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Sample records for partial mitochondrial cytochrome

  1. Genetic characterization of the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (cox 1) gene of the zoonotic parasitic nematode, Ancylostoma ceylanicum from humans, dogs and cats.

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    Ngui, Romano; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Chua, Kek Heng; Traub, Rebecca; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2013-10-01

    Ancylostoma ceylanicum is the only zoonotic hookworm species that is able to produce patent infections in humans with the majority of cases reported in South East Asia. Over the past few years, there have been an increasing number of studies investigating the prevalence of this parasitic zoonosis using molecular diagnostic tools and a single genetic locus as marker for species identification. As there can be limitations in using a single genetic locus for epidemiological studies and genetic discrimination, the complementary use of a more variable locus will provide additional evidence to support the zoonotic exchange of hookworm species between humans and animals. In the present study, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox 1) sequence of A. ceylanicum from positive human and animal fecal samples were determined and compared with published reference sequences. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that isolates of A. ceylanicum were divided into two clusters, one consisting 3 human isolates and the other comprising 19 isolates of human and animal origin from different geographical locations within Malaysia. The two groups of A. ceylanicum could be distinguished from one another through five fixed nucleotide differences at locations 891, 966, 1008, 1077 and 1083. The detection of genetically distinct groups and considerable level of genetic variation within the cox 1 sequence of A. ceylanicum might suggest potential haplotype-linked differences in zoonotic, epidemiological and pathobiological characteristics, a hypothesis that still needs further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma.

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    Babbitt, Shalon E; Sutherland, Molly C; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Kranz, Robert G

    2015-08-01

    Cytochromes c (cyt c) and c1 are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cyt c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for the import of apocytochrome c (apocyt c). Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cyt c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles of heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A mitochondrial cytochrome b mutation causing severe respiratory chain enzyme deficiency in humans and yeast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakely, E.L.; Mitchell, A.L.; Fisher, N.; Meunier, B.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Schaefer, A.M.; Jackson, M.J.; Turnbull, D.M.; Taylor, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas the majority of disease-related mitochondrial DNA mutations exhibit significant biochemical and clinical heterogeneity, mutations within the mitochondrially encoded human cytochrome b gene (MTCYB) are almost exclusively associated with isolated complex III deficiency in muscle and a clinical

  4. Enhanced mitochondrial degradation of yeast cytochrome c with amphipathic structures.

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    Chen, Xi; Moerschell, Richard P; Pearce, David A; Ramanan, Durga D; Sherman, Fred

    2005-02-01

    The dispensable N-terminus of iso-1-cytochrome c (iso-1) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was replaced by 11 different amphipathic structures. Rapid degradation of the corresponding iso-1 occurred, with the degree of degradation increasing with the amphipathic moments; and this amphipathic-dependent degradation was designated ADD. ADD occurred with the holo-forms in the mitochondria but not as the apo-forms in the cytosol. The extreme mutant type degraded with a half-life of approximately 12 min, whereas the normal iso-1 was stable over hours. ADD was influenced by the rho+/rho- state and by numerous chromosomal genes. Most importantly, ADD appeared to be specifically suppressed to various extents by deletions of any of the YME1, AFG3, or RCA1 genes encoding membrane-associated mitochondrial proteases, probably because the amphipathic structures caused a stronger association with the mitochondrial inner membrane and its associated proteases. The use of ADD assisted in the differentiation of substrates of different mitochondrial degradation pathways.

  5. Alterations of sirtuins in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase deficiency.

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    Arne Björn Potthast

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are NAD+ dependent deacetylases, which regulate mitochondrial energy metabolism as well as cellular response to stress. The NAD/NADH-system plays a crucial role in oxidative phosphorylation linking sirtuins and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, sirtuins are able to directly deacetylate and activate different complexes of the respiratory chain. This prompted us to analyse sirtuin levels in skin fibroblasts from patients with cytochrome c-oxidase (COX deficiency and to test the impact of different pharmaceutical activators of sirtuins (SRT1720, paeonol to modulate sirtuins and possibly respiratory chain enzymes in patient cells in vitro.We assayed intracellular levels of sirtuin 1 and the mitochondrial sirtuins SIRT3 and SIRT4 in human fibroblasts from patients with COX- deficiency. Furthermore, sirtuins were measured after inhibiting complex IV in healthy control fibroblasts by cyanide and after incubation with activators SRT1720 and paeonol. To determine the effect of sirtuin inhibition at the cellular level we measured total cellular acetylation (control and patient cells, with and without treatment by Western blot.We observed a significant decrease in cellular levels of all three sirtuins at the activity, protein and transcriptional level (by 15% to 50% in COX-deficient cells. Additionally, the intracellular concentration of NAD+ was reduced in patient cells. We mimicked the biochemical phenotype of COX- deficiency by incubating healthy fibroblasts with cyanide and observed reduced sirtuin levels. A pharmacological activation of sirtuins resulted in normalized sirtuin levels in patient cells. Hyper acetylation was also reversible after treatment with sirtuin activators. Pharmacological modulation of sirtuins resulted in altered respiratory chain complex activities.We found inhibition of situins 1, 3 and 4 at activity, protein and transcriptional levels in fibroblasts from patient with COX-deficiency. Pharmacological

  6. New insight into the mechanism of mitochondrial cytochrome c function

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    Chertkova, Rita V; Brazhe, Nadezda A; Bryantseva, Tatiana V

    2017-01-01

    We investigate functional role of the P76GTKMIFA83 fragment of the primary structure of cytochrome c. Based on the data obtained by the analysis of informational structure (ANIS), we propose a model of functioning of cytochrome c. According to this model, conformational rearrangements of the P76...... with conformational changes and reduced mobility of heme porphyrin. This points to a significant role of the P76GTKMIFA83 fragment in the electron transport function of cytochrome c....

  7. Molecular identification of sibling species of Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae that parasitize buprestid and cerambycid beetles by using partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and 28S ribosomal RNA gene.

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    Yuan Jiang

    Full Text Available The species belonging to Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae are currently the most important insect natural enemies of wood borer pests, mainly buprestid and cerambycid beetles, in China. However, some sibling species of this genus are very difficult to distinguish because of their similar morphological features. To address this issue, we conducted phylogenetic and genetic analyses of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI and 28S RNA gene sequences from eight species of Sclerodermus reared from different wood borer pests. The eight sibling species were as follows: S. guani Xiao et Wu, S. sichuanensis Xiao, S. pupariae Yang et Yao, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1-5. A 594-bp fragment of COI and 750-bp fragment of 28S were subsequently sequenced. For COI, the G-C content was found to be low in all the species, averaging to about 30.0%. Sequence divergences (Kimura-2-parameter distances between congeneric species averaged to 4.5%, and intraspecific divergences averaged to about 0.09%. Further, the maximum sequence divergences between congeneric species and Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5 averaged to about 16.5%. All 136 samples analyzed were included in six reciprocally monophyletic clades in the COI neighbor-joining (NJ tree. The NJ tree inferred from the 28S rRNA sequence yielded almost identical results, but the samples from S. guani, S. sichuanensis, S. pupariae, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1-4 clustered together and only Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5 clustered separately. Our findings indicate that the standard barcode region of COI can be efficiently used to distinguish morphologically similar Sclerodermus species. Further, we speculate that Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5 might be a new species of Sclerodermus.

  8. Non-cytochrome mediated mitochondrial ATP production in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienen, E. J.; Maturi, R. K.; Pollakis, G.; Clarkson, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    The life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei brucei involves a series of differentiation steps characterized by marked changes in mitochondrial development and function. The bloodstream forms of this parasite completely lack cytochromes and have not been considered to have any Krebs cycle function. It has

  9. Nitric oxide partitioning into mitochondrial membranes and the control of respiration at cytochrome c oxidase

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    Shiva, Sruti; Brookes, Paul S.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Anderson, Peter G.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2001-06-01

    An emerging and important site of action for nitric oxide (NO) within cells is the mitochondrial inner membrane, where NO binds to and inhibits members of the electron transport chain, complex III and cytochrome c oxidase. Although it is known that inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is competitive with O2, the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon remain unclear, and the impact of both NO and O2 partitioning into biological membranes has not been considered. These properties are particularly interesting because physiological O2 tensions can vary widely, with NO having a greater inhibitory effect at low O2 tensions (mitochondrial membranes in the absence of substrate, in a nonsaturable process that is O2 dependent. This consumption modulates inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO and is enhanced by the addition of exogenous membranes. From these data, it is evident that the partition of NO into mitochondrial membranes has a major impact on the ability of NO to control mitochondrial respiration. The implications of this conclusion are discussed in the context of mitochondrial lipid:protein ratios and the importance of NO as a regulator of respiration in pathophysiology.

  10. A novel mutation in the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene (MTCYB) in a patient with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes syndrome.

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    Emmanuele, Valentina; Sotiriou, Evangelia; Rios, Purificación Gutierrez; Ganesh, Jaya; Ichord, Rebecca; Foley, A Reghan; Akman, H Orhan; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene (MTCYB) have been commonly associated with isolated mitochondrial myopathy and exercise intolerance, rarely with multisystem disorders, and only once with a parkinsonism/mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS) overlap syndrome. Here, we describe a novel mutation (m.14864 T>C) in MTCYB in a 15-year-old girl with a clinical history of migraines, epilepsy, sensorimotor neuropathy, and strokelike episodes, a clinical picture reminiscent of MELAS.  The mutation, which changes a highly conserved cysteine to arginine at amino acid position 40 of cytochrome b, was heteroplasmic in muscle, blood, fibroblasts, and urinary sediment from the patient but absent in accessible tissues from her asymptomatic mother. This case demonstrates that MTCYB must be included in the already long list of mitochondrial DNA genes that have been associated with the MELAS phenotype.

  11. Genetic differentiation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I gene in genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora).

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    Zhao, Yan; Gentekaki, Eleni; Yi, Zhenzhen; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp.

  12. Genetic differentiation of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I gene in genus Paramecium (Protista, Ciliophora.

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    Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene is being used increasingly for evaluating inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity of ciliated protists. However, very few studies focus on assessing genetic divergence of the COI gene within individuals and how its presence might affect species identification and population structure analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the genetic variation of the COI gene in five Paramecium species for a total of 147 clones derived from 21 individuals and 7 populations. We identified a total of 90 haplotypes with several individuals carrying more than one haplotype. Parsimony network and phylogenetic tree analyses revealed that intra-individual diversity had no effect in species identification and only a minor effect on population structure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the COI gene is a suitable marker for resolving inter- and intra-specific relationships of Paramecium spp.

  13. Population structure of Tor tor inferred from mitochondrial gene cytochrome b.

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    Pasi, Komal Shyamakant; Lakra, W S; Bhatt, J P; Goswami, M; Malakar, A Kr

    2013-06-01

    Tor tor, commonly called as Tor mahseer, is a high-valued food and game fish endemic to trans-Himalayan region. Mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene region of 967 bp was used to estimate the population structure of T. tor. Three populations of T. tor were collected from Narmada (Hosangabad), Ken (Madla), and Parbati river (Sheopur) in Madhya Pradesh, India. The sequence analysis revealed that the nucleotide diversity (π) was low, ranging from 0.000 to 0.0150. Haplotype diversity (h) ranged from 0.000 to 1.000. The analysis of molecular variance analysis indicated significant genetic divergence among the three populations of T. tor. Neighboring-joining tree also showed that all individuals from three populations clustered into three distinct clades. The data generated by cyt b marker revealed interesting insight about population structure of T. tor, which would serve as baseline data for conservation and management of mahseer fishery.

  14. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

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    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jin, Shao-Bo [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Han, Liwei [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Lendahl, Urban [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhao, Jian, E-mail: Jian.Zhao@ki.se [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Nistér, Monica [Department of Oncology–Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK R8:05, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  15. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong; Jin, Shao-Bo; Han, Liwei; Lendahl, Urban; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  16. Site heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of the sterlet sturgeon Acipenser ruthenus

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    Andreea Dudu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sturgeons are fish species with a complex biology. They are also characterized by complex aspects including polyploidization and easiness of hybridization. As with most of the Ponto-Caspian sturgeons, the populations of Acipenser ruthenus from the Danube have declined drastically during the last decades. This is the first report on mitochondrial point heteroplasmy in the cytochrome b gene of this species. The 1141 bp sequence of the cytb gene in wild sterlet sturgeon individuals from the Lower Danube was determined, and site heteroplasmy evidenced in three of the 30 specimens collected. Two nucleotide sequences were identified in these heteroplasmic individuals. The majority of the heteroplasmic sites are synonymous and do not modify the sequence of amino acids in cytochrome B protein. To date, several cases of point heteroplasmy have been reported in animals, mostly due to paternal leakage of mtDNA. The presence of specific point heteroplasmic sites might be interesting for a possible correlation with genetically distinct groups in the Danube River.

  17. The Complexity of Mitochondrial Complex IV: An Update of Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis in Plants

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    Mansilla, Natanael; Racca, Sofia; Gras, Diana E.; Gonzalez, Daniel H.

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is an energy producing process that involves the coordinated action of several protein complexes embedded in the inner membrane to finally produce ATP. Complex IV or Cytochrome c Oxidase (COX) is the last electron acceptor of the respiratory chain, involved in the reduction of O2 to H2O. COX is a multimeric complex formed by multiple structural subunits encoded in two different genomes, prosthetic groups (heme a and heme a3), and metallic centers (CuA and CuB). Tens of accessory proteins are required for mitochondrial RNA processing, synthesis and delivery of prosthetic groups and metallic centers, and for the final assembly of subunits to build a functional complex. In this review, we perform a comparative analysis of COX composition and biogenesis factors in yeast, mammals and plants. We also describe possible external and internal factors controlling the expression of structural proteins and assembly factors at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and the effect of deficiencies in different steps of COX biogenesis to infer the role of COX in different aspects of plant development. We conclude that COX assembly in plants has conserved and specific features, probably due to the incorporation of a different set of subunits during evolution. PMID:29495437

  18. Comparison of brain mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity with cyanide LD(50) yields insight into the efficacy of prophylactics.

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    Marziaz, Mandy L; Frazier, Kathryn; Guidry, Paul B; Ruiz, Robyn A; Petrikovics, Ilona; Haines, Donovan C

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial respiratory pathway, therefore inhibiting the cell oxygen utilization and resulting in the condition of histotoxic anoxia. The enzyme rhodanese detoxifies cyanide by utilizing sulfur donors to convert cyanide to thiocyanate, and new and improved sulfur donors are actively sought as researchers seek to improve cyanide prophylactics. We have determined brain cytochrome c oxidase activity as a marker for cyanide exposure for mice pre-treated with various cyanide poisoning prophylactics, including sulfur donors thiosulfate (TS) and thiotaurine (TT3). Brain mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation, the outer mitochondrial membrane was disrupted by a maltoside detergent, and the decrease in absorbance at 550 nm as horse heart ferrocytochrome c (generated by the dithiothreitol reduction of ferricytochrome c) was oxidized was monitored. Overall, the TS control prophylactic treatment provided significant protection of the cytochrome c oxidase activity. The TT3-treated mice showed reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity even in the absence of cyanide. In both treatment series, addition of exogenous Rh did not significantly enhance the prevention of cytochrome c oxidase inhibition, but the addition of sodium nitrite did. These findings can lead to a better understanding of the protection mechanism by various cyanide antidotal systems. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The effect of X-irradiation on vitamin E deficient rat liver mitochondrial ATPase and cytochrome c oxidase

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    Korkut, S.

    1978-01-01

    Male albino rats were fed for 3 weeks on standard diets or on diets either deficient in or supplemented by vitamin E, whole-body X-irradiated and then immediately decapitated. Liver mitochondrial ATPase activity was stimulated and cytochrome c oxidase inhibited in the irradiated vitamin E deficient group. These activities were not influenced by irradiation in the rats fed on vitamin E supplemented and standard diets. The live mitochondrial vitamin E level was decreased in rats fed on the deficient diet. No differences in liver mitochondrial vitamin E levels were observed after X-irradiation of rats fed on any of the diets. The results suggest that the liver mitochondrial inner-membrane structure may be altered by a diet deficient in vitamin E. (U.K.)

  20. Genetic variation of Taenia pisiformis collected from Sichuan, China, based on the mitochondrial cytochrome B gene.

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    Yang, Deying; Ren, Yongjun; Fu, Yan; Xie, Yue; Nie, Huaming; Nong, Xiang; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2013-08-01

    Taenia pisiformis is one of the most important parasites of canines and rabbits. T. pisiformis cysticercus (the larval stage) causes severe damage to rabbit breeding, which results in huge economic losses. In this study, the genetic variation of T. pisiformis was determined in Sichuan Province, China. Fragments of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb) (922 bp) gene were amplified in 53 isolates from 8 regions of T. pisiformis. Overall, 12 haplotypes were found in these 53 cytb sequences. Molecular genetic variations showed 98.4% genetic variation derived from intra-region. FST and Nm values suggested that 53 isolates were not genetically differentiated and had low levels of genetic diversity. Neutrality indices of the cytb sequences showed the evolution of T. pisiformis followed a neutral mode. Phylogenetic analysis revealed no correlation between phylogeny and geographic distribution. These findings indicate that 53 isolates of T. pisiformis keep a low genetic variation, which provide useful knowledge for monitoring changes in parasite populations for future control strategies.

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of Palaearctic Formica species (Hymenoptera, Formicidae based on mitochondrial cytochrome B sequences.

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    Anna V Goropashnaya

    Full Text Available Ants of genus Formica demonstrate variation in social organization and represent model species for ecological, behavioral, evolutionary studies and testing theoretical implications of the kin selection theory. Subgeneric division of the Formica ants based on morphology has been questioned and remained unclear after an allozyme study on genetic differentiation between 13 species representing all subgenera was conducted. In the present study, the phylogenetic relationships within the genus were examined using mitochondrial DNA sequences of the cytochrome b and a part of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6. All 23 Formica species sampled in the Palaearctic clustered according to the subgeneric affiliation except F. uralensis that formed a separate phylogenetic group. Unlike Coptoformica and Formica s. str., the subgenus Serviformica did not form a tight cluster but more likely consisted of a few small clades. The genetic distances between the subgenera were around 10%, implying approximate divergence time of 5 Myr if we used the conventional insect divergence rate of 2% per Myr. Within-subgenus divergence estimates were 6.69% in Serviformica, 3.61% in Coptoformica, 1.18% in Formica s. str., which supported our previous results on relatively rapid speciation in the latter subgenus. The phylogeny inferred from DNA sequences provides a necessary framework against which the evolution of social traits can be compared. We discuss implications of inferred phylogeny for the evolution of social traits.

  2. A Heme-Sensing Mechanism in the Translational Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

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    Soto, Iliana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Myers, Richard S.; Hamel, Patrice; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Heme plays fundamental roles as cofactor and signaling molecule in multiple pathways devoted to oxygen sensing and utilization in aerobic organisms. For cellular respiration, heme serves as a prosthetic group in electron transfer proteins and redox enzymes. Here we report that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a heme-sensing mechanism translationally controls the biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme. We show that Mss51, a COX1 mRNA-specific translational activator and Cox1 chaperone, which coordinates Cox1 synthesis in mitoribosomes with its assembly in COX, is a heme-binding protein. Mss51 contains two heme regulatory motifs or Cys-Pro-X domains located in its N-terminus. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we have demonstrated that these motifs are important for heme binding and efficient performance of Mss51 functions. We conclude that heme sensing by Mss51 regulates COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production. PMID:23217259

  3. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the family Acrypteridae (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) based on mitochondrial cytochrome B gene.

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    Huo, Guangming; Jiang, Guofang; Sun, Zhengli; Liu, Dianfeng; Zhang, Yalin; Lu, Lin

    2007-04-01

    Sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (Cyt b) were determined for 25 species from the superfamily Acridoidae and the homologous sequences of 19 species of grasshoppers were downloaded from the GenBank data library. The purpose was to develop a molecular phylogeny of the Acrypteridae, and to interpret the phylogenetic position of the family within the superfamily Acridoidea. Phylogeny was reconstructed by Maximum-parsimony (MP) and Bayesian criteria using Yunnanites coriacea and Tagasta marginella as outgroups. The alignment length of the fragments was 384 bp after excluding ambiguous sites, including 167 parsimony informative sites. In the fragments, the percentages of A + T and G + C were 70.7% and 29.3%, respectively. The monophyly of Arcypteridae is not supported by phylogenetic trees. Within the Arcypteridae, neither Arcypterinae nor Ceracrinae is supported as a monophyletic group. The current genus Chorthippus is not a monophyletic group, and should be a polyphyletic group. The present results are significantly different from the classification scheme of Arcypteridae, which is based on morphology.

  4. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: Role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Shimoji, Manami; Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Sunakawa, Hajime; Aniya, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1) is activated by oxidative stress. Although MGST1 is found in mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1), there is no information about the oxidative activation of mtMGST1. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mtMGST1 also undergoes activation and about its function. When rats were treated with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), mtMGST1 activity was significantly increased, and the increased activity was reduced by the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol. In mitochondria from GalN/LPS-treated rats, disulfide-linked mtMGST1 dimer and mixed protein glutathione disulfides (glutathionylation) were detected. In addition, cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from GalN/LPS-treated rats was observed, and the release was inhibited by anti-MGST1 antibodies. Incubation of mitochondria from control rats with diamide and diamide plus GSH in vitro resulted in dimer- and mixed disulfide bond-mediated activation of mtMGST1, respectively. The activation of mtMGST1 by diamide plus GSH caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and the release was prevented by treatment with anti-MGST1 antibodies. In addition, diamide plus GSH treatment caused mitochondrial swelling accompanied by cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BKA), inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Furthermore, mtMGST1 activity was also inhibited by CsA and BKA. These results indicate that mtMGST1 is activated through mixed disulfide bond formation that contributes to cytochrome c release from mitochondria through the MPT pore

  5. Thermodynamics and kinetics of reduction and species conversion at a hydrophobic surface for mitochondrial cytochromes c and their cardiolipin adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranieri, Antonio; Di Rocco, Giulia; Millo, Diego; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bortolotti, Carlo A.; Lancellotti, Lidia; Borsari, Marco; Sola, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cytochrome c and its adduct with cardiolipin can be immobilized on a hydrophobic SAM. • Adsorbed cytochrome c and its adduct undergo extensive unfolding and axial ligand substitution. • An equilibrium between a six-coordinated and a five-coordinated form is observed in both cases. • The reduced five-coordinated form is stabilized by cardiolipin binding. • Immobilized cytochrome c exchanges electrons more slowly upon cardiolipin binding. - Abstract: Cytochrome c (cytc) and its adduct with cardiolipin (CL) were immobilized on a hydrophobic SAM-coated electrode surface yielding a construct which mimics the environment experienced by the complex at the inner mitochondrial membrane where it plays a role in cell apoptosis. Under these conditions, both species undergo an equilibrium between a six-coordinated His/His-ligated and a five-coordinated His/- ligated forms stable in the oxidized and in the reduced state, respectively. The thermodynamics of the oxidation-state dependent species conversion were determined by temperature-dependent diffusionless voltammetry experiments. CL binding stabilizes the immobilized reduced His/- ligated form of cytc which was found previously to catalytically reduce dioxygen. Here, this adduct is also found to show pseudoperoxidase activity, catalysing reduction of hydrogen peroxide. These effects would impart CL with an additional role in the cytc-mediated peroxidation leading to programmed cell death. Moreover, immobilized cytc exchanges electrons more slowly upon CL binding possibly due to changes in solvent reorganization effects at the protein-SAM interface

  6. Identification of fraud (with pig stuffs) in chicken-processed meat through information of mitochondrial cytochrome b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Haitham A; Sadek, Mahmoud A

    2017-11-01

    This study was conducted to find out the fraud in chicken-processed meat ingredients to protect consumers from commercial adulteration and authentication through a reliable way: direct amplification of conserved segment of cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA, in addition, using species-specific primer assay for a certain cytochrome b. The results reported that chicken-processed meats were identified as a chicken meat based on amplification of conserved cytochrome b gene of mtDNA, while different fragments sizes were produced after the application of species-specific primer as follows: 227, 157, 274, 331, 389 and 439 bp for raw meat of chicken, goat, cattle, sheep, pig and horse, respectively. The results revealed that all chicken meat products are produced with 227 bp in size. While, an adulteration with pork stuffs was observed in some of the chicken meat products using a species-specific primer of cytochrome b gene, namely, chicken luncheon and chicken burger. This study represents a reliable technique that could be used to provide a promising solution for identifying the commercial adulteration and substitutions in processed meat in retail markets.

  7. The mammalian phosphate carrier SLC25A3 is a mitochondrial copper transporter required for cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Aren; Vest, Katherine E; Maynard, Margaret K; Gammon, Micah G; Russell, Antoinette C; Mathews, Alexander T; Cole, Shelbie E; Zhu, Xinyu; Phillips, Casey B; Kwong, Jennifer Q; Dodani, Sheel C; Leary, Scot C; Cobine, Paul A

    2018-02-09

    Copper is required for the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal electron-accepting complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The likely source of copper used for COX biogenesis is a labile pool found in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, the proteins that transport copper across the inner mitochondrial membrane remain unknown. We previously reported that the mitochondrial carrier family protein Pic2 in budding yeast is a copper importer. The closest Pic2 ortholog in mammalian cells is the mitochondrial phosphate carrier SLC25A3. Here, to investigate whether SLC25A3 also transports copper, we manipulated its expression in several murine and human cell lines. SLC25A3 knockdown or deletion consistently resulted in an isolated COX deficiency in these cells, and copper addition to the culture medium suppressed these biochemical defects. Consistent with a conserved role for SLC25A3 in copper transport, its heterologous expression in yeast complemented copper-specific defects observed upon deletion of PIC2 Additionally, assays in Lactococcus lactis and in reconstituted liposomes directly demonstrated that SLC25A3 functions as a copper transporter. Taken together, these data indicate that SLC25A3 can transport copper both in vitro and in vivo . © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. In situ Raman study of redox state changes of mitochondrial cytochromes in a perfused rat heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Treiman, Marek; Faricelli, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Raman spectroscopy-based approach for simultaneous study of redox changes in c-and b-type cytochromes and for a semiquantitative estimation of the amount of oxygenated myoglobin in a perfused rat heart. Excitation at 532 nm was used to obtain Raman scattering of the myocardial...... surface of the isolated heart at normal and hypoxic conditions. Raman spectra of the heart under normal pO2 demonstrate unique peaks attributable to reduced c-and b-type cytochromes and oxymyoglobin (oMb). The cytochrome peaks decreased in intensity upon FCCP treatment, as predicted from uncoupling...

  9. Identification of pork contamination in meatball using genetic marker mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene by duplex-PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novianty, E.; Kartikasari, L. R.; Lee, J. H.; Cahyadi, M.

    2017-04-01

    Meat based food products have a big opportunity to mix and adulterated with other meats. Muslim communities are prohibited to consume pork-containing product or other pig derivatives in food. Therefore, the high sensitivity, fast, cheap and accurate approach is needed to detect pig contamination in raw meat and meat-processed product such as meatball. The aim of this study was to identify pork contamination in meatball using genetic marker of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene by duplex-PCR. Samples were prepared and designed by following the proportions 0, 1, 5, 10, 25% of pork in meatballs, respectively. The DNA genome was extracted from meatballs and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed using species specific primer to isolate mt-DNA cytochrome b gene. The results showed that the DNA genome was successfully isolated from pork, beef, and contaminated meatballs. Furthermore, 2% agarose gels was able to visualize of duplex-PCR to identify pork contamination in meatballs up to very small proportion (1%). It can be concluded that duplex-PCR of mt-DNA cytochrome b gene was very sensitive to identify pork contamination in meatball with the presence of specific 398 bp DNA band.

  10. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis Is Regulated by the Redox State of a Heme-Binding Translational Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Iliana C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2016-02-20

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the respiratory chain, catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and therefore is essential for cell function and viability. COX is a multimeric complex, whose biogenesis is extensively regulated. One type of control targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1), a key COX enzymatic core subunit translated on mitochondrial ribosomes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cox1 synthesis and COX assembly are coordinated through a negative feedback regulatory loop. This coordination is mediated by Mss51, a heme-sensing COX1 mRNA-specific processing factor and translational activator that is also a Cox1 chaperone. In this study, we investigated whether Mss51 hemylation and Mss51-mediated Cox1 synthesis are both modulated by the reduction-oxidation (redox) environment. We report that Cox1 synthesis is attenuated under oxidative stress conditions and have identified one of the underlying mechanisms. We show that in vitro and in vivo exposure to hydrogen peroxide induces the formation of a disulfide bond in Mss51 involving CPX motif heme-coordinating cysteines. Mss51 oxidation results in a heme ligand switch, thereby lowering heme-binding affinity and promoting its release. We demonstrate that in addition to affecting Mss51-dependent heme sensing, oxidative stress compromises Mss51 roles in COX1 mRNA processing and translation. H2O2-induced downregulation of mitochondrial translation has so far not been reported. We show that high H2O2 concentrations induce a global attenuation effect, but milder concentrations specifically affect COX1 mRNA processing and translation in an Mss51-dependent manner. The redox environment modulates Mss51 functions, which are essential for regulation of COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production.

  11. Mapping of redox state of mitochondrial cytochromes in live cardiomyocytes using Raman microspectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda A; Treiman, Marek; Brazhe, Alexey R

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a nonivasive approach to study redox state of reduced cytochromes [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] of complexes II and III in mitochondria of live cardiomyocytes by means of Raman microspectroscopy. For the first time with the proposed approach ...

  12. Metallothionein 2A affects the cell respiration by suppressing the expression of mitochondrial protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Olga; Gurjanova, Karina; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Kulp, Maria; Karro, Niina; Tõugu, Vello; Palumaa, Peep

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are involved in a broad range of cellular processes and play a major role in protection of cells towards various stressors. Two functions of MTs, namely the maintaining of the homeostasis of transition metal ions and the redox balance, are directly linked to the functioning of mitochondria. Dyshomeostasis of MTs is often related with malfunctioning of mitochondria; however, the mechanism by which MTs affect the mitochondrial respiratory chain is still unknown. We demonstrated that overexpression of MT-2A in HEK cell line decreased the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the cells. HEK cells overexpressing MT-2A demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and lower cellular ATP levels. MT-2A did not affect the number of mitochondria, but reduced specifically the level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II protein, which resulted in lower activity of the complex IV.

  13. Molecular characterization of Taenia multiceps isolates from Gansu Province, China by sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen Hui; Jia, Wan Zhong; Qu, Zi Gang; Xie, Zhi Zhou; Luo, Jian Xun; Yin, Hong; Sun, Xiao Lin; Blaga, Radu; Fu, Bao Quan

    2013-04-01

    A total of 16 Taenia multiceps isolates collected from naturally infected sheep or goats in Gansu Province, China were characterized by sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene. The complete cox1 gene was amplified for individual T. multiceps isolates by PCR, ligated to pMD18T vector, and sequenced. Sequence analysis indicated that out of 16 T. multiceps isolates 10 unique cox1 gene sequences of 1,623 bp were obtained with sequence variation of 0.12-0.68%. The results showed that the cox1 gene sequences were highly conserved among the examined T. multiceps isolates. However, they were quite different from those of the other Taenia species. Phylogenetic analysis based on complete cox1 gene sequences revealed that T. multiceps isolates were composed of 3 genotypes and distinguished from the other Taenia species.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF PARAMECIUM BURSARIA SYNGENS THROUGH MOLECULAR MARKERS – COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MITOCHONDRIAL CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE SUBUNIT I (COI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Zagata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is an identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations and proving the correlation between distributions and belonging to any of five syngens. Ten strains of Paramecium bursaria belonging to five different syngens and strain of Paramecium multimicronucleatum were investigated using molecular marker — mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI. According to results, obtained in this study, using phylogenetic methods like Neighbor Joining (NJ and Maximum Likelihood (ML, relationship between analyzing strains through their clustering in clusters and correlation between strains belonging to any syngen and syngen’s distribution was confirmed. Phylograms constructed using NJ and ML methods revealed strains’ grouping in five clusters. Results which were obtained revealed usefulness of COI as a biomarker, which is important in identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens. This reports to a great potential of COI as a molecular marker and obtaining dependable results through combination of molecular methods with classical ones.

  15. Chemical labeling studies on isolated and vesicular bovine heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venzke, K.S.; Reynolds, K.A.; Prochaska, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase dispersed in Triton X-100, Tween 80, or dodecyl maltoside was reacted with the water-soluble reagents [ 35 S]-diazonium benzene sulfonate (DABS) (10-100 μM) or [ 125 I]-iodo-DABS (34-55 nM) to map the surface topography of the enzyme in different protein aggregation states. Both reagents gave similar labeling profiles of the enzyme under all conditions. Subunits II, III, and VII were extensively labeled by DABS, while subunits I and VI were unreactive with DABS in each detergent. Subunit V exhibited an increase in DABS labeling when the enzyme was reacted in Tween 80 as compared to the enzyme in Triton X-100 or dodecyl maltoside. Also, components b and c showed an increase in DABS reactivity when the enzyme was modified in dodecyl maltoside. In general, the labeling profile of the enzyme in dodecyl maltoside resembled that of the enzyme in Triton X-100, emphasizing that the mechanism of dispersal of the enzyme by both detergents is similar. Cytochrome c oxidase incorporated into phosphatidylglycerol:phosphatidylcholine(1:20)(w:w) phospholipid vesicles (COV) by cholate dialysis was reacted with DABS and subunits II and III were significantly labeled. Approximately 65-70% of the enzyme in COV was oriented with the cytochrome c binding domain facing the extravesicular medium, as determined by comparison of the DABS labeling in subunit IV in detergent-lysed and intact COV

  16. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by NiZn ferrite nanoparticles through mitochondrial cytochrome C release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Qubaisi MS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mothanna Sadiq Al-Qubaisi,1 Abdullah Rasedee,1,2 Moayad Husein Flaifel,3 Sahrim Hj Ahmad,3 Samer Hussein-Al-Ali,1 Mohd Zobir Hussein,4 Zulkarnain Zainal,4 Fatah H Alhassan,4 Yun H Taufiq-Yap,4 Eltayeb EM Eid,5 Ismail Adam Arbab,1 Bandar A Al-Asbahi,3 Thomas J Webster,6,7 Mohamed Ezzat El Zowalaty1,8,9 1Institute of Bioscience, 2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 3Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 4Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 5College of Pharmacy, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia; 6Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 7Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 8Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt; 9Faculty of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia Abstract: The long-term objective of the present study was to determine the ability of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles to kill cancer cells. NiZn ferrite nanoparticle suspensions were found to have an average hydrodynamic diameter, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of 254.2 ± 29.8 nm, 0.524 ± 0.013, and -60 ± 14 mV, respectively. We showed that NiZn ferrite nanoparticles had selective toxicity towards MCF-7, HepG2, and HT29 cells, with a lesser effect on normal MCF 10A cells. The quantity of Bcl-2, Bax, p53, and cytochrome C in the cell lines mentioned above was determined by colorimetric methods in order to clarify the mechanism of action of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles in the killing of cancer cells. Our results indicate that NiZn ferrite nanoparticles promote apoptosis in cancer cells via caspase-3 and caspase-9, downregulation of Bcl-2, and upregulation of Bax and p53, with cytochrome C translocation. There was a concomitant collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential in these cancer cells when treated

  17. Population genetic structure of cotton pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene sequences from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, J; Chinna Babu Naik, V; Ghodke, A; Kranthi, S; Kranthi, K R; Singh, B P; Choudhary, J S; Krishna, M S R

    2017-11-01

    Pink bollworm (PBW), Pectinophora gossypiella is one of the most destructive pest's globally inflicting huge economic losses in cotton even during later stages of crop growth. In the present investigation, the population genetic structure, distribution, and genetic diversity of P. gossypiella in cotton growing zones of India using partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase-I (COI) gene was addressed. The overall haplotype (Hd), number of nucleotide differences (K), and nucleotide diversity (π) were 0.3028, 0.327, and 0.00047, respectively which suggest that entire population exhibited low level of genetic diversity. Zone-wise clustering of population revealed that central zone recorded low level of Hd (0.2730) as compared to north (0.3619) and south (0.3028) zones. The most common haplotype (H1) reported in all 19 locations could be proposed as ancestral/original haplotype. This haplotype with one mutational step formed star-like phylogeny connected with 11 other haplotypes. The phylogenetic relationship studies revealed that most haplotypes of populations are closely related to each other. Haplotype 5 was exclusively present in Dharwad (South zone) shared with populations of Hanumangarh and Bathinda (North zone). The result indicated that there is no isolation by distance effect among the Indian populations of PBW. The present study reports a low genetic diversity among PBW populations of India and H1, as ancestral haplotype from which other haplotypes have evolved suggests that the migration and dispersal over long distance and invasiveness are major factors.

  18. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Loera-Castañeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12% harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn’t been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  19. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNA(Phe) transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNA(Phe). © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Knockout Serum Replacement Promotes Cell Survival by Preventing BIM from Inducing Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ishii

    Full Text Available Knockout serum replacement (KOSR is a nutrient supplement commonly used to replace serum for culturing stem cells. We show here that KOSR has pro-survival activity in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells transformed by the BCR-ABL oncogene. Inhibitors of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase kill CML cells by stimulating pro-apoptotic BIM and inhibiting anti-apoptotic BCL2, BCLxL and MCL1. We found that KOSR protects CML cells from killing by BCR-ABL inhibitors--imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib. The protective effect of KOSR is reversible and not due to the selective outgrowth of drug-resistant clones. In KOSR-protected CML cells, imatinib still inhibited the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, reduced the phosphorylation of STAT, ERK and AKT, down-regulated BCL2, BCLxL, MCL1 and up-regulated BIM. However, these pro-apoptotic alterations failed to cause cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. With mitochondria isolated from KOSR-cultured CML cells, we showed that addition of recombinant BIM protein also failed to cause cytochrome c release. Besides the kinase inhibitors, KOSR could protect cells from menadione, an inducer of oxidative stress, but it did not protect cells from DNA damaging agents. Switching from serum to KOSR caused a transient increase in reactive oxygen species and AKT phosphorylation in CML cells that were protected by KOSR but not in those that were not protected by this nutrient supplement. Treatment of KOSR-cultured cells with the PH-domain inhibitor MK2206 blocked AKT phosphorylation, abrogated the formation of BIM-resistant mitochondria and stimulated cell death. These results show that KOSR has cell-context dependent pro-survival activity that is linked to AKT activation and the inhibition of BIM-induced cytochrome c release from the mitochondria.

  1. Evidence that the assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves the formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-04-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc(1) complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc(1) subunits were deleted. In all the yeast strains tested, a bc(1) sub-complex of approximately 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS/PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits, cytochrome b and cytochrome c(1), associated with the noncatalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Together, these bc(1) subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc(1) core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc(1) complex; first, because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and, second, for its characteristics of stability, which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc(1) complex. By contrast, the bc(1) core structure is unable to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc(1) complex provides a number of new elements clarifying the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc(1) complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  2. Electronic Connection Between the Quinone and Cytochrome c Redox Pools and Its Role in Regulation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Redox Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration, an important bioenergetic process, relies on operation of four membranous enzymatic complexes linked functionally by mobile, freely diffusible elements: quinone molecules in the membrane and water-soluble cytochromes c in the intermembrane space. One of the mitochondrial complexes, complex III (cytochrome bc1 or ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase), provides an electronic connection between these two diffusible redox pools linking in a fully reversible manner two-electron quinone oxidation/reduction with one-electron cytochrome c reduction/oxidation. Several features of this homodimeric enzyme implicate that in addition to its well-defined function of contributing to generation of proton-motive force, cytochrome bc1 may be a physiologically important point of regulation of electron flow acting as a sensor of the redox state of mitochondria that actively responds to changes in bioenergetic conditions. These features include the following: the opposing redox reactions at quinone catalytic sites located on the opposite sides of the membrane, the inter-monomer electronic connection that functionally links four quinone binding sites of a dimer into an H-shaped electron transfer system, as well as the potential to generate superoxide and release it to the intermembrane space where it can be engaged in redox signaling pathways. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding how cytochrome bc1 may accomplish this regulatory physiological function, what is known and remains unknown about catalytic and side reactions within the quinone binding sites and electron transfers through the cofactor chains connecting those sites with the substrate redox pools. We also discuss the developed molecular mechanisms in the context of physiology of mitochondria. PMID:25540143

  3. Evidence that assembly of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex involves formation of a large core structure in the inner mitochondrial membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L.

    2009-01-01

    The assembly status of the cytochrome bc1 complex has been analyzed in distinct yeast deletion strains in which genes for one or more of the bc1 subunits had been deleted. In all the yeast strains tested a bc1 sub-complex of about 500 kDa was found when the mitochondrial membranes were analyzed by blue native electrophoresis. The subsequent molecular characterization of this sub-complex, carried out in the second dimension by SDS-PAGE and immunodecoration, revealed the presence of the two catalytic subunits cytochrome b and cytochrome c1, associated with the non catalytic subunits core protein 1, core protein 2, Qcr7p and Qcr8p. Altogether these bc1 subunits build up the core structure of the cytochrome bc1 complex which is then able to sequentially bind the remaining subunits, such as Qcr6p, Qcr9p, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein and Qcr10p. This bc1 core structure may represent a true assembly intermediate during the maturation of the bc1 complex, first because of its wide distribution in distinct yeast deletion strains and second for its characteristics of stability which resemble those of the intact homodimeric bc1 complex. Differently from this latter, however, the bc1 core structure is not able to interact with the cytochrome c oxidase complex to form respiratory supercomplexes. The characterization of this novel core structure of the bc1 complex provides a number of new elements for clarification of the molecular events leading to the maturation of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:19236481

  4. Molecular phylogeny of Japanese Rhinolophidae based on variations in the complete sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takahiro; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Harada, Masashi; Kanoe, Masamitsu; Yoshiyuki, Mizuko; Yonekawa, Hiromichi

    2003-04-01

    Microchiroptera have diversified into many species whose size and the shapes of the complicated ear and nose have been adapted to their echolocation abilities. Their speciation processes, and intra- and interspecies relationships are still under discussion. Here we report on the geographical variation of Japanese Rhinolophus ferrumequinum and R. cornutus using the complete sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to clarify the phylogenetic positions of the 2 species as well as that of Rhinolophidae within the Microchiroptera. We have found that sequence divergence values within each of the 2 species are unexpectedly low (0.07%-0.94%). We have also found that there is no local specificity of their mtCytb alleles. On the other hand, the divergence values for Japanese Microchiroptera (12.7%-16.6%) are much higher than those for other mammalian genera. Similarly, the values among five genera of Vespertilionidae were 20.5%-27.3%. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the 2 species of family Rhinolophidae in the suborder Microchiroptera belong to the Megachiroptera cluster in the constructed maximum parsimony tree. These results suggest that the speciation of Rhinolophidae involved its divergence as an independent lineage from other Microchiroptera, and other microbats might be paraphyletic. In addition, the tree also shows that the order Chiroptera is monophylitic, and the closest group to Chiroptera is the ungulates.

  5. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene analysis indicates a restricted genetic background in Finnish noble crayfish (Astacus astacus stocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makkonen J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The IUCN Red List indexes the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus as vulnerable, with a declining population trend. The main threats to the species are the crayfish plague caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces astaci and the introduced North American crayfish that act as the carriers of this disease. In Finland, the noble crayfish is considered as a native species, which original distribution area covers the southern part of the country, but the species distribution has been dispersed to cover almost the whole country. The aim of this study was to survey the genetic diversity among the Finnish noble crayfish populations. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI-gene was sequenced from 742 individuals representing 59 populations from Finland and Estonia. As a result, only a single haplotype was found. Based on these results, the genetic diversity of noble crayfish in its Northern distribution range is remarkably low. The observed lack of variation can result from several mechanisms including small size of the founder population and the intense spreading of the species by manmade stockings. The restricted diversity can also be caused by eradication of the original populations due to crayfish plague epidemics and spreading of the invasive crayfish species carrying the crayfish plague. It is also possible that all contemporary Finnish noble crayfish populations originate from stockings with no variation in respect to COI-gene.

  6. Hydrazine and hydroxylamine as probes for O2-reduction site of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T; Yoshikawa, S

    1993-01-01

    Reactions of hydrazine and hydroxylamine with bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase in the fully reduced state were investigated under anaerobic conditions following the visible-Soret spectral change. Hydrazine gave a sharp band at 575 nm with 20% decrease in the alpha band at 603 nm, and hydroxylamine induced a 2 nm blue-shift for the alpha band without any clear splitting. The Soret band at 443 nm was decreased significantly in intensity, with the concomitant appearance of a shoulder with hydrazine or a peak with hydroxylamine, both near 430 nm. The dependence on pH of the affinity of these reagents for the enzyme indicates that only the deprotonated forms of these reagents bind to the enzyme, suggesting a highly hydrophobic environment of the haem ligand-biding site. These spectral changes were largely removed by addition of cyanide or CO. However, detailed analysis of these spectral changes indicates that hydrazine perturbs the shape of the spectral change induced by cyanide and hydroxylamine perturbs that induced by CO. These results suggest that these aldehyde reagents bind to haem a3 iron as well as to a second site which is most likely to be the formyl group on the haem periphery, and that these two sites bind these reagents anti-cooperatively with each other. PMID:8389138

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zeugodacus tau (Insecta: Tephritidae) and differentiation of Z. tau species complex by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Song, Sze-Looi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2017-01-01

    The tephritid fruit fly Zeugodacus tau (Walker) is a polyphagous fruit pest of economic importance in Asia. Studies based on genetic markers indicate that it forms a species complex. We report here (1) the complete mitogenome of Z. tau from Malaysia and comparison with that of China as well as the mitogenome of other congeners, and (2) the relationship of Z. tau taxa from different geographical regions based on sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. The complete mitogenome of Z. tau had a total length of 15631 bp for the Malaysian specimen (ZT3) and 15835 bp for the China specimen (ZT1), with similar gene order comprising 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes-PCGs, 2 rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes) and a non-coding A + T-rich control region (D-loop). Based on 13 PCGs and 15 mt-genes, Z. tau NC_027290 (China) and Z. tau ZT1 (China) formed a sister group in the lineage containing also Z. tau ZT3 (Malaysia). Phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of cox1 gene indicates that the taxa from China, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, and Z. tau sp. A from Thailand belong to Z. tau sensu stricto. A complete cox1 gene (or 13 PCGs or 15 mt-genes) instead of partial sequence is more appropriate for determining phylogenetic relationship.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zeugodacus tau (Insecta: Tephritidae and differentiation of Z. tau species complex by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Sen Yong

    Full Text Available The tephritid fruit fly Zeugodacus tau (Walker is a polyphagous fruit pest of economic importance in Asia. Studies based on genetic markers indicate that it forms a species complex. We report here (1 the complete mitogenome of Z. tau from Malaysia and comparison with that of China as well as the mitogenome of other congeners, and (2 the relationship of Z. tau taxa from different geographical regions based on sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. The complete mitogenome of Z. tau had a total length of 15631 bp for the Malaysian specimen (ZT3 and 15835 bp for the China specimen (ZT1, with similar gene order comprising 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes-PCGs, 2 rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes and a non-coding A + T-rich control region (D-loop. Based on 13 PCGs and 15 mt-genes, Z. tau NC_027290 (China and Z. tau ZT1 (China formed a sister group in the lineage containing also Z. tau ZT3 (Malaysia. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of cox1 gene indicates that the taxa from China, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, and Z. tau sp. A from Thailand belong to Z. tau sensu stricto. A complete cox1 gene (or 13 PCGs or 15 mt-genes instead of partial sequence is more appropriate for determining phylogenetic relationship.

  9. The mitochondrial cytochrome c peroxidase Ccp1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in conveying an oxidative stress signal to the transcription factor Pos9 (Skn7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charizanis, C; Juhnke, H; Krems, B; Entian, K D

    1999-10-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae two transcription factors, Pos9 (Skn7) and Yap1, are involved in the response to oxidative stress. Fusion of the Pos9 response-regulator domain to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain results in a transcription factor which renders the expression of a GAL1-lacZ reporter gene dependent on oxidative stress. To identify genes which are involved in the oxygen-dependent activation of the Gal4-Pos9 hybrid protein we screened for mutants that failed to induce the heterologous test system upon oxidative stress (fap mutants for factors activating Pos9). We isolated several respiration-deficient and some respiration-competent mutants by this means. We selected for further characterization only those mutants which also displayed an oxidative-stress-sensitive phenotype. One of the respiration-deficient mutants (complementation groupfap6) could be complemented by the ISM1 gene, which encodes mitochondrial isoleucyl tRNA synthetase, suggesting that respiration competence was important for signalling of oxidative stress. In accordance with this notion a rho0 strain and a wild-type strain in which respiration had been blocked (by treatment with antimycin A or with cyanide) also failed to activate Gal4-Pos9 upon imposition of oxidative stress. Another mutant, fap24, which was respiration-competent, could be complemented by CCP1, which encodes the mitochondrial cytochrome c peroxidase. Mitochondrial cytochrome c peroxidase degrades reactive oxygen species within the mitochondria. This suggested a possible sensor function for the enzyme in the oxidative stress response. To test this we used the previously described point mutant ccp1 W191F, which is characterized by a 10(4)-fold decrease in electron flux between cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase. The Ccp1W191F mutant was still capable of activating the Pos9 transcriptional activation domain, suggesting that the signalling function of Ccp1 is independent of electron flux rates.

  10. Genetic variation and differentiation of Gekko gecko from different populations based on mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences and karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xin-Min; Li, Hui-Min; Zeng, Zhen-Hua; Zeng, De-Long; Guan, Qing-Xin

    2012-06-01

    Black-spotted and red-spotted tokay geckos are distributed in different regions and have significant differences in morphological appearance, but have been regarded as the same species, Gekko gecko, in taxonomy. To determine whether black-spotted and red-spotted tokay geckos are genetically differentiated, we sequenced the entire mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (1147 bp) from 110 individuals of Gekko gecko collected in 11 areas including Guangxi China, Yunnan China, Vietnam, and Laos. In addition, we performed karyotypic analyses of black-spotted tokay geckos from Guangxi China and red-spotted tokay geckos from Laos. These phylogenetic analyses showed that black-spotted and red-spotted tokay geckos are divided into two branches in molecular phylogenetic trees. The average genetic distances are as follows: 0.12-0.47% among six haplotypes in the black-spotted tokay gecko group, 0.12-1.66% among five haplotypes in the red-spotted tokay gecko group, and 8.76-9.18% between the black-spotted and red-spotted tokay geckos, respectively. The karyotypic analyses showed that the karyotype formula is 2n = 38 = 8m + 2sm + 2st + 26t in red-spotted tokay geckos from Laos compared with 2n = 38 = 8m + 2sm + 28t in black-spotted tokay geckos from Guangxi China. The differences in these two kinds of karyotypes were detected on the 15th chromosome. The clear differences in genetic levels between black-spotted and red-spotted tokay geckos suggest a significant level of genetic differentiation between the two.

  11. [Sequencing of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene in sarcosaphagous flies from 14 provinces in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Cai, Jifeng; Wen, Jifang; Guo, Yadong

    2010-08-01

    To detect the 278 bp region of gene of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) in mitochondral DNA (mtDNA) of sarcosaphagous flies, identify the species of sarcosaphagous flies, and provide reference for forensic application. Samples were collected in Baotou and Chifeng of Inner Mongolia, Tianjin, Nanning, Fuzhou, Linyi of Shandong, Shijiazhuang, Yinchuan, Lanzhou, Huairou of Beijing, Xinxiang and Nanyang of Henan, Datong of Shanxi, Wuhu of Anhui, Quzhou of Zhejiang, Changsha, Zhuzhou and Yongzhou of Hunan. A total of 38 flies were randomly collected from rabbits, dogs and pigs which were set outdoors, then the flies' mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were extracted by the improved small insects DNA homogenate method. Amplification was conducted by Perkin-Elmer 9600 thermal cycler, then vertical non-denaturing 7% polyacrylamide gelectrophoresis. PCR products were purified using the nucleic acid purification kit. Sequences of both strands were obtained by direct sequence of the double-stranded PCR product using one of the PCR primers and the ABI PRISM big dye terminator cycle sequencing dit. Sequence reactions were electrophorsed on ABI Model 3730 DNA Sequencers. A UPGMA tree was contrasted using the maximum composite likelihood method in MEGA4. The 38 sarcosaphagous flies belonged to 3 families(Muscidae, Calliphoridae, and Sarcophagidae), 10 genuses (Musca Linnaeus, Hydrotaea Robineau-Desvoidy, Aldrichina Townsend, Hemipyrellia Townsend, Achoetandrus Bezzi, Protophormia Townsend, Chrysomya Robineau-Desvoidy, Lucilia Robineau-Desvoidy, Helicophagella Enderlein, and Boettcherisca Rohdendorf), and 12 species [Musca domestica (Linnaeus), Hydrotaea (Ophyra) capensis (Wiedemann), Lucilia caesar (Linnaeus), Lucilia illustris (Meigen), Aldrichina graham (Aldrich), Hemipyrellia ligurriens, Achoetandrus (Chrysomya) rufifacies (Macquary), Protophormia terraenovae (Robineau-Desvoidy), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), Lucilia sericata (Meigen), Helicophagella melanura (Meigen), and

  12. Genetic distance of Malaysian mousedeer based on mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and D-loop region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Mohamad-Azam Akmal Abu; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine Japning; Ampeng, Ahmad; Yaakop, Salmah; Nor, Shukor Md; Md-Zain, Badrul Munir

    2018-04-01

    Mousedeer is one of the primitive mammals that can be found mainly in Southeast-Asia region. There are two species of mousedeer in Malaysia which are Tragulus kanchil and Tragulus napu. Both species can be distinguish by size, coat coloration, and throat pattern but clear diagnosis still cannot be found. The objective of the study is to show the genetic distance relationship between T. kanchil and T. napu and their population based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and D-loop region. There are 42 sample of mousedeer were used in this study collected by PERHILITAN from different locality. Another 29 D-loop sequence were retrieved from Genbank for comparative analysis. All sample were amplified using universal primer and species-specific primer for COI and D-loop genes via PCR process. The amplified sequences were analyzed to determine genetic distance of T. kanchil and T. napu. From the analysis, the average genetic distance between T. kanchil and T. napu based on locus COI and D-loop were 0.145 and 0.128 respectively. The genetic distance between populations of T. kanchil based on locus COI was between 0.003-0.013. For locus D-loop, genetic distance analysis showed distance in relationship between west-coast populations to east-coast population of T. kanchil. COI and D-loop mtDNA region provided a clear picture on the relationship within the mousedeer species. Last but not least, conservation effort toward protecting this species can be done by study the molecular genetics and prevent the extinction of this species.

  13. Exploring the Utility of Partial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit 1 for DNA Barcoding of Gobies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Bae Jeon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gobiids are hyperdiverse compared with other teleost groups, with about 2,000 species occurring in marine, freshwater, and blackish habitats, and they show a remarkable variety of morphologies and ecology. Testing the effectiveness of DNA barcodes on species that have emerged as a result of radiation remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Here, we used the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI sequences from 144 species of gobies and related species to evaluate the performance of distance-based DNA barcoding and to conduct a phylogenetic analysis. The average intra-genus genetic distance was considerably higher than that obtained in previous studies. Additionally, the interspecific divergence at higher taxonomic levels was not significantly different from that at the intragenus level, suggesting that congeneric gobies possess substantial interspecific sequence divergence in their COI gene. However, levels of intragenus divergence varied greatly among genera, and we do not provide sufficient evidence for using COI for cryptic species delimitation. Significantly more nucleotide changes were observed at the third codon position than that at the first and the second codons, revealing that extensive variation in COI reflects synonymous changes and little protein level variation. Despite clear signatures in several genera, the COI sequences did resolve genealogical relationships in the phylogenetic analysis well. Our results support the validity of COI barcoding for gobiid species identification, but the utilization of more gene regions will assist to offer a more robust gobiid species phylogeny.

  14. Partial cytochrome b sequences for six Hymenoptera of the eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A M; Gardner, L M

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes have been commonly used to determine honeybee subspecies relationships. To see if these markers would also be useful for comparisons of other Hymenoptera, we collected workers of six local species: Vespa crabro, the European hornet; Bombus impatiens, a bumblebee; Vespula germanica, the German yellow jacket; Polistes fuscatus, a paper wasp; Halictus ligatus, an alkali bee; and an unspecified Megachile, a leafcutting bee. MtDNA was isolated and digested with six endonucleases (AvaI, BglII, EcoRI, HindIII, HinfI, XbaI). The digested DNA was electrophoresed and visualized on agarose gels with comparison to a standard fragment marker and similarly treated honeybee mtDNA. The fragments obtained were also purified and sequenced. Phylogenetic relationships between six wasp and bee species, Apis mellifera, and several other similar aculeate Hymenoptera were determined. Newly defined DNA sequences were posted to GenBank (AF281169-AF281174).

  15. The novel primers for mammal species identification-based mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence: implication for reserved wild animals in Thailand and endangered mammal species in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangkram, Yuttamol; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Amano, Akira; Sukmak, Manakorn

    2018-01-01

    We presented the powerful techniques for species identification using the short amplicon of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence. Two faecal samples and one single hair sample of the Asian tapir were tested using the new cytochrome b primers. The results showed a high sequence similarity with the mainland Asian tapir group. The comparative sequence analysis of the reserved wild mammals in Thailand and the other endangered mammal species from Southeast Asia comprehensibly verified the potential of our novel primers. The forward and reverse primers were 94.2 and 93.2%, respectively, by the average value of the sequence identity among 77 species sequences, and the overall mean distance was 35.9%. This development technique could provide rapid, simple, and reliable tools for species confirmation. Especially, it could recognize the problematic biological specimens contained less DNA material from illegal products and assist with wildlife crime investigation of threatened species and related forensic casework.

  16. Leukotriene B4 omega-hydroxylase in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Partial purification and identification as a cytochrome P-450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, S; Goldstein, I M

    1985-09-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) not only synthesize and respond to leukotriene B4 (LTB4), but also catabolize this mediator of inflammation rapidly and specifically by omega-oxidation. To characterize the enzyme(s) responsible for omega-oxidation of LTB4, human PMN were disrupted by sonication and subjected to differential centrifugation to yield membrane, granule, and cytosol fractions (identified by biochemical markers). LTB4 omega-hydroxylase activity was concentrated (together with NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity) only in the membrane fraction (specific activity increased 10-fold as compared to whole sonicates, 41% recovery). Negligible activity was detected in granule or cytosol fractions. LTB4 omega-hydroxylase activity in isolated PMN membranes was linear with respect to duration of incubation and protein concentration, was maximal at pH 7.4, had a Km for LTB4 of 0.6 microM, and was dependent on oxygen and on reduced pyridine nucleotides (apparent Km for NADPH = 0.5 microM; apparent Km for NADH = 223 microM). The LTB4 omega-hydroxylase was inhibited significantly by carbon monoxide, ferricytochrome c, SKF-525A, and Triton X-100, but was not affected by alpha-naphthoflavone, azide, cyanide, catalase, and superoxide dismutase. Finally, isolated PMN membranes exhibited a carbon monoxide difference spectrum with a peak at 452 nm. Thus, we have partially purified the LTB4 omega-hydroxylase in human PMN and identified the enzyme as a membrane-associated, NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450.

  17. Mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence variations and population structure of Siberian chipmunk (Tamias sibiricus) in Northeastern Asia and population substructure in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mu-Yeong; Lissovsky, Andrey A; Park, Sun-Kyung; Obolenskaya, Ekaterina V; Dokuchaev, Nikolay E; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Yu, Li; Kim, Young-Jun; Voloshina, Inna; Myslenkov, Alexander; Choi, Tae-Young; Min, Mi-Sook; Lee, Hang

    2008-12-31

    Twenty-five chipmunk species occur in the world, of which only the Siberian chipmunk, Tamias sibiricus, inhabits Asia. To investigate mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence variations and population structure of the Siberian chipmunk in northeastern Asia, we examined mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences (1140 bp) from 3 countries. Analyses of 41 individuals from South Korea and 33 individuals from Russia and northeast China resulted in 37 haplotypes and 27 haplotypes, respectively. There were no shared haplotypes between South Korea and Russia--northeast China. Phylogenetic trees and network analysis showed 2 major maternal lineages for haplotypes, referred to as the S and R lineages. Haplotype grouping in each cluster was nearly coincident with its geographic affinity. In particular, 3 distinct groups were found that mostly clustered in the northern, central and southern parts of South Korea. Nucleotide diversity of the S lineage was twice that of lineage R. The divergence between S and R lineages was estimated to be 2.98-0.98 Myr. During the ice age, there may have been at least 2 refuges in South Korea and Russia--northeast China. The sequence variation between the S and R lineages was 11.3% (K2P), which is indicative of specific recognition in rodents. These results suggest that T. sibiricus from South Korea could be considered a separate species. However, additional information, such as details of distribution, nuclear genes data or morphology, is required to strengthen this hypothesis.

  18. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  19. The single IGF-1 partial deficiency is responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction and is restored by IGF-1 replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olleros Santos-Ruiz, M; Sádaba, M C; Martín-Estal, I; Muñoz, U; Sebal Neira, C; Castilla-Cortázar, I

    2017-08-01

    We previously described in cirrhosis and aging, both conditions of IGF-1 deficiency, a clear hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with increased oxidative damage. In both conditions, the hepatic mitochondrial function was improved with low doses of IGF-1. The aim of this work was to explore if the only mere IGF-1 partial deficiency, without any exogenous insult, is responsible for hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction. Heterozygous (igf1 +/- ) mice were divided into two groups: untreated and treated mice with low doses of IGF-1. WT group was used as controls. Parameters of hepatic mitochondrial function were determined by flow cytometry, antioxidant enzyme activities were determined by spectrophotometry, and electron chain transport enzyme levels were determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses. Liver expression of genes coding for proteins involved in mitochondrial protection and apoptosis was studied by microarray analysis and RT-qPCR. Hz mice showed a significant reduction in hepatic mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATPase activity, and an increase in intramitochondrial free radical production and proton leak rates, compared to controls. These parameters were normalized by IGF-1 replacement therapy. No significant differences were found between groups in oxygen consumption and antioxidant enzyme activities, except for catalase, whose activity was increased in both Hz groups. Relevant genes coding for proteins involved in mitochondrial protection and survival were altered in Hz group and were reverted to normal in Hz+IGF-1 group. The mere IGF-1 partial deficiency is per se associated with hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction sensitive to IGF-1 replacement therapy. Results in this work prove that IGF-1 is involved in hepatic mitochondrial protection, because it is able to reduce free radical production, oxidative damage and apoptosis. All these IGF-1 actions are mediated by the modulation of the expression of genes encoding citoprotective

  20. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-05-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-05-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-03-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Use of Raman spectroscopy to study reduction state of mitochondrial cytochromes in an isolated heart under normoxic and hypoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, N. A.; Treiman, M.; Faricelli, B.

    2013-01-01

    to 1606 cm-1). As expected from a decreased reduction of electron transport chain upon uncoupling, the presence of FCCP in the perfusion caused a decrease in the intensity of cytochromal peaks with no change of Mb peaks. Global stop-flow ischemia of 35 min elicited a progressive increase in the intensity...

  4. The axon-protective WLD(S) protein partially rescues mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis after axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzik, Katharina; Coleman, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The axon-protective Wallerian degeneration slow (WLD(S)) protein can ameliorate the decline in axonal ATP levels after neurite transection. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this effect is associated with maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and/or glycolysis. We used isolated neurites of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) cultures in the Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analyser to determine mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis under different conditions. We observed that both mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis declined significantly during the latent phase of Wallerian degeneration. WLD(S) partially reduced the decline both in glycolysis and in mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that depleting NAD levels in uncut cultures led to changes in mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis similar to those rescued by WLD(S) after cut, suggesting that the maintenance of NAD levels in Wld(S) neurites after axonal injury at least partially underlies the maintenance of ATP levels. However, by using another axon-protective mutation (Sarm1(-/-)), we could demonstrate that rescue of basal ECAR (and hence probably glycolysis) rather than basal OCR (mitochondrial respiration) may be part of the protective phenotype to delay Wallerian degeneration. These findings open new routes to study glycolysis and the connection between NAD and ATP levels in axon degeneration, which may help to eventually develop therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurotoxicity of MPP+: partial protection of PC12 cells by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew; Xu, Alex; Duhart, Helen; Ali, Syed F

    2004-10-01

    The damage to the central nervous system that is observed after administration of either methamphetamine (METH) or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the neurotoxic metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), is known to be linked to dopamine (DA). The underlying neurotoxicity mechanism for both METH and MPP+ seem to involve free radical formation and impaired mitochondrial function. The MPP+ is thought to selectively kill nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I, with cell death being attributed to oxidative stress damage to these vulnerable DA neurons. In the present study, MPP+ was shown to significantly inhibit the response to MTT by cultured PC12 cells. This inhibitory action of MPP+ could be partially reversed by the co-incubation of the cells with the acetylated form of carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Since at least part of the toxic action of MPP+ is related to mitochondrial inhibition, the partial reversal of the inhibition of MTT response by ALC could involve a partial restoration of mitochondrial function. The role carnitine derivatives, such as ALC, play in attenuating MPP+ and METH-evoked toxicity is still under investigation to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction in mechanisms of neurotoxicity.

  6. Molecular phylogeny of mitochondrial cytochrome b and 12S rRNA sequences in the Felidae: ocelot and domestic cat lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, R; Lopez, J V; Slattery, J P; Yuhki, N; O'Brien, S J

    1996-12-01

    Molecular phylogeny of the cat family Felidae is derived using two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome b and 12S rRNA. Phylogenetic methods of weighted maximum parsimony and minimum evolution estimated by neighbor-joining are employed to reconstruct topologies among 20 extant felid species. Sequence analyses of 363 bp of cytochrome b and 376 bp of the 12S rRNA genes yielded average pair-wise similarity values between felids ranging from 94 to 99% and from 85 to 99%, respectively. Phylogenetic reconstruction supports more recent, intralineage associations but fails to completely resolve interlineage relationships. Both genes produce a monophyletic group of Felis species but vary in the placement of the pallas cat. The ocelot lineage represents an early divergence within the Felidae, with strong associations between ocelot and margay, Geoffroy's cat and kodkod, and pampas cat and tigrina. Implications of the relative recency of felid evolution, presence of ancestral polymorphisms, and influence of outgroups in placement of the topological root are discussed.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA polymerase from embryos of Drosophila melanogaster: purification, subunit structure, and partial characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernette, C.M.; Kaguni, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA polymerase has been purified to near-homogeneity from early embryos of Drosophila melanogaster. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the highly purified enzyme reveals two polypeptides with molecular masses of 125,000 and 35,000 daltons, in a ratio of 1:1. The enzyme has a sedimentation coefficient of 7.6 S and a stokes radius of 51 A. Taken together, the data suggest that the D. melanogaster DNA polymerase γ is a heterodimer. DNA polymerase activity gel analysis has allowed the assignment of the DNA polymerization function to the large subunit. The DNA polymerase exhibits a remarkable ability to utilize efficiently a variety of template-primers including gapped DNA, poly(rA).oligo(dT) and singly primed phiX174 DNA. Both the crude and the highly purified enzymes are stimulated by KCl, and inhibited by dideoxythymidine triphosphate and by N-ethylmaleimide. Thus, the catalytic properties of the near-homogeneous Drosophila enzyme are consistent with those of DNA polymerase γ as partially purified from several vertebrates

  8. Roles of Neuroglobin Binding to Mitochondrial Complex III Subunit Cytochrome c1 in Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neurotoxicity in Primary Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Ning; Yuan, Jing; Lin, Li; Zhuge, Qichuan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-07-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a tissue globin specifically expressed in brain neurons. Recent studies by our laboratory and others have demonstrated that Ngb is protective against stroke and related neurological disorders, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. We previously identified cytochrome c1 (Cyc1) as an Ngb-interacting molecule by yeast two-hybrid screening. Cyc1 is a subunit of mitochondria complex III, which is a component of mitochondrial respiratory chain and a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under both physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we for the first time defined Ngb-Cyc1 binding, and investigated its roles in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation-induced neurotoxicity and ROS production in primary neurons. Immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation validated Ngb-Cyc1 binding, which was significantly increased by OGD and Ngb overexpression. We found 4 h OGD with/without 4 h reoxygenation significantly increased complex III activity, but this activity elevation was significantly attenuated in three groups of neurons: Ngb overexpression, specific complex III inhibitor stigmatellin, or stigmatellin plus Ngb overexpression, whereas there was no significant differences between these three groups, suggesting Ngb-Cyc1 binding may function in suppressing OGD-mediated complex III activity elevation. Importantly, these three groups of neurons also showed significant decreases in OGD-induced superoxide anion generation and neurotoxicity. These results suggest that Ngb can bind to mitochondrial complex III subunit Cyc1, leading to suppression of OGD-mediated complex III activity and subsequent ROS production elevation, and eventually reduction of OGD-induced neurotoxicity. This molecular signaling cascade may be at least part of the mechanisms of Ngb neuroprotection against OGD-induced neurotoxicity.

  9. On the potential of using peculiarities of the protein intrinsic disorder distribution in mitochondrial cytochrome b to identify the source of animal meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Haitham A.; Sadek, Mahmoud A.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was conducted to identify the source of animal meat based on the peculiarities of protein intrinsic disorder distribution in mitochondrial cytochrome b (mtCyt-b). The analysis revealed that animal and avian species can be discriminated based on the proportions of the two groups of residues, Leu+Ile, and Ser+Pro+Ala, in the amino acid sequences of their mtCyt-b. Although levels of the overall intrinsic disorder in mtCyt-b is not very high, the peculiarities of disorder distribution within the sequences of mtCyt-b from different species varies in a rather specific way. In fact, positions and intensities of disorder/flexibility “signals” in the corresponding disorder profiles are relatively unique for avian and animal species. Therefore, it is possible to devise a set of simple rules based on the peculiarities of disorder profiles of their mtCyt-b proteins to discriminate among species. This intrinsic disorder-based analysis represents a new technique that could be used to provide a promising solution for identification of the source of meats. PMID:28331777

  10. Identification of two invasive Cacopsylla chinensis (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) lineages based on two mitochondrial sequences and restriction fragment length polymorphism of cytochrome oxidase I amplicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsien-Chung; Yang, Man-Miao; Yeh, Wen-Bin

    2008-08-01

    The occurrence of pear decline, a disease found in some pear (Pyrus spp.) orchards of Taiwan in recent years, is accompanied by an outbreak of Cacopsylla chinensis (Yang & Li). Two major morphological forms (summer and winter forms) with a variety of intermediate body color and two phylogenetic lineages of this psyllid have been described. The work herein used sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and 16S rDNA regions to delineate the genetic differentiation of this color-variable insect and to elucidate their relationship. Sequence divergence and phylogenetic analysis have shown that C. chinensis individuals could be divided into two lineages with 3.3 and 2.3% divergence of COI and 16S rDNA, respectively. All specimens from China were found to belong to lineage I. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of COI with restriction enzymes AcuI, AseI, BccI, and FokI on 263 specimens of six populations from Taiwan produced two digestion patterns, which are in agreement with the two lineages described above. Both patterns could be found in each population, with most individuals belonging to lineage I and 5-21% of the individuals belonging to lineage II. Because these two lineages included summer as well as winter morphological forms, the lineage differentiation is apparently not related to morphological characters of this psyllid. Because the invasive records are not in favor of a sympatric differentiation, this psyllid is more likely introduced as different populations from countries in temperate regions.

  11. Analysis of host preference and geographical distribution of Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae) using phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I DNA sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, L M; Shatters, R G; Hall, D G; Burns, R E; Franqui, R A

    2006-10-01

    Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) is an economically important pest, restricted to the Greater Antilles and southern Florida. It infests a wide variety of hosts and is of quarantine importance in citrus, a multi-million dollar industry in Florida. The observed recent increase in citrus infested with A. suspensa in Florida has raised questions regarding host-specificity of certain populations and genetic diversity of the pest throughout its geographical distribution. Cytochrome oxidase I (COI) DNA sequence data was used to characterize the genetic diversity of A. suspensa from Florida and Caribbean populations reared from different host plants. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic methods were used to analyse COI data. Sequence variation among mitochondrial COI genes from 107 A. suspensa samples collected throughout Florida and the Caribbean ranged between 0 and 10% and placed all A. suspensa as a monophyletic group that united all A. suspensa in a clade sister to a Central American group of the A. fraterculus paraphyletic species complex. The most likely tree of the COI locus indicated that COI sequence variation was too low to provide resolution at the subspecies level, therefore monophyletic groups based on host-plant use, geography (Florida, Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Puerto Rico or Dominican Republic) or population sampled are not supported. This result indicates that either no population segregation has occurred based on these biological or geographical distinctions and that this is a generalist, polyphagous invasive genotype. Alternatively, if populations are distinct, the segregation event was more recent than can be distinguished based on COI sequence variation.

  12. Insights into Korean red fox (Vulpes vulpes) based on mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence variation in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong-Nam; Han, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Bang-Hwan; Kryukov, Alexey P; Kim, Soonok; Lee, Byoung-Yoon; Kwak, Myounghai

    2012-11-01

    The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is the most widely distributed terrestrial carnivore in the world, occurring throughout most of North America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa. In South Korea, however, this species has been drastically reduced due to habitat loss and poaching. Consequently, it is classified as an endangered species in Korea. As a first step of a planned red fox restoration project, preserved red fox museum specimens were used to determine the genetic status of red foxes that had previously inhabited South Korea against red foxes from neighboring countries. Total eighty three mtDNA cytochrome b sequences, including 22 newly obtained East Asian red fox sequences and worldwide red fox sequences from NCBI, were clustered into three clades (i.e., I, II, and III) based on haplotype network and neighbor-joining trees. The mean genetic distance between clades was 2.0%. Clade III contained South Korean and other East Asian samples in addition to Eurasian and North Pacific individuals. In clade III, South Korean individuals were separated into two lineages of Eurasian and North Pacific groups, showing unclear phylogeographic structuring and admixture. This suggests that South Korean red fox populations may have been composed of individuals from these two different genetic lineages.

  13. [Variability of Cytochrome b Gene and Adjacent Section of Gene tRNA-Thr of Mitochondrial DNA in the Northern Mole Vole Ellobius talpinus (Mammalia, Rodentia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, A S; Lebedev, V S; Zykov, A E; Bakloushinskaya, I Yu

    2015-12-01

    The Northern mole vole E. talpinus, despite its wide distribution, is characterized by a stable karyotype (2n = NF = 54) and slight morphological polymorphism. We made a preliminary analysis of a mitochondrial DNA fragment to clarify the level of genetic variation and differentiation of E. talpinus. the complete cytochrome b gene (cyt b, 1143 bp) and a short part of its flanking gene tRNA-Thr (27 bp) were sequenced. We studied 16 specimens from eight localities, including Crimea, the Volga region, the Trans-Volga region, the Southern Urals, Western Siberia, and Eastern Turkmenistan. Mitotypes of E. talpinus were distributed on a ML dendrogram as four distinct clusters: the first (I) contains specimens from the Crimea, the second (II) combines individuals from the Volgograd region and the left bank of the Don River, the third (III) includes those from the Trans-Volga region, Southern Urals, the left bank of the Irtysh River, and Eastern Turkmenistan; the fourth (IV) are those from the right bank of the Irtysh River. These clusters were relatively distant from each other: the mean genetic distances (D) between them are 0.021-0.051. The Eastern mole vole E. tancrei differed from E. talpinus population groups 1.5-2 times more (D = 0.077-0.084) than the latter did among themselves. Such variations indirectly proved the unity of E. talpinus, despite its high intraspecific differentiation for the studied fragment of mitochondrial DNA. This differentiation apparently occurred because of the long isolation of E. talpinus population groups, which was due to geographic barriers, in particular, the large rivers that completely separate the species range meridionally (the Volga River, the Irtysh River). Sociality and underground lifestyle could accelerate the fixation of mutations in disjunct populations. The composition and distribution of intraspecific groups of E. talpinus, which were identified in analysis of the mitochondrial DNA fragment, do not coincide with the

  14. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen.

  15. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

  16. Cytochrome oxidase assembly does not require catalytically active cytochrome C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Antoni; Pierre, Danielle; Lee, Johnson; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2003-03-14

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, catalyzes the transfer of electrons from reduced cytochrome c to molecular oxygen. COX assembly requires the coming together of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits and the assistance of a large number of nuclear gene products acting at different stages of maturation of the enzyme. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of cytochrome c, encoded by CYC1 and CYC7, is required not only for electron transfer but also for COX assembly through a still unknown mechanism. We have attempted to distinguish between a functional and structural requirement of cytochrome c in COX assembly. A cyc1/cyc7 double null mutant strain was transformed with the cyc1-166 mutant gene (Schweingruber, M. E., Stewart, J. W., and Sherman, F. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 4132-4143) that expresses stable but catalytically inactive iso-1-cytochrome c. The COX content of the cyc1/cyc7 double mutant strain harboring non-functional iso-1-cytochrome c has been characterized spectrally, functionally, and immunochemically. The results of these studies demonstrate that cytochrome c plays a structural rather than functional role in assembly of cytochrome c oxidase. In addition to its requirement for COX assembly, cytochrome c also affects turnover of the enzyme. Mutants containing wild type apocytochrome c in mitochondria lack COX, suggesting that only the folded and mature protein is able to promote COX assembly.

  17. Variations in epidermal cytochrome oxidase activity after local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoiz, M.E.; Rey, B.M. de; Cabrini, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase activity was evaluated histochemically as an index of mitochondrial damage after local irradiation with X-rays. It was determined by microphotometry on the tail skin of newly born Wistar rats four days after irradiation with doses ranging from 2 to 16krad. The enzyme activity of the whole epidermis increased after irradiation, the increases being related to the increase in thickness of the epithelium which was observed as a response to irradiation injury. Within the dose range tested, the enzyme concentration (expressed per unit volume of tissue) decreased in relation to the dose applied. At the electron microscopy level, the cytochemical demonstration of cytochrome oxidase revealed an irregular reaction over the cristae, intramitochondrial vacuolization and partial homogenization of the matrix. Positive membrane fragments were seen around lipid droplets. This reaction confirms the mitochondrial origin of these previously observed radiation-induced vacuoles. (author)

  18. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Hudson

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1 determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2 establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  19. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Matthew B; Smuder, Ashley J; Nelson, W Bradley; Wiggs, Michael P; Shimkus, Kevin L; Fluckey, James D; Szeto, Hazel H; Powers, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1) determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2) establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  20. Simultaneous identification and DNA barcoding of six Eimeria species infecting turkeys using PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Mian A; Shivaramaiah, Srichaitanya; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Cobean, Julie; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    Species-specific PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus were generated that allow for the specific identification of the most common Eimeria species infecting turkeys (i.e., Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria innocua). PCR reaction chemistries were optimized with respect to divalent cation (MgCl2) and dNTP concentrations, as well as PCR cycling conditions (particularly anneal temperature for primers). Genomic DNA samples from single oocyst-derived lines of six Eimeria species were tested to establish specificity and sensitivity of these newly designed primer pairs. A mixed 60-ng total DNA sample containing 10 ng of each of the six Eimeria species was used as DNA template to demonstrate specific amplification of the correct product using each of the species-specific primer pairs. Ten nanograms of each of the five non-target Eimeria species was pooled to provide a non-target, control DNA sample suitable to test the specificity of each primer pair. The amplifications of the COI region with species-specific primer pairs from pooled samples yielded products of expected sizes (209 to 1,012 bp) and no amplification of non-target Eimeria sp. DNA was detected using the non-target, control DNA samples. These primer pairs specific for Eimeria spp. of turkeys did not amplify any of the seven Eimeria species infecting chickens. The newly developed PCR primers can be used as a diagnostic tool capable of specifically identifying six turkey Eimeria species; additionally, sequencing of the PCR amplification products yields sequence-based genotyping data suitable for identification and molecular phylogenetics.

  1. Overview of worldwide diversity of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 haplotypes: two Old World lineages and a New World invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykin, L.M.; De Barro, P.; Hall, D.G.; Hunter, W.B.; McKenzie, C.L.; Powell, C.A.; Shatters, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Relationships among worldwide collections of Diaphorina citri (Asian citrus psyllid) were analyzed using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) haplotypes from novel primers. Sequences were produced from PCR amplicons of an 821bp portion of the mtCOI gene using D. citri specific primers, derived from an existing EST library. An alignment was constructed using 612bps of this fragment and consisted of 212 individuals from 52 collections representing 15 countries. There were a total of eight polymorphic sites that separated the sequences into eight different haplotypes (Dcit-1 through Dcit-8). Phylogenetic network analysis using the statistical parsimony software, TCS, suggests two major haplotype groups with preliminary geographic bias between southwestern Asia (SWA) and southeastern Asia (SEA). The recent (within the last 15 to 25 years) invasion into the New World originated from only the SWA group in the northern hemisphere (USA and Mexico) and from both the SEA and SWA groups in the southern hemisphere (Brazil). In only one case, Reunion Island, did haplotypes from both the SEA and SWA group appear in the same location. In Brazil, both groups were present, but in separate locations. The Dcit-1 SWA haplotype was the most frequently encountered, including ~50% of the countries sampled and 87% of the total sequences obtained from India, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia. The second most frequently encountered haplotype, Dcit-2, the basis of the SEA group, represented ~50% of the countries and contained most of the sequences from Southeast Asia and China. Interestingly, only the Caribbean collections (Puerto Rico and Guadeloupe) represented a unique haplotype not found in other countries, indicating no relationship between the USA (Florida) and Caribbean introductions. There is no evidence for cryptic speciation for D. citri based on the COI region included in this study. PMID:22717059

  2. Applicability of partial characterization of cytochrome oxidase I in identification of forensically important flies (Diptera) from China and Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Sanaa Mohamed; Wen, Jifang

    2013-07-01

    Precise species identification of every insect sample collected from criminal scenes play an essential role in the accurate estimation of postmortem interval. The morphological similarity poses a great challenge for forensic entomologists. DNA-based method can be used as a supplemental means of morphological method. In the present study, we demonstrate the applicability of the 304-bp cytochrome oxidase I gene fragment in molecular identification of forensically important Diptera. We analyzed 75 specimens belonging to 19 species of 3 families originating from China (Calliphoridae: Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya albiceps, Chrysomya rufifacies, Chrysomya nigripes, Aldrichina grahami; Lucilia bazini, Lucilia caesar, Lucilia cuprina, Lucilia sericata, Lucilia porphyrina; Muscidae: Musca autumnalis, Musca domestica, Fannia canicularis, Stomoxys calcitrans; Sarcophagidae: Sarcophaga albiceps, Sarcophaga dux, Helicophagella melanura) and Egypt (Calliphoridae: C. megacephala, C. albiceps, L. sericata; Muscidae: M. domestica, F. canicularis, S. calcitrans, Synthesiomyia nudiseta; Sarcophagidae: Sarcophaga argyrostoma). This region was amplified using polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing of the amplification products. Nucleotide sequence divergences were calculated using the Kimura two-parameter distance model and a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree generated. Intraspecific variation ranged from 0-0.8 % and interspecific variation occurred between 1-19 %. Although all examined specimens were assigned to the correct species and formed distinct monophyletic clades, the data of the phylogenetic analysis were not completely in accordance with the traditional morphological classification. As both C. nigripes and A. grahami unexpectedly joined with Muscidae and Sarcophagidae groups respectively. Moreover, both Calliphorinae and Luciliinae clades failed to represent Calliphoridae as a separate group. Therefore, although molecular methods are beneficial

  3. Deletion of P399{sub E}401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueck, Christa E., E-mail: christa.flueck@dkf.unibe.ch [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Mallet, Delphine [Service d' Endocrinologie Moleculaire et Maladies Rares, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron (France); Hofer, Gaby [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Samara-Boustani, Dinane [Hopital Necker-Enfants malades, Paris (France); Leger, Juliane [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France); Polak, Michel [Hopital Necker-Enfants malades, Paris (France); Morel, Yves [Service d' Endocrinologie Moleculaire et Maladies Rares, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron (France); Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. {yields} We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399{sub E}401del. {yields} POR mutation P399{sub E}401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. {yields} Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. {yields} Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399{sub E}401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399{sub E}401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17{alpha}-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399{sub E}401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399{sub E}401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399{sub E}401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  4. Deletion of P399E401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mallet, Delphine; Hofer, Gaby; Samara-Boustani, Dinane; Leger, Juliane; Polak, Michel; Morel, Yves; Pandey, Amit V.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. → We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399 E 401del. → POR mutation P399 E 401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. → Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. → Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399 E 401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399 E 401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17α-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399 E 401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399 E 401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399 E 401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  5. Alteration of structure and function of ATP synthase and cytochrome c oxidase by lack of F-o-a and Cox3 subunits caused by mitochondrial DNA 9205delTA mutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejzlarová, Kateřina; Kaplanová, Vilma; Nůsková, Hana; Kovářová, Nikola; Ješina, Pavel; Drahota, Zdeněk; Mráček, Tomáš; Seneca, S.; Houštěk, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 466, č. 3 (2015), s. 601-611 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0970; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1363 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP synthase * cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrial diseases * mtDNA MT-ATP6 mutation * oxidative phosphorylation * threshold effect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2015

  6. The impact of partial manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2)-deficiency on mitochondrial oxidant stress, DNA fragmentation and liver injury during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, Anup; Lebofsky, Margitta; Weinman, Steven A.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in many countries. The mechanism of cell death is initiated by formation of a reactive metabolite that binds to mitochondrial proteins and promotes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is a critical defense enzyme located in the mitochondrial matrix. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the functional consequences of partial SOD2-deficiency (SOD2+/-) on intracellular signaling mechanisms of necrotic cell death after APAP overdose. Treatment of C57Bl/6J wild type animals with 200 mg/kg APAP resulted in liver injury as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activities (2870 ± 180 U/L) and centrilobular necrosis at 6 h. In addition, increased tissue glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels and GSSG-to-GSH ratios, delayed mitochondrial GSH recovery, and increased mitochondrial protein carbonyls and nitrotyrosine protein adducts indicated mitochondrial oxidant stress. In addition, nuclear DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay) correlated with translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Furthermore, activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) was documented by the mitochondrial translocation of phospho-JNK. SOD2+/- mice showed 4-fold higher ALT activities and necrosis, an enhancement of all parameters of the mitochondrial oxidant stress, more AIF release and more extensive DNA fragmentation and more prolonged JNK activation. Conclusions: the impaired defense against mitochondrial superoxide formation in SOD2+/- mice prolongs JNK activation after APAP overdose and consequently further enhances the mitochondrial oxidant stress leading to exaggerated mitochondrial dysfunction, release of intermembrane proteins with nuclear DNA fragmentation and more necrosis.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-09-01

    To confirm phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences, mtDNA 16S partial sequences of ten isolates of three Demodex species from China were amplified, recombined, and sequenced and then analyzed with two Demodex folliculorum isolates from Spain. Lastly, genetic distance was computed, and phylogenetic tree was reconstructed. MEGA 4.0 analysis showed high sequence identity among 16S rDNA partial sequences of three Demodex species, which were 95.85 % in D. folliculorum, 98.53 % in Demodex canis, and 99.71 % in Demodex brevis. The divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversions of the three Demodex species reached interspecies level, whereas there was no significant difference of the divergence (1.1 %), genetic distance (0.011), and transition/transversions (3/1) of the two geographic D. folliculorum isolates (Spain and China). Phylogenetic trees reveal that the three Demodex species formed three separate branches of one clade, where D. folliculorum and D. canis gathered first, and then gathered with D. brevis. The two Spain and five China D. folliculorum isolates did not form sister clades. In conclusion, 16S mtDNA are suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis in low taxa (genus or species), but not for intraspecies determination of Demodex. The differentiation among the three Demodex species has reached interspecies level.

  8. Impaired expression of mitochondrial and adipogenic genes in adipose tissue from a patient with acquired partial lipodystrophy (Barraquer-Simons syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guallar Jordi P

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acquired partial lipodystrophy or Barraquer-Simons syndrome is a rare form of progressive lipodystrophy. The etiopathogenesis of adipose tissue atrophy in these patients is unknown. Case presentation This is a case report of a 44-year-old woman with acquired partial lipodystrophy. To obtain insight into the molecular basis of lipoatrophy in acquired partial lipodystrophy, we examined gene expression in adipose tissue from this patient newly diagnosed with acquired partial lipodystrophy. A biopsy of subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from the patient, and DNA and RNA were extracted in order to evaluate mitochondrial DNA abundance and mRNA expression levels. Conclusion The expression of marker genes of adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism, including the master regulator PPARγ, was down-regulated in subcutaneous adipose tissue from this patient. Adiponectin mRNA expression was also reduced but leptin mRNA levels were unaltered. Markers of local inflammatory status were unaltered. Expression of genes related to mitochondrial function was reduced despite unaltered levels of mitochondrial DNA. It is concluded that adipogenic and mitochondrial gene expression is impaired in adipose tissue in this patient with acquired partial lipodystrophy.

  9. Changes in Respiratory Mitochondrial Machinery and Cytochrome and Alternative Pathway Activities in Response to Energy Demand Underlie the Acclimation of Respiration to Elevated CO2 in the Invasive Opuntia ficus-indica1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Casanovas, Nuria; Blanc-Betes, Elena; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.; Azcon-Bieto, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    Studies on long-term effects of plants grown at elevated CO2 are scarce and mechanisms of such responses are largely unknown. To gain mechanistic understanding on respiratory acclimation to elevated CO2, the Crassulacean acid metabolism Mediterranean invasive Opuntia ficus-indica Miller was grown at various CO2 concentrations. Respiration rates, maximum activity of cytochrome c oxidase, and active mitochondrial number consistently decreased in plants grown at elevated CO2 during the 9 months of the study when compared to ambient plants. Plant growth at elevated CO2 also reduced cytochrome pathway activity, but increased the activity of the alternative pathway. Despite all these effects seen in plants grown at high CO2, the specific oxygen uptake rate per unit of active mitochondria was the same for plants grown at ambient and elevated CO2. Although decreases in photorespiration activity have been pointed out as a factor contributing to the long-term acclimation of plant respiration to growth at elevated CO2, the homeostatic maintenance of specific respiratory rate per unit of mitochondria in response to high CO2 suggests that photorespiratory activity may play a small role on the long-term acclimation of respiration to elevated CO2. However, despite growth enhancement and as a result of the inhibition in cytochrome pathway activity by elevated CO2, total mitochondrial ATP production was decreased by plant growth at elevated CO2 when compared to ambient-grown plants. Because plant growth at elevated CO2 increased biomass but reduced respiratory machinery, activity, and ATP yields while maintaining O2 consumption rates per unit of mitochondria, we suggest that acclimation to elevated CO2 results from physiological adjustment of respiration to tissue ATP demand, which may not be entirely driven by nitrogen metabolism as previously suggested. PMID:17660349

  10. Dependence of mitochondrial and cytosolic adenine nucleotides on oxygen partial pressure in isolated hepatocytes. Application of a new rapid high pressure filtration technique for fractionation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hummerich, H; de Groot, H; Noll, T; Soboll, S

    1988-01-01

    By using a new rapid high pressure filtration technique, mitochondrial and cytosolic ATP and ADP contents were determined in isolated hepatocytes at different oxygen partial pressures. At 670 mmHg, subcellular adenine nucleotide contents and ATP/ADP ratios were comparable with values obtained with the digitonin fractionation technique. However at lower oxygen partial pressure ADP appears to be rephosphorylated during digitonin fractionation whereas with high pressure filtration fractionation ...

  11. A complex of cardiac cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Y L; Kaminsky, L S; King, T E

    1976-01-10

    The interactions of cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c from bovine cardiac mitochondria were investigated. Cytochrome c1 and cytochrome c formed a 1:1 molecular complex in aqueous solutions of low ionic strength. The complex was stable to Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The formation and stability of the complex were independent of the oxidation state of the cytochrome components as far as those reactions studied were concerned. The complex was dissociated in solutions of ionic strength higher than 0.07 or pH exceeding 10 and only partially dissociated in 8 M urea. No complexation occurred when cytochrome c was acetylated on 64% of its lysine residues or photooxidized on its 2 methionine residues. Complexes with molecular ratios of less than 1:1 (i.e. more cytochrome c) were obtained when polymerized cytochrome c, or cytochrome c with all lysine residues guanidinated, or a "1-65 heme peptide" from cyanogen bromide cleavage of cytochrome c was used. These results were interpreted to imply that the complex was predominantly maintained by ionic interactions probably involving some of the lysine residues of cytochrome c but with major stabilization dependent on the native conformations of both cytochromes. The reduced complex was autooxidizable with biphasic kinetics with first order rate constants of 6 X 10(-5) and 5 X U0(-5) s-1 but did not react with carbon monoxide. The complex reacted with cyanide and was reduced by ascorbate at about 32% and 40% respectively, of the rates of reaction with cytochrome c alone. The complex was less photoreducible than cytochrome c1 alone. The complex exhibited remarkably different circular dichroic behavior from that of the summation of cytochrome c1 plus cytochrome c. We concluded that when cytochromes c1 and c interacted they underwent dramatic conformational changes resulting in weakening of their heme crevices. All results available would indicate that in the complex cytochrome c1 was bound at the entrance to the heme crevice of

  12. 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA and internal transcribed spacers ribosomal DNA as differential markers of Trichuris discolor populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejón, R; Halajian, A; de Rojas, M; Marrugal, A; Guevara, D; Cutillas, C

    2012-05-25

    Comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular studies of Trichuris discolor isolated from Bos taurus from Spain and Iran was carried out. Furthermore, Trichuris ovis isolated from B. taurus and Capra hircus from Spain has been, molecularly, analyzed. Morphological studies revealed clear differences between T. ovis and T. discolor isolated from B. taurus but differences were not observed between populations of T. discolor isolated from different geographical regions. Nevertheless, the molecular studies based on the amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 ribosomal DNA and 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA showed clear differences between both populations of T. discolor from Spain and Iran suggesting two cryptic species. Phylogenetic studies corroborated these data. Thus, phylogenetic trees based on ITS1, ITS2 and 16S partial gene sequences showed that individuals of T. discolor from B. taurus from Iran clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, of T. discolor isolated from B. taurus from Spain, while populations of T. ovis from B. taurus and C. hircus from Spain clustered together but separated with high bootstrap values of both populations of T. discolor. Furthermore, a comparative phylogenetic study has been carried out with the ITS1and ITS2 sequences of Trichuris species from different hosts. Three clades were observed: the first clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing herbivores (T. discolor, T. ovis, Trichuris leporis and Trichuris skrjabini), the second clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing omnivores (Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis) and finally, the third clustered species of Trichuris parasitizing carnivores (Trichuris muris, Trichuris arvicolae and Trichuris vulpis). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics Decrease Prior to Axon Degeneration Induced by Vincristine and are Partially Rescued by Overexpressed cytNmnat1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Berbusse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Axon degeneration is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and is often characterized by aberrant mitochondrial dynamics. Mitochondrial fission, fusion, and motility have been shown to be particularly important in progressive neurodegeneration. Thus we investigated these imperative dynamics, as well as mitochondrial fragmentation in vincristine induced axon degradation in cultured DRG neurons. CytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration in various paradigms including vincristine toxicity. The mechanism of its protection is not yet fully understood; therefore, we also investigated the effect of cytNmnat1 on mitochondrial dynamics in vincristine treated neurons. We observed that vincristine treatment decreases the rate of mitochondrial fission, fusion and motility and induces mitochondrial fragmentation. These mitochondrial events precede visible axon degeneration. Overexpression of cytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration and preserves the normal mitochondrial dynamics and motility in vincristine treated neurons. We suggest the alterations in mitochondrial structure and dynamics are early events which lead to axon degeneration and cytNmnat1 blocks axon degeneration by halting the vincristine induced changes to mitochondrial structure and dynamics.

  14. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Release and Suppression of Caspases by Gamma-Tocotrienol Prevent Apoptosis and Delay Aging in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence of Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Makpol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the molecular mechanism of γ-tocotrienol (GTT in preventing cellular aging by focusing on its anti-apoptotic effect in stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs. Results obtained showed that SIPS exhibited senescent-phenotypic characteristic, increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal and promoted G0/G1 cell cycle arrest accompanied by shortening of telomere length with decreased telomerase activity. Both SIPS and senescent HDFs shared similar apoptotic changes such as increased Annexin V-FITC positive cells, increased cytochrome c release and increased activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 (P<0.05. GTT treatment resulted in a significant reduction of Annexin V-FITC positive cells, inhibited cytochrome c release and decreased activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 (P<0.05. Gene expression analysis showed that GTT treatment down regulated BAX mRNA, up-regulated BCL2A1 mRNA and decreased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 protein expression (P<0.05 in SIPS. These findings suggested that GTT inhibits apoptosis by modulating the upstream apoptosis cascade, causing the inhibition of cytochrome c release from the mitochondria with concomitant suppression of caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. In conclusion, GTT delays cellular senescence of human diploid fibroblasts through the inhibition of intrinsic mitochondria-mediated pathway which involved the regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins.

  15. Molecular systematics and DNA barcoding of Altai osmans, oreoleuciscus (pisces, cyprinidae, and leuciscinae), and their nearest relatives, inferred from sequences of cytochrome b (Cyt-b), cytochrome oxidase c (Co-1), and complete mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartavtsev, Yuri Phedorovich; Batischeva, Natalia M; Bogutskaya, Nina G; Katugina, Anna O; Hanzawa, Naoto

    2017-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) at the protein-coding Cyt-b gene along with data retrieved from GenBank for Co-1 gene fragments and complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Altai osmans and the nearest relatives of Leuciscinae fish species were compared for the estimation of variability and phylogenetic tree building. Phylogenetic trees were built by four techniques: Bayesian (BA), maximum likelihood (ML), maximum parsimony (MP), and neighbor-joining (NJ). Resolution of Cyt-b trees for species of two genera (Oreoleuciscus and Phoxinus) was quite distinct at all the approaches. For Tribolodon, the single gene trees were not well resolved; however, the mitogenome tree was resolved. Species identification on per individual basis (DNA barcoding) was high for both Cyt-b and Co-1 genes. The trees built using the data for 13 protein mitochondrial genes revealed a complicated phylogenetic pattern within the subfamily Leuciscinae. Scores of the average p-distances at three taxonomic levels were considerably different: (1) 1.16 ± 0.96, (2) 8.21 ± 1.01, and (3) 16.41 ± 0.85 for Cyt-b and (1) 1.04 ± 0.78, (2) 8.30 ± 0.92, and (3) 10.74 ± 0.79 for 13 protein genes of mitogenome, where (1) is intraspecies, (2) is intragenus, and (3) is intrasubfamily levels. Data on mitogenome distances were summarized for the taxonomic hierarchy for the first time. A concordant increase in distance score with growth of the rank of taxa (having the minimum score at the intraspecies level), both for a single gene and the whole mitogenome, substantiates the concept that speciation in the subfamily Leuciscinae in most cases follows the geographic mode. The distinct clustering of Altai osmans, Oreoleuciscus potanini and O. humilis, in the Cyt-b and Co-1 gene trees with small overall genetic distances, obtained for both genes, allows us to consider these taxa as separate but genetically sister species.

  16. Identification of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by using polymerase chain reaction amplification and restriction analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, E; García, T; Céspedes, A; González, I; Sanz, B; Hernández, P E; Martín, R

    1998-04-01

    Restriction site analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from a conserved region of the cytochrome b gene has been used for the identification of fresh and smoked samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Digestion of the 359-bp PCR product with the endonucleases EcoRV and TaqI yielded specific banding patterns for salmon and trout. This genetic marker can be very useful for detecting fraudulent substitution of the cheaper smoked trout for the more expensive smoked salmon.

  17. [Investigation into the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, tRNA gene and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene variations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, J; Gu, G Z; Chen, G S; Li, Y H; Zhang, H L; Yang, Q Y; Xu, X R; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; He, L H; Zheng, Y X; Yu, S F

    2017-01-06

    Objective: To explore the relationship between mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene variation, tRNA gene variation and cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene point mutations and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Methods: A nested case-control study was performed that followed a cohort of 7 445 noise-exposed workers in a steel factory in Henan province, China, from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2015. Subjects whose average hearing threshold was more than 40 dB(A) in high frequency were defined as the case group, and subjects whose average hearing threshold was less than 35 dB(A) in high frequency and less than 25 dB (A) in speech frequency were defined as the control group. Subjects was recruited into the case group ( n =286) and the control group ( n= 286) according to gender, age, job category and time of exposure to noise, and a 1∶1 case-control study was carried out. We genotyped eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in the mitochondrial 12 S rRNA gene, the mitochondrial tRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase Ⅱ gene using SNPscan high-throughput genotyping technology from the recruited subjects. The relationship between polymorphic sites and NIHL, adjusted for covariates, was analyzed using conditional logistic regression analysis, as were the subgroup data. Results: The average age of the recruited subjects was (40.3±8.1) years and the length of service exposure to noise was (18.6±8.9) years. The range of noise exposed levels and cumulative noise exposure (CNE) was 80.1- 93.4 dB (A) and 86.8- 107.9 dB (A) · year, respectively. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 1.88 (1.16-3.05) compared with non-smokers; for workers exposed to noise at a CNE level ≥98 dB(A) · year, smokers showed an increased risk of NIHL of 2.53 (1.49- 4.30) compared with non-smokers. For workers exposed to noise at a CNE level<98 dB (A) · year, the results of univariate analysis and multifactor analysis

  18. [Mitochondrial disease due to the deficit of Q-cytochrome C oxidoreductase coenzyme in the respiratory chain. Report of a new case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, S; Lluch, M D; Navarro Quesada, F J; Hevia, A

    1995-01-01

    Reference has been made in the literature of the variability in the clinical presentation of deficiency of complex III of the respiratory chain, identifying up to the moment, four groups, the first of which is characterized by hipotonia and wearness starting at variable ages. We report a new case of mitochondrial myopathy due to deficiency of this complex and included within this first group, and consider the importance of defining the clinical and histochemical characteristics of this polymorphous entity.

  19. Molecular Identification of Necrophagous Muscidae and Sarcophagidae Fly Species Collected in Korea by Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I Nucleotide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hoon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of insect species is an important task in forensic entomology. For more convenient species identification, the nucleotide sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene have been widely utilized. We analyzed full-length COI nucleotide sequences of 10 Muscidae and 6 Sarcophagidae fly species collected in Korea. After DNA extraction from collected flies, PCR amplification and automatic sequencing of the whole COI sequence were performed. Obtained sequences were analyzed for a phylogenetic tree and a distance matrix. Our data showed very low intraspecific sequence distances and species-level monophylies. However, sequence comparison with previously reported sequences revealed a few inconsistencies or paraphylies requiring further investigation. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report of COI nucleotide sequences from Hydrotaea occulta, Muscina angustifrons, Muscina pascuorum, Ophyra leucostoma, Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis, Sarcophaga harpax, and Phaonia aureola.

  20. Biotin starvation causes mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation and partial rescue by the SIRT3-like deacetylase Hst4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Toft; Sylvestersen, Kathrine Beck; Young, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    deficiency. Upregulated mitochondrial acetylation sites correlate with the cellular deficiency of the Hst4p deacetylase, and a biotin-starvation-induced accumulation of Hst4p in mitochondria supports a role for Hst4p in lowering mitochondrial acetylation. We show that biotin starvation and knockout of Hst4p...... cause alterations in cellular respiration and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that Hst4p plays a pivotal role in biotin metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis, and supports that Hst4p is a functional yeast homologue of the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3. With biotin...

  1. Genetic diversity of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in Lutzomyia spp., with special reference to Lutzomyia peruensis, a main vector of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in the Peruvian Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kento; Cáceres, Abraham G; Gomez, Eduardo A; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Korenaga, Masataka; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Katakura, Ken; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Kato, Hirotomo

    2013-05-01

    The genetic divergence caused by genetic drift and/or selection is suggested to affect the vectorial capacity and insecticide susceptibility of sand flies, as well as other arthropods. In the present study, cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequences were determined in 13 species circulating in Peru to establish a basis for analysis of the genetic structure, and the intraspecific genetic diversity was assessed in the Lutzomyia (Lu.) peruensis, a main vector species of Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana in Peruvian Andes. Analysis of intraspecific genetic diversity in the cyt b gene sequences from 36 Lu. peruensis identified 3 highly polymorphic sites in the middle region of the gene. Haplotype and gene network analyses were performed on the cyt b gene sequences of 130 Lu. peruensis in 9 Andean areas from 3 Departments (Ancash, Lima and La Libertad). The results showed that the populations of La Libertad were highly polymorphic and that their haplotypes were distinct from those of Ancash and Lima, where dominant haplotypes were observed, suggesting that a population bottleneck may have occurred in Ancash and Lima, but not in La Libertad. The present study indicated that the middle region of the cyt b gene is useful for the analysis of genetic structure in sand fly populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Thai oyster (Ostreidae) based on partial sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussarawit, Somchai; Gravlund, Peter; Glenner, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Ten oyster species of the family Ostreidae (Subfamilies Crassostreinae and Lophinae) from Thailand were studied using morphological data and mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene sequences. Additional sequence data from five specimens of Ostreidae and one specimen of Tridacna gigas were downloaded from Gen...

  3. Dichloroacetate stimulates changes in the mitochondrial network morphology via partial mitophagy in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pajuelo-Reguera, David; Alán, Lukáš; Olejár, Tomáš; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 6 (2015), s. 2409-2418 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dichloroacetate * mitochondria * mitophagy * neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells * mitochondrial network Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.018, year: 2015

  4. Variations in dark respiration and mitochondrial numbers within needles of Pinus radiata grown in ambient or elevated CO2 partial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, K. L.; Anderson, O. R.; Tissue, D. T.; Turnbull, M. H.; Whitehead, D.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment involving comparison of within-leaf variations in cell size, mitochondrial numbers and dark respiration in the most recently expanded tip, the mid-section and the base of needles of Pinus radiata grown for four years at ambient and elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure, is described. Results showed variation in mitochondrial numbers and respiration along the length of the needle, with the highest number of mitochondria per unit cytoplasm and the highest rate of respiration per unit leaf area at the base of the needle. Elevated carbon dioxide pressure caused the number of mitochondria per unit cytoplasm to double regardless of location (tip, basal or mid sections). Under these conditions, greatest mitochondrial density was observed at the tip. The mean size of mitochondria was not affected by either growth at elevated carbon dioxide pressure or by position on the needle. Respiration per unit leaf area at elevated carbon dioxide pressure was highest at the tip of needles, decreasing towards the middle and basal sections. The observed data supports the hypothesis that the highest number of mitochondria per unit area of cytoplasm occurs at the base of the needle, but does not support the hypothesis that the lowest rate of respiration also occurs at the base. It is suggested that the relationship that determines the association between structure and function in these needles is more complex than previously thought. 33 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  5. Absence of population genetic structure in Heterakis gallinarum of chicken from Sichuan, inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaobin; Zhu, Jun-Yang; Jian, Ke-Ling; Wang, Bao-Jian; Peng, Xue-Rong; Yang, Guang-You; Wang, Tao; Zhong, Zhi-Jun; Peng, Ke-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Population genetics information provides a foundation for understanding the transmission and epidemiology of parasite and, therefore, may be used to assist in the control of parasitosis. However, limited available sequence information in Heterakis gallinarum has greatly impeded the study in this area. In this study, we first investigated the genetic variability and genetic structure of H. gallinarum. The 1325 bp fragments of the mitochondrial COX1 gene were amplified in 56 isolates of H. gallinarum from seven different geographical regions in Sichuan province, China. The 56 sequences were classified into 22 haplotypes (H1-H22). The values of haplotype diversity (0.712) and nucleotide diversity (0.00158) in Sichuan population indicate a rapid expansion occurred from a relatively small, short-term effective population in the past. The haplotype network formed a distribution around H1 in a star-like topology, and the haplotypes did not cluster according to their geographical location. Similar conclusions could be made from MP phylogenetic tree. The Fst value (FstNeutrality tests (Tajima's D and Fu's Fs) and mismatch analysis indicated that H. gallinarum experienced a population expansion in the past. Our results indicated that H. gallinarum experienced a rapid population expansion in the past, and there was a low genetic diversity and an absence of population structure across the population.

  6. Molecular phylogeny of the neritidae (Gastropoda: Neritimorpha) based on the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and 16S rRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero Galvis, Julian Fernando; Castro, Lyda Raquel

    2013-01-01

    The family Neritidae has representatives in tropical and subtropical regions that occur in a variety of environments, and its known fossil record dates back to the late Cretaceous. However there have been few studies of molecular phylogeny in this family. We performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the family Neritidae using the COI (722 bp) and the 16S rRNA (559 bp) regions of the mitochondrial genome. Neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference were performed. The best phylogenetic reconstruction was obtained using the COI region, and we consider it an appropriate marker for phylogenetic studies within the group. Consensus analysis (COI +16S rRNA) generally obtained the same tree topologies and confirmed that the genus Nerita is monophyletic. The consensus analysis using parsimony recovered a monophyletic group consisting of the genera Neritina, Septaria, Theodoxus, Puperita, and Clithon, while in the Bayesian analyses Theodoxus is separated from the other genera. The phylogenetic status of the species from the genus Nerita from the Colombian Caribbean generated in this study was consistent with that reported for the genus in previous studies. In the resulting consensus tree obtained using maximum parsimony, we included information on habitat type for each species, to map the evolution by habitat. Species of the family Neritidae possibly have their origin in marine environments, which is consistent with conclusions from previous reports based on anatomical studies.

  7. Biotin starvation causes mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation and partial rescue by the SIRT3-like deacetylase Hst4p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Christian T.; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B.; Young, Clifford; Larsen, Sara C.; Poulsen, Jon W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Palmqvist, Eva A.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jensen, Per B.; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The essential vitamin biotin is a covalent and tenaciously attached prosthetic group in several carboxylases that play important roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. Here we describe increased acetyl-CoA levels and mitochondrial hyperacetylation as downstream metabolic effects of biotin deficiency. Upregulated mitochondrial acetylation sites correlate with the cellular deficiency of the Hst4p deacetylase, and a biotin-starvation-induced accumulation of Hst4p in mitochondria supports a role for Hst4p in lowering mitochondrial acetylation. We show that biotin starvation and knockout of Hst4p cause alterations in cellular respiration and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that Hst4p plays a pivotal role in biotin metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis, and supports that Hst4p is a functional yeast homologue of the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3. With biotin deficiency being involved in various metabolic disorders, this study provides valuable insight into the metabolic effects biotin exerts on eukaryotic cells. PMID:26158509

  8. Genetic defects of cytochrome c oxidase assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecina, Petr; Houšťková, H.; Hansíková, H.; Zeman, J.; Houštěk, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl. 1 (2004), s. S213-S223 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/03/0749 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrial disorders Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  9. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL overexpression inhibits cytochrome c release, activation of multiple caspases, and virus release following coxsackievirus B3 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carthy, Christopher M.; Yanagawa, Bobby; Luo Honglin; Granville, David J.; Yang, Decheng; Cheung, Paul; Cheung, Caroline; Esfandiarei, Mitra; Rudin, Charles M.; Thompson, Craig B.; Hunt, David W.C.; McManus, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3, a cytopathic virus in the family Picornaviridae, induces degenerative changes in host cell morphology. Here we demonstrate cytochrome c release and caspases-2, -3, -6, -7, -8, and -9 processing. Enforced Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression markedly reduced release of cytochrome c, presentation of the mitochondrial epitope 7A6, and depressed caspase activation following infection. In comparison, cell death using TRAIL ligand caused caspase-8 processing prior to cytochrome c release and executioner caspases and cell death was only partially rescued by Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL overexpression. Disruption of the mitochondrial inner membrane potential following CVB3 infection was not inhibited by zVAD.fmk treatment. Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL overexpression or zVAD.fmk treatment delayed the loss of host cell viability and decreased progeny virus release following infection. Our data suggest that mitochondrial release of cytochrome c may be an important early event in caspase activation in CVB3 infection, and, as such, may contribute to the loss of host-cell viability and progeny virus release

  10. Identification of Potential Calorie Restriction-Mimicking Yeast Mutants with Increased Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain and Nitric Oxide Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR induces a metabolic shift towards mitochondrial respiration; however, molecular mechanisms underlying CR remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that CR-induced mitochondrial activity is associated with nitric oxide (NO production. To understand the role of mitochondria in CR, we identify and study Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with increased NO levels as potential CR mimics. Analysis of the top 17 mutants demonstrates a correlation between increased NO, mitochondrial respiration, and longevity. Interestingly, treating yeast with NO donors such as GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione is sufficient to partially mimic CR to extend lifespan. CR-increased NO is largely dependent on mitochondrial electron transport and cytochrome c oxidase (COX. Although COX normally produces NO under hypoxic conditions, CR-treated yeast cells are able to produce NO under normoxic conditions. Our results suggest that CR may derepress some hypoxic genes for mitochondrial proteins that function to promote the production of NO and the extension of lifespan.

  11. Biogenesis of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is composed of four different protein complexes that cooperate in electron transfer and proton pumping across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The cytochrome bc1 complex, or complex III, is a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This review will focus on the biogenesis of the bc1 complex in the mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In wild type yeast mitochondrial membranes the major part of the cytochrome bc1 complex was found in association with one or two copies of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. The analysis of several yeast mutant strains in which single genes or pairs of genes encoding bc1 subunits had been deleted revealed the presence of a common set of bc1 sub-complexes. These sub-complexes are represented by the central core of the bc1 complex, consisting of cytochrome b bound to subunit 7 and subunit 8, by the two core proteins associated with each other, by the Rieske protein associated with subunit 9, and by those deriving from the unexpected interaction of each of the two core proteins with cytochrome c1. Furthermore, a higher molecular mass sub-complex is that composed of cytochrome b, cytochrome c1, core protein 1 and 2, subunit 6, subunit 7 and subunit 8. The identification and characterization of all these sub-complexes may help in defining the steps and the molecular events leading to bc1 assembly in yeast mitochondria.

  12. Phylogenetic relationships in three species of canine Demodex mite based on partial sequences of mitochondrial 16S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Natalia; Ravera, Ivan; Villanueva, Sergio; Altet, Laura; Bardagí, Mar; Sánchez, Armand; Francino, Olga; Ferrer, Lluís

    2012-12-01

    The historical classification of Demodex mites has been based on their hosts and morphological features. Genome sequencing has proved to be a very effective taxonomic tool in phylogenetic studies and has been applied in the classification of Demodex. Mitochondrial 16S rDNA has been demonstrated to be an especially useful marker to establish phylogenetic relationships. To amplify and sequence a segment of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA from Demodex canis and Demodex injai, as well as from the short-bodied mite called, unofficially, D. cornei and to determine their genetic proximity. Demodex mites were examined microscopically and classified as Demodex folliculorum (one sample), D. canis (four samples), D. injai (two samples) or the short-bodied species D. cornei (three samples). DNA was extracted, and a 338 bp fragment of the 16S rDNA was amplified and sequenced. The sequences of the four D. canis mites were identical and shared 99.6 and 97.3% identity with two D. canis sequences available at GenBank. The sequences of the D. cornei isolates were identical and showed 97.8, 98.2 and 99.6% identity with the D. canis isolates. The sequences of the two D. injai isolates were also identical and showed 76.6% identity with the D. canis sequence. Demodex canis and D. injai are two different species, with a genetic distance of 23.3%. It would seem that the short-bodied Demodex mite D. cornei is a morphological variant of D. canis. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2012 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of some avian species using Cytochrome b gene sequence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A; Khalil, S. R; Abd-Elhakim, Y. M

    2015-01-01

    Veritable identification and differentiation of avian species is a vital step in conservative, taxonomic, forensic, legal and other ornithological interventions. Therefore, this study involved the application of molecular approach to identify some avian species i.e. Chicken (Gallus gallus), Muskovy duck (Cairina moschata), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), Laughing dove (Streptopelia senegalensis), and Rock pigeon (Columba livia). Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples and partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (358 bp) was amplified and sequenced using universal primers. Sequences alignment and phylogenetic analyses were performed by CLC main workbench program. The obtained five sequences were deposited in GenBank and compared with those previously registered in GenBank. The similarity percentage was 88.60% between Gallus gallus and Coturnix japonica and 80.46% between Gallus gallus and Columba livia. The percentage of identity between the studied species and GenBank species ranged from 77.20% (Columba oenas and Anas platyrhynchos) to 100% (Gallus gallus and Gallus sonneratii, Coturnix coturnix and Coturnix japonica, Meleagris gallopavo and Columba livia). Amplification of the partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene proved to be practical for identification of an avian species unambiguously. PMID:27175180

  14. 驯鹿的皮蝇蛆线粒体CO1基因序列分析%Sequence analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) gene of warble fly larvae from reindeer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高慧; 杨晓野; 李云章; 莫内; 阿拉腾保力格; 赵治国; 王瑞

    2011-01-01

    The specificity of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidaae 1 ( CO1) gene sequence of warble fly larvae of unknown species from reindeer in Inner Mongolia region of China were analyzed by molecular biological techniques. The results showed that the size of CO1 gene fragment from UEA7 to UEA10 was approximately 689 bp. The analysis of phylogenic tree showed that the unknown species from the reindeer in Inner Mongolia had high homology with Hypoderma diana France isolate. The differences analysis between the different fly species showed:the sequences between Hypodermatidae and Oestridae were obviously different, ranged from 19. 3% to 25. 5% . The divergences of different fly larvae in deer ranged from 1. 9% to 25. 5% . The divergences of Hypoderma. ranged from 6. 7% to 18. 7%. The divergences of Cephenemyia. ranged from 1. 9% to 9. 6% and the variation of the different Hypoderma diana strains was 6. 0%. It suggested that the nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial CO1 genes could indicate the phylogenetic relationships among different genera, species and strains to some extent.%利用分子生物学技术对内蒙古驯鹿未定种皮蝇蛆线粒体CO1基因种属特异性序列进行了研究.DNA核苷酸测序结果证实:该种皮蝇线粒体CO1种属特异性基因UEA7到UEA10特殊目标编码区域片段长度约为689 bp;种系发生进化树和同源性分析显示其与鹿皮蝇法国株同源性非常接近,因此确定内蒙古地区感染驯鹿的皮蝇蛆为鹿皮蝇(Hypoderma diana).不同蝇种间差异性分析显示:皮蝇科(Hypodermatidae)与狂蝇科(Oestridae)之间序列差异明显,差异性为19.3%~25.5%;寄生于鹿的不同蝇蛆种间差异性为1.9%~25.5%;皮蝇属(Hypoderma)不同种间差异性为6.7%~18.7%;鹿蝇属(Cephenemyia)不同种间差异性为1.9%~9.6%;而同种不同株的鹿皮蝇差异性为6.0%;说明生物线粒体CO1基因核苷酸序列在一定程度上可反映出种属及株间在进化上的差异性.

  15. Rastrelliger systematics inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome b ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... were selected as outgroups to root the phylogenetic trees. All sequences were viewed, edited and aligned using MEGA version 4 software (Tamura et al., 2007). Substitution saturation tests were performed using DAMBE (Xia and Xie, 2001) by plotting the number of observed transitions (Ti) relative to that ...

  16. Effects of Muscle-Specific Oxidative Stress on Cytochrome c Release and Oxidation-Reduction Potential Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yiling; Mitacek, Rachel M; Abraham, Anupam; Mafi, Gretchen G; VanOverbeke, Deborah L; DeSilva, Udaya; Ramanathan, Ranjith

    2017-09-06

    Mitochondria play a significant role in beef color. However, the role of oxidative stress in cytochrome c release and mitochondrial degradation is not clear. The objective was to determine the effects of display time on cytochrome c content and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of beef longissimus lumborum (LL) and psoas major (PM) muscles. PM discolored by day 3 compared with LL. On day 0, mitochondrial content and mitochondrial oxygen consumption were greater in PM than LL. However, mitochondrial content and oxygen consumption were lower (P stress can affect cytochrome c release and ORP changes.

  17. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  18. Partial suppression of the respiratory defect of qrs1/her2 glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase mutants by overexpression of the mitochondrial pentatricopeptide Msc6p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Bruno S; Ferreira-Júnior, José Ribamar; Barros, Mario H

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a large body of evidences indicates the existence in the mitochondrial matrix of foci that contain different proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. Some of these proteins have a pentatricopeptide repeat motif that constitutes their RNA-binding structures. Here we report that MSC6, a mitochondrial pentatricopeptide protein of unknown function, is a multi copy suppressor of mutations in QRS1/HER2 a component of the trimeric complex that catalyzes the transamidation of glutamyl-tRNAQ to glutaminyl-tRNAQ. This is an essential step in mitochondrial translation because of the lack of a specific mitochondrial aminoacyl glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. MSC6 over-expression did not abolish translation of an aberrant variant form of Cox2p detected in QRS1/HER2 mutants, arguing against a suppression mechanism that bypasses Qrs1p function. A slight decrement of the mitochondrial translation capacity as well as diminished growth on respiratory carbon sources media for respiratory activity was observed in the msc6 null mutant. Additionally, the msc6 null mutant did not display any impairment in RNA transcription, processing or turnover. We concluded that Msc6p is a mitochondrial matrix protein and further studies are required to indicate the specific function of Msc6p in mitochondrial translation.

  19. Partial mitochondrial DNA sequences suggest the existence of a cryptic species within the Leucosphyrus group of the genus Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae), forest malaria vectors, in northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kohei Takenaka; Nguyen, Ngoc Thi Hong; Nguyen, Binh Thi Huong; Sunahara, Toshihiko; Yasunami, Michio; Nguyen, Manh Duc; Takagi, Masahiro

    2010-04-30

    During the last decade, Southeast Asian countries have been very successful in reducing the burden of malaria. However, malaria remains endemic in these countries, especially in remote and forested areas. The Leucosphyrus group of the genus Anopheles harbors the most important malaria vectors in forested areas of Southeast Asia. In Vietnam, previous molecular studies have resulted in the identification of only Anopheles dirus sensu stricto (previously known as An. dirus species A) among the Leucosphyrus group members. However, Vietnamese entomologists have recognized that mosquitoes belonging to the Leucosphyrus group in northern Vietnam exhibit morphological characteristics similar to those of Anopheles takasagoensis, which has been reported only from Taiwan. Here, we aimed to confirm the genetic and morphological identities of the members of the Leucosphyrus group in Vietnam. In the molecular phylogenetic trees reconstructed using partial COI and ND6 mitochondrial gene sequences, samples collected from southern and central Vietnam clustered together with GenBank sequences of An. dirus that were obtained from Thailand. However, samples from northern Vietnam formed a distinct clade separated from both An. dirus and An. takasagoensis by other valid species. The results suggest the existence of a cryptic species in northern Vietnam that is morphologically similar to, but phylogenetically distant from both An. dirus and An. takasagoensis. We have tentatively designated this possible cryptic species as Anopheles aff. takasagoensis for convenience, until a valid name is assigned. However, it is difficult to distinguish the species solely on the basis of morphological characteristics. Further studies on such as karyotypes and polytene chromosome banding patterns are necessary to confirm whether An. aff. takasagoensis is a valid species. Moreover, studies on (1) the geographic distribution, which is potentially spreading along the Vietnam, China, Laos, and Myanmar borders

  20. Reversible infantile mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Bansagi, Boglarka; Horvath, Rita

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are usually severe and progressive conditions; however, there are rare forms that show remarkable spontaneous recoveries. Two homoplasmic mitochondrial tRNA mutations (m.14674T>C/G in mt-tRNA(Glu)) have been reported to cause severe infantile mitochondrial myopathy in the first months of life. If these patients survive the first year of life by extensive life-sustaining measures they usually recover and develop normally. Another mitochondrial disease due to deficiency of the 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase (TRMU) causes severe liver failure in infancy, but similar to the reversible mitochondrial myopathy, within the first year of life these infants may also recover completely. Partial recovery has been noted in some other rare forms of mitochondrial disease due to deficiency of mitochondrial tRNA synthetases and mitochondrial tRNA modifying enzymes. Here we summarize the clinical presentation of these unique reversible mitochondrial diseases and discuss potential molecular mechanisms behind the reversibility. Understanding these mechanisms may provide the key to treatments of potential broader relevance in mitochondrial disease, where for the majority of the patients no effective treatment is currently available.

  1. Partial mitochondrial DNA sequences suggest the existence of a cryptic species within the Leucosphyrus group of the genus Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae, forest malaria vectors, in northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunami Michio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last decade, Southeast Asian countries have been very successful in reducing the burden of malaria. However, malaria remains endemic in these countries, especially in remote and forested areas. The Leucosphyrus group of the genus Anopheles harbors the most important malaria vectors in forested areas of Southeast Asia. In Vietnam, previous molecular studies have resulted in the identification of only Anopheles dirus sensu stricto (previously known as An. dirus species A among the Leucosphyrus group members. However, Vietnamese entomologists have recognized that mosquitoes belonging to the Leucosphyrus group in northern Vietnam exhibit morphological characteristics similar to those of Anopheles takasagoensis, which has been reported only from Taiwan. Here, we aimed to confirm the genetic and morphological identities of the members of the Leucosphyrus group in Vietnam. Results In the molecular phylogenetic trees reconstructed using partial COI and ND6 mitochondrial gene sequences, samples collected from southern and central Vietnam clustered together with GenBank sequences of An. dirus that were obtained from Thailand. However, samples from northern Vietnam formed a distinct clade separated from both An. dirus and An. takasagoensis by other valid species. Conclusions The results suggest the existence of a cryptic species in northern Vietnam that is morphologically similar to, but phylogenetically distant from both An. dirus and An. takasagoensis. We have tentatively designated this possible cryptic species as Anopheles aff. takasagoensis for convenience, until a valid name is assigned. However, it is difficult to distinguish the species solely on the basis of morphological characteristics. Further studies on such as karyotypes and polytene chromosome banding patterns are necessary to confirm whether An. aff. takasagoensis is a valid species. Moreover, studies on (1 the geographic distribution, which is potentially

  2. Inhibiting c-Jun N-terminal kinase partially attenuates caffeine-dependent cell death without alleviating the caffeine-induced reduction in mitochondrial respiration in C2C12 skeletal myotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, R.M.; Hughes, M.A.; Kinsey, S.T.; Johnson, M.C.; Baumgarner, B.L.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is a widely consumed stimulant that has previously been shown to promote cytotoxic stress and even cell death in numerous mammalian cell lines. Thus far there is little information available regarding the toxicity of caffeine in skeletal muscle cells. Our preliminary data revealed that treating C2C12 myotubes with 5 mM caffeine for 6 h increased nuclear fragmentation and reduced basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in skeletal myotubes. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the pathways by which caffeine increased cell death and reduced mitochondrial respiration. We specifically examined the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which has previously been shown to simultaneously increase caspase-dependent cell death and reduce mitochondrial respiration in other mammalian cell lines. We found that caffeine promoted a dose-dependent increase in cell death in multinucleated myotubes but did not in mononucleated myoblasts. The addition of 10 μM Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of executioner caspases, completely inhibited caffeine-dependent cell death. Further, the addition of 400 μM dantrolene, a specific ryanodine receptor (RYR) inhibitor, prevented the caffeine-dependent increase in cell death and the reduction in basal and maximal OCR. We also discovered that caffeine treatment significantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK and that the addition of 30 μM SP600125 (JNKi), a specific JNK inhibitor, partially attenuated caffeine-induced cell death without preventing the caffeine-dependent reduction in basal and maximal OCR. Our results suggest that JNK partially mediates the increase in caspase-dependent cell death but does not contribute to reduced mitochondrial respiration in caffeine-treated skeletal muscle cells. We conclude that caffeine increased cell death and reduced mitochondrial respiration in a calcium-dependent manner by activating the RYR and promoting reticular calcium release. - Highlights: • Caffeine

  3. The amino acid sequence of cytochrome c from Cucurbita maxima L. (pumpkin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. W.; Richardson, M.; Boulter, D.

    1971-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of pumpkin cytochrome c was determined on 2μmol of protein. Some evidence was found for the occurrence of two forms of cytochrome c, whose sequences differed in three positions. Pumpkin cytochrome c consists of 111 residues and is homologous with mitochondrial cytochromes c from other plants. Experimental details are given in a supplementary paper that has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50005 at the National Lending Library for Science and Technology, Boston Spa, Yorks. LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1971), 121, 7. PMID:5131733

  4. Cytochrome c oxidase inhibition by calcium at physiological ionic composition of the medium: Implications for physiological significance of the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vygodina, Tatiana V; Mukhaleva, Elizaveta; Azarkina, Natalia V; Konstantinov, Alexander A

    2017-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) from mammalian mitochondria binds Ca 2+ and Na + in a special cation binding site. Binding of Ca 2+ brings about partial inhibition of the enzyme while Na + competes with Ca 2+ for the binding site and protects the enzyme from the inhibition [Vygodina, T., Kirichenko, A. and Konstantinov, A.A. (2013). Direct Regulation of Cytochrome c oxidase by Calcium Ions. PLoS One 8(9): e74436]. In the original studies, the inhibition was found to depend significantly on the ionic composition of the buffer. Here we describe inhibition of CcO by Ca 2+ in media containing the main ionic components of cytoplasm (150mM KCl, 12mM NaCl and 1mM MgCl 2 ). Under these conditions, Ca 2+ inhibits CcO with effective K i of 20-26μM, that is an order of magnitude higher than determined earlier in the absence of Na + . At physiological value of ionic strength, the inhibition can be observed at any turnover number of CcO, rather than only at low TN (calcium matches closely the known value of "K m " for Ca 2+ -induced activation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. The inhibition of CcO by Ca 2+ is proposed to modulate mitochondrial Ca 2+ -uptake via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter, promote permeability transition pore opening and induce reduction of Mia40 in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MITOCHONDRIAL BKCa CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eBalderas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in a glioma cell line 15 years ago, mitochondrial BKCa channel (mitoBKCa has been studied in brain cells and cardiomyocytes sharing general biophysical properties such as high K+ conductance (~300 pS, voltage-dependency and Ca2+-sensitivity. Main advances in deciphering the molecular composition of mitoBKCa have included establishing that it is encoded by the Kcnma1 gene, that a C-terminal splice insert confers mitoBKCa ability to be targeted to cardiac mitochondria, and evidence for its potential coassembly with β subunits. Notoriously, β1 subunit directly interacts with cytochrome c oxidase and mitoBKCa can be modulated by substrates of the respiratory chain. mitoBKCa channel has a central role in protecting the heart from ischemia, where pharmacological activation of the channel impacts the generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial Ca2+ preventing cell death likely by impeding uncontrolled opening of the mitochondrial transition pore. Supporting this view, inhibition of mitoBKCa with Iberiotoxin, enhances cytochrome c release from glioma mitochondria. Many tantalizing questions remain. Some of them are: how is mitoBKCa coupled to the respiratory chain? Does mitoBKCa play non-conduction roles in mitochondria physiology? Which are the functional partners of mitoBKCa? What are the roles of mitoBKCa in other cell types? Answers to these questions are essential to define the impact of mitoBKCa channel in mitochondria biology and disease.

  6. Mitochondrial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Kurt; Turgut Topal

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major energy source of cells. Mitochondrial disease occurs due to a defect in mitochondrial energy production. A valuable energy production in mitochondria depend a healthy interconnection between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. A mutation in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA may cause abnormalities in ATP production and single or multiple organ dysfunctions, secondarily. In this review, we summarize mitochondrial physiology, mitochondrial genetics, and clinical expression and ...

  7. Becoming a Peroxidase: Cardiolipin-Induced Unfolding of Cytochrome c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Julia; Toffey, Jason R.; Hong, Yuning; Pletneva, Ekaterina V.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of cytochrome c (cyt c) with a unique mitochondrial glycerophospholipid cardiolipin (CL) are relevant for the protein’s function in oxidative phosphorylation and apoptosis. Binding to CL-containing membranes promotes cyt c unfolding and dramatically enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity, which is critical in early stages of apoptosis. We have employed a collection of seven dansyl variants of horse heart cyt c to probe the sequence of steps in this functional transformation. Kinetic measurements have unraveled four distinct processes during CL-induced cyt c unfolding: rapid protein binding to CL liposomes; rearrangements of protein substructures with small unfolding energies; partial insertion of the protein into the lipid bilayer; and extensive protein restructuring leading to “open” extended structures. While early rearrangements depend on a hierarchy of foldons in the native structure, the later process of large-scale unfolding is influenced by protein interactions with the membrane surface. The opening of the cyt c structure exposes the heme group, which enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity and also frees the C-terminal helix to aid in the translocation of the protein through CL membranes. PMID:23713573

  8. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF CYTOCHROME C – LIPID COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Trusova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between a mitochondrial hemoprotein cytochrome c (cyt c and the model lipid membranes composed of zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC and anionic lipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG, phosphatidylserine (PS or cardiolipin (CL were studied using the method of molecular dynamics. It was found that cyt c structure remains virtually unchanged in the protein complexes with PC/PG or PC/PS bilayers. In turn, protein binding to PC/CL bilayer is followed by the rise in cyt c radius of gyration and root-mean-square fluctuations. The magnitude of these changes was demonstrated to increase with the anionic lipid content. The revealed effect was interpreted in terms of the partial unfolding of polypeptide chain in the region Ala15-Leu32, widening of the heme crevice and enhancement of the conformational fluctuations in the region Pro76-Asp93 upon increasing the CL molar fraction from 5 to 25%. The results obtained seem to be of utmost importance in the context of amyloidogenic propensity of cyt c.

  9. Common effects of lithium and valproate on mitochondrial functions: protection against methamphetamine-induced mitochondrial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Rosilla F; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Peixiong; Zhou, Rulun; Li, Xiaoxia; Alesci, Salvatore; Du, Jing; Manji, Husseini K

    2009-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the progression of a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Thus, enhancing mitochondrial function could potentially help ameliorate the impairments of neural plasticity and cellular resilience associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. A series of studies was undertaken to investigate the effects of mood stabilizers on mitochondrial function, and against mitochondrially mediated neurotoxicity. We found that long-term treatment with lithium and valproate (VPA) enhanced cell respiration rate. Furthermore, chronic treatment with lithium or VPA enhanced mitochondrial function as determined by mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial oxidation in SH-SY5Y cells. In-vivo studies showed that long-term treatment with lithium or VPA protected against methamphetamine (Meth)-induced toxicity at the mitochondrial level. Furthermore, these agents prevented the Meth-induced reduction of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity. Oligoarray analysis demonstrated that the gene expression of several proteins related to the apoptotic pathway and mitochondrial functions were altered by Meth, and these changes were attenuated by treatment with lithium or VPA. One of the genes, Bcl-2, is a common target for lithium and VPA. Knock-down of Bcl-2 with specific Bcl-2 siRNA reduced the lithium- and VPA-induced increases in mitochondrial oxidation. These findings illustrate that lithium and VPA enhance mitochondrial function and protect against mitochondrially mediated toxicity. These agents may have potential clinical utility in the treatment of other diseases associated with impaired mitochondrial function, such as neurodegenerative diseases and schizophrenia.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP

  12. Obesity-induced oocyte mitochondrial defects are partially prevented and rescued by supplementation with co-enzyme Q10 in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, C.E.; Boudoures, A.; Zhang, W.; Drury, A.; Moley, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does supplementation with co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) improve the oocyte mitochondrial abnormalities associated with obesity in mice? SUMMARY ANSWER In an obese mouse model, CoQ10 improves the mitochondrial function of oocytes. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Obesity impairs oocyte quality. Oocytes from mice fed a high-fat/high-sugar (HF/HS) diet have abnormalities in mitochondrial distribution and function and in meiotic progression. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Mice were randomly assigned to a normal, chow diet or an isocaloric HF/HS diet for 12 weeks. After 6 weeks on the diet, half of the mice receiving a normal diet and half of the mice receiving a HF/HS diet were randomly assigned to receive CoQ10 supplementation injections for the remaining 6 weeks. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Dietary intervention was initiated on C57Bl6 female mice at 4 weeks of age, CoQ10 versus vehicle injections were assigned at 10 weeks, and assays were conducted at 16 weeks of age. Mice were super-ovulated, and oocytes were collected and stained to assess mitochondrial distribution, quantify reactive oxygen species (ROS), assess meiotic spindle formation, and measure metabolites. In vitro fertilization was performed, and blastocyst embryos were transferred into control mice. Oocyte number, fertilization rate, blastulation rate and implantation rate were compared between the four cohorts. Bivariate statistics were performed appropriately. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE HF/HS mice weighed significantly more than normal diet mice (29 versus 22 g, P< 0.001). CoQ10 supplementation did not influence weight. Levels of ATP, citrate, and phosphocreatine were lower and ROS levels were higher in HF/HS mice than in controls (P< 0.001). CoQ10 supplementation significantly increased the levels of metabolites and decreased ROS levels in oocytes from normal diet mice but not in oocytes from HF/HS mice. However, CoQ10 completely prevented the mitochondrial distribution abnormalities

  13. The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA markers in constructing genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA markers in constructing genetic relationship among Oryx species. ... These data were used to provide the genetic kinship among different Oryx species. The complete cytochrome b gene ... Key words: Conservation, endangered species, Oryx, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers.

  14. Differentiation of Meat Samples from Domestic Horses ( Equus caballus and Asiatic Wild Asses ( Equus hemionus Using a Species-Speci fi c Restriction Site in the Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Kuehn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that Asiatic wild asses ( Equus hemionus are being increasingly poached in a commercial fashion. Part of the meat is believed to reach the meat markets in the capital Ulaanbaatar. To test this hypothesis, we collected 500 meat samples between February and May 2006. To differentiate between domestic horse ( Equus caballus and wild ass meat, we developed a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. We ampli fi ed and sequenced a cytochrome b fragment (335 bp and carried out a multialignment of the generated sequences for the domestic horse, the Asiatic wild ass, the domestic donkey ( Equus asinus and the Przewalski’s horse ( Equus ferus przewalskii . We detected a species-speci fi c restriction site (AatII for the Asiatic wild ass, resulting in a speci fi c restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP band pattern. This RFLP assay represents a rapid and cost-effective method to detect wild ass meat. All of the 500 meat samples we collected and analysed within this pilot project proved to be domestic horsemeat as declared by the sales people. Thus, either the assumption that wild ass meat is sold as “cheap horse meat” is wrong, or we picked the wrong markets, products or season.

  15. Production and characterization of yeast cytochrome c antibodies; immunological studies of mutants with altered cytochrome c synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matner, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Mutations at the structural gene, CYC1, for iso-1-cytochrome c and at the structural gene, CYC7, for iso-2-cytochrome c can reduce the levels of the respective proteins by varying degrees in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations at two other loci, cyc2 and cyc3, that are unlinked to either of the structural genes, specifically reduced the levels of both iso-cytochromes c. The cyc2 mutations can cause as low as 10 to 20% of the normal level and cyc3 mutations can cause complete deficiencies. We have explored the possiblity that the CYC2 and CYC3 loci code for maturation functions in the biosynthesis of cytochrome c. The approach used to characterize the nature of the cyc2 and cyc3 induced deficiencies of cytochrome c involved four steps. The results were used to propose possible roles for the CYC2 and CYC3 encoded functions. The CYC3 encoded function is hypothesized to be enzymatic heme attachment. CYC2 may code for a protein that binds and transports apo-cytochrome c through the outer mitochondrial membrane and/or enhances the activity of the heme attachment enzyme

  16. Mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pools in thymidine kinase 2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Ann; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Zyslin, Rivka; Miller, Chaya; Mandel, Hanna; Elpeleg, Orly

    2003-10-24

    Deficiency of mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and manifests by severe skeletal myopathy in infancy. In order to elucidate the pathophysiology of this condition, mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools were determined in patients' fibroblasts. Despite normal mtDNA content and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, mitochondrial dNTP pools were imbalanced. Specifically, deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) content was markedly decreased, resulting in reduced dTTP:deoxycytidine triphosphate ratio. These findings underline the importance of balanced mitochondrial dNTP pools for mtDNA synthesis and may serve as the basis for future therapeutic interventions.

  17. Tributyltin interacts with mitochondria and induces cytochrome c release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikimi, A; Kira, Y; Kasahara, E; Sato, E F; Kanno, T; Utsumi, K; Inoue, M

    2001-01-01

    Although triorganotins are potent inducers of apoptosis in various cell types, the critical targets of these compounds and the mechanisms by which they lead to cell death remain to be elucidated. There are two major pathways by which apoptotic cell death occurs: one is triggered by a cytokine mediator and the other is by a mitochondrion-dependent mechanism. To elucidate the mechanism of triorganotin-induced apoptosis, we studied the effect of tributyltin on mitochondrial function. We found that moderately low doses of tributyltin decrease mitochondrial membrane potential and induce cytochrome c release by a mechanism inhibited by cyclosporine A and bongkrekic acid. Tributyltin-induced cytochrome c release is also prevented by dithiols such as dithiothreitol and 2,3-dimercaptopropanol but not by monothiols such as GSH, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, L-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol. Further studies with phenylarsine oxide agarose revealed that tributyltin interacts with the adenine nucleotide translocator, a functional constituent of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, which is selectively inhibited by dithiothreitol. These results suggest that, at low doses, tributyltin interacts selectively with critical thiol residues in the adenine nucleotide translocator and opens the permeability transition pore, thereby decreasing membrane potential and releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria, a series of events consistent with established mechanistic models of apoptosis. PMID:11368793

  18. The effect of amixin and agmatine on cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Uspenska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs control permeability transition pore formation and cytochrome c release in the presence of apoptogenic factors. This study demonstrates that pharmacological agents amixin and agmatine affect mitochondrial nAChR functioning: they slightly suppress cytochrome c release from mouse brain and liver mitochondria stimulated with apoptogenic dose of Са2+ and prevent the effect of α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987. We conclude that mitochondria may be one of therapeutic targets of amixin and agmatine.

  19. Removal of Bound Triton X-100 from Purified Bovine Heart Cytochrome bc1

    OpenAIRE

    Varhač, Rastislav; Robinson, Neal C.; Musatov, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome bc1 isolated from Triton X-100 solubilized mitochondrial membranes contains up to 120 nmol of Triton X-100 bound per nmol of the enzyme. Purified cytochrome bc1 is fully active; however, protein bound Triton X-100 significantly interferes with structural studies of the enzyme. Removal of Triton X-100 bound to bovine cytochrome bc1 was accomplished by incubation with Bio-Beads SM-2 in presence of sodium cholate. Sodium cholate is critical since it does not interfere with the adsorpt...

  20. Immobilized unfolded cytochrome c acts as a catalyst for dioxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, Claudio; Monari, Stefano; Ranieri, Antonio; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Peressini, Silvia; Borsari, Marco

    2011-10-21

    Unfolding turns immobilized cytochrome c into a His-His ligated form endowed with catalytic activity towards O(2), which is absent in the native protein. Dioxygen could be used by naturally occurring unfolded cytochrome c as a substrate for the production of partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) contributing to the cell oxidative stress.

  1. The mechanism by which oxygen and cytochrome c increase the rate of electron transfer from cytochrome a to cytochrome a3 of cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickar, D; Turrens, J F; Lehninger, A L

    1986-11-05

    When cytochrome c oxidase is isolated from mitochondria, the purified enzyme requires both cytochrome c and O2 to achieve its maximum rate of internal electron transfer from cytochrome a to cytochrome a3. When reductants other than cytochrome c are used, the rate of internal electron transfer is very slow. In this paper we offer an explanation for the slow reduction of cytochrome a3 when reductants other than cytochrome c are used and for the apparent allosteric effects of cytochrome c and O2. Our model is based on the conventional understanding of cytochrome oxidase mechanism (i.e. electron transfer from cytochrome a/CuA to cytochrome a3/CuB), but assumes a relatively rapid two-electron transfer between cytochrome a/CuA and cytochrome a3/CuB and a thermodynamic equilibrium in the "resting" enzyme (the enzyme as isolated) which favors reduced cytochrome a and oxidized cytochrome a3. Using the kinetic constants that are known for this reaction, we find that the activating effects of O2 and cytochrome c on the rate of electron transfer from cytochrome a to cytochrome a3 conform to the predictions of the model and so provide no evidence of any allosteric effects or control of cytochrome c oxidase by O2 or cytochrome c.

  2. Targeted Transgenic Overexpression of Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase (TK2) Alters Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Mitochondrial Polypeptide Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed H.; Kohler, James J.; Haase, Chad P.; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-γ. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:17322372

  3. Mitochondrial myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMauro, Salvatore

    2006-11-01

    Our understanding of mitochondrial diseases (defined restrictively as defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is expanding rapidly. In this review, I will give the latest information on disorders affecting predominantly or exclusively skeletal muscle. The most recently described mitochondrial myopathies are due to defects in nuclear DNA, including coenzyme Q10 deficiency and mutations in genes controlling mitochondrial DNA abundance and structure, such as POLG, TK2, and MPV17. Barth syndrome, an X-linked recessive mitochondrial myopathy/cardiopathy, is associated with decreased amount and altered structure of cardiolipin, the main phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane, but a secondary impairment of respiratory chain function is plausible. The role of mutations in protein-coding genes of mitochondrial DNA in causing isolated myopathies has been confirmed. Mutations in tRNA genes of mitochondrial DNA can also cause predominantly myopathic syndromes and--contrary to conventional wisdom--these mutations can be homoplasmic. Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain impair energy production and almost invariably involve skeletal muscle, causing exercise intolerance, cramps, recurrent myoglobinuria, or fixed weakness, which often affects extraocular muscles and results in droopy eyelids (ptosis) and progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

  4. Co-ordinate decrease in the expression of the mitochondrial genome and nuclear genes for mitochondrial proteins in the lactation-induced mitochondrial hypotrophy of rat brown fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, I; Giralt, M; Viñas, O; Iglesias, R; Mampel, T; Villarroya, F

    1995-01-01

    The relative abundance of the mitochondrial-encoded mRNAs for cytochrome c oxidase subunit II and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I was lower in brown adipose tissue (BAT) from lactating rats than in virgin controls. This decrease was in parallel with a significant decrease in mitochondrial 16 S rRNA levels and in the relative content of mitochondrial DNA in the tissue. BAT from lactating rats showed lowered mRNA expression of the nuclear-encoded genes for the mitochondrial uncoupling protein, subunit IV of cytochrome c oxidase and the adenine nucleotide translocase isoforms ANT1 and ANT2, whereas mRNA levels for the ATP synthase beta-subunit were unchanged. However, the relative content of this last protein was lower in BAT mitochondria from lactating rats than in virgin controls. It is concluded that lactation-induced mitochondrial hypotrophy in BAT is associated with a co-ordinate decrease in the expression of the mitochondrial genome and nuclear genes for mitochondrial proteins. This decrease is caused by regulatory events acting at different levels, including pre- and post-transcriptional regulation. BAT appears to be a useful model with which to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the co-ordination of the expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes during mitochondrial biogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8948428

  5. Systematics of the Dioryctria abietella Species Group (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) Based on Mitochondrial DNA Ann

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Roux-Morabito; N.E. Gillette; A. Roques; L. Dormont; J. Stein; F.A.H. Sperling

    2008-01-01

    Coneworms of the genus Dioryctria Zeller include several serious pests of conifer seeds that are notoriously difficult to distinguish as species. We surveyed mitochondrial DNA variation within the abietella species group by sequencing 451 bp of cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and 572 bp of cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 (COII...

  6. Multifunctional Mitochondrial AAA Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Steven E

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria perform numerous functions necessary for the survival of eukaryotic cells. These activities are coordinated by a diverse complement of proteins encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that must be properly organized and maintained. Misregulation of mitochondrial proteostasis impairs organellar function and can result in the development of severe human diseases. ATP-driven AAA+ proteins play crucial roles in preserving mitochondrial activity by removing and remodeling protein molecules in accordance with the needs of the cell. Two mitochondrial AAA proteases, i-AAA and m-AAA, are anchored to either face of the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they engage and process an array of substrates to impact protein biogenesis, quality control, and the regulation of key metabolic pathways. The functionality of these proteases is extended through multiple substrate-dependent modes of action, including complete degradation, partial processing, or dislocation from the membrane without proteolysis. This review discusses recent advances made toward elucidating the mechanisms of substrate recognition, handling, and degradation that allow these versatile proteases to control diverse activities in this multifunctional organelle.

  7. Effect of carbon source on the accumulation of cytochrome P-450 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärenlampi, S O; Marin, E; Hänninen, O O

    1981-02-15

    The appearance of cytochrome P-450 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depended on the substrate supporting growth. Cytochrome P-450 was apparent in yeast cells grown on a strongly fermentable sugar such as D-glucose, D-fructose or sucrose. When yeast was grown on D-galactose, D-mannose or maltose, where fermentation and respiration occurred concomitantly, cytochrome P-450 was also formed. The cytochrome P-450 concentration was maximal at the beginning of the stationary phase of the culture. Thereafter the concentration decreased, reaching zero at a late-stationary phase. When the yeast was grown on a medium that contained lactose or pentoses (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, D-ribose and D-xylose), cytochrome P-450 did not occur. When a non-fermentable energy source (glycerol, lactate or ethanol) was used, no cytochrome P-450 was detectable. Transfer of cells from D-glucose medium to ethanol medium caused a slow disappearance of cytochrome P-450, although the amount of the haemoprotein still continued to increase in the control cultures. Cytochrome P-450 appeared thus to accumulate in conditions where the rate of growth was fast and fermentation occurred. Occurrence of this haemoprotein is not necessarily linked, however, with the repression of mitochondrial haemoprotein synthesis.

  8. Partial neuroprotection by nNOS inhibition during profound asphyxia in preterm fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Paul P; Davidson, Joanne O; van den Heuij, Lotte G; Tan, Sidhartha; Silverman, Richard B; Ji, Haitao; Blood, Arlin B; Fraser, Mhoyra; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair Jan

    2013-12-01

    Preterm brain injury is partly associated with hypoxia-ischemia starting before birth. Excessive nitric oxide production during HI may cause nitrosative stress, leading to cell membrane and mitochondrial damage. We therefore tested the hypothesis that therapy with a new, selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor, JI-10 (0.022mg/kg bolus, n=8), given 30min before 25min of complete umbilical cord occlusion was protective in preterm fetal sheep at 101-104day gestation (term is 147days), compared to saline (n=8). JI-10 had no effect on fetal blood pressure, heart rate, carotid and femoral blood flow, total EEG power, nuchal activity, temperature or intracerebral oxygenation on near-infrared spectroscopy during or after occlusion. JI-10 was associated with later onset of post-asphyxial seizures compared with saline (p<0.05), and attenuation of the subsequent progressive loss of cytochrome oxidase (p<0.05). After 7days recovery, JI-10 was associated with improved neuronal survival in the caudate nucleus (p<0.05), but not the putamen or hippocampus, and more CNPase positive oligodendrocytes in the periventricular white matter (p<0.05). In conclusion, prophylactic nNOS inhibition before profound asphyxia was associated with delayed onset of seizures, slower decline of cytochrome oxidase and partial white and gray matter protection, consistent with protection of mitochondrial function. © 2013.

  9. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C. [Department of Biological Sciences, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Sohal, Rajindar S., E-mail: sohal@usc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. {yields} Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  10. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor; Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. → Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. → Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H 2 O 2 generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  11. Phosphorylation of Cytochrome c Threonine 28 Regulates Electron Transport Chain Activity in Kidney: IMPLICATIONS FOR AMP KINASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Gargi; Varughese, Ashwathy; Ji, Qinqin; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Vaishnav, Asmita; Sinkler, Christopher; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Moraes, Carlos T; Sanderson, Thomas H; Stemmler, Timothy L; Grossman, Lawrence I; Kagan, Valerian E; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Salomon, Arthur R; Edwards, Brian F P; Hüttemann, Maik

    2017-01-06

    Mammalian cytochrome c (Cytc) plays a key role in cellular life and death decisions, functioning as an electron carrier in the electron transport chain and as a trigger of apoptosis when released from the mitochondria. However, its regulation is not well understood. We show that the major fraction of Cytc isolated from kidneys is phosphorylated on Thr 28 , leading to a partial inhibition of respiration in the reaction with cytochrome c oxidase. To further study the effect of Cytc phosphorylation in vitro, we generated T28E phosphomimetic Cytc, revealing superior behavior regarding protein stability and its ability to degrade reactive oxygen species compared with wild-type unphosphorylated Cytc Introduction of T28E phosphomimetic Cytc into Cytc knock-out cells shows that intact cell respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), and ROS levels are reduced compared with wild type. As we show by high resolution crystallography of wild-type and T28E Cytc in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, Thr 28 is located at a central position near the heme crevice, the most flexible epitope of the protein apart from the N and C termini. Finally, in silico prediction and our experimental data suggest that AMP kinase, which phosphorylates Cytc on Thr 28 in vitro and colocalizes with Cytc to the mitochondrial intermembrane space in the kidney, is the most likely candidate to phosphorylate Thr 28 in vivo We conclude that Cytc phosphorylation is mediated in a tissue-specific manner and leads to regulation of electron transport chain flux via "controlled respiration," preventing ΔΨ m hyperpolarization, a known cause of ROS and trigger of apoptosis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Phosphorylation of Cytochrome c Threonine 28 Regulates Electron Transport Chain Activity in Kidney: IMPLICATIONS FOR AMP KINASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Gargi; Varughese, Ashwathy; Ji, Qinqin; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Vaishnav, Asmita; Sinkler, Christopher; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Moraes, Carlos T.; Sanderson, Thomas H.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Salomon, Arthur R.; Edwards, Brian F. P.; Hüttemann, Maik

    2016-10-07

    Mammalian cytochrome c (Cytc) plays a key role in cellular life and death decisions, functioning as an electron carrier in the electron transport chain and as a trigger of apoptosis when released from the mitochondria. However, its regulation is not well understood. We show that the major fraction of Cytc isolated from kidneys is phosphorylated on Thr28, leading to a partial inhibition of respiration in the reaction with cytochrome c oxidase. To further study the effect of Cytc phosphorylation in vitro, we generated T28E phosphomimetic Cytc, revealing superior behavior regarding protein stability and its ability to degrade reactive oxygen species compared with wild-type unphosphorylated Cytc. Introduction of T28E phosphomimetic Cytc into Cytc knock-out cells shows that intact cell respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and ROS levels are reduced compared with wild type. As we show by high resolution crystallography of wild-type and T28E Cytc in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, Thr28 is located at a central position near the heme crevice, the most flexible epitope of the protein apart from the N and C termini. Finally, in silico prediction and our experimental data suggest that AMP kinase, which phosphorylates Cytc on Thr28 in vitro and colocalizes with Cytc to the mitochondrial intermembrane space in the kidney, is the most likely candidate to phosphorylate Thr28 in vivo. We conclude that Cytc phosphorylation is mediated in a tissue-specific manner and leads to regulation of electron transport chain flux via “controlled respiration,” preventing ΔΨm hyperpolarization, a known cause of ROS and trigger of apoptosis.

  13. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  14. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman W. El-Hattab

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA while more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA. Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular noncompaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain (ETC complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial tRNAs, rRNAs, ribosomal proteins, and translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  15. Mutations in the UQCC1-Interacting Protein, UQCC2, Cause Human Complex III Deficiency Associated with Perturbed Cytochrome b Protein Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucker, E.J.; Wanschers, B.F.J.; Szklarczyk, R.; Mountford, H.S.; Wijeyeratne, X.W.; Brand, M.A.M. van den; Leenders, A.M.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Reljic, B.; Compton, A.G.; Frazier, A.E.; Bruno, D.L.; Christodoulou, J.; Endo, H.; Ryan, M.T.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Huynen, M.A.; Thorburn, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is responsible for generating the majority of cellular ATP. Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase) is the third of five OXPHOS complexes. Complex III assembly relies on the coordinated expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes,

  16. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Luz

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1-, fusion (fzo-1-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  17. MBA1 encodes a mitochondrial membrane-associated protein required for biogenesis of the respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rep, M; Grivell, L A

    1996-06-17

    The yeast MBA 1 gene (Multi-copy Bypass of AFG3) is one of three genes whose overexpression suppresses afg3-null and rca1-null mutations. Bypass of AFG3 and RCA1, whose products are essential for assembly of mitochondrial inner membrane enzyme complexes, suggests a related role for MBA1. The predicted translation product is a 30 kDa hydrophilic protein with a putative mitochondrial targeting sequence and no homology to any sequence in protein or EST databases. Gene disruption leads to a partial respiratory growth defect, which is more pronounced at temperatures above 30 degrees C. Concomitantly, amounts of cytochromes b and aa3 are reduced. A C-terminal c-myc-tagged MBA1 gene product is functional and is found associated with the mitochondrial inner membrane, from which it can he extracted by carbonate, but not by high salt. These observations give further support to a role of MBA1 in assembly of the respiratory chain.

  18. Cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene in mitochondria of Oenothera has no intron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Brennicke, Axel

    1983-01-01

    The cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene has been localized in the mitochondrial genome of Oenothera berteriana and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The coding sequence contains 777 bp and, unlike the corresponding gene in Zea mays, is not interrupted by an intron. No TGA codon is found within the open reading frame. The codon CGG, as in the maize gene, is used in place of tryptophan codons of corresponding genes in other organisms. At position 742 in the Oenothera sequence the TGG of maize is changed into a CGG codon, where Trp is conserved as the amino acid in other organisms. Homologous sequences occur more than once in the mitochondrial genome as several mitochondrial DNA species hybridize with DNA probes of the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:16453484

  19. Human skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, U F; Rasmussen, H N

    2000-04-01

    Under aerobic work, the oxygen consumption and major ATP production occur in the mitochondria and it is therefore a relevant question whether the in vivo rates can be accounted for by mitochondrial capacities measured in vitro. Mitochondria were isolated from human quadriceps muscle biopsies in yields of approximately 45%. The tissue content of total creatine, mitochondrial protein and different cytochromes was estimated. A number of activities were measured in functional assays of the mitochondria: pyruvate, ketoglutarate, glutamate and succinate dehydrogenases, palmitoyl-carnitine respiration, cytochrome oxidase, the respiratory chain and the ATP synthesis. The activities involved in carbohydrate oxidation could account for in vivo oxygen uptakes of 15-16 mmol O2 min-1 kg-1 or slightly above the value measured at maximal work rates in the knee-extensor model of Saltin and co-workers, i.e. without limitation from the cardiac output. This probably indicates that the maximal oxygen consumption of the muscle is limited by the mitochondrial capacities. The in vitro activities of fatty acid oxidation corresponded to only 39% of those of carbohydrate oxidation. The maximal rate of free energy production from aerobic metabolism of glycogen was calculated from the mitochondrial activities and estimates of the DeltaG or ATP hydrolysis and the efficiency of the actin-myosin reaction. The resultant value was 20 W kg-1 or approximately 70% of the maximal in vivo work rates of which 10-20% probably are sustained by the anaerobic ATP production. The lack of aerobic in vitro ATP synthesis might reflect termination of some critical interplay between cytoplasm and mitochondria.

  20. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... noting “soft signs” in unaffected relatives. These include deaf- ness, short stature, migraine headaches and PEO. Muscle ... mitochondrial defects and provide valuable information for family planning. Perhaps most important, knowing the genetic defects that ...

  1. The cytochrome p450 homepage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David R

    2009-10-01

    The Cytochrome P450 Homepage is a universal resource for nomenclature and sequence information on cytochrome P450 ( CYP ) genes. The site has been in continuous operation since February 1995. Currently, naming information for 11,512 CYPs are available on the web pages. The P450 sequences are manually curated by David Nelson, and the nomenclature system conforms to an evolutionary scheme such that members of CYP families and subfamilies share common ancestors. The organisation and content of the Homepage are described.

  2. The release of cytochrome c and the regulation of the programmed cell death progress in the endosperm of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under waterlogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuan-Hong; Mao, Fang-Fang; Zhou, Zhu-Qing; Liu, Dong-Cheng; Min-Yu; Deng, Xiang-Yi; Li, Ji-Wei; Mei, Fang-Zhu

    2018-05-02

    It has been shown in mammalian systems that the mitochondria can play a key role in the regulation of apoptosis by releasing intermembrane proteins (such as cytochrome c) into the cytosol. Cytochrome c released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm activates proteolytic enzyme cascades, leading to specific nuclear DNA degradation and cell death. This pathway is considered to be one of the important regulatory mechanisms of apoptosis. Previous studies have shown that endosperm cell development in wheat undergoes specialized programmed cell death (PCD) and that waterlogging stress accelerates the PCD process; however, little is known regarding the associated molecular mechanism. In this study, changes in mitochondrial structure, the release of cytochrome c, and gene expression were studied in the endosperm cells of the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar "huamai 8" during PCD under different waterlogging durations. The results showed that waterlogging aggravated the degradation of mitochondrial structure, increased the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), resulting in the advancement of the endosperm PCD process. In situ localization and western blotting of cytochrome c indicated that with the development of the endosperm cell, cytochrome c was gradually released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and waterlogging stress led to an advancement and increase in the release of cytochrome c. In addition, waterlogging stress resulted in the increased expression of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), suggesting that the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) may be involved in endosperm PCD under waterlogging stress. The MPTP inhibitor cyclosporine A effectively suppressed cell death and cytochrome c release during wheat endosperm PCD. Our results indicate that the mitochondria play important roles in the PCD of endosperm cells and that

  3. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Icksoo, E-mail: icksoolee@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  4. Mitochondrial Myopathy: A Rare Cause of Early-Onset Vocal Fold Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Bock, Jonathan M.; Peltier, Amanda C.; Oh, Shin J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We present the second published case of laryngeal involvement in mitochondrial myopathy. Methods A patient with laryngeal involvement of mitochondrial myopathy is presented, together with a literature review. Results A 41-year-old man presented with progressive breathy dysphonia. His brother had mitochondrial myopathy. Biopsy of the biceps muscle demonstrated cytochrome C oxidase–negative ragged blue fibers confirming mitochondrial myopathy. Videostroboscopy showed marked vocal fold atrophy, but subsequent injection laryngoplasty did not significantly improve the patient’s voice, despite improved postoperative glottic closure. Conclusions Mitochondrial myopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe early-onset vocal fold atrophy. PMID:23577570

  5. Evidence of multiple divergent mitochondrial lineages within the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On this basis, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) was used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Bicoxidens and reveal divergent lineages within the genus. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses recovered a paraphyletic Bicoxidens phylogram with divergent lineages present in three species ...

  6. The efficiency of mitochondrial DNA markers in constructing genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-30

    May 30, 2011 ... To date, only parts of mitochondrial DNA from cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA and non-coding D- loop had been sequenced for different species of Oryx. Discrepancy in the genetic relationship among. Oryx species was previously revealed when combinations of these sequences were analyzed. In the.

  7. A novel alkaloid, evodiamine causes nuclear localization of cytochrome-c and induces apoptosis independent of p53 in human lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Vijay [School of Life Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Agarwal, Rajesh [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Singh, Rana P., E-mail: ranaps@hotmail.com [School of Life Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India)

    2016-09-02

    Lung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy that contributes to high proportion of deaths globally among patients who die due to cancer. Chemotherapy remains the common mode of treatment for lung cancer patients though with limited success. We assessed the biological effects and associated molecular changes of evodiamine, a plant alkaloid, on human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells along with other epithelial cancer and normal lung SAEC cells. Our data showed that 20–40 μM evodiamine treatment for 24–48 h strongly (up to 73%, P < 0.001) reduced the growth and survival of these cancer cells. However, it also moderately inhibited growth and survival of SAEC cells. A strong inhibition (P < 0.001) was observed on clonogenicity of A549 cells. Further, evodiamine increased (4-fold) mitochondrial membrane depolarization with 6-fold increase in apoptosis and a slight increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. It increased the cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into the cytosol as well as nucleus. Cytosolic cytochrome-c activated cascade of caspase-9 and caspase-3 intrinsic pathway, however, DR5 and caspase-8 extrinsic pathway was also activated which could be due to nuclear cytochrome-c. Pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD.fmk) partially reversed evodiamine induced apoptosis. An increase in p53 as well as its serine 15 phosphorylation was also observed. Pifithrin-α, a p53 inhibitor, slightly inhibited growth of A549 cells and under p53 inhibitory condition evodiamine-induced apoptosis could not be reversed. Together these findings suggest that evodiamine is a strong inducer of apoptosis in lung epithelial cancer cells independent of their p53 status and that could involve both intrinsic as well as extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Thus evodiamine could be a potential anticancer agent against lung cancer. - Highlights: • Evodiamine, a novel plant alkaloid, relatively selectively inhibited growth and survival of human lung cancer cells. • Increased cancer cell

  8. Coordinate regulation of cytochrome and alternative pathway respiration in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlerberghe, G C; McIntosh, L

    1992-12-01

    In suspension cells of NT1 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv bright yellow), inhibition of the cytochrome pathway of respiration with antimycin A induced a large increase in the capacity of the alternative pathway over a period of approximately 12 h, as confirmed in both whole cells and isolated mitochondria. The increase in alternative pathway capacity required de novo RNA and protein synthesis and correlated closely with the increase of a 35-kD alternative oxidase protein. When the cytochrome pathway of intact cells was inhibited by antimycin A, respiration proceeded exclusively through the alternative pathway, reached rates significantly higher than before antimycin A addition, and was not stimulated by p-trifluoromethoxycarbonylcyanide (FCCP). When inhibition of the cytochrome pathway was relieved, alternative pathway capacity and the level of the 35-kD alternative oxidase protein declined. Respiration rate also declined and could once again be stimulated by FCCP. These observations show that the capacities of the mitochondrial electron transport pathways can be regulated in a coordinate fashion.

  9. Targeted transgenic overexpression of mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) alters mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial polypeptide abundance: transgenic TK2, mtDNA, and antiretrovirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed H; Kohler, James J; Haase, Chad P; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-gamma. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA-based identification of some forensically important blowflies in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preativatanyou, Kanok; Sirisup, Nantana; Payungporn, Sunchai; Poovorawan, Yong; Thavara, Usavadee; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Sungpradit, Sivapong; Siriyasatien, Padet

    2010-10-10

    Accurate identification of insects collected from death scenes provides not only specific developmental data assisting forensic entomologists to determine the postmortem interval more precisely but also other kinds of forensic evidence. However, morphological identification can be complicated due to the similarity among species, especially in the early larval stages. To simplify and make the species identification more practical and reliable, DNA-based identification is preferentially considered. In this study, we demonstrate the application of partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and cytochrome oxidase II (COII) sequences for differentiation of forensically important blowflies in Thailand; Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya rufifacies and Lucilia cuprina by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The PCR yields a single 1324bp-sized amplicon in all blowfly specimens, followed by direct DNA sequencing. Taq(α)I and VspI predicted from the sequencing data provide different RFLP profiles among these three species. Sequence analysis reveals no significant intraspecific divergence in blowfly specimens captured from different geographical regions in Thailand. Accordingly, neighbor-joining tree using Kimura's 2-parameter model illustrates reciprocal monophyly between species. Thus, these approaches serve as promising tools for molecular identification of these three common forensically important blowfly species in Thailand. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly rearranged mitochondrial genome in Nycteria parasites (Haemosporidia) from bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjian, Gregory; Hassanin, Alexandre; Saintpierre, Benjamin; Gembu Tungaluna, Guy-Crispin; Ariey, Frederic; Ayala, Francisco J; Landau, Irene; Duval, Linda

    2016-08-30

    Haemosporidia parasites have mostly and abundantly been described using mitochondrial genes, and in particular cytochrome b (cytb). Failure to amplify the mitochondrial cytb gene of Nycteria parasites isolated from Nycteridae bats has been recently reported. Bats are hosts to a diverse and profuse array of Haemosporidia parasites that remain largely unstudied. There is a need to obtain more molecular data from chiropteran parasites. Such data would help to better understand the evolutionary history of Haemosporidia, which notably include the Plasmodium parasites, malaria's agents. We use next-generation sequencing to obtain the complete mitochondrial genome of Nycteria parasites from African Nycteris grandis (Nycteridae) and Rhinolophus alcyone (Rhinolophidae) and Asian Megaderma spasma (Megadermatidae). We report four complete mitochondrial genomes, including two rearranged mitochondrial genomes within Haemosporidia. Our results open outlooks into potentially undiscovered Haemosporidian diversity.

  12. Nitrate as a probe of cytochrome c surface : crystallographic identification of crucial "hot spots" for protein-protein recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De March, Matteo; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Casini, Angela; Gabbiani, Chiara; Guerri, Annalisa; Messori, Luigi; Geremia, Silvano

    The electrostatic surface of cytochrome c and its changes with the iron oxidation state are involved in the docking and undocking processes of this protein to its biological partners in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway. To investigate the subtle mechanisms of formation of productive

  13. Evidence from the structure and function of cytochromes c(2) that nonsulfur purple bacterial photosynthesis followed the evolution of oxygen respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Terry; Van Driessche, Gonzalez; Ambler, Richard; Kyndt, John; Devreese, Bart; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Cusanovich, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Cytochromes c(2) are the nearest bacterial homologs of mitochondrial cytochrome c. The sequences of the known cytochromes c(2) can be placed in two subfamilies based upon insertions and deletions, one subfamily is most like mitochondrial cytochrome c (the small C2s, without significant insertions and deletions), and the other, designated large C2, shares 3- and 8-residue insertions as well as a single-residue deletion. C2s generally function between cytochrome bc(1) and cytochrome oxidase in respiration (ca 80 examples known to date) and between cytochrome bc(1) and the reaction center in nonsulfur purple bacterial photosynthesis (ca 21 examples). However, members of the large C2 subfamily are almost always involved in photosynthesis (12 of 14 examples). In addition, the gene for the large C2 (cycA) is associated with those for the photosynthetic reaction center (pufBALM). We hypothesize that the insertions in the large C2s, which were already functioning in photosynthesis, allowed them to replace the membrane-bound tetraheme cytochrome, PufC, that otherwise mediates between the small C2 or other redox proteins and photosynthetic reaction centers. Based upon our analysis, we propose that the involvement of C2 in nonsulfur purple bacterial photosynthesis was a metabolic feature subsequent to the evolution of oxygen respiration.

  14. Mitochondrial flash as a novel biomarker of mitochondrial respiration in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guohua; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Huiliang; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Wang, Wang

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial respiration through electron transport chain (ETC) activity generates ATP and reactive oxygen species in eukaryotic cells. The modulation of mitochondrial respiration in vivo or under physiological conditions remains elusive largely due to the lack of appropriate approach to monitor ETC activity in a real-time manner. Here, we show that ETC-coupled mitochondrial flash is a novel biomarker for monitoring mitochondrial respiration under pathophysiological conditions in cultured adult cardiac myocyte and perfused beating heart. Through real-time confocal imaging, we follow the frequency of a transient bursting fluorescent signal, named mitochondrial flash, from individual mitochondria within intact cells expressing a mitochondrial matrix-targeted probe, mt-cpYFP (mitochondrial-circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein). This mt-cpYFP recorded mitochondrial flash has been shown to be composed of a major superoxide signal with a minor alkalization signal within the mitochondrial matrix. Through manipulating physiological substrates for mitochondrial respiration, we find a close coupling between flash frequency and the ETC electron flow, as measured by oxygen consumption rate in cardiac myocyte. Stimulating electron flow under physiological conditions increases flash frequency. On the other hand, partially block or slowdown electron flow by inhibiting the F0F1 ATPase, which represents a pathological condition, transiently increases then decreases flash frequency. Limiting electron entrance at complex I by knocking out Ndufs4, an assembling subunit of complex I, suppresses mitochondrial flash activity. These results suggest that mitochondrial electron flow can be monitored by real-time imaging of mitochondrial flash. The mitochondrial flash frequency could be used as a novel biomarker for mitochondrial respiration under physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Mutation in mitochondrial complex IV subunit COX5A causes pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, and failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertling, Fabian; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Al-Senaidi, Khalfan; Joshi, Niranjan P; Venselaar, Hanka; van den Brand, Mariël Am; Nijtmans, Leo Gj; Rodenburg, Richard Jt

    2017-06-01

    COX5A is a nuclear-encoded subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase). We present patients with a homozygous pathogenic variant in the COX5A gene. Clinical details of two affected siblings suffering from early-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, failure to thrive, and isolated complex IV deficiency are presented. We show that the variant lies within the evolutionarily conserved COX5A/COX4 interface domain, suggesting that it alters the interaction between these two subunits during complex IV biogenesis. In patient skin fibroblasts, the enzymatic activity and protein levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. Lentiviral complementation rescues complex IV deficiency. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates demonstrating a function of COX5A in complex IV biogenesis. A potential therapeutic lead is demonstrated by showing that copper supplementation leads to partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca 2+ -mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1

  17. Utilizing Chemical Genomics to Identify Cytochrome b as a Novel Drug Target for Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Khare

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unbiased phenotypic screens enable identification of small molecules that inhibit pathogen growth by unanticipated mechanisms. These small molecules can be used as starting points for drug discovery programs that target such mechanisms. A major challenge of the approach is the identification of the cellular targets. Here we report GNF7686, a small molecule inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and identification of cytochrome b as its target. Following discovery of GNF7686 in a parasite growth inhibition high throughput screen, we were able to evolve a GNF7686-resistant culture of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Clones from this culture bore a mutation coding for a substitution of leucine by phenylalanine at amino acid position 197 in cytochrome b. Cytochrome b is a component of complex III (cytochrome bc1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c by a mechanism that utilizes two distinct catalytic sites, QN and QP. The L197F mutation is located in the QN site and confers resistance to GNF7686 in both parasite cell growth and biochemical cytochrome b assays. Additionally, the mutant cytochrome b confers resistance to antimycin A, another QN site inhibitor, but not to strobilurin or myxothiazol, which target the QP site. GNF7686 represents a promising starting point for Chagas disease drug discovery as it potently inhibits growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50 of 0.15 µM, and is highly specific for T. cruzi cytochrome b. No effect on the mammalian respiratory chain or mammalian cell proliferation was observed with up to 25 µM of GNF7686. Our approach, which combines T. cruzi chemical genetics with biochemical target validation, can be broadly applied to the discovery of additional novel drug targets and drug leads for Chagas disease.

  18. Probing cytochrome c in living mitochondria with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda A.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Goodilin, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    Selective study of the electron transport chain components in living mitochondria is essential for fundamental biophysical research and for the development of new medical diagnostic methods. However, many important details of inter- and intramembrane mitochondrial processes have remained in shadow...... due to the lack of non-invasive techniques. Here we suggest a novel label-free approach based on the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to monitor the redox state and conformation of cytochrome c in the electron transport chain in living mitochondria. We demonstrate that SERS spectra of living...... mitochondria placed on hierarchically structured silver-ring substrates provide exclusive information about cytochrome c behavior under modulation of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, proton gradient and the activity of ATP-synthetase. Mathematical simulation explains the observed enhancement of Raman...

  19. Population structure and genetic diversity of Indian Major Carp, Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822) from three phylo-geographically isolated riverine ecosystems of India as revealed by mtDNA cytochrome b region sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Bijay Kumar; Baisvar, Vishwamitra Singh; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Meena, Dharmendra Kumar; Panda, Debarata; Pakrashi, Sudip; Paria, Prasenjit; Das, Pronob; Bhakta, Dibakar; Debnath, Dipesh; Roy, Suvra; Suresh, V R; Jena, J K

    2018-03-01

    The population structure and genetic diversity of Rohu (Labeo rohita Hamilton, 1822) was studied by analysis of the partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b region. We examined 133 samples collected from six locations in three geographically isolated rivers of India. Analysis of 11 haplotypes showed low haplotype diversity (0.00150), nucleotide diversity (π) (0.02884) and low heterogeneity value (0.00374). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed the genetic diversity of L. rohita within population is very high than between the populations. The Fst scores (-0.07479 to 0.07022) were the indication of low genetic structure of L. rohita populations of three rivers of India. Conspicuously, Farakka-Bharuch population pair Fst score of 0.0000, although the sampling sites are from different rivers. The phylogenetic reconstruction of unique haplotypes revealed sharing of a single central haplotype (Hap_1) by all the six populations with a point mutations ranging from 1-25 nucleotides.

  20. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Nikola; Vrbacká-Čížková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, V.; Pronicka, E.; Kmoch, S.; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1822, č. 7 (2012), s. 1114-1124 ISSN 0925-4439 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MZd(CZ) NT12370; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial disorder * SURF1 gene * Leigh syndrome * gene expression * oxidative phosphorylation * cytochrome c oxidase Subject RIV: FG - Pediatrics Impact factor: 4.910, year: 2012

  1. Molecular phylogeny of Toxoplasmatinae: comparison between inferences based on mitochondrial and apicoplast genetic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Klein Sercundes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Phylogenies within Toxoplasmatinae have been widely investigated with different molecular markers. Here, we studied molecular phylogenies of the Toxoplasmatinae subfamily based on apicoplast and mitochondrial genes. Partial sequences of apicoplast genes coding for caseinolytic protease (clpC and beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB, and mitochondrial gene coding for cytochrome B (cytB were analyzed. Laboratory-adapted strains of the closely related parasites Sarcocystis falcatula and Sarcocystis neurona were investigated, along with Neospora caninum, Neospora hughesi, Toxoplasma gondii (strains RH, CTG and PTG, Besnoitia akodoni, Hammondia hammondiand two genetically divergent lineages of Hammondia heydorni. The molecular analysis based on organellar genes did not clearly differentiate between N. caninum and N. hughesi, but the two lineages of H. heydorni were confirmed. Slight differences between the strains of S. falcatula and S. neurona were encountered in all markers. In conclusion, congruent phylogenies were inferred from the three different genes and they might be used for screening undescribed sarcocystid parasites in order to ascertain their phylogenetic relationships with organisms of the family Sarcocystidae. The evolutionary studies based on organelar genes confirm that the genusHammondia is paraphyletic. The primers used for amplification of clpC and rpoB were able to amplify genetic sequences of organisms of the genus Sarcocystisand organisms of the subfamily Toxoplasmatinae as well.

  2. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  3. Isolated cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in G93A SOD1 mice overexpressing CCS protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Marjatta; Leary, Scot C; Romain, Nadine; Pierrel, Fabien; Winge, Dennis R; Haller, Ronald G; Elliott, Jeffrey L

    2008-05-02

    G93A SOD1 transgenic mice overexpressing CCS protein develop an accelerated disease course that is associated with enhanced mitochondrial pathology and increased mitochondrial localization of mutant SOD1. Because these results suggest an effect of mutant SOD1 on mitochondrial function, we assessed the enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in the spinal cords of CCS/G93A SOD1 and control mice. CCS/G93A SOD1 mouse spinal cord demonstrates a 55% loss of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) activity compared with spinal cord from age-matched non-transgenic or G93A SOD1 mice. In contrast, CCS/G93A SOD1 spinal cord shows no reduction in the activities of complex I, II, or III. Blue native gel analysis further demonstrates a marked reduction in the levels of complex IV but not of complex I, II, III, or V in spinal cords of CCS/G93A SOD1 mice compared with non-transgenic, G93A SOD1, or CCS/WT SOD1 controls. With SDS-PAGE analysis, spinal cords from CCS/G93A SOD1 mice showed significant decreases in the levels of two structural subunits of cytochrome c oxidase, COX1 and COX5b, relative to controls. In contrast, CCS/G93A SOD1 mouse spinal cord showed no reduction in levels of selected subunits from complexes I, II, III, or V. Heme A analyses of spinal cord further support the existence of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in CCS/G93A SOD1 mice. Collectively, these results establish that CCS/G93A SOD1 mice manifest an isolated complex IV deficiency which may underlie a substantial part of mutant SOD1-induced mitochondrial cytopathy.

  4. Mitochondrial Ca2+ overload underlies Abeta oligomers neurotoxicity providing an unexpected mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Valero, Ruth A; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2008-07-23

    Dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis may underlie amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) but the mechanism is unknown. In search for this mechanism we found that Abeta(1-42) oligomers, the assembly state correlating best with cognitive decline in AD, but not Abeta fibrils, induce a massive entry of Ca(2+) in neurons and promote mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload as shown by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorin in individual neurons. Abeta oligomers induce also mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release, apoptosis and cell death. Mitochondrial depolarization prevents mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload, cytochrome c release and cell death. In addition, we found that a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including salicylate, sulindac sulfide, indomethacin, ibuprofen and R-flurbiprofen depolarize mitochondria and inhibit mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload, cytochrome c release and cell death induced by Abeta oligomers. Our results indicate that i) mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload underlies the neurotoxicity induced by Abeta oligomers and ii) inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload provides a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs against Abeta oligomers and AD.

  5. Mitochondrial Ca2+ overload underlies Abeta oligomers neurotoxicity providing an unexpected mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sanz-Blasco

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis may underlie amyloid beta peptide (Abeta toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease (AD but the mechanism is unknown. In search for this mechanism we found that Abeta(1-42 oligomers, the assembly state correlating best with cognitive decline in AD, but not Abeta fibrils, induce a massive entry of Ca(2+ in neurons and promote mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload as shown by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorin in individual neurons. Abeta oligomers induce also mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release, apoptosis and cell death. Mitochondrial depolarization prevents mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death. In addition, we found that a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs including salicylate, sulindac sulfide, indomethacin, ibuprofen and R-flurbiprofen depolarize mitochondria and inhibit mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death induced by Abeta oligomers. Our results indicate that i mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload underlies the neurotoxicity induced by Abeta oligomers and ii inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload provides a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs against Abeta oligomers and AD.

  6. Cytochrome c interaction with hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggleston, Carrick M. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)]. E-mail: carrick@uwyo.edu; Khare, Nidhi [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Lovelace, David M. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    The interaction of metalloproteins such as cytochromes with oxides is of interest for a number of reasons, including molecular catalysis of environmentally important mineral-solution electron transfer reactions (e.g., dehalogenations) and photovoltaic applications. Iron reduction by bacteria, thought to be cytochrome mediated, is of interest for geochemical and environmental remediation reasons. As a baseline for understanding cytochrome interaction with ferric oxide surfaces, we report on the interaction of mitochondrial cytochrome c (Mcc), a well-studied protein, with hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) surfaces. Mcc sorbs strongly to hematite from aqueous solution in a narrow pH range corresponding to opposite charge on Mcc and hematite (between pH 8.5 and 10, Mcc is positively charged and hematite surfaces are negatively charged). Cyclic voltammetry of Mcc using hematite electrodes gives redox potentials characteristic of Mcc in a native conformational state, with no evidence for unfolding on the hematite surface. Atomic force microscopy imaging is consistent with a loosely attached adsorbate that is easily deformed by the AFM tip. In phosphate-containing solution, Mcc adhers to the surface more strongly. These results establish hematite as a viable material for electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization of cytochrome-mineral interaction.

  7. Mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesa, Marc; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    The meaning of the word mitochondrion (from the Greek mitos, meaning thread, and chondros, grain) illustrates that the heterogeneity of mitochondrial morphology has been known since the first descriptions of this organelle. Such a heterogeneous morphology is explained by the dynamic nature of mitochondria. Mitochondrial dynamics is a concept that includes the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, the regulation of mitochondrial architecture (morphology and distribution), and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission events. The relevance of these events in mitochondrial and cell physiology has been partially unraveled after the identification of the genes responsible for mitochondrial fusion and fission. Furthermore, during the last decade, it has been identified that mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause prevalent neurodegenerative diseases (Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and Kjer disease/autosomal dominant optic atrophy). In addition, other diseases such as type 2 diabetes or vascular proliferative disorders show impaired MFN2 expression. Altogether, these findings have established mitochondrial dynamics as a consolidated area in cellular physiology. Here we review the most significant findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian cells and their implication in human pathologies.

  8. Drp1-Dependent Mitochondrial Autophagy Plays a Protective Role Against Pressure Overload-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakabe, Akihiro; Zhai, Peiyong; Ikeda, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Toshiro; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Nomura, Masatoshi; Egashira, Kensuke; Levine, Beth; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2016-03-29

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important mediator of mitochondrial quality control in cardiomyocytes. The occurrence of mitochondrial autophagy and its significance during cardiac hypertrophy are not well understood. Mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and observed at multiple time points up to 30 days. Cardiac hypertrophy developed after 5 days, the ejection fraction was reduced after 14 days, and heart failure was observed 30 days after TAC. General autophagy was upregulated between 1 and 12 hours after TAC but was downregulated below physiological levels 5 days after TAC. Mitochondrial autophagy, evaluated by electron microscopy, mitochondrial content, and Keima with mitochondrial localization signal, was transiently activated at ≈3 to 7 days post-TAC, coinciding with mitochondrial translocation of Drp1. However, it was downregulated thereafter, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction. Haploinsufficiency of Drp1 abolished mitochondrial autophagy and exacerbated the development of both mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure after TAC. Injection of Tat-Beclin 1, a potent inducer of autophagy, but not control peptide, on day 7 after TAC, partially rescued mitochondrial autophagy and attenuated mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure induced by overload. Haploinsufficiency of either drp1 or beclin 1 prevented the rescue by Tat-Beclin 1, suggesting that its effect is mediated in part through autophagy, including mitochondrial autophagy. Mitochondrial autophagy is transiently activated and then downregulated in the mouse heart in response to pressure overload. Downregulation of mitochondrial autophagy plays an important role in mediating the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure, whereas restoration of mitochondrial autophagy attenuates dysfunction in the heart during pressure overload. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Calcium and mitochondrial metabolism in ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Valentina; Moraga, Francisco; Kuzmicic, Jovan; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Torrealba, Natalia; Criollo, Alfredo; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Rothermel, Beverly A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides are important intermediates in the biosynthesis and degradation of sphingolipids that regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, cell growth, differentiation and death. In cardiomyocytes, ceramides induce apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and promoting cytochrome-c release. Ca(2+) overload is a common feature of all types of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ceramides on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels, mitochondrial function and cardiomyocyte death. Our data show that C2-ceramide induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured cardiomyocytes by a mechanism involving increased Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial network fragmentation and loss of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffer capacity. These biochemical events increase cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and trigger cardiomyocyte death via the activation of calpains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ebselen protects mitochondrial function and oxidative stress while inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway after acute spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhi-Qiang; Li, San-Qiang; Qiao, Wei-Qiang; Xu, Wen-Zhong; Xing, Jian-Wu; Liu, Jian-Tao; Song, Hui; Gao, Zhong-Yang; Xing, Bing-Wen; He, Xi-Jing

    2018-05-04

    Ebselen is a fat-soluble small molecule and organic selenium compound that regulates the activity of glutathione peroxidase to alleviate mitochondrial oxidative stress and improve mitochondrial function. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of ebselen on mitochondrial oxidative stress response, mitochondrial apotosis, and motor behaviors after spinal cord injury (SCI). We found that ebselen significantly increased the BBB score in motor behavior, thus suggesting a rescue effect of ebselen on motor function after SCI in rats. Meanwhile, we revealed that ebselen can increase glutathione (GSH) content as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities after SCI-this suggests ebselen has an antioxidant effect. Furthermore, the ATP content and Na + -K + -ATPase activity in mitochondria were increased by ebselen after SCI, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was decreased by ebselen. The Cytochrome C and Smac release from mitochondria were reduced by ebselen after SCI, thus indicating improved membrane permeability by ebselen. Moreover, the alterations in caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression, as well as the proportion of cell apoptosis were improved by ebselen treatment, which together suggested that ebselen has an inhibitory effect on mitochondrial apotosis pathways after SCI. Taken together, our results suggest that ebselen can inhibit secondary damage caused by spinal cord injury. Indeed it plays a neuroprotective role in spinal cord injury perhaps by improving mitochondrial function and inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diversity of tuco-tucos (Ctenomys, Rodentia) in the Northeastern wetlands from Argentina: mitochondrial phylogeny and chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Diego A; Abruzzese, Giselle A; Rossi, María Susana

    2012-06-01

    Tuco-tucos (small subterranean rodents of the genus Ctenomys) that inhabit sandy soils of the area under the influence of the second largest wetland of South America, in Northeastern Argentina (Corrientes province), are a complex of species and forms whose taxonomic status were not defined, nor are the evolutionary relationships among them. The tuco-tuco populations of this area exhibit one of the most ample grades of chromosomal variability within the genus. In order to analyze evolutionary relationships within the Corrientes group and its chromosomal variability, we completed the missing karyotypic information and performed a phylogenetic analysis. We obtained partial sequences of three mitochondrial markers: D-loop, cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase I. The Corrientes group was monophyletic and split into three main clades that grouped related karyomorphs. The phylogeny suggested an ancestral condition of the karyomorph with diploid number (2n) 70 and fundamental number (FN) 84 that has evolved mainly via reductions of the FN although amplifications occurred in certain lineages. We discuss the relationship between patterns of chromosomal variability and species and groups boundaries. From the three main clades the one named iberá exhibited a remarkable karyotypic homogeneity, and could be considered as an independent and cohesive evolutionary lineage. On the contrary, the former recognized species C. dorbignyi is a polyphyletic lineage and hence its systematic classification should be reviewed.

  12. Molecular diversification of Trichuris spp. from Sigmodontinae (Cricetidae) rodents from Argentina based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejón, Rocío; Robles, María Del Rosario; Panei, Carlos Javier; Cutillas, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for the genus Trichuris based on sequence data from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) and cytochrome b (cob). The taxa consisted of nine populations of whipworm from five species of Sigmodontinae rodents from Argentina. Bayesian Inference, Maximum Parsimony, and Maximum Likelihood methods were used to infer phylogenies for each gene separately but also for the combined mitochondrial data and the combined mitochondrial and nuclear dataset. Phylogenetic results based on cox1 and cob mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) revealed three clades strongly resolved corresponding to three different species (Trichuris navonae, Trichuris bainae, and Trichuris pardinasi) showing phylogeographic variation, but relationships among Trichuris species were poorly resolved. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on concatenated sequences had greater phylogenetic resolution for delimiting species and populations intra-specific of Trichuris than those based on partitioned genes. Thus, populations of T. bainae and T. pardinasi could be affected by geographical factors and co-divergence parasite-host.

  13. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  14. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  15. Rational redesign of the biodegradative enzyme cytochrome P450 cam:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, R.; Paulsen, M.; Bass, M.; Arnold, G.

    1991-03-01

    Cytochromes P450, a superfamily of monooxygenase enzymes present in all kingdoms of living organisms, are very versatile with respect to substrate range and catalytic functionality. Many recalcitrant halogenated hydrocarbons, on DOE sites and throughout the nation, result in serious environmental impact. Cytochromes P450 have been shown to be catalytically capable of, at least partial, dehalogenation of some such compounds. Clearly, however, their active site stereochemistry and related functional components are not well suited for this role because the rates of dehalogenation are generally rather modest. The evolution of modified active site and access channel structures may proceed very slowly if multiple genetic changes are simultaneously required for enzyme adaptation. Since each mutational event is by itself a rare event, a basic premise of our research is that designing multiple changes into an enzyme may be more timely than waiting for them to occur biologically either via natural selection or under laboratory-controlled conditions. Starting with available high-resolution x-ray crystal structures, molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to probe the basic structure/function principles and conformational fluctuations of the biodegradative enzyme, cytochrome P450cam (camphor hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida) and active site mutants, to provide the fundamental understanding necessary for rational engineering of the enzyme for modified substrate specificity. In the present paper, we review our progress to data, in the area of molecular dynamics simulations and active site redesign of P450cam. 36 refs., 2 figs

  16. A highly rearranged mitochondrial genome in Nycteria parasites (Haemosporidia) from bats

    OpenAIRE

    Karadjian , Gregory; Hassanin , Alexandre; Saintpierre , Benjamin; Gembu Tungaluna , Guy-Crispin; Ariey , Frederic; Ayala , Francisco J.; Landau , Irene; Duval , Linda

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Haemosporidia parasites have mostly and abundantly been described using mitochondrial genes, and in particular cytochrome b (cytb). Failure to amplify the mitochondrial cytb gene of Nycteria parasites isolated from Nycteridae bats has been recently reported. Bats are hosts to a diverse and profuse array of Haemosporidia parasites that remain largely unstudied. There is a need to obtain more molecular data from chiropteran parasites. Such data would help to better under...

  17. Unique organizational and functional features of the cytochrome c maturation system in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Jin

    Full Text Available Shewanella are renowned for their ability to respire on a wide range of electron acceptors, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. In the model species S. oneidensis MR-1, at least 41 genes encode c-type cytochromes that are predicted to be intact, thereby likely functional. Previously, in-frame deletion mutants for 36 of these genes were obtained and characterized. In this study, first we completed the construction of an entire set of c-type cytochrome mutants utilizing a newly developed att-based mutagenesis approach, which is more effective and efficient than the approach used previously by circumventing the conventional cloning. Second, we investigated the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm system in S. oneidensis. There are two loci predicted to encode components of the Ccm system, SO0259-SO0269 and SO0476-SO0478. The former is proven essential for cytochrome c maturation whereas the latter is dispensable. Unlike the single operon organization observed in other γ-proteobacteria, genes at the SO0259-SO0269 locus are uniquely organized into four operons, ccmABCDE, scyA, SO0265, and ccmFGH-SO0269. Functional analysis revealed that the SO0265 gene rather than the scyA and SO0269 genes are relevant to cytochrome c maturation.

  18. Role of cytochrome B in the processing of the subunits of complex III in the yeast mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The work described in this dissertation deals with the effect of cytochrome b on the biogenesis and assembly of the subunits of complex III in the mitochondrial membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cytochrome b-mutants (Box mutants of S. cerevisiae form an excellent system to study such a role of cytochome B. The amounts of cytochrome c 1 in the mitochrondria, as determined both spectroscopically and immunologically, were not affected by the absence of cytochrome b. Pulse labelling of the cells with ( 35 S) methionine in the presence of CCCP showed the accumulation of the precursors to the core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in similar amounts in the mutant Box 6-2 and the wild type cells. Synthesis of the iron sulfur protein and the cytochrome c 1 by in vitro translation of mRNA isolated from wild type and mutant Box 6-2 in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, also confirmed that the synthesis of the nuclear encoded subunits was not affected in the mutants. Pulse labeling of the cells in the absence of CCCP and subsequent chase with cold methionine, however, showed much less of the mature subunits of core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in the mitochrondria of the mutant cells relative to the wild type. These results indicate that cytochrome b is necessary for the proper processing of certain subunits of complex III

  19. Mitochondrial respiratory control is lost during growth factor deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Eyal; Armour, Sean M; Thompson, Craig B

    2002-10-01

    The ability of cells to maintain a bioenergetically favorable ATP/ADP ratio confers a tight balance between cellular events that consume ATP and the rate of ATP production. However, after growth factor withdrawal, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio declines. To investigate these changes, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells isolated before the onset of apoptosis were characterized in vitro. Mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells have lost their ability to undergo matrix condensation in response to ADP, which is accompanied by a failure to perform ADP-coupled respiration. At the time of analysis, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells were not depleted of cytochrome c and cytochrome c-dependent respiration was unaffected, demonstrating that the inhibition of the respiratory rate is not due to loss of cytochrome c. Agents that disrupt the mitochondrial outer membrane, such as digitonin, or maintain outer membrane exchange of adenine nucleotide, such as Bcl-x(L), restored ADP-dependent control of mitochondrial respiration. Together, these data suggest that the regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability contributes to respiratory control.

  20. Multifunctional Cytochrome c: Learning New Tricks from an Old Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Hannibal, Luciana; Castro, María A; Oviedo-Rouco, Santiago; Demicheli, Veronica; Tórtora, Veronica; Tomasina, Florencia; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2017-11-08

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) is a small soluble heme protein characterized by a relatively flexible structure, particularly in the ferric form, such that it is able to sample a broad conformational space. Depending on the specific conditions, interactions, and cellular localization, different conformations may be stabilized, which differ in structure, redox properties, binding affinities, and enzymatic activity. The primary function is electron shuttling in oxidative phosphorylation, and is exerted by the so-called native cyt c in the intermembrane mitochondrial space of healthy cells. Under pro-apoptotic conditions, however, cyt c gains cardiolipin peroxidase activity, translocates into the cytosol to engage in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and enters the nucleus where it impedes nucleosome assembly. Other reported functions include cytosolic redox sensing and involvement in the mitochondrial oxidative folding machinery. Moreover, post-translational modifications such as nitration, phosphorylation, and sulfoxidation of specific amino acids induce alternative conformations with differential properties, at least in vitro. Similar structural and functional alterations are elicited by biologically significant electric fields and by naturally occurring mutations of human cyt c that, along with mutations at the level of the maturation system, are associated with specific diseases. Here, we summarize current knowledge and recent advances in understanding the different structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic factors that regulate the primary electron transfer function, as well as alternative functions and conformations of cyt c. Finally, we present recent technological applications of this moonlighting protein.

  1. CMS-G from Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima is maintained in natural populations despite containing an atypical cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Etienne H; Lehmann, Caroline; Boivin, Stéphane; Brings, Lea; De Cauwer, Isabelle; Bock, Ralph; Kühn, Kristina; Touzet, Pascal

    2018-02-23

    While mitochondrial mutants of the respiratory machinery are rare and often lethal, cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), a mitochondrially inherited trait that results in pollen abortion, is frequently encountered in wild populations. It generates a breeding system called gynodioecy. In Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima , a gynodioecious species, we found CMS-G to be widespread across the distribution range of the species. Despite the sequencing of the mitochondrial genome of CMS-G, the mitochondrial sterilizing factor causing CMS-G is still unknown. By characterizing biochemically CMS-G, we found that the expression of several mitochondrial proteins is altered in CMS-G plants. In particular, Cox1, a core subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), is larger but can still assemble into complex IV. However, the CMS-G-specific complex IV was only detected as a stabilized dimer. We did not observe any alteration of the affinity of complex IV for cytochrome c ; however, in CMS-G, complex IV capacity is reduced. Our results show that CMS-G is maintained in many natural populations despite being associated with an atypical complex IV. We suggest that the modified complex IV could incur the associated cost predicted by theoretical models to maintain gynodioecy in wild populations. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 μM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt max of 105 ± 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 ± 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 ± 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 ± 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 ± 1 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 ± 3 μM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  3. Caffeic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer Cells Through the Mitochondrial Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Chang

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Caffeic acid induces apoptosis by inhibiting Bcl-2 activity, leading to release of cytochrome c and subsequent activation of caspase-3, indicating that caffeic acid induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This also suggests that caffeic acid has a strong anti-tumor effect and may be a promising chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent.

  4. Molecular phylogeny of the Oriental butterfly genus Arhopala (Lycaenidae, Theclinae) inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, H.J.W.C.; Nes, Van W.J.; Moorsel, van C.H.M.; Pierce, N.E.; Jong, de R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a phylogeny for a selection of species of the butterfly genus Arhopala Boisduval, 1832 based on molecular characters. We sequenced 1778 bases of the mitochondrial genes Cytochrome Oxidase 1 and 2 including tRNALeu, and a 393-bp fragment of the nuclear wingless gene for a total of 42

  5. Oxidative Stress in Cardiac Mitochondria Caused by Copper Deficiency May Be Insufficient to Damage Mitochondrial Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper (Cu) deficiency may promote the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the mitochondrial electron transport chain through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) and increased reduction of respiratory complexes upstream from CCO. In the present study, respiration, H2O2 production and...

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of Phytophthora Species Based on Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, L.P.N.M.; Bakker, F.T.; Bosch, van den G.B.M.; Bonants, P.J.M.; Flier, W.G.

    2004-01-01

    A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the genus Phytophthora was performed, 113 isolates from 48 Phytophthora species were included in this analysis. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on regions of mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1; NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1) and nuclear gene

  7. Alcohol dehydrogenase accentuates ethanol-induced myocardial dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in mice: role of mitochondrial death pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Binge drinking and alcohol toxicity are often associated with myocardial dysfunction possibly due to accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde although the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study was designed to examine the impact of accelerated ethanol metabolism on myocardial contractility, mitochondrial function and apoptosis using a murine model of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH.ADH and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p. for 3 days. Myocardial contractility, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis (death receptor and mitochondrial pathways were examined.Ethanol led to reduced cardiac contractility, enlarged cardiomyocyte, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, the effects of which were exaggerated by ADH transgene. In particular, ADH exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction manifested as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and accumulation of mitochondrial O(2 (*-. Myocardium from ethanol-treated mice displayed enhanced Bax, Caspase-3 and decreased Bcl-2 expression, the effect of which with the exception of Caspase-3 was augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated ethanol-induced increase in the mitochondrial death domain components pro-caspase-9 and cytochrome C in the cytoplasm. Neither ethanol nor ADH affected the expression of ANP, total pro-caspase-9, cytosolic and total pro-caspase-8, TNF-alpha, Fas receptor, Fas L and cytosolic AIF.Taken together, these data suggest that enhanced acetaldehyde production through ADH overexpression following acute ethanol exposure exacerbated ethanol-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, cardiomyocyte enlargement, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, indicating a pivotal role of ADH in ethanol-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly through mitochondrial death pathway of apoptosis.

  8. Alcohol dehydrogenase accentuates ethanol-induced myocardial dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in mice: role of mitochondrial death pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-18

    Binge drinking and alcohol toxicity are often associated with myocardial dysfunction possibly due to accumulation of the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde although the underlying mechanism is unknown. This study was designed to examine the impact of accelerated ethanol metabolism on myocardial contractility, mitochondrial function and apoptosis using a murine model of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). ADH and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3 days. Myocardial contractility, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis (death receptor and mitochondrial pathways) were examined. Ethanol led to reduced cardiac contractility, enlarged cardiomyocyte, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, the effects of which were exaggerated by ADH transgene. In particular, ADH exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction manifested as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and accumulation of mitochondrial O(2) (*-). Myocardium from ethanol-treated mice displayed enhanced Bax, Caspase-3 and decreased Bcl-2 expression, the effect of which with the exception of Caspase-3 was augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated ethanol-induced increase in the mitochondrial death domain components pro-caspase-9 and cytochrome C in the cytoplasm. Neither ethanol nor ADH affected the expression of ANP, total pro-caspase-9, cytosolic and total pro-caspase-8, TNF-alpha, Fas receptor, Fas L and cytosolic AIF. Taken together, these data suggest that enhanced acetaldehyde production through ADH overexpression following acute ethanol exposure exacerbated ethanol-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction, cardiomyocyte enlargement, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, indicating a pivotal role of ADH in ethanol-induced cardiac dysfunction possibly through mitochondrial death pathway of apoptosis.

  9. The Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein: Import and Assembly into the Cytochrome bc 1 Complex of Yeast Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Laura; Zara, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The Rieske iron-sulfur protein, one of the catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc 1 complex, is involved in electron transfer at the level of the inner membrane of yeast mitochondria. The Rieske iron-sulfur protein is encoded by nuclear DNA and, after being synthesized in the cytosol, is imported into mitochondria with the help of a cleavable N-terminal presequence. The imported protein, besides incorporating the 2Fe-2S cluster, also interacts with other catalytic and non-catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc 1 complex, thereby assembling into the mature and functional respiratory complex. In this paper, we summarize the most recent findings on the import and assembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein into Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, also discussing a possible role of this protein both in the dimerization of the cytochrome bc 1 complex and in the interaction of this homodimer with other complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:21716720

  10. The Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein: Import and Assembly into the Cytochrome bc(1) Complex of Yeast Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Laura; Zara, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The Rieske iron-sulfur protein, one of the catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, is involved in electron transfer at the level of the inner membrane of yeast mitochondria. The Rieske iron-sulfur protein is encoded by nuclear DNA and, after being synthesized in the cytosol, is imported into mitochondria with the help of a cleavable N-terminal presequence. The imported protein, besides incorporating the 2Fe-2S cluster, also interacts with other catalytic and non-catalytic subunits of the cytochrome bc(1) complex, thereby assembling into the mature and functional respiratory complex. In this paper, we summarize the most recent findings on the import and assembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein into Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria, also discussing a possible role of this protein both in the dimerization of the cytochrome bc(1) complex and in the interaction of this homodimer with other complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  11. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  12. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling and calorie restriction increase fasting eNOS, akt and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Fernanda M; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2011-03-31

    Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis promoted by eNOS activation is believed to play a central role in the beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR). Since treatment of mice with dinitrophenol (DNP) promotes health and lifespan benefits similar to those observed in CR, we hypothesized that it could also impact biogenesis. We found that DNP and CR increase citrate synthase activity, PGC-1α, cytochrome c oxidase and mitofusin-2 expression, as well as fasting plasma levels of NO• products. In addition, eNOS and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue was activated in fasting CR and DNP animals. Overall, our results indicate that systemic mild uncoupling activates eNOS and Akt-dependent pathways leading to mitochondrial biogenesis.

  13. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling and calorie restriction increase fasting eNOS, akt and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Cerqueira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis promoted by eNOS activation is believed to play a central role in the beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR. Since treatment of mice with dinitrophenol (DNP promotes health and lifespan benefits similar to those observed in CR, we hypothesized that it could also impact biogenesis. We found that DNP and CR increase citrate synthase activity, PGC-1α, cytochrome c oxidase and mitofusin-2 expression, as well as fasting plasma levels of NO• products. In addition, eNOS and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue was activated in fasting CR and DNP animals. Overall, our results indicate that systemic mild uncoupling activates eNOS and Akt-dependent pathways leading to mitochondrial biogenesis.

  14. Glucose metabolism determines resistance of cancer cells to bioenergetic crisis after cytochrome-c release.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Huber, Heinrich J

    2011-03-01

    Many anticancer drugs activate caspases via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Activation of this pathway triggers a concomitant bioenergetic crisis caused by the release of cytochrome-c (cyt-c). Cancer cells are able to evade these processes by altering metabolic and caspase activation pathways. In this study, we provide the first integrated system study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and apoptosis signalling and examine the role of mitochondrial cyt-c release in these events. In accordance with single-cell experiments, our model showed that loss of cyt-c decreased mitochondrial respiration by 95% and depolarised mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨ(m) from -142 to -88 mV, with active caspase-3 potentiating this decrease. ATP synthase was reversed under such conditions, consuming ATP and stabilising ΔΨ(m). However, the direction and level of ATP synthase activity showed significant heterogeneity in individual cancer cells, which the model explained by variations in (i) accessible cyt-c after release and (ii) the cell\\'s glycolytic capacity. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic explanation for the protective role of enhanced glucose utilisation for cancer cells to avert the otherwise lethal bioenergetic crisis associated with apoptosis initiation.

  15. Elucidating cytochrome C release from mitochondria: insights from an in silico three-dimensional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Zhi Yang; Cai, Yi Hui; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2010-11-17

    Mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis depends on the programmed release of proapoptotic proteins such as cytochrome c (Cyt c) through the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). Although a few key processes involved in this release have been identified, including the liberation of inner membrane-bound Cyt c and formation of diffusible pores on the OMM, other details like the transport of Cyt c within complex mitochondrial compartments, e.g., the cristae and crista junctions, are not yet fully understood (to our knowledge). In particular, a remodeling of the inner mitochondrial membrane accompanying apoptosis seen in a few studies, in which crista junctions widen, has been hypothesized to be a necessary step in the Cyt c release. Using a three-dimensional spatial modeling of mitochondrial crista and the crista junction, model simulations and analysis illustrated how the interplay among solubilization of Cyt c, fast diffusion of Cyt c, and OMM permeabilization gives rise to the observed experimental release profile. Importantly, the widening of the crista junction was found to have a negligible effect on the transport of free Cyt c from cristae. Finally, model simulations showed that increasing the fraction of free/loosely-bound Cyt c can sensitize the cell to apoptotic stimuli in a threshold manner, which may explain increased sensitivity to cell death associated with aging. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The dimerization of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex is an early event and is independent of Rip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Annalea; Papa, Benedetta; Ferramosca, Alessandra; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the mature cytochrome bc1 complex exists as an obligate homo-dimer in which each monomer consists of ten distinct protein subunits inserted into or bound to the inner mitochondrial membrane. Among them, the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (Rip1), besides its catalytic role in electron transfer, may be implicated in the bc1 complex dimerization. Indeed, Rip1 has the globular domain containing the catalytic center in one monomer while the transmembrane helix interacts with the adjacent monomer. In addition, the lack of Rip1 leads to the accumulation of an immature bc1 intermediate, only loosely associated with cytochrome c oxidase. In this study we have investigated the biogenesis of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex using epitope tagged proteins to purify native assembly intermediates. We showed that the dimerization process is an early event during bc1 complex biogenesis and that the presence of Rip1, differently from previous proposals, is not essential for this process. We also investigated the multi-step model of bc1 assembly thereby lending further support to the existence of bona fide subcomplexes during bc1 maturation in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Finally, a new model of cytochrome bc1 complex assembly, in which distinct intermediates sequentially interact during bc1 maturation, has been proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tibetan antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shu Qing; Yang, Ying Zhong; Zhou, Jun

    2005-01-01

    To investigate genetic mechanisms of high altitude adaptations of native mammals on the Tibetan Plateau, we compared mitochondrial sequences of the endangered Pantholops hodgsonii with its lowland distant relatives Ovis aries and Capra hircus, as well as other mammals. The complete mitochondrial...... genome of P. hodgsonii (16,498 bp) revealed a similar gene order as of other mammals. Because of tandem duplications, the control region of P. hodgsonii mitochondrial genome is shorter than those of O. aries and C. hircus, but longer than those of Bos species. Phylogenetic analysis based on alignments...... of the entire cytochrome b genes suggested that P. hodgsonii is more closely related to O. aries and C. hircus, rather than to species of the Antilopinae subfamily. The estimated divergence time between P. hodgsonii and O. aries is about 2.25 million years ago. Further analysis on natural selection indicated...

  18. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of the Foodborne Parasitic Pathogen Cyclospora cayetanensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hediye Nese Cinar

    Full Text Available Cyclospora cayetanensis is a human-specific coccidian parasite responsible for several food and water-related outbreaks around the world, including the most recent ones involving over 900 persons in 2013 and 2014 outbreaks in the USA. Multicopy organellar DNA such as mitochondrion genomes have been particularly informative for detection and genetic traceback analysis in other parasites. We sequenced the C. cayetanensis genomic DNA obtained from stool samples from patients infected with Cyclospora in Nepal using the Illumina MiSeq platform. By bioinformatically filtering out the metagenomic reads of non-coccidian origin sequences and concentrating the reads by targeted alignment, we were able to obtain contigs containing Eimeria-like mitochondrial, apicoplastic and some chromosomal genomic fragments. A mitochondrial genomic sequence was assembled and confirmed by cloning and sequencing targeted PCR products amplified from Cyclospora DNA using primers based on our draft assembly sequence. The results show that the C. cayetanensis mitochondrion genome is 6274 bp in length, with 33% GC content, and likely exists in concatemeric arrays as in Eimeria mitochondrial genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of the C. cayetanensis mitochondrial genome places this organism in a tight cluster with Eimeria species. The mitochondrial genome of C. cayetanensis contains three protein coding genes, cytochrome (cytb, cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (cox1, and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 3 (cox3, in addition to 14 large subunit (LSU and nine small subunit (SSU fragmented rRNA genes.

  19. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simarro, Maria [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kedersha, Nancy [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A. [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhee, Kirsten [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Benarafa, Charaf [Theodor Kocher Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Orduna, Anonio [Unidad de Investigacion, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Anderson, Paul, E-mail: panderson@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  20. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. → The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. → Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  1. Cytochrome P450 humanised mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Frank J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Humans are exposed to countless foreign compounds, typically referred to as xenobiotics. These can include clinically used drugs, environmental pollutants, food additives, pesticides, herbicides and even natural plant compounds. Xenobiotics are metabolised primarily in the liver, but also in the gut and other organs, to derivatives that are more easily eliminated from the body. In some cases, however, a compound is converted to an electrophile that can cause cell toxicity and transformation leading to cancer. Among the most important xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes are the cytochromes P450 (P450s. These enzymes represent a superfamily of multiple forms that exhibit marked species differences in their expression and catalytic activities. To predict how humans will metabolise xenobiotics, including drugs, human liver extracts and recombinant P450s have been used. New humanised mouse models are being developed which will be of great value in the study of drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in vivo, and in carrying out human risk assessment of xenobiotics. Humanised mice expressing CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, two major drug-metabolising P450s, have revealed the feasibility of this approach.

  2. Cytochrome P450 humanised mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Humans are exposed to countless foreign compounds, typically referred to as xenobiotics. These can include clinically used drugs, environmental pollutants, food additives, pesticides, herbicides and even natural plant compounds. Xenobiotics are metabolised primarily in the liver, but also in the gut and other organs, to derivatives that are more easily eliminated from the body. In some cases, however, a compound is converted to an electrophile that can cause cell toxicity and transformation leading to cancer. Among the most important xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes are the cytochromes P450 (P450s). These enzymes represent a superfamily of multiple forms that exhibit marked species differences in their expression and catalytic activities. To predict how humans will metabolise xenobiotics, including drugs, human liver extracts and recombinant P450s have been used. New humanised mouse models are being developed which will be of great value in the study of drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in vivo, and in carrying out human risk assessment of xenobiotics. Humanised mice expressing CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, two major drug-metabolising P450s, have revealed the feasibility of this approach. PMID:15588489

  3. NADPH–Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase: Roles in Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinxin; Wolf, C. Roland; Porter, Todd D.; Pandey, Amit V.; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Finn, Robert D.; Ronseaux, Sebastien; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zou, Ling; Flück, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and held at the Experimental Biology 2012 meeting in San Diego, California, on April 25, 2012. The symposium speakers summarized and critically evaluated our current understanding of the physiologic, pharmacological, and toxicological roles of NADPH–cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR), a flavoprotein involved in electron transfer to microsomal cytochromes P450 (P450), cytochrome b5, squalene mono-oxygenase, and heme oxygenase. Considerable insight has been derived from the development and characterization of mouse models with conditional Por deletion in particular tissues or partial suppression of POR expression in all tissues. Additional mouse models with global or conditional hepatic deletion of cytochrome b5 are helping to clarify the P450 isoform- and substrate-specific influences of cytochrome b5 on P450 electron transfer and catalytic function. This symposium also considered studies using siRNA to suppress POR expression in a hepatoma cell–culture model to explore the basis of the hepatic lipidosis phenotype observed in mice with conditional deletion of Por in liver. The symposium concluded with a strong translational perspective, relating the basic science of human POR structure and function to the impacts of POR genetic variation on human drug and steroid metabolism. PMID:23086197

  4. High resolution respirometry analysis of polyethylenimine-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis and cellular stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Larsen, Anna Karina; Parhamifar, Ladan

    2013-01-01

    and spectrophotometry analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activity we were able to identify complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) as a likely specific site of PEI mediated inhibition within the electron transport system. Unraveling the mechanisms of PEI-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis is central for combinatorial design...... of PEI-mediated plasma membrane damage and subsequent ATP leakage to the extracellular medium. Studies with freshly isolated mouse liver mitochondria corroborated with bioenergetic findings and demonstrated parallel polycation concentration- and time-dependent changes in state 2 and state 4o oxygen flux...... as well as lowered ADP phosphorylation (state 3) and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Polycation-mediated reduction of electron transport system activity was further demonstrated in 'broken mitochondria' (freeze-thawed mitochondrial preparations). Moreover, by using both high-resolution respirometry...

  5. A new procedure for the purification of monodisperse highly active cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y; Naqui, A; Frey, T G; Chance, B

    1987-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the isolation of a large quantity of cytochrome c oxidase from bovine heart mitochondria was developed, based on selective solubilization of mitochondrial protein with first Triton and then lauryl maltoside. Gel filtration shows that the lauryl maltoside-solubilized oxidase preparation is in a hydrodynamically homogeneous state with a Stokes radius of 7.5 +/- 0.2 nm. It contains 8.0 mumol of haem (with an a/a3 ratio of 1)/g of protein. The catalytic constant (max...

  6. COI (cytochrome oxidase-I) sequence based studies of Carangid fishes from Kakinada coast, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persis, M; Chandra Sekhar Reddy, A; Rao, L M; Khedkar, G D; Ravinder, K; Nasruddin, K

    2009-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA, cytochrome oxidase-1 gene sequences were analyzed for species identification and phylogenetic relationship among the very high food value and commercially important Indian carangid fish species. Sequence analysis of COI gene very clearly indicated that all the 28 fish species fell into five distinct groups, which are genetically distant from each other and exhibited identical phylogenetic reservation. All the COI gene sequences from 28 fishes provide sufficient phylogenetic information and evolutionary relationship to distinguish the carangid species unambiguously. This study proves the utility of mtDNA COI gene sequence based approach in identifying fish species at a faster pace.

  7. Differentiation of Melipona quadrifasciata L. (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini subspecies using cytochrome b PCR-RFLP patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério O. Souza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Melipona quadrifasciata quadrifasciata and M. quadrifasciata anthidioides are subspecies of M. quadrifasciata, a stingless bee species common in coastal Brazil. These subspecies are discriminated by the yellow stripe pattern of the abdominal tergites. We found Vsp I restriction patterns in the cytochrome b region closely associated to each subspecies in 155 M. quadrifasciata colonies of different geographical origin. This mitochondrial DNA molecular marker facilitates diagnosis of M. quadrifasciata subspecies matrilines and can be used to establish their natural distribution and identify hybrid colonies.

  8. Prognostic relevance of cytochrome C oxidase in primary glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne E Griguer

    Full Text Available Patients with primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM have one of the lowest overall survival rates among cancer patients, and reliable biomarkers are necessary to predict patient outcome. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO promotes the switch from glycolytic to OXPHOS metabolism, and increased CcO activity in tumors has been associated with tumor progression after chemotherapy failure. Thus, we investigated the relationship between tumor CcO activity and the survival of patients diagnosed with primary GBM. A total of 84 patients with grade IV glioma were evaluated in this retrospective cohort study. Cumulative survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by the log-rank test, and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox regression model. Mitochondrial CcO activity was determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the oxidation of cytochrome c. High CcO activity was detected in a subset of glioma tumors (∼30%, and was an independent prognostic factor for shorter progression-free survival and overall survival [P = 0.0087 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 3.57 for progression-free survival; P<0.001 by the log-rank test, hazard ratio = 10.75 for overall survival]. The median survival time for patients with low tumor CcO activity was 14.3 months, compared with 6.3 months for patients with high tumor CcO activity. High CcO activity occurs in a significant subset of high-grade glioma patients and is an independent predictor of poor outcome. Thus, CcO activity may serve as a useful molecular marker for the categorization and targeted therapy of GBMs.

  9. Lack of mitochondrial MutS homolog 1 in Toxoplasma gondii disrupts maintenance and fidelity of mitochondrial DNA and reveals metabolic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamila Garbuz

    Full Text Available The importance of maintaining the fidelity of the mitochondrial genome is underscored by the presence of various repair pathways within this organelle. Presumably, the repair of mitochondrial DNA would be of particular importance in organisms that possess only a single mitochondrion, like the human pathogens Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Understanding the machinery that maintains mitochondrial DNA in these parasites is of particular relevance, as mitochondrial function is a validated and effective target for anti-parasitic drugs. We previously determined that the Toxoplasma MutS homolog TgMSH1 localizes to the mitochondrion. MutS homologs are key components of the nuclear mismatch repair system in mammalian cells, and both yeast and plants possess MutS homologs that localize to the mitochondria where they regulate DNA stability. Here we show that the lack of TgMSH1 results in accumulation of single nucleotide variations in mitochondrial DNA and a reduction in mitochondrial DNA content. Additionally, parasites lacking TgMSH1 function can survive treatment with the cytochrome b inhibitor atovaquone. While the Tgmsh1 knockout strain has several missense mutations in cytochrome b, none affect amino acids known to be determinants of atovaquone sensitivity and atovaquone is still able to inhibit electron transport in the Tgmsh1 mutants. Furthermore, culture of Tgmsh1 mutant in the presence atovaquone leads to parasites with enhanced atovaquone resistance and complete shutdown of respiration. Thus, parasites lacking TgMSH1 overcome the disruption of mitochondrial DNA by adapting their physiology allowing them to forgo the need for oxidative phosphorylation. Consistent with this idea, the Tgmsh1 mutant is resistant to mitochondrial inhibitors with diverse targets and exhibits reduced ability to grow in the absence of glucose. This work shows TgMSH1 as critical for the maintenance and fidelity of the mitochondrial DNA in Toxoplasma

  10. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jianfei, E-mail: jjf73@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C. [Center for Biologic Imaging, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Greenberger, Joel S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Kagan, Valerian E., E-mail: kagan@pitt.edu [Center for Free Radical and Antioxidant Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh (United States)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  11. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jianfei; Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing; Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. → Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. → Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient ρ 0 cells. → Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H 2 O 2 was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient ρ o HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  12. Nitrate as a probe of cytochrome c surface: crystallographic identification of crucial "hot spots" for protein-protein recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De March, Matteo; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Casini, Angela; Gabbiani, Chiara; Guerri, Annalisa; Messori, Luigi; Geremia, Silvano

    2014-06-01

    The electrostatic surface of cytochrome c and its changes with the iron oxidation state are involved in the docking and undocking processes of this protein to its biological partners in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway. To investigate the subtle mechanisms of formation of productive macromolecular complexes and of their breakage following the electron transfer process, the X-ray structures of horse heart ferri-cytochrome c (trigonal form) and ferro-cytochrome c (monoclinic form) were obtained using nitrate ions both as a crystallizing agent and an anionic probe for mapping the electrostatic surface changes. Both crystal forms contain three protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. In addition, a total of 21.5 and 18 crystallographically independent nitrate ions were identified for the trigonal and monoclinic forms, respectively. By matching all the six crystallographically independent protein molecules, 26 different anion-protein interaction sites were identified on the surfaces of cytochrome c, 10 of which were found in both forms, 8 present only in the oxidized and 8 only in the reduced form. The structural analysis of the electron transfer complexes, based on this new information, suggests a specific exit strategy for cytochrome c after formation of productive protein-protein complexes: a directional sliding mechanism for the electron shuttle on the surface of the redox partner is proposed to take place after the electron transfer process has occurred. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rieske iron-sulfur protein of the cytochrome bc(1) complex: a potential target for fungicide discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Chao; Li, Hui; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-07-23

    The cytochrome bc(1) complex (complex III, cyt bc(1)) is an essential component of cellular respiration. Cyt bc(1) has three core subunits that are required for its catalytic activity: cytochrome b, cytochrome c(1), and the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (ISP). Although most fungicides inhibit this enzyme by binding to the cytochrome b subunit, resistance to these fungicides has developed rapidly due to their widespread application. Resistance is mainly associated with mutations in cytochrome b, the only subunit encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Recently, the flexibility and motion of the ISP and its essential role in electron transfer have received intense attention; this leads us to propose a new classification of cyt bc(1) inhibitors (three types of Q(o) inhibitors) that mobilize, restrict, or fix the rotation of the ISP. Importantly, the strengths of the ISP-inhibitor interactions correlate with inhibitor activity and the development of resistance to Q(o) inhibitors, thereby offering clues for designing novel cyt bc(1) inhibitors with high potency and a low risk of resistance. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Cytochrome b based genetic differentiation of Indian wild pig (Sus scrofa cristatus) and domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) and its use in wildlife forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, Ajit; Hussain, Syed Ainul; Vipin; Singh, Lalji

    2013-06-01

    The Indian wild pig (Sus scrofa cristatus) is a protected species and listed in the Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. The wild pig is often hunted illegally and sold in market as meat warranting punishment under law. To avoid confusion in identification of these two subspecies during wildlife forensic examinations, we describe genetic differentiation of Indian wild and domestic pigs using a molecular technique. Analysis of sequence generated from the partial fragment (421bp) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene exhibited unambiguous (>3%) genetic variation between Indian wild and domestic pigs. We observed nine forensically informative nucleotide sequence (FINS) variations between Indian wild and domestic pigs. The overall genetic variation described in this study is helpful in forensic identification of the biological samples of wild and domestic pigs. It also helped in differentiating the Indian wild pig from other wild pig races. This study indicates that domestic pigs in India are not descendent of the Indian wild pig, however; they are closer to the other wild pig races found in Asia and Europe. Copyright © 2012 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cytochrome b gene reveals panmixia among Japanese Threadfin Bream, Nemipterus japonicus (Bloch, 1791) populations along the coasts of Peninsular Malaysia and provides evidence of a cryptic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hong-Chiun; Ahmad, Abu Talib; Nuruddin, Ahmad Adnan; Mohd Nor, Siti Azizah

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated genetic differentiation among ten presumed Japanese threadfin bream, Nemipterus japonicus populations along the coast of Peninsular Malaysia based on the partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (982 bp). Genetic divergences (Kimura-2 parameter) ranged from 0.5% to 0.8% among nine of the ten populations while these nine populations were 4.4% to 4.6% diverged from the Kuala Besar population located at the Northeast coast. The constructed Neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees based on haplotypes showed the Kuala Besar population forming an isolated cluster. The Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) of the ten populations a priori assigned into four regions, revealed that most of the variation occurred within population with a fairly low but significant level of regional differentiation (FST = 0.07, p 0.05 and FCT = 0.07, p Malaysia were panmictic. However, the Kuala Besar population, although morphologically identical was composed of a genetically discrete taxon from the rest. These findings are important contributions in formulating sustainable fishery management policies for this important fishery in Peninsular Malaysia.

  16. Protective effects of physical exercise on MDMA-induced cognitive and mitochondrial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Ghorban; Pourahmad, Jalal; Mehdizadeh, Hajar; Foroumadi, Alireza; Torkaman-Boutorabi, Anahita; Hassani, Shokoufeh; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Shariatmadari, Reyhaneh; Gholami, Mahdi; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Debate continues about the effect of 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on cognitive and mitochondrial function through the CNS. It has been shown that physical exercise has an important protective effect on cellular damage and death. Therefore, we investigated the effect of physical exercise on MDMA-induced impairments of spatial learning and memory as well as MDMA effects on brain mitochondrial function in rats. Male wistar rats underwent short-term (2 weeks) or long-term (4 weeks) treadmill exercise. After completion of exercise duration, acquisition and retention of spatial memory were evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) test. Rats were intraperitoneally (I.P) injected with MDMA (5, 10, and 15mg/kg) 30min before the first training trial in 4 training days of MWM. Different parameters of brain mitochondrial function were measured including the level of ROS production, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial outermembrane damage, the amount of cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and ADP/ATP ratio. MDMA damaged the spatial learning and memory in a dose-dependent manner. Brain mitochondria isolated from the rats treated with MDMA showed significant increase in ROS formation, collapse of MMP, mitochondrial swelling, and outer membrane damage, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and finally increased ADP/ATP ratio. This study also found that physical exercise significantly decreased the MDMA-induced impairments of spatial learning and memory and also mitochondrial dysfunction. The results indicated that MDMA-induced neurotoxicity leads to brain mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent oxidative stress is followed by cognitive impairments. However, physical exercise could reduce these deleterious effects of MDMA through protective effects on brain mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kgb.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits-NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. © 2013.

  18. Cytochrome c1 exhibits two binding sites for cytochrome c in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2014-10-01

    In plants, channeling of cytochrome c molecules between complexes III and IV has been purported to shuttle electrons within the supercomplexes instead of carrying electrons by random diffusion across the intermembrane bulk phase. However, the mode plant cytochrome c behaves inside a supercomplex such as the respirasome, formed by complexes I, III and IV, remains obscure from a structural point of view. Here, we report ab-initio Brownian dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance-driven docking computations showing two binding sites for plant cytochrome c at the head soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1, namely a non-productive (or distal) site with a long heme-to-heme distance and a functional (or proximal) site with the two heme groups close enough as to allow electron transfer. As inferred from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, the two binding sites exhibit different equilibrium dissociation constants, for both reduced and oxidized species, that are all within the micromolar range, thus revealing the transient nature of such a respiratory complex. Although the docking of cytochrome c at the distal site occurs at the interface between cytochrome c1 and the Rieske subunit, it is fully compatible with the complex III structure. In our model, the extra distal site in complex III could indeed facilitate the functional cytochrome c channeling towards complex IV by building a "floating boat bridge" of cytochrome c molecules (between complexes III and IV) in plant respirasome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cytochrome cbb3 of Thioalkalivibrio is a Na+-pumping cytochrome oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntyan, M.S.; Cherepanov, D.A.; Malinen, A.M.; Bloch, D.A.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Severina, I.I.; Ivashina, T.V.; Lahti, R.; Muyzer, G.; Skulachev, V.P.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (Coxs) are the basic energy transducers in the respiratory chain of the majority of aerobic organisms. Coxs studied to date are redox-driven proton-pumping enzymes belonging to one of three subfamilies: A-, B-, and C-type oxidases. The C-type oxidases (cbb3 cytochromes), which

  20. Defects in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 are linked to apoptotic resistance and autophagy in a lung cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Jean Thomas

    Full Text Available Evasion of apoptosis is implicated in almost all aspects of cancer progression, as well as treatment resistance. In this study, resistance to apoptosis was identified in tumorigenic lung epithelial (A549 cells as a consequence of defects in mitochondrial and autophagic function. Mitochondrial function is determined in part by mitochondrial morphology, a process regulated by mitochondrial dynamics whereby the joining of two mitochondria, fusion, inhibits apoptosis while fission, the division of a mitochondrion, initiates apoptosis. Mitochondrial morphology of A549 cells displayed an elongated phenotype-mimicking cells deficient in mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. A549 cells had impaired Drp1 mitochondrial recruitment and decreased Drp1-dependent fission. Cytochrome c release and caspase-3 and PARP cleavage were impaired both basally and with apoptotic stimuli in A549 cells. Increased mitochondrial mass was observed in A549 cells, suggesting defects in mitophagy (mitochondrial selective autophagy. A549 cells had decreased LC3-II lipidation and lysosomal inhibition suggesting defects in autophagy occur upstream of lysosomal degradation. Immunostaining indicated mitochondrial localized LC3 punctae in A549 cells increased after mitochondrial uncoupling or with a combination of mitochondrial depolarization and ectopic Drp1 expression. Increased inhibition of apoptosis in A549 cells is correlated with impeded mitochondrial fission and mitophagy. We suggest mitochondrial fission defects contribute to apoptotic resistance in A549 cells.

  1. Spatial genetic structure and mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Argentinean populations of the grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rosetti

    Full Text Available Many grasshopper species are considered of agronomical importance because they cause damage to pastures and crops. Comprehension of pest population dynamics requires a clear understanding of the genetic diversity and spatial structure of populations. In this study we report on patterns of genetic variation in the South American grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus which is an agricultural pest of crops and forage grasses of great economic significance in Argentina. We use Direct Amplification of Minisatellite Regions (DAMD and partial sequences of the cytochrome oxydase 1 (COI mitochondrial gene to investigate intraspecific structure, demographic history and gene flow patterns in twenty Argentinean populations of this species belonging to different geographic and biogeographic regions. DAMD data suggest that, although genetic drift and migration occur within and between populations, measurable relatedness among neighbouring populations declines with distance and dispersal over distances greater than 200 km is not typical, whereas effective gene flow may occur for populations separated by less than 100 km. Landscape analysis was useful to detect genetic discontinuities associated with environmental heterogeneity reflecting the changing agroecosystem. The COI results indicate the existence of strong genetic differentiation between two groups of populations located at both margins of the Paraná River which became separated during climate oscillations of the Middle Pleistocene, suggesting a significant restriction in effective dispersion mediated by females and large scale geographic differentiation. The number of migrants between populations estimated through mitochondrial and DAMD markers suggest that gene flow is low prompting a non-homogeneous spatial structure and justifying the variation through space. Moreover, the genetic analysis of both markers allows us to conclude that males appear to disperse more than females, reducing the chance of the

  2. Mitochondrial Alterations in Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Delbarba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, evidences of mitochondrial defects in AD peripheral cells are still inconclusive. Here, some mitochondrial-encoded and nuclear-encoded proteins, involved in maintaining the correct mitochondria machine, were investigated in terms of protein expression and enzymatic activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs isolated from AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI patients and healthy subjects. In addition mitochondrial DNA copy number was measured by real time PCR. We found some differences and some similarities between AD and MCI patients when compared with healthy subjects. For example, cytochrome C and cytochrome B were decreased in AD, while MCI showed only a statistical reduction of cytochrome C. On the other hand, both AD and MCI blood cells exhibited highly nitrated MnSOD, index of a prooxidant environment inside the mitochondria. TFAM, a regulator of mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, was decreased in both AD and MCI patients’ blood cells. Moreover also the mitochondrial DNA amount was reduced in PBMCs from both patient groups. In conclusion these data confirmed peripheral mitochondria impairment in AD and demonstrated that TFAM and mtDNA amount reduction could be two features of early events occurring in AD pathogenesis.

  3. Molecular phylogeny of the lionfish genera Dendrochirus and Pterois (Scorpaenidae, Pteroinae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochzius, Marc; Söller, Rainer; Khalaf, Maroof A; Blohm, Dietmar

    2003-09-01

    This study investigates the molecular phylogeny of seven lionfishes of the genera Dendrochirus and Pterois. MP, ML, and NJ phylogenetic analysis based on 964 bp of partial mitochondrial DNA sequences (cytochrome b and 16S rDNA) revealed two main clades: (1) "Pterois" clade (Pterois miles and Pterois volitans), and (2) "Pteropterus-Dendrochirus" clade (remainder of the sampled species). The position of Dendrochirus brachypterus either basal to the main clades or in the "Pteropterus-Dendrochirus" clade cannot be resolved. However, the molecular phylogeny did not support the current separation of the genera Pterois and Dendrochirus. The siblings P. miles and P. volitans are clearly separated and our results support the proposed allopatric or parapatric distribution in the Indian and Pacific Ocean. However, the present analysis cannot reveal if P. miles and P. volitans are separate species or two populations of a single species, because the observed separation in different clades can be either explained by speciation or lineage sorting. Molecular clock estimates for the siblings P. miles and P. volitans suggest a divergence time of 2.4-8.3 mya, which coincide with geological events that created vicariance between populations of the Indian and Pacific Ocean.

  4. Changes in mitochondrial electron transport chain activity during insect metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, M E

    2007-02-01

    The midgut of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) is a highly aerobic tissue that is destroyed by programmed cell death during larval-pupal metamorphosis. The death of the epithelium begins after commitment to pupation, and the oxygen consumption of isolated midgut mitochondria decreases soon after commitment. To assess the role of the electron transport chain in this decline in mitochondrial function, the maximal activities of complexes I-IV of the respiratory chain were measured in isolated midgut mitochondria. Whereas there were no developmental changes in the activity of complex I or III, activities of complexes II and IV [cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] were higher in mitochondria from precommitment than postcommitment larvae. This finding is consistent with a higher rate of succinate oxidation in mitochondria isolated from precommitment larvae and reveals that the metamorphic decline in mitochondrial respiration is due to the targeted destruction or inactivation of specific sites within the mitochondria, rather than the indiscriminate destruction of the organelles. The COX turnover number (e- x s(-1) x cytochrome aa3(-1)) was greater for the enzyme from precommitment than postcommitment larvae, indicating a change in the enzyme structure and/or its lipid environment during the early stages of metamorphosis. The turnover number of COX in the intact mitochondria (in organello COX) was also lower in postcommitment larvae. In addition to changes in the protein or membrane phospholipids, the metamorphic decline in this rate constant may be a result of the observed loss of endogenous cytochrome c.

  5. Prevalence and genotypic characterization of bovine Echinococcus granulosus isolates by using cytochrome oxidase 1 (Co1) gene in Hyderabad, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan, Muhammad; Akhter, Nasreen; Bhutto, Bachal; Arijo, Abdullah; Ali Gadahi, Javaid

    2017-05-30

    Cystic echinococcosis is an important zoonotic disease; it has serious impacts on animals as well as human health throughout the world. Genotypic characterization of Echinocossus granulosus (E. granulosus) in buffaloes has not been addressed in Pakistan. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate the incidence and genotypic characterization of bovine E. granulosus. Out of 832 buffaloes examined, 112 (13.46%) were found infected. The favorable site for hydatid cyst development was liver (8.65%) followed by lungs (4.80%). The rate of cystic echinococcosis was found higher in females 14.43% than males 9.77%. The females above seven years aged were more infected as compared to the young ones. The partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) gene was used for identification and molecular analysis of buffalo's E. granulosus isolates. The alignment of redundant sequences were compared with already identified 10 genotypes available at National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) GenBank. The sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of all randomly selected buffalo isolates were belong to the G1- G3 complex (E. granulosus sensu stricto). All sequences were diverse from the reference sequence. No one showed complete identity to the buffalo strain (G3), representing substantial microsequence variability in G1, G2 and G3 genotypes. We evaluated the echinococcal infectivity and first time identification of genotypes in buffaloes in Sindh, Pakistan. This study will lead to determine accurate source of this zoonotic disease to humans in Pakistan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Partial Cancellation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Partial Cancellation. Full Cancellation is desirable. But complexity requirements are enormous. 4000 tones, 100 Users billions of flops !!! Main Idea: Challenge: To determine which cross-talker to cancel on what “tone” for a given victim. Constraint: Total complexity is ...

  7. Lycopene Prevents Amyloid [Beta]-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunctions in Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingyue; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Yuanxiang; Song, Zhenyao; Nan, Xinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a large spectrum of mitochondrial alterations at both morphological and genetic level. The causal link between β-amyloid (Aβ) and mitochondrial dysfunction has been established in cellular models of AD. We observed previously that lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family of phytochemicals, could counteract neuronal apoptosis and cell damage induced by Aβ and other neurotoxic substances, and that this neuroprotective action somehow involved the mitochondria. The present study aims to investigate the effects of lycopene on mitochondria in cultured rat cortical neurons exposed to Aβ. It was found that lycopene attenuated Aβ-induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by the decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondria-derived superoxide production. Additionally, lycopene ameliorated Aβ-induced mitochondrial morphological alteration, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pores and the consequent cytochrome c release. Lycopene also improved mitochondrial complex activities and restored ATP levels in Aβ-treated neuron. Furthermore, lycopene prevented mitochondrial DNA damages and improved the protein level of mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria. Those results indicate that lycopene protects mitochondria against Aβ-induced damages, at least in part by inhibiting mitochondrial oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial function. These beneficial effects of lycopene may account for its protection against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Morphofunctional and Biochemical Approaches for Studying Mitochondrial Changes during Myoblasts Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Barbieri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes mitochondrial behaviour during the C2C12 myoblast differentiation program and proposes a proteomic approach to mitochondria integrated with classical morphofunctional and biochemical analyses. Mitochondrial ultrastructure variations were determined by transmission electron microscopy; mitochondrial mass and membrane potential were analysed by Mitotracker Green and JC-1 stains and by epifluorescence microscope. Expression of PGC1 , NRF1 , and Tfam genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis was studied by real-time PCR. The mitochondrial functionality was tested by cytochrome c oxidase activity and COXII expression. Mitochondrial proteomic profile was also performed. These assays showed that mitochondrial biogenesis and activity significantly increase in differentiating myotubes. The proteomic profile identifies 32 differentially expressed proteins, mostly involved in oxidative metabolism, typical of myotubes formation. Other notable proteins, such as superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, a cell protection molecule, and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein (VDAC1 involved in the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, were found to be regulated by the myogenic process. The integration of these approaches represents a helpful tool for studying mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis, and functionality in comparative surveys on mitochondrial pathogenic or senescent satellite cells.

  9. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a λgt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  10. Modulation of mitochondrial morphology by bioenergetics defects in primary human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillery, O.; Malka, F.; Frachon, P.

    2008-01-01

    induced partial but significant mitochondrial fragmentation, whereas dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (D Psi m) provoked complete fragmentation, and glycolysis inhibition had no effect. Oxidative phosphorylation defective fibroblasts had essentially normal filamentous mitochondria under...... basal conditions, although when challenged some of them presented with mild alteration of fission or fusion efficacy. Severely defective cells disclosed complete mitochondrial fragmentation under glycolysis inhibition. In conclusion, mitochondrial morphology is modulated by D Psi m but loosely linked...... to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Its alteration by glycolysis, inhibition points to a severe oxidative phosphorylation defect. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  11. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1’s heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  12. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-09

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification.

  13. Versatility of non-native forms of human cytochrome c: pH and micellar concentration dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthieu; Metzinger-Le Meuth, Valérie; Chevance, Soizic; Delalande, Olivier; Bondon, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its electron transfer activity, cytochrome c is now known to trigger apoptosis via peroxidase activity. This new function is related to a structural modification of the cytochrome upon association with anionic lipids, particularly cardiolipin present in the mitochondrial membrane. However, the exact nature of the non-native state induced by this interaction remains an active subject of debate. In this work, using human cytochromes c (native and two single-histidine mutants and the corresponding double mutant) and micelles as a hydrophobic medium, we succeeded, through UV-visible spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy, in fully characterizing the nature of the sixth ligand replacing the native methionine. Furthermore, careful pH titrations permitted the identification of the amino acids involved in the iron binding over a range of pH values. Replacement of the methionine by lysine was only observed at pH above 8.5, whereas histidine binding is dependent on both pH and micelle concentration. The pH variation range for histidine protonation is relatively narrow and is consistent with the mitochondrial intermembrane pH changes occurring during apoptosis. These results allow us to rule out lysine as the sixth ligand at pH values close to neutrality and reinforce the role of histidines (preferentially His33 vs. His26) as the main candidate to replace methionine in the non-native cytochrome c. Finally, on the basis of these results and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a 3D model for non-native cytochrome c in a micellar environment.

  14. Mitochondrial ceramide-rich macrodomains functionalize Bax upon irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunmi Lee

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that Bax functions as a "lipidic" pore to regulate mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP, the apoptosis commitment step, through unknown membrane elements. Here we show mitochondrial ceramide elevation facilitates MOMP-mediated cytochrome c release in HeLa cells by generating a previously-unrecognized mitochondrial ceramide-rich macrodomain (MCRM, which we visualize and isolate, into which Bax integrates.MCRMs, virtually non-existent in resting cells, form upon irradiation coupled to ceramide synthase-mediated ceramide elevation, optimizing Bax insertion/oligomerization and MOMP. MCRMs are detected by confocal microscopy in intact HeLa cells and isolated biophysically as a light membrane fraction from HeLa cell lysates. Inhibiting ceramide generation using a well-defined natural ceramide synthase inhibitor, Fumonisin B1, prevented radiation-induced Bax insertion, oligomerization and MOMP. MCRM deconstruction using purified mouse hepatic mitochondria revealed ceramide alone is non-apoptogenic. Rather Bax integrates into MCRMs, oligomerizing therein, conferring 1-2 log enhanced cytochrome c release. Consistent with this mechanism, MCRM Bax isolates as high molecular weight "pore-forming" oligomers, while non-MCRM membrane contains exclusively MOMP-incompatible monomeric Bax.Our recent studies in the C. elegans germline indicate that mitochondrial ceramide generation is obligate for radiation-induced apoptosis, although a mechanism for ceramide action was not delineated. Here we demonstrate that ceramide, generated in the mitochondrial outer membrane of mammalian cells upon irradiation, forms a platform into which Bax inserts, oligomerizes and functionalizes as a pore. We posit conceptualization of ceramide as a membrane-based stress calibrator, driving membrane macrodomain organization, which in mitochondria regulates intensity of Bax-induced MOMP, and is pharmacologically tractable in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G.; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems – at least partially – in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. -- Highlights: •Mitochondrial matrix contains ubiquitinated proteins. •Ubiquitination occurs most probably in the matrix. •Dma1p is a ubiquitin ligase present in mitochondrial preparations.

  16. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Gilad [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ziv, Tamar [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Braten, Ori [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Admon, Arie [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Udasin, Ronald G. [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ciechanover, Aaron, E-mail: aaroncie@tx.technion.ac.il [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel)

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems – at least partially – in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. -- Highlights: •Mitochondrial matrix contains ubiquitinated proteins. •Ubiquitination occurs most probably in the matrix. •Dma1p is a ubiquitin ligase present in mitochondrial preparations.

  17. Partial processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This discussion paper considers the possibility of applying to the recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors a particular method of partial processing based on the PUREX process but named CIVEX to emphasise the differences. The CIVEX process is based primarily on the retention of short-lived fission products. The paper suggests: (1) the recycle of fission products with uranium and plutonium in thermal reactor fuel would be technically feasible; (2) it would, however, take ten years or more to develop the CIVEX process to the point where it could be launched on a commercial scale; (3) since the majority of spent fuel to be reprocessed this century will have been in storage for ten years or more, the recycling of short-lived fission products with the U-Pu would not provide an effective means of making refabrication fuel ''inaccessible'' because the radioactivity associated with the fission products would have decayed. There would therefore be no advantage in partial processing

  18. Partial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.М. Karimova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A girl with partial gigantism (the increased I and II fingers of the left foot is being examined. This condition is a rare and unresolved problem, as the definite reason of its development is not determined. Wait-and-see strategy is recommended, as well as correcting operations after closing of growth zones, and forming of data pool for generalization and development of schemes of drug and radial therapeutic methods.

  19. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a...

  20. Cox1 mutation abrogates need for Cox23 in cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Dela Cruz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cox23 is a known conserved assembly factor for cytochrome c oxidase, although its role in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO biogenesis remains unresolved. To gain additional insights into its role, we isolated spontaneous suppressors of the respiratory growth defect in cox23∆ yeast cells. We recovered independent colonies that propagated on glycerol/lactate medium for cox23∆ cells at 37°C. We mapped these mutations to the mitochondrial genome and specifically to COX1 yielding an I101F substitution. The I101F Cox1 allele is a gain-of-function mutation enabling yeast to respire in the absence of Cox23. CcO subunit steady-state levels were restored with the I101F Cox1 suppressor mutation and oxygen consumption and CcO activity were likewise restored. Cells harboring the mitochondrial genome encoding I101F Cox1 were used to delete genes for other CcO assembly factors to test the specificity of the Cox1 mutation as a suppressor of cox23∆ cells. The Cox1 mutant allele fails to support respiratory growth in yeast lacking Cox17, Cox19, Coa1, Coa2, Cox14 or Shy1, demonstrating its specific suppressor activity for cox23∆ cells.

  1. Mutation in mitochondrial complex IV subunit COX5A causes pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia, and failure to thrive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baertling, F.; Al-Murshedi, F.; Sanchez Caballero, L.M.; Al-Senaidi, K.; Joshi, N.P.; Venselaar, H.; Brand, M.A.M. van den; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2017-01-01

    COX5A is a nuclear-encoded subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase). We present patients with a homozygous pathogenic variant in the COX5A gene. Clinical details of two affected siblings suffering from early-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension, lactic acidemia,

  2. Taxonomic relationships among Phenacomys voles as inferred by cytochrome b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, M.R.; Haig, S.M.; Forsman, E.D.; Mullins, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Taxonomic relationships among red tree voles (Phenacomys longicaudus longicaudus, P. l. silvicola), the Sonoma tree vole (P. pomo), the white-footed vole (P. albipes), and the heather vole (P. intermedius) were examined using 664 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Results indicate specific differences among red tree voles, Sonoma tree voles, white-footed voles, and heather voles, but no clear difference between the 2 Oregon subspecies of red tree voles (P. l. longicaudus and P. l. silvicola). Our data further indicated a close relationship between tree voles and albipes, validating inclusion of albipes in the subgenus Arborimus. These 3 congeners shared a closer relationship to P. intermedius than to other arvicolids. A moderate association between porno and albipes was indicated by maximum parsimony and neighbor-joining phylogenetic analyses. Molecular clock estimates suggest a Pleistocene radiation of the Arborimus clade, which is concordant with pulses of diversification observed in other murid rodents. The generic rank of Arborimus is subject to interpretation of data.

  3. A Mitochondrial Genome of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) and a Comparative Analysis of Related Mitochondrial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Yang, Jie; Li, Yinwan; Cui, Ying; Xie, Qiang; Bu, Wenjun; Hillis, David M

    2016-10-19

    The Rhyparochromidae, the largest family of Lygaeoidea, encompasses more than 1,850 described species, but no mitochondrial genome has been sequenced to date. Here we describe the first mitochondrial genome for Rhyparochromidae: a complete mitochondrial genome of Panaorus albomaculatus (Scott, 1874). This mitochondrial genome is comprised of 16,345 bp, and contains the expected 37 genes and control region. The majority of the control region is made up of a large tandem-repeat region, which has a novel pattern not previously observed in other insects. The tandem-repeats region of P. albomaculatus consists of 53 tandem duplications (including one partial repeat), which is the largest number of tandem repeats among all the known insect mitochondrial genomes. Slipped-strand mispairing during replication is likely to have generated this novel pattern of tandem repeats. Comparative analysis of tRNA gene families in sequenced Pentatomomorpha and Lygaeoidea species shows that the pattern of nucleotide conservation is markedly higher on the J-strand. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on mitochondrial genomes suggests that Rhyparochromidae is not the sister group to all the remaining Lygaeoidea, and supports the monophyly of Lygaeoidea.

  4. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel

    2015-02-06

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel; Michá lek, Jan; Janouškovec, Jan; Lai, De Hua; Jirků, Milan; Hajdušková , Eva; Tomčala, Aleš; Otto, Thomas D.; Keeling, Patrick J.; Pain, Arnab; Oborní k, Miroslav; Lukeš, J.

    2015-01-01

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Characterization of Mitochondrial Injury after Cardiac Arrest (COMICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W.; Liu, Xiaowen; Andersen, Lars W.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Abella, Benjamin S.; Gaieski, David F.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Gazmuri, Raúl J.; Grossestreur, Anne V.; Cocchi, Michaen N.; Abbate, Antonio; Uber, Amy; Clore, John; Peberdy, Mary Anne; Callaway, Clifton

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mitochondrial injury post-cardiac arrest has been described in pre-clinical settings but the extent to which this injury occurs in humans remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased levels of mitochondrial biomarkers would be associated with mortality and neurological morbidity in post-cardiac arrest subjects. Methods We performed a prospective multicenter study of post-cardiac arrest subjects. Inclusion criteria were comatose adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mitochondrial biomarkers were measured at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after return of spontaneous circulation as well as in healthy controls. Results Out of 111 subjects enrolled, 102 had evaluable samples at 0 hours. Cardiac arrest subjects had higher baseline cytochrome c levels compared to controls (2.18 ng/mL [0.74, 7.74] vs. 0.16 ng/mL [0.03, 0.91], p<0.001), and subjects who died had higher 0 hours cytochrome c levels compared to survivors (3.66 ng/mL [1.40, 14.9] vs. 1.27 ng/mL [0.16, 2.37], p<0.001). There were significantly higher RNAase P (3.3 [1.2, 5.7] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.2], p<0.001) and B2M (12.0 [1.0, 22.9], vs. 0.6 [0.6, 1.3], p<0.001) levels in cardiac arrest subjects at baseline compared to the control subjects. There were no differences between survivors and non-survivors for mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA. Conclusions Cytochrome C was increased in post-cardiac arrest subjects compared to controls, and in post-cardiac arrest non-survivors compared to survivors. Nuclear DNA and cell free DNA was increased in plasma of post-cardiac arrest subjects. There were no differences in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA between survivors and non-survivors. Mitochondrial injury markers showed mixed results in post-arrest period. Future research needs to investigate these differences. PMID:28126408

  7. Characterization of mitochondrial injury after cardiac arrest (COMICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Liu, Xiaowen; Andersen, Lars W; Rittenberger, Jon C; Abella, Benjamin S; Gaieski, David F; Ornato, Joseph P; Gazmuri, Raúl J; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Cocchi, Michael N; Abbate, Antonio; Uber, Amy; Clore, John; Peberdy, Mary Anne; Callaway, Clifton W

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial injury post-cardiac arrest has been described in pre-clinical settings but the extent to which this injury occurs in humans remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that increased levels of mitochondrial biomarkers would be associated with mortality and neurological morbidity in post-cardiac arrest subjects. We performed a prospective multicenter study of post-cardiac arrest subjects. Inclusion criteria were comatose adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Mitochondrial biomarkers were measured at 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48h after return of spontaneous circulation as well as in healthy controls. Out of 111 subjects enrolled, 102 had evaluable samples at 0h. Cardiac arrest subjects had higher baseline cytochrome c levels compared to controls (2.18ng/mL [0.74, 7.74] vs. 0.16ng/mL [0.03, 0.91], p<0.001), and subjects who died had higher 0h cytochrome c levels compared to survivors (3.66ng/mL [1.40, 14.9] vs. 1.27ng/mL [0.16, 2.37], p<0.001). There were significantly higher Ribonuclease P (RNaseP) (3.3 [1.2, 5.7] vs. 1.2 [0.8, 1.2], p<0.001) and Beta-2microglobulin (B2M) (12.0 [1.0, 22.9], vs. 0.6 [0.6, 1.3], p<0.001) levels in cardiac arrest subjects at baseline compared to the control subjects. There were no differences between survivors and non-survivors for mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA. Cytochrome c was increased in post- cardiac arrest subjects compared to controls, and in post-cardiac arrest non-survivors compared to survivors. Nuclear DNA and cell free DNA was increased in plasma of post-cardiac arrest subjects. There were no differences in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA, or cell free DNA between survivors and non-survivors. Mitochondrial injury markers showed mixed results in the post-cardiac arrest period. Future research needs to investigate these differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J.L. [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Bal, Amanjit [Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Gill, Kiran Dip, E-mail: kdgill2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10 mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits–NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: • Aluminium decreases the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and nuclear encoded

  9. Mitochondrial shaping cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Henriques, Mafalda; Langer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A broad range of cellular processes are regulated by proteolytic events. Proteolysis has now also been established to control mitochondrial morphology which results from the balanced action of fusion and fission. Two out of three known core components of the mitochondrial fusion machinery are under proteolytic control. The GTPase Fzo1 in the outer membrane of mitochondria is degraded along two independent proteolytic pathways. One controls mitochondrial fusion in vegetatively growing cells, the other one acts upon mating factor-induced cell cycle arrest. Fusion also depends on proteolytic processing of the GTPase Mgm1 by the rhomboid protease Pcp1 in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Functional links of AAA proteases or other proteolytic components to mitochondrial dynamics are just emerging. This review summarises the current understanding of regulatory roles of proteolytic processes for mitochondrial plasticity.

  10. Mechanistic perspective of mitochondrial fusion: tubulation vs. fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Henriques, Mafalda; Anton, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is a fundamental process driven by dynamin related GTPase proteins (DRPs), in contrast to the general SNARE-dependence of most cellular fusion events. The DRPs Mfn1/Mfn2/Fzo1 and OPA1/Mgm1 are the key effectors for fusion of the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes, respectively. In order to promote fusion, these two DRPs require post-translational modifications and proteolysis. OPA1/Mgm1 undergoes partial proteolytic processing, which results in a combination between short and long isoforms. In turn, ubiquitylation of mitofusins, after oligomerization and GTP hydrolysis, promotes and positively regulates mitochondrial fusion. In contrast, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, negative regulation by proteolysis on these DRPs results in mitochondrial fragmentation. This occurs by complete processing of OPA1 and via ubiquitylation and degradation of mitofusins. Mitochondrial fragmentation contributes to the elimination of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy, and may play a protective role against Parkinson's disease. Moreover, a link of Mfn2 to Alzheimer's disease is emerging and mutations in Mfn2 or OPA1 cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A neuropathy or autosomal-dominant optic atrophy. Here, we summarize our current understanding on the molecular mechanisms promoting or inhibiting fusion of mitochondrial membranes, which is essential for cellular survival and disease control. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial dynamics and physiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The mitochondrial death squad: hardened killers or innocent bystanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, Paul G; Vaux, David L

    2005-12-01

    Since the discovery that formation of the apoptosome in mammalian cells is triggered by cytochrome c released from the mitochondria, many other mitochondrial proteins have been suspected to be part of a conspiracy to cause cell death. AIF, EndoG, ANT, cyclophilin D, Bit1, p53AIP, GRIM-19, DAP3, Nur77/TR3/NGFB-1, HtrA2/Omi and Smac/Diablo have all been convicted as killers, but new genetic technology is raising questions about their guilt. Gene knockout experiments suggest that many were wrongly convicted on circumstantial evidence, and just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

  12. Patients with sepsis exhibit increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity in peripheral blood immune cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Persson, Johan Mikael

    2013-01-01

    to 7). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), cytochrome c (Cyt c), and citrate synthase (CS) were measured as indicators of cellular mitochondrial content. RESULTS: In intact PBICs with endogenous substrates, a gradual increase in cellular respiration reached 173% of controls after 1 week (P = 0......INTRODUCTION: In sepsis, mitochondria have been associated with both initial dysfunction and subsequent upregulation (biogenesis). However, the evolvement of mitochondrial function in sepsis over time is largely unknown, and we therefore investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood.......001). In permeabilized cells, respiration using substrates of complex I, II, and IV were significantly increased days 1 to 2, reaching 137%, 130%, and 173% of controls, respectively. In parallel, higher levels of CS activity, mtDNA, and Cyt c content in PBICs (211%, 243%, and 331% of controls for the respective...

  13. Destabilization of the Outer and Inner Mitochondrial Membranes by Core and Linker Histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Conclusions We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage. PMID:22523586

  14. Lowered iPLA2γ activity causes increased mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction in a rotenone-induced model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Honglu; Liu, Yinlong; Fu, Xian; Xu, Xiupeng; Bao, Zhongyuan; Lin, Chao; Li, Zheng; Liu, Yan; Wang, Xiaoming; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Ji, Jing

    2018-02-01

    iPLA 2 γ, calcium-independent phospholipase A 2 γ, discerningly hydrolyses glycerophospholipids to liberate free fatty acids. iPLA 2 γ-deficiency has been associated with abnormal mitochondrial function. More importantly, the iPLA 2 family is causative proteins in mitochondrial neurodegenerative disorders such as parkinsonian disorders. However, the mechanisms by which iPLA 2 γ affects Parkinson's disease (PD) remain unknown. Mitochondrion stress has a key part in rotenone-induced dopaminergic neuronal degeneration. The present evaluation revealed that lowered iPLA 2 γ function provokes the parkinsonian phenotype and leads to the reduction of dopamine and its metabolites, lowered survival, locomotor deficiencies, and organismal hypersensitivity to rotenone-induced oxidative stress. In addition, lowered iPLA 2 γ function escalated the amount of mitochondrial irregularities, including mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) regeneration, reduced ATP synthesis, reduced glutathione levels, and abnormal mitochondrial morphology. Further, lowered iPLA 2 γ function was tightly linked with strengthened lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane flaws following rotenone treatment, which can cause cytochrome c release and eventually apoptosis. These results confirmed the important role of iPLA 2 γ, whereby decreasing iPLA 2 γ activity aggravates mitochondrial degeneration to induce neurodegenerative disorders in a rotenone rat model of Parkinson's disease. These findings may be useful in the design of rational approaches for the prevention and treatment of PD-associated symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Steroid hydroxylations: A paradigm for cytochrome P450 catalyzed mammalian monooxygenation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, Ronald W.

    2005-01-01

    The present article reviews the history of research on the hydroxylation of steroid hormones as catalyzed by enzymes present in mammalian tissues. The report describes how studies of steroid hormone synthesis have played a central role in the discovery of the monooxygenase functions of the cytochrome P450s. Studies of steroid hydroxylation reactions can be credited with showing that: (a) the adrenal mitochondrial enzyme catalyzing the 11β-hydroxylation of deoxycorticosterone was the first mammalian enzyme shown by O 18 studies to be an oxygenase; (b) the adrenal microsomal enzyme catalyzing the 21-hydroxylation of steroids was the first mammalian enzyme to show experimentally the proposed 1:1:1 stoichiometry (substrate:oxygen:reduced pyridine nucleotide) of a monooxygenase reaction; (c) application of the photochemical action spectrum technique for reversal of carbon monoxide inhibition of the 21-hydroxylation of 17α-OH progesterone was the first demonstration that cytochrome P450 was an oxygenase; (d) spectrophotometric studies of the binding of 17α-OH progesterone to bovine adrenal microsomal P450 revealed the first step in the cyclic reaction scheme of P450, as it catalyzes the 'activation' of oxygen in a monooxygenase reaction; (e) purified adrenodoxin was shown to function as an electron transport component of the adrenal mitochondrial monooxygenase system required for the activity of the 11β-hydroxylase reaction. Adrenodoxin was the first iron-sulfur protein isolated and purified from mammalian tissues and the first soluble protein identified as a reductase of a P450; (f) fractionation of adrenal mitochondrial P450 and incubation with adrenodoxin and a cytosolic (flavoprotein) fraction were the first demonstration of the reconstitution of a mammalian P450 monooxygenase reaction

  16. Characterization of the cytochrome c oxidase in isolated and purified plasma membranes from the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschek, G.A.; Wastyn, M.; Trnka, M.; Molitor, V.; Fry, I.V.; Packer, L.

    1989-01-01

    Functionally intact plasma membranes were isolated from the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Anacystis nidulans through French pressure cell extrusion of lysozyme/EDTA-treated cells, separated from thylakoid membranes by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and purified by repeated recentrifugation. Origin and identity of the chlorophyll-free plasma membrane fraction were confirmed by labeling of intact cells with impermeant protein markers, [ 35 S]diazobenzenesulfonate and fluorescamine, prior to membrane isolation. Rates of oxidation of reduced horse heart cytochrome c by purified plasma and thylakoid membranes were 90 and 2 nmol min -1 (mg of protein) -1 , respectively. The cytochrome oxidase in isolated plasma membranes was identified as a copper-containing aa 3 -type enzyme from the properties of its redox-active and EDTA-resistant Cu 2+ ESR signal, the characteristic inhibition profile, reduced minus oxidized difference spectra, carbon monoxide difference spectra, photoaction and photodissociation spectra of the CO-inhibited enzyme, and immunological cross-reaction of two subunits of the enzyme with antibodies against subunits I and II, and the holoenzyme, of Paracoccus denitrificans aa 3 -type cytochrome oxidase. The data presented are the first comprehensive evidence for the occurrence of aa 3 -type cytochrome oxidase in the plasma membrane of a cyanobacterium similar to the corresponding mitochondrial enzyme

  17. The cytochrome b p.278Y>C mutation causative of a multisystem disorder enhances superoxide production and alters supramolecular interactions of respiratory chain complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelli, Anna; Tropeano, Concetta V; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    , the examination of respiratory supercomplexes revealed that the amounts of CIII dimer and III2IV1 were reduced, whereas those of I1III2IVn slightly increased. We therefore suggest that the deleterious effects of p.278Y>C mutation on cytochrome b are palliated when CIII is assembled into the supercomplexes I1III2......IVn, in contrast to when it is found alone. These findings underline the importance of supramolecular interactions between complexes for maintaining a basal respiratory chain activity and shed light to the molecular basis of disease manifestations associated with this mutation.......Cytochrome b is the only mtDNA-encoded subunit of the mitochondrial complex III (CIII), the functional bottleneck of the respiratory chain. Previously, the human cytochrome b missense mutation m.15579A>G, which substitutes the Tyr 278 with Cys (p.278Y>C), was identified in a patient with severe...

  18. Targeted impairment of thymidine kinase 2 expression in cells induces mitochondrial DNA depletion and reveals molecular mechanisms of compensation of mitochondrial respiratory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarroya, Joan; Lara, Mari-Carmen; Dorado, Beatriz; Garrido, Marta; Garcia-Arumi, Elena; Meseguer, Anna; Hirano, Michio; Vila, Maya R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1 - cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2 - ). → TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. → Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2 - cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. → Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. → Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol γ, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2 - cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed the first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1 - cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase γ, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory activity despite profound depletion in mtDNA levels.

  19. Clinical case of Mitochondrial DNA Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Degtyareva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reports clinical case of early neonatal manifestation of a rare genetic disease – mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, confirmed in laboratory in Russia. Mutations of FBXL4, which encodes an orphan mitochondrial F-box protein, involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, ultimately leading to disruption of mtDNA replication and decreased activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. It’s a reason of abnormalities in clinically affected tissues, most of all the muscular system and the brain. In our case hydronephrosis on the right, subependimal cysts of the brain, partial intestinal obstruction accompanied by polyhydramnios were diagnosed antenatal. Baby’s condition at birth was satisfactory and worsened dramatically towards the end of the first day of life. Clinical presentation includes sepsis-like symptom complex, neonatal depression, muscular hypotonia, persistent decompensated lactic acidosis, increase in the concentration of mitochondrial markers in blood plasma and urine, and changes in the basal ganglia of the brain. Imaging of the brain by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated global volume loss particularly the subcortical and periventricular white matter with significant abnormal signal in bilateral basal ganglia and brainstem with associated delayed myelination. Differential diagnosis was carried out with hereditary diseases that occur as a «sepsis-like» symptom complex, accompanied by lactic acidosis: a group of metabolic disorders of amino acids, organic acids, β-oxidation defects of fatty acids, respiratory mitochondrial chain disorders and glycogen storage disease. The diagnosis was confirmed after sequencing analysis of 62 mytochondrial genes by NGS (Next Generation Sequencing. Reported disease has an unfavorable prognosis, however, accurate diagnosis is very important for genetic counseling and helps prevent the re-birth of a sick child in the family.

  20. Cytokine and nitric oxide levels in patients with sepsis--temporal evolvement and relation to platelet mitochondrial respiratory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander

    2014-01-01

    the correlation between observed changes in platelet mitochondrial respiration and a set of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as NO plasma levels in patients with sepsis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Platelet mitochondrial respiration and levels of TNFα, MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), INFγ (interferon......-γ), IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-17 and NO were analyzed in 38 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock at three time points during one week following admission to the ICU. Citrate synthase, mitochondrial DNA and cytochrome c were measured as markers of cellular mitochondrial content....... All mitochondrial respiratory states increased over the week analyzed (prespiration on day 6-7 (p = 0.02, r2 = 0.22) and was also higher in non-survivors compared to survivors on day 3-4 and day 6-7 (p = 0.03 respectively). Neither NO nor any...

  1. Two weeks of metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of AMPK kinase dead but not wild type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jonas Møller; Larsen, Steen; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2013-01-01

    signaling. We investigated this by two weeks of oral metformin treatment of muscle specific kinase dead a(2) (KD) AMPK mice and wild type (WT) littermates. We measured mitochondrial respiration and protein activity and expressions of key enzymes involved in mitochondrial carbohydrate and fat metabolism...... and oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial respiration, HAD and CS activity, PDH and complex I-V and cytochrome c protein expression were all reduced in AMPK KD compared to WT tibialis anterior muscles. Surprisingly, metformin treatment only enhanced respiration in AMPK KD mice and thereby rescued...... the respiration defect compared to the WT mice. Metformin did not influence protein activities or expressions in either WT or AMPK KD mice.We conclude that two weeks of in vivo metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in the mitochondrial deficient AMPK KD but not WT mice. The improvement seems...

  2. Inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex alters mitochondrial function and cellular calcium regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsueh-Meei; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Hui; Gibson, Gary E

    2003-01-20

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases. The alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) catalyzes a key and arguably rate-limiting step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). A reduction in the activity of the KGDHC occurs in brains and cells of patients with many of these disorders and may underlie the abnormal mitochondrial function. Abnormalities in calcium homeostasis also occur in fibroblasts from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and in cells bearing mutations that lead to AD. Thus, the present studies test whether the reduction of KGDHC activity can lead to the alterations in mitochondrial function and calcium homeostasis. alpha-Keto-beta-methyl-n-valeric acid (KMV) inhibits KGDHC activity in living N2a cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Surprisingly, concentration of KMV that inhibit in situ KGDHC by 80% does not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). However, similar concentrations of KMV induce the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, reduce basal [Ca(2+)](i) by 23% (Pcalcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by 46% (P<0.005). This result suggests that diminished KGDHC activities do not lead to the Ca(2+) abnormalities in fibroblasts from AD patients or cells bearing PS-1 mutations. The increased release of cytochrome c with diminished KGDHC activities will be expected to activate other pathways including cell death cascades. Reductions in this key mitochondrial enzyme will likely make the cells more vulnerable to metabolic insults that promote cell death.

  3. Phenotypic diversity associated with the mitochondrial m.8313G>A point mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Rourke, Killian

    2012-02-01

    We report the clinical, histochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a patient with progressive mitochondrial cytopathy due to the m.8313G>A point mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Lys) (MTTK) gene. The clinical features in this case are severe, including short stature, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and osteoporosis, while extensive analysis of maternal relatives indicate that the mutation has arisen de novo and was not maternally inherited. This report of a second case, together with single muscle fiber mutation analysis that shows clear segregation of mutation load with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, confirms that the mutation is pathologic.

  4. The role of PGC-1alpha on mitochondrial function and apoptotic susceptibility in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhihetty, Peter J; Uguccioni, Giulia; Leick, Lotte

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for cellular bioenergetics, and they mediate apoptosis within cells. We used whole body peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) knockout (KO) animals to investigate its role on organelle function, apoptotic signaling, and cytochrome......-c oxidase activity, an indicator of mitochondrial content, in muscle and other tissues (brain, liver, and pancreas). Lack of PGC-1alpha reduced mitochondrial content in all muscles (17-44%; P liver, and pancreas. However, the tissue expression of proteins involved...

  5. Sulfite oxidase activity of cytochrome c: Role of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Velayutham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In humans, sulfite is generated endogenously by the metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids such as methionine and cysteine. Sulfite is also formed from exposure to sulfur dioxide, one of the major environmental pollutants. Sulfite is used as an antioxidant and preservative in dried fruits, vegetables, and beverages such as wine. Sulfite is also used as a stabilizer in many drugs. Sulfite toxicity has been associated with allergic reactions characterized by sulfite sensitivity, asthma, and anaphylactic shock. Sulfite is also toxic to neurons and cardiovascular cells. Recent studies suggest that the cytotoxicity of sulfite is mediated by free radicals; however, molecular mechanisms involved in sulfite toxicity are not fully understood. Cytochrome c (cyt c is known to participate in mitochondrial respiration and has antioxidant and peroxidase activities. Studies were performed to understand the related mechanism of oxidation of sulfite and radical generation by ferric cytochrome c (Fe3+cyt c in the absence and presence of H2O2. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spin trapping studies using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO were performed with sulfite, Fe3+cyt c, and H2O2. An EPR spectrum corresponding to the sulfite radical adducts of DMPO (DMPO-SO3- was obtained. The amount of DMPO-SO3- formed from the oxidation of sulfite by the Fe3+cyt c increased with sulfite concentration. In addition, the amount of DMPO-SO3- formed by the peroxidase activity of Fe3+cyt c also increased with sulfite and H2O2 concentration. From these results, we propose a mechanism in which the Fe3+cyt c and its peroxidase activity oxidizes sulfite to sulfite radical. Our results suggest that Fe3+cyt c could have a novel role in the deleterious effects of sulfite in biological systems due to increased production of sulfite radical. It also shows that the increased production of sulfite radical may be responsible for neurotoxicity and some of the injuries which

  6. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah, E-mail: sitinurfadzilah077@ppinang.uitm.edu.my [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Faculty of Pharmacy, University Teknologi Mara (Malaysia); Lang, Matti A., E-mail: m.lang@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Abu-Bakar, A' edah, E-mail: a.abubakar@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  7. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A.; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  8. IDENTIFIKASI DAGING BABI MENGGUNAKAN METODE PCR-RFLP GEN Cytochrome b DAN PCR PRIMER SPESIFIK GEN AMELOGENIN (Pork Identification Using PCR-RFLP of Cytochrome b Gene and Species Specific PCR of Amelogenin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuny Erwanto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP and species specific PCR methods had been applied for identifying pork in mixture of meat. Pork sample in various levels (1, 3, 5 and 10% was prepared in mixture with beef, chicken and mutton. The primary CYTb1 and CYTb2 were designed in the mitochondrial cytochrome b b (cytochrome b gene and PCR successfully amplified fragments of 359 bp. To distinguish pig species existence, the amplified PCR products of mitochondrial DNA were cut by BseDI restriction enzyme. The result showed that pig mitochondrial DNA was cut into 131 and 228 bp fragments. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR method based on the nucleotide sequence variation in the amelogenin gene has been chosen for the specific identification of pork DNAs in mixture meat. The primers designed generated specific fragments of 353 and 312 bp length for pork. The specificity of the primary designed was tested on 4 animal species including pig, cattle, chicken and goat species. Analysis of experimental mixture meat demonstrated that 1% of raw pork tissues could be detected using PCR-RFLP with BseDI restriction enzyme but detection using species-specific PCR showed the cross reactivity to beef, chicken and mutton. The cytochrome b PCR-RFLP species identification assay yielded excellent results for identification of pig species. PCR-RFLP is a potentially reliable technique for detection of the existence of pork in animal food product for Halal authentication. Keywords: Pork identification, cytochrome b, amelogenin, polymerase chain reaction   ABSTRAK   Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengaplikasikan metode deteksi daging babi dalam campuan daging dengan sapi, kambing dan ayam melalui PCR-RFLP dan PCR dengan primer spesifik untuk babi. Level kontaminasi daging babi dibuat sebesar 1, 3, 5 dan 10% dari total daging dalam campuran. Metode PCR-RFLP menggunakan sepasang primer yaitu gen cytochrome b dari mitokondria yang

  9. Data on cytochrome c oxidase assembly in mice and human fibroblasts or tissues induced by SURF1 defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Kovářová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes data related to a research article entitled “Tissue- and species-specific differences in cytochrome c oxidase assembly induced by SURF1 defects” [1]. This paper includes data of the quantitative analysis of individual forms of respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV present in SURF1 knockout (SURF1−/− and control (SURF1+/+ mouse fibroblasts and tissues and in fibroblasts of human control and patients with SURF1 gene mutation. Also it includes data demonstrating response of complex IV, cytochrome c oxidase (COX, to reversible inhibition of mitochondrial translation in SURF1−/− mouse and SURF1 patient fibroblast cell lines.

  10. Electrochemistry suggests proton access from the exit site to the binuclear center in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase pathway variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas; Melin, Frédéric; Richter, Oliver-M H; Ludwig, Bernd; Kannt, Aimo; Müller, Hanne; Michel, Hartmut; Hellwig, Petra

    2015-02-27

    Two different pathways through which protons access cytochrome c oxidase operate during oxygen reduction from the mitochondrial matrix, or the bacterial cytoplasm. Here, we use electrocatalytic current measurements to follow oxygen reduction coupled to proton uptake in cytochrome c oxidase isolated from Paracoccus denitrificans. Wild type enzyme and site-specific variants with defects in both proton uptake pathways (K354M, D124N and K354M/D124N) were immobilized on gold nanoparticles, and oxygen reduction was probed electrochemically in the presence of varying concentrations of Zn(2+) ions, which are known to inhibit both the entry and the exit proton pathways in the enzyme. Our data suggest that under these conditions substrate protons gain access to the oxygen reduction site via the exit pathway. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Resolution of the African hominoid trichotomy by use of a mitochondrial gene sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvolo, M.; Disotell, T.R.; Allard, M.W. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Brown, W.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Honeycutt, R.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene have been determined for five primate species, siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus), crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis), and green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops), and compared with published sequences of other primate and nonprimate species. Comparisons of cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene sequences provide clear-cut evidence from the mitochondrial genome for the separation of the African ape trichotomy into two evolutionary lineages, one leading to gorillas and the other to humans and chimpanzees. Several different tree-building methods support this same phylogenetic tree topology. The comparisons also yield trees in which a substantial length separates the divergence point of gorillas from that of humans and chimpanzees, suggesting that the lineage most immediately ancestral to humans and chimpanzees may have been in existence for a relatively long time.

  12. Resolution of the African hominoid trichotomy by use of a mitochondrial gene sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruvolo, M.; Disotell, T.R.; Allard, M.W.; Brown, W.M.; Honeycutt, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene have been determined for five primate species, siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus), crab-eating macaque (Macaca fascicularis), and green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops), and compared with published sequences of other primate and nonprimate species. Comparisons of cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene sequences provide clear-cut evidence from the mitochondrial genome for the separation of the African ape trichotomy into two evolutionary lineages, one leading to gorillas and the other to humans and chimpanzees. Several different tree-building methods support this same phylogenetic tree topology. The comparisons also yield trees in which a substantial length separates the divergence point of gorillas from that of humans and chimpanzees, suggesting that the lineage most immediately ancestral to humans and chimpanzees may have been in existence for a relatively long time

  13. Epilepsy and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P. Saneto DO, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. In a large cohort of children and adolescents with mitochondrial disease (n = 180, over 48% of patients developed seizures. The majority (68% of patients were younger than 3 years and medically intractable (90%. The electroencephalographic pattern of multiregional epileptiform discharges over the left and right hemisphere with background slowing occurred in 62%. The epilepsy syndrome, infantile spasms, was seen in 17%. Polymerase γ mutations were the most common genetic etiology of seizures, representing Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (14%. The severity of disease in those patients with epilepsy was significant, as 13% of patients experienced early death. Simply the loss of energy production cannot explain the development of seizures or all patients with mitochondrial dysfunction would have epilepsy. Until the various aspects of mitochondrial physiology that are involved in proper brain development are understood, epilepsy and its treatment will remain unsatisfactory.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in lyssavirus-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Alireza; Kassis, Raïd; Real, Eléonore; Delmas, Olivier; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Larrous, Florence; Obach, Dorothée; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Jacob, Yves; Bourhy, Hervé

    2008-05-01

    Lyssaviruses are highly neurotropic viruses associated with neuronal apoptosis. Previous observations have indicated that the matrix proteins (M) of some lyssaviruses induce strong neuronal apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism(s) involved in this phenomenon is still unknown. We show that for Mokola virus (MOK), a lyssavirus of low pathogenicity, the M (M-MOK) targets mitochondria, disrupts the mitochondrial morphology, and induces apoptosis. Our analysis of truncated M-MOK mutants suggests that the information required for efficient mitochondrial targeting and dysfunction, as well as caspase-9 activation and apoptosis, is held between residues 46 and 110 of M-MOK. We used a yeast two-hybrid approach, a coimmunoprecipitation assay, and confocal microscopy to demonstrate that M-MOK physically associates with the subunit I of the cytochrome c (cyt-c) oxidase (CcO) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain; this is in contrast to the M of the highly pathogenic Thailand lyssavirus (M-THA). M-MOK expression induces a significant decrease in CcO activity, which is not the case with M-THA. M-MOK mutations (K77R and N81E) resulting in a similar sequence to M-THA at positions 77 and 81 annul cyt-c release and apoptosis and restore CcO activity. As expected, the reverse mutations, R77K and E81N, introduced in M-THA induce a phenotype similar to that due to M-MOK. These features indicate a novel mechanism for energy depletion during lyssavirus-induced apoptosis.

  15. Ultrastructural examination of skin biopsies may assist in diagnosing mitochondrial cytopathy when muscle biopsies yield negative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, John L; Warren, Christine B; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    Ultrastructural evaluation of skin biopsies has been utilized for diagnosis of mitochondrial disease. This study investigates how frequently skin biopsies reveal mitochondrial abnormalities, correlates skin and muscle biopsy findings, and describes clinical diagnoses rendered following the evaluation. A retrospective review of surgical pathology reports from 1990 to 2015 identified skin biopsies examined by electron microscopy for suspected metabolic disease. A total of 630 biopsies were included from 615 patients. Of these patients, 178 also underwent a muscle biopsy. Of the 630 skin biopsies, 75 (12%) showed ultrastructural abnormalities and 34 (5%) specifically showed mitochondrial abnormalities including increased size (n=27), reduced or abnormal cristae (n=23), dense matrices (n=20), and increased number (n=8). Additional findings included lysosomal abnormalities (n=13), lipid accumulation (n=2) or glycogen accumulation (n=1). Of the 34 patients with mitochondrial abnormalities on skin biopsy, 20 also had muscle biopsies performed and nine showed abnormalities suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder including absent cytochrome oxidase staining (n=2), increased subsarcolemmal NADH, SDH, or cytochrome oxidase staining (n=1), or ultrastructural findings including large mitochondrial size (n=5), abnormal mitochondrial structure (n=5), and increased mitochondrial number (n=4). The most common presenting symptoms were intellectual disability (n=13), seizures (n=12), encephalopathy (n=9), and gastrointestinal disturbances (n=9). At last known follow-up, 12 patients had a definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder. One patient each had Complex I deficiency, Complex III deficiency, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Our results suggest that skin biopsy sometimes yields diagnostic clues suggestive of a mitochondrial cytopathy in cases with a negative muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  17. Understanding Free Radicals: Isolating Active Thylakoid Membranes and Purifying the Cytochrome b6f Complex for Superoxide Generation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Stofleth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All life persists in an environment that is rich in molecular oxygen. The production of oxygen free radicals, or superoxide, is a necessary consequence of the biogenesis of energy in cells. Both mitochondrial and photosynthetic electron transport chains have been found to produce superoxide associated with cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell death, thereby contributing to the effects of aging. Aerobic respiration in mitochondria consumes oxygen, whereas photosynthesis in chloroplasts or cyanobacteria produces oxygen. The increased concentration of molecular oxygen may serve to allow greater availability for the production of superoxide by cytochrome bc complexes in photosynthetic membranes compared to those of mitochondrial membranes. The isolation of well-coupled chloroplasts, containing the cytochrome b6f complex of oxygenic photosynthesis, is a vital initial step in the process of comparing the rate of production of superoxide to those of the homologous cytochrome bc1 complex of aerobic respiration. It is necessary to determine if the isolated chloroplasts have retained their oxygengenerating capability after isolation by an oxygen evolution assay with a Clark-type electrode. A necessary second step, which is the isolation of cytochrome b6f from spinach, has yet to be successfully performed. Oxygen measurements taken from chloroplasts in the presence of the uncoupler, NH4Cl, exhibited a rate of oxygen evolution over three times greater at 344 +/- 18 μmol O2/mg Chlorophyll a/hr than the rate of oxygen evolution without uncoupler at 109 +/- 29 μmol O2/mg Chlorophyll a/hr. These data demonstrate that the technique used to isolate spinach chloroplasts preserves their light-driven electron-transport activity, making them reliable for future superoxide assays.

  18. Mitochondrial signaling in health and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orrenius, Sten; Packer, Lester; Cadenas, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    .... The text covers themes essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial activity, including electron transport and energy production, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics, mitochondrial signaling...

  19. Bayesian, Maximum Parsimony and UPGMA Models for Inferring the Phylogenies of Antelopes Using Mitochondrial Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Haseeb A.; Arif, Ibrahim A.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Al Farhan, Ahmad H.; Al Homaidan, Ali A.

    2008-01-01

    This investigation was aimed to compare the inference of antelope phylogenies resulting from the 16S rRNA, cytochrome-b (cyt-b) and d-loop segments of mitochondrial DNA using three different computational models including Bayesian (BA), maximum parsimony (MP) and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). The respective nucleotide sequences of three Oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) and an out-group (Addax nasomaculatus) were aligned and subjected to B...

  20. DEAD-box RNA helicase is dispensable for mitochondrial translation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richterová, Lenka; Vávrová, Zuzana; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 1 (2011), 300-303 ISSN 0014-4894 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * Mitochondrial translation * RNA helicase * Cytochrome c oxidase * Mitochondrion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.122, year: 2011

  1. Unfolding of cytochrome c immobilized on self-assembled monolayers. An electrochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monari, Stefano; Ranieri, Antonio; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Peressini, Silvia; Tavagnacco, Claudio; Borsari, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Denaturation involves intermediate and partially unfolded forms. → An unfolded species displaying the haem with Fe coordinated by two His is observed. → Under unfolding conditions the nature of the SAM influences conformation of protein. → Concentration of the unfolding agent affects redox properties of immobilized protein. - Abstract: The electron transfer (ET) process of progressively unfolded bovine cytochrome c immobilized on different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was investigated. Insight is gained on the role of the SAM surface on the functionality of the partially unfolded and non-native forms of the adsorbed protein. Direct electrochemical measurements were performed on cytochrome c adsorbed on mercaptopyridine (MP) and mixed 11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid/11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUA/MU) at varying temperature, in the presence of urea as unfolding agent. Under strongly unfolding conditions, a non-native form of cytochrome c, in which the methionine ligand is replaced by a histidine, was observed on both MP and MUA/MU SAMs. The E o ' of the native form, in which the haem is axially coordinated by methionine and histidine, slightly shifts to negative values upon increasing urea concentration. However, the non-native bis-histidinate species shows a much lower E o ' value (by approximately 0.4 V) which is by far enthalpic in origin and largely determined by axial ligand swapping. Analysis of the reduction enthalpies and entropies and of the ET rate constants indicate that the nature of the SAM (hydrophilic or anionic) results in changes in the conformational rearrangement of the cytochrome c under unfolding conditions.

  2. Unfolding of cytochrome c immobilized on self-assembled monolayers. An electrochemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monari, Stefano; Ranieri, Antonio; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Peressini, Silvia [Department of Chemistry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Campi 183, 41125 Modena (Italy); Tavagnacco, Claudio [Department of Chemistry, University of Trieste, via Giorgieri 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Borsari, Marco, E-mail: marco.borsari@unimore.it [Department of Chemistry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Campi 183, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > Denaturation involves intermediate and partially unfolded forms. > An unfolded species displaying the haem with Fe coordinated by two His is observed. > Under unfolding conditions the nature of the SAM influences conformation of protein. > Concentration of the unfolding agent affects redox properties of immobilized protein. - Abstract: The electron transfer (ET) process of progressively unfolded bovine cytochrome c immobilized on different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was investigated. Insight is gained on the role of the SAM surface on the functionality of the partially unfolded and non-native forms of the adsorbed protein. Direct electrochemical measurements were performed on cytochrome c adsorbed on mercaptopyridine (MP) and mixed 11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid/11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUA/MU) at varying temperature, in the presence of urea as unfolding agent. Under strongly unfolding conditions, a non-native form of cytochrome c, in which the methionine ligand is replaced by a histidine, was observed on both MP and MUA/MU SAMs. The E{sup o}' of the native form, in which the haem is axially coordinated by methionine and histidine, slightly shifts to negative values upon increasing urea concentration. However, the non-native bis-histidinate species shows a much lower E{sup o}' value (by approximately 0.4 V) which is by far enthalpic in origin and largely determined by axial ligand swapping. Analysis of the reduction enthalpies and entropies and of the ET rate constants indicate that the nature of the SAM (hydrophilic or anionic) results in changes in the conformational rearrangement of the cytochrome c under unfolding conditions.

  3. Insulin and IGF-1 improve mitochondrial function in a PI-3K/Akt-dependent manner and reduce mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species in Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Márcio; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Oliveira, Ana M; Oliveira, Catarina R; Rego, A Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been described in Huntington's disease, a disorder caused by expression of mutant huntingtin (mHtt). IGF-1 was previously shown to protect HD cells, whereas insulin prevented neuronal oxidative stress. In this work we analyzed the role of insulin and IGF-1 in striatal cells derived from HD knock-in mice on mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related antioxidant and signaling pathways influencing mitochondrial function. Insulin and IGF-1 decreased mitochondrial ROS induced by mHtt and normalized mitochondrial SOD activity, without affecting intracellular glutathione levels. IGF-1 and insulin promoted Akt phosphorylation without changing the nuclear levels of phosphorylated Nrf2 or Nrf2/ARE activity. Insulin and IGF-1 treatment also decreased mitochondrial Drp1 phosphorylation, suggesting reduced mitochondrial fragmentation, and ameliorated mitochondrial function in HD cells in a PI-3K/Akt-dependent manner. This was accompanied by increased total and phosphorylated Akt, Tfam, and mitochondrial-encoded cytochrome c oxidase II, as well as Tom20 and Tom40 in mitochondria of insulin- and IGF-1-treated mutant striatal cells. Concomitantly, insulin/IGF-1-treated mutant cells showed reduced apoptotic features. Hence, insulin and IGF-1 improve mitochondrial function and reduce mitochondrial ROS caused by mHtt by activating the PI-3K/Akt signaling pathway, in a process independent of Nrf2 transcriptional activity, but involving enhanced mitochondrial levels of Akt and mitochondrial-encoded complex IV subunit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of the mitochondrial genetic background in complex III deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Carmen Gil Borlado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years clinical evidence has emphasized the importance of the mtDNA genetic background that hosts a primary pathogenic mutation in the clinical expression of mitochondrial disorders, but little experimental confirmation has been provided. We have analyzed the pathogenic role of a novel homoplasmic mutation (m.15533 A>G in the cytochrome b (MT-CYB gene in a patient presenting with lactic acidosis, seizures, mild mental delay, and behaviour abnormalities. METHODOLOGY: Spectrophotometric analyses of the respiratory chain enzyme activities were performed in different tissues, the whole muscle mitochondrial DNA of the patient was sequenced, and the novel mutation was confirmed by PCR-RFLP. Transmitochondrial cybrids were constructed to confirm the pathogenicity of the mutation, and assembly/stability studies were carried out in fibroblasts and cybrids by means of mitochondrial translation inhibition in combination with blue native gel electrophoresis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biochemical analyses revealed a decrease in respiratory chain complex III activity in patient's skeletal muscle, and a combined enzyme defect of complexes III and IV in fibroblasts. Mutant transmitochondrial cybrids restored normal enzyme activities and steady-state protein levels, the mutation was mildly conserved along evolution, and the proband's mother and maternal aunt, both clinically unaffected, also harboured the homoplasmic mutation. These data suggested a nuclear genetic origin of the disease. However, by forcing the de novo functioning of the OXPHOS system, a severe delay in the biogenesis of the respiratory chain complexes was observed in the mutants, which demonstrated a direct functional effect of the mitochondrial genetic background. CONCLUSIONS: Our results point to possible pitfalls in the detection of pathogenic mitochondrial mutations, and highlight the role of the genetic mtDNA background in the development of mitochondrial disorders.

  5. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein in brown adipocytes differentiated in cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, J.; Baudysova, M.; Zanotti, F.; Janikova, D.; Pavelka, S.; Houstek, J.

    1990-01-01

    In order to characterize the biogenesis of unique thermogenic mitochondria of brown adipose tissue, differentiation of precursor cells isolated from mouse brown adipose tissue was studied in cell culture. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP), F1-ATPase, and cytochrome oxidase was examined by L-[35S]methionine labeling and immunoblotting. For the first time, synthesis of physiological amounts of the UCP, a key and tissue-specific component of thermogenic mitochondria, was observed in cultures at about confluence (day 6), indicating that a complete differentiation of brown adipocytes was achieved in vitro. In postconfluent cells (day 8) the content of UCP decreased rapidly, in contrast to some other mitochondrial proteins (beta subunit of F1-ATPase, cytochrome oxidase). In these cells, it was possible, by using norepinephrine, to induce specifically the synthesis of the UCP but not of F1-ATPase or cytochrome oxidase. The maximal response was observed at 0.1 microM norepinephrine and the synthesis of UCP remained activated for at least 24 h. Detailed analysis revealed a major role of the beta-adrenergic receptors and elevated intracellular concentration of cAMP in stimulation of UCP synthesis. A quantitative recovery of the newly synthesized UCP in the mitochondrial fraction indicated completed biogenesis of functionally competent thermogenic mitochondria

  6. Influenza virus PB1-F2 protein induces cell death through mitochondrial ANT3 and VDAC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Zamarin

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The influenza virus PB1-F2 is an 87-amino acid mitochondrial protein that previously has been shown to induce cell death, although the mechanism of apoptosis induction has remained unclear. In the process of characterizing its mechanism of action we found that the viral PB1-F2 protein sensitizes cells to apoptotic stimuli such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, as demonstrated by increased cleavage of caspase 3 substrates in PB1-F2-expressing cells. Moreover, treatment of purified mouse liver mitochondria with recombinant PB1-F2 protein resulted in cytochrome c release, loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and enhancement of tBid-induced mitochondrial permeabilization, suggesting a possible mechanism for the observed cellular sensitization to apoptosis. Using glutathione-S-transferase pulldowns with subsequent mass spectrometric analysis, we identified the mitochondrial interactors of the PB1-F2 protein and showed that the viral protein uniquely interacts with the inner mitochondrial membrane adenine nucleotide translocator 3 and the outer mitochondrial membrane voltage-dependent anion channel 1, both of which are implicated in the mitochondrial permeability transition during apoptosis. Consistent with this interaction, blockers of the permeability transition pore complex (PTPC inhibited PB1-F2-induced mitochondrial permeabilization. Based on our findings, we propose a model whereby the proapoptotic PB1-F2 protein acts through the mitochondrial PTPC and may play a role in the down-regulation of the host immune response to infection.

  7. Transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO2 induces mitochondrial apoptosis in human malignant fibrous histiocytoma in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Onishi

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play an essential role in cellular energy metabolism and apoptosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that decreased mitochondrial biogenesis is associated with cancer progression. In mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α regulates the activities of multiple nuclear receptors and transcription factors involved in mitochondrial proliferation. Previously, we showed that overexpression of PGC-1α leads to mitochondrial proliferation and induces apoptosis in human malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH cells in vitro. We also demonstrated that transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO(2 to rat skeletal muscle induces PGC-1α expression and causes an increase in mitochondrial proliferation. In this study, we utilized a murine model of human MFH to determine the effect of transcutaneous CO(2 exposure on PGC-1α expression, mitochondrial proliferation and cellular apoptosis. PGC-1α expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, while mitochondrial proliferation was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and the relative copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA was assessed by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence staining and DNA fragmentation assays were used to examine mitochondrial apoptosis. We also evaluated the expression of mitochondrial apoptosis related proteins, such as caspases, cytochorome c and Bax, by immunoblot analysis. We show that transcutaneous application of CO(2 induces PGC-1α expression, and increases mitochondrial proliferation and apoptosis of tumor cells, significantly reducing tumor volume. Proteins involved in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, including caspase 3 and caspase 9, were elevated in CO(2 treated tumors compared to control. We also observed an enrichment of cytochrome c in the cytoplasmic fraction and Bax protein in the mitochondrial fraction of CO(2 treated tumors, highlighting the involvement of mitochondria in apoptosis

  8. The role of p38 in mitochondrial respiration in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaohua; Wen, Yi; Metzger, Daniel; Jung, Marianna

    2013-06-07

    p38 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase and mediates cell growth, cell differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. The aim of this study is to determine the extent to which p38 plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial respiration in male and female mice under a normal condition. To achieve this aim, we have generated transgenic mice that lack p38 in cerebellar Purkinje neurons by crossing Pcp2 (Purkinje cell protein 2)-Cre mice with p38(loxP/loxP) mice. Mitochondria from cerebellum were then isolated from the transgenic and wild-type mice to measure mitochondrial respiration using XF24 respirometer. The mRNA and protein expression of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in cerebellum were also measured using RT-PCR and immunoblot methods. Separately, HT22 cells were used to determine the involvement of 17β-estradiol (E2) and COX in mitochondrial respiration. The genetic knockout of p38 in Purkinje neurons suppressed the mitochondrial respiration only in male mice and increased COX expression only in female mice. The inhibition of COX by sodium azide (SA) sharply suppressed mitochondrial respiration of HT22 cells in a manner that was protected by E2. These data suggest that p38 is required for the mitochondrial respiration of male mice. When p38 is below a normal level, females may maintain mitochondrial respiration through COX up-regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of tributyltin on trout blood cells: changes in mitochondrial morphology and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Luca; Fedeli, Donatella; Santoni, Giorgio; Davies, Ian; Falcioni, Giancarlo

    2003-05-12

    The aquatic environment is the largest sink for the highly toxic organotin compounds, particularly as one of the main sources is the direct release of organotins from marine antifouling paints. The aim of this study was to investigate the mitochondrial toxicity and proapoptotic activity of tributyltin chloride (TBTC) in teleost leukocytes and nucleated erythrocytes, by means of electron microscopy investigation and mitochondrial membrane potential evaluation, in order to provide an early indicator of aquatic environmental pollution. Erythrocytes and leukocytes were obtained from an inbred strain of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Transmission electronic micrographs of trout red blood cells (RBC) incubated in the presence of TBTC at 1 and 5 microM for 60 min showed remarkable mitochondrial morphological changes. TBTC-mediated toxicity involved alteration of the cristae ultrastructure and mitochondrial swelling, in a dose-dependent manner. Both erythrocytes and leukocytes displayed a consistent drop in mitochondrial membrane potential following TBTC exposure at concentrations >1 microM. The proapoptotic effect of TBTC on fish blood cells, and involvement of mitochondrial pathways was also investigated by verifying the release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase-3 and the presence of "DNA laddering". Although mitochondrial activity was much more strongly affected in erythrocytes, leukocytes incubated in the presence of TBTC showed the characteristic features of apoptosis after only 1 h of incubation. Longer exposures, up to 12 h, were required to trigger an apoptotic response in erythrocytes.

  10. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-de-Arce, Karen; Foncea, Rocio; Leighton, Federico

    2005-01-01

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-κB activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy

  11. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and β-Cell Failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmin Alex Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is the most common human endocrine disease and is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance and pancreatic islet β-cell failure. Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is a central contributor to β-cell failure in the evolution of T2DM. As reviewed elsewhere, reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by β-cell mitochondria as a result of metabolic stress activate several stress-response pathways. This paper focuses on mechanisms whereby ROS affect mitochondrial structure and function and lead to β-cell failure. ROS activate UCP2, which results in proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane, and this leads to reduced β-cell ATP synthesis and content, which is a critical parameter in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In addition, ROS oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids in mitochondrial cardiolipin and other phospholipids, and this impairs membrane integrity and leads to cytochrome c release into cytosol and apoptosis. Group VIA phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β appears to be a component of a mechanism for repairing mitochondrial phospholipids that contain oxidized fatty acid substituents, and genetic or acquired iPLA2β-deficiency increases β-cell mitochondrial susceptibility to injury from ROS and predisposes to developing T2DM. Interventions that attenuate ROS effects on β-cell mitochondrial phospholipids might prevent or retard development of T2DM.

  12. Mitochondrial targeted curcumin exhibits anticancer effects through disruption of mitochondrial redox and modulation of TrxR2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Pal, Debojyoti; Singh, Babita; Sharma, Deepak; Kutala, Vijay Kumar; Sandur, Santosh Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Mitocurcumin is a derivative of curcumin, which has been shown to selectively enter mitochondria. Here we describe the anti-tumor efficacy of mitocurcumin in lung cancer cells and its mechanism of action. Mitocurcumin, showed 25-50 fold higher efficacy in killing lung cancer cells as compared to curcumin as demonstrated by clonogenic assay, flow cytometry and high throughput screening assay. Treatment of lung cancer cells with mitocurcumin significantly decreased the frequency of cancer stem cells. Mitocurcumin increased the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreased the mitochondrial glutathione levels and induced strand breaks in the mitochondrial DNA. As a result, we observed increased BAX to BCL-2 ratio, cytochrome C release into the cytosol, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased caspase-3 activity suggesting that mitocurcumin activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Docking studies using mitocurcumin revealed that it binds to the active site of the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2) with high affinity. In corroboration with the above finding, mitocurcumin decreased TrxR activity in cell free as well as the cellular system. The anti-cancer activity of mitocurcumin measured in terms of apoptotic cell death and the decrease in cancer stem cell frequency was accentuated by TrxR2 overexpression. This was due to modulation of TrxR2 activity to NADPH oxidase like activity by mitocurcumin, resulting in higher ROS accumulation and cell death. Thus, our findings reveal mitocurcumin as a potent anticancer agent with better efficacy than curcumin. This study also demonstrates the role of TrxR2 and mitochondrial DNA damage in mitocurcumin mediated killing of cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The partial mitochondrial sequence of the Old World stingless bee ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sequences of primers used in PCR reactions of T. pagdeni mtDNA. mtDNA genes. Primer. Sequence. ATPase (6,8). ATPS6-F. 5 -AAG ATA TAT GGA AAT AAG CT-3. tRNA-ASP-R. 5 -ATA AAA TAA CGT CAA AAT GTC A-3. COI. COI-F. 5 - ATA ATT ATT GTT GCT GAT GTA-3. COI-R. 5 -CTA TTC ATA TAA CTG GAA TTT C-3.

  14. The partial mitochondrial sequence of the Old World stingless bee ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirikul Thummajitsakul1 2 Kun Silprasit3 Sirawut Klinbunga4 Siriporn Sittipraneed2. Faculty of Health Science, Srinakharinwirot University Ongkharak, Nakhon-Nayok 26120, Thailand; Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Faculty of Environmental Culture and ...

  15. Insight into mitochondrial structure and function from electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, T G; Renken, C W; Perkins, G A

    2002-09-10

    In recent years, electron tomography has provided detailed three-dimensional models of mitochondria that have redefined our concept of mitochondrial structure. The models reveal an inner membrane consisting of two components, the inner boundary membrane (IBM) closely apposed to the outer membrane and the cristae membrane that projects into the matrix compartment. These two components are connected by tubular structures of relatively uniform size called crista junctions. The distribution of crista junction sizes and shapes is predicted by a thermodynamic model based upon the energy of membrane bending, but proteins likely also play a role in determining the conformation of the inner membrane. Results of structural studies of mitochondria during apoptosis demonstrate that cytochrome c is released without detectable disruption of the outer membrane or extensive swelling of the mitochondrial matrix, suggesting the formation of an outer membrane pore large enough to allow passage of holo-cytochrome c. The possible compartmentation of inner membrane function between the IBM and the cristae membrane is also discussed.

  16. The HO-1/CO system regulates mitochondrial-capillary density relationships in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorella, Shelly R H; Potter, Jennifer V F; Cherry, Anne D; Peacher, Dionne F; Welty-Wolf, Karen E; Moon, Richard E; Piantadosi, Claude A; Suliman, Hagir B

    2015-10-15

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) system induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but its biological impact in human skeletal muscle is uncertain. The enzyme system generates CO, which stimulates mitochondrial proliferation in normal muscle. Here we examined whether CO breathing can be used to produce a coordinated metabolic and vascular response in human skeletal muscle. In 19 healthy subjects, we performed vastus lateralis muscle biopsies and tested one-legged maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) before and after breathing air or CO (200 ppm) for 1 h daily for 5 days. In response to CO, there was robust HO-1 induction along with increased mRNA levels for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), cytochrome c, cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COX IV), and mitochondrial-encoded COX I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NDI). CO breathing did not increase V̇o2max (1.96 ± 0.51 pre-CO, 1.87 ± 0.50 post-CO l/min; P = not significant) but did increase muscle citrate synthase, mitochondrial density (139.0 ± 34.9 pre-CO, 219.0 ± 36.2 post-CO; no. of mitochondrial profiles/field), myoglobin content and glucose transporter (GLUT4) protein level and led to GLUT4 localization to the myocyte membrane, all consistent with expansion of the tissue O2 transport system. These responses were attended by increased cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31)-positive muscle capillaries (1.78 ± 0.16 pre-CO, 2.37 ± 0.59 post-CO; capillaries/muscle fiber), implying the enrichment of microvascular O2 reserve. The findings support that induction of the HO-1/CO system by CO not only improves muscle mitochondrial density, but regulates myoglobin content, GLUT4 localization, and capillarity in accordance with current concepts of skeletal muscle plasticity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The reaction of neuroglobin with potential redox protein partners cytochrome b5  and cytochrome c

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Mathews, A.J.; Moens, L.

    2006-01-01

    Previously identified, potentially neuroprotective reactions of neuroglobin require the existence of yet unknown redox partners. We show here that the reduction of ferric neuroglobin by cytochrome b5 is relatively slow (k=6×102M-1s-1 at pH 7.0) and thus is unlikely to be of physiological...... significance. In contrast, the reaction between ferrous neuroglobin and ferric cytochrome c is very rapid (k=2×107M-1s-1) with an apparent overall equilibrium constant of 1μM. Based on this data we propose that ferrous neuroglobin may well play a role in preventing apoptosis...

  18. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics during ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte early apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Valentina; Eisner, Veronica; Chiong, Mario; Criollo, Alfredo; Moraga, Francisco; Garcia, Alejandra; Härtel, Steffen; Jaimovich, Enrique; Zorzano, Antonio; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2008-01-15

    In cells, mitochondria are organized as a network of interconnected organelles that fluctuate between fission and fusion events (mitochondrial dynamics). This process is associated with cell death. We investigated whether activation of apoptosis with ceramides affects mitochondrial dynamics and promotes mitochondrial fission in cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with C(2)-ceramide or the inactive analog dihydro-C(2)-ceramide for up to 6 h. Three-dimensional images of cells loaded with mitotracker green were obtained by confocal microscopy. Dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp-1) and mitochondrial fission protein 1 (Fis1) distribution and levels were studied by immunofluorescence and western blot. Mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) and cytochrome c (cyt c) distribution were used as indexes of early activation of apoptosis. Cell viability and DNA fragmentation were determined by propidium iodide staining/flow cytometry, whereas cytotoxicity was evaluated by lactic dehydrogenase activity. To decrease the levels of the mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 2, we used an antisense adenovirus (AsMfn2). C(2)-ceramide, but not dihydro-C(2)-ceramide, promoted rapid fragmentation of the mitochondrial network in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. C(2)-ceramide also increased mitochondrial Drp-1 and Fis1 content, Drp-1 colocalization with Fis1, and caused early activation of apoptosis. AsMfn2 accentuated the decrease in DeltaPsi(m) and cyt c redistribution induced by C(2)-ceramide. Doxorubicin, which induces cardiomyopathy and apoptosis through ceramide generation, also stimulated mitochondrial fragmentation. Ceramides stimulate mitochondrial fission and this event is associated with early activation of cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  19. The cytochrome oxidase subunit I and subunit III genes in Oenothera mitochondria are transcribed from identical promoter sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Schobel, Werner; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1987-01-01

    Two loci encoding subunit III of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) in Oenothera mitochondria have been identified from a cDNA library of mitochondrial transcripts. A 657-bp sequence block upstream from the open reading frame is also present in the two copies of the COX subunit I gene and is presumably involved in homologous sequence rearrangement. The proximal points of sequence rearrangements are located 3 bp upstream from the COX I and 1139 bp upstream from the COX III initiation codons. The 5'-termini of both COX I and COX III mRNAs have been mapped in this common sequence confining the promoter region for the Oenothera mitochondrial COX I and COX III genes to the homologous sequence block. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:15981332

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Aline Haas; Costa, Ana Beatriz; Engel, Jéssica Della Giustina; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2018-01-01

    Obesity leads to various changes in the body. Among them, the existing inflammatory process may lead to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, in turn, can trigger mitochondrial changes, which is called mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, excess nutrients supply (as it commonly is the case with obesity) can overwhelm the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, causing a mitochondrial dysfunction, and lead to a higher ROS formation. This increase in ROS production by the respiratory chain may also cause oxidative stress, which may exacerbate the inflammatory process in obesity. All these intracellular changes can lead to cellular apoptosis. These processes have been described in obesity as occurring mainly in peripheral tissues. However, some studies have already shown that obesity is also associated with changes in the central nervous system (CNS), with alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and in cerebral structures such as hypothalamus and hippocampus. In this sense, this review presents a general view about mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity, including related alterations, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, and focusing on the whole organism, covering alterations in peripheral tissues, BBB, and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-intensity laser irradiation at 660 nm stimulates cytochrome c oxidase in stressed fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houreld, Nicolette N; Masha, Roland T; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2012-07-01

    Low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been used to modulate a variety of biological processes, including diabetic wound healing. The mechanism of action is thought to exist primarily with the mitochondria. This study aimed to determine the effect of irradiation on normal, diabetic, and ischemic mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes. Normal, diabetic and ischemic human skin fibroblast mitochondria were irradiated in vitro at a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of either 5 or 15 J/cm(2). Non-irradiated mitochondria served as controls. Enzyme activities of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV were determined immediately post-irradiation. Normal, diabetic, and ischemic cells were irradiated and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and active mitochondria were determined by luminescence and fluorescent microscopy, respectively. Irradiated diabetic mitochondria at a fluence of 15 J/cm(2) showed a significant decrease in complex III activity (P < 0.05). Normal (P < 0.01) and diabetic (P < 0.05) mitochondria irradiated at either 5 or 15 J/cm(2) showed a significant increase in complex IV activity. ATP results showed a significant increase in irradiated normal cells (5 J/cm(2); P < 0.05) and diabetic cells (15 J/cm(2); P < 0.01). There was a higher accumulation of active mitochondria in irradiated cells than non-irradiated cells. Irradiation at 660 nm has the ability to influence mitochondrial enzyme activity, in particular cytochrome c oxidase. This leads to increased mitochondrial activity and ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and insecticide resistance in insects.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergé, J B; Feyereisen, R; Amichot, M

    1998-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in many cases of resistance of insects to insecticides. Resistance has long been associated with an increase in monooxygenase activities and with an increase in cytochrome P450 content. However, this increase does not always account for all of the resistance. In Drosophila melanogaster, we have shown that the overproduction of cytochrome P450 can be lost by the fly without a corresponding complete loss of resistance. These results prompted the seque...

  3. AKIP1 expression modulates mitochondrial function in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjuan Yu

    Full Text Available A kinase interacting protein 1 (AKIP1 is a molecular regulator of protein kinase A and nuclear factor kappa B signalling. Recent evidence suggests AKIP1 is increased in response to cardiac stress, modulates acute ischemic stress response, and is localized to mitochondria in cardiomyocytes. The mitochondrial function of AKIP1 is, however, still elusive. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial function of AKIP1 in a neonatal cardiomyocyte model of phenylephrine (PE-induced hypertrophy. Using a seahorse flux analyzer we show that PE stimulated the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR in cardiomyocytes. This was partially dependent on PE mediated AKIP1 induction, since silencing of AKIP1 attenuated the increase in OCR. Interestingly, AKIP1 overexpression alone was sufficient to stimulate mitochondrial OCR and in particular ATP-linked OCR. This was also true when pyruvate was used as a substrate, indicating that it was independent of glycolytic flux. The increase in OCR was independent of mitochondrial biogenesis, changes in ETC density or altered mitochondrial membrane potential. In fact, the respiratory flux was elevated per amount of ETC, possibly through enhanced ETC coupling. Furthermore, overexpression of AKIP1 reduced and silencing of AKIP1 increased mitochondrial superoxide production, suggesting that AKIP1 modulates the efficiency of electron flux through the ETC. Together, this suggests that AKIP1 overexpression improves mitochondrial function to enhance respiration without excess superoxide generation, thereby implicating a role for AKIP1 in mitochondrial stress adaptation. Upregulation of AKIP1 during different forms of cardiac stress may therefore be an adaptive mechanism to protect the heart.

  4. Prediction of cytochrome P450 mediated metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars; Oostenbrink, Chris; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) form one of the most important enzyme families involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. CYPs comprise many isoforms, which catalyze a wide variety of reactions, and potentially, a large number of different metabolites can be formed. However, it is often hard...... to rationalize what metabolites these enzymes generate. In recent years, many different in silico approaches have been developed to predict binding or regioselective product formation for the different CYP isoforms. These comprise ligand-based methods that are trained on experimental CYP data and structure...

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans as a Model System for Studying Drug Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard de Boer

    Full Text Available Today HIV-1 infection is recognized as a chronic disease with obligatory lifelong treatment to keep viral titers below detectable levels. The continuous intake of antiretroviral drugs however, leads to severe and even life-threatening side effects, supposedly by the deleterious impact of nucleoside-analogue type compounds on the functioning of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. For detailed investigation of the yet partially understood underlying mechanisms, the availability of a versatile model system is crucial. We therefore set out to develop the use of Caenorhabditis elegans to study drug induced mitochondrial toxicity. Using a combination of molecular-biological and functional assays, combined with a quantitative analysis of mitochondrial network morphology, we conclude that anti-retroviral drugs with similar working mechanisms can be classified into distinct groups based on their effects on mitochondrial morphology and biochemistry. Additionally we show that mitochondrial toxicity of antiretroviral drugs cannot be exclusively attributed to interference with the mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

  6. The mitochondrial genomes of the ciliates Euplotes minuta and Euplotes crassus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynh Minh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are thousands of very diverse ciliate species from which only a handful mitochondrial genomes have been studied so far. These genomes are rather similar because the ciliates analysed (Tetrahymena spp. and Paramecium aurelia are closely related. Here we study the mitochondrial genomes of the hypotrichous ciliates Euplotes minuta and Euplotes crassus. These ciliates are only distantly related to Tetrahymena spp. and Paramecium aurelia, but more closely related to Nyctotherus ovalis, which possesses a hydrogenosomal (mitochondrial genome. Results The linear mitochondrial genomes of the hypotrichous ciliates Euplotes minuta and Euplotes crassus were sequenced and compared with the mitochondrial genomes of several Tetrahymena species, Paramecium aurelia and the partially sequenced mitochondrial genome of the anaerobic ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis. This study reports new features such as long 5'gene extensions of several mitochondrial genes, extremely long cox1 and cox2 open reading frames and a large repeat in the middle of the linear mitochondrial genome. The repeat separates the open reading frames into two blocks, each having a single direction of transcription, from the repeat towards the ends of the chromosome. Although the Euplotes mitochondrial gene content is almost identical to that of Paramecium and Tetrahymena, the order of the genes is completely different. In contrast, the 33273 bp (excluding the repeat region piece of the mitochondrial genome that has been sequenced in both Euplotes species exhibits no difference in gene order. Unexpectedly, many of the mitochondrial genes of E. minuta encoding ribosomal proteins possess N-terminal extensions that are similar to mitochondrial targeting signals. Conclusion The mitochondrial genomes of the hypotrichous ciliates Euplotes minuta and Euplotes crassus are rather different from the previously studied genomes. Many genes are extended in size compared to mitochondrial

  7. Cilostazol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through activating the expression of PGC-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Luning; Li, Qiang; Sun, Bei; Xu, Zhiying; Ge, Zhiming

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► First time to show that cilostazol promotes the expressions of PGC-1α. ► First time to show that cilostazol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HUVECs. ► PKA/CREB pathway mediates the effect of cilostazol on PGC-1α expression. ► Suggesting the roles of cilostazol in mitochondrial dysfunction related disease. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently observed in vascular diseases. Cilostazol is a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Cilostazol increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels through inhibition of type III phosphodiesterase. The effects of cilostazol in mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. Cilostazol treated HUVECs displayed increased levels of ATP, mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA ratio, expressions of cytochrome B, and mitochondrial mass, suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis induced by cilostazol. The promoted mitochondrial biogenesis could be abolished by Protein kinase A (PKA) specific inhibitor H-89, implying that PKA pathway played a critical role in increased mitochondrial biogenesis after cilostazol treatment. Indeed, expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), NRF 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were significantly increased in HUVECs after incubation with cilostazol at both mRNA levels and protein levels. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α could abolish cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Enhanced expression of p-CREB and PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by H-89. Moreover, the increased expression of PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA at both mRNA and protein levels. All the results indicated that cilostazol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis through activating the expression of PGC-1α in

  8. Role of mitochondrial permeability transition in human renal tubular epithelial cell death induced by aristolochic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Xinming; Cai Yan; Gong Likun; Liu Linlin; Chen Fangping; Xiao Ying; Wu Xiongfei; Li Yan; Xue Xiang; Ren Jin

    2007-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA), a natural nephrotoxin and carcinogen, can induce a progressive tubulointerstitial nephropathy. However, the mechanism by which AA causes renal injury remains largely unknown. Here we reported that the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays an important role in the renal injury induced by aristolochic acid I (AAI). We found that in the presence of Ca 2+ , AAI caused mitochondrial swelling, leakage of Ca 2+ , membrane depolarization, and release of cytochrome c in isolated kidney mitochondria. These alterations were suppressed by cyclosporin A (CsA), an agent known to inhibit MPT. Culture of HK-2 cell, a human renal tubular epithelial cell line for 24 h with AAI caused a decrease in cellular ATP, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, and increase of caspase 3 activity. These toxic effects of AAI were attenuated by CsA and bongkrekic acid (BA), another specific MPT inhibitor. Furthermore, AAI greatly inhibited the activity of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) in isolated mitochondria. We suggested that ANT may mediate, at least in part, the AAI-induced MPT. Taken together, these results suggested that MPT plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HK-2 cell injury induced by AAI and implied that MPT might contribute to human nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid

  9. Impaired Mitochondrial Respiratory Functions and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbuswamy K. Prabu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown a tissue-specific increase in oxidative stress in the early stages of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. In this study, we investigated oxidative stress-related long-term complications and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the different tissues of STZ-induced diabetic rats (>15 mM blood glucose for 8 weeks. These animals showed a persistent increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively production. Oxidative protein carbonylation was also increased with the maximum effect observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes ubiquinol: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (Complex III and cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV were significantly decreased while that of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex II were moderately increased in diabetic rats, which was confirmed by the increased expression of the 70 kDa Complex II sub-unit. Mitochondrial matrix aconitase, a ROS sensitive enzyme, was markedly inhibited in the diabetic rat tissues. Increased expression of oxidative stress marker proteins Hsp-70 and HO-1 was also observed along with increased expression of nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that mitochondrial respiratory complexes may play a critical role in ROS/RNS homeostasis and oxidative stress related changes in type 1 diabetes and may have implications in the etiology of diabetes and its complications.

  10. Prediction of activation energies for aromatic oxidation by cytochrome P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Ryde, Ulf; Olsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We have estimated the activation energy for aromatic oxidation by compound I in cytochrome P450 for a diverse set of 17 substrates using state-of-the-art density functional theory (B3LYP) with large basis sets. The activation energies vary from 60 to 87 kJ/mol. We then test if these results can...... be reproduced by computationally less demanding methods. The best methods (a B3LYP calculation of the activation energy of a methoxy-radical model or a partial least-squares model of the semiempirical AM1 bond dissociation energies and spin densities of the tetrahedral intermediate for both a hydroxyl...

  11. Upper and lower limits of the proton stoichiometry of cytochrome c oxidation in rat liver mitoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Costa, L E; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-25

    The stoichiometry of vectorial H+ translocation coupled to oxidation of added ferrocytochrome c by O2 via cytochrome-c oxidase of rat liver mitoplasts was determined employing a fast-responding O2 electrode. Electron flow was initiated by addition of either ferrocytochrome c or O2. When the rates were extrapolated to level flow, the H+/O ratios in both cases were less than but closely approached 4; the directly observed H+/O ratios significantly exceeded 3.0. The mechanistic H+/O ratio was then more closely fixed by a kinetic approach that eliminates the necessity for measuring energy leaks and is independent of any particular model of the mechanism of energy transduction. From two sets of kinetic measurements, an overestimate and an underestimate and thus the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic H+/O ratio could be obtained. In the first set, the utilization of respiratory energy was systematically varied through changes in the concentrations of valinomycin or K+. From the slope of a plot of the initial rates of H+ ejection (JH) and O2 uptake (JO) obtained in such experiments, the upper limit of the H+/O ratio was in the range 4.12-4.19. In the second set of measurements, the rate of respiratory energy production was varied by inhibiting electron transport. From the slope of a plot of JH versus JO, the lower limit of the H+/O ratio, equivalent to that at level flow, was in the range 3.83-3.96. These data fix the mechanistic H+/O ratio for the cytochrome oxidase reaction of mitoplasts at 4.0, thus confirming our earlier measurements (Reynafarje, B., Alexandre, A., Davies, P., and Lehninger, A. L. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 7218-7222). Possible reasons for discrepancies in published reports on the H+/O ratio of cytochrome oxidase in various mitochondrial and reconstituted systems are discussed.

  12. Ginsenoside Rb1 Attenuates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Cells via Protection of Mitochondria and Inhibition of AIF and Cytochrome c Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Ge

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of mitochondria in the protective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on cellular apoptosis caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation, in this study, MTT assay, TUNEL staining, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to examine the cellular viability, apoptosis, ROS level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the distribution of apoptosis inducing factor, cytochrome c, Bax and Bcl-2 in nucleus, mitochondria and cytoplasm. We found that pretreatment with GRb1 improved the cellular viability damaged by OGD. Moreover, GRb1 inhibited apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells induced by OGD. Further studies showed that the elevation of cellular reactive oxygen species levels and the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential caused by OGD were both counteracted by GRb1. Additionally, GRb1 not only suppressed the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor into nucleus and cytochrome c into cytoplasm, but also inhibited the increase of Bax within mitochondria and alleviated the decrease of mitochondrial Bcl-2. Our study indicates that the protection of GRb1 on OGD-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells is associated with its protection on mitochondrial function and inhibition of release of AIF and cytochrome c.

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Coupling Mitochondrial Fitness with Healthy Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, David; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in mitochondrial function and the accumulation of abnormal mitochondria. However, the precise mechanisms by which aging promotes these mitochondrial alterations and the role of the latter in aging are still not fully understood. Mitochondrial dynamics is a key process regulating mitochondrial function and quality. Altered expression of some mitochondrial dynamics proteins has been recently associated with aging and with age-related alterations in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mice, and humans. Here, we review the link between alterations in mitochondrial dynamics, aging, and age-related impairment. We propose that the dysregulation of mitochondrial dynamics leads to age-induced accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria and contributes to alterations linked to aging, such as diabetes and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Population genetic structure and demographic history of Atrina pectinata based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Xiu Xue

    Full Text Available The pen shell, Atrina pectinata, is one of the commercial bivalves in East Asia and thought to be recently affected by anthropogenic pressure (habitat destruction and/or fishing pressure. Information on its population genetic structure is crucial for the conservation of A. pectinata. Considering its long pelagic larval duration and iteroparity with high fecundity, the genetic structure for A. pectinata could be expected to be weak at a fine scale. However, the unusual oceanography in the coasts of China and Korea suggests potential for restricted dispersal of pelagic larvae and geographical differentiation. In addition, environmental changes associated with Pleistocene sea level fluctuations on the East China Sea continental shelf may also have strongly influenced historical population demography and genetic diversity of marine organisms. Here, partial sequences of the mitochondrial Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene and seven microsatellite loci were used to estimate population genetic structure and demographic history of seven samples from Northern China coast and one sample from North Korea coast. Despite high levels of genetic diversity within samples, there was no genetic differentiation among samples from Northern China coast and low but significant genetic differentiation between some of the Chinese samples and the North Korean sample. A late Pleistocene population expansion, probably after the Last Glacial Maximum, was also demonstrated for A. pectinata samples. No recent genetic bottleneck was detected in any of the eight samples. We concluded that both historical recolonization (through population range expansion and demographic expansion in the late Pleistocene and current gene flow (through larval dispersal were responsible for the weak level of genetic structure detected in A. pectinata.

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kunz, W.S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 35-40 ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR GA309/08/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epilepsy * mitochondrial dysfunction * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.025, year: 2012

  17. Fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction regulates mitochondrial-network structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Wellman, Tyler J.; Martinez, Nuria; Allen, Philip G.; Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2015-10-01

    Cells can be exposed to irregular mechanical fluctuations, such as those arising from changes in blood pressure. Here, we report that ATP production, assessed through changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, is downregulated in vascular smooth muscle cells in culture exposed to monotonous stretch cycles when compared with cells exposed to a variable cyclic stretch that incorporates physiological levels of cycle-by-cycle variability in stretch amplitude. Variable stretch enhances ATP production by increasing the expression of ATP synthase’s catalytic domain, cytochrome c oxidase and its tyrosine phosphorylation, mitofusins and PGC-1α. Such a fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction mechanism is mediated by motor proteins and by the enhancement of microtubule-, actin- and mitochondrial-network complexity. We also show that, in aorta rings isolated from rats, monotonous stretch downregulates--whereas variable stretch maintains--physiological vessel-wall contractility through mitochondrial ATP production. Our results have implications for ATP-dependent and mechanosensitive intracellular processes.

  18. Lactate dehydrogenase is not a mitochondrial enzyme in human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans N; van Hall, Gerrit; Rasmussen, Ulla F

    2002-01-01

    The presence of lactate dehydrogenase in skeletal muscle mitochondria was investigated to clarify whether lactate is a possible substrate for mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were prepared from 100 mg samples of human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle. All fractions from the preparation...... procedure were assayed for marker enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The mitochondrial fraction contained no LDH activity (detection limit approximately 0.05 % of the tissue activity) and the distribution of LDH activity among the fractions paralleled that of pyruvate kinase, i.e. LDH was fractionated...... as a cytoplasmic enzyme. Respiratory experiments with the mitochondrial fraction also indicated the absence of LDH. Lactate did not cause respiration, nor did it affect the respiration of pyruvate + malate. The major part of the native cytochrome c was retained in the isolated mitochondria, which, furthermore...

  19. Opposing effects of nitric oxide and prostaglandin inhibition on muscle mitochondrial VO2 during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert C; Fuentes, Teresa; Hellsten, Ylva

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG) together play a role in regulation blood flow during exercise. NO also regulates mitochondrial oxygen consumption through competitive binding to cytochrome c oxidase. Indomethacin both uncouples and inhibits the electron transport chain in a concentration......-dependent manner, and thus inhibition of NO and PG may regulate both muscle oxygen delivery and utilization. The purpose of this study was to examine the independent and combined effects of NO and PG blockade (L-NMMA and indomethacin respectively) on mitochondrial respiration in human muscle following knee...... extension (KE) exercise. Mitochondrial respiration was measured ex-vivo by high resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized fibers following 6 min KE in control (CON, n=8), arterial infusion of LNMMA (n=4) and Indo (n=4) followed by combined inhibition of NO and PG (L-NMMA + Indo, n=8). ADP...

  20. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Oliver, Lisa [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vallette, Francois M. [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Mignotte, Bernard [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vayssiere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.vayssiere@uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France)

    2009-10-02

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  1. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie; Oliver, Lisa; Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore; Vallette, Francois M.; Mignotte, Bernard; Vayssiere, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  2. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 Inhibitors Protect against Ischemic Toxicity through Attenuating Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uptake from Endoplasmic Reticulum Store in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular calcium homeostasis disorder and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases, including ischemic brain injury. An imbalance in mitochondrial fission and fusion is one of the most important structural abnormalities found in a large number of mitochondrial dysfunction related diseases. Here, we investigated the effects of mitochondrial division inhibitor A (mdivi A and mdivi B, two small molecule inhibitors of mitochondrial fission protein dunamin-related protein 1 (Drp-1, in neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in PC12 cells. We found that mdivi A and mdivi B inhibited OGD-induced neuronal injury through attenuating apoptotic cell death. These two inhibitors also preserved mitochondrial function, as evidenced by reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and cytochrome c release, as well as prevented loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Moreover, mdivi A and mdivi B significantly suppressed mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, but had no effect on cytoplasmic Ca2+ after OGD injury. The results of calcium imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that Drp-1 inhibitors attenuated endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+ release and prevented ER morphological changes induced by OGD. These results demonstrate that Drp-1 inhibitors protect against ischemic neuronal injury through inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake from the ER store and attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. A protocol for isolating insect mitochondrial genomes: a case study of NUMT in Melipona flavolineata (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Françoso, Elaine; Gomes, Fernando; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial DNA insertions (NUMTs) are mitochondrial DNA sequences that have been transferred into the nucleus and are recognized by the presence of indels and stop codons. Although NUMTs have been identified in a diverse range of species, their discovery was frequently accidental. Here, our initial goal was to develop and standardize a simple method for isolating NUMTs from the nuclear genome of a single bee. Subsequently, we tested our new protocol by determining whether the indels and stop codons of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequence of Melipona flavolineata are of nuclear origin. The new protocol successfully demonstrated the presence of a COI NUMT. In addition to NUMT investigations, the protocol described here will also be very useful for studying mitochondrial mutations related to diseases and for sequencing complete mitochondrial genomes with high read coverage by Next-Generation technology.

  4. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  5. Mitochondrial Cytochrome oxidase 1 phylogeny supports alternative taxonomic scheme for the marine Haplosclerida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raleigh, J.; Redmond, N.E.; Delahan, E.; Tropey, S.; van Soest, R.W.M.; Kelly, M.; McCormack, G.P.

    2007-01-01

    Recent molecular studies have shown that the sponge order Haploslcerida is polyphyletic as the freshwater sponges appear to be more closely related to other demosponges than they are to the marine haplosclerids. Within the marine haplosclerid clade relationships viewed via 18S and 28S rRNA gene

  6. Biological roles of Cytochrome c: mitochondrial electron transport, programmed cell death and gain of peroxidatic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Colman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available El citocromo c (cyt c es una pequeña proteína monomérica de 13,0 kDa, que posee carga neta positiva a pH fisiológico. En su estructura se destaca un grupo hemo hexa-coordinado siendo la His18 y la Met80 la quinta y sexta posición de coordinación, respectivamente. Es una molécula soluble que se asocia mediante interacciones electrostáticas a la parte externa de la membrana mitocondrial interna, donde cumple una importante función como transportador de electrones entre los complejos III y IV de la cadena respiratoria mitocondrial, formando parte de una de las rutas catabólicas principales que llevan a la generación de ATP. Además, el cyt c participa en otras dos funciones esenciales para la célula: la apoptosis y la peroxidación de la cardiolipina de membrana. La actividad peroxidasa del cyt c es esencial para el inicio de la apoptosis, debido a que provoca la oxigenación específica de la cardiolipina para producir hidroperóxidos de cardiolipina, necesarios para la liberación de otros factores pro-apoptóticos. Durante la apoptosis, el cyt c se libera desde el espacio intermembrana de la mitocondria hacia el citosol, formando un complejo con APAF-1 y ATP, modulando las vías dependientes de caspasas. Esta función del cyt c también es muy importante ya que la muerte celular programada es un proceso celular fundamental para la correcta eliminación de células dañadas, evitando la diseminación de los restos celulares. La presente monografía pretende reunir información sobre estas tres principales funciones del cyt c, que dejan en manifiesto su importancia para la vida celular.

  7. PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene among Haruan (Channa striatus) in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mohamamd Hafiz Abdul; Ismail, Patimah; Alias, Rozila; Muhammad, Norwati; Mat Jais, Abdul Manan

    2012-02-15

    Haruan (Channa striatus) is in great demand in the Malaysian domestic fish market. In the present study, mtDNA cyt b was used to investigate genetic variation of C. striatus among populations in Peninsular Malaysia. The overall population of C. striatus demonstrated a high level of haplotype diversity (h) and a low-to-moderate level of nucleotide diversity (π). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results showed a significantly different genetic differentiation among 6 populations (F(ST)=0.37566, P=0.01). Gene flow (Nm) was high and ranged from 0.32469 to infinity (∞). No significant relationship between genetic distance and geographic distance was detected. A UPGMA tree based on the distance matrix of net interpopulation nucleotide divergence (d(A)) and haplotype network of mtDNA cyt b revealed that C. striatus is divided into 2 major clades. The neutrality and mismatch distribution tests for all populations suggested that C. striatus in the study areas had undergone population expansion. The estimated time of population expansion in the mtDNA cyt b of C. striatus populations occurred 0.72-6.19 million years ago. Genetic diversity of mtDNA cyt b and population structure among Haruan populations in Peninsular Malaysia will be useful in fisheries management for standardization for Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) in fish-farming technology, as well as providing the basis for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Mitochondrial Protein Atlas: A Database of Experimentally Verified Information on the Human Mitochondrial Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Noa; Eichler, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Given its central role in various biological systems, as well as its involvement in numerous pathologies, the mitochondrion is one of the best-studied organelles. However, although the mitochondrial genome has been extensively investigated, protein-level information remains partial, and in many cases, hypothetical. The Mitochondrial Protein Atlas (MPA; URL: lifeserv.bgu.ac.il/wb/jeichler/MPA ) is a database that provides a complete, manually curated inventory of only experimentally validated human mitochondrial proteins. The MPA presently contains 911 unique protein entries, each of which is associated with at least one experimentally validated and referenced mitochondrial localization. The MPA also contains experimentally validated and referenced information defining function, structure, involvement in pathologies, interactions with other MPA proteins, as well as the method(s) of analysis used in each instance. Connections to relevant external data sources are offered for each entry, including links to NCBI Gene, PubMed, and Protein Data Bank. The MPA offers a prototype for other information sources that allow for a distinction between what has been confirmed and what remains to be verified experimentally.

  9. Use the Protonmotive Force: Mitochondrial Uncoupling and Reactive Oxygen Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Brandon J; Trewin, Adam J; Amitrano, Andrea M; Kim, Minsoo; Wojtovich, Andrew P

    2018-04-04

    Mitochondrial respiration results in an electrochemical proton gradient, or protonmotive force (pmf), across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The pmf is a form of potential energy consisting of charge (∆ψ m ) and chemical (∆pH) components, that together drive ATP production. In a process called uncoupling, proton leak into the mitochondrial matrix independent of ATP production dissipates the pmf and energy is lost as heat. Other events can directly dissipate the pmf independent of ATP production as well, such as chemical exposure or mechanisms involving regulated mitochondrial membrane electrolyte transport. Uncoupling has defined roles in metabolic plasticity and can be linked through signal transduction to physiologic events. In the latter case, the pmf impacts mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Although capable of molecular damage, ROS also have signaling properties that depend on the timing, location, and quantity of their production. In this review, we provide a general overview of mitochondrial ROS production, mechanisms of uncoupling, and how these work in tandem to affect physiology and pathologies, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, and immunity. Overall, we highlight that isolated bioenergetic models-mitochondria and cells-only partially recapitulate the complex link between the pmf and ROS signaling that occurs in vivo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential efficacy of mitochondrial genes for animal DNA barcoding: a case study using eutherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Arong; Zhang, Aibing; Ho, Simon Yw; Xu, Weijun; Zhang, Yanzhou; Shi, Weifeng; Cameron, Stephen L; Zhu, Chaodong

    2011-01-28

    A well-informed choice of genetic locus is central to the efficacy of DNA barcoding. Current DNA barcoding in animals involves the use of the 5' half of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 gene (CO1) to diagnose and delimit species. However, there is no compelling a priori reason for the exclusive focus on this region, and it has been shown that it performs poorly for certain animal groups. To explore alternative mitochondrial barcoding regions, we compared the efficacy of the universal CO1 barcoding region with the other mitochondrial protein-coding genes in eutherian mammals. Four criteria were used for this comparison: the number of recovered species, sequence variability within and between species, resolution to taxonomic levels above that of species, and the degree of mutational saturation. Based on 1,179 mitochondrial genomes of eutherians, we found that the universal CO1 barcoding region is a good representative of mitochondrial genes as a whole because the high species-recovery rate (> 90%) was similar to that of other mitochondrial genes, and there were no significant differences in intra- or interspecific variability among genes. However, an overlap between intra- and interspecific variability was still problematic for all mitochondrial genes. Our results also demonstrated that any choice of mitochondrial gene for DNA barcoding failed to offer significant resolution at higher taxonomic levels. We suggest that the CO1 barcoding region, the universal DNA barcode, is preferred among the mitochondrial protein-coding genes as a molecular diagnostic at least for eutherian species identification. Nevertheless, DNA barcoding with this marker may still be problematic for certain eutherian taxa and our approach can be used to test potential barcoding loci for such groups.

  11. Tissue- and Condition-Specific Isoforms of Mammalian Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunits: From Function to Human Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Sinkler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c oxidase (COX is the terminal enzyme of the electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from cytochrome c to oxygen. COX consists of 14 subunits, three and eleven encoded, respectively, by the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Tissue- and condition-specific isoforms have only been reported for COX but not for the other oxidative phosphorylation complexes, suggesting a fundamental requirement to fine-tune and regulate the essentially irreversible reaction catalyzed by COX. This article briefly discusses the assembly of COX in mammals and then reviews the functions of the six nuclear-encoded COX subunits that are expressed as isoforms in specialized tissues including those of the liver, heart and skeletal muscle, lung, and testes: COX IV-1, COX IV-2, NDUFA4, NDUFA4L2, COX VIaL, COX VIaH, COX VIb-1, COX VIb-2, COX VIIaH, COX VIIaL, COX VIIaR, COX VIIIH/L, and COX VIII-3. We propose a model in which the isoforms mediate the interconnected regulation of COX by (1 adjusting basal enzyme activity to mitochondrial capacity of a given tissue; (2 allosteric regulation to adjust energy production to need; (3 altering proton pumping efficiency under certain conditions, contributing to thermogenesis; (4 providing a platform for tissue-specific signaling; (5 stabilizing the COX dimer; and (6 modulating supercomplex formation.

  12. Menadione-Induced DNA Damage Leads to Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Fragmentation During Rosette Formation in Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halilovic, Adna; Schmedt, Thore; Benischke, Anne-Sophie; Hamill, Cecily; Chen, Yuming; Santos, Janine Hertzog; Jurkunas, Ula V

    2016-06-20

    Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), a leading cause of age-related corneal edema requiring transplantation, is characterized by rosette formation of corneal endothelium with ensuing apoptosis. We sought to determine whether excess of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species leads to chronic accumulation of oxidative DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, instigating cell death. We modeled the pathognomonic rosette formation of postmitotic corneal cells by increasing endogenous cellular oxidative stress with menadione (MN) and performed a temporal analysis of its effect in normal (HCEnC, HCECi) and FECD (FECDi) cells and ex vivo specimens. FECDi and FECD ex vivo specimens exhibited extensive mtDNA and nDNA damage as detected by quantitative PCR. Exposure to MN triggered an increase in mitochondrial superoxide levels and led to mtDNA and nDNA damage, while DNA amplification was restored with NAC pretreatment. Furthermore, MN exposure led to a decrease in ΔΨm and adenosine triphosphate levels in normal cells, while FECDi exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction at baseline. Mitochondrial fragmentation and cytochrome c release were detected in FECD tissue and after MN treatment of HCEnCs. Furthermore, cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3 followed MN-induced cytochrome c release in HCEnCs. This study provides the first line of evidence that accumulation of oxidative DNA damage leads to rosette formation, loss of functionally intact mitochondria via fragmentation, and subsequent cell death during postmitotic cell degeneration of ocular tissue. MN induced rosette formation, along with mtDNA and nDNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and fragmentation, leading to activation of the intrinsic apoptosis via caspase cleavage and cytochrome c release. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 1072-1083.

  13. The SMARTCyp cytochrome P450 metabolism prediction server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Olsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The SMARTCyp server is the first web application for site of metabolism prediction of cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism.......The SMARTCyp server is the first web application for site of metabolism prediction of cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism....

  14. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moepert, Kristin [Silence Therapeutics AG, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Hajek, Petr [Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Frank, Stephan [Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Basel, CH-4031 Basel (Switzerland); Chen, Christiane [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Children' s Hospital Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Kaufmann, Joerg [Silence Therapeutics AG, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Santel, Ansgar, E-mail: a.santel@silence-therapeutics.com [Silence Therapeutics AG, 13125 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-08-01

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  15. Roles of Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, PGC-1α and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-I Yang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary physiological function of mitochondria is to generate adenosine triphosphate through oxidative phosphorylation via the electron transport chain. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS as byproducts generated from mitochondria have been implicated in acute brain injuries such as stroke from cerebral ischemia. It was well-documented that mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway involves pro- and anti-apoptotic protein binding, release of cytochrome c, leading ultimately to neuronal death. On the other hand, mitochondria also play a role to counteract the detrimental effects elicited by excessive oxidative stress. Recent studies have revealed that oxidative stress and the redox state of ischemic neurons are also implicated in the signaling pathway that involves peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ (PPARγ co-activator 1α (PGC1-α. PGC1-α is a master regulator of ROS scavenging enzymes including manganese superoxide dismutase 2 and the uncoupling protein 2, both are mitochondrial proteins, and may contribute to neuronal survival. PGC1-α is also involved in mitochondrial biogenesis that is vital for cell survival. Experimental evidence supports the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress as determinants of neuronal death as well as endogenous protective mechanisms after stroke. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying cerebral ischemia involving ROS, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, mitochondrial proteins capable of ROS scavenging, and mitochondrial biogenesis.

  16. Modulation of liver mitochondrial NOS is implicated in thyroid-dependent regulation of O(2) uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, M C; Peralta, J G; Converso, D P; Finocchietto, P V; Rebagliati, I; Zaninovich, A A; Poderoso, J J

    2001-12-01

    Changes in O(2) uptake at different thyroid status have been explained on the basis of the modulation of mitochondrial enzymes and membrane biophysical properties. Regarding the nitric oxide (NO) effects, we tested whether liver mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) participates in the modulation of O(2) uptake in thyroid disorders. Wistar rats were inoculated with 400 microCi (131)I (hypothyroid group), 20 microg thyroxine (T(4))/100 g body wt administered daily for 2 wk (hyperthyroid group) or vehicle (control). Basal metabolic rate, mitochondrial function, and mtNOS activity were analyzed. Systemic and liver mitochondrial O(2) uptake and cytochrome oxidase activity were lower in hypothyroid rats with respect to controls; mitochondrial parameters were further decreased by L-arginine (-42 and -34%, P activity (260%) were selectively increased in hypothyroidism and reverted by hormone replacement without changes in other nitric oxide isoforms. Moreover, mtNOS activity correlated with serum 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)) and O(2) uptake. Increased mtNOS activity was also observed in skeletal muscle mitochondria from hypothyroid rats. Therefore, we suggest that modulation of mtNOS is a substantial part of thyroid effects on mitochondrial O(2) uptake.

  17. Inhibition of NAPDH Oxidase 2 (NOX2 Prevents Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Abnormalities Caused by Saturated Fat in Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroy C Joseph

    Full Text Available Obesity and high saturated fat intake increase the risk of heart failure and arrhythmias. The molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that physiologic levels of saturated fat could increase mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS in cardiomyocytes, leading to abnormalities of calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. We investigated the effect of saturated fat on mitochondrial function and calcium homeostasis in isolated ventricular myocytes. The saturated fatty acid palmitate causes a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in cardiomyocytes. Palmitate, but not the monounsaturated fatty acid oleate, causes an increase in both total cellular ROS and mitochondrial ROS. Palmitate depolarizes the mitochondrial inner membrane and causes mitochondrial calcium overload by increasing sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Inhibitors of PKC or NOX2 prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and the increase in ROS, demonstrating that PKC-NOX2 activation is also required for amplification of palmitate induced-ROS. Cardiomyocytes from mice with genetic deletion of NOX2 do not have palmitate-induced ROS or mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that palmitate induces mitochondrial ROS that is amplified by NOX2, causing greater mitochondrial ROS generation and partial depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane. The abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak caused by palmitate could promote arrhythmia and heart failure. NOX2 inhibition is a potential therapy for heart disease caused by diabetes or obesity.

  18. Ontogeny and nutritional programming of mitochondrial proteins in the ovine kidney, liver and lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, D P; Mostyn, A; Hyatt, M A; Kurlak, L O; Budge, H; Stephenson, T; Symonds, M E

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated the developmental and nutritional programming of two important mitochondrial proteins, namely voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and cytochrome c, in the sheep kidney, liver and lung. The effect of maternal nutrient restriction between early and mid-gestation (i.e. 28- to 80-day gestation, the period of maximal placental growth) on the abundance of these proteins was also examined in fetal and juvenile offspring. Fetuses were sampled at 80 and 140 days of gestation (term approximately 147 days), and postnatal animals at 1 and 30 days and 6 months of age. The abundance of VDAC peaked at 140 days of gestation in the lung, compared with 1 day after birth in the kidney and liver, whereas cytochrome c abundance was greatest at 140 days of gestation in the liver, 1 day after birth in the kidney and 6 months of age in lungs. This differential ontogeny in mitochondrial protein abundance between tissues was accompanied with very different tissue-specific responses to changes in maternal food intake. In the liver, maternal nutrient restriction only increased mitochondrial protein abundance at 80 days of gestation, compared with no effect in the kidney. In contrast, in the lung mitochondrial protein, abundance was raised near to term, whereas VDAC abundance was decreased by 6 months of age. These findings demonstrate the tissue-specific nature of mitochondrial protein development that reflects differences in functional adaptation after birth. The divergence in mitochondrial response between tissues to maternal nutrient restriction early in pregnancy further reflects these differential ontogenies.

  19. Mitochondrial cristae remodelling is associated with disrupted OPA1 oligomerisation in the Huntington's disease R6/2 fragment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Tanja; Kojer, Kerstin; Birth, Nathalie; Hallitsch, Jaqueline; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Orth, Michael

    2017-02-01

    There is evidence of an imbalance of mitochondrial fission and fusion in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and HD animal models. Fission and fusion are important for mitochondrial homeostasis including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance and may be relevant for the selective striatal mtDNA depletion that we observed in the R6/2 fragment HD mouse model. We aimed to investigate the fission/fusion balance and the integrity of the mitochondrial membrane system in cortex and striatum of end-stage R6/2 mice and wild-type animals. Mitochondrial morphology was determined using electron microscopy, and transcript and protein levels of factors that play a key role in fission and fusion, including DRP1, mitofusin 1 and 2, mitofilin and OPA1, and cytochrome c and caspase 3 were assessed by RT-qPCR and immunoblotting. OPA1 oligomerisation was evaluated using blue native gels. In striatum and cortex of R6/2 mice, mitochondrial cristae morphology was abnormal. Mitofilin and the overall levels of the fission and fusion factors were unaffected; however, OPA1 oligomerisation was abnormal in striatum and cortex of R6/2 mice. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic cytochrome c levels were similar in R6/2 and wild-type mice with no significant increase of activated caspase 3. Our results indicate that the integrity of the mitochondrial cristae is compromised in striatum and cortex of the R6/2 mice and that this is most likely caused by impaired OPA1 oligomerisation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tributyltin (TBT) and mitochondrial respiration in mussel digestive gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Salvatore; Ventrella, Vittoria; Trombetti, Fabiana; Pirini, Maurizio; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of organotins and especially tri-n-butyltin (TBT) on mitochondria is well known. However as far as we are aware, effects on mitochondrial respiration are unexplored in mollusks. In this work mitochondria isolated from the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis and susceptive to the classical respiratory chain inhibitors, were assayed in the presence of micromolar TBT concentrations to investigate mitochondrial respiratory activities. Intact and freeze-thawed mitochondria were used. TBT significantly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of glutamate/malate or succinate as substrates. Conversely cytochrome c oxidase activity (complex IV), assayed both polarographically and spectrophotometrically, was unaffected. The addition of 1,4-dithioerythritol (DTE) decreased the TBT-driven inhibition of complexes I and III. The TBT capability of covalent binding to thiol groups of mitochondrial proteins in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed by the aid of Ellman's reagent. Data strongly suggests that TBT may prevent the electron transfer from complexes I and III to downhill respiratory chain complexes by binding to critical SH residues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving Mitochondrial Function Protects Bumblebees from Neonicotinoid Pesticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Powner

    Full Text Available Global pollination is threatened by declining insect pollinator populations that may be linked to neonicotinoid pesticide use. Neonicotinoids over stimulate neurons and depolarize their mitochondria, producing immobility and death. However, mitochondrial function can be improved by near infrared light absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondrial respiration. In flies, daily exposure to 670nm light throughout life increases average lifespan and aged mobility, and reduces systemic inflammation. Here we treat bumble bees with Imidacloprid a common neonicotinoid. This undermined ATP and rapidly induced immobility and reduced visual function and survival. Bees exposed to insecticide and daily to 670nm light showed corrected ATP levels and significantly improved mobility allowing them to feed. Physiological recordings from eyes revealed that light exposure corrected deficits induced by the pesticide. Overall, death rates in bees exposed to insecticide but also given 670nm light were indistinguishable from controls. When Imidacloprid and light exposure were withdrawn, survival was maintained. Bees and insects generally cannot see deep red light so it does not disturb their behaviour. Hence, we show that deep red light exposure that improves mitochondrial function, reverses the sensory and motor deficits induced by Imidacloprid. These results may have important implications as light delivery is economic and can be placed in hives/colonies.

  2. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H., E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  3. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-01

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  4. MicroRNA-661 Enhances TRAIL or STS Induced Osteosarcoma Cell Apoptosis by Modulating the Expression of Cytochrome c1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Fan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Osteosarcoma (OS is an aggressive bone malignancy that affects rapidly growing bones and is associated with a poor prognosis. Our previous study showed that cytochrome c1 (CYC1, a subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III of the mitochondrial electron chain, is overexpressed in human OS tissues and cell lines and its silencing induces apoptosis in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the modulation of CYC1 expression in OS and its role in the resistance of OS to apoptosis. Methods: qRT-PCR, luciferase reporter assay, western blotting, fow cytometry, and animal experiments were performed in this study. Results: MicroRNA (miR-661 was identified as a downregulated miRNA in OS tissues and cells and shown to directly target CYC1. Ectopically expressed miR-661 inhibited OS cell growth, promoted apoptosis, and reduced the activity of mitochondrial complex III. miR-661 overexpression enhanced TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis and promoted the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, which induced caspase-9 activation, and these effects were abolished by a caspase-3 inhibitor. Overexpression of CYC1 rescued the effects of miR-661 on sensitizing OS cells to TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis, indicating that the antitumor effect of miR-661 is mediated by the downregulation of CYC1. In vivo, miR-661 overexpression sensitized tumors to TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis in a xenograft mouse model, and these effects were attenuated by co-expression of CYC1. Conclusion: Taken together, our results indicate that miR-661 plays a tumor suppressor role in OS mediated by the downregulation of CYC1, suggesting a potential mechanism underlying cell death resistance in OS.

  5. The postglacial recolonization of Northern Europe by Rana arvalis as revealed by microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, T; Merilä, J

    2009-02-01

    The postglacial history of the moor frog (Rana arvalis) in Northern Europe was investigated with the aid of eight variable microsatellite loci and a 661 bp sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. A division between eastern and western mitochondrial lineages was discovered, supporting two recolonization routes to Fennoscandia since the last glacial maximum. This result was corroborated by the microsatellite data, which revealed a contact zone between the two lineages in Northern Sweden. These findings add to the increasing evidence that an intraspecific genetic biodiversity founded on the existence of eastern and western clades is a common element in Fennoscandian fauna and flora.

  6. The erratic mitochondrial clock: variations of mutation rate, not population size, affect mtDNA diversity across birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last ten years, major advances have been made in characterizing and understanding the evolution of mitochondrial DNA, the most popular marker of molecular biodiversity. Several important results were recently reported using mammals as model organisms, including (i the absence of relationship between mitochondrial DNA diversity and life-history or ecological variables, (ii the absence of prominent adaptive selection, contrary to what was found in invertebrates, and (iii the unexpectedly large variation in neutral substitution rate among lineages, revealing a possible link with species maximal longevity. We propose to challenge these results thanks to the bird/mammal comparison. Direct estimates of population size are available in birds, and this group presents striking life-history trait differences with mammals (higher mass-specific metabolic rate and longevity. These properties make birds the ideal model to directly test for population size effects, and to discriminate between competing hypotheses about the causes of substitution rate variation. Results A phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome b third-codon position confirms that the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate is quite variable in birds, passerines being the fastest evolving order. On average, mitochondrial DNA evolves slower in birds than in mammals of similar body size. This result is in agreement with the longevity hypothesis, and contradicts the hypothesis of a metabolic rate-dependent mutation rate. Birds show no footprint of adaptive selection on cytochrome b evolutionary patterns, but no link between direct estimates of population size and cytochrome b diversity. The mutation rate is the best predictor we have of within-species mitochondrial diversity in birds. It partly explains the differences in mitochondrial DNA diversity patterns observed between mammals and birds, previously interpreted as reflecting Hill-Robertson interferences with the W

  7. Genotypes and clinical phenotypes in children with cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darin, N; Moslemi, A-R; Lebon, S; Rustin, P; Holme, E; Oldfors, A; Tulinius, M

    2003-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency has been associated with a wide spectrum of clinical features and may be caused by mutations in different genes of both the mitochondrial and the nuclear DNA. In an attempt to correlate the clinical phenotype with the genotype in 16 childhood cases, mtDNA was analysed for deletion, depletion, and mutations in the three genes encoding COX subunits and the 22 tRNA genes. Furthermore, nuclear DNA was analysed for mutations in the SURF1, SCO2, COX10, and COX17 genes and cases with mtDNA depletion were analysed for mutations in the TK2 gene. SURF1-mutations were identified in three out of four cases with Leigh syndrome while a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA (trp) gene was identified in the fourth. One case with mtDNA depletion had mutations in the TK2 gene. In two cases with leukoencephalopathy, one case with encephalopathy, five cases with fatal infantile myopathy and cardiomyopathy, two cases with benign infantile myopathy, and one case with mtDNA depletion, no mutations were identified. We conclude that COX deficiency in childhood should be suspected in a wide range of clinical settings and although an increasing number of genetic defects have been identified, the underlying mutations remain unclear in the majority of the cases.

  8. Mam33 promotes cytochrome c oxidase subunit I translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Gabrielle A; Henry, Michael F

    2015-08-15

    Three mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, Cox1, Cox2, and Cox3, comprise the core of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. Gene-specific translational activators ensure that these respiratory chain subunits are synthesized at the correct location and in stoichiometric ratios to prevent unassembled protein products from generating free oxygen radicals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nuclear-encoded proteins Mss51 and Pet309 specifically activate mitochondrial translation of the largest subunit, Cox1. Here we report that Mam33 is a third COX1 translational activator in yeast mitochondria. Mam33 is required for cells to adapt efficiently from fermentation to respiration. In the absence of Mam33, Cox1 translation is impaired, and cells poorly adapt to respiratory conditions because they lack basal fermentative levels of Cox1. © 2015 Roloff and Henry. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. PGC-1{alpha} is required for AICAR induced expression of GLUT4 and mitochondrial proteins in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Fentz, Joachim; Biensø, Rasmus S

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that repeated activation of AMPK induces mitochondrial and glucose membrane transporter gene/protein expression via a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor Upsilon co-activator (PGC)-1alpha dependent mechanism. Whole body PGC-1alpha knockout (KO) and littermate wild...... GLUT4, cytochrome c oxidase (COX)I and cytochrome (cyt) c protein expression ~10-40% relative to saline in white muscles of the WT mice, but not of the PGC-1alpha KO mice. In line, GLUT4 and cyt c mRNA content increased 30-60% 4h after a single AICAR injection relative to saline only in WT mice. One...... and PGC-1alpha KO mice. In conclusion, we here provide genetic evidence for a major role of PGC-1alpha in AMPK mediated regulation of mitochondrial and glucose membrane transport protein expression in skeletal muscle....

  10. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Junghwa [Chemical Genomics National Research Lab., Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hye Jin [Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asansi, Chungnam 330-150 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin [National Research Laboratory for Mitochondrial Signaling, Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Center, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Lab., Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders.

  11. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Junghwa; Jung, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders

  12. Cytochrome P450-Mediated Phytoremediation using Transgenic Plants: A Need for Engineered Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Santosh; Jin, Mengyao; Weemhoff, James L

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for versatile and ubiquitous Cytochrome P450 (CYP) biocatalysts for biotechnology, medicine, and bioremediation. In the last decade there has been an increase in realization of the power of CYP biocatalysts for detoxification of soil and water contaminants using transgenic plants. However, the major limitations of mammalian CYP enzymes are that they require CYP reductase (CPR) for their activity, and they show relatively low activity, stability, and expression. O...

  13. Mitochondrial disease and endocrine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jasmine; Rahman, Joyeeta; Achermann, John C; Dattani, Mehul T; Rahman, Shamima

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are critical organelles for endocrine health; steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs in these organelles and they provide energy in the form of ATP for hormone production and trafficking. Mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders that feature defective oxidative phosphorylation, and are characterized by enormous clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mitochondrial diseases have been found to result from >250 monogenic defects encoded across two genomes: the nuclear genome and the ancient circular mitochondrial genome located within mitochondria themselves. Endocrine dysfunction is often observed in genetic mitochondrial diseases and reflects decreased intracellular production or extracellular secretion of hormones. Diabetes mellitus is the most frequently described endocrine disturbance in patients with inherited mitochondrial diseases, but other endocrine manifestations in these patients can include growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid disease. Although mitochondrial endocrine dysfunction frequently occurs in the context of multisystem disease, some mitochondrial disorders are characterized by isolated endocrine involvement. Furthermore, additional monogenic mitochondrial endocrine diseases are anticipated to be revealed by the application of genome-wide next-generation sequencing approaches in the future. Understanding the mitochondrial basis of endocrine disturbance is key to developing innovative therapies for patients with mitochondrial diseases.

  14. Flower colour and cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Brugliera, Filippa

    2013-02-19

    Cytochromes P450 play important roles in biosynthesis of flavonoids and their coloured class of compounds, anthocyanins, both of which are major floral pigments. The number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of anthocyanidins (the chromophores and precursors of anthocyanins) impact the anthocyanin colour, the more the bluer. The hydroxylation pattern is determined by two cytochromes P450, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) and thus they play a crucial role in the determination of flower colour. F3'H and F3'5'H mostly belong to CYP75B and CYP75A, respectively, except for the F3'5'Hs in Compositae that were derived from gene duplication of CYP75B and neofunctionalization. Roses and carnations lack blue/violet flower colours owing to the deficiency of F3'5'H and therefore lack the B-ring-trihydroxylated anthocyanins based upon delphinidin. Successful redirection of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway to delphinidin was achieved by expressing F3'5'H coding regions resulting in carnations and roses with novel blue hues that have been commercialized. Suppression of F3'5'H and F3'H in delphinidin-producing plants reduced the number of hydroxyl groups on the anthocyanidin B-ring resulting in the production of monohydroxylated anthocyanins based on pelargonidin with a shift in flower colour to orange/red. Pelargonidin biosynthesis is enhanced by additional expression of a dihydroflavonol 4-reductase that can use the monohydroxylated dihydrokaempferol (the pelargonidin precursor). Flavone synthase II (FNSII)-catalysing flavone biosynthesis from flavanones is also a P450 (CYP93B) and contributes to flower colour, because flavones act as co-pigments to anthocyanins and can cause blueing and darkening of colour. However, transgenic plants expression of a FNSII gene yielded paler flowers owing to a reduction of anthocyanins because flavanones are precursors of anthocyanins and flavones.

  15. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Cooper, H M; Reyes, A; Di Re, M; Sembongi, H; Litwin, T R; Gao, J; Neuman, K C; Fearnley, I M; Spinazzola, A; Walker, J E; Holt, I J

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion.

  16. Differences in activity of cytochrome C oxidase in brain between sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, Elena V; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zhang, Lin; Cater, Jacqueline R; Galante, Raymond J; Ward, Stephen E; Avadhani, Narayan G; Pack, Allan I

    2005-01-01

    Increased mRNA level of subunit 1 cytochrome c oxidase (COXI) during wakefulness and after short-term sleep deprivation has been described in brain. We hypothesized that this might contribute to increased activity of cytochrome oxidase (COX) enzyme during wakefulness, as part of the mechanisms to provide sufficient amounts of adenosine triphosphate to meet increased neuronal energy demands. COX activity was measured in isolated mitochondria from different brain regions in groups of rats with 3 hours of spontaneous sleep, 3 hours of spontaneous wake, and 3 hours of sleep deprivation. The group with 3 hours of spontaneous wake was added to delineate the circadian component of changes in the enzyme activity. Northern blot analysis was performed to examine the mRNA levels of 2 subunits of the enzyme COXI and COXIV, encoded by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Laboratory of Biochemistry, Department of Animal Biology, and Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania. 2-month-old male Fischer rats (N = 21) implanted for polygraphic recording. For COX activity, there was a main effect by analysis of variance of experimental group (P sleep-deprived groups as compared to the sleep group. A main effect of brain region was also significant (P sleep. There is an increase in COX activity after both 3 hours of spontaneous wake and 3 hours of sleep deprivation as compared with 3 hours of spontaneous sleep in diverse brain regions, which could be, in part, explained by the increased levels of bigenomic transcripts of the enzyme. This likely contributes to increased adenosine triphosphate production during wakefulness. ADP, adenosine diphosphate; ATP, adenosine triphosphate; COXI, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mRNA; COX, cytochrome c oxidase (protein); CREB, cyclic AMP response element binding protein; DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid; EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; EEG, electroencephalography; EMG, electromyography; GABP, GA binding

  17. MITOCHONDRIAL NEUROGASTROINTESTINAL ENCEPHALOMYOPATHY (MNGIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ayatollahi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalo-myopathy (MNGIE is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP gene mutation. Here we report a patient with MNGIE in whom sensorimotor polyneuropathy was the first presenting symptom and had a fluctuating course. This 26-year-old female patient developed acute-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy from the age of 6 with two relapses later on. In addition, she had gastrointestinal symptoms (diarrhea, recurrent abdominal pain, progressive weight loss and ophthalmoparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed white matter abnormalities, and muscle biopsy showed ragged red fibers. This constellation of clinical and laboratory findings raised the diagnosis of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE. This report highlights the uncommon clinical characteristics of this rare disease.

  18. The mitochondrial uncoupling proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ledesma, Amalia; de Lacoba, Mario García; Rial, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    The uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are transporters, present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, that mediate a regulated discharge of the proton gradient that is generated by the respiratory chain. This energy-dissipatory mechanism can serve functions such as thermogenesis, maintenance of the redox balance, or reduction in the production of reactive oxygen species. Some UCP homologs may not act as true uncouplers, however, and their activity has yet to be defined. The UCPs are integral membrane...

  19. Authentication of beef, carabeef, chevon, mutton and pork by a PCR-RFLP assay of mitochondrial cytb gene

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, S. P.; Karabasanavar, Nagappa S.; Singh, Rashmi; Umapathi, V.

    2012-01-01

    Authentication of meat assumes significance in view of religious, quality assurance, food safety, public health, conservation and legal concerns. Here, we describe a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay targeting mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene for the identification of meats of five most common food animals namely cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep and pig. A pair of forward and reverse primers (VPH-F & VPH-R) amplifying a conserved region (168–776 b...

  20. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels and spectrum of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in synovial tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia and oxidative stress levels. METHODS: Random Mutation Capture assay was used to quantitatively evaluate alterations of the synovial mitochondrial genome. In vivo tissue oxygen levels (tPO(2)) were measured at arthroscopy using a Licox probe. Synovial expression of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (CytcO II) deficiency were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro levels of mtDNA point mutations, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine [8-oxodG]) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) were determined in human synoviocytes under normoxia and hypoxia (1%) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or a hydroxylase inhibitor (dimethyloxalylglycine [DMOG]). Patients were categorized according to their in vivo tPO(2) level (<20 mm Hg or >20 mm Hg), and mtDNA point mutations, immunochemistry features, and stress markers were compared between groups. RESULTS: The median tPO(2) level in synovial tissue indicated significant hypoxia (25.47 mm Hg). Higher frequency of mtDNA mutations was associated with reduced in vivo oxygen tension (P = 0.05) and with higher synovial 4-HNE cytoplasmic expression (P = 0.04). Synovial expression of CytcO II correlated with in vivo tPO(2) levels (P = 0.03), and levels were lower in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (P < 0.05). In vitro levels of mtDNA mutations, ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, 8-oxo-dG, and 4-HNE were higher in synoviocytes exposed to 1% hypoxia (P < 0.05); all of these increased levels were rescued by SOD and DMOG and, with the exception of ROS, by NAC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives

  1. Calorie restriction increases muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E Civitarese

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction without malnutrition extends life span in a range of organisms including insects and mammals and lowers free radical production by the mitochondria. However, the mechanism responsible for this adaptation are poorly understood.The current study was undertaken to examine muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics in response to caloric restriction alone or in combination with exercise in 36 young (36.8 +/- 1.0 y, overweight (body mass index, 27.8 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2 individuals randomized into one of three groups for a 6-mo intervention: Control, 100% of energy requirements; CR, 25% caloric restriction; and CREX, caloric restriction with exercise (CREX, 12.5% CR + 12.5% increased energy expenditure (EE. In the controls, 24-h EE was unchanged, but in CR and CREX it was significantly reduced from baseline even after adjustment for the loss of metabolic mass (CR, -135 +/- 42 kcal/d, p = 0.002 and CREX, -117 +/- 52 kcal/d, p = 0.008. Participants in the CR and CREX groups had increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial function such as PPARGC1A, TFAM, eNOS, SIRT1, and PARL (all, p < 0.05. In parallel, mitochondrial DNA content increased by 35% +/- 5% in the CR group (p = 0.005 and 21% +/- 4% in the CREX group (p < 0.004, with no change in the control group (2% +/- 2%. However, the activity of key mitochondrial enzymes of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle (citrate synthase, beta-oxidation (beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and electron transport chain (cytochrome C oxidase II was unchanged. DNA damage was reduced from baseline in the CR (-0.56 +/- 0.11 arbitrary units, p = 0.003 and CREX (-0.45 +/- 0.12 arbitrary units, p = 0.011, but not in the controls. In primary cultures of human myotubes, a nitric oxide donor (mimicking eNOS signaling induced mitochondrial biogenesis but failed to induce SIRT1 protein expression, suggesting that additional factors may regulate SIRT1 content during CR.The observed increase in

  2. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  3. Characterisation of MtoD from Sideroxydans lithotrophicus: a cytochrome c electron shuttle used in lithoautotrophic growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    christopher eBeckwith

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The autotrophic Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1 can grow by coupling the oxidation of ferrous iron to the reduction of oxygen. Soluble ferrous iron is oxidised at the surface of the cell by an MtoAB porin-cytochrome complex that functions as an electron conduit through the outer membrane. Electrons are then transported to the cytoplasmic membrane where they are used to generate proton motive force (for ATP synthesis and NADH for autotrophic processes such as carbon fixation.As part of the mtoAB gene cluster, S. lithotrophicus also contains the gene mtoD that is proposed to encode a cytochrome c protein. We isolated mtoD from a Shewanella oneidensis expression system where the mtoD gene was expressed on a pBAD plasmid vector. Biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic characterisation of the purified MtoD revealed it as an 11 kDa monomeric protein containing a single heme. Sequence and structural alignment indicated that MtoD belonged to the class-1 cytochrome c family and had a similar fold to ferricytochrome c552 family, however the MtoD heme is bis-histidine coordinated and is substantially more exposed than the hemes of other family members. The reduction potential of the MtoD heme at pH 7 was +155 mV vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode, which is approximately 100 mV lower than that of mitochondrial cytochromes c. Consideration of the properties of MtoD in the context of the potential respiratory partners identified from the genome suggests that MtoD could associate to multiple electron transfer partners as the primary periplasmic electron shuttle.

  4. Subamolide B Isolated from Medicinal Plant Cinnamomum subavenium Induces Cytotoxicity in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells through Mitochondrial and CHOP-Dependent Cell Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yi Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subamolide B is a butanolide isolated from Cinnamomum subavenium, a medicinal plant traditionally used to treat various ailments including carcinomatous swelling. We herein reported for the first time that subamolide B potently induced cytotoxicity against diverse human skin cancer cell lines while sparing nonmalignant cells. Mechanistic studies on human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cell line SCC12 highlighted the involvement of apoptosis in subamolide B-induced cytotoxicity, as evidenced by the activation of caspases-8, -9, -4, and -3, the increase in annexin V-positive population, and the partial restoration of cell viability by cotreatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Additionally, subamolide B evoked cell death pathways mediated by FasL/Fas, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, as supported by subamolide B-induced FasL upregulation, BCL-2 suppression/cytosolic release of cytochrome c, and UPR activation/CHOP upregulation, respectively. Noteworthy, ectopic expression of c-FLIPL or dominant-negative mutant of FADD failed to impair subamolide B-induced cytotoxicity, whereas BCL-2 overexpression or CHOP depletion greatly rescued subamolide B-stimulated cells. Collectively, these results underscored the central role of mitochondrial and CHOP-mediated cell death pathways in subamolide B-induced cytotoxicity. Our findings further implicate the potential of subamolide B for cutaneous SCC therapy or as a lead compound for developing novel chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction is responsible for the intestinal calcium absorption inhibition induced by menadione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionatti, Ana M; Perez, Adriana V; Diaz de Barboza, Gabriela E; Pereira, Beatriz M; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2008-02-01

    Menadione (MEN) inhibits intestinal calcium absorption by a mechanism not completely understood. The aim of this work was to find out the role of mitochondria in this inhibitory mechanism. Hence, normal chicks treated with one i.p. dose of MEN were studied in comparison with controls. Intestinal calcium absorption was measured by the in situ ligated intestinal segment technique. GSH, oxidoreductase activities from the Krebs cycle and enzymes of the antioxidant system were measured in isolated mitochondria. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by a flow cytometer technique. DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c localization were determined by immunocytochemistry. Data indicate that in 30 min, MEN decreases intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, which returns to the control values after 10 h. GSH was only decreased for half an hour, while the activity of malate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was diminished for 48 h. Mn(2+)-superoxide dismutase activity was increased in 30 min, whereas the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase remained unaltered. DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c release were maximal in 30 min, but were recovered after 15 h. In conclusion, MEN inhibits intestinal Ca(2+) absorption by mitochondrial dysfunction as revealed by GSH depletion and alteration of the permeability triggering the release of cytochrome c and DNA fragmentation.

  6. NMR comparison of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytochromes c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, Meihing; Cai, Meng Li; Timkovich, R.

    1990-01-01

    1 H NMR spectroscopy has been used to examine ferrocytochrome c-551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 19429) over the pH range 3.5-10.6 and the temperature range 4-60 degree C. Resonance assignments are proposed for main-chain and side-chain protons. Comparison of results for cytochrome c-551 to recently assigned spectra for horse cytochrome c and mutants of yeast iso-1 cytochrome reveals some unique resonances with unusual chemical shifts in all cytochromes that may serve as markers for the heme region. Results for cytochrome c-551 indicate that in the smaller prokaryotic cytochrome, all benzoid side chains are rapidly flipping on the NMR time scale. In contrast, in eukaryotic cytochromes there are some rings flipping slowly on the NMR time scale. The ferrocytochrome c-551 undergoes a transition linked to pH with a pK around 7. The pH behavior of assigned resonances provides evidence that the site of protonation is the inner or buried 17-propionic acid heme substituent (IUPAC-IUB porphyrin nomenclature). Conformational heterogeneity has been observed for segments near the inner heme propionate substituent

  7. Calcium transport in vesicles energized by cytochrome oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, Randy N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on the reconstitution of cytochrome oxidase into phospholipid vesicles were carried out using techniques of selectivity energizing the suspensions with ascorbate and cytochrome c or ascorbate, PMS, and internally trapped cytochrome c. It was found that the K+ selective ionophore valinomycin stimulated the rate of respiration of cytochrome oxidase vesicles regardless of the direction of the K+ flux across the vesicle membranes. The stimulation occurred in the presence of protonophoric uncouplers and in the complete absence of potassium or in detergent-lysed suspensions. Gramicidin had similar effects and it was determined that the ionophores acted by specific interaction with cytochrome oxidase rather than by the previously assumed collapse of membrane potentials. When hydrophobic proteins and appropriate coupling factors were incorporated into the cytochrome oxidase, vesicles phosphorylation of ADP could be coupled to the oxidation reaction of cytochrome oxidase. Relatively low P:O, representing poor coupling of the system, were problematical and precluded measurements of protonmotive force. However the system was used to study ion translocation.

  8. Mitochondrial functionality in female reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Gąsior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In most animal species female germ cells are the source of mitochondrial genome for the whole body of individuals. As a source of mitochondrial DNA for future generations the mitochondria in the female germ line undergo dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes. In addition to maintaining the intact template of mitochondrial genome from one generation to another, mitochondrial role in oocytes is much more complex and pleiotropic. The quality of mitochondria determines the ability of meiotic divisions, fertilization ability, and activation after fertilization or sustaining development of a new embryo. The presence of normal number of functional mitochondria is also crucial for proper implantation and pregnancy maintaining. This article addresses issues of mitochondrial role and function in mammalian oocyte and presents new approaches in studies of mitochondrial function in female germ cells.

  9. Molecular basis for mitochondrial signaling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent advances in the study of structure, function, and regulation of metabolite, protein and ion translocating channels, and transporters in mitochondria. A wide array of cutting-edge methods are covered, ranging from electrophysiology and cell biology to bioinformatics, as well as structural, systems, and computational biology. At last, the molecular identity of two important channels in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been established. After years of work on the physiology and structure of VDAC channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane, there have been multiple discoveries on VDAC permeation and regulation by cytosolic proteins. Recent breakthroughs in structural studies of the mitochondrial cholesterol translocator reveal a set of novel unexpected features and provide essential clues for defining therapeutic strategies. Molecular Basis for Mitochondrial Signaling covers these and many more re...

  10. Control of electron transfer in the cytochrome system of mitochondria by pH, transmembrane pH gradient and electrical potential. The cytochromes b-c segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, S; Lorusso, M; Izzo, G; Capuano, F

    1981-02-15

    1. A study is presented of the effects of pH, transmembrane pH gradient and electrical potential on oxidoreductions of b and c cytochromes in ox heart mitochondria and 'inside-out' submitochondrial particles. 2. Kinetic analysis shows that, in mitochondria at neutral pH, there is a restraint on the aerobic oxidation of cytochrome b566 with respect to cytochrome b562. Valinomycin plus K+ accelerates cytochrome b566 oxidation and retards net oxidation of cytochrome b562. At alkaline pH the rate of cytochrome b566 oxidation approaches that of cytochrome b562 and the effects of valinomycin on b cytochromes are impaired. 3. At slightly acidic pH, oxygenation of antimycin-supplemented mitochondria causes rapid reduction of cytochrome b566 and small delayed reduction of cytochrome b562. Valinomycin or a pH increase in the medium promote reduction of cytochrome b562 and decrease net reduction of cytochrome b566. 4. Addition of valinomycin to mitochondria and submitochondrial particles in the respiring steady state causes, at pH values around neutrality, preferential oxidation of cytochrome b566 with respect to cytochrome b562. The differential effect of valinomycin on oxidation of cytochromes b566 and b562 is enhanced by substitution of 1H2O of the medium with 2H2O and tends to disappear as the pH of the medium is raised to alkaline values. 5. Nigericin addition in the aerobic steady state causes, both in mitochondria and submitochondrial particles, preferential oxidation of cytochrome b562 with respect to cytochrome b566. This is accompanied by c cytochrome oxidation in mitochondria but c cytochrome reduction in submitochondrial particles. 6. In mitochondria as well as in submitochondrial particles, the aerobic transmembrane potential (delta psi) does not change by raising the pH of the external medium from neutrality to alkalinity. The transmembrane pH gradient (delta pH) on the other hand, decrease slightly. 7. The results presented provide evidence that the delta psi

  11. Plastocyanin/cytochrome c6 interchange in Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramar, M Dolores; Inda, Luis A; Saraiva, Lígia M; Peleato, M Luisa

    2003-12-01

    Plastocyanin and cytochrome c6 from the green alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus were immunoquantified in cells grown under different concentrations of copper and iron. Plastocyanin expression was constitutive, its synthesis was not significantly affected by iron availability, and increases with copper availability. On the contrary, cytochrome c6 synthesis is repressed by copper, and only residual amounts of the protein were detected at 0.1 micromol/L copper. Under copper deficiency, cytochrome c6 is slightly dependent on iron. In natural environments, plastocyanin seems to be the predominant electron donor to P700.

  12. Training Enhances Immune Cells Mitochondrial Biosynthesis, Fission, Fusion, and Their Antioxidant Capabilities Synergistically with Dietary Docosahexaenoic Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Busquets-Cortés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training induces adaptations in mitochondrial metabolism, dynamics, and oxidative protection. Omega-3 fatty acids change membrane lipid composition and modulate mitochondrial function. The aim was to investigate the effect of 8-week training and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA supplementation (1.14 g/day on the mitochondria dynamics and antioxidant status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from sportsmen. Subjects were assigned to an intervention (N=9 or placebo groups (N=7 in a randomized double-blind trial. Nutritional intervention significantly increased the DHA content in erythrocyte membranes from the experimental group. No significant differences were reported in terms of circulating PBMCs, Mn-superoxide dismutase protein levels, and their capability to produce reactive oxygen species. The proteins related to mitochondrial dynamics were, in general, increased after an 8-week training and this increase was enhanced by DHA supplementation. The content in mitofusins Mtf-1 and Mtf-2, optic atrophy protein-1 (Opa-1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam were significantly higher in the DHA-supplemented group after intervention. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX-IV activity and uncoupling proteins UCP-2 and UCP-3 protein levels were increased after training, with higher UCP-3 levels in the supplemented group. In conclusion, training induced mitochondrial adaptations which may contribute to improved mitochondrial function. This mitochondrial response was modulated by DHA supplementation.

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  14. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... myopathies. We investigated regeneration in muscle biopsies from 61 genetically well-defined patients affected by mitochondrial myopathy. Our results show that the perturbed energy metabolism in mitochondrial myopathies causes ongoing muscle regeneration in a majority of patients, and some were even affected...

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Unwinding Enzyme Required for Liver Regeneration | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The liver has an exceptional capacity to proliferate. This ability allows the liver to regenerate its mass after partial surgical removal or injury and is the key to successful partial liver transplants. Liver cells, called hepatocytes, are packed with mitochondria, and regulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is crucial to mitochondrial function, including energy production, during proliferation. Yves Pommier, M.D., Ph.D., of CCR’s Developmental Therapeutics Branch, and his colleagues recently showed that the vertebrate mitochondrial topoisomerase, Top1mt, was critical in maintaining mitochondrial function in the heart after doxorubicin-induced damage. The group wondered whether Top1mt might play a similar role in liver regeneration.

  16. Water-Soluble Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits Nuclear Translocation of Apoptosis Inducing Factor and Cell Death Caused by Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haining Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were to explore the mechanism of rotenone-induced cell damage and to examine the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 on the toxic effects of rotenone. Murine hippocampal HT22 cells were cultured with mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Water-soluble CoQ10 was added to the culture media 3 h prior to the rotenone incubation. Cell viability was determined by alamar blue, reactive oxygen species (ROS production by dihydroethidine (DHE and mitochondrial membrane potential by tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM. Cytochrome c, caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF were measured using Western blotting after 24 h rotenone incubation. Rotenone caused more than 50% of cell death, increased ROS production, AIF nuclear translocation and reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, but failed to cause mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Pretreatment with water-soluble CoQ10 enhanced cell viability, decreased ROS production, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented AIF nuclear translocation. The results suggest that rotenone activates a mitochondria-initiated, caspase-independent cell death pathway. Water-soluble CoQ10 reduces ROS accumulation, prevents the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibits AIF translocation and subsequent cell death.

  17. Cysteine Supplementation May be Beneficial in a Subgroup of Mitochondrial Translation Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsakoulia, Marina; Mϋller, Juliane S; Gomez-Duran, Aurora; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Boczonadi, Veronika; Horvath, Rita

    2016-08-30

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are severe, relentlessly progressive conditions and there are very few effective therapies available to date. We have previously suggested that in two rare forms of reversible mitochondrial disease (reversible infantile respiratory chain deficiency and reversible infantile hepatopathy) supplementation with L-cysteine can improve mitochondrial protein synthesis, since cysteine is required for the 2-thiomodification of mitochondrial tRNAs. We studied whether supplementation with L-cysteine or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) results in any improvement of the mitochondrial function in vitro in fibroblasts of patients with different genetic forms of abnormal mitochondrial translation. We studied in vitro in fibroblasts of patients carrying the common m.3243A>G and m.8344A>G mutations or autosomal recessive mutations in genes affecting mitochondrial translation, whether L-cysteine or N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation have an effect on mitochondrial respiratory chain function. Here we show that supplementation with L-cysteine, but not with N-acetyl-cysteine partially rescues the mitochondrial translation defect in vitro in fibroblasts of patients carrying the m.3243A>G and m.8344A>G mutations. In contrast, N-acetyl-cysteine had a beneficial effect on mitochondrial translation in TRMU and MTO1 deficient fibroblasts. Our results suggest that L-cysteine or N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation may be a potential treatment for selected subgroups of patients with mitochondrial translation deficiencies. Further studies are needed to explore the full potential of cysteine supplementation as a treatment for patients with mitochondrial disease.

  18. Rcan1-1L overexpression induces mitochondrial autophagy and improves cell survival in angiotensin II-exposed cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Hongyan; Li, Yongqiang; Yan, Lijie; Yang, Haitao; Wu, Jintao; Qian, Peng; Li, Bing; Wang, Shanling

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important adaptive stress response and can be modulated by various key molecules. A previous study found that the regulator of calcineurin 1-1L (Rcan1-1L) may regulate mitochondrial autophagy and cause mitochondria degradation in neurocytes. However, the effect of Rcan1-1L on cardiomyocytes has not been determined. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of Rcan1-1L in angiotensin II (Ang II)-exposed human cardiomyocytes. Above all, Human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs) were exposed to 200 nmol/L Ang II for 4 days. Enhanced H 2 O 2 production, cytochrome C release and mitochondrial permeability were observed in these cells, which were blocked by valsartan. Consistently, Ang II exposure significantly reduced cardiomyocyte viability. However, transfection of Rcan1-1L vector promoted cell viability and ameliorated the apoptosis caused by Ang II. Rcan1-1L clearly promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs, with elevated autophagy protein (ATG) 5 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression. Transient mitochondrial biogenesis and reduced cytochrome C release was also induced by Rcan1-1L. Additionally, Rcan1-1L significantly inhibited calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. We thus conclude that Rcan1-1L may play a protective role in Ang II-treated cardiomyocytes through the induction of mitochondrial autophagy, and may be an alternative method of cardiac protection. - Highlights: • Transfection of Rcan1-1L into HACMs promoted cell viability and reduced apoptosis. • Transfection of Rcan1-1L promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs. • Rcan1-1L inhibited the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling

  19. Rcan1-1L overexpression induces mitochondrial autophagy and improves cell survival in angiotensin II-exposed cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongyan; Li, Yongqiang; Yan, Lijie; Yang, Haitao; Wu, Jintao; Qian, Peng; Li, Bing; Wang, Shanling, E-mail: shanglingwang@126.com

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial autophagy is an important adaptive stress response and can be modulated by various key molecules. A previous study found that the regulator of calcineurin 1-1L (Rcan1-1L) may regulate mitochondrial autophagy and cause mitochondria degradation in neurocytes. However, the effect of Rcan1-1L on cardiomyocytes has not been determined. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of Rcan1-1L in angiotensin II (Ang II)-exposed human cardiomyocytes. Above all, Human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs) were exposed to 200 nmol/L Ang II for 4 days. Enhanced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production, cytochrome C release and mitochondrial permeability were observed in these cells, which were blocked by valsartan. Consistently, Ang II exposure significantly reduced cardiomyocyte viability. However, transfection of Rcan1-1L vector promoted cell viability and ameliorated the apoptosis caused by Ang II. Rcan1-1L clearly promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs, with elevated autophagy protein (ATG) 5 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression. Transient mitochondrial biogenesis and reduced cytochrome C release was also induced by Rcan1-1L. Additionally, Rcan1-1L significantly inhibited calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. We thus conclude that Rcan1-1L may play a protective role in Ang II-treated cardiomyocytes through the induction of mitochondrial autophagy, and may be an alternative method of cardiac protection. - Highlights: • Transfection of Rcan1-1L into HACMs promoted cell viability and reduced apoptosis. • Transfection of Rcan1-1L promoted mitochondrial autophagy in HACMs. • Rcan1-1L inhibited the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling.

  20. Vitamin E protects against the mitochondrial damage caused by cyclosporin A in LLC-PK1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriba, G. de; Perez de Hornedo, J.; Ramirez Rubio, S.; Calvino Fernandez, M.; Benito Martinez, S.; Maiques Camarero, M.; Parra Cid, T.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has nephrotoxic effects known to involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), since antioxidants prevent the kidney damage induced by this drug. Given that mitochondria are among the main sources of intracellular ROS, the aims of our study were to examine the mitochondrial effects of CsA in the porcine renal endothelial cell line LLC-PK1 and the influence of the antioxidant Vitamin E (Vit E). Following the treatment of LLC-PK1 cells with CsA, we assessed the mitochondrial synthesis of superoxide anion, permeability transition pore opening, mitochondrial membrane potential, cardiolipin peroxidation, cytochrome c release and cellular apoptosis, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy procedures. Similar experiments were done after Vit E preincubation of cells. CsA treatment increased superoxide anion in a dose-dependent way. CsA opened the permeability transition pores, caused Bax migration to mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and cardiolipin content. Also CsA released cytochrome c into cytosol and provoked cellular apoptosis. Vit E pretreatment inhibited the effects that CsA induced on mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells and avoided apoptosis. CsA modifies mitochondrial LLC-PK1 cell physiology with loss of negative electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane and increased lipid peroxidation. These features are related to apoptosis and can explain the cellular damage that CsA induces. As Vit E inhibited these effects, our results suggest that they were mediated by an increase in ROS production by mitochondria.

  1. Ferulic acid with ascorbic acid synergistically extenuates the mitochondrial dysfunction during beta-adrenergic catecholamine induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogeeta, Surinder Kumar; Raghavendran, Hanumantha Rao Balaji; Gnanapragasam, Arunachalam; Subhashini, Rajakannu; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2006-10-27

    Disruption of mitochondria and free radical mediated tissue injury have been reported during cardiotoxicity induced by isoproterenol (ISO), a beta-adrenergic catecholamine. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of the combination of ferulic acid (FA) and ascorbic acid (AA) on the mitochondrial damage in ISO induced cardiotoxicity. Induction of rats with ISO (150 mg/kg b.wt., i.p.) for 2 days resulted in a significant decrease in the activities of respiratory chain enzymes (NADH dehydrogenase and cytochrome c-oxidase), tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes (isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase), mitochondrial antioxidants (GPx, GST, SOD, CAT, GSH), cytochromes (b, c, c1, aa3) and in the level of mitochondrial phospholipids. A marked elevation in mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids were also observed in ISO intoxicated rats. Pre-co-treatment with the combination of FA (20 mg/kg b.wt.) and AA (80 mg/kg b.wt.) orally for 6 days significantly enhanced the attenuation of these functional abnormalities and restored normal mitochondrial function when compared to individual drug treated groups. Mitigation of ISO induced biochemical and morphological changes in mitochondria were more pronounced with a combination of FA and AA rather than the individual drug treated groups. Transmission electron microscopic observations also correlated with these biochemical parameters. Hence, these findings demonstrate the synergistic ameliorative potential of FA and AA on mitochondrial function during beta-adrenergic catecholamine induced cardiotoxicity and associated oxidative stress in rats.

  2. Effects of TCDD on the expression of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lynn, Scott G.; LaPres, John J.; Zacharewski, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 μg/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 h) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change| > 1.5 and P-value < 0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a sigmoidal or exponential dose-response profile (0.03 to 300 μg/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 h. Dose-responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of all 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity.

  3. Troxerutin abrogates mitochondrial oxidative stress and myocardial apoptosis in mice fed calorie-rich diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, Rajagopalan; Sathiya Priya, Chandrasekaran; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2017-12-25

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of myocardial apoptosis in metabolic syndrome (MS) patients. In this study, we investigated the effect of troxerutin (TX), an antioxidant on mitochondrial oxidative stress and apoptotic markers in heart of mice fed fat and fructose-rich diet. Adult male Mus musculus mice were fed either control diet or high fat, high fructose diet (HFFD) for 60 days to induce MS. Mice from each dietary group were divided into two on the 16th day and were either treated or untreated with TX (150 mg/kg bw, p.o) for the next 45 days. At the end of the study, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, oxidative stress markers, levels of intracellular calcium, cardiolipin content, cytochrome c release and apoptotic markers were examined in the myocardium. HFFD-feeding resulted in diminution of antioxidants and increased ROS production, lipid peroxidation and oxidatively modified adducts of 8-OHG, 4-HNE and 3-NT. Further increase in Ca 2+ levels, low levels of calcium transporters and decrease in cardiolipin content were noted. Changes in the mitochondrial structure were observed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, cytochrome c release, increase in proapoptotic proteins (APAF-1, BAX, caspases-9 and-3) and decrease in antiapoptotic protein (BCL-2) in HFFD-fed mice suggest myocardial apoptosis. These changes were significantly restored by TX supplementation. TX administration effectively attenuated cardiac apoptosis and exerted a protective role by increasing antioxidant potential and by improving mitochondrial function. Thus, TX could be a promising therapeutic candidate for treating cardiac disease in MS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons: implications for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambonin, Jessica L.; Zhao, Chao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Campbell, Graham R.; Engeham, Sarah; Ziabreva, Iryna; Schwarz, Nadine; Lee, Sok Ee; Frischer, Josa M.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial content within axons increases following demyelination in the central nervous system, presumably as a response to the changes in energy needs of axons imposed by redistribution of sodium channels. Myelin sheaths can be restored in demyelinated axons and remyelination in some multiple sclerosis lesions is extensive, while in others it is incomplete or absent. The effects of remyelination on axonal mitochondrial content in multiple sclerosis, particularly whether remyelination completely reverses the mitochondrial changes that follow demyelination, are currently unknown. In this study, we analysed axonal mitochondria within demyelinated, remyelinated and myelinated axons in post-mortem tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis and controls, as well as in experimental models of demyelination and remyelination, in vivo and in vitro. Immunofluorescent labelling of mitochondria (porin, a voltage-dependent anion channel expressed on all mitochondria) and axons (neurofilament), and ultrastructural imaging showed that in both multiple sclerosis and experimental demyelination, mitochondrial content within remyelinated axons was significantly less than in acutely and chronically demyelinated axons but more numerous than in myelinated axons. The greater mitochondrial content within remyelinated, compared with myelinated, axons was due to an increase in density of porin elements whereas increase in size accounted for the change observed in demyelinated axons. The increase in mitochondrial content in remyelinated axons was associated with an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity. In vitro studies showed a significant increase in the number of stationary mitochondria in remyelinated compared with myelinated and demyelinated axons. The number of mobile mitochondria in remyelinated axons did not significantly differ from myelinated axons, although significantly greater than in demyelinated axons. Our neuropathological data and findings in

  5. Inference of epistatic effects in a key mitochondrial protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2018-06-01

    We use Potts model inference to predict pair epistatic effects in a key mitochondrial protein—cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2—for ray-finned fishes. We examine the effect of phylogenetic correlations on our predictions using a simple exact fitness model, and we find that, although epistatic effects are underpredicted, they maintain a roughly linear relationship to their true (model) values. After accounting for this correction, epistatic effects in the protein are still relatively weak, leading to fitness valleys of depth 2 N s ≃-5 in compensatory double mutants. Interestingly, positive epistasis is more pronounced than negative epistasis, and the strongest positive effects capture nearly all sites subject to positive selection in fishes, similar to virus proteins evolving under selection pressure in the context of drug therapy.

  6. Distribution patterns of postmortem damage in human mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J

    2002-01-01

    1 (HVR1) and cytochrome oxidase subunit III genes. A comparison of damaged sites within and between the regions reveals that damage hotspots exist and that, in the HVR1, these correlate with sites known to have high in vivo mutation rates. Conversely, HVR1 subregions with known structural function......, such as MT5, have lower in vivo mutation rates and lower postmortem-damage rates. The postmortem data also identify a possible functional subregion of the HVR1, termed "low-diversity 1," through the lack of sequence damage. The amount of postmortem damage observed in mitochondrial coding regions...... was significantly lower than in the HVR1, and, although hotspots were noted, these did not correlate with codon position. Finally, a simple method for the identification of incorrect archaeological haplogroup designations is introduced, on the basis of the observed spectrum of postmortem damage....

  7. Mitochondrial diversity and phylogeography of Acrossocheilus paradoxus (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yu-Min; Hsu, Kui-Ching; Yang, Jin-Quan; Wu, Jui-Hsien; Li, Shan; Wang, Wei-Kuang; Ding, Fang; Li, Jun; Lin, Hung-Du

    2018-01-31

    Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b sequences (1141 bp) in 229 specimens of Acrossocheilus paradoxus from 26 populations were identified as four lineages. The pairwise genetic distances among these four lineages ranged from 1.57 to 2.37% (mean= 2.00%). Statistical dispersal-vicariance analysis suggests that the ancestral populations were distributed over mainland China and Northern and Western Taiwan. Approximate Bayesian computation approaches show that the three lineages in Taiwan originated from the lineage in mainland China through three colonization routes during two glaciations. The results indicated that during the glaciation and inter-glacial periods, the Taiwan Strait was exposed and sank, which contributed to the dispersion and differentiation of populations. Furthermore, the populations of A. paradoxus colonized Taiwan through a land bridge to the north of the Formosa Bank, and the Miaoli Plateau in Taiwan was an important barrier that limited gene exchange between populations on both the sides.

  8. Inferring kangaroo phylogeny from incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Phillips

    Full Text Available The marsupial genus Macropus includes three subgenera, the familiar large grazing kangaroos and wallaroos of M. (Macropus and M. (Osphranter, as well as the smaller mixed grazing/browsing wallabies of M. (Notamacropus. A recent study of five concatenated nuclear genes recommended subsuming the predominantly browsing Wallabia bicolor (swamp wallaby into Macropus. To further examine this proposal we sequenced partial mitochondrial genomes for kangaroos and wallabies. These sequences strongly favour the morphological placement of W. bicolor as sister to Macropus, although place M. irma (black-gloved wallaby within M. (Osphranter rather than as expected, with M. (Notamacropus. Species tree estimation from separately analysed mitochondrial and nuclear genes favours retaining Macropus and Wallabia as separate genera. A simulation study finds that incomplete lineage sorting among nuclear genes is a plausible explanation for incongruence with the mitochondrial placement of W. bicolor, while mitochondrial introgression from a wallaroo into M. irma is the deepest such event identified in marsupials. Similar such coalescent simulations for interpreting gene tree conflicts will increase in both relevance and statistical power as species-level phylogenetics enters the genomic age. Ecological considerations in turn, hint at a role for selection in accelerating the fixation of introgressed or incompletely sorted loci. More generally the inclusion of the mitochondrial sequences substantially enhanced phylogenetic resolution. However, we caution that the evolutionary dynamics that enhance mitochondria as speciation indicators in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting may also render them especially susceptible to introgression.

  9. Direct Regulation of Mitochondrial RNA Synthesis by Thyroid Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, José A.; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Montoya, Julio

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the influence of in vivo treatment and in vitro addition of thyroid hormone on in organello mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and, in parallel, on the in organello footprinting patterns at the mtDNA regions involved in the regulation of transcription. We found that thyroid hormone modulates mitochondrial RNA levels and the mRNA/rRNA ratio by influencing the transcriptional rate. In addition, we found conspicuous differences between the mtDNA dimethyl sulfate footprinting patterns of mitochondria derived from euthyroid and hypothyroid rats at the transcription initiation sites but not at the mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) binding region. Furthermore, direct addition of thyroid hormone to the incubation medium of mitochondria isolated from hypothyroid rats restored the mRNA/rRNA ratio found in euthyroid rats as well as the mtDNA footprinting patterns at the transcription initiation area. Therefore, we conclude that the regulatory effect of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial transcription is partially exerted by a direct influence of the hormone on the mitochondrial transcription machinery. Particularly, the influence on the mRNA/rRNA ratio is achieved by selective modulation of the alternative H-strand transcription initiation sites and does not require the previous activation of nuclear genes. These results provide the first functional demonstration that regulatory signals, such as thyroid hormone, that modify the expression of nuclear genes can also act as primary signals for the transcriptional apparatus of mitochondria. PMID:9858589

  10. Thallium induces hydrogen peroxide generation by impairing mitochondrial function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzel, Cecilia E.; Verstraeten, Sandra V.

    2006-01-01

    Thallium (Tl) is highly toxic through yet poorly understood mechanisms. In this study, we comparatively investigated the effects of thallic (Tl(III)) cations on mitochondrial functionality and oxidative stress promotion, and results were compared to those obtained for thallous (Tl(I)) cation. PC12 cells were incubated between 1 and 72 h in the presence of a single dose of Tl(I) or Tl(III) (10-250 μM). A metal concentration- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability was observed evaluated by both MTT reduction and calcein fluorescence. After 24 h in culture, Tl(I) and Tl(III) significantly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential evaluated as the incorporation of rhodamine 123. Along the incubation period assessed, both Tl(I) and Tl(III) (50 and 100 μM) significantly increased mitochondrial H 2 O 2 steady-state levels, being the magnitude of the effect: Tl(III) > Tl(I). Glutathione content, measured by reaction with monochlorobimane, was significantly reduced in Tl-treated cells. Finally, higher oxidant species content in cells cytoplasm was found, which positively correlated with mitochondrial H 2 O 2 content. Together, these results indicate that both ionic species of Tl enhance cells reactive oxygen species production, decreasing mitochondrial functionality. These effects could partially be responsible for the loss of cell viability, and account for the metabolic alterations found in Tl intoxication

  11. Aspirin Induces Apoptosis through Release of Cytochrome c from Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja C. Zimmermann

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID reduce the risk for cancer, due to their anti proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects. A critical pathway for apoptosis involves the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, which then interacts with Apaf-1 to activate caspase proteases that orchestrate cell death. In this study we found that treatment of a human cancer cell line with aspirin induced caspase activation and the apoptotic cell morphology, which was blocked by the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying this apoptotic event showed that aspirin induces translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and triggers release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. The release of cytochrome c from mitochondria was inhibited by overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cells that lack Apaf-1 were resistant to aspirin-induced apoptosis. These data provide evidence that the release of cytochrome c is an important part of the apoptotic mechanism of aspirin.

  12. Cytochrome c Is Tyrosine 97 Phosphorylated by Neuroprotective Insulin Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanderson, T. H.; Mahapatra, G.; Pecina, Petr; Ji, Q.; Yu, K.; Sinkler, Ch.; Varughese, A.; Kumar, R.; Bukowski, M. J.; Tousignant, R. N.; Salomon, A. R.; Lee, I.; Hüttemann, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2013), e78627 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cytochrome c * tyrosine phosphorylation * brain ischemia * insulin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  13. North African genetic variation of cytochrome and sulfotransferase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in these genes have shown relevant ethnic differences among Sub-Saharan .... This cytochrome catalyzes a big amount of oxidative reactions of substances like ... with samples of European and African origin (because of the scarce data ...

  14. Isolation and purification of membrane-bound cytochrome c from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    ferrochrome and redox spectra showed the presence of heme-c. Key words: Cytochrome c, respiratory chain and Proteus mirabilis. INTRODUCTION. Proteus mirabilis is facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped, gram negative bacterium.

  15. Oxygen and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeptar, A.R.; Scheerens, H.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen reductase and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450 (P450) are reviewed. During the oxygen reductase activity of P450, molecular oxygen is reduced to superoxide anion radicals (O

  16. Downregulation of mitochondrial UQCRB inhibits cancer stem cell-like properties in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Narae; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Jung, Hye Jin

    2018-01-01

    Glioblastoma stem cell targeted therapies have become a powerful strategy for the treatment of this deadliest brain tumor. We demonstrate for the first time that downregulation of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) inhibits the cancer stem cell-like properties in human glioblastoma cells. The synthetic small molecules targeting UQCRB significantly suppressed not only the self-renewal capacity such as growth and neurosphere formation, but also the metastatic potential such as migration and invasion of glioblastoma stem‑like cells (GSCs) derived from U87MG and U373MG at subtoxic concentrations. Notably, the UQCRB inhibitors repressed c‑Met-mediated downstream signal transduction and hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α) activation, thereby reducing the expression levels of GSC markers including CD133, Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 in the GSCs. Furthermore, the UQCRB inhibitors decreased mitochondrial ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential in the GSCs, indicating that they regulate the mitochondrial function in GSCs. Indeed, the knockdown of UQCRB gene by UQCRB siRNA significantly inhibited the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes as well as the expression of stemness markers by blocking mitochondrial ROS/HIF‑1α/c‑Met pathway in U87MG GSCs. These findings suggest that UQCRB and its inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target and lead compounds for eliminating cancer stem cells in glioblastoma.

  17. Sites of inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport in macrophage-injured neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, D L; Lehninger, A L

    1982-11-01

    Previous work has shown that injury of neoplastic cells by cytotoxic macrophages (CM) in cell culture is accompanied by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We have investigated the nature of this inhibition by studying mitochondrial respiration in CM-injured leukemia L1210 cells permeabilized with digitonin. CM-induced injury affects the mitochondrial respiratory chain proper. Complex I (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase) and complex II (succinate-coenzyme Q reductase) are markedly inhibited. In addition a minor inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was found. Electron transport from alpha-glycerophosphate through the respiratory chain to oxygen is unaffected and permeabilized CM-injured L1210 cells oxidizing this substrate exhibit acceptor control. However, glycerophosphate shuttle activity was found not to occur within CM-injured or uninjured L1210 cells in culture hence, alpha-glycerophosphate is apparently unavailable for mitochondrial oxidation in the intact cell. It is concluded that the failure of respiration of intact neoplastic cells injured by CM is caused by the nearly complete inhibition of complexes I and II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The time courses of CM-induced electron transport inhibition and arrest of L1210 cell division are examined and the possible relationship between these phenomena is discussed.

  18. The P66Shc/Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Pathway Determines Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costanza Savino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial-mediated oxidative stress and apoptosis play a crucial role in neurodegenerative disease and aging. Both mitochondrial permeability transition (PT and swelling of mitochondria have been involved in neurodegeneration. Indeed, knockout mice for cyclophilin-D (Cyc-D, a key regulatory component of the PT pore (PTP that triggers mitochondrial swelling, resulted to be protected in preclinical models of multiple sclerosis (MS, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, how neuronal stress is transduced into mitochondrial oxidative stress and swelling is unclear. Recently, the aging determinant p66Shc that generates H2O2 reacting with cytochrome c and induces oxidation of PTP and mitochondrial swelling was found to be involved in MS and ALS. To investigate the role of p66Shc/PTP pathway in neurodegeneration, we performed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE experiments in p66Shc knockout mice (p66Shc−/−, knock out mice for cyclophilin-D (Cyc-D−/−, and p66Shc Cyc-D double knock out (p66Shc/Cyc-D−/− mice. Results confirm that deletion of p66Shc protects from EAE without affecting immune response, whereas it is not epistatic to the Cyc-D mutation. These findings demonstrate that p66Shc contributes to EAE induced neuronal damage most likely through the opening of PTP suggesting that p66Shc/PTP pathway transduces neurodegenerative stresses.

  19. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  20. The adaptive evolution of the mammalian mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Stephen J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondria produce up to 95% of a eukaryotic cell's energy through oxidative phosphorylation. The proteins involved in this vital process are under high functional constraints. However, metabolic requirements vary across species, potentially modifying selective pressures. We evaluate the adaptive evolution of 12 protein-coding mitochondrial genes in 41 placental mammalian species by assessing amino acid sequence variation and exploring the functional implications of observed variation in secondary and tertiary protein structures. Results Wide variation in the properties of amino acids were observed at functionally important regions of cytochrome b in species with more-specialized metabolic requirements (such as adaptation to low energy diet or large body size, such as in elephant, dugong, sloth, and pangolin, and adaptation to unusual oxygen requirements, for example diving in cetaceans, flying in bats, and living at high altitudes in alpacas. Signatures of adaptive variation in the NADH dehydrogenase complex were restricted to the loop regions of the transmembrane units which likely function as protons pumps. Evidence of adaptive variation in the cytochrome c oxidase complex was observed mostly at the interface between the mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits, perhaps evidence of co-evolution. The ATP8 subunit, which has an important role in the assembly of F0, exhibited the highest signal of adaptive variation. ATP6, which has an essential role in rotor performance, showed a high adaptive variation in predicted loop areas. Conclusion Our study provides insight into the adaptive evolution of the mtDNA genome in mammals and its implications for the molecular mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation. We present a framework for future experimental characterization of the impact of specific mutations in the function, physiology, and interactions of the mtDNA encoded proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation.

  1. The biodiversity of microbial cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven L; Lamb, David C; Jackson, Colin J; Warrilow, Andrew G; Kelly, Diane E

    2003-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of genes and proteins are well known for their involvement in pharmacology and toxicology, but also increasingly for their importance and diversity in microbes. The extent of diversity has only recently become apparent with the emergence of data from whole genome sequencing projects and the coming years will reveal even more information on the diversity in microbial eukaryotes. This review seeks to describe the historical development of these studies and to highlight the importance of the genes and proteins. CYPs are deeply involved in the development of strategies for deterrence and attraction as well as detoxification. As such, there is intense interest in pathways of secondary metabolism that include CYPs in oxidative tailoring of antibiotics, sometimes influencing potency as bioactive compounds. Further to this is interest in CYPs in metabolism of xenobiotics for use as carbon sources for microbial growth and as biotransformation agents or in bioremediation. CYPs are also current and potential drug targets; compounds inhibiting CYP are antifungal and anti-protozoan agents, and potentially similar compounds may be useful against some bacterial diseases such as tuberculosis. Of note is the diversity of CYP requirements within an organism, ranging from Escherichia coli that has no CYPs as in many bacteria, to Mycobacterium smegmatis that has 40 representing 1% of coding genes. The basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium surprised all when it was found to contain a hundred or more CYPs. The functional genomic investigation of these orphan CYPs is a major challenge for the future.

  2. Geometrical analysis of cytochrome c unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urie, Kristopher G.; Pletneva, Ekaterina; Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2011-01-01

    A geometrical model has been developed to study the unfolding of iso-1 cytochrome c. The model draws on the crystallographic data reported for this protein. These data were used to calculate the distance between specific residues in the folded state, and in a sequence of extended states defined by n = 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 residue units. Exact calculations carried out for each of the 103 residues in the polypeptide chain demonstrate that different regions of the chain have different unfolding histories. Regions where there is a persistence of compact structures can be identified, and this geometrical characterization is fully consistent with analyses of time-resolved fluorescence energy-transfer (TrFET) data using dansyl-derivatized cysteine side-chain probes at positions 39, 50, 66, 85, and 99. The calculations were carried out assuming that different regions of the polypeptide chain unfold synchronously. To test this assumption, lattice Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study systematically the possible importance of asynchronicity. Calculations show that small departures from synchronous dynamics can arise if displacements of residues in the main body of the chain are much more sluggish than near-terminal residues.

  3. Epidermal CYP2 family cytochromes P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Liping; Hoffman, Susan M.G.; Keeney, Diane S.

    2004-01-01

    Skin is the largest and most accessible drug-metabolizing organ. In mammals, it is the competent barrier that protects against exposure to harmful stimuli in the environment and in the systemic circulation. Skin expresses many cytochromes P450 that have critical roles in exogenous and endogenous substrate metabolism. Here, we review evidence for epidermal expression of genes from the large CYP2 gene family, many of which are expressed preferentially in extrahepatic tissues or specifically in epithelia at the environmental interface. At least 13 CYP2 genes (CYP2A6, 2A7, 2B6, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1) are expressed in skin from at least some human individuals, and the majority of these genes are expressed in epidermis or cultured keratinocytes. Where epidermal expression has been localized in situ by hybridization or immunocytochemistry, CYP2 transcripts and proteins are most often expressed in differentiated keratinocytes comprising the outer (suprabasal) cell layers of the epidermis and skin appendages. The tissue-specific transcriptional regulation of CYP2 genes in the epidermis, and in other epithelia that interface with the environment, suggests important roles for at least some CYP2 gene products in the production and disposition of molecules affecting competency of the epidermal barrier

  4. Novel extrahepatic cytochrome P450s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlgren, Maria; Miura, Shin-ichi; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzymes are highly expressed in the liver and are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Because of the initiatives associated with the Human Genome Project, a great progress has recently been seen in the identification and characterization of novel extrahepatic P450s, including CYP2S1, CYP2R1, CYP2U1 and CYP2W1. Like the hepatic enzymes, these P450s may play a role in the tissue-specific metabolism of foreign compounds, but they may also have important endogenous functions. CYP2S1 has been shown to metabolize all-trans retinoic acid and CYP2R1 is a major vitamin D 25-hydroxylase. Regarding their metabolism of xenobiotics, much remains to be established, but CYP2S1 metabolizes naphthalene and it is likely that these P450s are responsible for metabolic activation of several different kinds of xenobiotic chemicals and contribute to extrahepatic toxicity and carcinogenesis

  5. Polyethylene glycol promotes autoxidation of cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Uchida, Takeshi; Saio, Tomohide; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2018-06-01

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) was rapidly oxidized by molecular oxygen in the presence, but not absence of PEG. The redox potential of heme c was determined by the potentiometric titration to be +236 ± 3 mV in the absence of PEG, which was negatively shifted to +200 ± 4 mV in the presence of PEG. The underlying the rapid oxidation was explored by examining the structural changes in Cyt c in the presence of PEG using UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism, resonance Raman, and fluorescence spectroscopies. These spectroscopic analyses suggested that heme oxidation was induced by a modest tertiary structural change accompanied by a slight shift in the heme position (c, which triggered heme displacement. The primary dehydration site was estimated to be around surface-exposed hydrophobic residues near the heme center: Ile81 and Val83. These findings and our previous studies, which showed that hydrated water molecules around Ile81 and Val83 are expelled when Cyt c forms a complex with CcO, proposed that dehydration of these residues is functionally significant to electron transfer from Cyt c to CcO. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding mitochondrial myopathies: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu S. Ahuja

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are small, energy-producing structures vital to the energy needs of the body. Genetic mutations cause mitochondria to fail to produce the energy needed by cells and organs which can cause severe disease and death. These genetic mutations are likely to be in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, or possibly in the nuclear DNA (nDNA. The goal of this review is to assess the current understanding of mitochondrial diseases. This review focuses on the pathology, causes, risk factors, symptoms, prevalence data, symptomatic treatments, and new research aimed at possible preventions and/or treatments of mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial myopathies are mitochondrial diseases that cause prominent muscular symptoms such as muscle weakness and usually present with a multitude of symptoms and can affect virtually all organ systems. There is no cure for these diseases as of today. Treatment is generally supportive and emphasizes symptom management. Mitochondrial diseases occur infrequently and hence research funding levels tend to be low in comparison with more common diseases. On the positive side, quite a few genetic defects responsible for mitochondrial diseases have been identified, which are in turn being used to investigate potential treatments. Speech therapy, physical therapy, and respiratory therapy have been used in mitochondrial diseases with variable results. These therapies are not curative and at best help with maintaining a patient’s current abilities to move and function.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Keane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial proteins or proteins implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the central involvement of mitochondria in PD. This involvement is corroborated by reports that environmental toxins that inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been shown to be associated with PD. This paper aims to illustrate the considerable body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of PD patients and to highlight the important need for further research in this area.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-11-30

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis.

  10. Endocrine disorders in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andrew M; Walker, Mark; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2013-10-15

    Endocrine dysfunction in mitochondrial disease is commonplace, but predominantly restricted to disease of the endocrine pancreas resulting in diabetes mellitus. Other endocrine manifestations occur, but are relatively rare by comparison. In mitochondrial disease, neuromuscular symptoms often dominate the clinical phenotype, but it is of paramount importance to appreciate the multi-system nature of the disease, of which endocrine dysfunction may be a part. The numerous phenotypes attributable to pathogenic mutations in both the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA creates a complex and heterogeneous catalogue of disease which can be difficult to navigate for novices and experts alike. In this article we provide an overview of the endocrine disorders associated with mitochondrial disease, the way in which the underlying mitochondrial disorder influences the clinical presentation, and how these factors influence subsequent management. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  12. Bauhinia championii Flavone Attenuates Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Induced Apoptosis in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes by Improving Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ping; Sun, Guibo; Zhang, Chan; Wang, Min; Sun, Yao; Zhou, Yuehan; Sun, Xiaobo; Jian, Jie

    2016-11-04

    This study aimed to determine the effects of Bauhinia championii flavone (BCF) on hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes and to explore potential mechanisms. The H/R model in H9c2 cardiomyocytes was established by 6 h of hypoxia and 12 h of reoxygenation. Cell viability was detected by CCK-8 assay. Apoptotic rate was measured by Annexin V/PI staining. Levels of mitochondria-associated ROS, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (∆Ψm) and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTP) opening were assessed by fluorescent probes. ATP production was measured by ATP assay kit. The release of cytochrome c, translocation of Bax, and related proteins were measured by western blotting. Our results showed that pretreatment with BCF significantly improved cell viability and attenuated the cardiomyocyte apoptosis caused by H/R. Furthermore, BCF increased ATP production and inhibited ROS-generating mitochondria, depolarization of ΔΨm, and MPTP opening. Moreover, BCF pretreatment decreased Bax mitochondrial translocation, cytochrome c release, and activation of caspase-3, as well as increased the expression of p-PI3K, p-Akt, and the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax. Interestingly, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, LY294002, partly reversed the anti-apoptotic effect of BCF. These observations indicated that BCF pretreatment attenuates H/R-induced myocardial apoptosis strength by improving mitochondrial dysfunction via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  13. Mitochondrial complex III defects contribute to inefficient respiration and ATP synthesis in the myocardium of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a thorough analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetic function as well as the biochemical and molecular factors that are deregulated and contribute to compromised adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in the myocardium during Trypanosoma cruzi infection. We show that ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration and ATP synthesis supported by pyruvate/malate (provides electrons to complex I) and succinate (provides electrons to complex II) substrates were significantly decreased in left ventricular tissue and isolated cardiac mitochondria of infected mice. The decreased mitochondrial ATP synthesis in infected murine hearts was not a result of uncoupling between the electron-transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation and decreased availability of the intermediary metabolites (e.g., NADH). The observed decline in the activities of complex-I, -IV, and -V was not physiologically relevant and did not contribute to compromised respiration and ATP synthesis in infected myocardium. Instead, complex III activity was decreased above the threshold level and contributed to respiratory-chain inefficiency and the resulting decline in mitochondrial ATP synthesis in infected myocardium. The loss in complex III activity occurred as a consequence of cytochrome b depletion. Treatment of infected mice with phenyl-alpha-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN, antioxidant) was beneficial in preserving the mtDNA-encoded cytochrome b expression, and subsequently resulted in improved complex III activity, mitochondrial respiration, and ATP production in infected myocardium. Overall, we provide novel data on the mechanism(s) involved in cardiac bioenergetic inefficiency during T. cruzi infection.

  14. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria. PMID:27999288

  15. Cytochrome b5 and NADH cytochrome b5 reductase: genotype-phenotype correlations for hydroxylamine reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, James C; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2010-01-01

    NADH cytochrome b5 reductase (b5R) and cytochrome b5 (b5) catalyze the reduction of sulfamethoxazole hydroxylamine (SMX-HA), which can contribute to sulfonamide hypersensitivity, to the parent drug sulfamethoxazole. Variability in hydroxylamine reduction could thus play a role in adverse drug reactions. The aim of this study was to characterize variability in SMX-HA reduction in 111 human livers, and investigate its association with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in b5 and b5R cDNA. Liver microsomes were assayed for SMX-HA reduction activity, and b5 and b5R expression was semiquantified by immunoblotting. The coding regions of the b5 (CYB5A) and b5R (CYB5R3) genes were resequenced. Hepatic SMX-HA reduction displayed a 19-fold range of individual variability (0.06-1.11 nmol/min/mg protein), and a 17-fold range in efficiency (Vmax/Km) among outliers. SMX-HA reduction was positively correlated with b5 and b5R protein content (Phydroxylamine reduction activities, these low-frequency cSNPs seem to only minimally impact overall observed phenotypic variability. Work is underway to characterize polymorphisms in other regions of these genes to further account for individual variability in hydroxylamine reduction.

  16. Solution NMR study of the yeast cytochrome c peroxidase: cytochrome c interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, Alexander N., E-mail: ovolkov@vub.ac.be; Nuland, Nico A. J. van [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Jean Jeener NMR Centre, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-07-15

    Here we present a solution NMR study of the complex between yeast cytochrome c (Cc) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), a paradigm for understanding the biological electron transfer. Performed for the first time, the CcP-observed heteronuclear NMR experiments were used to probe the Cc binding in solution. Combining the Cc- and CcP-detected experiments, the binding interface on both proteins was mapped out, confirming that the X-ray structure of the complex is maintained in solution. Using NMR titrations and chemical shift perturbation analysis, we show that the interaction is independent of the CcP spin-state and is only weakly affected by the Cc redox state. Based on these findings, we argue that the complex of the ferrous Cc and the cyanide-bound CcP is a good mimic of the catalytically-active Cc-CcP compound I species. Finally, no chemical shift perturbations due to the Cc binding at the low-affinity CcP site were observed at low ionic strength. We discuss possible reasons for the absence of the effects and outline future research directions.

  17. Comparison of Vertebrate Cytochrome b and Prepronociceptin for Blood Meal Analyses in Culicoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Henni, Leila; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Depaquit, Jérôme; Noël, Philippe; Germain, Adeline; Helder, Remi; Augot, Denis

    2015-01-01

    To date, studies on host preferences and blood meal identification have been conducted for Culicoides species using molecular-based methods such as PCR techniques to amplify only a fragment from universal vertebrate mitochondrial genes such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit I or cytochrome b (Cyt b). The vertebrate prepronociceptin gene (PNOC) was also tested in this field. However, the choice of molecular marker to identify blood meal is critical. The objective of our study is to compare the ability of Cyt b and PNOC as molecular markers for blood meal identification depending on the stage of blood meal digestion. In order to determine whether these Cyt b and PNOC could provide a positive result, 565 blood-fed females of Culicoides spp were collected and morphologically identified. The samples were collected between 2012 and 2014, in two localities in France. The collection localities were near either livestock or a forest. To catch the specimens, we used UV CDC miniature light traps. PNOC sequence of donkeys (Equus asinus) was sequenced and submitted because it was missing in GenBank. Our findings emphasize that the PNOC marker is not suitable to separate closely related Equid species such as horses and donkeys. The Cyt b marker was able to identify 204 more samples when compared to PNOC (99.55% of specimens). Cyt b appears to be better able to detect the origin of blood meals from females with digested blood in their abdomens. We conclude that Cyt b is a good marker as it increases the accuracy of blood meal identification of engorged females containing digested blood in their abdomens. The host opportunist behavior of Culicoides, especially that of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus, the main vectors of BTV in Europe was also highlighted. PMID:26664944

  18. Comparison of vertebrate cytochrome b and prepronociceptin for blood meal analyses in Culicoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eHadj-henni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, studies on host preferences and blood meal identification have been conducted for Culicoides species using molecular-based methods such as PCR techniques to amplify only a fragment from universal vertebrate mitochondrial genes such as Cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI or Cytochrome b (Cyt b. The vertebrate prepronociceptin gene (PNOC was also tested in this field. However, the choice of molecular marker to identify blood meal is critical.The objective of our study is to compare the ability of Cyt b and PNOC as molecular markers for blood meal identification depending on the stage of blood meal digestion. In order to determine whether these Cyt b and PNOC could provide a positive result, 565 blood-fed females of Culicoides spp were collected and morphologically identified. The samples were collected between 2012 and 2014, in two localities in France. The collection localities were near either livestock or a forest. To catch the specimens, we used UV CDC miniature light traps. PNOC sequence of donkeys (Equus asinus was sequenced and submitted because it was missing in GenBank. Our findings emphasize that the PNOC marker is not suitable to separate closely related Equid species such as horses and donkeys. The Cyt b marker was able to identify 204 more samples when compared to PNOC (99.55% of specimens. Cyt b appears to be better able to detect the origin of blood meals from females with digested blood in their abdomens. We conclude that Cyt b is a good marker as it increases the accuracy of blood meal identification of engorged females containing digested blood in their abdomens. The host opportunist behavior of Culicoides, especially that of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus, the main vectors of BTV in Europe was also highlighted.

  19. Essays on partial retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarci, T.

    2012-01-01

    The five essays in this dissertation address a range of topics in the micro-economic literature on partial retirement. The focus is on the labor market behavior of older age groups. The essays examine the economic and non-economic determinants of partial retirement behavior, the effect of partial

  20. Tempo enhances heat-induced apoptosis by mitochondrial targeting of Bax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.-L.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2003-01-01

    A stable membrane-permeable nitroxide, Tempo, exerts an SOD-like antioxidant activity against ROS. Reportedly, Tempo inhibits ROS-induced thymocyte apoptosis, while 10 mM Tempo activates JNK1 to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We have observed that nontoxic 5 mM Tempo enhances suboptimal hyperthermia (44 deg C/10 min)-induced apoptosis in U937 cells. Here we report the enhancing mechanism, focusing on activation and targeting of Bax to mitochondria and cytochrome c release. Methods: U937 cells were treated with either Tempo (5 mM, 37 deg C/10 min), heating (44 deg C/10 min), or Tempo-plus-heating, washed and incubated for various times up to 6 h, until assessing apoptosis, mitochondrial potential (ΔΨ>), and amount of superoxide by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC/PI, TMRM, and dihydroethidium, respectively. Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, and cytochrome c were detected by western blotting, activated Bax was by immunoprecipitation, and ATP was by a luciferase assay. Bax targeting to and cytochrome c release from mitochorndria were also detected immunocytochemically under fluorescent microscopy. Results and Discussion: Treatment of U937 cells with 5 mM Tempo for 10 min at 37 deg C or suboptimal heating (44 deg C/ 10 min) alone did not induce apoptosis. The combined treatment with 5 mM Tempo and 44 deg C for 10 min dramatically induced ∼90% apoptosis in 6 h, as did the 44 deg C/30 min heating. During the enhanced apoptosis, cytochrome c release progressed. Although signals of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax in cell lysates were not altered, Bax was specifically activated and translocated to mitochondria after the combined treatment. Further, loss of ΔΨ>and decreases in superoxide and ATP progressed after the combined treatment, suggesting that the treatment may disturb mitochondrial electron transport. Thus, Tempo sensitizes the heat-induced apoptosis through (1) targeting of Bax to mitochondria and releasing cytochrome c, and (2) mitochondrial dysfunction

  1. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  2. Cardioprotection by modulation of mitochondrial respiration during ischemia–reperfusion: Role of apoptosis-inducing factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Aijun; Szczepanek, Karol; Hu, Ying; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Blockade of electron transport prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria during IR. •Blockade of electron transport decreases caspase-independent cell death during IR. •Mitochondrial AIF content is down-regulated in Harlequin mice. •Blockade of electron transport protects Harlequin mouse hearts during IR. •Amobarbital protection is partially dependent on mitochondrial AIF content. -- Abstract: The transient, reversible blockade of electron transport (BET) during ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion protects mitochondria and decreases cardiac injury. Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is located within the mitochondrial intermembrane space. A release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nucleus triggers caspase-independent cell death. We asked if BET prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria as a mechanism of protection in the buffer perfused heart. BET during ischemia with amobarbital, a rapidly reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, attenuated a release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol, in turn decreasing the formation of cleaved and activated PARP-1. These results suggest that BET-mediated protection may occur through prevention of the loss of AIF from mitochondria during ischemia–reperfusion. In order to further clarify the role of mitochondrial AIF in BET-mediated protection, Harlequin (Hq) mice, a genetic model with mitochondrial AIF deficiency, were used to test whether BET could still decrease cell injury in Hq mouse hearts during reperfusion. BET during ischemia protected Hq mouse hearts against ischemia–reperfusion injury and improved mitochondrial function in these hearts during reperfusion. Thus, cardiac injury can still be decreased in the presence of down-regulated mitochondrial AIF content. Taken together, BET during ischemia protects both hearts with normal mitochondrial AIF content and hearts with mitochondrial AIF deficiency. Although preservation of mitochondrial AIF content plays a key role in

  3. Cardioprotection by modulation of mitochondrial respiration during ischemia–reperfusion: Role of apoptosis-inducing factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Aijun [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Szczepanek, Karol; Hu, Ying [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Lesnefsky, Edward J. [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); McGuire Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Richmond, VA 23249 (United States); Chen, Qun, E-mail: qchen8@vcu.edu [Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Cardiology), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Blockade of electron transport prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria during IR. •Blockade of electron transport decreases caspase-independent cell death during IR. •Mitochondrial AIF content is down-regulated in Harlequin mice. •Blockade of electron transport protects Harlequin mouse hearts during IR. •Amobarbital protection is partially dependent on mitochondrial AIF content. -- Abstract: The transient, reversible blockade of electron transport (BET) during ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion protects mitochondria and decreases cardiac injury. Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is located within the mitochondrial intermembrane space. A release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nucleus triggers caspase-independent cell death. We asked if BET prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria as a mechanism of protection in the buffer perfused heart. BET during ischemia with amobarbital, a rapidly reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, attenuated a release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol, in turn decreasing the formation of cleaved and activated PARP-1. These results suggest that BET-mediated protection may occur through prevention of the loss of AIF from mitochondria during ischemia–reperfusion. In order to further clarify the role of mitochondrial AIF in BET-mediated protection, Harlequin (Hq) mice, a genetic model with mitochondrial AIF deficiency, were used to test whether BET could still decrease cell injury in Hq mouse hearts during reperfusion. BET during ischemia protected Hq mouse hearts against ischemia–reperfusion injury and improved mitochondrial function in these hearts during reperfusion. Thus, cardiac injury can still be decreased in the presence of down-regulated mitochondrial AIF content. Taken together, BET during ischemia protects both hearts with normal mitochondrial AIF content and hearts with mitochondrial AIF deficiency. Although preservation of mitochondrial AIF content plays a key role in

  4. Nucleo-mitochondrial interaction of yeast in response to cadmium sulfide quantum dot exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquali, Francesco; Agrimonti, Caterina; Pagano, Luca; Zappettini, Andrea; Villani, Marco; Marmiroli, Marta; White, Jason C.; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CdS QDs induce oxidative stress in yeast. • CdS QDs disrupt mitochondrial membrane potentials and morphology. • CdS QDs do not affect mtDNA content. • CdS QDs modify the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial organization and function. • Deletion of some of these genes induces either tolerant or sensitive phenotypes to CdS QDs. - Abstract: Cell sensitivity to quantum dots (QDs) has been attributed to a cascade triggered by oxidative stress leading to apoptosis. The role and function of mitochondria in animal cells are well understood but little information is available on the complex genetic networks that regulate nucleo-mitochondrial interaction. The effect of CdS QD exposure in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was assessed under conditions of limited lethality (<10%), using cell physiological and morphological endpoints. Whole-genomic array analysis and the screening of a deletion mutant library were also carried out. The results showed that QDs: increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the level of reduced vs oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG); reduced oxygen consumption and the abundance of respiratory cytochromes; disrupted mitochondrial membrane potentials and affected mitochondrial morphology. Exposure affected the capacity of cells to grow on galactose, which requires nucleo-mitochondrial involvement. However, QDs exposure did not materially induce respiratory deficient (RD) mutants but only RD phenocopies. All of these cellular changes were correlated with several key nuclear genes, including TOM5 and FKS1, involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial organization and function. The consequences of these cellular effects are discussed in terms of dysregulation of cell function in response to these “pathological mitochondria”.

  5. Nucleo-mitochondrial interaction of yeast in response to cadmium sulfide quantum dot exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, Francesco; Agrimonti, Caterina [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Pagano, Luca [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Stockbridge school of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT (United States); Zappettini, Andrea; Villani, Marco [IMEM-CNR - Istituto dei Materiali per l' Elettronica ed il Magnetismo, Parma (Italy); Marmiroli, Marta [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); White, Jason C. [The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT (United States); Marmiroli, Nelson, E-mail: nelson.marmiroli@unipr.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma (Italy); CINSA - Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per le Scienze Ambientali, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • CdS QDs induce oxidative stress in yeast. • CdS QDs disrupt mitochondrial membrane potentials and morphology. • CdS QDs do not affect mtDNA content. • CdS QDs modify the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial organization and function. • Deletion of some of these genes induces either tolerant or sensitive phenotypes to CdS QDs. - Abstract: Cell sensitivity to quantum dots (QDs) has been attributed to a cascade triggered by oxidative stress leading to apoptosis. The role and function of mitochondria in animal cells are well understood but little information is available on the complex genetic networks that regulate nucleo-mitochondrial interaction. The effect of CdS QD exposure in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was assessed under conditions of limited lethality (<10%), using cell physiological and morphological endpoints. Whole-genomic array analysis and the screening of a deletion mutant library were also carried out. The results showed that QDs: increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the level of reduced vs oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG); reduced oxygen consumption and the abundance of respiratory cytochromes; disrupted mitochondrial membrane potentials and affected mitochondrial morphology. Exposure affected the capacity of cells to grow on galactose, which requires nucleo-mitochondrial involvement. However, QDs exposure did not materially induce respiratory deficient (RD) mutants but only RD phenocopies. All of these cellular changes were correlated with several key nuclear genes, including TOM5 and FKS1, involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial organization and function. The consequences of these cellular effects are discussed in terms of dysregulation of cell function in response to these “pathological mitochondria”.

  6. Phylogenetic relationship of the Brazilian isolates of the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae employing mitochondrial COI gene sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monte Tainá CC

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis can cause eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in humans. This nematode’s main definitive hosts are rodents and its intermediate hosts are snails. This parasite was first described in China and currently is dispersed across several Pacific islands, Asia, Australia, Africa, some Caribbean islands and most recently in the Americas. Here, we report the genetic variability among A. cantonensis isolates from different geographical locations in Brazil using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene sequences. Methods The isolates of A. cantonensis were obtained from distinct geographical locations of Brazil. Genomic DNAs were extracted, amplified by polymerase reaction, purified and sequenced. A partial sequence of COI gene was determined to assess their phylogenetic relationship. Results The sequences of A. cantonensis were monophyletic. We identified a distinct clade that included all isolates of A. cantonensis from Brazil and Asia based on eight distinct haplotypes (ac1, ac2, ac3, ac4, ac5, ac6, ac7 and ac8 from a previous study. Interestingly, the Brazilian haplotype ac5 is clustered with isolates from Japan, and the Brazilian haplotype ac8 from Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Pará and Pernambuco states formed a distinct clade. There is a divergent Brazilian haplotype, which we named ac9, closely related to Chinese haplotype ac6 and Japanese haplotype ac7. Conclusion The genetic variation observed among Brazilian isolates supports the hypothesis that the appearance of A. cantonensis in Brazil is likely a result of multiple introductions of parasite-carrying rats, transported on ships due to active commerce with Africa and Asia during the European colonization period. The rapid spread of the intermediate host, Achatina fulica, also seems to have contributed to the dispersion of this parasite and the infection of the definitive host in different Brazilian regions.

  7. Phylogenetic relationship of the Brazilian isolates of the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae) employing mitochondrial COI gene sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis can cause eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in humans. This nematode’s main definitive hosts are rodents and its intermediate hosts are snails. This parasite was first described in China and currently is dispersed across several Pacific islands, Asia, Australia, Africa, some Caribbean islands and most recently in the Americas. Here, we report the genetic variability among A. cantonensis isolates from different geographical locations in Brazil using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences. Methods The isolates of A. cantonensis were obtained from distinct geographical locations of Brazil. Genomic DNAs were extracted, amplified by polymerase reaction, purified and sequenced. A partial sequence of COI gene was determined to assess their phylogenetic relationship. Results The sequences of A. cantonensis were monophyletic. We identified a distinct clade that included all isolates of A. cantonensis from Brazil and Asia based on eight distinct haplotypes (ac1, ac2, ac3, ac4, ac5, ac6, ac7 and ac8) from a previous study. Interestingly, the Brazilian haplotype ac5 is clustered with isolates from Japan, and the Brazilian haplotype ac8 from Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Pará and Pernambuco states formed a distinct clade. There is a divergent Brazilian haplotype, which we named ac9, closely related to Chinese haplotype ac6 and Japanese haplotype ac7. Conclusion The genetic variation observed among Brazilian isolates supports the hypothesis that the appearance of A. cantonensis in Brazil is likely a result of multiple introductions of parasite-carrying rats, transported on ships due to active commerce with Africa and Asia during the European colonization period. The rapid spread of the intermediate host, Achatina fulica, also seems to have contributed to the dispersion of this parasite and the infection of the definitive host in different Brazilian regions. PMID:23130987

  8. Phylogenetic relationship of the Brazilian isolates of the rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae) employing mitochondrial COI gene sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Tainá C C; Simões, Raquel O; Oliveira, Ana Paula M; Novaes, Clodoaldo F; Thiengo, Silvana C; Silva, Alexandre J; Estrela, Pedro C; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2012-11-06

    The rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis can cause eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in humans. This nematode's main definitive hosts are rodents and its intermediate hosts are snails. This parasite was first described in China and currently is dispersed across several Pacific islands, Asia, Australia, Africa, some Caribbean islands and most recently in the Americas. Here, we report the genetic variability among A. cantonensis isolates from different geographical locations in Brazil using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences. The isolates of A. cantonensis were obtained from distinct geographical locations of Brazil. Genomic DNAs were extracted, amplified by polymerase reaction, purified and sequenced. A partial sequence of COI gene was determined to assess their phylogenetic relationship. The sequences of A. cantonensis were monophyletic. We identified a distinct clade that included all isolates of A. cantonensis from Brazil and Asia based on eight distinct haplotypes (ac1, ac2, ac3, ac4, ac5, ac6, ac7 and ac8) from a previous study. Interestingly, the Brazilian haplotype ac5 is clustered with isolates from Japan, and the Brazilian haplotype ac8 from Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Pará and Pernambuco states formed a distinct clade. There is a divergent Brazilian haplotype, which we named ac9, closely related to Chinese haplotype ac6 and Japanese haplotype ac7. The genetic variation observed among Brazilian isolates supports the hypothesis that the appearance of A. cantonensis in Brazil is likely a result of multiple introductions of parasite-carrying rats, transported on ships due to active commerce with Africa and Asia during the European colonization period. The rapid spread of the intermediate host, Achatina fulica, also seems to have contributed to the dispersion of this parasite and the infection of the definitive host in different Brazilian regions.

  9. Molecular analyses reveal two geographic and genetic lineages for tapeworms, Taenia solium and Taenia saginata, from Ecuador using mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Danilo; Navarro, Juan Carlos; León-Reyes, Antonio; Benítez-Ortiz, Washington; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar

    2016-12-01

    Tapeworms Taenia solium and Taenia saginata are the causative agents of taeniasis/cysticercosis. These are diseases with high medical and veterinary importance due to their impact on public health and rural economy in tropical countries. The re-emergence of T. solium as a result of human migration, the economic burden affecting livestock industry, and the large variability of symptoms in several human cysticercosis, encourage studies on genetic diversity, and the identification of these parasites with molecular phylogenetic tools. Samples collected from the Ecuadorian provinces: Loja, Guayas, Manabí, Tungurahua (South), and Imbabura, Pichincha (North) from 2000 to 2012 were performed under Maximum Parsimony analyses and haplotype networks using partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA, cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and NADH subunit I (NDI), from Genbank and own sequences of Taenia solium and Taenia saginata from Ecuador. Both species have shown reciprocal monophyly, which confirms its molecular taxonomic identity. The COI and NDI genes results suggest phylogenetic structure for both parasite species from south and north of Ecuador. In T. solium, both genes gene revealed greater geographic structure, whereas in T. saginata, the variability for both genes was low. In conclusion, COI haplotype networks of T. solium suggest two geographical events in the introduction of this species in Ecuador (African and Asian lineages) and occurring sympatric, probably through the most common routes of maritime trade between the XV-XIX centuries. Moreover, the evidence of two NDI geographical lineages in T. solium from the north (province of Imbabura) and the south (province of Loja) of Ecuador derivate from a common Indian ancestor open new approaches for studies on genetic populations and eco-epidemiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interspecific Comparison and annotation of two complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millenbaugh, Bonnie A; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Torriani, Stefano F.F.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Kema, Gert H.J.; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2007-12-07

    The mitochondrial genomes of two isolates of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola were sequenced completely and compared to identify polymorphic regions. This organism is of interest because it is phylogenetically distant from other fungi with sequenced mitochondrial genomes and it has shown discordant patterns of nuclear and mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial genome of M. graminicola is a circular molecule of approximately 43,960 bp containing the typical genes coding for 14 proteins related to oxidative phosphorylation, one RNA polymerase, two rRNA genes and a set of 27 tRNAs. The mitochondrial DNA of M. graminicola lacks the gene encoding the putative ribosomal protein (rps5-like), commonly found in fungal mitochondrial genomes. Most of the tRNA genes were clustered with a gene order conserved with many other ascomycetes. A sample of thirty-five additional strains representing the known global mt diversity was partially sequenced to measure overall mitochondrial variability within the species. Little variation was found, confirming previous RFLP-based findings of low mitochondrial diversity. The mitochondrial sequence of M. graminicola is the first reported from the family Mycosphaerellaceae or the order Capnodiales. The sequence also provides a tool to better understand the development of fungicide resistance and the conflicting pattern of high nuclear and low mitochondrial diversity in global populations of this fungus.

  11. Cytochrome P450s and molecular epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gelboin, Harry V.

    1993-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) represent a superfamily of heme-containing monooxygenases that are found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms and in many microorganisms. A number of these enzymes are involved in biosynthetic pathways of steroid synthesis but in mammals the vast majority of P450s function to metabolize foreign chemicals or xenobiotics. In the classical phase I reactions on the latter, a membrane-bound P450 will hydroxylate a compound, usually hydrophobic in nature, and the hydroxyl group will serve as a substrate for the various transferases or phase II enzymes that attach hydrophilic substituents such as glutathione, sulfate or glucuronic acid. Some chemicals, however, are metabolically-activated by P450s to electrophiles capable of reacting with cellular macromolecules. The cellular concentrations of the chemical and P450, reactivity of the active metabolite with nucleic acid and the repairability of the resultant adducts, in addition to the nature of the cell type, likely determines whether a chemical will be toxic and kill the cell or will transform the cell. Immunocorrelative and cDNA-directed expression have been used to define the substrate specificities of numerous human P450s. Levels of expression of different human P450 forms have been measured by both in vivo and in vitro methodologies leading to the realization that a large degree of interindividual differences occur in P450 expression. Reliable procedures for measuring P450 expression in healthy and diseased subjects will lead to prospective and case- cohort studies to determine whether interindividual differences in levels of P450 are associated with susceptibility or resistance to environmentally-based disease.

  12. Cytochrome b5 reductase is the component from neuronal synaptic plasma membrane vesicles that generates superoxide anion upon stimulation by cytochrome c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro K. Samhan-Arias

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we measured the effect of cytochrome c on the NADH-dependent superoxide anion production by synaptic plasma membrane vesicles from rat brain. In these membranes, the cytochrome c stimulated NADH-dependent superoxide anion production was inhibited by antibodies against cytochrome b5 reductase linking the production to this enzyme. Measurement of the superoxide anion radical generated by purified recombinant soluble and membrane cytochrome b5 reductase corroborates the production of the radical by different enzyme isoforms. In the presence of cytochrome c, a burst of superoxide anion as well as the reduction of cytochrome c by cytochrome b5 reductase was measured. Complex formation between both proteins suggests that cytochrome b5 reductase is one of the major partners of cytochrome c upon its release from mitochondria to the cytosol during apoptosis. Superoxide anion production and cytochrome c reduction are the consequences of the stimulated NADH consumption by cytochrome b5 reductase upon complex formation with cytochrome c and suggest a major role of this enzyme as an anti-apoptotic protein during cell death.

  13. [Effects of berberine on the recovery of rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes after partial hepatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverinsky, I V; Zverinskaya, H G; Sutsko, I P; Telegin, P G; Shlyahtun, A G

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of berberine on the recovery processes of liver xenobiotic-metabolizing function during its compensatory growth after 70% partial hepatectomy. It was found the hepatic ability to metabolize foreign substances are not restored up to day 8. Administration of berberine (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 6 days led to normalization of both cytochrome P450-dependent and flavin-containing monooxygenases. It is suggested that in the biotransformation of berberine involved not only cytochrome P450, but also flavin-containing monooxygenases.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA copy number threshold in mtDNA depletion myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, S E; Bonilla, E; Samuels, D C; DiMauro, S; Chinnery, P F

    2005-08-09

    The authors measured the absolute amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) within single muscle fibers from two patients with thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency and two healthy controls. TK2 deficient fibers containing more than 0.01 mtDNA/microm3 had residual cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity. This defines the minimum amount of wild-type mtDNA molecules required to maintain COX activity in skeletal muscle and provides an explanation for the mosaic histochemical pattern seen in patients with mtDNA depletion syndrome.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of the holotype specimen of Wildemania schizophylla (Bangiales: Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mayra Y; Hughey, Jeffery R

    2016-01-01

    Ion Proton data was used to assemble the complete mitochondrial genome from the holotype specimen of Wildemania schizophylla (29,156 bp). The mitogenome contains 50 genes, including 2 ribosomal RNA, 23 transfer RNA, 4 ribosomal proteins, 2 ymfs, 3 open reading frames (ORFs), and 19 genes involved in cellular respiration. Although gene synteny is conserved, the mitogenome of W. schizophylla is significantly smaller due to the lack of large intronic ORFs present in the cytochrome oxidase locus of other Bangiales. The results support the recognition of Wildemania as distinct from Porphyra, and demonstrate that small amounts of type material are suitable for genomic studies.

  16. Sevoflurane postconditioning improves myocardial mitochondrial respiratory function and reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury by up-regulating HIF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Xie, Peng; Wu, Jianjiang; Yu, Jin; Yu, Tian; Wang, Haiying; Wang, Jiang; Xia, Zhengyuan; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane postconditioning (SPostC) can exert myocardial protective effects similar to ischemic preconditioning. However, the exact myocardial protection mechanism by SPostC is unclear. Studies indicate that hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) maintains cellular respiration homeostasis by regulating mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity under hypoxic conditions. This study investigated whether SPostC could regulate the expression of myocardial HIF-1α and to improve mitochondrial respiratory function, thereby relieving myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. The myocardial ischemia-reperfusion rat model was established using the Langendorff isolated heart perfusion apparatus. Additionally, postconditioning was performed using sevoflurane alone or in combination with the HIF-1α inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2). The changes in hemodynamic parameters, HIF-1α protein expression levels, mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activity, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates, and mitochondrial ultrastructure were measured or observed. Compared to the ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) group, HIF-1α expression in the SPostC group was significantly up-regulated. Additionally, cardiac function indicators, mitochondrial state 3 respiratory rate, respiratory control ratio (RCR), cytochrome C oxidase (C c O), NADH oxidase (NADHO), and succinate oxidase (SUCO) activities, mitochondrial ROS production rate, and mitochondrial ultrastructure were significantly better than those in the I/R group. However, these advantages were completely reversed by the HIF-1α specific inhibitor 2ME2 ( P <0.05). The myocardial protective function of SPostC might be associated with the improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function after up-regulation of HIF-1α expression.

  17. Recurrent Partial Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Blanchet-Sadri

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Partial words are sequences over a finite alphabet that may contain wildcard symbols, called holes, which match or are compatible with all letters; partial words without holes are said to be full words (or simply words. Given an infinite partial word w, the number of distinct full words over the alphabet that are compatible with factors of w of length n, called subwords of w, refers to a measure of complexity of infinite partial words so-called subword complexity. This measure is of particular interest because we can construct partial words with subword complexities not achievable by full words. In this paper, we consider the notion of recurrence over infinite partial words, that is, we study whether all of the finite subwords of a given infinite partial word appear infinitely often, and we establish connections between subword complexity and recurrence in this more general framework.

  18. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  19. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  20. Metformin reduces hyper-reactivity of platelets from patients with polycystic ovary syndrome by improving mitochondrial integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Mann, W Alexander; Elgheznawy, Amro; Popp, Rüdiger; Rogowski, Paul; Dornauf, Imke; Dröse, Stefan; Fleming, Ingrid

    2015-08-31

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with decreased fertility, insulin resistance and an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Treating PCOS patients with metformin improves fertility and decreases cardiovascular complications. Given that platelet activation contributes to both infertility and cardiovascular disease development, we assessed platelet reactivity in PCOS patients and the consequences of metformin treatment. Compared to washed platelets from healthy donors, platelets from PCOS patients demonstrated enhanced reactivity and impaired activation of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). PCOS platelets also demonstrated enhanced expression of mitochondrial proteins such as the cytochrome c reductase, ATP synthase and the voltage-dependent anion channel-1. However, mitochondrial function was impaired as demonstrated by a decreased respiration rate. In parallel, the phosphorylation of dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp-1) on Ser616 was increased while that on Ser637 decreased. The latter changes were accompanied by decreased mitochondrial size. In insulin-resistant PCOS patients (HOMA-IR> 2) metformin treatment (1.7 g per day for 4 weeks to 6 months) improved insulin sensitivity, restored mitochondrial integrity and function and normalised platelet aggregation. Treatment was without effect in PCOS patients with HOMA-IRtreatment of megakaryocytes with metformin enhanced mitochondrial content and in the same cells metformin enhanced the phosphorylation of the Drp-1 on Ser637 via an AMPKα1-dependent mechanism. In conclusion, the improvement of mitochondrial integrity and platelet reactivity may contribute to the beneficial effects of metformin on cardiovascular disease.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect Nucleus Pulposus Cells from Compression-Induced Apoptosis by Inhibiting the Mitochondrial Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Excessive apoptosis of nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs induced by various stresses, including compression, contributes to the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can benefit the regeneration of NPCs and delay IVDD, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the antiapoptosis effects of bone marrow-derived MSC (BMSC on rat NPCs exposed to compression and investigate whether the mitochondrial pathway was involved. Methods. BMSCs and NPCs were cocultured in the compression apparatus at 1.0 MPa for 36 h. Cell viability, apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins were evaluated. Results. The results showed that coculturing with BMSCs increased the cell viability and reduced apoptosis of NPCs exposed to compression. Meanwhile, BMSCs could relieve the compression-induced mitochondrial damage of NPCs by decreasing reactive oxygen species level and maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential as well as mitochondrial integrity. Furthermore, coculturing with BMSCs suppressed the activated caspase-3 and activated caspase-9, decreased the expressions of cytosolic cytochrome c and Bax, and increased the expression of Bcl-2. Conclusions. Our results suggest that BMSCs can protect against compression-induced apoptosis of NPCs by inhibiting the mitochondrial pathway and thus enhance our understanding on the MSC-based therapy for IVDD.

  2. Neuron-specific specificity protein 4 bigenomically regulates the transcription of all mitochondria- and nucleus-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Dhar, Shilpa; Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-11-01

    Neurons are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism for their energy supply, and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a key energy-generating enzyme in the mitochondria. A unique feature of COX is that it is one of only four proteins in mammalian cells that are bigenomically regulated. Of its thirteen subunits, three are encoded in the mitochondrial genome and ten are nuclear-encoded on nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multisubunit, bigenomic enzyme poses a distinct challenge. In recent years, we found that nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) mediate such bigenomic coordination. The latest candidate is the specificity factor (Sp) family of proteins. In N2a cells, we found that Sp1 regulates all 13 COX subunits. However, we discovered recently that in primary neurons, it is Sp4 and not Sp1 that regulates some of the key glutamatergic receptor subunit genes. The question naturally arises as to the role of Sp4 in regulating COX in primary neurons. The present study utilized multiple approaches, including chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, knockdown and over-expression of Sp4, as well as functional assays to document that Sp4 indeed functionally regulate all 13 subunits of COX as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B. The present study discovered that among the specificity family of transcription factors, it is the less known neuron-specific Sp4 that regulates the expression of all 13 subunits of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) enzyme in primary neurons. Sp4 also regulates the three mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M) and a COX assembly protein SURF-1 in primary neurons. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Keeping it complicated: Mitochondrial genome plasticity across diplonemids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valach, Matus; Moreira, Sandrine; Hoffmann, Steve; Stadler, Peter F; Burger, Gertraud

    2017-10-26

    Chromosome rearrangements are important drivers in genome and gene evolution, with implications ranging from speciation to development to disease. In the flagellate Diplonema papillatum (Euglenozoa), mitochondrial genome rearrangements have resulted in nearly hundred chromosomes and a systematic dispersal of gene fragments across the multipartite genome. Maturation into functional RNAs involves separate transcription of gene pieces, joining of precursor RNAs via trans-splicing, and RNA editing by substitution and uridine additions both reconstituting crucial coding sequence. How w