dating of geologic materials. A set of samples can be loaded simultaneously and degassed in turn in the system by high frequency induction heating in a molybdenum crucible. The argon purification is carried out by titanium sponge, molecular sieve, copper oxide and glass and charcoal filled traps cooled by liquid nitrogen. The /sup 38/Ar spike and the atmospheric argon used for calibrating the mass spectrometer are dispensed by a gas-pipette system. 80-120 minutes after starting the degassing of the sample, the purified argon can be introduced into the mass spectrometer; the gettering materials regenerate in 1-5 hours, thus 1-3 samples may be analysed a day. The atmospheric argon inflow during an experimental process is less than 5x10/sup -8/ cc STP.

  16. Influence of argon impurities on the elastic scattering of x-rays from imploding beryllium capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, A. M.; Chapman, D. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Schoff, M.; Shuldberg, C.; Landen, O. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Falcone, R. W.; Gericke, D. O.; Döppner, T.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the effect of argon impurities on the elastic component of x-ray scattering spectra taken from directly driven beryllium capsule implosions at the OMEGA laser. The plasma conditions were obtained in a previous analysis [18] by fitting the inelastic scattering component. We show that the known argon impurity in the beryllium modifies the elastic scattering due to the larger number of bound electrons. We indeed find significant deviations in the elastic scattering from roughly 1 at.% argon contained in the beryllium. With knowledge of the argon impurity fraction, we use the elastic scattering component to determine the charge state of the compressed beryllium, as the fits are rather insensitive to the argon charge state. Finally, we discuss how doping small fractions of mid- or high-Z elements into low-Z materials could allow ionization balance studies in dense plasmas.

  17. Simulation of argon response and light detection in the DarkSide-50 dual phase TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P.; et al.

    2017-07-18

    A Geant4-based Monte Carlo package named G4DS has been developed to simulate the response of DarkSide-50, an experiment operating since 2013 at LNGS, designed to detect WIMP interactions in liquid argon. In the process of WIMP searches, DarkSide-50 has achieved two fundamental milestones: the rejection of electron recoil background with a power of ~10^7, using the pulse shape discrimination technique, and the measurement of the residual 39Ar contamination in underground argon, ~3 orders of magnitude lower with respect to atmospheric argon. These results rely on the accurate simulation of the detector response to the liquid argon scintillation, its ionization, and electron-ion recombination processes. This work provides a complete overview of the DarkSide Monte Carlo and of its performance, with a particular focus on PARIS, the custom-made liquid argon response model.

  18. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sangiorgio, Samuele [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foxe, Michael P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Hagmann, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Kazkaz, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Norman, E. B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pereverzev, S. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rebassoo, Finn O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sorensen, Peter F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  19. Comparison study of nitrogen and argon processing in a plasma arc centrifugal treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuey, M.; Tsuji, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Recent testing performed at the plasma research center of Retech Services, Inc. compared nitrogen with argon as plasma gas in the processing of simulated wastes. The testing took place in a full-scale production PACT system under a cooperative research and development study between Retech Services Inc. and Toyo Engineering Corporation. This study shows that simulated waste can be processed by both nitrogen and argon plasmas. Heat losses to the torch nozzle were significantly lower with argon and should be studied further. Both argon and nitrogen plasma were able to process feeds containing both metals and oxides. Some of the drawbacks to using argon plasma are cost, higher volume flow rates, and dual mode torch nozzle erosion. (authors)

  20. Orthodontic Replacement of Lost Permanent Molar with Neighbor Molar: A Six-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisa Boamorte Raveli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraction is very frequent indication in orthodontic planning, especially when there are crowding, biprotrusion, and aesthetically unpleasant profiles. Next to extraction comes space closure, which represents a challenge for orthodontists because of extended treatment time, discomfort created for the patient, tissue tolerance, and stability concerns. When it comes to what mechanics to choose for space closure, loops present two major advantages in relation to sliding mechanics: absence of abrasion and possibility to reach pure dental translation. A case is presented where an adult female patient with early loss of the first lower permanent molars, minor lower crowding, and tooth biprotrusion was treated with upper first bicuspids extraction along with upper and lower space closure done with T-loops to promote best space closure control in order to correct the malocclusion and enhance facial aesthetics.

  1. Orthodontic Replacement of Lost Permanent Molar with Neighbor Molar: A Six-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Knop, Luegya Amorim Henriques; Sampaio, Luana Paz

    2017-01-01

    Extraction is very frequent indication in orthodontic planning, especially when there are crowding, biprotrusion, and aesthetically unpleasant profiles. Next to extraction comes space closure, which represents a challenge for orthodontists because of extended treatment time, discomfort created for the patient, tissue tolerance, and stability concerns. When it comes to what mechanics to choose for space closure, loops present two major advantages in relation to sliding mechanics: absence of abrasion and possibility to reach pure dental translation. A case is presented where an adult female patient with early loss of the first lower permanent molars, minor lower crowding, and tooth biprotrusion was treated with upper first bicuspids extraction along with upper and lower space closure done with T-loops to promote best space closure control in order to correct the malocclusion and enhance facial aesthetics. PMID:29318054

  2. Standardised studies on Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) and Hypomineralised Second Primary Molars (HSPM): a need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfrink, M E C; Ghanim, A; Manton, D J; Weerheijm, K L

    2015-06-01

    In November 2014, a review of literature concerning prevalence data of Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) and Hypomineralised Second Primary Molars (HSPM) was performed. A search of PubMed online databases was conducted for relevant articles published until November 2014. The reference lists of all retrieved articles were hand-searched. Studies were included after assessing the eligibility of the full-text article. Out of 1078 manuscripts, a total of 157 English written publications were selected based on title and abstract. Of these 157, 60 were included in the study and allocated as 52 MIH and 5 HSPM, and 3 for both MIH and HSPM. These studies utilised the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry judgment criteria, the modified index of developmental defects of enamel (mDDE) and self-devised criteria, and demonstrated a wide variation in the reported prevalence (MIH 2.9-44 %; HSPM 0-21.8 %). Most values mentioned were representative for specific areas. More studies were performed in cities compared with rural areas. A great variation was found in calibration methods, number of participants, number of examiners and research protocols between the studies. The majority of the prevalence studies also investigated possible aetiological factors. To compare MIH and HSPM prevalence and or aetiological data around the world, standardisation of such studies seems essential. Standardisation of the research protocol should include a clearly described sample of children (minimum number of 300 for prevalence and 1000 for aetiology studies) and use of the same calibration sets and methods whereas aetiological studies need to be prospective in nature. A standardised protocol for future MIH and HSPM prevalence and aetiology studies is recommended.

  3. Endodontic treatment of an unusual connation of permanent mandibular molars: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengbo; Fan, Bing; Peng, Bin; Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan

    2006-10-01

    A 27-year-old patient with an anomalous mandibular molar was referred for endodontic therapy. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed the connation of a second mandibular molar with a third molar. Challenging endodontic therapy was performed in the unusual connated molars. A 2-year recall showed good treatment result.

  4. Pattern of third molar impaction in a Saudi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Hassan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Ali H Hassan11Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To evaluate the current pattern of third molar impaction in a sample of Saudi patients.Methods: One thousand thirty-nine orthopantomograms (OPG of patients ranging in age from 19 to 46 years (536 males and 503 females were evaluated to determine the frequency of impacted third molars, their levels of eruption, and their angulations.Results: Four hundred twenty-two (40.5% of the 1039 OPG showed at least one impacted third molar, with no significant difference between males (222; 52.6% and females (200; 47.4% (P = 0.284. The most common number of impacted third molars per OPG was one (72.5%. Impacted third molars were 1.64 times more likely to occur in the mandible than in the maxilla. The most common angulation of impaction in the mandible was the mesial (33.4%, while the most common angulation in the maxilla, was the vertical (49.6%. Level B impaction was the most common in both maxilla (48.2% and mandible (67.7%. There was no significant difference in the frequency of impaction between the right and left sides in both jaws.Conclusion: The pattern of third molar impaction in the western region of Saudi Arabia is characterized by a high prevalence of impaction that is greater in the mandibles and with no sex predilection.Keywords: third molar, impaction, prevalence, Saudi 

  5. Genetic integration of molar cusp size variation in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Christina; Bates, Elizabeth; Broughton, Elizabeth; Do, Nicholas T; Fletcher, Zachary; Mahaney, Michael C; Hlusko, Leslea J

    2010-06-01

    Many studies of primate diversity and evolution rely on dental morphology for insight into diet, behavior, and phylogenetic relationships. Consequently, variation in molar cusp size has increasingly become a phenotype of interest. In 2007 we published a quantitative genetic analysis of mandibular molar cusp size variation in baboons. Those results provided more questions than answers, as the pattern of genetic integration did not fit predictions from odontogenesis. To follow up, we expanded our study to include data from the maxillary molar cusps. Here we report on these later analyses, as well as inter-arch comparisons with the mandibular data. We analyzed variation in two-dimensional maxillary molar cusp size using data collected from a captive pedigreed breeding colony of baboons, Papio hamadryas, housed at the Southwest National Primate Research Center. These analyses show that variation in maxillary molar cusp size is heritable and sexually dimorphic. We also estimated additive genetic correlations between cusps on the same crown, homologous cusps along the tooth row, and maxillary and mandibular cusps. The pattern for maxillary molars yields genetic correlations of one between the paracone-metacone and protocone-hypocone. Bivariate analyses of cuspal homologues on adjacent teeth yield correlations that are high or not significantly different from one. Between dental arcades, the nonoccluding cusps consistently yield high genetic correlations, especially the metaconid-paracone and metaconid-metacone. This pattern of genetic correlation does not immediately accord with the pattern of development and/or calcification, however these results do follow predictions that can be made from the evolutionary history of the tribosphenic molar. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. 2D DC Subnormal Glow Discharge in Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchikhi, A.; Hamid, A.

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed and used to describe a DC subnormal glow discharge in argon with Cartesian geometry. This configuration allows us to take into account the transverse expansion of the discharge. A hydrodynamic fluid model used in this paper is based on the moments of the Boltzmann transport equation. The resultant set of governing equations consists of continuity equations (fluxes and densities) for electrons and ions, an energy equation for electrons, and Poisson's equation. Simulation results are presented for the densities of charged particles, the electric voltage, the electric field, and the electron temperature of the discharge. The results were compared with those obtained in the literature.

  7. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Gendotti, A; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Loew, T; Mladenov, D; Montanari, C; Murphy, S; Nessi, M; Norris, B; Noto, F; Rubbia, A; Sharma, R; Smargianaki, D; Stewart, J; Vignoli, C; Wilson, P; Wu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study ne...

  8. Cold Electronics for Giant Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Lanni, F.; Li, S.; Nambiar, N.; Rescia, S.; Thorn, C.; Yarema, R.; Yu, B.

    2011-01-01

    The choice between cold and warm electronics (inside or outside the cryostat) in very large LAr TPCs (>5-10 ktons) is not an electronics issue, but it is rather a major cryostat design issue. This is because the location of the signal processing electronics has a direct and far reaching effect on the cryostat design, an indirect effect on the TPC electrode design (sense wire spacing, wire length and drift distance), and a significant effect on the TPC performance. All these factors weigh so overwhelmingly in favor of the cold electronics that it remains an optimal solution for very large TPCs. In this paper signal and noise considerations are summarized, the concept of the readout chain is described, and the guidelines for design of CMOS circuits for operation in liquid argon (at ∼89 K) are discussed.

  9. Is there excess argon in the Fish Canyon magmatic system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C. M.; Sherlock, S.; Kelley, S. P.; Charlier, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    Some phenocrysts from the Fish Canyon Tuff (San Juan volcanic field, south-western Colorado, USA) have yielded anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages and yet the sanidine ages are sufficiently reproducible to allow its use as an international standard. The eruption age of the Fish Canyon tuff has recently been determined by high precision analysis and recalibration of the decay constants based on the sanidine standard at 28.305 ± 0.036 Ma [1], slightly younger than the generally accepted U-Pb age. Previously, minerals from the tuff have been used in various geochronological studies e.g., fission-track; U-Pb; Rb-Sr; K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar, but U-Pb zircon ages which range 28.37 - 28.61 Ma appear to be older than the sanidine and other minerals, including biotite, yield older ages (27.41 - 28.25 Ma for biotite) [2]. In the Fish Canyon volcanic system, the erupted products are thought to exist in the magma chamber for significant periods prior to eruption [3] and then pass rapidly from a high temperature magmatic environment (where Ar is free to re-equilibrate among the minerals), to effectively being quenched upon eruption (where Ar becomes immobile). Artificially elevated ages, older than eruption age, have been identified in some 40Ar/39Ar geochronological studies (e.g. [4]). These older ages may either reflect; 1) argon accumulation in pheno- or xenocrysts (by radioactive decay of parent 40K), 2) excess argon (40ArE) incorporated into a mineral during crystallisation (via diffusion into the mineral lattice or hosted within fluid or melt inclusions) or 3) inherited radiogenic argon (the dated material contains a component older than the age of eruption) [5]. To better understand the effects of 40ArE on 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages we have conducted a detailed study of intra-grain grain age variations by UV-LAMP Ar-analysis. Analysis of polished thick sections has been performed in-situ using a 213nm laser and Nu Instruments Noblesse which is able to discriminate against

  10. Liquid argon calorimetry with LHC-performance specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianotti, F.; Battistoni, G.; Camin, D.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Ferrari, A.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Perini, L.; Pessina, G.; Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Beaugiraud, B.; Cavanna, F.; Colas, J.; Lebeau, M.; Leflour, T.; LeMarec, J.C.; Maire, M.; Petitpas, P.; Thion, J.; Vialle, J.P.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Gordon, H.A.; Polychronakos, V.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Stephani, D.; Baisin, L.; Berset, J.C.; Chevalley, J.L.; Fabjan, C.W.; Franz, A.; Farthouat, P.; Gildemeister, O.; Jenni, P.; Lefebvre, M.; Marin, C.P.; Nessi, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pepe, M.; Polesello, G.; Richter, W.; Sigrist, A.; Stevenson, G.R.; Willis, W.J.; Baze, J.M.; Gosset, L.; Lavocat, P.; Mansoulie, B.; Meyer, J.P.; Renardy, J.F.; Teiger, J.; Zaccone, H.; Auge, E.; Chase, R.L.; Chollet, J.C.; La Taille, C. de; Fayard, L.; Fournier, D.; Guilhem, G.; Hrisoho, A.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Jean, P.; Merkel, B.; Noppe, J.M.; Parrour, G.; Petroff, P.; Repellin, J.P.; Schaffer, A.; Seguin, N.; Veillet, J.J.; Fuglesang, C.

    1992-01-01

    A novel geometry liquid argon calorimeter with accordion-shaped electrodes and converter plates has been recently conceived. Such a design allows for a fast readout and for a high granularity over large volumes with minimal dead spaces, properties which are considered essential for operation at the future hadron colliders. The first electromagnetic prototype based on this scheme has been built and tested at the CERN SPS. For a response peaking time of 140 ns an energy resolution of 10%/√E(GeV) and a space resolution of 4.4 mm/√E(GeV) with 2.7 cm cell size were achieved for electrons. A few preliminary results from a test with fast readout (response peaking time of less than 40 ns) are also presented. (orig.)

  11. Performance of a liquid argon Accordion calorimeter with fast readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Beaugiraud, B.; Colas, J.; Leflour, T.; Maire, M.; Vialle, J.P.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Zolnierowski, Y.P.; Gordon, H.A.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Stephani, D.; Chevalley, J.L.; Fabjan, C.W.; Fournier, D.; Franz, A.; Gildemeister, O.; Jenni, P.; Nessi, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pepe, M.; Richter, W.; Soderqvist, J.; Baze, J.M.; Gosset, L.; Lavocat, P.; Lottin, J.P.; Mansoulie, B.; Meyer, J.F.; Renardy, J.F.; Teiger, J.; Zaccone, H.; Battistoni, G.; Camin, D.V.; Cavalli, D.; Costa, G.; Cravero, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gianotti, F.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Perini, L.; Pessina, G.; Sala, P.; Sciamanna, M.; Auge, E.; Chase, R.; Chollet, J.C.; La Taille, C. de; Fayard, L.; Jean, P.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Merkel, B.; Noppe, J.M.; Parrour, G.; Petroff, P.; Repellin, J.P.; Schaffer, A.; Seguin, N.; Unal, G.; Fuglesang, C.; Lefebvre, M.; Towers, S.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype lead-liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeter with parallel plates and Accordion geometry has been equipped with high speed readout electronics and tested with electron and muon beams at the CERN SPS. For a response peaking time of about 35 ns, fast enough for operation at the future hadron colliders, the energy resolution for electrons is 9.6%/√E[GeV] with a local constant term of 0.3% and a noise contribution of 0.33/E[GeV]. The spatial accuracy achieved with a detector granularity of 2.7 cm is 3.7 mm/√E[GeV] and the angular resolution 12 mrad at 60 GeV. (orig.)

  12. High pressure argon detector of high energy neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevskii, A.V.; Golutvin, I.A.; Sarantsev, V.L.; Sviridov, V.A.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Kalinovskii, A.N.; Sosnovtsev, V.V.; Chernyatin, V.K.; Kaftanov, V.S.; Khovanskii, V.D.; Shevchenko, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, we suggest an electron neutrino detector of a new type where track information is available for all charged particles. As a working medium we use Argon compressed up to a pressure of 100 to 150 atm (approximately 0.2-0.3 g/cm 3 ). The spatial reconstruction of tracks are accomplished with an accuracy not inferior to that of bubble chambers. The detector has a high sensitivity in ionization measurements. An assembly with a working medium mass of approximately 100 tons seem to be realisable. This makes it possible to perform tasks with cross-sections of (10 -5 + 10 -3 ) x delty tot at an intensity of the neutrino beam which is available in present-day accelerators. (orig.)

  13. Electron-ion recombination study in argon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafrouni, Hanna.

    1979-01-01

    This study deals with a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure. A transient mode is obtained using a fast thyristor connected to the electrodes, which short-circuits the discharge. By means of two wavelengths laser interferometry and spectroscopy measurements we have determined the temporal changes of the electron density, ground state atom density and excited atom density. We have shown that, when the electric field is suppressed, the electron temperature rapidly decreases to the gas temperature before changing electron and atom densities. This phenomenon is applied to determine the gas temperature and to evaluate the role played by ionization in electron density balance. The coefficients of ambipolar diffusion, ionization and recombination and an apparent recombination coefficient are determined versus electron temperature and compared with theoretical values [fr

  14. Readout Electronics Upgrades of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, Christopher Ryan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The high-luminosity LHC will provide 5-7 times higher luminosites than the orignal design. An improved readout system of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter is needed to readout the 182,500 calorimeter cells at 40 MHz with 16 bit dynamic range in these conditions. Low-noise, low-power, radiation-tolerant and high-bandwidth electronics components are being developed in 65 and 130 nm CMOS technologies. First prototypes of the front-end electronics components show good promise to match the stringent specifications. The off-detector electronics will make use of FPGAs connected through high-speed links to perform energy reconstruction, data reduction and buffering. Results of tests of the first prototypes of front-end components will be presented, along with design studies on the performance of the off-detector readout system.

  15. Raman spectra of ruthenium and tantalum trimers in argon matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Shen, Xiaole; Chen, Xiaoyu; Lombardi, John R.

    2000-12-01

    The resonance Raman spectra of ruthenium trimers (Ru 3) in argon matrices have been obtained. Three resonance Raman transitions were observed between 570 and 590 nm. Two of them (303.4 and 603.7 cm -1) are assigned to the totally symmetric vibrational progression, giving k e=1.86 mdyne/ Å. The line at 581.5 cm-1 is assigned as the origin of a low-lying electronic state. We also report on the observation of a resonance Raman spectrum of tantalum trimers (Ta 3). Observed lines include 251.2 and 501.9 cm-1 which we assign to the fundamental and the first overtone of the symmetric stretch in Ta 3. This gives k e=2.25 mdyne/ Å.

  16. Liquid argon TPC signal formation, signal processing and reconstruction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baller, B.

    2017-07-01

    This document describes a reconstruction chain that was developed for the ArgoNeuT and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermilab. These experiments study accelerator neutrino interactions that occur in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. Reconstructing the properties of particles produced in these interactions benefits from the knowledge of the micro-physics processes that affect the creation and transport of ionization electrons to the readout system. A wire signal deconvolution technique was developed to convert wire signals to a standard form for hit reconstruction, to remove artifacts in the electronics chain and to remove coherent noise. A unique clustering algorithm reconstructs line-like trajectories and vertices in two dimensions which are then matched to create of 3D objects. These techniques and algorithms are available to all experiments that use the LArSoft suite of software.

  17. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  18. Drift velocity of free electrons in liquid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkowiak, W.

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of the drift velocity of free electrons in liquid argon has been performed. Free electrons have been produced by photoelectric effect using laser light in a so-called 'laser chamber'. The results on the drift velocity v d are given as a function of the electric field strength in the range 0.5 kV/cm≤|E|≤12.6 kV/cm and the temperature in the range 87 K≤T≤94 K. A global parametrization of v d (|E|,T) has been fitted to the data. A temperature dependence of the electron drift velocity is observed, with a mean value of Δv d /(ΔT v d )=(-1.72±0.08)%/K in the range of 87-94 K

  19. LET dependence of scintillation yields in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doke, Tadayoshi; Hitachi, Akira; Kikuchi, Jun; Crawford, H J; Lindstrom, P J; Masuda, Kimiaki; Shibamura, Eido; Takahashi, Tan

    1988-06-01

    Scintillation yields (scintillation intensity per unit absorbed energy) in liquid argon for ionizing particles are reviewed as a function of LET for the particles. The maximum scintillation yield, which is obtained for relativistic heavy ions from Ne to La, is about 1.2 times larger than that for gamma rays in NaI(Tl) crystal. In the low LET region, the scintillation yields for relativistic electrons, protons and He ions are 10-20% lower than the maximum yield. This tendency can be explained by taking into account the existence of the electrons which have escaped from their parent ions. In the high LET region, a quenching effect due to high ionization density is observed for alpha particles, fission fragments and relativistic Au ions.

  20. Effect of the levitating microparticle cloud on radiofrequency argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitic, S.; Pustylnik, M. Y.; Klumov, B. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a levitating cloud of microparticles on the parameters of a radiofrequency (RF) plasma has been studied by means of two experimental techniques. Axial distributions of 1s excited states of argon were measured by a self-absorption method. A correction of a standard self-absorption method for the extinction of the light by the levitating microparticles is proposed. In addition the electron temperature was estimated using the optical emission spectroscopy. Measurements at the same discharge conditions in a microparticle-free discharge and discharge, containing a cloud of levitating microparticles, revealed the non-local influence of the microparticle cloud on the discharge plasma. The most probable cause of this influence is the disturbance of the ionization balance by the levitating microparticles.