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Sample records for partial ionization effect

  1. Turbulence effect on Ohm's law in partially ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of nonuniformity on electric current flow in partially ionized plasmas is made. An Ohm's law for a nonuniform plasma was derived, from which Rosa's equation is obtained as a special case. Making use of this new Ohm's law, the effective electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient are determined for isotropically turbulent plasmas. They are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained previously. (author)

  2. Electrostatic perturbations in partially ionized plasma with the effects of ionization and recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranjes, J.; Tanaka, M.Y.; Kono, M.; Poedts, S.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of the electrostatic ion acoustic mode in a partially ionized plasma is studied in the presence of collisions which involve processes of ionization and recombination, taking into account the dynamics of the neutrals caused by elastic and inelastic collisions with ions. The application of the model to space plasmas, which are usually subject to gravity, is discussed in detail. A dispersion equation which includes the effects of ionization and recombination is derived and the stability/instability conditions are discussed. Parameters applicable to a region of the upper solar chromosphere are used and the increment of the ion sound wave is calculated yielding an unstable ion sound wave for wavelengths larger than 20 km

  3. Physics of partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter; the other three being solid, liquid and gas. Several components, such as molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar gas, the solar atmosphere, the Earth's ionosphere and laboratory plasmas, including fusion plasmas, constitute the partially ionized plasmas. This book discusses different aspects of partially ionized plasmas including multi-fluid description, equilibrium and types of waves. The discussion goes on to cover the reionization phase of the universe, along with a brief description of high discharge plasmas, tokomak plasmas and laser plasmas. Various elastic and inelastic collisions amongst the three particle species are also presented. In addition, the author demonstrates the novelty of partially ionized plasmas using many examples; for instance, in partially ionized plasma the magnetic induction is subjected to the ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, as well as the usual resistive dissipation. Also included is an observation of kinematic dynam...

  4. On the effect of electron's runaway in partially ionized hydrogen semiclassical nonideal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turekhanova, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The effect of runaway electrons occurs frequently in tokamak plasmas. The majority of experiments in tokamak research have been devoted to the study of confinement properties of runaway electrons. Runaway electrons are reason of various destroying untolarance in tokamak plasmas. At high plasma density, when the critical energy is comparable with the rest energy the multiplication of runaway electrons accelerate at the sacrifice of increase of plasma density. The plasma conductivity is determined by electrons with energy several times higher than the thermal one and does not practically depend on slower electrons distribution. It is important to analyze the probability of runaway electrons at investigation of physical properties of nonideal plasmas under external electric field and running numerical simulations of their. The present paper is devoted to the investigation of effect of runaway electrons in partially ionized hydrogen dense plasma using the effective potentials of particle's interaction. At the investigation of composition of plasma we used the Saha equation with corrections to nonideality (lowering of ionization potentials). The Saha equation was solved for obtaining of plasma ionization stages at the different number density and temperature. As well, when take into account quantum-mechanical diffraction and screening effects, whereas free path of electrons increases with increase of plasma coupling parameter. The condition for appearance of runaway electrons in semiclassical partially ionized plasma is more favorable in regime of dense plasma. In summary it means that the probability of runaway electron in dense plasma is more than the same in rarified plasma that is possibly connected with formation of some ordered structures in dense plasma.

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation and partial hepatectomy on messenger RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Halim, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Newly synthesized messenger RNA, as measured by a 40 min uptake of the radioactive precursor (6- 14 C) orotic acid, was studied in the regenerating livers of non-irradiated and gamma-irradiated (1800 rad) adrenal-intact and adrenalectomized rats 24 and 48 hours after partial hepatectomy. Two groups of rats, one with and one without adrenal glands were each divided into four subgroups: (1) control rats, (2) irradiated rats, (3) partially hepatectomized rats and (4) irradiated, partially hepatectomized rats. The radioactive profile of polyribosome formation and distribution was determined by sucrose density gradient centrifugation (10 to 40 per cent). The result of this study indicates that ionizing radiation decreases the synthesis of newly formed messenger RNA in regenerating livers of adrenal-intact rats. However, adrenalectomy largely abolished that inhibition. These data suggest that the decrease in messenger RNA synthesis may be explained by the disturbance of adrenal hormones induced by partial hepatectomy and ionizing radiation. (author)

  6. Quantum effects on the formation of negative hydrogen ion by polarization electron capture in partially ionized dense hydrogen plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Young-Dae; Kato, Daiji

    2009-05-01

    The quantum effects on the formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H - ) by the polarization electron capture process are investigated in partially ionized dense hydrogen plasmas. It is shown that the quantum effect strongly suppresses the electron capture radius as well as the cross section for the formation of the negative hydrogen ion. In addition, it has been found that the electron capture position is receded from the center of the projectile with decreasing the quantum effect of the plasma. (author)

  7. Collision effects on propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in a sub-wavelength plasma slab of partially ionized dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, LI; Zhibin, WANG; Qiuyue, NIE; Xiaogang, WANG; Fanrong, KONG; Zhenyu, WANG

    2018-01-01

    Intensive collisions between electrons and neutral particles in partially ionized plasmas generated in atmospheric/sub-atmospheric pressure environments can sufficiently affect the propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves, particularly in the sub-wavelength regime. To investigate the collisional effect in such plasmas, we introduce a simplified plasma slab model with a thickness on the order of the wavelength of the incident electromagnetic wave. The scattering matrix method (SMM) is applied to solve the wave equation in the plasma slab with significant nonuniformity. Results show that the collisions between the electrons and the neutral particles, as well as the incident angle and the plasma thickness, can disturb the transmission and reduce reflection significantly.

  8. Effects of dust-charge fluctuations on the potential of an array of projectiles in a partially ionized dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Nasim, M.H.; Murtaza, G.

    2003-01-01

    The expressions for the Debye and the wake potential are derived by incorporating dust-charge fluctuations of a single projectile, as well as of an array of dust grain projectiles, propagating through a partially ionized dusty plasma with a constant velocity. Numerically, the effects of the dust-charge fluctuations and the dust-neutral collisions on the electrostatic potential for a single, three, six and ten projectiles are examined. The dust-charge relaxation rate modifies the shape of the Debye as well as the wake potential. For smaller values of the relaxation rates a potential well is formed instead of Debye potential

  9. MICROWAVE INTERACTIONS WITH INHOMOGENEOUS PARTIALLY IONIZED PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritz, A. H.

    1962-11-15

    Microwave interactions with inhomogeneous plasmas are often studied by employing a simplified electromagnetic approach, i.e., by representing the effects of the plasma by an effective dielectric coefficient. The problems and approximations associated with this procedure are discussed. The equation describing the microwave field in an inhomogeneous partially ionized plasma is derived, and the method that is applied to obtain the reflected, transmitted, and absorbed intensities in inhomogeneous plasmas is presented. The interactions of microwaves with plasmas having Gaussian electron density profiles are considered. The variation of collision frequency with position is usually neglected. In general, the assumption of constant collision frequency is not justified; e.g., for a highly ionized plasma, the electron density profile determines, in part, the profile of the electron-ion collision frequency. The effect of the variation of the collision frequency profile on the interaction of microwaves with inhomogeneous plasmas is studied in order to obtain an estimate of the degree of error that may result when constant collision frequency is assumed instead of a more realistic collision frequency profile. It is shown that the degree of error is of particular importance when microwave analysis is used as a plasma diagnostic. (auth)

  10. Ionization of xenon by electrons: Partial cross sections for single, double, and triple ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, D.; Badrinathan, C.

    1987-01-01

    High-sensitivity measurements of relative partial cross sections for single, double, and triple ionization of Xe by electron impact have been carried out in the energy region from threshold to 100 eV using a crossed-beam apparatus incorporating a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The weighted sum of the relative partial cross sections at 50 eV are normalized to the total ionization cross section of Rapp and Englander-Golden to yield absolute cross-section functions. Shapes of the partial cross sections for single and double ionization are difficult to account for within a single-particle picture. Comparison of the Xe + data with 4d partial photoionization cross-section measurements indicates the important role played by many-body effects in describing electron-impact ionization of high-Z atoms

  11. Effect of surface potential and intrinsic magnetic field on resistance of a body in a supersonic flow of rarefied partially ionized gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuvalov, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    The character of flow over a body, structure of the perturbed zone, and flow resistance in a supersonic flow of rarefied partially ionized gas are determined by the intrinsic magnetic field and surface potential of the body. There have been practically no experimental studies of the effect of intrinsic magnetic field on flow of a rarefied plasma. Studies of the effect of surface potential have been limited to the case R/λd 10 2 (where R is the characteristic dimension of the body and λd is the Debye radius). At the same time R/λd > 10 2 , the regime of flow over a large body, is of the greatest practical interest. The present study will consider the effect of potential and intrinsic magnetic field on resistance of a large (R/λd > 10 2 ) axisymmetric body (disk, sphere) in a supersonic flow of rarefield partially ionized gas

  12. Dynamic conductivity and partial ionization in dense fluid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    A theoretical description for optical conduction experiments in dense fluid hydrogen is presented. Different quantum statistical approaches are used to describe the mechanism of electronic transport in hydrogen's high-temperature dense phase. We show that at the onset of the metallic transition, optical conduction could be described by a strong rise in atomic polarizability, due to increased ionization, whereas in the highly degenerate limit, the Ziman weak scattering model better accounts for the observed saturation of reflectance. The inclusion of effects of partial ionization in the highly degenerate region provides great agreement with experimental results. Hydrogen's fluid metallic state is revealed to be a partially ionized free-electron plasma. Our results provide some of the first theoretical transport models that are experimentally benchmarked, as well as an important guide for future studies.

  13. The temporal behaviour of MHD waves in a partially ionized prominence-like plasma: Effect of heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, J. L.; Carbonell, M.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.

    2018-01-01

    Context. During heating or cooling processes in prominences, the plasma microscopic parameters are modified due to the change of temperature and ionization degree. Furthermore, if waves are excited on this non-stationary plasma, the changing physical conditions of the plasma also affect wave dynamics. Aims: Our aim is to study how temporal variation of temperature and microscopic plasma parameters modify the behaviour of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves excited in a prominence-like hydrogen plasma. Methods: Assuming optically thin radiation, a constant external heating, the full expression of specific internal energy, and a suitable energy equation, we have derived the profiles for the temporal variation of the background temperature. We have computed the variation of the ionization degree using a Saha equation, and have linearized the single-fluid MHD equations to study the temporal behaviour of MHD waves. Results: For all the MHD waves considered, the period and damping time become time dependent. In the case of Alfvén waves, the cut-off wavenumbers also become time dependent and the attenuation rate is completely different in a cooling or heating process. In the case of slow waves, while it is difficult to distinguish the slow wave properties in a cooling partially ionized plasma from those in an almost fully ionized plasma, the period and damping time of these waves in both plasmas are completely different when the plasma is heated. The temporal behaviour of the Alfvén and fast wave is very similar in the cooling case, but in the heating case, an important difference appears that is related with the time damping. Conclusions: Our results point out important differences in the behaviour of MHD waves when the plasma is heated or cooled, and show that a correct interpretation of the observed prominence oscillations is very important in order to put accurate constraints on the physical situation of the prominence plasma under study, that is, to perform prominence

  14. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  15. Approximate thermodynamic state relations in partially ionized gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshaw, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Thermodynamic state relations for mixtures of partially ionized nonideal gases are often approximated by artificially partitioning the mixture into compartments or subvolumes occupied by the pure partially ionized constituent gases, and requiring these subvolumes to be in temperature and pressure equilibrium. This intuitively reasonable procedure is easily shown to reproduce the correct thermal and caloric state equations for a mixture of neutral (nonionized) ideal gases. The purpose of this paper is to point out that (a) this procedure leads to incorrect state equations for a mixture of partially ionized ideal gases, whereas (b) the alternative procedure of requiring that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and free electron density reproduces the correct thermal and caloric state equations for such a mixture. These results readily generalize to the case of partially degenerate and/or relativistic electrons, to a common approximation used to represent pressure ionization effects, and to two-temperature plasmas. This suggests that equating the subvolume electron number densities or chemical potentials instead of pressures is likely to provide a more accurate approximation in nonideal plasma mixtures

  16. Theory on a partially ionized gas centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.S. van den.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis contains a study of some flow processes occurring in the Gaswhirl experiments. In this apparatus a partially ionized gas is forced into rotation by an azimuthal electromagnetic force. After a short introduction in which a motivation is given of our research project, a comprehensive treatment is presented of the principle of rotating plasmas. Further, a historical review is given of rotating plasma systems. A derivation of the fundamental equations is given which describe the flow system mathematically and these are applied to rotating plasmas. The occurrence of secondary flows with radial and axial components is considered. This qualitative picture of secondary whirls is confirmed by measurements reported in the next chapter. The last chapter offers a possible explanation of the occurrence of the transition process in the Gaswhirl apparatus. (Auth.)

  17. Theory of vortex flows in partially ionized magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K

    2004-06-07

    A complete theory for vortex flows in partially ionized magnetoplasmas is presented. Accurate analytical and numerical results are obtained concerning the structure of a Burger's vortex and a tripolar vortex. A novel type of rotating tripolar vortices with elliptic cores are found in the systems dominated by the convection in incompressible flows, but whose generation is triggered by the diffusive and compressible effects. Our vortex flow models successfully explain recent observations from laboratory magnetoplasmas and geophysical flows.

  18. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. I. NEUTRAL RETURN FLUX AND ITS EFFECTS ON ACCELERATION OF TEST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.; Bandiera, R.; Amato, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caprioli, D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    A collisionless shock may be strongly modified by the presence of neutral atoms through the processes of charge exchange between ions and neutrals and ionization of the latter. These two processes lead to exchange of energy and momentum between charged and neutral particles both upstream and downstream of the shock. In particular, neutrals that suffer a charge exchange downstream with shock-heated ions generate high-velocity neutrals that have a finite probability of returning upstream. These neutrals might then deposit heat in the upstream plasma through ionization and charge exchange, thereby reducing the fluid Mach number. A consequence of this phenomenon, which we refer to as the neutral return flux, is a reduction of the shock compression factor and the formation of a shock precursor upstream. The scale length of the precursor is determined by the ionization and charge-exchange interaction lengths of fast neutrals moving toward upstream infinity. In the case of a shock propagating in the interstellar medium, the effects of ion-neutral interactions are especially important for shock velocities <3000 km s{sup -1}. Such propagation velocities are common among shocks associated with supernova remnants, the primary candidate sources for the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays. We then investigate the effects of the return flux of neutrals on the spectrum of test particles accelerated at the shock. We find that, for shocks slower than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, the particle energy spectrum steepens appreciably with respect to the naive expectation for a strong shock, namely, {proportional_to}E{sup -2}.

  19. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED FILAMENT THREAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Oscillations and propagating waves are commonly seen in high-resolution observations of filament threads, i.e., the fine-structures of solar filaments/prominences. Since the temperature of prominences is typically of the order of 10 4 K, the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. In this paper, we study the effect of neutrals on the wave propagation in a filament thread modeled as a partially ionized homogeneous magnetic flux tube embedded in an homogeneous and fully ionized coronal plasma. Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion are considered in the basic resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. We numerically compute the eigenfrequencies of kink, slow, and Alfven linear MHD modes and obtain analytical approximations in some cases. We find that the existence of propagating modes is constrained by the presence of critical values of the longitudinal wavenumber. In particular, the lower and upper frequency cutoffs of kink and Alfven waves owe their existence to magnetic diffusion parallel and perpendicular to magnetic field lines, respectively. The slow mode only has a lower frequency cutoff, which is caused by perpendicular magnetic diffusion and is significantly affected by the ionization degree. In addition, ion-neutral collision is the most efficient damping mechanism for short wavelengths, while ohmic diffusion dominates in the long-wavelength regime.

  20. Re-ionization of a partially ionized plasma by an Alfven wave of moderate amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.; Sawley, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    The use of forced magnetic-acoustic oscillations to investigate the effect of a torsional hydromagnetic (Alfven) wave pulse of moderate amplitude on the properties of a partially ionized afterglow helium plasma is reported. Observations of the magnetic flux associated with the oscillations, measured at a number of frequencies are used to determine radial density profiles and to provide estimates of plasma temperature. The torsional wave is shown to cause significant re-ionization of the plasma with no corresponding increase in the plasma temperature. The presence of a number of energetic particles is evidenced by the production of a significant number of doubly charged helium ions. (author)

  1. Simulations of Hall reconnection in partially ionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Maria Elena; Jiang, Wei; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in the Hall, partially ionized regime in environments as diverse as molecular clouds, protostellar disks and regions of the solar chromosphere. While much is known about Hall reconnection in fully ionized plasmas, Hall reconnection in partially ionized plasmas is, in comparison, still relatively unexplored. This notwithstanding the fact that partial ionization is expected to affect fundamental processes in reconnection such as the transition from the slow, fluid to the fast, kinetic regime, the value of the reconnection rate and the dimensions of the diffusion regions [Malyshkin and Zweibel 2011 , Zweibel et al. 2011]. We present here the first, to our knowledge, fully kinetic simulations of Hall reconnection in partially ionized plasmas. The interaction of electrons and ions with the neutral background is realistically modelled via a Monte Carlo plug-in coded into the semi-implicit, fully kinetic code iPic3D [Markidis 2010]. We simulate a plasma with parameters compatible with the MRX experiments illustrated in Zweibel et al. 2011 and Lawrence et al. 2013, to be able to compare our simulation results with actual experiments. The gas and ion temperature is T=3 eV, the ion to electron temperature ratio is Tr=0.44, ion and electron thermal velocities are calculated accordingly resorting to a reduced mass ratio and a reduced value of the speed of light to reduce the computational costs of the simulations. The initial density of the plasma is set at n= 1.1 1014 cm-3 and is then left free to change during the simulation as a result of gas-plasma interaction. A set of simulations with initial ionisation percentage IP= 0.01, 0.1, 0.2, 0.6 is presented and compared with a reference simulation where no background gas is present (full ionization). In this first set of simulations, we assume to be able to externally control the initial relative densities of gas and plasma. Within this parameter range, the ion but not the electron population is

  2. Heating and ionization in MHD shock waves propagating into partially ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bighel, L.; Collins, A.R.; Cramer, N.F.; Watson-Munro, C.N.

    1975-09-01

    A model of the structure of MHD switch-on shocks propagating in a partially ionized plasma, in which the primary dissipation mechanism is friction between ions and neutrals, is here compared favourably with experimental results. Four degrees of upstream ionization were studied, ranging from almost complete to very small ionization. (author)

  3. Heating and ionization in MHD shock wave propagating into partially ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bighel, L.; Collins, A.R.; Cramer, N.F.; Watson-Munro, C.N.

    1975-09-01

    A model of the structure of MHD switch-on shocks propagating in a partially ionized plasma, in which the primary dissipation mechanism is friction between ions and neutrals, is here compared favourably with experimental results. Four degrees of upstream ionization were studied, ranging from almost complete to very small ionization. (author)

  4. Effects of dose and of partial body ionizing radiation on taste aversion learning in rats with lesions of the area postrema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of area postrema lesions on the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion following partial body exposure to ionizing radiation was investigated in rats exposed to head-only irradiation at 100, 200 and 300 rad or to body-only irradiation at 100 and 200 rad. Following head-only irradiation area postrema lesions produced a significant attenuation of the radiation-induced taste aversion at all dose levels, although the rats still showed a significant reduction in sucrose preference. Following body-only exposure, area postrema lesions completely disrupted the acquisition of the conditioned taste aversion. The results are interpreted as indicating that: (a) the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion following body-only exposure is mediated by the area postrema; and (b) taste aversion learning following radiation exposure to the head-only is mediated by both the area postrema and a mechanism which is independent of the area postrema

  5. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, M., E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  6. Alfven wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, Christopher; Hanna, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Results from a laboratory study of the dispersion relation of Alfven waves propagating through a partially ionized plasma are presented. The plasma is generated using a helicon source, creating a high density, current-free discharge, where the source can be adjusted to one of several modes with varying neutral fraction. Depending on the neutral fraction, the measured dispersion curve of shear Alfven waves can change significantly. Measurement results are compared with theoretical predictions of the effect of neutral particles on Alfven wave propagation. In fitting the theory, the neutral fraction is independently estimated using two simple particle transport models, one collisionless, the other collisional. The two models predict comparable neutral fractions, and agree well with the neutral fraction required for the Alfven dispersion theory

  7. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  8. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Carbonell, Marc, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es, E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es, E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es [Departament de Matemàtiques i Informàtica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given.

  9. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis; Carbonell, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given

  10. Turbulent Dynamics of Partially-Ionized Fluids in 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, S.; Flierl, G.

    2017-12-01

    Ionization occurs in the upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters, as well asthe interiors of Gas Giants, leading to Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effectswhich can significantly alter the flow. The interactions of these MHDregions with the non-ionized atmosphere will occur in transitionregions where only a fraction of the fluid is ionized. We areexploring the dynamics of Partially-Ionized MHD (PIMHD) using a twofluid model - one neutral and one ionized and subject to MHD -coupled by a collision, or Joule heating, term proportional to thedifference in velocities. By varying both the ionization fraction aswell as the collision frequency (coupling), we examine the parameterspace of 2D PIMHD turbulence in hopes of better understanding itscharacteristics in certain, possibly realistic, regimes. We payparticular attention to the Joule heating term and its role indissipation and energy exchange between the two species. Thisknowledge will serve as the basis to further studies in which we lookat, in a more realistic setting, the PIMHD dynamics in Gas Giant orHot Jupiter atmospheres.

  11. Equation of state of partially-ionized dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes methods for calculating the equation of state of partially-ionized dense plasmas. The term dense plasma is used rather than strongly coupled plasma, since it is possible that at plasma conditions such that only a few levels can be observed spectroscopically the plasma coupling parameters are not large. Due mainly to their importance in theoretical astrophysics, the properties of partially ionized plasmas have been of interest for a long while. More recently, this interest has intensified due to the development of methods for producing partially ionized plasmas in the laboratory. This has opened up large programs of experimental investigation and of practical application. In this paper we consider detailed statistical mechanical methods that explicitly treat the distribution over ionic species and their energy level structure. These detailed approaches are generally characterized as being in the ''chemical picture'' when a free energy expression is minimized or in the ''physical picture'' when the starting point is the grand canonical ensemble. 52 refs., 2 tabs

  12. A drift-ordered short mean-free path description of a partially ionized magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simakov, Andrei N

    2009-01-01

    Neutral particles that are present at the edge of plasma magnetic confinement devices can play an important role in energy and momentum transport, and their effects should be accounted for. This work uses the drift ordering to derive a closed fluid description for a collisional, magnetized, partially ionized plasma. Charge-exchange, ionization and recombination processes are taken into account. It is assumed that electron distribution function is unaffected by atomic processes, so that electron-ion momentum and energy exchange are described by the usual expressions for a fully ionized plasma, and that neutral-neutral collisions are unimportant. The collisional fluid equations derived herein generalize the drift-ordered description of a fully ionized collisional plasma (Catto P J et al 2004 Phys. Plasmas 11 90), agree with the MHD-ordered description of a partially ionized plasma (Helander P et al 1994 Phys. Plasmas 1 3174) in the large-flow limit and can be used to describe both turbulent and collisional behavior of a partially ionized plasma.

  13. Fluid description of multi-component solar partially ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.; Vitas, N.; Díaz, A.

    2014-01-01

    We derive self-consistent formalism for the description of multi-component partially ionized solar plasma, by means of the coupled equations for the charged and neutral components for an arbitrary number of chemical species, and the radiation field. All approximations and assumptions are carefully considered. Generalized Ohm's law is derived for the single-fluid and two-fluid formalism. Our approach is analytical with some order-of-magnitude support calculations. After general equations are developed, we particularize to some frequently considered cases as for the interaction of matter and radiation

  14. Nonlinear acoustic waves in partially ionized collisional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, N.N.; Kaup, D.J.; Shukla, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation of acoustic-type waves in a partially ionized three-component collisional plasma consisting of electrons, ions and neutral particles is investigated. For bidirectional propagation, it is shown that the small- but finite-amplitude waves are governed by the Boussinesq equation, which for unidirectional propagation near the acoustic speed reduces to the usual Korteweg-de Vries equation. For large-amplitude waves, it is demonstrated that the relevant fluid equations are integrable in a stationary frame, and the parameter values for the existence of finite-amplitude solutions are explicitly obtained. In both cases, the different temperatures of the individual species, are taken into account. The relevance of the results to the earth's ionospheric plasma in the lower altitude ranges is pointed out. (author)

  15. On the thermal raleigh problem in partially ionized argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutten Mansfeld, A.C.B.

    1976-01-01

    A partially ionized gas is created by the reflection of a shock wave with incident Mach numbers in the range 7 to 10 and an initial pressure of 5 Torr against the cold end wall of a shock tube. Heat exchange between the plasma and this cold wall induces several relaxation processes in the thermal boundary layer. Of these, relaxation of i) the electron and heavy particles temperature and ii) the degree of ionization towards a local thermodynamic equilibrium state are considered. In the model, transport and relaxation processes are treated simultaneously. A classification on the basis of relaxation phenomena is performed, i.e., simplified sets of equations are obtained in a systematic way from the frozen or equilibrium limits of the relaxation processes. A finite difference numerical solution for the different models is obtained. Because the boundary conditions are of mixed type and the relaxation processes show aspects of stiffness, the application of a backward implicit discretization scheme is necessary. As a diagnostic tool, a two wavelength version of the laser schlieren method is used. The measurements provide time histories of both the electron and atom number density gradients

  16. Determination of composition and physical properties of partially ionized plasmas in the function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaporowski, B.

    1992-01-01

    The investigations of various kinds of partially ionized plasma were conducted for the pressure of 0.1 MPa and in the range of temperature of 298.15 K to 24000 K. The physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma depend mainly of their composition and temperature. The composition of particular kinds of partially ionized plasmas varies also in the function of temperature. Simultaneous going on of physical and chemical processes in plasma is the reason of difficulties in the calculations of plasma's physical properties. The use of the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics for the calculations of physical properties of partially ionized plasma is impossible. There are enough exact methods for measuring of physical properties of partially ionized plasma. For these reasons the theoretical method using the base of statistic physics was used to calculate the composition and physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  17. Biology of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferradini, C.; Pucheault, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present trends in biology of ionizing radiation are reviewed. The following topics are investigated: interaction of ionizing radiations with matter; the radiolysis of water and aqueous solutions; properties of the free radicals intervening in the couples O 2 /H 2 O and H 2 O/H 2 ; radiation chemistry of biological compounds; biological effects of ionizing radiations; biochemical mechanisms involving free radicals as intermediates; applications (biotechnological applications, origins of life) [fr

  18. Screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas within linear response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Wuensch, K.; Gregori, G.

    2010-01-01

    We employ a pseudopotential approach to investigate the screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas. Here, the effect of the tightly bound electrons is condensed into an effective potential between the (free) valence electrons and the ionic cores. Even for weak electron-ion coupling, the corresponding screening clouds show strong modifications from the Debye result for elements heavier than helium. Modifications of the theoretically predicted x-ray scattering signal and implications on measurements are discussed.

  19. Quantum statistical mechanics of dense partially ionized hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, H. E.; Rogers, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The theory of dense hydrogenic plasmas beginning with the two component quantum grand partition function is reviewed. It is shown that ionization equilibrium and molecular dissociation equilibrium can be treated in the same manner with proper consideration of all two-body states. A quantum perturbation expansion is used to give an accurate calculation of the equation of state of the gas for any degree of dissociation and ionization. In this theory, the effective interaction between any two charges is the dynamic screened potential obtained from the plasma dielectric function. We make the static approximation; and we carry out detailed numerical calculations with the bound and scattering states of the Debye potential, using the Beth-Uhlenbeck form of the quantum second virial coefficient. We compare our results with calculations from the Saha equation.

  20. PHYSICS OF A PARTIALLY IONIZED GAS RELEVANT TO GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS-THE IONIZATION POTENTIAL ENERGY RESERVOIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.; Schroyen, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Jachowicz, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Simulation codes for galaxy formation and evolution take on board as many physical processes as possible beyond the standard gravitational and hydrodynamical physics. Most of this extra physics takes place below the resolution level of the simulations and is added in a ''sub-grid'' fashion. However, these sub-grid processes affect the macroscopic hydrodynamical properties of the gas and thus couple to the ''on-grid'' physics that is explicitly integrated during the simulation. In this paper, we focus on the link between partial ionization and the hydrodynamical equations. We show that the energy stored in ions and free electrons constitutes a potential energy term which breaks the linear dependence of the internal energy on temperature. Correctly taking into account ionization hence requires modifying both the equation of state and the energy-temperature relation. We implemented these changes in the cosmological simulation code GADGET2. As an example of the effects of these changes, we study the propagation of Sedov-Taylor shock waves through an ionizing medium. This serves as a proxy for the absorption of supernova feedback energy by the interstellar medium. Depending on the density and temperature of the surrounding gas, we find that up to 50% of the feedback energy is spent ionizing the gas rather than heating it. Thus, it can be expected that properly taking into account ionization effects in galaxy evolution simulations will drastically reduce the effects of thermal feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this potential energy term is not used in current simulations of galaxy formation and evolution.

  1. PHYSICS OF A PARTIALLY IONIZED GAS RELEVANT TO GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS—THE IONIZATION POTENTIAL ENERGY RESERVOIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.; Schroyen, J.; Jachowicz, N.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation codes for galaxy formation and evolution take on board as many physical processes as possible beyond the standard gravitational and hydrodynamical physics. Most of this extra physics takes place below the resolution level of the simulations and is added in a ''sub-grid'' fashion. However, these sub-grid processes affect the macroscopic hydrodynamical properties of the gas and thus couple to the ''on-grid'' physics that is explicitly integrated during the simulation. In this paper, we focus on the link between partial ionization and the hydrodynamical equations. We show that the energy stored in ions and free electrons constitutes a potential energy term which breaks the linear dependence of the internal energy on temperature. Correctly taking into account ionization hence requires modifying both the equation of state and the energy-temperature relation. We implemented these changes in the cosmological simulation code GADGET2. As an example of the effects of these changes, we study the propagation of Sedov-Taylor shock waves through an ionizing medium. This serves as a proxy for the absorption of supernova feedback energy by the interstellar medium. Depending on the density and temperature of the surrounding gas, we find that up to 50% of the feedback energy is spent ionizing the gas rather than heating it. Thus, it can be expected that properly taking into account ionization effects in galaxy evolution simulations will drastically reduce the effects of thermal feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this potential energy term is not used in current simulations of galaxy formation and evolution.

  2. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. II. BALMER EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G.; Bandiera, R.; Blasi, P.; Amato, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    Strong shocks propagating into a partially ionized medium are often associated with optical Balmer lines. This emission is due to impact excitation of neutral hydrogen by hot protons and electrons in the shocked gas. The structure of such Balmer-dominated shocks has been computed in a previous paper, where the distribution function of neutral particles was derived from the appropriate Boltzmann equation including coupling with ions and electrons through charge exchange and ionization. This calculation showed how the presence of neutrals can significantly modify the shock structure through the formation of a neutral-induced precursor ahead of the shock. Here we follow up on our previous work and investigate the properties of the resulting Balmer emission, with the aim of using the observed radiation as a diagnostic tool for shock parameters. Our main focus is on supernova remnant shocks, and we find that, for typical parameters, the H{alpha} emission typically has a three-component spectral profile, where (1) a narrow component originates from upstream cold hydrogen atoms, (2) a broad component comes from hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with shocked protons downstream of the shock, and (3) an intermediate component is due to hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with warm protons in the neutral-induced precursor. The relative importance of these three components depends on the shock velocity, on the original degree of ionization, and on the electron-ion temperature equilibration level. The intermediate component, which is the main signature of the presence of a neutral-induced precursor, becomes negligible for shock velocities {approx}< 1500 km s{sup -1}. The width of the intermediate line reflects the temperature in the precursor, while the width of the narrow one is left unaltered by the precursor. In addition, we show that the profiles of both the intermediate and broad components generally depart from a thermal distribution, as a

  3. Photoionization effects in ionization fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Fontelos, Marco A; Trueba, Jose L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of photoionization processes on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharge. We show that negative fronts accelerate in the presence of photoionization events. The appearance and propagation of positive ionization fronts travelling with constant velocity is explained as the result of the combined effects of photoionization and electron diffusion. The photoionization range plays an important role in the selection of the velocity of the ionization front as we show in this work

  4. Photoionization effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Fontelos, Marco A [Departamento de Matematicas, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, C/Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Trueba, Jose L [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-12-21

    In this paper we study the effects of photoionization processes on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharge. We show that negative fronts accelerate in the presence of photoionization events. The appearance and propagation of positive ionization fronts travelling with constant velocity is explained as the result of the combined effects of photoionization and electron diffusion. The photoionization range plays an important role in the selection of the velocity of the ionization front as we show in this work.

  5. DAMPING OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN PARTIALLY IONIZED PLASMA: IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC RAY PROPAGATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Siyao; Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the damping processes of both incompressible and compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a partially ionized medium. We start from the linear analysis of MHD waves, applying both single-fluid and two-fluid treatments. The damping rates derived from the linear analysis are then used in determining the damping scales of MHD turbulence. The physical connection between the damping scale of MHD turbulence and the cutoff boundary of linear MHD waves is investigated. We find two branches of slow modes propagating in ions and neutrals, respectively, below the damping scale of slow MHD turbulence, and offer a thorough discussion of their propagation and dissipation behavior. Our analytical results are shown to be applicable in a variety of partially ionized interstellar medium (ISM) phases and the solar chromosphere. The importance of neutral viscosity in damping the Alfvenic turbulence in the interstellar warm neutral medium and the solar chromosphere is demonstrated. As a significant astrophysical utility, we introduce damping effects to the propagation of cosmic rays in partially ionized ISM. The important role of turbulence damping in both transit-time damping and gyroresonance is identified.

  6. DYNAMICS OF CORONAL RAIN AND DESCENDING PLASMA BLOBS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES. II. PARTIALLY IONIZED CASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Zaqarashvili, T. V., E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es [Institute of Physics, IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, 8010, Graz (Austria)

    2016-02-20

    Coronal rain clumps and prominence knots are dense condensations with chromospheric to transition region temperatures that fall down in the much hotter corona. Their typical speeds are in the range 30–150 km s{sup −1} and of the order of 10–30 km s{sup −1}, respectively, i.e., they are considerably smaller than free-fall velocities. These cold blobs contain a mixture of ionized and neutral material that must be dynamically coupled in order to fall together, as observed. We investigate this coupling by means of hydrodynamic simulations in which the coupling arises from the friction between ions and neutrals. The numerical simulations presented here are an extension of those of Oliver et al. to the partially ionized case. We find that, although the relative drift speed between the two species is smaller than 1 m s{sup −1} at the blob center, it is sufficient to produce the forces required to strongly couple charged particles and neutrals. The ionization degree has no discernible effect on the main results of our previous work for a fully ionized plasma: the condensation has an initial acceleration phase followed by a period with roughly constant velocity, and, in addition, the maximum descending speed is clearly correlated with the ratio of initial blob to environment density.

  7. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, B.

    1989-12-01

    Ionizing radiation is energy that travels through space as electromagnetic waves or a stream of fast moving particles. In the workplace, the sources of ionizing radiation are radioactive substances, nuclear power plants, x-ray machines and nuclear devices used in medicine, research and industry. Commonly encountered types of radiation are alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays. Alpha particles have very little penetrating power and pose a risk only when the radioactive substance is deposited inside the body. Beta particles are more penetrating than alpha particles and can penetrate the outer body tissues causing damage to the skin and the eyes. Gamma rays are highly penetrating and can cause radiation damage to the whole body. The probability of radiation-induced disease depends on the accumulated amount of radiation dose. The main health effects of ionizing radiation are cancers in exposed persons and genetic disorders in the children, grandchildren and subsequent generations of the exposed parents. The fetus is highly sensitive to radiation-induced abnormalities. At high doses, radiation can cause cataracts in the eyes. There is no firm evidence that ionizing radiation causes premature aging. Radiation-induced sterility is highly unlikely for occupational doses. The data on the combined effect of ionizing radiation and other cancer-causing physical and chemical agents are inconclusive

  8. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas : numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Alastuey , Angel; Ballenegger , Vincent

    2010-01-01

    8 pages; International audience; We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first five leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation ...

  9. Comments on evaluation of energy of partial discharges in ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechowski, Z.

    1980-01-01

    A method of evaluation of energy of partial discharges in ionization chambers which are intended for investigation on electric strength of insulating materials is presented. It is demonstrated that an ionization chamber must be considered as a set of discharge sources and that for energy evaluation an amplitude analysis of apparent charge of discharges is useful. (author)

  10. Influence of collective nonideal shielding on fusion reaction in partially ionized classical nonideal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-04-01

    The collective nonideal effects on the nuclear fusion reaction process are investigated in partially ionized classical nonideal hydrogen plasmas. The effective pseudopotential model taking into account the collective and plasma shielding effects is applied to describe the interaction potential in nonideal plasmas. The analytic expressions of the Sommerfeld parameter, the fusion penetration factor, and the cross section for the nuclear fusion reaction in nonideal plasmas are obtained as functions of the nonideality parameter, Debye length, and relative kinetic energy. It is found that the Sommerfeld parameter is suppressed due to the influence of collective nonideal shielding. However, the collective nonideal shielding is found to enhance the fusion penetration factor in partially ionized classical nonideal plasmas. It is also found that the fusion penetration factors in nonideal plasmas represented by the pseudopotential model are always greater than those in ideal plasmas represented by the Debye-Hückel model. In addition, it is shown that the collective nonideal shielding effect on the fusion penetration factor decreases with an increase of the kinetic energy.

  11. Stimulating effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworowski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of low doses on human organism is not definite known up to now. The worldwide discussion on this topic has been presented. A lot of analysed statistical data proved that the stimulating effect of low doses of ionizing radiation really exists and can have a beneficial influence on human health. 43 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  12. Biopositive Effects of Ionizing Radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1972-01-01

    This paper was written for a talk given by E. Broda in Vienna for an event organised by the chemical physical society, the Austrian biochemical society and the Austrian biophysical society in December 1972. In this paper Broda analyses the question of biopositive effects of ionizing radiation. (nowak)

  13. Ionizing radiations: effects and sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignes, S.; Nenot, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Having first mentioned the effects of ionizing radiations in cancerogenisis, pre-natal, and genetic fields, the authors present the different sources of radiations and estimate their respective contributions to the total irradiation dose. Their paper makes reference to the main elements of a report issued by the United Nations Scientific Committee in 1977 [fr

  14. Health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    This presentation is restricted to the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. In general, these cumulative exposures are well below 100 rem, or about 50 times background or less. The two effects of interest in this dose range are genetic mutations and cancer production. The genetic effects will not be discussed in detail. The chief reason for the rise in risk estimates for cancer is the longer follow-up of exposed populations

  15. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments with small animals, tissue cultures, and inanimate materials help with understanding the effects of ionizing radiation that occur at the molecular level and cause the gross effects observed in man. Topics covered in this chapter include the following: Radiolysis of Water; Radiolysis of Organic Compounds; Radiolysis in Cells; Radiation Exposure and Dose Units; Dose Response Curves; Radiation Effects in Animals; Factors Affecting Health Risks. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heribanova, A.

    1995-01-01

    The basic principles and pathways of effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms and cells are outlined. The following topics are covered: effects of radiation on living matter (direct effects, radical or indirect effects, dual radiation action, and molecular biological theories); effects of radiation on cells and tissues (cell depletion, changes in the cytogenetic information, reparation mechanisms), dose-response relationship (deterministic effects, stochastic effects), and the effects of radiation on man (acute radiation sickness, acute local changes, fetus injuries, non-tumorous late injuries, malignant tumors, genetic changes). (P.A.). 3 tabs., 2 figs., 5 refs

  17. Effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussens, G.

    1984-08-01

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs [fr

  18. Progress on untargeted effects of ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jing; Chen Jihong; Li Wenjian

    2010-01-01

    The side effect of ionizing irradiation has been paid more attention with its widely using in tumor treating and mutation breeding. In recent years, untargeted effects induced by ionizing irradiation have become a hotspot of radiobiology. Here, according to reported results, we reviewed the types (genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response) and mechanisms of untargeted effects of ionizing irradiation in this paper. (authors)

  19. Ionization effects in electronic inner-shells of ionized atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchornak, G.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the atomic physics of ionization atoms has been presented. Interaction and structure effects in atomic shells, correlated to the occurrence of vacancies in several subshells of the atom have been considered. The methods of calculations of atomic states and wave functions have been reviewed. The energy shift of characteristic X-rays is discussed as a function of the ionization stage of the atom. The influence of inner and outer-shell vacancies on the energy of the X-rays is shown in detail. The influence of chemical effects on the parameters of X-rays is also taken into account. Further on, the change of transition probabilities in radiative and non-radiative transitions by changing stage of ionization is discussed; and among them the leading part of Auger and Coster-Kronig transitions by the arearrangement of the atomic states is shown. The influence of non-radiative electronic transitions on ionization cross-sections for multiple ionization is discussed. Using these results, ionization cross-sections for direct and indirect processes for several ionization stages are given

  20. Influence of partial ionization and scattering states on the solar interior structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The equation of state for the solar interior is normally assumed to be a fully ionized gas corrected by the Debye-Hueckel Coulomb interaction, partial degeneracy, and radiation pressure. The assumption of full ionization is dropped in this paper, and the influence of scattering states is included. The theory of scattering states appears to be new to astrophysics. This theory has been developed by Larkin and is discussed thoroughly by Ebeling, Kraft, and Kremp. The effect of scattering states eliminates the need to invoke a process of ''pressure ionization'' for which no satisfactory theory exists. Six solar models which include varying forms of the equation of state are discussed. The Saha equation without scattering states gives a neutrino counting rate of 7.41 SNU for the 37 Cl experiment, while assumed ionization for T>3 x 10 5 K gives 8.87 SNU, and the Saha equation with the lowest order effect of scattering states (Planck-Larkin equation) gives 8.83 SNU. Inclusion of the second virial coefficient due to scattering states brings the result to 9.02 SNU. The changes of quantities such as central temperature and the temperature at the base of the convective envelope are small and bear a similar relationship among the models. The initial hydrogen abundance of the model including the second virial coefficient due to scattering states is in good agreement with that found for the Orion nebula and B stars, i.e., log (N/sub He//N/sub H/)+12 = 10.97

  1. Epigenetic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Naggar, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Data generated during the last three decades provide evidence of Epigenetic Effects that ave-induced by ionizing radiation, particularly those of high LET values, and low level dose exposures. Epigenesist is defined as the stepwise process by which genetic information, as modified by environmental influences, is translated into the substance and behavior of cells, tissues, organism.The epigenetic effects cited in the literature are essentially classified into fine types depending on the type and nature of the effect induced.The most accepted postulation, for the occurrence of these epigenetic effects, is a radiation induced bio electric disturbances in the environment of the non-irradiated cellular volume. This will trigger signals that will induce effects in the unirradiated cells.The epigenetic effects referenced in the literature up to date are five types; namely, Genomic Instability, Bystander. Effects, Clastogenic Plasma Factors,, Abscopal Effects, and Tran generational Effects.The demonstration of Epigenetic Effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation indicates the need to re- examine the concept of radiation dose and target size. Also an improved understanding of qualifiring and quantifying radiation risk estimates may be attained. Also, a more logical means to understand the underlying mechanisms of radiation induced carcinogenic transformation of cells

  2. Saha and temperature relaxation approximations for the study of ionization instability in partially ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.

    1976-01-01

    The growth rates for the ionization instability obtained using the Saha and temperature relaxation approximations are compared with those obtained from an exact treatment, and the requirements for validity of these two approximations are obtained analytically. For the range of plasma parameters pertinent to MHD power generation it is found that the Saha approximation is valid for relatively high electron temperature, which it becomes inapplicable as the electron temperature is decreased. On the other hand, the temperature relaxation approximation is accurate over a wide range of electron temperature. It is found also that the marginal condition for the ionization instability is correctly obtained from both approximations. (author)

  3. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  4. ALFVÉN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M.

    2013-01-01

    Alfvén waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfvén waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfvén waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfvén waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  5. A partially ionized plasma modeling; Un modele de plasma partiellement ionise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Thanh, K.C.; Raviart, P.A

    2003-07-01

    We propose a model for the partially ionized plasma sheaths near the anode of an anodic spot electric arc where the cathode is considered as an electron emitter. A fluid description takes into account the heating and the ionization of the plasma induced by the electron beam. As physical hypothesis we assume that the condition of charge neutrality is valid. According that the electron mass can be neglected compared to the ion mass, we can assume that ions and atoms have the same velocity and the same temperature. Electrons and heavy particles are then regarded as two separate fluids coexisting in the plasma. Governing equations are then multi-fluid equations with relaxation correction to the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and heating by Joule effect. Equations are solved by an operator splitting procedure. That is we first discretize the homogeneous conservation laws (i.e. without source terms) by a finite volume method. The second step is to solve the ordinary differential system (i.e, governing equation without transport terms) with an implicit scheme. (authors)

  6. Oscillator strength of partially ionized high-Z atom on Hartree-Fock Slater model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, S.; Nishikawa, T.; Takabe, H.; Mima, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock Slater (HFS) model has been solved for the partially ionized gold ions generated when an intense laser light is irradiated on a gold foil target. The resultant energy levels are compared with those obtained by a simple screened hydrogenic model with l-splitting effect (SHML). It is shown that the energy levels are poorly model by SHML as the ionization level becomes higher. The resultant wave functions are used to evaluate oscillator strength of important line radiations and compared with those obtained by a simple model using hydrogenic wave functions. Its demonstrated that oscillator strength of the 4p-4d and 4d-4f lines are well modeled by the simple method, while the 4-5 transitions such as 4f-5g, 4d-5f, 4p-5d, and 4f-5p forming the so-called N-band emission are poorly modeled and HFS results less strong line emissions. (author)

  7. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - III. Disruption of partially unbound clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We extend our previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range 104-106 M⊙ with initial virial ratios Ekin/Epot = 2.3, allow them to form stars and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3 Myr time-scale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fraction of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while low-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this time-scale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.

  8. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas: numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alastuey, A. [Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS, Lyon (France); Ballenegger, V. [Institut UTINAM, Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first.ve leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation of state have been derived[A. Alastuey, V. Ballenegger et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)]. Those corrections account for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations up to order exp(E{sub H} /kT) included, where E{sub H} {approx_equal} -13.6 eV is the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom. Among the.ve leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve suitably truncated internal partition functions of H{sub 2} molecules and H{sup -} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions, for which no analytical formulae are available in closed form. We estimate those partitions functions at.nite temperature via a simple phenomenology based on known values of rotational and vibrational energies. This allows us to compute numerically the leading deviations to the Saha pressure along several isotherms and isochores. Our values are compared with those of the OPAL tables (for pure hydrogen) calculated within the ACTEX method (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Influence of relaxation processes on the structure of a thermal boundary layer in partially ionized argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongen, M.E.H. van; Eck, R.B. van P. van; Hagebeuk, H.J.L.; Hirschberg, A.; Hutten-Mansfeld, A.C.B.; Jager, H.J.; Willems, J.F.H.

    1981-01-01

    A model for the unsteady thermal boundary-layer development at the end wall of a shock tube, in partially ionized atmospheric argon, is proposed. Consideration is given to ionization and thermal relaxation processes. In order to obtain some insight into the influence of the relaxation processes on the structure of the boundary layer, a study of the frozen and equilibrium limits has been carried out. The transition from a near-equilibrium situation in the outer part of the boundary layer towards a frozen situation near the wall is determined numerically. Experimental data on the electron and atom density profiles obtained from laser schlieren and absorption measurements are presented. A quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is found for a moderate degree of ionization (3%). At a higher degree of ionization the structure of the boundary layer is dominated by the influence of radiation cooling, which has been neglected in the model. (author)

  10. Properties of partially ionized hydrogen plasmas in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawetz, K.

    1993-03-01

    In this thesis the fundamental equations of many-particle quantum-statistics of nonequilibrium are treated in respect to arbitrary high electric fields. Generalizations are found for the T-matrix approximation as well as for the shielded potential approximation valid for any field strength. These result in a non-Markovian behavior of the obtained collision integrals, also known as intra-collisional-field-effect (ICFE), and in a broadening of the energy conservation, the so-called collisional broadening (CB), caused by applied electric fields. In linear response it is shown in a new way, how the Debye-Onsager relaxation effect can be rederived from these collision integrals. Furthermore the complete quantum result is presented. Both effects, ICFE and CB, contribute to the right classical limit. The quantum result yields an surprising maximum of this field effects in dependence of the interacting mass ratio, which may be important in exciton-plasmas and semiconductors. (orig.)

  11. Multi-fluid Approach to High-frequency Waves in Plasmas. II. Small-amplitude Regime in Partially Ionized Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Gómez, David; Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume, E-mail: david.martinez@uib.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2017-03-01

    The presence of neutral species in a plasma has been shown to greatly affect the properties of magnetohydrodynamic waves. For instance, the interaction between ions and neutrals through momentum transfer collisions causes the damping of Alfvén waves and alters their oscillation frequency and phase speed. When the collision frequencies are larger than the frequency of the waves, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic approximations can accurately describe the effects of partial ionization, since there is a strong coupling between the various species. However, at higher frequencies, the single-fluid models are not applicable and more complex approaches are required. Here, we use a five-fluid model with three ionized and two neutral components, which takes into consideration Hall’s current and Ohm’s diffusion in addition to the friction due to collisions between different species. We apply our model to plasmas composed of hydrogen and helium, and allow the ionization degree to be arbitrary. By analyzing the corresponding dispersion relation and numerical simulations, we study the properties of small-amplitude perturbations. We discuss the effect of momentum transfer collisions on the ion-cyclotron resonances and compare the importance of magnetic resistivity, and ion–neutral and ion–ion collisions on the wave damping at various frequency ranges. Applications to partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere are performed.

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation on vitamins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.W.; Fox, J.B. Jr.; Lakritz, L.

    1991-01-01

    Vitamins are known to be sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation. Since most foods contain a large proportion of water, the most probable reaction of the ionizing radiation would be with water; and as vitamins are present in very small amounts compared with other substances in the food they will be affected indirectly by the radiation. This chapter discusses the effect of ionizing radiation on water soluble vitamins and fat soluble vitamins. (author)

  13. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  14. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, John B.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  15. The multiple ionization of helium induced by partially stripped carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xiaohong; Chen Ximeng; Shen Ziyong

    1996-01-01

    The ratios of the double to single ionization cross sections of helium impacted by partially stripped C q+ ions (q = 1,2,3,4) in energy range of 1.5-7.5 MeV were measured by using the time of flight procedure. The n-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculation was carried out to get the Olson-Schlachter scaling. The single and double ionization cross sections of helium were obtained by comparing the cross section ratios of the present work with the Olson-Schlachter scaling

  16. Partial volume effect in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Munehiro; Yoshiya, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Eiji

    1989-01-01

    According to the direction and the thickness of the imaging slice in tomography, the border between the tissues becomes unclear (partial volume effect). In the present MRI experiment, we examined border area between fat and water components using phantom in order to investigate the partial volume effect in MRI. In spin echo sequences, the intensity of the border area showed a linear relationship with composition of fat and water. Whereas, in inversion recovery and field echo sequences, we found the parameters to produce an extremely low intensity area at the border region between fat and water. This low intensity area was explained by cancellation of NMR signals from fat and water due to the difference in the direction of magnetic vectors. Clinically, partial volume effect can cause of mis-evaluation of walls, small nodules, tumor capsules and the tumor invasion in the use of inversion recovery and field echo sequences. (author)

  17. Total, partial and differential ionization cross sections in proton-hydrogen collisions at low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Shiyang [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, School of Mathematical and Physical Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Pichl, Lukas [University of Aizu, Foundation of Computer Science Laboratory, Aizuwakamatsu, Fukushima (Japan); Kimura, Mineo [Yamaguchi Univ., Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kato, Takako [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Single-differential, partial and total ionization cross sections for the proton-hydrogen collision system at low energy range (0.1-10 keV/amu) are determined by using the electron translation factor corrected molecular-orbital close-coupling method. Full convergence of ionization cross sections as a function of H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular basis size is achieved by including up to 10 bound states, and 11 continuum partial waves. The present cross sections are in an excellent agreement with the recent experiments of Shah et al., but decrease more rapidly than the cross sections measured by Pieksma et al. with decreasing energy. The calculated cross section data are included in this report. (author)

  18. The Physics of Partially Ionized Gas with Applications to Processes in the Interstellar Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, E. J.; Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, Joe

    2011-01-01

    The dynamical equations for a partially ionized plasma are a matter of some recent controversy. Understanding this problem is important in understanding the interaction of the interstellar medium with the heliosphere and for understanding the spectrum of interstellar turbulence. If collision scales are much smaller than the internal interaction scales such as the ion gyroradius, the fluid approximation may be used. The analysis then must deal with at least three fluids (protons, electrons, and neutrals) which are coupled to each other by collisions and/or electromagnetic fields. Often, the proton and electron gyro-radii are much smaller than the collision length scales, so the electric and magnetic fields dominate the motions of the electrons and protons. In this case, the only important particle-particle collisions are those of the electrons and protons with the neutral atoms. Since the three species have, in general, different velocities, it is not immediately clear which fluid velocity to use. This ambiguity in the choice of fluid velocity has led to recent confusion regarding the physics of partially ionized plasmas. If the neutrals have a significant fraction of the mass, working in the center-of-mass coordinate frame can result in dynamical equations that differ greatly from those of ideal MHD. This is because the magnetic field is not frozen into the frame moving at the center-of-mass velocity, which leads to additional effects on the magnetic field that can be difficult to understand intuitively. To the extent that the electron mass is negligible, the magnetic field is actually found to be frozen into the frame moving with the electron bulk velocity. If we then take U to be the bulk velocity of the proton fluid the resulting dynamical equations closely resemble those of ideal MHD with the exception of the Hall term in the induction equation. Similarly, the frequently used Cowling conductivity also depends on the choice of coordinate frame. These conclusions

  19. Genetic effects of ionizing radiations in Eucaryocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jullien, Pierre

    1976-01-01

    The litterature on the genetic effects of ionizing radiations is reviewed, especially as concerns specific loci or chromosome mutations. Extrapolation from one species to another is considered as well as extra-nuclear mutations [fr

  20. The effect of ionizing radiation on cyanophyta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'eva, N.V.; Shevchenko, T.F.; Golubkova, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    Publication data on the effect of ionizing radiation on cyanophyta are generalized. The conclusion about the presence of premises for forming cyanophyta radiobiology as special direction of procaryotic algae investigation is made

  1. Formation of β-FeSi 2 thin films by partially ionized vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Noriyuki; Takai, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    The partially ionized vapor deposition (PIVD) is proposed as a new method to realize low temperature formation of β-FeSi 2 thin films. In this method, Fe is evaporated by E-gun and a few percents of Fe atoms are ionized. We have investigated influences of the ion content and the accelerating voltage of Fe ions on the structural properties of β-FeSi 2 films deposited on Si substrates. It was confirmed that β-FeSi 2 can be formed on Si(1 0 0) substrate by PIVD even at substrate temperature as low as 350, while FeSi by the conventional vacuum deposition. It was concluded that the influence of Fe ions on preferential orientation of β-FeSi 2 depends strongly on the content and the acceleration energy of ions.

  2. Formation of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} thin films by partially ionized vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Noriyuki; Takai, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    The partially ionized vapor deposition (PIVD) is proposed as a new method to realize low temperature formation of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} thin films. In this method, Fe is evaporated by E-gun and a few percents of Fe atoms are ionized. We have investigated influences of the ion content and the accelerating voltage of Fe ions on the structural properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} films deposited on Si substrates. It was confirmed that {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} can be formed on Si(1 0 0) substrate by PIVD even at substrate temperature as low as 350, while FeSi by the conventional vacuum deposition. It was concluded that the influence of Fe ions on preferential orientation of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} depends strongly on the content and the acceleration energy of ions.

  3. The Electron Temperature of a Partially Ionized Gas in an Electric Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robben, F.

    1968-03-01

    The electron temperature of a partially ionized gas in an electric field can be determined by the collision rate for momentum transfer and the collision rate for energy transfer. Mean values of these rates are defined such that a simple expression for the electron temperature is obtained, and which depends, among other things, on the ratio of these mean rates. This ratio is calculated in the Lorentz approximation for power law cross sections, and also as a function of the degree of ionization for a helium plasma. It is pointed out that the complete results of refined transport theory can be used in calculating electron mobility and electron temperature in a multicomponent plasma without undue difficulty

  4. Advanced carbon-based material C60 modification using partially ionized cluster and energetic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yuancheng; Ren Zhongmin; Ning Zhifeng; Xu Ning; Li Fuming

    1997-01-01

    Two processes have been undertaken using Partially ionized cluster deposition (PICBD) and energetic ion bombardment beams deposition (IBD) respectively. C 60 films deposited by PICBD at V=0 and 65 V, which result in highly textured close-packed structure in orientation (110) and being more polycrystalline respectively, the resistance of C 60 films to oxygen diffusion contamination will be improved. In the case of PICBD, the ionized C 60 soccer-balls molecules in the evaporation beams will be fragmented in collision with the substrate under the elevated accelerating fields Va. As a new synthetic IBD processing, two low energy (400 and 1000 eV) nitrogen ion beams have been used to bombard C 60 films to synthesize the carbon nitride films

  5. The Electron Temperature of a Partially Ionized Gas in an Electric Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robben, F

    1968-03-15

    The electron temperature of a partially ionized gas in an electric field can be determined by the collision rate for momentum transfer and the collision rate for energy transfer. Mean values of these rates are defined such that a simple expression for the electron temperature is obtained, and which depends, among other things, on the ratio of these mean rates. This ratio is calculated in the Lorentz approximation for power law cross sections, and also as a function of the degree of ionization for a helium plasma. It is pointed out that the complete results of refined transport theory can be used in calculating electron mobility and electron temperature in a multicomponent plasma without undue difficulty.

  6. How to identify partial exposures to ionizing radiation? Proposal for a cytogenetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, T.S.; Silva, E.B.; Pinto, M.M.P.L.; Amaral, A.; Lloyd, David

    2013-01-01

    In cases of radiological incidents or in occupational exposures to ionizing radiation, the majority of exposures are not related to the total body, but only partial. In this context, if the cytogenetic dosimetry is performed, there will be an underestimation of the absorbed dose due to the dilution of irradiated cells with non-irradiated cells. Considering the norms of NR 32 - Safety and Health in the Work of Health Service - which recommends cytogenetic dosimetry in the investigation of accidental exposures to ionizing radiations, it is necessary to develop of a tool to provide a better identification of partial exposures. With this aim, a partial body exposure was simulated by mixing, in vitro, 70% of blood irradiated with 4 Gy of X-rays with 30% of unirradiated blood from the same healthy donor. Aliquots of this mixture were cultured for 48 and 72 hours. Prolonging the time of cell culture from 48 to 72 hours produced no significant change in the yield of dicentrics. However, when only M1 (first division cells) were analyzed, the frequency of dicentrics per cell was increased. Prolonging the time of cell culture allowed cells in mitotic delay by irradiation to reach metaphase, and thus provides enough time for the damage to be visualized. The results of this research present the proposed method as an important tool in the investigation of exposed individuals, allowing associating the cytogenetic analysis with the real percentage of irradiated cells, contributing significantly for the decision making in terms of occupational health. (author)

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, L.

    1982-01-01

    Radiobiology in the last years was able to find detailed explanations for the effects of ionizing radiation on living organisms. But it is still impossible to make exact statements concerning the damages by radiation. Even now, science has to content itself with probability data. Moreover no typical damages of ionizing radiation can be identified. Therefore, the risks of ionizing radiation can only be determined by comparison with the spontaneous rate of cancerous or genetic defects. The article describes the interaction of high-energy radiation with the molecules of the organism and their consequences for radiation protection. (orig.)

  8. Ionization versus indirect effects of ionizing radiation on cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadet, Jean; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed in the last decade on the elucidation of the main degradation pathways of isolated DNA mediated by hydroxyl radical (OH) and one-electron oxidation reactions as the result of indirect and direct effects of ionizing radiation respectively. This has led to the isolation and characterization of about 100 oxidized purine and pyrimidine nucleosides if hydroperoxide precursors and diastereomers are included. However, far less information is available on the mechanisms of radiation-induced degradation of bases in cellular DNA mostly due partly to analytical difficulties. It may be reminded that the measurement of oxidized nucleosides and bases in nuclear DNA is still a challenging issue which until recently has been hampered by the use of inappropriate methods such as the GC-MS that have led to overestimated values of the lesions by factors varying between two and three orders of magnitude. At the present, using the accurate and sensitive HPLC/MS/MS assay, 11 single modified nucleosides and bases were found to be generated in cellular DNA upon exposure to gamma rays and heavy ions. This validates several of the OH-mediated oxidation pathways of thymine, guanine and adenine that were previously inferred from model studies. The concomitant decrease in the yields of oxidized bases with the increase in the LET of heavy ions is accounted for by the preponderance of indirect effects in the damaging action of ionizing radiation on DNA. Further evidence for the major role played by .OH was provided by the results of exposure of cells to high intensity 266 nm laser pulses. Under these conditions 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine is mostly produced by biphotonic ionization of DNA nucleobases and subsequent hole migration to guanine bases. It is likely that some of the oxidized bases that have been isolated as single lesions are in fact involved in clustered damage. Interestingly it was recently shown that a single oxidation hit is capable of generating complex

  9. What fills the space between the partially ionized clouds in the local interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey; Redfield, Seth

    2015-01-01

    The interstellar matter located between the warm clouds in the LISM and in the Local Cavity is now thought to be photoionized gas with temperatures in the range 10,000-20,000 K. While the hot stars ε CMa and β CMa are the primary photoionizing sources in the LISM, hot white dwarfs also contribute. We consider whether the Stromgren sphere gas produced by very local hot white dwarfs like Sirius B can be important in explaining the local intercloud gas. We find that the Stromgren sphere of Sirius can at least partially explain the intercloud gas in the lines of sight to several nearby stars. We also suggest that the partially ionized warm clouds like the Local Interstellar Cloud in which the Sun is located may be in part Strömgren sphere shells

  10. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, Alexander; Burkart, Werner; Grosche, Bernd; Jung, Thomas; Martignoni, Klaus; Stephan, Guenther

    1997-01-01

    This paper approaches the long-term effects of ionizing radiation considering the common thought that killing of cells is the basis for deterministic effects and that the subtle changes in genetic information are important in the development of radiation-induced cancer, or genetic effects if these changes are induced in germ cells

  11. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  12. Fluctuation charge effects in ionization fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L; Baltanas, J P

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of charge fluctuations on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharges. We show that fronts accelerate when random charge creation events are present. This effect might play a similar role to photoionization in order to make the front move faster

  13. Fluctuation charge effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel; Trueba, Jose L [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain); Baltanas, J P [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2008-05-21

    In this paper, we study the effects of charge fluctuations on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharges. We show that fronts accelerate when random charge creation events are present. This effect might play a similar role to photoionization in order to make the front move faster.

  14. Effect of ionizing radiations on connective tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, K.I.; Gerber, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiations on connective tissue in lung, heart, vasculature, kidney, skin, and skeletal tissues are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the effect of ionizing radiations on vasculo-connective tissue and fibrotic changes following radiation-induced injury to organs and tissues. In order to put the subject matter in proper prospective, the general biochemistry, physiology, and pathology of connective tissue is reviewed briefly together with the participation of connective tissue in disease. The review closes with an assessment of future problems and an enumeration and discussion of important, as yet unanswered questions

  15. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  16. Genetic and somatic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This is the ninth substantive report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) to the General Assembly. This report contains reviews on three special topics in the field of biological effects of ionizing radiation that are among those presently under consideration by the Committee: genetic effects of radiation, dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer and biological effects of pre-natal irradiation

  17. Shear flow instability in a partially-ionized plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The stability of ion acoustic waves in a sheared-flow, partially-ionized compressible plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle in the upper atmosphere, is described and evaluated for different flow profiles. In a compressible plasma with shear flow, instability occurs for any velocity profile, not just for profiles with an inflection point. A second-order differential equation for the electrostatic potential of excited ion acoustic waves in the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals is derived and solved numerically using a shooting method with boundary conditions appropriate for a finite thickness sheath in contact with the vehicle. We consider three different velocity flow profiles and find that in all cases that neutral collisions can completely suppress the instability.

  18. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  19. A consistent model for the equilibrium thermodynamic functions of partially ionized flibe plasma with Coulomb corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2003-01-01

    Flibe (2LiF-BeF2) is a molten salt that has been chosen as the coolant and breeding material in many design studies of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) chamber. Flibe plasmas are to be generated in the ICF chamber in a wide range of temperatures and densities. These plasmas are more complex than the plasma of any single chemical species. Nevertheless, the composition and thermodynamic properties of the resulting flibe plasmas are needed for the gas dynamics calculations and the determination of other design parameters in the ICF chamber. In this paper, a simple consistent model for determining the detailed plasma composition and thermodynamic functions of high-temperature, fully dissociated and partially ionized flibe gas is presented and used to calculate different thermodynamic properties of interest to fusion applications. The computed properties include the average ionization state; kinetic pressure; internal energy; specific heats; adiabatic exponent, as well as the sound speed. The presented results are computed under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and electro-neutrality. A criterion for the validity of the LTE assumption is presented and applied to the computed results. Other attempts in the literature are assessed with their implied inaccuracies pointed out and discussed

  20. INJECTION TO RAPID DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AT PERPENDICULAR SHOCKS IN PARTIALLY IONIZED PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Yutaka, E-mail: ohira@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan)

    2016-08-10

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and upstream ionization fraction are v {sub sh} ≈ 1333 km s{sup −1} and f {sub i} ∼ 0.5, which are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results showing that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region and are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed DSA can be interpreted as shock drift acceleration with scattering. In this simulation, particles are accelerated to v ∼ 100 v {sub sh} ∼ 0.3 c within ∼100 gyroperiods. The acceleration timescale is faster than that of DSA in parallel shocks. Our simulation results suggest that SNRs can accelerate cosmic rays to 10{sup 15.5} eV (the knee) during the Sedov phase.

  1. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  2. Calculations on charge state and energy loss of argon ions in partially and fully ionized carbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Casas, David; Morales, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The energy loss of argon ions in a target depends on their velocity and charge density. At the energies studied in this work, it depends mostly on the free and bound electrons in the target. Here the random-phase approximation is used for analyzing free electrons at any degeneracy. For the plasma-bound electrons, an interpolation between approximations for low and high energies is applied. The Brandt-Kitagawa (BK) model is employed to depict the projectile charge space distribution, and the stripping criterion of Kreussler et al. is used to determine its equilibrium charge state Q(eq). This latter criterion implies that the equilibrium charge state depends slightly on the electron density and temperature of the plasma. On the other hand, the effective charge Q(eff) is obtained as the ratio between the energy loss of the argon ion and that of the proton for the same plasma conditions. This effective charge Q(eff) is larger than the equilibrium charge state Q(eq) due to the incorporation of the BK charge distribution. Though our charge-state estimations are not exactly the same as the experimental values, our energy loss agrees quite well with the experiments. It is noticed that the energy loss in plasmas is higher than that in the same cold target of about, ∼42-62.5% and increases with carbon plasma ionization. This confirms the well-known enhanced plasma stopping. It is also observed that only a small part of this energy loss enhancement is due to an increase of the argon charge state, namely only ∼2.2 and 5.1%, for the partially and the fully ionized plasma, respectively. The other contribution is connected with a better energy transfer to the free electrons at plasma state than to the bound electrons at solid state of about, ∼38.8-57.4%, where higher values correspond to a fully ionized carbon plasma.

  3. Radiobiology: Biologic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    The biologic effects after exposure to ionizing radiation, such as cell death or tissue injury, result from a chain of complex physical, chemical, metabolic, and histologic events. The time scale of these radiation actions spans many orders of magnitude. The physical absorption of ionizing radiation occurs in about 10 -18 s, while late carcinogenic and genetic effects are expressed years or even generations later. Collectively, these effects form the science of radiobiology. Many of the concepts discussed in this chapter have been developed through the study of effects generated in tissues by external radiation sources, but they apply generally and often specifically to internally distributed radiopharmaceuticals which form the central topic of this book

  4. Ionization and pulse lethargy effects in inverse Cherenkov accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Hubbard, R.F.; Hafizi, B.

    1997-01-01

    Ionization processes limit the accelerating gradient and place an upper limit on the pulse duration of the electromagnetic driver in the inverse Cherenkov accelerator (ICA). Group velocity slippage, i.e., pulse lethargy, on the other hand, imposes a lower limit on the pulse duration. These limits are obtained for two ICA configurations in which the electromagnetic driver (e.g., laser or millimeter wave source) is propagated in a waveguide that is (i) lined with a dielectric material or (ii) filled with a neutral gas. In either configuration the electromagnetic driving field is guided and has an axial electric field with phase velocity equal to the speed of light in vacuum, c. The intensity of the driver in the ICA, and therefore the acceleration gradient, is limited by tunneling and collisional ionization effects. Partial ionization of the dielectric liner or gas can lead to significant modification of the dispersive properties of the waveguide, altering the phase velocity of the accelerating field and causing particle slippage, thus disrupting the acceleration process. An additional limitation on the pulse duration is imposed since the group velocity of the driving pulse is less than c and the pulse slips behind the accelerated electrons. Hence for sufficiently short pulses the electrons outrun the pulse, terminating the acceleration. Limitations on the driver pulse duration and accelerating gradient, due to ionization and pulse lethargy, are estimated for the two ICA configurations. Maximum accelerating gradients and pulse durations are presented for a 10 μm, 1 mm, and 1 cm wavelength electromagnetic driver. The combination of ionization and pulse lethargy effects impose severe limitations on the maximum energy gain in inverse Cherenkov accelerators. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. The toxic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draghita Payet, A.C.

    2006-06-01

    The sources of radiations to which the human body is subjected are of natural or artificial origin and the irradiation of the human body can take place either by internal or external way. The ionizing radiations act at several levels of the human body, the main thing being the molecule of DNA. The ionizing radiations have no specificity, the effects on the human body can be: somatic, genetic or hereditary, teratogen. In the case of a human being irradiation, we proceed to the diagnosis and to the treatment of the irradiated person, however, to decrease the incidence of injuries we use the radiation protection. The treatment if necessary will be established according to the irradiation type. (N.C.)

  6. Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document reprints the text of the French by-law from January 8, 2002 relative to the approval and to the controls and verifications of facilities devoted to the ionizing of food products for human beings and animals. The by-law imposes the operators of such facilities to perform measurements and dosimetric verifications all along the ionization process. (J.S.)

  7. The effects of ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1975-08-01

    This paper describes the major effects of ionizing radiation on man and the relationship between such effects and radiation dose, with the conclusion that standards of radiological safety must be based on the carcinogenetic and mutagenic properties of ionizing radiation. Man is exposed to radiation from natural sources and from man-made sources. Exposure from the latter should be regulated but, since there is little observational or experimental evidence for predicting the effects of the very small doses likely to be required for adequate standards of safety, it is necessary to infer them from what is seen at high doses. Because the formal relationship between dose and effect is not fully understood, simplifying assumptions are necessary to estimate the effects of low doses. Two such assumptions are conventionally used; that there is a linear relationship between dose and effect at all levels of dose, and that the rate at which a dose of radiation is given does not alter the magnitude of the effect. These assumptions are thought to be conservative, that is they will not lead to an underestimation of the effects of small radiation doses although they may give an over-estimate. (author)

  8. Genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiations deal with those effects in the descendants of the individuals irradiated. The information base concerning genetic and chromosomal injury to humans from radiation is less adequate than is the information base for cancer and leukemia. As a result, it is not possible to make the kinds of quantitative estimates that have been made for carcinogenesis in previous chapters of this book. The chapter includes a detailed explanation of various types of genetic injuries such as chromosomal diseases, x-linked diseases, autosomal dominant diseases, recessive diseases, and irregularly inherited diseases. Quantitative estimates of mutation rates and incidences are given based on atomic bomb survivors data

  9. Multiple ionization and coupling effects in L-subshell ionization of heavy atoms by oxygen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, M.; Banas, D.; Semaniak, J.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Chojnacki, S.; Czyzewski, T.; Fijal, I.; Jaskola, M.; Glombik, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Trautmann, D.; Lapicki, G.; Mukoyama, T.

    2003-01-01

    The multiple-ionization and coupling effects in L-shell ionization of atoms by heavy-ion impact have been studied by measuring the L x-ray production cross sections in solid targets of Au, Bi, Th, and U bombarded by oxygen ions in the energy range 6.4-70 MeV. The measured L x-ray spectra were analyzed using the recently proposed method accounting for the multiple-ionization effects, such as x-ray line shifting and broadening, which enables one to obtain the ionization probabilities for outer shells. The L-subshell ionization cross sections have been obtained from measured x-ray production cross sections for resolved Lα 1,2 , Lγ 1 , and Lγ 2,3 transitions using the L-shell fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields being substantially modified by the multiple ionization in the M and N shells. In particular, the effect of closing of strong L 1 -L 3 M 4,5 Coster-Kronig transitions in multiple-ionized atoms was evidenced and discussed. The experimental ionization cross sections for the L 1 , L 2 , and L 3 subshells have been compared with the predictions of the semiclassical approximation (SCA) and the ECPSSR theory that includes the corrections for the binding-polarization effect within the perturbed stationary states approximation, the projecticle energy loss, and Coulomb deflection effects as well as the relativistic description of inner-shell electrons. These approaches were further modified to include the L-subshell couplings within the ''coupled-subshell model'' (CSM). Both approaches, when modified for the coupling effects, are in better agreement with the data. Particularly, the predictions of the SCA-CSM calculations reproduce the experimental L-subshell ionization cross section reasonably well. Remaining discrepancies are discussed qualitatively, in terms of further modifications of the L-shell decay rates caused by a change of electronic wave functions in multiple-ionized atoms

  10. Effects of ionizing radiations on insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyffon, Max.

    1978-01-01

    The most traditional effects caused by irradiation are development and morphogenesis disorders since on the whole the sensitivity of the developing organism to ionizing radiations is all the greater as the growth rate is faster. During the development of higher insects two categories of cell divide: larval cells on the one hand, which differentiate immediately after segmentation and give rise to larval organisms, and embryonic cells on the other which divide actively to form various islets or imaginal discs destined, each to its own extent, to provide the organs of the adult. Two cell categories thus coexist in the larva, one undergoing differentiation and the other multiplication, the radiosensitivity of which will be quite different for this very reason and will account at least partly, where the lethal effect of ionizing radiations is concerned, for the results observed. Three chapters deal in turn with effects on longevity, on regeneration and restoration and on morphogenesis and development. Strong doses give rise beyond a certain threshold to the appearance of acute radiodermatitis; their clinical signs and different degrees of seriousness liken them to burns of a special type [fr

  11. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. III. EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G.; Blasi, P.; Bandiera, R.; Amato, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caprioli, D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we present the first formulation of the theory of nonlinear particle acceleration in collisionless shocks in the presence of neutral hydrogen in the acceleration region. The dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles, the magnetic field amplification, and the magnetic dynamical effects on the shock are also included. The main new aspect of this study, however, consists of accounting for charge exchange and the ionization of a neutral hydrogen, which profoundly change the structure of the shock, as discussed in our previous work. This important dynamical effect of neutrals is mainly associated with the so-called neutral return flux, namely the return of hot neutrals from the downstream region to upstream, where they deposit energy and momentum through charge exchange and ionization. We also present the self-consistent calculation of Balmer line emission from the shock region and discuss how to use measurements of the anomalous width of the different components of the Balmer line to infer cosmic ray acceleration efficiency in supernova remnants showing Balmer emission: the broad Balmer line, which is due to charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with hot ions downstream of the shock, is shown to become narrower as a result of the energy drainage into cosmic rays, while the narrow Balmer line, due to charge exchange in the cosmic-ray-induced precursor, is shown to become broader. In addition to these two well-known components, the neutral return flux leads to the formation of a third component with an intermediate width: this too contains information on ongoing processes at the shock.

  12. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovsky, K.N.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of δ- and β- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both θ- and α-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author)

  13. Neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyagu, A I; Loganovsky, K N [Department of Neurology, Inst. of Clinical Radiology, Scientific Centre for Radiation Medicine of Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare bioelectrical activity of the brain in remote period of acute radiation sickness (ARS), chronic and prenatal irradiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. Registration of computerized 19-channel EEG, visual and somato-sensory evoked potentials have been carried out for 70 patients who had a verified ARS, 100 Chernobyl disaster survivors, who have been working in the Chernobyl exclusion zone since 1986-87 during 5 and more years, 50 prenatally irradiated children, and relevant controls. The relative risks of neurophysiological abnormalities are 4.5 for the ARS-patients, 3.6 for the chronically irradiated persons and 3.7 for the prenatally irradiated children. The data obtained testify to possibility of radiation-induced neurophysiological abnormalities in examined Chernobyl accident survivors which seems to be non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation. For all examined irradiated patients it was typically an increasing of {delta}- and {beta}- powers of EEG, particularly, in the frontal lobe shifted to the left fronto-temporal region, but spectral power of both {theta}- and {alpha}-range was significantly depressed. Aforesaid signs together with data of evoked potentials reflect the structural and functional abnormalities of limbic system and the left hemisphere as the first revealed neurophysiological appropriateness of ionizing radiation effects. (author). 25 refs.

  14. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  15. PARTIAL REINFORCEMENT (ACQUISITION) EFFECTS WITHIN SUBJECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMSEL, A; MACKINNON, J R; RASHOTTE, M E; SURRIDGE, C T

    1964-03-01

    Acquisition performance of 22 rats in a straight alley runway was examined. The animals were subjected to partial reinforcement when the alley was black (B+/-) and continuous reinforcement when it was white (W+). The results indicated (a) higher terminal performance, for partial as against continuous reinforcement conditions, for starting-time and running-time measures, and (b) lower terminal performance under partial conditions for a goal-entry-time measure. These results confirm within subjects an effect previously demonstrated, in the runway, only in between-groups tests, where one group is run under partial reinforcement and a separate group is run under continuous reinforcement in the presence of the same external stimuli. Differences between the runway situation, employing a discrete-trial procedure and performance measures at three points in the response chain, and the Skinner box situation, used in its free-operant mode with a single performance measure, are discussed in relation to the present findings.

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadi, F [National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia). Pasar Djumat Research Centre

    1976-10-01

    The differences of radiosensitivities among bacteria in addition to the dependence upon the species or strains also depends on the environmental condition during irradiation (temperature, medium, the presence of protective or sensitizing agents, the gas phase or atmosphere, and water activity, or degree of hydration) and on the effects of the environmental condition before and after irradiation treatment (temperature of incubation, age of culture and growth medium). In general, spores are more resistant to radiation than vegetatic bacteria, with the exception that a few cocci are the most radiation resistant bacteria (Micrococcus and Streptococcus). The application of ionizing radiation in the fields of microbiology supports the radiation sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products. In addition, microbiological aspects of food preservation, especially radurization, radicidation, and immunization studies by using irradiated microorganisms, are also important.

  17. Health Effects of Non-Ionizing Radiation on Human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubaidah-Alatas; Yanti Lusiyanti

    2001-01-01

    Increases of development and use of equipment that procedures non-ionizing radiant energy such as laser, radar, microwave ovens, power lines and hand phones, bring about public concern about the possible health effects owing to the non-ionizing radiation exposure. Non ionizing electromagnetic radiation compared to ionizing radiation, has longer wavelength, lower frequency, and lower photon energy in its interaction with body tissues. The term on non-ionizing radiation refers to the groups of electromagnetic radiations with energies less than about 10 eV corresponding to wavelengths in the ultraviolet, visible, infra red microwave and radiofrequency spectral regions. This paper describes the current state of knowledge about types of non-ionizing radiation and the health effects at molecular and cellular levels as well as its effects on human health. (author)

  18. Estimation of the contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Komarov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A simple theoretical model is proposed for estimating the differential contribution of ionization and excitation to the lethal effect of ionizing radiation. Numerical results were obtained on the basis of published experimental data on the ability of bacterial cells Escherichia coli to undergo photoreactivation of radiation-induced damage. It was shown that inactivation by excitation may be highly significant for UV-hypersensitive cells capable of photoreactivation; inactivation by excitation increased with the energy of ionizing radiation and the volume of irradiated suspensions. The data are in qualitative agreement with the assumption of a possible contribution of the UV-component of Cerenkov radiation to the formation of excitations responsible for the lethal effect and the phenomenon of photoreactivation after ionizing radiation. Some predictions from the model are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Ionizing radiation effect on human reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirous, J.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented of the existing knowledge on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation on human reproduction. Some interesting findings have been obtained by interapolating the results of studies in mouse embryos to humans, important knowledge has been obtained in studies involving the population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The review summarizes the knowledge in the following conclusions: (1) prior to the blastocyst stage, the mammalian embryo is insensitive to teratogenic and growth retarding radiation effects but is highly sensitive to the lethal radiation effect; (2) in the early organogenesis, the embryo is very sensitive to growth retarding, teratogenic and lethal radiation effects. It can, however, partly offset growth retardation in the post-natal period; (3) in the early fetal development stage, the fetus shows reduced sensitivity to teratogenic damage of many organs; sensitivity of the central nervous system and growth retardation remain which can only be compensated post-natally with difficulties; (4) in the late stage of pregnancy the fetus is not significantly deformed as a result of irradiation but permanent cellular depletion can result in various organs and tissues post-natally if radiation doses are high. (L.O.). 22 refs

  20. Power absorption of high-frequency electromagnetic waves in a partially ionized magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Bin; Wang Xiaogang

    2005-01-01

    Power absorption of high-frequency electromagnetic waves in a uniformly magnetized plasma layer covering a highly conducting surface is studied under atmosphere conditions. It is assumed that the system consists of not only electrons and positive ions but negative ions as well. By a general formula derived in our previous work [B. Guo and X. G. Wang, Plasma Sci. Tech. 7, 2645 (2005)], the total power absorption in the plasma layer with multiple reflections between an air-plasma interface and the conducting surface is computed. The results show that although the existence of negative ions greatly reduces the total power absorption, the magnetization of the plasma can, however, partially enhance it. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation and steady magnetic field on erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S. P.; Galutzov, B. P.; Kuzmanova, M. A.; Markov, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    A complex biophysical test for studying the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation has been developed. The following cell and membrane parameters have been investigated: cell size, cell shape, cell distribution by size, electrophoretic mobility, extent of hemolysis, membrane transport and membrane impedance. Gamma ray doses of 2.2 Gy and 3.3 Gy were used as ionizing radiation and steady (DC) magnetic field of 5-90 mT representing the non-ionizing radiation. Erythrocytes from humans and rats were exposed in vitro to both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. In some experiments ionizing radiation was applied in vivo as well. Each of the simultaneously studied parameters have been found to change as a function of applied radiation. The proposed test allows an estimation of the changes in the elastic, rheological and electrical parameters of cells and biological membranes. Results indicate that ionizing radiation is significantly more effective in an in vivo application, while magnetic fields are more effective when applied in vitro. Surprisingly, steady magnetic fields were found to act as protector against some harmful effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  2. Ionizing radiation effects on silicon test structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Chen, W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Dou, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.

    1993-12-01

    The effects of 60 Co gamma irradiation on MOSCAPS and special junction diode detectors have been studied. The capacitors were used to ellicit the charge accumulation and anneal in two types of thermally grown oxides representative of those used in routine detector processing. Ion implanted, oxide passivated junction detectors having 0.25 and 1 cm 2 areas and perimeter to area ratios of 1 (a square), 2 and 5 were designed and constructed to amplify the ionizing effects expected to largely affect junction edges through changes in fixed oxide charges. Detectors were exposed to over 4 Mrad and showed clear increases in leakage current in proportion to the junction edge length. Annealing schedules were determined to provide a continuous response to incremental irradiations and subsequent room temperature anneals of leakage current. Besides an increase in gate threshold, little effect on the C(V) response was found. PISCES simulation of the edge fields using different fixed oxide charge revealed regions of very high lateral fields near the junction edges for fixed charges in the 2 x 10 12 /cm 2 range expected from the capacitor studies which could be responsible for the observed leakage currents

  3. The late biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-06-15

    Full text: The principal objective of the symposium was to review the current status of understanding of the late biological effects of ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. A second objective was to critically evaluate information obtained from epidemiological studies of human population groups as well as from animal experimentation in order to provide a solid scientific basis upon which problems of current concern, such as radiation protection standards and risk-benefit analysis, could be deliberated. Eighty-one papers were presented in 10 sessions which covered epidemiological studies of late effects in human populations exposed to internal and/or external ionizing radiation; quantitative and qualitative data from animal experimentation of late effects; methodological problems and modern approaches; factors influencing susceptibility or expression of late radiation injury; comparative evaluation of late effects induced by radiation and other environmental pollutants, and problems of risk assessment. In addition, there were two evening sessions for free discussion of problems of interpreting animal data, and of the epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations. Reports on atomic bomb survivors showed that these epidemiological studies are providing dependable data, such as dose-related excess infant mortality. The reports also revealed the need for consensus in the method employed in the interpretation of data. That was also the case with studies on occupationally exposed populations at Hanford plant, where disparate results were presented on radiation-induced neoplasia among radiation workers. These data are, however, considered not so significant in relative terms when compared to risks involved in other industries. It was recommended that national registry systems for the dosimetry and medical records of radiation workers be established and co-ordinated internationally in order to facilitate reliable epidemiological

  4. Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities

  5. Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.W. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities.

  6. Bias-induced migration of ionized donors in amorphous oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors with full bottom-gate and partial top-gate structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Mativenga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bias-induced charge migration in amorphous oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs confirmed by overshoots of mobility after bias stressing dual gated TFTs is presented. The overshoots in mobility are reversible and only occur in TFTs with a full bottom-gate (covers the whole channel and partial top-gate (covers only a portion of the channel, indicating a bias-induced uneven distribution of ionized donors: Ionized donors migrate towards the region of the channel that is located underneath the partial top-gate and the decrease in the density of ionized donors in the uncovered portion results in the reversible increase in mobility.

  7. Biological effects of low-level ionizing and non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Early in this century it was recognized that large doses of ionizing radiation could injure almost any tissue in the body, but small doses were generally thought to be harmless. By the middle of the century however it came to be suspected that even the smallest doses of ionizing radiation to the gonads might increase the risk of hereditary disease in subsequently-conceived offspring. Since then the hypothesis that carcinogenic and teratogenic effects also have no threshold has been adopted for purposes of radiological protection. It is estimated nevertheless that the risks that may be associated with natural background levels of ionizing irradiation are too small to be detectable. Hence validation of such risk estimates will depend on further elucidation of the dose-effect relationships and mechanisms of the effects in question, through studies at higher dose levels. In contrast to the situation with ionizing radiation, exposure to natural background levels of ultraviolet radiation has been implicated definitively in the etiology of skin cancers in fair-skinned individuals. Persons with inherited effects in DNA repair capacity are particularly susceptible. Non-ionizing radiations of other types can also affect health at high dose levels, but whether they can cause injury at low levels of exposure is not known

  8. Effective stress principle for partially saturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McTigue, D.F.; Wilson, R.K.; Nunziato, J.W.

    1984-04-01

    In support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project, we have undertaken a fundamental study of water migration in partially saturated media. One aspect of that study, on which we report here, has been to use the continuum theory of mixtures to extend the classical notion of effective stress to partially saturated media. Our analysis recovers previously proposed phenomenological representations for the effective stress in terms of the capillary pressure. The theory is illustrated by specializing to the case of linear poroelasticity, for which we calculate the deformation due to the fluid pressure in a static capillary fringe. We then examine the transient consolidation associated with liquid flow induced by an applied surface load. Settlement accompanies this flow as the liquid is redistributed by a nonlinear diffusion process. For material properties characteristic of tuff from the Nevada Test Site, these effects are found to be vanishingly small. 14 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  9. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros da Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro; Ramos, Pedro Augusto Mendes; Nesrallah, Ana Cristina Aló; Parahyba, Cláudia Joffily; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present a literature review on the effects of the ionizing radiation from radiotherapy treatment on dental tissues. Among the effects of increasing global life expectancy and longevity of the teeth in the oral cavity, increasing rates of neoplastic diseases have been observed. One of the important treatment modalities for head and neck neoplastic diseases is radiotherapy, which uses ionizing radiation as the main mechanism of action. Therefore, it is essential for dentists to be aware of the changes in oral and dental tissues caused by ionizing radiation, and to develop treatment and prevention strategies. In general, there is still controversy about the effects of ionizing radiation on dental structures. However, qualitative and quantitative changes in saliva and oral microbiota, presence of oral mucositis and radiation-related caries are expected, as they represent the well-known side effects of treatment with ionizing radiation. Points that still remain unclear are the effects of radiotherapy on enamel and dentin, and on their mechanisms of bonding to contemporary adhesive materials. Ionizing radiation has shown important interaction with organic tissues, since more deleterious effects have been shown on the oral mucosa, salivary glands and dentin, than on enamel. With the increasing number of patients with cancer seeking dental treatment before and after head and neck radiotherapy, it is important for dentists to be aware of the effects of ionizing radiation on the oral cavity.

  10. Ionizing radiation effects on floating gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Visconti, A.; Bonanomi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Floating gate (FG) memories, and in particular Flash, are the dominant among modern nonvolatile memory technologies. Their performance under ionizing radiation was traditionally studied for the use in space, but has become of general interest in recent years. We are showing results on the charge loss from programmed FG arrays after 10 keV x-rays exposure. Exposure to ionizing radiation results in progressive discharge of the FG. More advanced devices, featuring smaller FG, are less sensitive to ionizing radiation that older ones. The reason is identified in the photoemission of electrons from FG, since at high doses it dominates over charge loss deriving from electron/hole pairs generation in the oxides

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on gastrointestinal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertin, C; Dublineau, I; Griffiths, N M; Joubert, C; Linard, C; Martin, J M; Mathe, D; Scanff, P; Valette, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1994-10-01

    The aim of this project is to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation (<10 Gy) on several parameters of gastrointestinal function: (a) regulatory peptides; (b) pancreatic and biliary secretions and (c) electrolyte and lipid transport using both gamma alone (cobalt-60) and a mixture of gamma/neutron ({gamma}/N Silene reactor) in two animal models, the rat and the pig. Preliminary data in rats following gamma irradiation (2-8 Gy) show that plasma nurotensin gastrin releasing peptide and substance P are increased in a dose dependent manner most markedly between two and four days after exposure. Intestinal brush border marker enzyme activities (sucrose and leucine amino-peptidase) were also reduced. Such differences were more marked and persisted longer after {gamma}/N irradiation (2-4 Gy: +Pb: {gamma}/:N =0.2). Following the latter type of irradiation (4 Gy) plasma cholesterol increased as well as the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio. Analysis of cholesterol distribution in lipoprotein actions revealed a large increase in cholesterol carried b High Density Lipoprotein-1 (HDL1). In the pig following either type of irradiation the volumes of both pancreatic and biliary secretions were reduced. Irradiation of pigs with either {gamma} (6 Gy) alone or {gamma}/N (6 Gy: {gamma}/N I :1) resulted in a marked decrease in both brush border (sucrase: leucine aminopeptidase) and basolateral (sodium ump` aden late cyclase) enzyme activities. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) stimulated adenylate cyclase was markedly attenuated and in addition specific VIP binding was modified as shown by a reduction in receptor affinity. The significance of the data will be discussed and the importance of a new therapeutic strategies or new biological markers of radiation-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  12. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrynkiewicz, A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the monograph is to review practical aspects of dosimetry. The work describes basic units which are used in dosimetry and natural as well as industrial sources of ionizing radiation. Information given in the monograph help in assessment of the radiation risk. 8 refs, 15 tabs

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation on plant tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hell, K.G.

    1978-01-01

    A short review is done of the biological effects of ionizing radiations on plant tissues kept in culture, from the work of Gladys King, in 1949, with X-ray irradiated tobacco. The role of plant hormones is discussed in the processes of growth inhibition and growth restoration of irradiated tissues, as well as morphogenesis. Radioresistance of cells kept in culture and the use of ionizing radiations as mutagens are also commented. Some aspects of the biological effects of ionizing radiations that need to be investigated are discussed, and the problem of genome instability of plant tissues kept in culture is pointed out. (M.A.) [pt

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, F.; Bradley, D.A.; Winlove, C.P.

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve (≤20% strain), from 23±18 kPa for controls to 57±22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, α=0.05). At larger strain (≥20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92±0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31±0.56 MPa (p=0.01, α=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626±65 kPa, irradiated 474±121 kPa (p=0.02, α=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400±194 cP for controls to 1500±88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s -1 and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization

  16. Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetic Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TerMarsch, D.J.; Gentner, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Nine papers were presented at this workshop held to mark the retirement of Dr. D.K. Myers. The papers reviewed recent literature on the heritable effects of ionizing radiation and identified areas of uncertainty. (L.L.)

  17. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Desouky; Nan Ding; Guangming Zhou

    2015-01-01

    For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT), possible ris...

  18. Biological Dosimetry Using Micronucleus Assay in Simulated Partial-Body Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Purnami

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In radiation accidents, it is common that only several parts of the body are exposed to radiation. As a consequence there is a mixture of exposed and unexposed lymphocytes in peripheral blood cells of the samples. This phenomenon will cause the dose value estimated using the exposed lymphocytes to be lower than the actual dose. In this study, an assessment of partial body exposures using micronucleus assay by estimating the partial body dose and fraction of irradiated blood was conducted. An optimal D0 value also has been determined in this study to estimate the fraction of irradiated cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs from three healthy donors were irradiated in vitro with 2 Gy of X-rays. Partial radiation exposure was simulated by mixing the irradiated and non-irradiated blood in different proportions. The proportions of mixtures of blood samples irradiated in vitro were 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 %. Blood samples were then cultured and harvested based on micronuclei assay protocol. At least 2000 binucleated cells with well-preserved cytoplasm were scored for the MN frequency. Dose Estimate 5.1 software was used to calculate the dispersion index (σ2/y and normalized unit of this index (U in each proportion of bloods. The fractions of irradiated cells were calculated with CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software for several different D0 values (2.7; 3.8; 5.4. The results showed that D0 value at 5.4 gave the closest results to the actual proportion of irradiated bloods, while for the dose estimation the estimated doses value from all proportions in all donors were higher than the actual dose. The factor that may cause this phenomenon was that the dose response calibration curve used to predict the radiation dose was not constructed in the laboratory used. Overall it can be concluded that a biodosimetry using MN assay can be used to estimate the radiation dose in partial body exposure. In order to establish a biodosimetry using MN

  19. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flury-Herard, A.; Boiteux, S.; Dutrillaux, B.; Toledano, M.

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  20. Densely Ionizing Radiation Effects on the Microenvironment Promote Aggressive Trp53 Null Mammary Carcinomas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Densely ionizing radiation is a major component of the space radiation environment and has potentially greater carcinogenic effect compared to sparsely ionizing...

  1. Gravity Effects Observed In Partially Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Gauguly, Ranjan; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    Partially premixed flames (PPFs) contain a rich premixed fuel air mixture in a pocket or stream, and, for complete combustion to occur, they require the transport of oxidizer from an appropriately oxidizer-rich (or fuel-lean) mixture that is present in another pocket or stream. Partial oxidation reactions occur in fuel-rich portions of the mixture and any remaining unburned fuel and/or intermediate species are consumed in the oxidizer-rich portions. Partial premixing, therefore, represents that condition when the equivalence ratio (phi) in one portion of the flowfield is greater than unity, and in another section its value is less than unity. In general, for combustion to occur efficiently, the global equivalence ratio is in the range fuel-lean to stoichiometric. These flames can be established by design by placing a fuel-rich mixture in contact with a fuel-lean mixture, but they also occur otherwise in many practical systems, which include nonpremixed lifted flames, turbulent nonpremixed combustion, spray flames, and unwanted fires. Other practical applications of PPFs are reported elsewhere. Although extensive experimental studies have been conducted on premixed and nonpremixed flames under microgravity, there is a absence of previous experimental work on burner stabilized PPFs in this regard. Previous numerical studies by our group employing a detailed numerical model showed gravity effects to be significant on the PPF structure. We report on the results of microgravity experiments conducted on two-dimensional (established on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner) and axisymmetric flames (on a coannular burner) that were investigated in a self-contained multipurpose rig. Thermocouple and radiometer data were also used to characterize the thermal transport in the flame.

  2. Effects of ionizing radiations on proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, M. le; Foresta, B. de; Viel, A.; Thauvette, L.; Beauregard, G.; Potier, M.

    1990-01-01

    We have reinvestigated the use of ionizing radiations to measure the molecular mass of water-soluble or membrane proteins. Exposure of purified standard proteins to increasing doses of ionizing radiation causes progressive fragmentation of the native protein into defined peptide patterns. The coloured band corresponding to the intact protein was measured on the SDS gel as a function of dose to determine the dose (D 37.t ) corresponding to 37% of the initial amount of unfragmented protein deposited on the gel. This led to a calibration curve and the known molecular mass of the standard proteins. However, we have to conclude that this method is useless to determine the state of aggregation of a protein, since, for all the oligomers tested, the best fit was obtained by using the protomeric molecular mass, suggesting that there is no energy transfer between protomers. Furthermore, SDS greatly increases the fragmentation rate of proteins, which suggests additional calibration problems for membrane proteins in detergent or in the lipid bilayer. The main drawback of the technique is that some proteins behaved anomalously, leading to very large errors in the apparent target size as compared with true molecular mass. It is thus unreliable to apply the radiation method for absolute molecular-mass determination. We then focused on the novel finding that discrete fragmentation of proteins occurs at preferential sites, and this was studied with aspartate transcarbamylase. (author)

  3. Two-dimensional Radiative Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Partial Ionization in the Chromosphere. II. Dynamics and Energetics of the Low Solar Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, Petaluma, CA 94952 (United States); Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris V. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Nóbrega-Siverio, Daniel, E-mail: juanms@lmsal.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain)

    2017-09-20

    We investigate the effects of interactions between ions and neutrals on the chromosphere and overlying corona using 2.5D radiative MHD simulations with the Bifrost code. We have extended the code capabilities implementing ion–neutral interaction effects using the generalized Ohm’s law, i.e., we include the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. Our models span from the upper convection zone to the corona, with the photosphere, chromosphere, and transition region partially ionized. Our simulations reveal that the interactions between ionized particles and neutral particles have important consequences for the magnetothermodynamics of these modeled layers: (1) ambipolar diffusion increases the temperature in the chromosphere; (2) sporadically the horizontal magnetic field in the photosphere is diffused into the chromosphere, due to the large ambipolar diffusion; (3) ambipolar diffusion concentrates electrical currents, leading to more violent jets and reconnection processes, resulting in (3a) the formation of longer and faster spicules, (3b) heating of plasma during the spicule evolution, and (3c) decoupling of the plasma and magnetic field in spicules. Our results indicate that ambipolar diffusion is a critical ingredient for understanding the magnetothermodynamic properties in the chromosphere and transition region. The numerical simulations have been made publicly available, similar to previous Bifrost simulations. This will allow the community to study realistic numerical simulations with a wider range of magnetic field configurations and physics modules than previously possible.

  4. Deterministic effects of the ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raslawski, Elsa C.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The deterministic effect is the somatic damage that appears when radiation dose is superior to the minimum value or 'threshold dose'. Over this threshold dose, the frequency and seriousness of the damage increases with the amount given. Sixteen percent of patients younger than 15 years of age with the diagnosis of cancer have the possibility of a cure. The consequences of cancer treatment in children are very serious, as they are physically and emotionally developing. The seriousness of the delayed effects of radiation therapy depends on three factors: a)- The treatment ( dose of radiation, schedule of treatment, time of treatment, beam energy, treatment volume, distribution of the dose, simultaneous chemotherapy, etc.); b)- The patient (state of development, patient predisposition, inherent sensitivity of tissue, the present of other alterations, etc.); c)- The tumor (degree of extension or infiltration, mechanical effects, etc.). The effect of radiation on normal tissue is related to cellular activity and the maturity of the tissue irradiated. Children have a mosaic of tissues in different stages of maturity at different moments in time. On the other hand, each tissue has a different pattern of development, so that sequelae are different in different irradiated tissues of the same patient. We should keep in mind that all the tissues are affected in some degree. Bone tissue evidences damage with growth delay and degree of calcification. Damage is small at 10 Gy; between 10 and 20 Gy growth arrest is partial, whereas at doses larger than 20 Gy growth arrest is complete. The central nervous system is the most affected because the radiation injuries produce demyelination with or without focal or diffuse areas of necrosis in the white matter causing character alterations, lower IQ and functional level, neuro cognitive impairment,etc. The skin is also affected, showing different degrees of erythema such as ulceration and necrosis, different degrees of

  5. Ionizing radiation: levels and effects. Volume II. Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    The genetic effects of ionizing radiation were last reviewed comprehensively by the Committee in its 1966 report (575), whereas the particular problem of the induction of chromosome aberrations by irradiation of human somatic cells was reviewed in the Committee's 1969 report (576). The present review will consider the further experimental data that have been obtained since these reports. Of the recent advances in human genetics, those concerning the occurrence and transmission of translocations have particular relevance to the problem of estimating risks, and will be discussed in the last section of this review.

  6. On the mechanism of the biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, M.A.; Margulis, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of the biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and ultrasound (US) were considered. The current views on the nature of toxicity of IR, which is usually assigned to the formation of radicals in living tissues and to the straight-line collision of an ionizing particle with the DNA molecule, were analyzed. It was established that the amount of radicals formed in biological tissues in conditions of ultrasonically induced cavitation can be as large as that for IR; however, the biological effect of US is much softer as compared to IR. It was shown that the contribution of the indirect mechanism to the total biological effect of IR can be estimated by comparing US and IR in their chemical action; the contribution of the indirect mechanism to the biological effect of IR was found to be negligibly small. An alternative mechanism was proposed to explain the biological effect of IR. In accordance with the proposed model, IR with a high linear energy transfer (LET) value breaks through cell walls and biological membranes and causes damage to them, such that the cell can lose its regenerative capacity. Moreover, high-energy heavy ionizing particles perforate cytoplasm to form channels. Ionizing radiation with a low LET value (γ- and X-rays) causes multiple damages to biological membranes. Ionizing particles can also cause damages to membranes of mitochondria thus affecting the mechanism of cellular respiration, which will cause neoplastic diseases. The straight-line collision of an ionizing particle with a DNA molecule was found to be 5-7 orders of magnitude less probable as compared to the collision with a wall or membrane. It was shown that multiple perforations of cell walls and damages to membranes are characteristic only of ionizing particles, which have sufficiently long tracks, and do not occur upon exposure to ultrasonic waves, microwaves, UV radiation, and magnetic fields [ru

  7. Ionizing and non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The monograph is a small manual to get a knowledge of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations. The main chapters are: - Electromagnetic radiations - Ionizing and non-ionizing radiations - Non-ionizing electromagnetic radiations - Ionizing electromagnetic radiation - Other ionizing radiations - Ionizing radiation effects - The Nuclear Safety Conseil

  8. The effect of ionizing radiation on hemoglobin synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinski, S

    1972-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on hemoglobin synthesis was studied and its effect on the quality of protein was discovered. The biological effects due to the changes in the structure of protein were also observed. The results of the experiments are presented.

  9. Inconsistencies and open questions regarding low-dose health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, R.H.; Koehnlein, W.

    1994-01-01

    The state of knowledge of health effects from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation has recently been reviewed in extensive reports by three prestigious national and international commissions of scientific and medical experts with partially overlapping membership, known by their acronyms UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation), BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation), and ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). Publication of these reports was followed by a number of summaries in scientific journals, authored by recognized radiation experts, that purport to present a scientific consensus of low-dose effects in a more accessible format for health professionals. A critical comparison between various presentations of accepted views, however, reveals inconsistencies regarding open-quotes establishedclose quotes facts and unsettled questions

  10. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Desouky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT, possible risks from exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to higher doses of radiation. This model has been challenged by numerous observations, in which cells that were not directly traversed by the ionizing radiation exhibited responses similar to those of the directly irradiated cells. Therefore, it is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects.

  11. Charge correlation effects on ionization of weak polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagiotopoulos, A Z

    2009-01-01

    Ionization curves of weak polyelectrolytes were obtained as a function of the charge coupling strength from Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast to many earlier studies, the present work treats counterions explicitly, thus allowing the investigation of charge correlation effects at strong couplings. For conditions representing typical weak polyelectrolytes in water near room temperature, ionization is suppressed because of interactions between nearby dissociated groups, as also seen in prior work. A novel finding here is that, for stronger couplings, relevant for non-aqueous environments in the absence of added salt, the opposite behavior is observed-ionization is enhanced relative to the behavior of the isolated groups due to ion-counterion correlation effects. The fraction of dissociated groups as a function of position along the chain also behaves non-monotonically. Dissociation is highest near the ends of the chains for aqueous polyelectrolytes and highest at the chain middle segments for non-aqueous environments. At intermediate coupling strengths, dissociable groups appear to behave in a nearly ideal fashion, even though chain dimensions still show strong expansion effects due to ionization. These findings provide physical insights on the impact of competition between acid/base chemical equilibrium and electrostatic attractions in ionizable systems.

  12. Epidemiology and effects on health of low ionizing radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Artalejo, F.; Andres Manzano, B. de; Rel Calero, J. del

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the concept and aims of epidemiology, its methods and contribution to the knowledge of the effects of low ionizing radiation doses on health. The advantages of epidemiological studies for knowing the consequences of living near nuclear facilities and the effects of occupational exposure to radiations are also described. (Author) 43 refs

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation of electrical properites of refractory insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Lint, V.A.J.; Bunch, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Los Alamos Reference Theta Pinch Reactor (RTPR) requires on the first wall an electrical insulator which will withstand transient high voltage at high temperature 10 sec after severe neutron and ionizing irradiation. Few measurements of electrical parameters for heavily disordered refractory insulators have been reported; estimates are made as to whether breakdown strength or conductivity will be degraded by the irradiation. The approach treats separately short-term ionization effects (free and trapped electrons and holes) and long-term gross damage effects (transmutation products and various lattice defects). The following processes could produce unacceptable conduction across the first wall insulator: (a) delayed electronic conductivity 10 sec after the prompt ionization by bremsstrahlung; (b) prompt electronic conductivity from delayed ionization; (c) electronic breakdown; (d) electronic or ionic conductivity due to thermal motion in the disordered material, possibly leading to thermal breakdown. Worst-case calculations based on lower limits to recombination coefficients limit process (a) to sigma much less than 5 x 10 -14 mho/cm. Data on ionization-induced conductivity in insulators predict for process (b) sigma much less than 10 -8 mho/cm. Electronic breakdown generally occurs at fields well above the 10 5 V/cm required for RTPR. Thermal breakdown is negligible due to the short voltage pulse. Ionic and electronic conduction must be studied theoretically and experimentally in the type of highly disordered materials that result from neutron irradiation of the first wall

  14. Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability in partially ionized plasma and the equatorial spread - F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.K.; Das, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the collisional gravitation induced Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability in the equatorial F region is investigated taking into account the finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the complete ion inertial term in ion equation of motion. A special class of coherent weakly nonlinear modes as solutions to the wave equation describing R-T instability driven modes is obtained. The leading nonlinear effects in the wave equation are found to appear through Vsub(L), the ion diamagnetic drift which essentially gives the FLR corrections. It is shown that the R-T modes in the equatorial F region can evolve into coherent, nonlinear, almost sinusoidal, stationary wave structures. These structures are found to travel with a constant phase velocity and to have slightly distorted sinusoidal shapes. These results seem to have a good agreement with many of the recent rocket and satellite observations of the equatorial spread F irregularities. (author)

  15. Kinetic models of partially ionized complex plasmas in the low frequency regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; Angelis, U. de

    2011-01-01

    The results from three kinetic models of complex plasmas taking into account collisions with neutrals are compared in the low-frequency regime: The ''full'' model which considers the absorption of plasma fluxes on dust particles and dust charge fluctuations, the ''multi-component'' model where both these effects are neglected, and the ''standard'' model which takes into account the dust charge perturbations but not the absorption of fluxes. We derive and numerically evaluate expressions of the low frequency responses of these models, also taking into account the modification of the capture cross-sections due to the effect of neutrals. The role of plasma sources and collisions with neutrals is assessed by computing the plasma permittivities and static permittivities for all the three models.

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on gelatine films added with antioxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraide, Felipe H.; Inamura, Patricia Y.; Mastro, Nelida L. del

    2011-01-01

    This work evaluates the effect of ionizing radiation on the gelatin films in presence of antioxidant. Gelatin solutions of glycerine and poly vinil alcohol, with and without the addition were prepared until the complete homogenization. The films were irradiated with 20 and 40 kGy in a electron accelerator, in the presence of air and at the room temperature. The use of ionizing radiation and the addition of antioxidant changed the properties of the film. The result of water absorption test revealed that with increasing of radiation dose occurred a reduction in the absorption, suggesting that happen a reticulation

  17. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, David; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Perez-Mercader, Juan; Visser, Matt

    1999-01-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this ''direct approach'' is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from QFT to the case of

  18. Effective action for stochastic partial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, David [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA, Carratera Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850 Torrejon, Madrid, (Spain); Molina-Paris, Carmen [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Perez-Mercader, Juan [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Fisica Fundamental, Apartado 50727, 28080 Madrid, (Spain); Visser, Matt [Physics Department, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri 63130-4899 (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) are the basic tool for modeling systems where noise is important. SPDEs are used for models of turbulence, pattern formation, and the structural development of the universe itself. It is reasonably well known that certain SPDEs can be manipulated to be equivalent to (nonquantum) field theories that nevertheless exhibit deep and important relationships with quantum field theory. In this paper we systematically extend these ideas: We set up a functional integral formalism and demonstrate how to extract all the one-loop physics for an arbitrary SPDE subject to arbitrary Gaussian noise. It is extremely important to realize that Gaussian noise does not imply that the field variables undergo Gaussian fluctuations, and that these nonquantum field theories are fully interacting. The limitation to one loop is not as serious as might be supposed: Experience with quantum field theories (QFTs) has taught us that one-loop physics is often quite adequate to give a good description of the salient issues. The limitation to one loop does, however, offer marked technical advantages: Because at one loop almost any field theory can be rendered finite using zeta function technology, we can sidestep the complications inherent in the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism (the SPDE analog of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism used in QFT) and instead focus attention on a minimalist approach that uses only the physical fields (this ''direct approach'' is the SPDE analog of canonical quantization using physical fields). After setting up the general formalism for the characteristic functional (partition function), we show how to define the effective action to all loops, and then focus on the one-loop effective action and its specialization to constant fields: the effective potential. The physical interpretation of the effective action and effective potential for SPDEs is addressed and we show that key features carry over from

  19. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  20. Electron ionization and the Compton effect in double ionization of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses ionization phenomena in helium, both photoionization and electron ionization. In particular he compares double ionization cross sections with total cross sections, as a function of electron energy, and photon energy. Data is discussed over the energy range up to 10 keV

  1. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  2. Effects of a static electric field on nonsequential double ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyun; Wang Bingbing; Li Xiaofeng; Fu Panming; Chen Jing; Liu Jie; Jiang Hongbing; Gong Qihuang; Yan Zongchao

    2007-01-01

    Using a three-dimensional semiclassical method, we perform a systematic analysis of the effects of an additional static electric field on nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of a helium atom in an intense, linearly polarized laser field. It is found that the static electric field influences not only the ionization rate, but also the kinetic energy of the ionized electron returning to the parent ion, in such a way that, if the rate is increased, then the kinetic energy of the first returning electron is decreased, and vice versa. These two effects compete in NSDI. Since the effect of the static electric field on the ionization of the first electron plays a more crucial role in the competition, the symmetric double-peak structure of the He 2+ momentum distribution parallel to the polarization of the laser field is destroyed. Furthermore, the contribution of the trajectories with multiple recollisions to the NSDI is also changed dramatically by the static electric field. As the static electric field increases, the trajectories with two recollisions, which start at the time when the laser and the static electric field are in the same direction, become increasingly important for the NSDI

  3. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  4. Irradiation spectrum and ionization-induced diffusion effects in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    There are two main components to the irradiation spectrum which need to be considered in radiation effects studies on nonmetals, namely the primary knock-on atom energy spectrum and ionizing radiation. The published low-temperature studies on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO suggest that the defect production is nearly independent of the average primary knock-on atom energy, in sharp contrast to the situation for metals. On the other hand, ionizing radiation has been shown to exert a pronounced influence on the microstructural evolution of both semiconductors and insulators under certain conditions. Recent work on the microstructure of ion-irradiated ceramics is summarized, which provides evidence for significant ionization-induced diffusion. Polycrystalline samples of MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} were irradiated with various ions ranging from 1 MeV H{sup +} to 4 MeV Zr{sup +} ions at temperatures between 25 and 650{degrees}C. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the depth-dependent microstructural of the irradiated specimens. Dislocation loop nucleation was effectively suppressed in specimens irradiated with light ions, whereas the growth rate of dislocation loops was enhanced. The sensitivity to irradiation spectrum is attributed to ionization-induced diffusion. The interstitial migration energies in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are estimated to be {le}0.4 eV and {le}0.8 eV, respectively for irradiation conditions where ionization-induced diffusion effects are expected to be negligible.

  5. Effect of partial replacement of fishmeal with african yam bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of partial replacement of fishmeal with african yam bean ( Sphenostylis stenocarpa ) meal on eggs, sperm quality and spawning performance of African Catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) broodstock.

  6. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2006-01-01

    Aerodynamic effects in ionized gases, often neglected phenomena, have been subject of a renewed interest in recent years. After a brief historical account, we discuss a selected number of effects and unresolved problems that appear to be relevant in both aeronautic and propulsion applications in subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow. Interaction between acoustic shock waves and weakly ionized gas is manifested either as plasma-induced shock wave dispersion and acceleration or as shock-wave induced double electric layer in the plasma, followed by the localized increase of the average electron energy and density, as well as enhancement of optical emission. We describe the phenomenology of these effects and discuss several experiments that still do not have an adequate interpretation. Critical for application of aerodynamic effects is the energy deposition into the flow. We classify and discuss some proposed wall-free generation schemes with respect to the efficiency of energy deposition and overall generation of the aerodynamic body force

  7. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and partial least squares discriminant analysis applied to the quality control of olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Junia O; Botelho, Bruno G; Sena, Marcelo M; Augusti, Rodinei

    2013-10-01

    Direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the positive ion mode [ESI(+)-MS] is used to obtain fingerprints of aqueous-methanolic extracts of two types of olive oils, extra virgin (EV) and ordinary (OR), as well as of samples of EV olive oil adulterated by the addition of OR olive oil and other edible oils: corn (CO), sunflower (SF), soybean (SO) and canola (CA). The MS data is treated by the partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) protocol aiming at discriminating the above-mentioned classes formed by the genuine olive oils, EV (1) and OR (2), as well as the EV adulterated samples, i.e. EV/SO (3), EV/CO (4), EV/SF (5), EV/CA (6) and EV/OR (7). The PLS-DA model employed is built with 190 and 70 samples for the training and test sets, respectively. For all classes (1-7), EV and OR olive oils as well as the adulterated samples (in a proportion varying from 0.5 to 20.0% w/w) are properly classified. The developed methodology required no ions identification and demonstrated to be fast, as each measurement lasted about 3 min including the extraction step and MS analysis, and reliable, because high sensitivities (rate of true positives) and specificities (rate of true negatives) were achieved. Finally, it can be envisaged that this approach has potential to be applied in quality control of EV olive oils. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effects of previous ionization and excitation on the ionization wave propagation along the dielectric tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping; Bi, Zhenhua; Wang, Xueyang; Niu, Jinhai; Ji, Longfei; Song, Ying; Qi, Zhihua; Wang, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, by using a high precision synchronization system, the ignition time, velocity, and propagation properties of the ionization waves (IWs) have been investigated in detail from the 1st high voltage (HV) pulse to the sequential ones over a large range of the pulse-off time. In order to clarify the effects of previous ionization and excitation on the IW propagation, the density of the residual charges are controlled by varying the pulse-off time from 199 μs to 15 μs. The results show that the formation and propagation of IWs can be strongly affected by previous discharge. For a longer pulse-off time (100 μs–190 μs), the propagation velocity of plasma bullets are decreased from the 1st to the 10th HV pulse, then increased after the 10th pulse, and finally become stable after about 500 pulses. When the pulse-off time is reduced to 15 μs, the propagation velocity of plasma bullets will rapidly increase and become stable after the 1st HV pulse. The ignition voltage is significantly reduced after the 1st HV pulse with the decrease in pulse-off time. Consequently, the generation and propagation of IWs in the tube are strongly affected by the accumulation of long-lived metastable helium (He) species and residual charges from previous discharges, which is important for understanding the plasma bullet behavior. (paper)

  9. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere -- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation, or

  10. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Zhang, Ming [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere –- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation

  11. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and; Zhang, Ming [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Physics and Space Sciences Dept.; Borovikov, Sergey [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Heerikhuisen, Jacob [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Zank, Gary [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Gamayunov, Konstantin [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Physics and Space Sciences Dept.; Colella, Phillip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere - the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct regions are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker–Planck equation, or

  12. Partial Volume Effects correction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pogam, Adrien

    2010-01-01

    Partial Volume Effects (PVE) designates the blur commonly found in nuclear medicine images and this PhD work is dedicated to their correction with the objectives of qualitative and quantitative improvement of such images. PVE arise from the limited spatial resolution of functional imaging with either Positron Emission Tomography (PET) or Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). They can be defined as a signal loss in tissues of size similar to the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF of the imaging device. In addition, PVE induce activity cross contamination between adjacent structures with different tracer uptakes. This can lead to under or over estimation of the real activity of such analyzed regions. Various methodologies currently exist to compensate or even correct for PVE and they may be classified depending on their place in the processing chain: either before, during or after the image reconstruction process, as well as their dependency on co-registered anatomical images with higher spatial resolution, for instance Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The voxel-based and post-reconstruction approach was chosen for this work to avoid regions of interest definition and dependency on proprietary reconstruction developed by each manufacturer, in order to improve the PVE correction. Two different contributions were carried out in this work: the first one is based on a multi-resolution methodology in the wavelet domain using the higher resolution details of a co-registered anatomical image associated to the functional dataset to correct. The second one is the improvement of iterative deconvolution based methodologies by using tools such as directional wavelets and curvelets extensions. These various developed approaches were applied and validated using synthetic, simulated and clinical images, for instance with neurology and oncology applications in mind. Finally, as currently available PET/CT scanners incorporate more

  13. Effect of ionizing radiation on rat parotid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraks, George; Tampelini, Flavio Silva; Pereira, Kleber Fernando; Chopard, Renato Paulo [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. of Biomedical Sciences. Dept. of Anatomy]. E-mail: rchopard@usp.br

    2008-01-15

    A common side effect of radiotherapy used in the treatment of oral cancer is the occurrence of structural and physiological alterations of the salivary glands due to exposure to ionizing radiation, as demonstrated by conditions such as decreased salivary flow. The present study evaluated ultrastructural alterations in the parotid glands of rats receiving a fractionated dose (1,500-cGy) of radiation emitted by a Cesium-137 source and rats that were not subjected to ionizing radiation. After sacrifice, the parotid glands were removed and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Damage such as cytoplasmic vacuolisation, dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum and destruction of mitochondria, as well as damage to the cellular membrane of acinar cells, were observed. These findings lead to the conclusion that ionizing radiation promotes alterations in the glandular parenchyma, and that these alterations are directly related to the dose level of absorbed radiation. Certain phenomena that appear in the cytoplasm and nuclear material indicate that ionizing radiation causes acinar cell death (apoptosis). (author)

  14. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  15. Coffee-ring effects in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie-Bi; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L

    2013-03-05

    This report focuses on the heterogeneous distribution of small molecules (e.g. metabolites) within dry deposits of suspensions and solutions of inorganic and organic compounds with implications for chemical analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Taking advantage of the imaging capabilities of a modern mass spectrometer, we have investigated the occurrence of "coffee rings" in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) sample spots. It is seen that the "coffee-ring effect" in MALDI/SALDI samples can be both beneficial and disadvantageous. For example, formation of the coffee rings gives rise to heterogeneous distribution of analytes and matrices, thus compromising analytical performance and reproducibility of the mass spectrometric analysis. On the other hand, the coffee-ring effect can also be advantageous because it enables partial separation of analytes from some of the interfering molecules present in the sample. We report a "hidden coffee-ring effect" where under certain conditions the sample/matrix deposit appears relatively homogeneous when inspected by optical microscopy. Even in such cases, hidden coffee rings can still be found by implementing the MALDI-MS imaging technique. We have also found that to some extent, the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed during SALDI sample preparation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on Amphistome metacercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Md.; Rao, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on amphistome metacercariae and the parasitological and cytological findings of the resultant flukes were studied in lambs and kids. The flukes recovered from the metacercariae irradiated at 2.0 Krad were less in percentage with stunted growth, degenerative changes of gonads, absence of eggs in uterus and hampered spermatogenesis. The metacercariae irradiated at 2.5 and 3.0 Krad could be developed into flukes and seen only 15 days post exposure but not 87/120 days. Fifteen days flukes were showing retarded development and without any reproductive organs. 39 refs., 3 tables. (author)

  17. Study of total ionization dose effects in electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nidhin, T.S.; Bhattacharyya, Anindya; Gour, Aditya; Behera, R.P.; Jayanthi, T.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation effects in electronic devices are a major challenge in the dependable application developments of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems. The main radiation effects are total ionization dose (TID) effects, displacement damage dose (DDD) effects and single event effects (SEE). In this study, we are concentrating on TID effects in electronic devices. The focus of the study is mainly on SRAM based field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) along with that the devices of our interest are voltage regulators, flash memory and optocoupler. The experiments are conducted by exposing the devices to gamma radiation in power off condition and the degradation in the performances are analysed

  18. Effect of ionizing radiation on cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milliat, F.; Benderitter, M.; Gaugler, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment for cancer of the chest, mediastinal area or the neck area is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. With the increasing number of cancer patients and the increased treatment efficiency, the number of cancer survivors is increasing exponentially. The cancer survivors live longer and their long-term follow-up must be considered. The cardiovascular toxicity is mainly associated with the treatment of breast cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma and head and neck cancer. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects are insidious and chronic. Their occurrence is linked to numerous factors including the age of the patient at the beginning of the radiotherapy schedule, the number of years following radiotherapy, the doses (and volume) to the heart and the large vessels (coronary and carotid arteries), and the association with the traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear and, even if similarities with age-related atherosclerosis were established, the specificities of the radiation-induced atherosclerosis for high doses remain to be discovered. For low/moderate doses of ionising radiation, recent epidemiological studies provide evidence of increased risk of cardiovascular pathologies. A better knowledge of the mechanisms associated with the radiation-induced cardiovascular pathologies and the more precise identification of the populations at risk in the future should allow a more effective care of these patients with cardiovascular risk. (authors)

  19. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.; Chottova, O.; Kubankova, V.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on the efficacy of chymotrypsin in pancreatin prepared by the separation of enzymes from an activated pancreas extract, in the same sample in which the content of lipids was increased to 16.55%, and in pancreatin prepared by drying an incompletely activated ground pancreas were compared with the effect of radiation on crystaline lyophilized chymotrypsin. The working conditions were identical with those described in the previous communication, all samples possessed nearly identical humidity on irradiation. The efficacy of chymotrypsin was determined by the method of PhBs 3, ethyl ester L-tyrosine hydrochloride being used as the substrate. The results were statistically evaluated and after calculation for dried lipid-free substance represented in graphs. The sequence of the loss of efficacy in pancreatin corresponded to the sequence of the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy found in the previous communication. The lowest remaining efficacy was found in crystalline lyophilized chymotrypsin. Percent losses of chymotrypsin efficacy in pancreatin determined by the synthetic substrate were in good agreement with the loss of the total proteolytic efficacy of the same samples determined by casein. (author)

  20. Side effects of ionizing radiation on healthy tissues and organs at risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiations induce cell death, causing deterministic or stochastic side-effects. This paper briefly summarizes the biological mechanisms of early and late side-effects of ionizing radiations on healthy tissue. (author)

  1. Effect of ionizing radiation on enzymes. VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Pipota, J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect was examined of gamma radiation on the efficacy of cellulase irradiated with doses graded from 10 to 120 kGy. The results were statistically evaluated. The dose dependence of inactivation corresponds to the course of the decrease in efficacy of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes and pepsin investigated in previous communications. In the semilogarithmical arrangement of the graph this dependence is linear. It can be seen from the graph that a dose of 10 kGy, usually sufficient to achieve microbiological indefectibility, produces an approximately 7% loss in efficacy. With a dose of 25 kGy necessary to achieve sterility, cellulase already loses approximately 17% of its efficacy. With 120 kGy, the largest dose used, the efficacy was reduced to only 47.9%. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  2. V. Physical effects in ionizing radiation passage through matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The ionization of the medium during absorption of alpha particles is described. The ranges are given of alpha particles in the air and in certain liquids and solids. The absorption of protons and deuterons takes place similarly as in alpha particles but protons and deuterons have a bigger range at the same energy. The term half-thickness has been introduced for the absorption of beta particles. For different energies of beta particles the absorption of these particles is graphically represented for different materials. The greatest attention is devoted to the absorption of electromagnetic radiation, i.e., X radiation and gamma radiation. The mechanisms are explained of absorption by photoelectric effect, the Compton effect and electron pair formation. In X radiation radiotherapy, filters are used, mostly aluminium, copper or zinc plates. The values are given of radiation intensity for different thicknesses of aluminium and copper filters and a survey is given of combined filters for 220 to 400 kV. For radiotherapy purposes great attention is devoted to the calculation of the depth dose. The effects are discussed of ionizing radiation on photographic emulsion, on changes in the colouring of some substances and fluorescence. Also given are the biological effects of ionizing radiation and the theory of direct and indirect effects is briefly described. (E.S.)

  3. Dielectric response of fully and partially depleted ferroelectric thin films and inversion of the thickness effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misirlioglu, I B; Yildiz, M

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of full and partial depletion on the dielectric response characteristics of ferroelectric thin films with impurities via a computational approach. Using a thermodynamic approach along with the fundamental equations for semiconductors, we show that films with partial depletion display unique features and an enhanced dielectric response compared with those fully depleted. We find that the capacitance peak at switching can be significantly suppressed in the case of high impurity densities (>10 25 m −3 ) with relatively low ionization energy, of the order of 0.5 eV. For conserved number of species in films, electromigration of ionized impurities at room temperature is negligible and has nearly no effect on the dielectric response. In films with high impurity density, the dielectric response at zero bias is enhanced with respect to charge-free films or those with relatively low impurity density ( 24 m −3 ). We demonstrate that partially depleted films should be expected to exhibit peculiar capacitance–voltage characteristics at low and high bias and that the thickness effect probed in experiments in ferroelectric thin films could be entirely inverted in thin films with depletion charges where a higher dielectric response can be measured in thicker films. Therefore, depletion charge densities in ferroelectric thin films should be estimated before size-effect-related studies. Finally, we noted that these findings are in good qualitative agreement with dielectric measurements carried out on PbZr x Ti 1−x O 3 . (paper)

  4. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Chottova, O.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect was studied of gamma radiation on the proteolytic activity of pancreatin prepared either by separating enzymes from an activated extract of the pancreas, containing 2.15% of lipids, or by drying the not completely activated ground pancreas, containing 6.14% of lipids. A part of the first sample in which the proportion of lipids was additionally increased to 16.55% was also irradiated. The moisture content was practically the same in all three samples. The source of radiation was 60 Co, the dose rate 1.27 kGy/h. The samples of pancreatin in test-tubes were irradiated at 25 degC, doses ranging from 1x10 4 to 12x10 4 Gy. The results were statistically evaluated and are given in tables, and converted to the dried lipid-free substance they are expressed in graphs. The technological procedure of pancreatin preparation and the content of lipids do not influence the decrease in proteolytic activity (Graph 3). (author)

  5. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Fidlerova, J.; Husakova, A.; Urban, J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect was studied of 60 Co gamma radiation on the total proteolytic efficacy of pancreatin with gradually differentiated humidity, both in a preparation obtained by separating the active ingredients from an extract from the pancreas destroyed by autolysis, and in a preparation containing the remains of the pancreatic tissue, where the basic operation of manufacture was drying of the ground pancreas. The samples were irradiated with doses of 2.5x10 4 and 12x10 4 , or 14.2x10 4 Gy. The mean values found of the residual proteolytic efficacy expressed in the units of PhBs 3, calculated to the dried substance, are tabulated. At the same time the efficacy of samples before irradiation was tested. The evaluation of results included in the individual tables by variance analysis and Lord's u-test shows that there is no statistically significant difference between the mean values of the efficacy of samples with the initial humidity and the samples with increased humidity (maximally 16.20%). (author)

  6. Thyroid cancer due to biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvão, T.; Castro, N.; Teixeira, D.; Matuo, R.

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is considered the most common in the region of the head and neck. It can be caused by spontaneous mutations, but also by ionizing radiation. The effect of ionizing radiation on the thyroid has been studied for several decades. The exact cause of the cancer is not known, but people with certain risk factors are more vulnerable, such as exposure to radiation, family history and age over 40 years. The thyroid is susceptible to the effects of radiation and is involved in the field of diagnostic or therapeutic irradiation, and may present functional and structural changes. Radiation can act in different ways, such as inhibiting or activating specific functions of the follicular epithelium, reducing the number of functioning follicles, altering vascularization or vascular permeability and inducing immune reactions. These morphological and histological changes may be related to the development of thyroid cancer

  7. Effects of air humidity on ionization chamber response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meger, C.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Venci, R.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the effect of air humidity on four different ionization chamber cap materials verified earlier studies (Kristensen and Sundbom, 1981; Mijnheer et al., 1983) and extended our understanding of the problem. We found nylon and A-150 plastic caps swell as they absorb water from the air. This accounts for as much as 2.5% increase in ionization response. Graphite chambers readily absorb and desorb water from the air. This creates a problem in maintaining dry air in a wet graphite chamber. Humid air has a different density and W value than dry air (Niatel, 1969, 1975). This decreases the charge collected in a wet graphite chamber. We observe a decrease in response of approximately 2%, a value greater than can be accounted for by these effects alone. Polyethylene chambers are unaffected by humid air. 4 refs., 9 figs

  8. Experimental research on transient ionizing radiation effects of CMOS microcontroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xiaoming; Fan Ruyu; Chen Wei; Wang Guizhen; Lin Dongsheng; Yang Shanchao; Bai Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental test system of CMOS microcontroller EE80C196KC20. Based on this system, the transient ionizing radiation effects on microcontroller were investigated using 'Qiangguang-I' accelerator. The gamma pulse width was 20 ns and the dose rate (for the Si atom) was in the range of 6.7 x 10 6 to 2.0 x 10 8 Gy/s in the experimental study. The disturbance and latchup effects were observed at different dose rate levels. Latchup threshold of the microcontroller was obtained. Disturbance interval and the system power supply current have a relationship with the dose rate level. The transient ionizing radiation induces photocurrent in the PN junctions that are inherent in CMOS circuits. The photocurrent is responsible for the electrical and functional degradation. (authors)

  9. Survival of the Partial Reinforcement Extinction Effect after Contextual Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughner, Robert L.; Papini, Mauricio R.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of contextual shifts on the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) were studied in autoshaping with rats. Experiment 1 established that the two contexts used subsequently were easily discriminable and equally salient. In Experiment 2, independent groups of rats received acquisition training under partial reinforcement (PRF) or…

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation; Effecten van ioniserende straling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M.; Hardeman, F.; Holmstock, L.; Hurtgen, C.; Mahieu, L.; Sohier, A.; Vandecasteele, C.; Vanhavere, F.; Vanmaercke, H.; Zeevaert, T

    1998-12-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on.

  11. Effect of suprathermal electrons on the impurity ionization state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochando, M A; Medina, F; Zurro, B; McCarthy, K J; Pedrosa, M A; Baciero, A; Rapisarda, D; Carmona, J M; Jimenez, D

    2006-01-01

    The effect of electron cyclotron resonance heating induced suprathermal electron tails on the ionization of iron impurities in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated. The behaviour of plasma emissivity immediately after injection provides evidence of a spatially localized 'shift' towards higher charge states of the impurity. Bearing in mind that the non-inductive plasma heating methods generate long lasting non-Maxwellian distribution functions, possible implications on the deduced impurity transport coefficients, when fast electrons are present, are discussed

  12. Simulation experiment on total ionization dose effects of linear CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Benqi; Zhang Yong; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Shaoyan

    2004-01-01

    We carry out the ionization radiation experiment of linear CCDs operated in unbiased, biased, biased and driven mode respectively by Co-60 γ source with our self-designed test system, and offline test the Dark signal and Saturation voltage and SNR varied with total dose for TCD132D, and get some valuable results. On the basis of above work, we set forth a primary experiment approaches to simulate the total dose radiation effects of charge coupled devices. (authors)

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo Soriani, Renata; Satomi, Lucilia Cristina; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus A.

    2005-01-01

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) and guarana (Paullinia cupana H.B.K.)

  14. Bystander effect induced by ionizing radiation and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Tu Yu

    2009-01-01

    An indirect effect induced by ionizing radiation called bystander effect is being highly concentrated. Many domestic and foreign researchers have verified the existence of bystander effect and have got more understanding of the mechanism with advanced detection techniques and methods. So far, the research about it has expanded from a single cell to multiple cells, from the in vitro to the whole, and has extended to in vivo from in vitro, which provides powerful evidence to explain how bystander effects happen and the regulation mechanism and especially gives scientific evidence to clinical radiation oncology application in the future. (authors)

  15. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  16. The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, A.N.; Dixit, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by various researches, that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health. There is substantial controversy regarding the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause radiation injury, and these injuries can be relatively severe with sufficiently high radiation doses. Prolonged exposure to low levels of radiation may lead to cancer, although the nature of our response to very low radiation levels is not well known at this time. Many of our radiation safety regulations and procedures are designed to protect the health of those exposed to radiation occupationally or as members of the public. According to the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, any amount, however small, of radiation is potentially harmful, even down to zero levels. The threshold hypothesis, on the other hand, emphasizes that below a certain threshold level of radiation exposure, any deleterious effects are absent. At the same time, there are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). These effects cannot be anticipated by extrapolating from harmful effects noted at high doses. Evidence indicates an inverse relationship between chronic low-dose radiation levels and cancer incidence and/or mortality rates. Examples are drawn from: 1) state surveys for more than 200 million people in the United States; 2) state cancer hospitals for 200 million people in India; 3) 10,000 residents of Taipei who lived in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; 4) high-radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 5) 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; 6) almost 300,000 radon measurements of homes in the United States; and 7) non-smokers in high-radon areas of early Saxony, Germany. This evidence conforms to the hypothesis that

  17. Ionizing radiation effects in MgAl2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra Sanchez, A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation in MgAl2O4 has been studied, paying special interest to the influence of the high concentration of intrinsic dsefects of this material. Optical absorption, ESR, photoluminiscence, radioluminiscence, and thermoluminiscence are the main techniques used. The ionizing radiation induces to formation of V centres. During the work its characteristics (structure, thermal stability, absorption spectra, etc.) has been studied. The thermoluminiscence spectra allowed the discovery of several charge release processes between 85 and 650 K, all of them associated to electron release. The V-centres and several impurities (Cr, Mn,...) appear as recombination centres. The obtained data show that the kinetic of these charge release processes is regulated by the presence of a point defect with a very high concentration. This defect is an electron trap and its structure is an Al ion in a lattice site of tetraedral symmetry. (Author)

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    After reviewing the different lymphoid organs and the essential phases of the immune response, we studied the morphological and functional effects of ionizing radiation on the immunological system. Histologic changes in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, and different lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in relation with the radiation dose and irradiated volume (whole body irradiation, localized irradiation). Functional changes in the immune system induced by ionizing radiation were also investigated by a study of humoral-mediated immunity (antibody formation) and cell-mediated immunity (behavior of macrophages, B-cells, T suppressor cells, T helper cells, T effector cells, and natural killer cells). A study into the mechanisms of action of ionizing radiation and the immune processes it interferes with suggests several likely hypotheses (direct action on the immune cells, on their precursors, on seric mediators or on cell mediators). The effects on cancer patients' immune reactions of low radiation doses delivered to the various lymphoid organs are discussed, as well as the relationships between the host and the evolution of the tumor [fr

  19. The mechanism for the primary biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byakov, Vsevolod M; Stepanov, Sergei V

    2006-01-01

    The primary biological response of living organisms to the passage of fast charged particles is traditionally believed to be dominated by the chemical reactions of the radical products from the radiolysis of cellular water (OH, H, e aq - , O 2 - , H 2 O 2 ) and by the bioradicals that they produce (and which can also result from the direct electronic activation of biomolecules). This understanding has provided insight into how ionizing radiations affect biological systems and, most importantly, what radioprotection and radiosensibilizing effects are produced by chemical compounds introduced into an organism. However, a number of key radiobiological facts remain unexplained by the current theory, stimulating a search for other biologically active factors that may be triggered by radiation. This review examines a fact that is usually ignored in discussing the biological impact of ionizing radiation: the local increase in acidity in the water solution along the track of a charged particle. The acidity in the track is very different from its value for cellular water in a living organism. Biological processes are well-known to be highly sensitive to changes in the environmental acidity. It seems that the biological impact of ionizing radiations is dominated not by the water radiolysis products (mostly radicals) listed above but particles of a different nature, hydroxonium ions H 3 O + , where the term hydroxonium refer to protonated water molecules. This modification of the mechanism of primary radiobiological effects is in good agreement with experimental data. In particular, the extremal dependence of the relative biological efficiency (RBE) of radiations on their ionizing energy losses is accounted for in quantitative terms, as is the increase in the RBE in the relativistic energy range. (reviews of topical problems)

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on starch and cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenha, J.; Bockova, J.

    1973-09-01

    The investigation is reported of the effects of ionizing radiation both on macromolecular systems generally and on polysaccharides, starch and cellulose. Attention is focused on changes in the physical and physico-chemical properties of starch and cellulose, such as starch swelling, gelation, viscosity, solubility, reaction with iodine, UV, IR and ESR spectra, chemical changes resulting from radiolysis and from the effect of amylases on irradiated starch, changes in cellulose fibre strength, water absorption, stain affinity, and also the degradation of cellulose by radiation and the effect of cellulases on irradiated cellulose. Practical applications of the findings concerning cellulose degradation are discussed. (author)

  1. Effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A panel of experts in November 1971 specifically considered the effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems and formulated detailed suggestions for research in the area. A further panel meeting took place in April 1974. The results of the work are presented in this report which is divided into 3 chapters in the first chapter the concentrations of natural and artificial radionuclides in aquatic environments and the radiation dose rates received by aquatic organisms are discussed. In particular, simple dosimetry models for phytoplankton, zooplankton, mollusca, crustacea and fish are presented which permit the estimation of the dose rates from incorporated radionuclides and from radionuclides in the external environment. In the second chapter the somatic and genetic effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms are reviewed. Somatic effects are discussed separately as effects due to short-term (acute) exposure to near-lethal doses of radiation. Great attention is paid to the effects due to long-term (chronic) exposure at lower doses rates. Consideration is given to behaviour, repair mechanisms and metabolic stimulation after exposure, and also the influence of environmental factors on radiation effects. In the third chapter the potential effects of low-level irradiation on aquatic populations are considered. First, the possible consequences of somatic effects on egg and larval mortality, stock-recruitment, fecundity and ecosystem stability are discussed. Subsequently, the assessment of genetic effects as they relate to population genetics and increased mutation rates are considered

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  3. Non-carcinogenic late effects of ionizing radiation; human data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The late effects of ionizing radiation may be somatic effect or potential effect, about which such informations as follows are required: teratogenesis the disturbances in growth and development, cataracts, infertility, cytogenetic aberration, and accelerated aging. Although much is known about the nature of the malformations produced by ionizing radiation, and about the vulnerability of human embryonal and fetal tissues during various stages of organogenesis, the quantitative information is uncertain and incomplete. The data on A-bomb survivors were flawed by confounding radiation dose with nutritional and other influences caused by the disasters created by war-time bombings. If the effects of radiation are real, they are quite small for the dose below 100 rad (kerma), are confined to the children of pre-pubertal age at the time of exposure, and are of much less consequence for low-LET radiation than for high. Radiation-induced lenticular changes are of graded severity, and as for cataracts, the threshold is in the range from 600 to 1,000 rad of low-LET radiation, and perhaps 75 to 100 rad for fast neutrons; the average latent period is 2 to 7 years. The estimate of the RBE for neutrons is in the range from 2 to 10, and dose-dependent. Ionizing radiation has important effects on fertility only at very high dose. The relationship of the quantitative aspects of the biologic significance of chromosomal aberration in somatic cells to dose may provide an interesting parallel to the carcinogenic effect. For neutrons, the dose-response curve appears to be linear, at least for stable aberration. (Yamashita, S.)

  4. The role of multiple ionization and subshell coupling effects in L-shell ionization of Au by oxygen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Pajek, M.; Semaniak, J.; Czyzewski, T.; Fijal, I.; Jaskola, M.; Kretschmer, W.; Mukoyama, T.; Trautmann, D.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization of L-subshell electrons in gold by the impact of 0.4-2.2 MeV amu -1 O ions was studied by observing excited Lγ(L-N, O) x-rays. We demonstrate that both the multiple ionization in outer M- and N-shells as well as the coupling effects in the L-shell play an important role in understanding the measured L-subshell ionization cross sections. The multiple ionization was found to be important in two aspects: first, the analysis of x-ray energy shifts and line broadening was crucial for proper interpretation of measured x-ray spectra; second, the additional vacancies in the M- and N-shells substantially influenced the L 1 -subshell fluorescence and Coster-Kronig (CK) yields, mainly by closing strong L 1 -L 3 M 4,5 CK transitions. The data are compared with the simplified coupled-channels calculations using the 'coupled-subshell model' (CSM) based on the semiclassical approximation (SCA), which describes both direct Coulomb ionization as well as the L-subshell couplings within the same theoretical approach. A good agreement of the present data with the theoretical predictions based on the discussed SCA-CSM approach is observed. Present findings partly explain the long-standing problem of inadequate theoretical description of L-shell ionization by heavy ion impact. (author)

  5. Biological effects of ionizing radiation; Efectos biologicos de la radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gisone, Pablo; Perez, Maria R [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  6. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  7. Ionization of deep quantum wells: Optical trampoline effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, E. Yu.; Levitskiĭ, R. S.

    2007-02-01

    A new mechanism of transitions of an electronic system from the ground state to states with excitation energies exceeding many times the energy of a light photon initiating the transitions has been considered. This mechanism is based on the so-called optical “trampoline” effect: one of the interacting electrons receives energy from another electron and, simultaneously absorbing a photon ħω, overcomes the energy gap significantly exceeding ħω. Ionization of deep quantum wells by low-frequency light of moderate intensity due to the optical trampoline effect was calculated.

  8. Genetics and ionizing radiations. 2. The genetic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1980-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are the best known mutagenic agents. Their relative importance as compared to other mutagens cannot be determined. Experiments show that male germinal cells are more sensitive than female germinal cells. This sensitivity is determined by the cell phase at the time of agression. Acute X-exposure results in a mutation rate of about 1.7x10 -7 rad -1 per gamete and per gene in the male. This rate is lower in case of chronic exposure. Pathological effects will appear in the first (dominant genes, and unbalanced chromosomal anomalies) or n-th generation (recessive genes and balanced chromosomal rearrangements). Direct studies on humans have brought contradictory results. Only X or γ-emitters induce a true genetic risk, the other radiations being too little penetrating to reach the gonads. The doubling dose of the mutation rate is estimated at over 100 rad in males and over 1,000 rad in females. However, one cannot conclude that low doses are not harmless because their effects are difficult to demonstrate. The individual risk, that remains low, must be distinguished from the collective risk for which the safeguard of the quality of the genetic material of our species must remain our prime purpose [fr

  9. Ionizing radiation: levels and effects. Volume I. Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This is the sixth substantive report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation to the General Assembly. It reviews the levels of radiation received from all sources to which man is exposed and, among the effects of ionizing radiation, it considers the genetic effects, the effects on the immune response and the induction of malignancies in animals and man. These are not the only effects of ionizing radiation. The acute consequences of massive amounts of radiation that may be received accidentally or during nuclear warfare are not reviewed here (the short discussion of this subject in the 1962 report is still largely valid, at least as an introduction), nor are the effects on the nervous system and the induction of chromosome anomalies in somatic cells, which were both considered by the Committee in its 1969 report. Unlike previous reports of the Committee, the present report is submitted to the General Assembly without the technical annexes in which the evidence considered by the Committee is discussed in detail and in which the bases for the Committee's conclusions, which are stated in the report, are fully documented. However, the annexes are being made available at the same time as the report in a separate publication, issued in two volumes and the Committee wishes to draw the attention of the General Assembly to the fact that the separation of the report from the annexes is for convenience only and that major importance attaches to the scientific evidence given in the annexes.

  10. Possibilities to reduce the effect of ionizing radiation by interaction of two types of radiation into a matter: ionized and non-ionized radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanvir

    2007-01-01

    Full text: At present it has been accepted that ionized radiation can cause biological effects on the human body and the only way of preventing this effect, is by shielding the source of radiation by absorbing materials. On the other hand, the technology of non-ionizing radiation is upgraded. The canalization of radiation through the wave-guide based structures and optical fiber is well established. This reminds us that passing through benzene non-ionized radiation give the 'Raman' effect, which can ensure the secondary generation of non-ionized radiation with the wave length of nanometer and so far. These types of non-ionized radiation can easily be correlated with the gamma radiation, which is ionized. We know that high-energized photon usually interacts with matter and reduces its energy to the matter and generate electro-magnetic waves into the molecules of the matter. It is also well known that through the wave-guide based structures and optical fiber; the path of energy distribution of photon is likely to be optical energetic modes. If two types of photon from two types of radiation (ionized and non-ionized) interact with matter and pass through the optical fiber, they can generate optical modes with various wavelengths and phase velocities. With 'Raman' effect we can generate secondary electromagnetic waves of nanometer; as well as optical modes into the optical fiber. These optical modes from two types of radiation with various phase velocities, having the similar wavelength, can decrease or accelerate some modes. On the view of signal distribution, we can assume that if two similar signals pass through the circuit with phase difference 180P 0 P, then the result posses no signal. We are also reminded that photon of γ - radiation can spread from 0 deg. to 180 deg. C, where the 'Compton' loss of radiation is minimum. In view of the electro-magnetic theory of Maxwell we can assume the energetic field of optical modes, which are generated into the optical

  11. Effects of total dose of ionizing radiation on integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marcilei A.G.; Cirne, K.H.; Gimenez, S.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Added, N.; Barbosa, M.D.L.; Medina, N.H.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de; Seixas Junior, L.E.; Melo, W. [Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Paulo Archer, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The study of ionizing radiation effects on materials used in electronic devices is of great relevance for the progress of global technological development and, particularly, it is a necessity in some strategic areas in Brazil. Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by radiation and the need for IC's featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics. On the other hand, aerospace agencies are encouraging both scientific community and semiconductors industry to develop hardened-by-design components using standard manufacturing processes to achieve maximum performance, while significantly reducing costs. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the integrated circuits are usually divided into two categories: total ionizing dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; single events effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits. TID is one of the most common effects and may generate degradation in some parameters of the CMOS electronic devices, such as the threshold voltage oscillation, increase of the sub-threshold slope and increase of the off-state current. The effects of ionizing radiation are the creation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide layer changing operation mode parameters of the electronic device. Indirectly, there will be also changes in the device due to the formation of secondary electrons from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the material, since the charge carriers can be trapped both in the oxide layer and in the interface with the oxide. In this work we have investigated the behavior of MOSFET devices fabricated with

  12. How to identify partial exposures to ionizing radiation? Proposal for a cytogenetic method; Como identificar exposicoes parciais as radiacoes ionizantes? Proposta de um metodo citogenetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, T.S.; Silva, E.B.; Pinto, M.M.P.L.; Amaral, A., E-mail: thiagosalazar@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (LAMBDA/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear. Lab. de Modelagem e Biodosimetria Aplicada; Lloyd, David [Health Protection Agency, Oxford (United Kingdom). Radiation Protection Division

    2013-08-15

    In cases of radiological incidents or in occupational exposures to ionizing radiation, the majority of exposures are not related to the total body, but only partial. In this context, if the cytogenetic dosimetry is performed, there will be an underestimation of the absorbed dose due to the dilution of irradiated cells with non-irradiated cells. Considering the norms of NR 32 - Safety and Health in the Work of Health Service - which recommends cytogenetic dosimetry in the investigation of accidental exposures to ionizing radiations, it is necessary to develop of a tool to provide a better identification of partial exposures. With this aim, a partial body exposure was simulated by mixing, in vitro, 70% of blood irradiated with 4 Gy of X-rays with 30% of unirradiated blood from the same healthy donor. Aliquots of this mixture were cultured for 48 and 72 hours. Prolonging the time of cell culture from 48 to 72 hours produced no significant change in the yield of dicentrics. However, when only M1 (first division cells) were analyzed, the frequency of dicentrics per cell was increased. Prolonging the time of cell culture allowed cells in mitotic delay by irradiation to reach metaphase, and thus provides enough time for the damage to be visualized. The results of this research present the proposed method as an important tool in the investigation of exposed individuals, allowing associating the cytogenetic analysis with the real percentage of irradiated cells, contributing significantly for the decision making in terms of occupational health. (author)

  13. Effect of dietary citric acid supplementation and partial replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... evaluate the effect of soybean meal (SBM) as a fishmeal (FM) partial replacement and citric acid (CA) .... temperature, pH and salinity were monitored daily and dissolved .... Digestibility, metabolism and excretion of dietary.

  14. Effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalovidouris, A.E.; Papayannis, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function was investigated in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (300x10 9 /l) was irradiated with doses of 1, 4, 10, 20 and 50 Gy. Platelet function tests were performed on both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) platelet samples. The platelet function tests were (1) platelet aggregation by ADP (1, 2, 4 μmol final concentration), adrenaline and collagen, (2) ADP-release from platelets, (3) clot retraction and (4) platelet factor-3 availability. It was found that roentgen irradiation of platelets in vitro did not affect these platelet function tests. (Auth.)

  15. Cytotoxic Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Chlorpyrifos on White Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bahkery, A.M.L.H.

    2014-01-01

    The hazard of accidental exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and/or neurotoxic insecticides like the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) represent series health problem for human. In the present work, the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation and chlorpyrifos on rats were studied where animals were under glutathione (GSH) depletion. Animals were pre-treated with single dose of Buthionine Sulfoximine (BSO) (200 mg/kg body weight, by oral intubation), then treated with high dose of CPF (30 mg/kg body weight) and or exposure to IR (single dose of 6 Gy whole body gamma ray) one hour after BSO treatment. Another groups of animals pertreated with N-acetyl cystiene (NAC) one hour before treated with CPF and/or IR. After 24 hours blood sample, liver and brain were taken and used for estimate the GSH level and the activities of glutathione-stransferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), acetyl cholinesterase (AChE), carboxyl esterase (CE), paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (AE). Also, native PAGE electrophoresis was undertaken for separating the CE and PON isozymes in plasma, liver and brain. The results indicated that CPF produced no change in GSH level. Whereas, treatment with either BSO or IR, produced decrease in GSH level. NAC restored GSH level near the control level in all treated groups CPF had no effect on GST activity and pretreatment with either BSO or NAC increased GST activity in CPF treated groups. Also, exposure to IR had no effect on GST activity. Whereas, IR in combination with CPF and/or NAC and/or BSO produced inhibition in plasma GST activity and increased liver GST activity. In addition, both CPF and IR had no effect on the activity of GR. Whereas, pre-treatment with either BSO or NAC produced inhibition in plasma and liver GR activity in CPF treated groups. No change had observed in the IR exposed groups. Treatment with CPF inhibited AChE activity in plasma, liver and brain. Whereas, exposure to IR inhibited AChE activity in brain only

  16. Non-targeted bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to those responses occurring in cells that were not subject to energy deposition events following ionizing radiation. These bystander cells may have been neighbors of irradiated cells, or physically separated but subject to soluble secreted signals from irradiated cells. Bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in vivo and for various radiation qualities. In tribute to an old friend and colleague, Anthony V. Carrano, who would have said 'well what are the critical questions that should be addressed, and so what?', we review the evidence for non-targeted radiation-induced bystander effects with emphasis on prevailing questions in this rapidly developing research field, and the potential significance of bystander effects in evaluating the detrimental health effects of radiation exposure

  17. Skin-effect in a dense ionizing plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenkov, G.V.; Taranenko, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of multiple ionization and radiation (bremmstrahlung and photorecombination) on skin effect in a dense plasma is investigated. Limiting cases are considered: 1) fast skin-effect, when plasma movement and any types of losses (radiation, electron thermal conductivity) have no time to manifest themselves during short heating times; 2) deceleration of skinning under effect of radiation achieving equilibrium with Joule heating. Self-simulating solutions of the problem for half-space are investigated. The results are applied to analysing experiments with exploding wires. It is shown that under conditions, typical of heavy-current decelerators tubular structures are produced as a result of heat and current skinning under free dispersion of plasma produced during the explosion. Their dimensions are of the order of dozens of microns, and the temperature exceeds 50 eV. The linear power and complete ''tube'' radiation yield at this stage are able to make a substantial contribution to the energy balance in the group

  18. Single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Jianshe; Cai Nan; Liu Jiaxin; Wu Qinzhi; Wang Jia

    2012-01-01

    In this work, single event effects and total ionizing dose effects of typical VDMOSFET irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays and 252 Cf source were studied. The single event burnout and single event gate rupture (SEB/SEGR) effects were investigated, and the relationship between drain-source breakdown voltage and ionizing dose was obtained. The results showed that the VDMOSFET devices were sensitive to SEB and SEGR, and measures to improve their resistance to SEB and SEGR should be considered seriously for their space applications. The drain-source breakdown voltage was sensitive to total ionizing dose effects as the threshold voltage. In assessing the devices' resistance to the total ionizing dose effects, both the threshold voltage and the drain-source breakdown voltage should be taken into account. (authors)

  19. Effect of ionizing radiation on active thyroid immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, I.I.; Abdelaal, A.E.; AL-Gachari, A.I.; Hindy, O.W.; Abdalla, M.I.; Said, M.M.; Shoucha, M.A.; and Salama, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was carried out to explore the effect of exposure to ionizing radiation on the immune system in cocks. A total number of 36 mature Fayoumi cocks were randomly assigned to: control, 300 R and 600 r groups. Whole body irradiation was carried out in co-60 unit 24 hours. Prior to induction of immunity. Thyroglobulin (T G) immunity was induced in all birds and sera were collected before, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 16 weeks. After immunization. T G antibodies were evaluated by using radioisotopic techniques: i- Ammonium sulphate method, ii-polyethylene glycol method and iii-The circulating thyroid hormones. The results obtained indicated the formation of thyroglobulin antibodies in all immunized birds at 6 weeks. After immunization and thereafter, although it was detected in some birds at 4 weeks. after immunization. The antibody titer increased sharply after the sixth Th week reaching its peak value at the sixteenth week interval. The suppressive effect of ionizing radiation on the immune response was evident in the irradiated groups, particularly the 600 r group. Some birds in the 600 r group were not able to respond appropriately to the challenge and did not survive until the end of observation period

  20. THE EFFECTS OF THE IONIZING RADIATION BACKGROUND ON GALAXY EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambrick, D. Clay; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    We find that the amount and nature of the assumed ionizing background can strongly affect galaxy formation and evolution. Galaxy evolution simulations typically incorporate an ultraviolet background which falls off rapidly above z = 3; e.g., that of Haardt and Madau. However, this decline may be too steep to fit the Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe constraints on electron scattering optical depth or observations of intermediate redshift (z ∼ 2-4) Lyα forest transmission. As an alternative, we present simulations of the cosmological formation of individual galaxies with UV backgrounds that decline more slowly at high redshift: both a simple intensity rescaling and the background recently derived by Faucher-Giguere, which softens the spectrum at higher redshifts. We also test an approximation of the X-ray background with a similar z dependence. We find for the test galaxies that an increase in either the intensity or hardness of ionizing radiation generically pushes star formation toward lower redshifts: although overall star formation in the simulation boxes is reduced by 10%-25%, the galaxies show a factor of ∼2 increase in the fraction of stars within a 30 kpc radius that are formed after z = 1. Other effects include late gas inflows enhanced up to 30 times, stellar half-mass radii decreased by up to 30%, central velocity dispersions increased up to 40%, and a strong reduction in substructure. The magnitude of the effects depends on the environmental/accretion properties of the particular galaxy.

  1. Biological effects of ionizing radiation - changing worker attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.; Schenley, C.

    1989-01-01

    Training Resources and Data Exchange (TRADE) Radiation Protection Training Special Interest Group has taken an innovative approach to providing DOE contractors with radiation worker training material information. Newly-hired radiation workers may be afraid to work near radiation and long-term radiation workers may become indifferent to the biological hazard of radiation. Commercially available training material is often presented at an inappropriate technical level or in an uninteresting style. These training problems have been addressed in the DOE system through development of a training videotape and supporting material package entitled Understanding Ionizing Radiation and its Biological Effects. The training package, developed and distributed by TRADE specifically to meet the needs of DOE contractor facilities, contains the videotape and accompanying paper supporting materials designed to assist the instructor. Learning objectives, presentation suggestion for the instructor, trainee worksheets, guided discussion questions, and trainee self-evaluation sheets are included in the training package. DOE contractors have agreed that incorporating this training module into radiation worker training programs enhances the quality of the training and increase worker understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation

  2. Health effects of low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1979-04-01

    It is now assumed that any exposure to radiaton at low levels of dose carries some risk of deleterious effects. How low this level may be, or the probability or magnitude of the risk, still are not known. Our best scientific knowledge and advice are essential for the protection of the public health, for the effective application of new technologies in medicine and industry and for guidance in the production of nuclear energy. Unless man wishes to dispense with those activities which inevitably involve exposure to low levels of ionizing radiations, he must recognize that some degree of risk to health, however small, exists. A pragmatic appraisal of how man wishes to continue to derive the benefits of health and happiness from such activities involving ionizing radiaton in times of everchanging conditions and public attitudes in our resource-limited society is the task which lies before all of us - all men and women of our society, of science and of medicine, and of law and government - now and in the future

  3. Current research in Canada on biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    A survey of current research in Canada on the biological effects of ionizing radiation has been compiled. The list of projects has been classified according to structure (organizational state of the test system) as well as according to the type of effects. Using several assumptions, ballpark estimates of expenditures on these activities have been made. Agencies funding these research activities have been tabulated and the break-down of research in government laboratories and in academic institutions has been designated. Wherever possible, comparisons have been made outlining differences or similarities that exist between the United States and Canada concerning biological radiation research. It has been concluded that relevant research in this area in Canada is inadequate. Wherever possible, strengths and weaknesses in radiation biology programs have been indicated. The most promising course for Canada to follow is to support adequately fundamental studies of the biological effects of radiation. (auth)

  4. Genetic effects of ionizing radiation and repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.

    1986-11-01

    Since DNA (=desoxyribonucleic acid) is the largest molecule within the cell it is the most important target for direct and indirect radiation effects. Within DNA the total genetic information is stored, thus damage to DNA in germ cells causes genetic disorders and damage in somatic cells is implicated in cancer and immunodeficiences. Alterations of DNA structure are not only due to ionizing radiation effects, but also to spontaneous DNA modifications and damage from interactions with environmental ultraviolet light and chemical agents. To maintain its genetic integrity, each organism had to develop different repair systems able to recognize and remove DNA damage. Repeated exposure to a DNA damaging agent can even lead to adaptation processes and increased resistance to the same agent. At normal function of repair systems it can be assumed that the capacity of those systems is adequate to scope with the effects of low radiation doses. (Author)

  5. Untargeted effects of ionizing radiation: Implications for radiation pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Eric G; Coates, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    The dogma that genetic alterations are restricted to directly irradiated cells has been challenged by observations in which effects of ionizing radiation, characteristically associated with the consequences of energy deposition in the cell nucleus, arise in non-irradiated cells. These, so called, untargeted effects are demonstrated in cells that have received damaging signals produced by irradiated cells (radiation-induced bystander effects) or that are the descendants of irradiated cells (radiation-induced genomic instability). Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by a number of delayed adverse responses including chromosomal abnormalities, gene mutations and cell death. Similar effects, as well as responses that may be regarded as protective, have been attributed to bystander mechanisms. Whilst the majority of studies to date have used in vitro systems, some adverse non-targeted effects have been demonstrated in vivo. However, at least for haemopoietic tissues, radiation-induced genomic instability in vivo may not necessarily be a reflection of genomically unstable cells. Rather the damage may reflect responses to ongoing production of damaging signals; i.e. bystander responses, but not in the sense used to describe the rapidly induced effects resulting from direct interaction of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. The findings are consistent with a delayed and long-lived tissue reaction to radiation injury characteristic of an inflammatory response with the potential for persisting bystander-mediated damage. An important implication of the findings is that contrary to conventional radiobiological dogma and interpretation of epidemiologically-based risk estimates, ionizing radiation may contribute to malignancy and particularly childhood leukaemia by promoting initiated cells rather than being the initiating agent. Untargeted mechanisms may also contribute to other pathological consequences

  6. Mass spectrometric determination of partial electron impact ionization cross sections of No, No2, and N2O from threshold up to 180 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. B.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact ionization of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) has been studied as a function of electron energy up to 180 eV with a double focussing mass spectrometer Varian MAT CH5 and an improved Nier type electron impact ion source. Relative partial ionization cross sections were measured for the processes NO + + 2e, NO ++ + 3e, and NO 2 + e -> NO + 2 + 2e, NO ++ + 3e and N 2 O + e -> N 2 O + + 2e. An accurate measurement of the cross section ratios q(NO 2+ /NO)/q(NO + /NO) and q(NO 2 2 /NO 2 )/q(NO + 2 /NO 2 ) has been made. Relative cross section functions were calibrated absolutely with two different normalization methods. Moreover, both metastable and collision induced dissociations of N 2 O + were studied quantitatively using the technique of decoupling the acceleration and deflection electric fields. Using the n- th root extrapolation the following ionization potentials have been derived from the cross section functions near threshold: NO + (X 1 Σ + ); NO ++ ; NO + 2 ; NO 2 ++ ; N 2 O + (X 2 π). These results are compared with previous measurements and theoretical calculations, where available. Part of the results presented have been already published in seven papers by the author. (Author)

  7. Ionizing radiation: effects upon acquisition and performance of behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Laercia Abreu

    1999-03-01

    The present study, using rats as subjects, attempted to assess the effects of multiple exposures to gamma radiation upon behavior in two procedures of a multiple schedule of repeated acquisition and performance. With an experimental chamber containing three levers displaced horizontally, left (l), center (c) and right (r), different levels of complexity were programmed for procedures A and B. In both procedures a new sequence of three responses was programmed for each session (lcr, lrc, clr, crl, rlc) for the acquisition component, whereas for the performance component the same sequence was maintained throughout the sessions. The completion of three sequences (nine responses) was followed by reinforcement and incorrect responses were followed by time-out without correction procedures. In procedure A the sequences consisted of one response in each lever (for example, crl→crl→crl→reinforcement) while in procedure B a sequence consisted of three response in the same lever, with the following three responses having to occur in a different lever (for example, ccc→rrr→lll→reinforcement). Six subjects were trained in each procedure. Base line data showed, by means of error percentage, that procedure B regardless of being more complex represented a lower difficulty level than procedure A: subjects in procedure B displayed, in general, a lower number of errors per session. After training in these procedures of repeated acquisition and performance, the subjects were exposed to doses of ionizing radiation of 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 and 8.0 Gy, with an interval of 45 days between exposures. With measurements of response rate and obtained reinforcers, the data showed a dose-response relation, with higher doses producing lower rates of responses and reinforcers. Percentage of errors was higher after doses of 6.0 and 8.0 Gy in the performance component, while changes in error patterns occurred in the acquisition component. The effects of radiation was more evident and orderly

  8. Novel approach to analyzing the carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, O; Cleland, M R

    2006-01-01

    Cancer incidence of ionizing radiations exposure is considered to be proportional to the absorbed dose. However, there are disagreements between substantial amounts of epidemiological studies. In this study, we question the basic relationship of the risk estimate with total accumulated dose, and reanalyse available data on the basis of a daily dose concept. The data analysed were relative mortality risk from all cancers vs. total-body dose on a daily basis. References have been selected on the basis of objective criteria. We found that this relationship removes major discrepancies. It revises estimates of low-level exposures, with consequences regarding nuclear power plants safety, wastes management, medical applications or homeland security. The idea that the dose rate may have a significant impact on health effects of ionizing radiations is not new, but has always been considered as a parameter in models based on integrated dose. The novel approach in this paper is to consider the primary relevant parameter as an average of dose rate over a time period of one day. This is an argument to revise the whole philosophy in radioprotection, and place regulatory limits on specific locations instead of annual limits relevant to individual persons.

  9. Effect of ionizing radiation in the quality of exportable asparagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio C, T.; Espinoza B, J.; Godoy, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the severe restriction which has been set upon the use of chemical fumigant by the importing countries of our horticulture products it has been studied the use of ionizing radiation in asparagus as an alternative treatment for quarantine restriction. The used are 0,15; 0,5; 1.0 y 2.0 kGy. Argenteuil and UC-157 varieties were used. The harvest, handing and storage conditions were the same as the ones export companies use. Both varieties were studied by the following quality parameters: pH, acidity, moisture, soluble solids, vitamin C, fibre content, dissecation, seeding and spreading, shooting, spear lengh, weight loss, microbial and moulds contamination, cutting resistance, respiratory rate, color and sensorial evaluation. From the result obtained it is possible to conclude that the irradiation did not produce deleterous effects on chemical, microbiological or organoleptic parameters in both varieties. From the point of view of the market quality the ionizing radiation could be used as a quarantine treatment under the normal marketing conditions used in Chile. Dose of 2.0 kGy does not produce a shelf life extention. (author)

  10. [Biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowski, A; Steciwko, A

    1998-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, when Adey discovered that extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) may affect the calcium ions efflux from various cells, bioeffects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) have become the subject of growing interest and numerous research projects. At present, the fact that NIR exerts both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on different physiological cellular parameters is rather unquestionable. At the same time, some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to EMF is potentially harmful even if its intensity is very low. It has been proved that thermal factors are not responsible for these effects, therefore nowadays, they are called 'non-thermal effects'. Our paper deals with three different aspects of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation, bioelectromagnetism, electromagnetobiology and electromagnetic bioinformation. Firstly, we describe how EMF and photons can be produced within a living cell, how biological cycles are controlled, and what are the features of endogenous electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, we discuss various facets of external EMF interactions with living matter, focusing on extremely-low-frequencies, radio- and microwaves. Possible mechanisms of these interactions are also mentioned. Finally, we present a short overview of current theories which explain how electromagnetic couplings may control an open and dissipative structure, namely the living organism. The theory of electromagnetic bioinformation seems to explain how different physiological processes are triggered and controlled, as well as how long-range interactions may possibly occur within the complex biological system. The review points out that the presented research data must be assessed very carefully since its evaluation is crucial to set the proper limits of EMF exposure, both occupational and environmental. The study of biological effects of non-ioinizing radiation may also contribute to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic

  11. Effects on vegetable seeds due to non ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acri, G.; Oliva, A.; Falcone, G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Fisica, Cosenza (Italy); Acri, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Ecologia, Cosenza (Italy); Bitonti, M.B.; Chiappetta, A. [Universita di Messina, Dipt. di Protezionistica Ambientale, Sanitaria, Sociale ed Industriale, Messina (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Based on the tightly relationship between light and plants growth and development, the present work aims to obtain some further insight into the effects of non ionizing radiation the photo-autotrophic organisms, due to the relevant implications for both scientific knowledge and economical and social effects. In this context, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the influence of a long-lasting exposition to both RF at 1850 MHz and polarized light source on roots elongation of corn kernels. The radical apparatus was chosen as a sensible parameter and the elongation of the roots was monitored as a function of time. Mitotic index and length of meta-xylem cells were estimated in root apex as an index of cell proliferation and cell expansion activity, respectively. (N.C.)

  12. Effects on vegetable seeds due to non ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acri, G.; Oliva, A.; Falcone, G.; Acri, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G.; Bitonti, M.B.; Chiappetta, A.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the tightly relationship between light and plants growth and development, the present work aims to obtain some further insight into the effects of non ionizing radiation the photo-autotrophic organisms, due to the relevant implications for both scientific knowledge and economical and social effects. In this context, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the influence of a long-lasting exposition to both RF at 1850 MHz and polarized light source on roots elongation of corn kernels. The radical apparatus was chosen as a sensible parameter and the elongation of the roots was monitored as a function of time. Mitotic index and length of meta-xylem cells were estimated in root apex as an index of cell proliferation and cell expansion activity, respectively. (N.C.)

  13. Effect of increased ionization on the atmospheric electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    This study is a review of atmospheric electrical theory with the purpose of predicting the atmospheric electrical effects of increased ionization caused by radioactive inert gases. A time-independent perturbation model for the global atmospheric electric circuit precdicts that the electric field at the sea surface would be reduced to about 76% of its unperturbed value by a surface 85 Kr concentration of 3 nCi/m 3 . The electric field at a typical land station is predicted to be about 84% of its unperturbed value. Some scientists have suggested that the atmospheric electric field is part of a closed electrical feedback loop. The present model does not include such a closed feedback loop and may underestimate the total effects. This model is also useful for interpreting atmospheric electrical responses to natural fluctuations in the cosmic-ray component of background radiation

  14. The ionization effects from nuclear explosions in high-altitude and their effect to radio propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Rongsheng; Li Qin

    1997-01-01

    A high-altitude nuclear explosions releases large quantities of energetic particles and electromagnetic radiation capable of producing ionization in the atmosphere. These particles and rays radiation character in the atmosphere are discussed. Ionizations due to explosion X rays, γ rays, neutrons and β particles are considered separately. The time-space distribution of additional electron density is computed and its nature is analyzed. The effects of explosion-induced ionization on the absorption of radio wave is considered and the dependence of the absorption on explosion characteristics, distance from the earth's atmosphere, and frequency of the radio wave is determined

  15. The effect of ionizing radiation on intraocular lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellerin, Bruce E.; Nisce, Lourdes Z.; Roberts, Calvin W.; Thornell, Cliff; Sabbas, Albert; Wang Huili; Li, P. Mark; Nori, Dattatreyudu

    2001-01-01

    artifactual aberrations inherent in analyzing convex lenses on a conventional flat-plate spectrophotometer, post-irradiation absorption spectra were subsequently reanalyzed on a Cary 300 spectrophotometer outfitted with a Labsphere Diffused Reflectance Accessory (DRA-CA-30-I) incorporating a Spectralon-coated integrating sphere. Main Outcome Measures: Primary: Changes in UV absorbance after irradiation. Secondary: Changes in visible and low-end near-infrared absorbance after irradiation. Results: Photon ionizing radiation in the 2-Gy to 100-Gy range produced no detectable alterations in the UV (280 nm ≤ λ < 400 nm), visible (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 700 nm), or low-end near-infrared (700 nm < λ ≤ 830 nm) absorption spectra of any of the lenses irradiated. However, silicone IOLs as a group revealed peak post-irradiation UV absorption at a shorter wavelength than did PMMA IOLs, with marginally greater UV transmission at the uppermost extreme of the UV spectrum (λ = 384.5-400 nm). Conclusions: At clinically relevant doses used in radiation therapy, megavoltage photon ionizing radiation produces no significant alterations in the absorption spectra of PMMA and silicone IOLs over the range λ = 280-830 nm. These findings indicate that, even at supraclinical doses, the UV-absorbing capacity of chromophore-bearing PMMA and silicone IOLs remains unimpaired. It is not clear whether the lower UV peak of silicone lenses represents a radiation effect or a peculiarity of the chromophore used in the lenses tested

  16. Effects of molecular orientation in the laser ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xinhua Xie; Gerald Jordan; Christopher Ede; Armin Scrinzi

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Time-dependent electron momentum distributions are calculated during ionization of linear molecules by a strong laser pulse and upon recollision. For typical experimental laser parameters, we find a strong influence of molecular orientation and initial state symmetry on the total ionization rates and also on momentum distributions, compared to which the effect of electron correlation is less important for simple molecules. The dynamics of electron release and subsequent recollision with the parent ion largely determines the time-frequency structure of harmonic radiation, which underlies the generation of attosecond XUV pulses and the time-resolved imaging techniques for the electronic structure of molecules. In the present work, the effects of orientation and initial orbital symmetry are investigated by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a two-dimensional diatomic molecule in the single-active electron approximation. As in the presence of strong external fields recolliding electrons cannot be easily separated from bound electrons, the electron wave packet is probed at some distance from where all electrons can be safety considered as detached. We find that momentum distributions strongly depend on molecular size, orientation of the molecular axis, and node structure of the initial state. In order to determine the momentum spectra at the time of electron release and upon recollision, we classically propagate the Wigner distributions of probed wavepackets backward and forward in time, respectively. We find that the times of peak recollision current can vary strongly with the orientation of the molecule. Moreover, correlation effects on the electron spectra are included using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method. The calculations are performed in three spatial dimensions with the restriction to cylindrical symmetry, where the molecule is aligned with the laser field. Correlation is studied

  17. Training strategic community agents in health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Teresa C.S.B.; Silva, IIson P.M. da; Jannuzzi, Denise M.S.; Maurmo, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The main motivation for the development of training was the need to train agents (opinion makers) with proximity and credibility among the population, to clarify the most frequently asked questions in relation to ionizing radiation, the operation of nuclear power plants, emergency plans and about the possibility of there effects of radiation on the health of inhabitants in regions close to the central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto - CNAAA. The project has a target audience of 420 agents, 60 of them have already been trained in a pilot project . The results indicate that the topics of training were adequate and the agents have expanded their knowledge. On the other hand, the information passed on to communities by agents, recognized by this population as ' the most reliable people', is of greater credibility and likelihood of success in communicating important issues for the population living in the vicinity of the CNAAA. (author)

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included

  19. Effect of ionizing radiation on transmembrane potential of Streptococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Akoev, I.G.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of Streptococcus faecalis with ionizing radiation at doses of 5 to 100 krad is shown to reduce the energy-dependent accumulation of dibenzyldimethylammonium (DDA + ) by the cell. Since transmembrane potential is the moving force of DDA + transport across the membrane, the decrease in DDA + accumulation is suggested to be due to potential reduction. This radiation effect was not due to inactivation of the potential-generating mechanism; thus, the ATPase activity and glycolytic activity of the irradiated cells were higher than in the control. At the same time, the membranes exhibited an increased permeability for K + and protons, which is probably due to structural rearrangements in the membranes after irradiation. It is suggested that the potential reduction results from the increase in proton permeability of membranes

  20. Non controlled effect of ionizing radiations : involvement for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely accepted that damage to DNA is the critical event on irradiated cells, and that double strand breaks are the primary DNA lesions responsible for the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This has lead to the long standing paradigm that these effects, be they cytotoxicity, mutagenesis or malignant transformation, occur in irradiated cells as a consequences of the DNA damage they incur. Evidence has been accumulating over the past decade, however, to indicate that radiation may induce effects that ar not targeted to the irradiated cells itself. Two non-targeted effects will be described in this review. The first, radiation-induced genomic instability, is a phenomenon whereby signals are transmitted to the progeny of the irradiated cell over many generations, leading to the occurrence of genetic effects such as mutations and chromosomal aberrations arising in the distant descendants of the irradiated cell. Second, the bystander effect, is a phenomenon whereby irradiated cells transmit damage signals to non-irradiated cells in a mixed population, leading to genetic effects arising in these bystander cells that received no radiation exposure. the model system described in this review involves dense monolayer cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles. The potential implications of these two phenomena for the analysis of the risk to the human population of exposure to low levels of ionising radiation is discussed. (Author) 111 refs

  1. Characterization of ionizing radiation effects on human skin allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourroul, Selma Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The skin has a fundamental role in the viability of the human body. In the cases of extensive wounds, allograft skin provides an alternative to cover temporarily the damaged areas. After donor screening and preservation in glycerol (above 85%), the skin can be stored in the Skin Banks. The glycerol at this concentration has a bacteriostatic effect after certain time of preservation. On the other hand, skin sterilization by ionizing radiation may reduces the quarantine period for transplantation in patients and its safety is considered excellent. The objectives of this work were to establish procedures using two sources of ionizing radiation for sterilization of human skin allograft, and to evaluate the skin after gamma and electron beam irradiation. The analysis of stress-strain intended to verify possible effects of the radiation on the structure of preserved grafts. Skin samples were submitted to doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy in an irradiator of 60 Co and in an electron beam accelerator. Morphology and ultra-structure studies were also accomplished. The samples irradiated with a dose of 25 kGy seemed to maintain the bio mechanic characteristics. The gamma irradiated samples with a dose of 50 kGy and submitted to an electron beam at doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy presented significant differences in the values of the elasticity modulus, in relation to the control. The analysis of the ultramicrographies revealed modifications in the structure and alterations in the pattern of collagen fibrils periodicity of the irradiated samples. (author)

  2. Quantification of brain tissue through incorporation of partial volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Howard D.; Santago, Peter, II; Snyder, Wesley E.

    1992-06-01

    This research addresses the problem of automatically quantifying the various types of brain tissue, CSF, white matter, and gray matter, using T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. The method employs a statistical model of the noise and partial volume effect and fits the derived probability density function to that of the data. Following this fit, the optimal decision points can be found for the materials and thus they can be quantified. Emphasis is placed on repeatable results for which a confidence in the solution might be measured. Results are presented assuming a single Gaussian noise source and a uniform distribution of partial volume pixels for both simulated and actual data. Thus far results have been mixed, with no clear advantage being shown in taking into account partial volume effects. Due to the fitting problem being ill-conditioned, it is not yet clear whether these results are due to problems with the model or the method of solution.

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurdana, Mihaela; Cemazar, Maja; Pegan, Katarina; Mars, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Long term effects of different doses of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle myoblast proliferation, cytokine signalling and stress response capacity were studied in primary cell cultures. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts obtained from muscle biopsies were cultured and irradiated with a Darpac 2000 X-ray unit at doses of 4, 6 and 8 Gy. Acute effects of radiation were studied by interleukin – 6 (IL-6) release and stress response detected by the heat shock protein (HSP) level, while long term effects were followed by proliferation capacity and cell death. Compared with non-irradiated control and cells treated with inhibitor of cell proliferation Ara C, myoblast proliferation decreased 72 h post-irradiation, this effect was more pronounced with increasing doses. Post-irradiation myoblast survival determined by measurement of released LDH enzyme activity revealed increased activity after exposure to irradiation. The acute response of myoblasts to lower doses of irradiation (4 and 6 Gy) was decreased secretion of constitutive IL-6. Higher doses of irradiation triggered a stress response in myoblasts, determined by increased levels of stress markers (HSPs 27 and 70). Our results show that myoblasts are sensitive to irradiation in terms of their proliferation capacity and capacity to secret IL-6. Since myoblast proliferation and differentiation are a key stage in muscle regeneration, this effect of irradiation needs to be taken in account, particularly in certain clinical conditions

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on the human body are the consequences of biological ones. They have been observed from the first few years after the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity: between 1902 and 1907, 170 cases of various lesions attributable to radiation were described. The pathological manifestations which result from a radio-exposure are of two kinds: short-term effects which inevitably occur after certain thresholds have been exceeded. More often than not they are reversible, their severity being a function of the dose; and delayed effects, slowly evolving, apparently random, more often than not irreversible. Here it is not the severity but the probability of their appearance which is proportional to the dose. It is, at the present time, impossible statistically, to prove the existence or non-existence of thresholds for delayed effect; thus, in the fixing of norms, the ICRP has cautiously chosen the hypothesis of the absence of thresholds, assuming a linear dose/effect relationship. This has probably led to an over-estimation of the risks associated with weak doses. Radio-exposure can be total, affecting the entire body, or may be localized in all or part of a specific organ or tissue

  5. Ecological effects of exposure to enhanced levels of ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geras'kin, Stanislav A

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation of plants and animals can result in disruption of ecological relationships between the components of ecosystems. Such effects may act as triggers of perturbation and lead to consequences that may differ essentially from expected ones based on effects observed at the organismal level. Considerable differences in ecology and niches occupied by different species lead to substantial differences in doses of ionizing radiation absorbed by species, even when they all are present in the same environment at the same time. This is especially evident for contamination with α-emitting radionuclides. Radioactive contamination can be considered an ecological factor that is able to modify the resistance in natural populations. However, there are radioecological situations when elevated radioresistance does not evolve or persist. The complexity and non-linearity of the structure and functioning of ecosystems can lead to unexpected consequences of stress effects, which would appear harmless if they were assessed within the narrower context of organism-based traditional radioecology. Therefore, the use of ecological knowledge is essential for understanding responses of populations and ecosystems to radiation exposure. Integration of basic ecological principles in the design and implementation of radioecological research is essential for predicting radiation effects under rapidly changing environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of dietary citric acid supplementation and partial replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Beluga is one of the most important fishes in Caspian Sea. The purpose of this experiment were to evaluate the effect of soybean meal (SBM) as a fishmeal (FM) partial replacement and citric acid (CA) supplement on the calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) of muscle, scute and serum of Beluga diets. Three isonitrogenous and ...

  7. Effect of partially purified angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the effect of partially-purified angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory proteins obtained from the leaves of Moringa oleifera on blood glucose, serum ACE activity and lipid profile of alloxaninduced diabetic rats. Twenty-five apparently healthy male albino rats were divided into five groups of five ...

  8. Effect of partial replacement of growers mash with gliricidia sepium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of partial replacement of growers mash with Gliricidia sepium leaf meal (GLM) on the growth of chinchilla rabbits and to determine its implication for extension advisory services. In this study, 10 eight weeks old Chinchilla rabbits were used. They were randomly allotted to three ...

  9. Effect of Honey as Partial Sugar Substitute on Pasting Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of partial substitution of sugar with liquid honey on the pasting properties of cooked dough made from cassava-wheat composite (10:90) flour as well as the sensory preference and shelf stability of its bread was investigated. Sucrose (S) in the bread recipe formulation was substituted with honey (H) at levels 0, 10, ...

  10. Effects of buffer ionization in protein transition volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung; Heerklotz, Heiko; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2010-05-01

    Protein denaturation events are generally associated with a change in the state of ionization of abnormally titrating groups and, therefore, are coupled with changes in buffer ionization/neutralization equilibria. Consequently, buffer ionization should influence the measured change in volume accompanying protein denaturation. Changes in volume accompanying protein denaturation reflect the differential packing and hydration of polypeptide chains in their native and denatured conformations while also describing the pressure stability of proteins. A characteristic feature of conformational transitions of globular proteins is a near zero change in volume that is comparable in magnitude with the volume of ionization of biologically relevant buffers. Thus, the impact of buffer ionization on the volume of protein denaturation could be very significant with the potential to affect not only its magnitude but also its sign. To investigate this point quantitatively, we performed pressure perturbation calorimetric (PPC) studies of lysozyme and ribonuclease A at pH 3.0 in four buffers differing in their ionization volumes. Our results identify buffer ionization as an important determinant of protein transition volume that needs to be carefully taken into account. We emphasize that the importance of our results is not limited to PPC measurements but is more general and applies to all volumetric investigations, in particular, extending to the derivation of the pressure-temperature phase diagram of protein stability.

  11. Multi-fluid Modeling of Magnetosonic Wave Propagation in the Solar Chromosphere: Effects of Impact Ionization and Radiative Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Laguna, Alejandro Alvarez; Poedts, Stefaan [Department of Mathematics, Center for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Catholic University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lani, Andrea, E-mail: yana.maneva@ws.kuleuven.be, E-mail: stefaan.poedts@wis.kuleuven.be, E-mail: alejandro.alvarez.laguna@vki.ac.be, E-mail: lani@vki.ac.be [von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, CFD group, Aeronautics and Aerospace, Rhode Saint-Genèse (Belgium)

    2017-02-20

    In order to study chromospheric magnetosonic wave propagation including, for the first time, the effects of ion–neutral interactions in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, we have developed a new multi-fluid computational model accounting for ionization and recombination reactions in gravitationally stratified magnetized collisional media. The two-fluid model used in our 2D numerical simulations treats neutrals as a separate fluid and considers charged species (electrons and ions) within the resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskiis transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations and the solenoidality of the magnetic field is enforced with a hyperbolic divergence-cleaning scheme. The initial density and temperature profiles are similar to VAL III chromospheric model in which dynamical, thermal, and chemical equilibrium are considered to ensure comparison to existing MHD models and avoid artificial numerical heating. In this initial setup we include simple homogeneous flux tube magnetic field configuration and an external photospheric velocity driver to simulate the propagation of MHD waves in the partially ionized reactive chromosphere. In particular, we investigate the loss of chemical equilibrium and the plasma heating related to the steepening of fast magnetosonic wave fronts in the gravitationally stratified medium.

  12. The influence of ultrasound on ionizing radiation effects, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Takeo; Fujita, Katsuzo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1976-01-01

    The effects of simultaneous administration of ionizing radiation ( 60 Co gamma-rays) and ultrasound (1 MHz, 3 W/cm 2 ) on normal tissues of the auricules and kidneys, of rabbits were examined. Irreversible damages of the auricules were obtained with simultaneous irradiation of 690 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and exposure to ultrasound for 15 minutes, but with only irradiation of 2760 R of 60 Co gamma-rays or only administration of ultrasound for 60 minutes, damages were reversible. In 5 of 6 kidneys, interstitial nephritis was demonstrated histopathologically after simultaneous administration of 200 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and ultrasound for 5 minutes. However, with each alone (600 R of 60 Co gamma-rays and ultrasound for 60 minutes) no detectable changes were found. The results obtained from these experiments suggest that the effect of simultaneous irradiation with 60 Co gamma-rays and exposure to ultrasound on normal tissues may be synergistic and that ultrasound may potentiate the effects of 60 Co gamma-rays. (Evans, J.)

  13. Ionizing radiation biological effects and the proper protective measures against it's harmful effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hhalel, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book intrduces a good knowledge in specifications of ionizing radiation biological effects and the proper protective measures againest harmful effectes. The book is devided in to five main sections, the first one introduces the hostorical bachground of the contributions of a number of scietists in the basic knolwledge of radiation and its biological effects. The second section deals with the physical and chemical principles of radiation the third one talks about radiation detection. While the fourth section talks (via seven chapter) about the effectes of ionizing radiation on living organisms molecules cells, tissues organs systems and the living organism the fifth section talks about the uses of radiation sources, the probability of radiation accidents, protective measures, international recommendations related to doses and safe use of ionizing radiation. (Abed Al-wali Al-ajlouni). 53 refs., 107 figs., 13 tabs

  14. Non-Ionizing Radiation - sources, exposure and health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hietanen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Non-ionizing radiation contains the electromagnetic wavelengths from ultraviolet (UV) radiation to static electric and magnetic fields. Optical radiation consists of UV, visible and infrared (IR) radiation while EM fields include static, extremely low (ELF), low frequency (LF) and radiofrequency (RF) fields. The principal scientific organization on non-ionizing radiation is the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The main activity of ICNIRP is to provide guidance on safe exposure and protection of workers and members of the public by issuing statements and recommendations. (orig.)

  15. Partially ionized gas flow and heat transfer in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions downstream of an abrupt circular channel expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, L. H.; Massier, P. F.; Roschke, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure measurements obtained in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions along a tube and nozzle located downstream of an abrupt channel expansion are presented for a very high enthalpy flow of argon. The ionization energy fraction extended up to 0.6 at the tube inlet just downstream of the arc heater. Reattachment resulted from the growth of an instability in the vortex sheet-like shear layer between the central jet that discharged into the tube and the reverse flow along the wall at the lower Reynolds numbers, as indicated by water flow visualization studies which were found to dynamically model the high-temperature gas flow. A reasonably good prediction of the heat transfer in the reattachment region where the highest heat transfer occurred and in the redevelopment region downstream can be made by using existing laminar boundary layer theory for a partially ionized gas. In the experiments as much as 90 per cent of the inlet energy was lost by heat transfer to the tube and the nozzle wall.

  16. Problems linked to effects of ionizing radiations low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    The question of exposure to ionizing radiations low doses and risks existing for professional and populations has been asked again, with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) to lower the previous standards and agreed as guides to organize radiation protection, by concerned countries and big international organisms. The sciences academy presents an analysis which concerned on epidemiological and dosimetric aspects in risk estimation, on cellular and molecular aspects of response mechanism to irradiation. The observation of absence of carcinogen effects for doses inferior to 200 milli-sieverts and a re-evaluation of data coming from Nagasaki and Hiroshima, lead to revise the methodology of studies to pursue, to appreciate more exactly the effects of low doses, in taking in part, particularly, the dose rate. The progress of molecular and cellular biology showed that the extrapolation from high doses to low doses is not in accordance with actual data. The acknowledge of DNA repair and carcinogenesis should make clearer the debate. (N.C.). 61 refs., 9 annexes

  17. Analytical models for total dose ionization effects in MOS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Bogdan, Carolyn W.

    2008-08-01

    MOS devices are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation due to charge buildup in gate, field and SOI buried oxides. Under positive bias holes created in the gate oxide will transport to the Si / SiO{sub 2} interface creating oxide-trapped charge. As a result of hole transport and trapping, hydrogen is liberated in the oxide which can create interface-trapped charge. The trapped charge will affect the threshold voltage and degrade the channel mobility. Neutralization of oxidetrapped charge by electron tunneling from the silicon and by thermal emission can take place over long periods of time. Neutralization of interface-trapped charge is not observed at room temperature. Analytical models are developed that account for the principal effects of total dose in MOS devices under different gate bias. The intent is to obtain closed-form solutions that can be used in circuit simulation. Expressions are derived for the aging effects of very low dose rate radiation over long time periods.

  18. Salt effects on ionization equilibria of histidines in myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Y H; Fitch, C A; Bhattacharya, S; Sarkisian, C J; Lecomte, J T; García-Moreno E, B

    2000-09-01

    The salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in sperm whale and horse myoglobin and in histidine-containing peptides was measured by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Structure-based pK(a) calculations were performed with continuum methods to test their ability to capture the effects of solution conditions on pK(a) values. The measured pK(a) of most histidines, whether in the protein or in model compounds, increased by 0.3 pH units or more between 0.02 M and 1.5 M NaCl. In myoglobin two histidines (His(48) and His(36)) exhibited a shallower dependence than the average, and one (His(113)) showed a steeper dependence. The (1)H-NMR data suggested that the salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in the protein was determined primarily by the preferential stabilization of the charged form of histidine with increasing salt concentrations rather than by screening of electrostatic interactions. The magnitude and salt dependence of interactions between ionizable groups were exaggerated in pK(a) calculations with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann method applied to a static structure, even when the protein interior was treated with arbitrarily high dielectric constants. Improvements in continuum methods for calculating salt effects on pK(a) values will require explicit consideration of the salt dependence of model compound pK(a) values used for reference in the calculations.

  19. Effect of sunitinib combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haiping; Jiao Xiaodong; Li Rui; Wang Jiejun; Takayama, Koichi; Su Bo

    2011-01-01

    The aims of present study were to evaluate the efficacy of combining sunitinib with ionizing radiation (IR) on endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to IR with or without sunitinib pretreatment. Apoptosis assay and cell cycle distribution were analyzed by flow cytometry. Clonogenic survival assay at 3 Gy dose with or without sunitinib was performed. The activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signal pathway was detected by Western immunoblot. Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model was built to examine the effect of combination therapy on endothelial cells in vivo. Microvasculature changes were detected by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD31 antibody. Our results showed combination therapy of sunitinib and IR significantly increased apoptosis of endothelial cells and inhibited colony formation compared to sunitinib or radiotherapy alone. It also resulted in cell cycle redistribution (decreasing cells in S phase and increasing cells in G2/M phase). The activity of PI3K/Akt signal pathway was inhibited, which could be the potential mechanisms that account for the enhanced radiation response induced by sunitinib. In vivo analysis showed that combination therapy significantly decreased microvasculature formation. The results demonstrated that combination therapy of sunitinib and IR has the potential to increase the cytotoxic effects on endothelial cells. (author)

  20. Effect of the ionizing radiation in polyurethane of medical grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron, P.; Rivera, T.; Calderon, J. A.; Paredes, L.

    2011-10-01

    The polyurethane is a material broadly used in implant medical devices, such as the connection blocks of the pacemakers and the insulator of the electrodes. Some patients that are users of these devices possibly have the necessity to receive external radiotherapy. For that reason is necessary to know the effects induced by the ionizing radiation in this polymer. In this study samples of Pellethane 2363 80a (thermoplastic polyurethane of medical grade) were irradiated. It was used the same energy and absorbed dose of a treatment of external radiotherapy in pelvis, by means of a linear accelerator of X-rays of 6 MeV and absorbed dose of 60 Gy to isocenter. The irradiation corresponding to the gamma sterilization of the material was reproduced (1, 5, 7.5, 10 and 25 kGy for the Co 60) the effects induced by the radiotherapy and for the sterilization in the material were studied by means of an analysis of the chemical connection, the molecular structure and identification of the functional groups of the polymer, by means of the infrared spectroscopy by Fourier transform in the infrared half region. (Author)

  1. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P wall , P stem , and P cel ) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude of

  2. Effects of prenatal ionizing irradiation on neural function and behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizzee, K.R.; Ordy, J.M.; Pennwalt Corp., Rochester, NY

    1986-01-01

    Behavioral studies in the past decade on postnatal effects of prenatal ionizing irradiation (125-R) revealed alterations in circadian locomotor activity and modifications of duration, frequency and sequences of certain behavioral acts in irradiated rats. Other studies have shown that the effect of irradiation (150-R) and enriched environment were both significant in initial, repetitive and total error scores while at 200-R enrichment was less effective. Rats irradiated on the 13th, 14th and 15th day of gestation were born with a hopping gait, paired hind and forelimbs moving in unison. Thoracic cord section led to crossed extention hind-limb reflexes in control rats and simultaneus withdrawal of hind limbs in hopping rats, in response to pinprick. In 90 day old squirrel monkeys the percent of correct response in visual orientation, discrimination and reversal learning in 50- and 100-R offspring (Co 60 irradiation at 89-90 days gestation) were significantly lower than those of controls, and differences in reversal learning persisted undiminished at 2 years of age. Time required for body righting, head-up orientation and climbing at 45 0 incline was significantly greater in irradiated (mainly 100-R) than control animals at from 2 to 28 days of age. Visual acuity levels of 50- and 100-R 30 day old infants were significantly lower than in control infants. Stabilimeter activity in the dark was significantly higher in 50- and 100-R 30 day old infants than in controls. In the squirrel monkey studies effects of Co 60 irradiation (100-R) on postnatal development of the brain and behaviour can be identified at statistically significant levels of confidence independent of offspring nursery rearing effects. (orig.)

  3. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Broock, M. van; Gillette, V.H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  4. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  5. Effects of the ionizing radiation in natural food colours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosentino, Helio Morrone

    2005-01-01

    The world's fast growing population and its consequent increase in demand for food has driven mankind into improving technologies which ensure a safer supply of such commodities. Both food radiation processing and its constituents are highlighted as a feasible alternative technique capable of meeting food safety standards. Natural dyes are extensively employed in the food industry thanks to their colour enhancing properties on food products. This paper has aimed at studying the effects of ionizing radiation on three natural dyes: carminic acid and its derivatives (cochineal dyes), bixine and its salts (annatto dyes) and curcumin (turmeric dyes), used in the food and cosmetic industries within dilutions and doses those goods might eventually be processed in. It also envisages clarifying the compatibility of the irradiation technique with the keeping of such relevant sensorial attribute which is the product colour. Spectrophotometry and capillary electrophoresis were the analytic methods employed. All in all, a colour decrease proportional to the increase on the applied gamma radiation (1 to 32 kGy) has been observed. The annatto dyes have proven moderately stable whereas turmeric has shown to be highly sensitive to radiation. Those results shall be taken into account as far as the need to alter the formulae additive amount in the product is concerned whenever undergoing radiation processing. (author)

  6. Model of comet comae. II. Effects of solar photodissociative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Giguere, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to our computer model of coma plotochemistry are described. These include an expansion of the chemical reactions network and new rate constants that have been measured only recently. Photolytic reactions of additional molecules are incorporated, and photolytic branching ratios are treated in far greater detail than in our previous work. A total of 25 photodissociative ionization (PDI) reactions are now considered (as compared to only 3 PDI reactions previously). Solar PDI of the mother molecule CO 2 is shown to compete effectively with photoionization of CO in the production of observed CO + . The CO + density peak predicted by our improved model, for COP 2 or CO mother molecules, is deep in the inner coma, in better agreement with observation than our old CO 2 model. However, neither CO 2 nor CO mother molecule calculations reproduce the CO + /H 2 O + ratio observed in comet Kohoutek. PDI products of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , and NH 3 mother molecules fuel a complex chemistry scheme, producing inner coma abundances of CN, C 2 , and C 3 much greater than previously calculated

  7. Modeling Natural Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on External Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  8. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation results in biological damage that differs from other hazardous substances and is highly dangerous to man. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by man's sense organs and the biological damage cannot be detected immediately afterwards (except in very high doses). Every human being is exposed to low doses of radiation. The structure of the atom; sources of ionizing radiation; radiation units; biological effects; norms for radiation protection; and the national control in South Africa are discussed. 1 fig., 5 refs

  9. Petroleomics by electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry coupled to partial least squares with variable selection methods: prediction of the total acid number of crude oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Luciana A; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Tose, Lílian V; Romão, Wanderson; de Souza, Douglas D; de Castro, Eustáquio V R; de Oliveira, Mirela S L; Dias, Júlio C M; Poppi, Ronei J

    2014-10-07

    Negative-ion mode electrospray ionization, ESI(-), with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was coupled to a Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression and variable selection methods to estimate the total acid number (TAN) of Brazilian crude oil samples. Generally, ESI(-)-FT-ICR mass spectra present a power of resolution of ca. 500,000 and a mass accuracy less than 1 ppm, producing a data matrix containing over 5700 variables per sample. These variables correspond to heteroatom-containing species detected as deprotonated molecules, [M - H](-) ions, which are identified primarily as naphthenic acids, phenols and carbazole analog species. The TAN values for all samples ranged from 0.06 to 3.61 mg of KOH g(-1). To facilitate the spectral interpretation, three methods of variable selection were studied: variable importance in the projection (VIP), interval partial least squares (iPLS) and elimination of uninformative variables (UVE). The UVE method seems to be more appropriate for selecting important variables, reducing the dimension of the variables to 183 and producing a root mean square error of prediction of 0.32 mg of KOH g(-1). By reducing the size of the data, it was possible to relate the selected variables with their corresponding molecular formulas, thus identifying the main chemical species responsible for the TAN values.

  10. Health and biological effects of non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Seze, R.; Souques, M.; Aurengo, A.; Bach, V.; Burais, N.; Cesarini, J.P.; Cherin, A.; Decobert, V.; Dubois, G.; Hours, M.; Lagroye, I.; Leveque, Ph.; Libert, J.P.; Lombard, J.; Loos, N.; Mir, L.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Thuroczy, G.; Wiart, J.; Lehericy, St.; Pelletier, A.; Marc-Vergnes, J.P.; Douki, Th.; Guibal, F.; Tordjman, I.; Gaillot de Saintignon, J.; Collard, J.F.; Scoretti, R.; Magne, I.; Veyret, B.; Katrib, J.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day on the biological and health effects of non-ionizing radiations. Sixteen presentations out of 17 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - NMR: biological effects and implications of Directive 2004/40 on electromagnetic fields (S. Lehericy); 2 - impact of RF frequencies from mobile telephone antennas on body homeostasis (A. Pelletier); 3 - expression of stress markers in the brain and blood of rats exposed in-utero to a Wi-Fi signal (I. Lagroye); 4 - people exposure to electromagnetic waves: the challenge of variability and the contribution of statistics to dosimetry (J. Wiart); 5 - status of knowledge about electromagnetic fields hyper-sensitivity (J.P. Marc-Vergnes; 6 - geno-toxicity of UV radiation: respective impact of UVB and UVA (T. Douki); 7 - National day of prevention and screening for skin cancers (F. Guibal); 8 - UV tan devices: status of knowledge about cancer risks (I. Tordjman, and J. Gaillot de Saintignon); 9 - modulation of brain activity during a tapping task after exposure to a 3000 μT magnetic field at 60 Hz (M. Souques and A. Legros); 10 - calculation of ELF electromagnetic fields in the human body by the finite elements method (R. Scoretti); 11 - French population exposure to the 50 Hz magnetic field (I. Magne); 12 - LF and static fields, new ICNIRP recommendations: what has changed, what remains (B. Veyret); 13 - risk assessment of low energy lighting systems - DELs and CFLs (J.P. Cesarini); 14 - biological effects to the rat of a chronic exposure to high power microwaves (R. De Seze); 15 - theoretical and experimental electromagnetic compatibility approaches of active medical implants in the 10-50 Hz frequency range: the case of implantable cardiac defibrillators (J. Katrib); French physicians and electromagnetic fields (M. Souques). (J.S.)

  11. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  12. Ionization waves caused by the effects of a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kosuke; Imazu, Shingo

    1980-01-01

    The self-excited ionization waves was observed in the Ne positive column. The experiments were made for Ne gas from 0.07 to 1.0 Torr, with the magnetic field from 0 to 3.33 kG. The discharge current were 10 to 300 mA. The longitudinal magnetic field was made by an air-core solenoid coil. The axial electric field was measured by two wall probes. The frequency, wave length and amplitude of waves were measured with a photo multiplier. It was found that the longitudinal magnetic field caused new self-excited ionization waves. The frequency of these waves decreased monotonously with increasing field. The behaviors of the wave length and amplitude were complicate, and the cause of these phenomena is related to the ionization waves due to the spatial resonance of electron gas, namely s-waves, p-waves and fluid γ-waves. The threshold of the magnetic field to cause the ionization waves increased with increasing gas pressure, and with decreasing discharge current in the range 0.07 to 0.44 Torr. The frequency of the self-excited ionization waves occurred at zero field was almost constant in the field-frequency relation. A simple dispersion equation was derived, and the Novak constant can be introduced. (J.P.N.)

  13. Effective constants for wave propagation through partially saturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.; Thigpen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The multipole scattering coefficients for elastic wave scattering from a spherical inhomogeneity in a fluid-saturated porous medium have been calculated. These coefficients may be used to obtain estimates of the effective macroscopic constants for long-wavelength propagation of elastic waves through partially saturated media. If the volume average of the single scattering from spherical bubbles of gas and liquid is required to vanish, the resulting equations determine the effective bulk modulus, density, and viscosity of the multiphase fluid filling the pores. The formula for the effective viscosity during compressional wave excitation is apparently new

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation on food packaging materials and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welle, F.; Franz, R.

    1999-01-01

    Tests have shown that ionizing radiation induces a characteristic smell in the packaging laminates which also affects the simulated foods used, which however were relatively neutral in flavour, so that the tests represent the worst case. The paper explains that due to the various additives used in the production of the plastic packaging materials, the same types of polymers may react differently to the ionizing radiation, so that the results obtained from the tests are not suitable for general application. It is recommended to very carefully select the suitable packaging material for given foods and intended irradiation processes. Aspects of particular importance are discusses. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Effect of ionization on the oxidation kinetics of aluminum nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yao-Ting; He, Min; Cheng, Guang-xu; Zhang, Zaoxiao; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Wang, Zhengdong

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) of the observed stepwise oxidation of core-shell structured Al/Al2O3 nanoparticles is presented. Different from the metal ion hopping process in the Cabrera-Mott model, which is assumed to occur only at a certain distance from the oxide layer, the MD simulation shows that Al atoms jump over various interfacial gaps directly under the thermal driving force. The energy barrier for Al ionization is found to be increased along with the enlargement of interfacial gap. A mechanism of competition between thermal driving force and ionization potential barrier is proposed in the interpretation of stepwise oxidation behavior.

  16. Theory of the effect of third-harmonic generation on three-photon resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization in focused beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Garrett, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization in the region near a three-photon resonance is treated for focused, plane-polarized Gaussian beams with diffraction-limited beam divergence. In this situation, a third-harmonic field is generated within the laser beam. At, and very near, three-photon resonance the driving rate for the upper-state probability amplitude due to one-photon absorption of third-harmonic light becomes nearly equal to the corresponding three-photon rate due to the laser field, but these effects are 180 0 out of phase. As a consequence of this cancellation between two pumping terms, the three-photon resonance line essentially disappears at moderate concentrations and the observed ionization has a line shape that is close to the phase-matching curve for third-harmonic generation. The ionization signal, near but not on the resonance, is due almost entirely to absorption of third-harmonic photons plus other laser photons; three-photon resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization by the laser is much weaker. This is particularly true on the blue side of the three-photon resonance at detunings where phase matching occurs. The problem is treated quite generally with predictions of the full line shape for n-photon ionization and third-harmonic light generation near three-photon resonance, including the rather strong influences of positively dispersive buffer gases. We also show that the cancellation between the one-photon and the three-photon process is partially spoiled in the presence of a counterpropagating beam at the same frequency

  17. The study of the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on birth weight of newborns to exposed mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Shirazi, K. R.; Mortazavi, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Life evolved in an environment filled with a wide variety of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. It was previously reported that medical exposures to pregnant women increases the risk of low birth weight. This study intends to investigate the relationship between exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and the risk of low birth weight. Materials and Methods: One thousand two hundred mothers with their first-term labor (vaginal or cesarean) whose newborns? history had been...

  18. Biological effects of very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with a qualitative microdosimetric analysis of a new radiobiological phenomenon (physiological reaction of the cell as a whole to very low doses of ionizing radiations). The analysis is aimed at identifying the type of the primary interaction of radiation with the cell and finding its place in the cell

  19. Two-center interference effects in (e, 2e) ionization of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Nakajima, Isao; Satoh, Hironori; Watanabe, Noboru; Jones, Darryl; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in understanding quantum mechanical interference effects in molecular ionization. Since this interference appears as a consequence of coherent electron emission from the different molecular centers, it should depend strongly on the nature of the ionized molecular orbital. Such molecular orbital patterns can be investigated by means of binary (e, 2e) spectroscopy, which is a kinematically-complete electron-impact ionization experiment performed under the high-energy Bethe ridge conditions. In this study, two-center interference effects in the (e, 2e) cross sections of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer are demonstrated with a high-statistics experiment, in order to elucidate the relationship between molecular orbital patterns and the interference structure. It is shown that the two-center interference is highly sensitive to the phase, spatial pattern, symmetry of constituent atomic orbital, and chemical bonding nature of the molecular orbital. This work was partially supported by Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research (S) (No. 20225001) and for Young Scientists (B) (No. 21750005) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  20. Effects of ionizing radiation on locomotory behavior and mechanosensation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Michiyo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Ohba, Hirofumi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Funayama, Tomoo; Fukamoto, Kana; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Yanase, Sumino; Higashitani, Atsushi; Tsuji, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Locomotory behavior (motility) and mechanosensation are of vital importance in animals. We examined the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on locomotory behavior and mechanosensation using a model organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Bacterial mechanosensation in C. elegans induces the dopamine-mediated slowing of locomotion in the presence of bacteria (food), known as the basal slowing response. We previously reported an IR-induced reduction of locomotory rate in the absence of food. In the present study, we observed a similar IR-induced reduction of locomotory rate in the cat-2 mutant, which is defective in bacterial mechanosensation. The dose response pattern of the locomotory rate in the presence of food was relatively flat in wild-type animals, but not in cat-2 mutants. This suggests that the dopamine system, which is related to bacterial mechanosensation in C. elegans, might have a dominant effect on locomotory rate in the presence of food, which masks the effects of other stimuli. Moreover, we found that the behavioral responses of hydrogen peroxide-exposed wild-type animals are similar to those of IR-exposed animals. Our findings suggest that the IR-induced reduction of locomotory rate in the absence of food is mediated by a different pathway from that for bacterial mechanosensation, at least partially through IR-produced hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  1. The effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-11-01

    In the summer of 1970, the Federal Radiation Council (whose activities have since been transferred to the Radiation Office of the EPA) asked the National Academy of Sciences for information relevant to an evaluation of present radiation protection guides. This report is in response to that request. It presents a summary and analysis, by members of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and its subcommittees, of current knowledge relating to risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. In many respects, the report is a sequel to the reports of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation, published by the NAS-NRC from 1956 to 1961

  2. The effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-11-01

    In the summer of 1970, the Federal Radiation Council (whose activities have since been transferred to the Radiation Office of the EPA) asked the National Academy of Sciences for information relevant to an evaluation of present radiation protection guides. This report is in response to that request. It presents a summary and analysis, by members of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and its subcommittees, of current knowledge relating to risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. In many respects, the report is a sequel to the reports of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation, published by the NAS-NRC from 1956 to 1961.

  3. Long-term biological effects induced by ionizing radiation--implications for dose mediated risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, S D; Astărăstoae, V

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are considered to be risk agents that are responsible for the effects on interaction with living matter. The occurring biological effects are due to various factors such as: dose, type of radiation, exposure time, type of biological tissue, health condition and the age of the person exposed. The mechanisms involved in the direct modifications of nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA are reviewed. Classical target theory of energy deposition in the nucleus that causes DNA damages, in particular DNA double-strand breaks and that explanation of the biological consequences of ionizing radiation exposure is a paradigm in radiobiology. Recent experimental evidences have demonstrated the existence of a molecular mechanism that explains the non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation exposure. Among these novel data, genomic instability and a variety of bystander effects are discussed here. Those bystander effects of ionizing radiation are fulfilled by cellular communication systems that give rise to non-targeted effects in the neighboring non irradiated cells. This paper provides also a commentary on the synergistic effects induced by the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and various physical agents such as electromagnetic fields and the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and chemical environmental contaminants such as metals. The biological effects of multiple stressors on genomic instability and bystander effects are also discussed. Moreover, a brief presentation of the methods used to characterize cyto- and genotoxic damages is offered.

  4. Human exposure to non-ionizing radiation and potential adverse health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulevic, B.; Maric, B.; Zivkovic, D.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of protection from the non-ionizing radiation has presented an actual subject in the last twenty years both worldwide and in our country. Great attention has been paid to this problem throughout the world and there is not almost a field of human activities that disregards the effect of non-ionizing radiation to the human health.The object of this work is to point concisely, on the basis of numerous domestic and foreign referential data, to the potential adverse health effects caused by uncontrolled exposure to non-ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. Effects of autoionizing states on two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Koesterke, Lars; Schneider, Barry I

    2014-01-01

    We report angle-resolved and angle-integrated cross sections for two-photon double-ionization of H by a strong laser pulse. The effect of doubly excited states on the predicted cross sections is addressed.

  6. Ionizing radiation effects on volatiles formation in Camellia sinensis (L) teas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanaro, Gustavo Bernardes

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of radiation on volatile formation in white, green, oolong and black teas. Samples were irradiated in room temperature at 60 Co source Gammacell 220 (A.E.C. Ltda) at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 kGy. The volatiles organic compound was extracted by hydro distillation and the extract was separated and identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) analysis. The results show that the volatiles formations are directly proportional to the increase of radiation dose. The white tea showed less influence of ionizing radiation, as 37.86% of the compounds were stable at all doses of radiation and formed 47.53% of new compounds after irradiation. The green tea was the tea that has the greatest influence of radiation effects, increasing 66.12% of volatiles identified in relation to the control sample and only 21.77% of volatiles found naturally were resistant to all doses of radiation. The oolong tea, despite suffering a partial enzymatic treatment, was the second tea that has least interference of radiation in increasing the formation of new volatile. >From this tea, was able to detect 49.59% of new compounds after irradiation and 30.08% of the compounds found naturally were also found after irradiation. The black tea has the second greatest influence of radiation on formation of new volatile (60.94%) and only 17.97% of all identified compounds were not degraded after radiation. (author)

  7. Anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, I.P.; Mamontov, A.P.; Botaki, A.A.; Cherdantsev, P.A.; Chakhlov, B.V.; Sharov, S.R.; Timoshnikov, Yu.A.; Filipenko, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of small doses of 60 Co gamma rays on copper, tungsten, and WCo alloys has been investigated. A decrease in the concentration of material defects under the influence of small doses of ionizing radiation was found. Also the structural rearrangement of the crystal was found to be still in progress after irradiation ceased. The mechanism of the anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys is discussed in terms of the electron energy scheme. (U.K.)

  8. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  9. Effect of ionizing radiation on humoral and cellular immunity in pigs vaccinated against Aujeszky's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartoszcze, M.; Roszkowski, J.

    1991-01-01

    An effect of ionizing radiation on the immune response in pigs of both sexes weighing 35 kg vaccinated with an attenuated Aujeszky's disease virus was investigated. Ionizing radiation in a dose of 200 or 400 r reduced the number of IgM and IgG antibodies produced in vaccinated pigs. Additionally, the 400 r dose delyed the cellular immune response. No effect of the radiation on a clinical course of postvaccinal reaction was found

  10. Effect of ionizing radiation on advanced life support medications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, D.J.; Hubbard, L.B.; Broadbent, M.V.; Stewart, P.; Jaeger, M.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced life support medications stored in emergency department stretcher areas, diagnostic radiology rooms, and radiotherapy suites are exposed to ionizing radiation. We hypothesized that radiation may decrease the potency and thus the shelf life of medications stored in these areas. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were exposed to a wide range of ionizing radiation. The potency of the four drugs was unaffected by levels of radiation found in ED stretcher areas and high-volume diagnostic radiograph rooms (eg, chest radiograph, computed tomography, fluoroscopy). The potency of atropine may be reduced by gamma radiation in high-use radiotherapy suites. However, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were unaffected by high doses of gamma radiation. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol may be safely kept in ED stretcher areas and diagnostic radiology rooms without loss of potency over the shelf life of the drugs

  11. Ionizing radiation, radiation sources, radiation exposure, radiation effects. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, E.

    1985-01-01

    Part 2 deals with radiation exposure due to artificial radiation sources. The article describes X-ray diagnosis complete with an analysis of major methods, nuclear-medical diagnosis, percutaneous radiation therapy, isotope therapy, radiation from industrial generation of nucler energy and other sources of ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the authors attempt to asses total dose, genetically significant dose and various hazards of total radiation exposure by means of a summation of all radiation impacts. (orig./WU) [de

  12. Study of ionizing radiation effect on human spermatozoa chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseaux, S.

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the radio-induced chromosomal aberrations in spermatozoa. After a brief recall on ionizing radiations, the author reviews the radio-induced chromosomal anomalies on somatic cells and on germinal line cells and spermatozoa. The author presents the technical aspects of human spermatozoa karyotype and finally studies the radio induced chromosomal anomalies of sperm to patients undergoing a radiotherapy. 13 tabs., 28 figs., 28 photos

  13. X-RAY SIGNATURES OF NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION EFFECTS IN GALAXY CLUSTER ACCRETION SHOCK REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Sarazin, Craig L.; Ji Li

    2011-01-01

    The densities in the outer regions of clusters of galaxies are very low, and the collisional timescales are very long. As a result, heavy elements will be under-ionized after they have passed through the accretion shock. We have studied systematically the effects of non-equilibrium ionization for relaxed clusters in the ΛCDM cosmology using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. We found that non-equilibrium ionization effects do not depend on cluster mass, but depend strongly on redshift which can be understood by self-similar scaling arguments. The effects are stronger for clusters at lower redshifts. We present X-ray signatures such as surface brightness profiles and emission lines in detail for a massive cluster at low redshift. In general, soft emission (0.3-1.0 keV) is enhanced significantly by under-ionization, and the enhancement can be nearly an order of magnitude near the shock radius. The most prominent non-equilibrium ionization signature we found is the O VII and O VIII line ratio. The ratios for non-equilibrium ionization and collisional ionization equilibrium models are different by more than an order of magnitude at radii beyond half of the shock radius. These non-equilibrium ionization signatures are equally strong for models with different non-adiabatic shock electron heating efficiencies. We have also calculated the detectability of the O VII and O VIII lines with the future International X-ray Observatory (IXO). Depending on the line ratio measured, we conclude that an exposure of ∼130-380 ks on a moderate-redshift, massive regular cluster with the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) on the IXO will be sufficient to provide a strong test for the non-equilibrium ionization model.

  14. Relative effectiveness of ionizing radiations in relation to LET and the influence of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1966-01-01

    For the investigation of the mechanism by which effects of ionizing radiations in living cells are initiated an important consideration is the comparison of responses caused by radiations which differ with regard to their ionization density. Many biological effects of ionizing radiations on living cells and organisms are produced more efficiently by radiations with a high as compared with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The assumption has generally been made that the nature and yield of ionizations and excitations produced by ionizing particles in biological material depend only to a relatively small extent on the charge and energy of the particles. Consequently differences in effectiveness per unit dose between various radiations must be due to differences in the spatial distributions of the ionizations produced in the irradiated objects. he high relative effectiveness of densely as compared with sparsely ionizing radiations, observed for various biological systems, implies that interaction occurs between primary effects of ionizations, e. g. chemical changes of various molecules produced close together, and that this interaction is required for, or at least enhances, the production of biological damage. As discussed previously by Pollard, Howard-Flanders and Brustad for inactivation of enzymes and reproductive death of bacteria and yeast cells, investigations of the relation between the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and LET may provide information about the number of ionizations which are required and the dimensions of the value in which the effects must be produced to initiate the sequence of biophysical, biochemical and biological changes which finally results in the observed effect, e.g. death of a cell. This type of analysis has also been applied to data obtained from irradiations of cultured human cells with α-particles and deuterons of different energies (Barendsen). An important characteristic of any interpretation of radiobiological

  15. The effect of unilateral partial edentulism to muscle thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca-Ceylan, Golzem; Guler, Ahmet U.; Taskay-Yelmir, Nergiz; Lutfi, Incesu; Aksoz, Tolga

    2003-01-01

    Teeth and muscle play a very important role for occlusal equilibrium and function.when tooth loss begins ,it may also effect the function of muscle tissues. The thickness of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were measured bilaterally in 30 healthy fully dentate adults and in 30 unilateral edentulous patients by using ultrasonographic imaging. All scans were carried out by the same radiologist to eliminate the inter-observer difference, using a real time scanner (Toshiba SSA -270A,Japan). A 7.5 MHz linear transducer was used. The effect of age, sex, duration of partial edentulism, unilateral chewing habits of the individuals to the muscle thickness were also evaluated. In all subjects,facial proportion index was also determined. Main purpose of this study was to compare and establish the differences of muscle thickness between dentate and edentulous side in unilateral partial edentulous patients with ultrasonography and to test whether the variation in the thickness of the muscle is related to the variation in the facial and morphology. Ultrasonography revealed a large variation in the thickness of the masseter and temporolis muscles in experimental and controlled groups ,both relaxed and contracted conditions.The thickness of muscles in females was less in both conditions.In experimental group, a high negative correlation was found between the thickness of the masseter muscle and Facial Proportion Index ( FPI) in the females ,however, the statistical analysis showed no significant difference in the males. Also a high negative correlation was found in female control group. There was no statistically significant relationship between unilateral chewing habits and muscle thickness .In this study the duration of partial edentulism did not affect the thickness of the muscle.Further research is required to study muscular atrophy for comparison with total edentulism. (author)

  16. The Effects of Partial Turbinectomy on Patients Undergoing Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Gandomi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A reduction or cessation of the ability to breathe through the nose can affect a person's overall health. Nasal passage blockage can also result in snoring. Difficulty in breathing through the nose after rhinoplasty is a serious problem and patient dissatisfaction can be significant even when cosmetic results are excellent. Long-term impacts on the quality of life and contributions to the pathophysiology of sleep-related breathing disorders have both been documented. This study compares nasal obstruction and other prevalent respiratory side effects of rhinoplasty in the presence and absence of partial turbinectomy. Methods and Materials: This is an experimental case study conducted in 2007 on patients undergoing rhinoplastic surgery in Shahid Dastgheyb Hospital of Shiraz, Iran. Sampling was done on all admitted patients during this year in the mentioned hospital. For the first group, rhinoplasty plus partial turbinectomy was performed while taking into consideration the Helsinki criteria septorhinoplasty without partial turbinectomy was performed on the second group. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference between the case and control group in terms of their mean age and gender distribution. Respiratory mean scores before and after rhinoplasty in both groups were significantly different in some issues of Nasal Scale (i.e.: Nasal blockage or obstruction, trouble sleeping, inability to get enough air through the nose during exercise or exertion, trouble breathing through nose.  Conclusion: Achieving cosmetic goals while preserving such necessary functions is a great concern for rhinologists and this makes different complexes. To create a balance between the maximum physiologic function and the best cosmetic feature is an art.

  17. The effectiveness of Pilates for partial anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Derya; Turkel, Nilgun

    2017-08-01

    This study explored the effects of Pilates on the muscle strength, function, and instability of patients with partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in situations in which a non-surgical treatment option is preferred. Fifty participants 20-45 years of age who were diagnosed with isolated ACL injuries were included in the study. The participants were randomly assigned to either the Pilates exercise group (n = 24) or the control group (n = 26). The subjects in the Pilates exercise group performed basic mat exercises that focused on the muscle strength and flexibility of the lower limbs and core muscles during each class session, which met three times per week for 12 weeks. The control group did not receive any treatment or home exercise programme. All patients were evaluated using the Lysholm Knee Scale, the Cincinnati Knee Rating System, and isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring strength. Patient satisfaction regarding improvement in knee stability was assessed using the Global Rating of Change scale. The Pilates group experienced significant improvement over the control group as measured by the difference in quadriceps strength at 12 weeks (p = 0.03). Both groups showed some clinical change over time, but the Pilates group improved for all outcome measurements at the 12-week follow-up, and the control group only improved for functional outcomes. Patient satisfaction with the level of knee stability based on the Global Rating of Change scale was higher in the Pilates group than in the control group. Although both groups exhibited improvements in knee strength and functional outcomes, the results suggest that Pilates is a superior management approach over a control treatment for increasing quadriceps strength in participants with partial ACL injury. Pilates may provide clinicians a novel option when choosing a treatment for a partial ACL injury. Further study is needed to determine whether certain subgroups of individuals might achieve an added

  18. Wavefunction effects in inner shell ionization of light atoms by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aashamar, K.; Amundsen, P.A.

    An efficient computer code for calculating the impact parameter distribution of atomic ionization probabilities caused by charged particle impact, has been developed. The programme is based on the semiclassical approximation, and it allows the use of an arbitrary atomic central potential for deriving the one-electron orbitals that form the basis for the description of the atomic states. Extensive calculations are reported for proton induced K-shell ionization in carbon and neon, covering energies in the range 0.1-10 MeV. Some calculations on proton-argon L-shell ionization are also reported. Comparison of the results obtained using (screened) hydrogenic potentials and the recently reported energy- optimized effective atomic central potentials, respectively demonstrates that wavefunction effects are generally important for inner-shell ionization of light atoms. The agreement between theory and experiment in the K-shell case is improved for fast collisions upon using better wavefunctions. (Auth.)

  19. Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Effects in Thin Layer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    capacitance and voltage) in the h-BN/Si heterojunction and between -1 to 1 V. Current and capacitance is studied before and after gamma and...resultant capacitance is calculated. 28 The high-frequency C-V data allow the following parameters to be extracted: oxide thickness, flat...band capacitance, flat band voltage, and effective and total bulk oxide charge. Initially, the oxide thickness was used to characterize the quality and

  20. Effect of an improved molecular potential on strong-field tunneling ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Songfeng; Jin Cheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of one-electron model potentials on the tunneling ionization rates of molecules in strong fields. By including electron correlation using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LB α) model, the binding energies of outer shells of molecules are significantly improved. However, we show that the tunneling ionization rates from the LB α do not differ much from the earlier calculations [Phys. Rev. A 81, 033423 (2010)], in which the local correlation potential was neglected.

  1. Non-ionizing radiations : physical characteristics, biological effects and health hazard assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repacholi, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Workshop was a project of the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee of IRPA and comprised a series of educational lectures and demonstrations intended to give a comprehensive overview of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation: physical characteristics, sources of concern, levels of exposure, mechanisms of interaction and reported effects of these fields and radiations with biological tissues, human studies, health risk assessment, national and international standards and guidelines, and protective measures

  2. Ionizing radiation effects on food vitamins: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionisio, Ana Paula; Gomes, Renata Takassugui; Oetterer, Marilia

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been widely used in industrial processes, especially in the sterilization of medicines, pharmaceuticals, cosmetic products, and in food processing. Similar to other techniques of food processing, irradiation can induce certain alterations that can modify both the chemical composition and the nutritional value of foods. These changes depend on the food composition, the irradiation dose and factors such as temperature and presence or absence of oxygen in the irradiating environment. The sensitivity of vitamins to radiation is unpredictable and food vitamin losses during the irradiation are often substantial. The aim of this study was to discuss retention or loss of vitamins in several food products submitted to an irradiation process. (author)

  3. Field tests on partial embedment effects (embedment effect tests on soil-structure interaction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurimoto, O.; Tsunoda, T.; Inoue, T.; Izumi, M.; Kusakabe, K.; Akino, K.

    1993-01-01

    A series of Model Tests of Embedment Effect on Reactor Buildings has been carried out by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and lndustry (MITI) of Japan. The nuclear reactor buildings are partially embedded due to conditions for the construction or building arrangement in Japan. It is necessary to verify the partial embedment effects by experiments and analytical studies in order to incorporate the effects in the seismic design. Forced vibration tests, therefore, were performed using a model with several types of embedment. Correlated simulation analyses were also performed and the characteristics of partial embedment effects on soil-structure interaction were evaluated. (author)

  4. Growth of carbon nanocone arrays on a metal catalyst: The effect of carbon flux ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, I.; Khachan, J.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Ostrikov, K.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of carbon nanocone arrays on metal catalyst particles by deposition from a low-temperature plasma is studied by multiscale Monte Carlo/surface diffusion numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the variation in the degree of ionization of the carbon flux provides an effective control of the growth kinetics of the carbon nanocones, and leads to the formation of more uniform arrays of nanostructures. In the case of zero degree of ionization (neutral gas process), a width of the distribution of nanocone heights reaches 360 nm with the nanocone mean height of 150 nm. When the carbon flux of 75% ionization is used, the width of the distribution of nanocone heights decreases to 100 nm, i.e., by a factor of 3.6. A higher degree of ionization leads to a better uniformity of the metal catalyst saturation and the nanocone growth, thus contributing to the formation of more height-uniform arrays of carbon nanostructures.

  5. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered

  6. Multiple ionization effects in atomic collisions in the K-L matching region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piticu, I.; Ciortea, C.; Dumitriu, D.; Enulescu, A.; Fluerasu, D.; Szilagyi, S.Z.; Zoran, V.; Bucur, B.I.

    1994-01-01

    The multiple ionization effect in the determination of 3dσ vacancy production cross sections and sharing probabilities in asymmetric quasimolecular collisions near K-L level matching, for the collision systems Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu + Bi in the energy range 0.25 - 1.75 MeV/u have been studied. The experimental energy and intensity shifts of some projectile and target X-ray lines, as well as Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations, have been used to estimate average single particle probabilities for multiple ionization of projectile L- and target M-shells. Using these estimates and a standard procedure, the experimental 3dσ vacancy production cross sections and sharing probabilities have been corrected for multiple ionization. The influence of the multiple ionization-induced increase in binding energy of the molecular orbitals implied in vacancy sharing is discussed. (Author)

  7. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Yahui; Tong Jian

    2007-01-01

    Non-targeted and delayed effects are relative phenomena in cellular responses to ionizing radiation. These effects (bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. It is clear that adaptive responses, bystander effects and genomic instability will play an important role in the low dose-response to radiation. This review will provide a synthesis of the known, and proposed interrelationships amongst low-dose cellular responses to radiation, It also will examine the potential biological significance of non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. (authors)

  8. Mechanism of the flame ionization detector. II. Isotope effects and heteroatom effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1997-01-01

    The relative molar flame ionization detecton (FID) response (RMR) for a hydrocarbon does not change when deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. The exception is methane for which an inverse deuterium effect of 3..5% is observed for tetradeuteriomethane. [13C]Methane shows an inverse isotope effect...... of 2%. The reason for the small or non-existent isotope effects is that H/2H exchange takes place in the pre-combustion hydrogenolysis in the flame. This was shown by taking samples from the lower part of the flame by means of a fused silica capillary probe. By the same technique the hydrogenolytic...

  9. Genetic effects of ionizing radiation – some questions with no answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosse, Irma B.

    2012-01-01

    There are a lot of questions about genetic effects of ionizing radiation, the main one is does ionizing radiation induce mutations in humans? There is no direct evidence that exposure of parents to radiation leads to excess heritable disease in offspring. What is the difference between human and other species in which radiation induced mutations are easily registered? During evolution germ cell selection ex vivo has been changed to a selection in vivo and we cannot observe such selection of radiation damaged cells in human. Low radiation doses – are they harmful or beneficial? The “hormesis” phenomenon as well as radioadaptive response proves positive effects of low radiation dose. Can analysis of chromosomal aberration rate in lymphocytes be used for dosimetry? Many uncontrolled factors may be responsible for significant mistakes of this method. Why did evolution preserve the bystander effect? This paper is discussion one and its goal is to pay attention on some effects of ionizing radiation. - Highlights: ► There are a lot of questions about genetic effects of ionizing radiation. ► Does ionizing radiation induce mutations in human? ► During evolution germ cell selection ex vivo has been changed to a selection in vivo. ► Radioadaptive response proves positive effects of low radiation doses. ► Many uncontrolled factors may be responsible for significant biodosimetry mistakes.

  10. Proceedings of the 15. Berzelius symposium on somatic and genetic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stigbrand, T.

    1989-01-01

    The symposium begins with a brush up on the physics of ionizing radiation and a background to the natural and man-made source of radiation to which we are exposed. The next section deals with the origin and nature of radiation-induced damage to DNA. The somatic effects of ionizing radiation span from DNA lesions to various effects on cell structure and cell function and effects on whole organs. The somatic effects are immediate as well as long-term, with mental impairment and an increased risk for carcinogenesis as consequences of main concern. The genetic effects of ionizing radiation can result in: infertility, spontaneous abortions, genetic diseases and malformations and increased risk for cancer. This leads over to the problems of risk estimation. Risk estimation which is mainly based on experimental data using animal models, human cell lines and epidemiological studies of exposed and unexposed populations

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on cholesterol in aqueous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakritz, L.; Maerker, G.

    1989-01-01

    Aqueous sodium stearate dispersions of cholesterol were irradiated at 0-2 degrees C with absorbed doses ranging from 2.5 to 50 kGy. The resulting mixture of cholesterol derivatives was isolated and examined for 7-ketocholesterol and cholesterol 5 alpha, 6 alpha-epoxide and 5 beta, 6 beta-epoxide content. Concentrations of all three compounds increased with dose, while the ratio of 7-ketocholesterol to total epoxides decreased with increasing dose. The ratio of 7-ketocholestrol to the epoxides was approximately 1 or below at all dose levels while the same ratio in autoxidations of cholesterol in dispersions was normally 6 or greater. The change in the keto/epoxide ratio may be a means for determining whether meat or other foods containing cholesterol have been subjected to ionizing radiation

  12. Effective slip over partially filled microcavities and its possible failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhouyang; Holmgren, Hanna; Kronbichler, Martin; Brandt, Luca; Kreiss, Gunilla

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the emerging applications of liquid-infused surfaces (LIS), we study the drag reduction and robustness of transverse flows over two-dimensional microcavities partially filled with an oily lubricant. Using separate simulations at different scales, characteristic contact line velocities at the fluid-solid intersection are first extracted from nanoscale phase field simulations and then applied to micronscale two-phase flows, thus introducing a multiscale numerical framework to model the interface displacement and deformation within the cavities. As we explore the various effects of the lubricant-to-outer-fluid viscosity ratio μ˜2/μ˜1 , the capillary number Ca, the static contact angle θs, and the filling fraction of the cavity δ , we find that the effective slip is most sensitive to the parameter δ . The effects of μ˜2/μ˜1 and θs are generally intertwined but weakened if δ 1 ), however, are immune to such failure due to their generally larger contact line velocity.

  13. The study of the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on birth weight of newborns to exposed mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S M J; Shirazi, K R; Mortazavi, G

    2013-01-01

    Life evolved in an environment filled with a wide variety of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. It was previously reported that medical exposures to pregnant women increases the risk of low birth weight. This study intends to investigate the relationship between exposure to ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and the risk of low birth weight. One thousand two hundred mothers with their first-term labor (vaginal or cesarean) whose newborns' history had been registered in neonates' screening program in Shiraz were interviewed and surveyed. Data collection was performed by the assessment of mother's history of radiography before and during pregnancy, physical examination of the mother for height and weight and weighing and examining the newborn for any diagnosis of disease and anomalies. There were no statistical significant differences between the mean weight of newborns whose mothers had been exposed to some common sources of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations such as dental or non dental radiographies, mobile phone, cordless phone and cathode ray tube (CRT) and those of non-exposed mothers. The findings of this study cast doubt on previous reports, which indicated that exposure to ionizing radiation during pregnancy increased the risk of low birth weight.

  14. Ionization versus displacement damage effects in proton irradiated CMOS sensors manufactured in deep submicron process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Saint-Pe, O.; Bernard, F.; Rolland, G.

    2009-01-01

    Proton irradiation effects have been studied on CMOS image sensors manufactured in a 0.18μm technology dedicated to imaging. The ionizing dose and displacement damage effects were discriminated and localized thanks to 60 Co irradiations and large photodiode reverse current measurements. The only degradation observed was a photodiode dark current increase. It was found that ionizing dose effects dominate this rise by inducing generation centers at the interface between shallow trench isolations and depleted silicon regions. Displacement damages are is responsible for a large degradation of dark current non-uniformity. This work suggests that designing a photodiode tolerant to ionizing radiation can mitigate an important part of proton irradiation effects.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation over the structure, metabolism and infectivity of a pathogenic protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii (Apicomplexa), has as definitive host domestic and wild felines and as intermediate hosts most species of mammals and birds, Including man. The infection in man is usually asymptomatic, but can become a severe and lethal illness in some special groups like the fetus of primoinfected pregnant woman, or in AIDS and transplanted patients. The transmission is due to ingestion of food or water contaminated with oocysts from cat feces as well as raw or rare cooked cyst containing meet. There is no available vaccine against toxoplasmosis, with some reports of the use ionizing radiation in order to attenuate or suppress the parasite. These studies are promising, but more research is needed to optimize the radiation process and to clarify those alterations caused on T gondii.Using a increasing doses of 60 Co irradiation on T.gondii tachyzoites, we studied many parameters such as morphology, both at optical and electron microscopy level, detection of DNA fragmentation, metabolism alterations (cellular oxidative burst, protein, nucleic acids and DNA synthesis), determination of the parasite survival both in in vivo and in vitro models, antigenicity and immunogenicity after the process, cellular invasion and irradiated tachyzoite induced protection. After definition of 200 Gy of 60 Co irradiation as the lower radiation dose that suppress parasite growth in vitro and in vivo, we found no detectable changes in parasite viability, its cell invasion capacity or in its structural proteins. DNA fragmentation like apoptosis or alterations of the parasite metabolism were similarly not affected by radiation. Mice infection with irradiated parasites induce partial protection when these animals were re-inoculated with non irradiated virulent parasites, inducing greater specific IgG levels as well as a longer survival. Irradiated T.gondii maintains its the ability of invasion, even under radiation effects. Based on our results we conclude that

  16. More on PT-Symmetry in (Generalized Effect Algebras and Partial Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Paseka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We continue in the direction of our paper on PT-Symmetry in (Generalized Effect Algebras and Partial Groups. Namely we extend our considerations to the setting of weakly ordered partial groups. In this setting, any operator weakly ordered partial group is a pasting of its partially ordered commutative subgroups of linear operators with a fixed dense domain over bounded operators. Moreover, applications of our approach for generalized effect algebras are mentioned.

  17. Initial events in the cellular effects of ionizing radiations: clustered damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Ionizing radiations produce many hundreds of different simple chemical products in DNA and also multitudes of possible clustered combinations. The simple products, including single-strand breaks, tend to correlate poorly with biological effectiveness. Even for initial double-strand breaks, as a broad class, there is apparently little or no increase in yield with increasing ionization density, in contrast with the large rise in relative biological effectiveness for cellular effects. Track structure analysis has revealed that clustered DNA damage of severity greater than simple double-strand breaks is likely to occur at biologically relevant frequencies with all ionizing radiations. Studies are in progress to describe in more detail the chemical nature of these clustered lesions and to consider the implications for cellular repair. (author)

  18. The effect of ionizing radiation with different ionizing density on the uni-cellular Alga Micrasterias denticulate Breb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reubel, B.

    1982-01-01

    The uni-cellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata Breb is very suitable for cytological, ultrastructural investigations as well as for growth studies of cell populations because of its size and its specific cellular pattern. Therefore these cells were investigated for their cell-cycle-dependent reaction to different types of radiation, dose-rates and cumulated doses and compared with results from the literature on radiobiological effects on single cells. Different types of ionizing radiation were used such as gamma rays ( 60 Co, 241 Am), alpha rays ( 241 Am) neutrons ( 252 Cf and 14 MeV-neutrons from a particle-accelerator) and protons (20-MeV-protons from a particle-accelerator). Irradiation with low doses (gamma-, neutron irradiation) did not show any statistically significant results. No effects could be observed after alpha irradiation because of the alpha particles could not penetrate the mucus cover. Irradiation with gamma rays and protons showed statistically significant reversible and irreversible effects. The reversible effect appeared in a dose-dependent division-delay of the populations. The results from literature, cell-cycle observations and ultra-structural investigations point to a block in the G 2 -phase and prolongation of the S-phase. Irreversible irradiation damage is caused by neutron- and proton irradiation. In the first case the length of division delay shows no dose-dependence. In the second case the following cell-cycles are retarded. The dose-effect-curves of proton-irradiations with different dose-rates show a plateau at high doses, which seems to be effected by the turn-on of an additional repair-mechanism. (Author)

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiro, B D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1995-08-01

    The Field-Irradiator-Gamma (FIG) project chronically exposed a section of the boreal forest to ionizing radiation by placing a {sup 137}Cs source on tope of a 20-m tower at a forest site in southeastern Manitoba. The irradiation continued from 1973 to 1986 and the forest was exposed to radiological dose rates ranging from 65 mGy.h{sup -1} to 0.005 mGy.h{sup -1} along a gradient extending 500 m from the source. The irradiation killed the tree canopy close to the irradiator, resulting in the formation of a herbaceous zone of vegetation at high dose rates. After 14 years of irradiation, some tree species were still being affected at dose rates as low as about 1 mGy.h{sup -1}. The data gathered at the FIG site can be used to identify radiological dose rates that forest communities can tolerate. This information allows decisions to be made concerning guidelines for protection of the general environment from radionuclide emissions from various anthropogenic sources, such as nuclear reactors and uranium tailings. This report reviews the previous data collected at the FIG site during the pre-irradiation and irradiation phases and the methodology used to establish a baseline for future comparisons. Permanently marked sampling plots are a particular strength to the study, whereby researchers can compare the present forest community with that measured during the past 25 years. (author). 53 refs., 6 tabs., 22 figs.

  20. Effects of ionizing radiation on the boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.D.

    1995-08-01

    The Field-Irradiator-Gamma (FIG) project chronically exposed a section of the boreal forest to ionizing radiation by placing a 137 Cs source on tope of a 20-m tower at a forest site in southeastern Manitoba. The irradiation continued from 1973 to 1986 and the forest was exposed to radiological dose rates ranging from 65 mGy.h -1 to 0.005 mGy.h -1 along a gradient extending 500 m from the source. The irradiation killed the tree canopy close to the irradiator, resulting in the formation of a herbaceous zone of vegetation at high dose rates. After 14 years of irradiation, some tree species were still being affected at dose rates as low as about 1 mGy.h -1 . The data gathered at the FIG site can be used to identify radiological dose rates that forest communities can tolerate. This information allows decisions to be made concerning guidelines for protection of the general environment from radionuclide emissions from various anthropogenic sources, such as nuclear reactors and uranium tailings. This report reviews the previous data collected at the FIG site during the pre-irradiation and irradiation phases and the methodology used to establish a baseline for future comparisons. Permanently marked sampling plots are a particular strength to the study, whereby researchers can compare the present forest community with that measured during the past 25 years. (author). 53 refs., 6 tabs., 22 figs

  1. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, W.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to simplify some of the relevant points of legislation, biological effects and protection for the benefit of the occupational health nurse not familiar with the nuclear industries. The subject is dealt with under the following headings; Understanding atoms. What is meant by ionizing radiation. Types of ionizing radiation. Effects of radiation: long and short term somatic effects, genetic effects. Control of radiation: occupational exposure, women of reproductive age, medical aspects, principles of control. The occupational health nurse's role. Emergency arrangements: national arrangements for incidents involving radiation, action to be taken by the nurse. Decontamination procedures: external and internal contamination. (U.K.)

  2. Indirect effect of ionizing radiation on adehylate cyclase activity of liver cells in rat embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slozhenikina, L.V.; Ushakova, T.E.; Mikhajlets, L.P.; Kuzin, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the effect of ionizing radiation on basal and catecholamine-stimulating activity of adenylate cyclase in the liver of 20-day embroys under in vivo and in vitro conditions (a membrane fraction and plasma membranes). The authors discuss the share of the indirect effect of radiation in modifying the adenylate cyclase activity

  3. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference

  4. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference. Refs, figs, tabs.

  5. Perturbed stationary-state description of the polarization effect in innershell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basbas, G.; Land, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A one-parameter trial initial-state wavefunction correlated to a projectile (polarized) is described and used to calculate innershell ionization cross sections for collisions with heavy charged particles. The variational principle is used to determine the parameter. The minimized energy gives the binding effect as a function of projectile position. Existing codes can be readily adapted to incorporate the trial wavefunction. Comparison with the previous theory of the polarization effect is made. Results for K-shell ionization of titanium by protons in the 0.3 to 2.4 MeV energy range agree with measured values

  6. The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation - A question of ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    Three ethical questions are asked and answered about the current state of affairs concerning how those in power manipulate public understanding of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The questions are as follows: (1) Is it ethical to frighten people when you do not know that there is anything to be frightened of? (2) Is it ethical to be so conservative that resources are spent to solve a problem that may not exist? (3) Is it ethical not to tell the whole truth about the effects of low levels of ionizing radiation?

  7. Study on the non-target effect of ionizing radiation using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Deguan; Liu Jianfeng; Chu Liping; Liu Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the non-target effect of ionizing radiation by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Methods: Cross incubated the irradiated( 137 Cs; 2Gy) or non-irradiated lymphocytes of human peripheral blood in the irradiated or non-irradiated plasma respectively, then, assess the DNA damage of lymphocytes using SCGE analysis. Results: The lymphocytes incubated in the irradiated plasma presented more obvious DNA damage than the incubated in the non-irradiated plasma dose (P<0.05). Conclusion: The non-target effect of ionizing radiation can be assessed by SCGE, and the results confirm that cytokines may play a great role in it. (authors)

  8. Assessment of public awareness of the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation in Kontagora, Niger State, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temaugee, S.T.; Daniel, T.A.; Oladejo, K.O.; Daniel, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the level of public awareness of detrimental effects of ionizing radiation in Nigeria, a case study of Federal College of Education Kontagora Niger State. A total of thirty-five (35) lecturers and seventy-five (75) students were randomly selected from the five schools in the College. The instrument used for data collection was a questionnaire. Data obtained from the questionnaire was analysed using simple percentages. The result of the study revealed that 10 (28.6%) out of 35 lecturers and 32 (42.7%) out of 75 students of the sampled population were totally unaware of ionization radiation and its health detriments. Moreover, the remaining percentage of both lecturers and students had limited knowledge about ionizing radiation and its detrimental effects to humans. The research also shows that a significant percentage of both lecturers and students claimed that the topic 'Ionizing radiations and their health detriments' is not relevant to their field of academic inclination. Based on the findings of the research, it was therefore recommended that the government, Nigeria Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NNRA), physicists and concerned individuals should enlighten the general public on ionizing radiations, its health detriment and safety measures through seminars and the mass media.

  9. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resat, Marianne S.; Arthurs, Benjamin J.; Estes, Brian J.; Morgan, william F.

    2006-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizing radiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation

  10. Ionization balance for Ti and Cr ions: effects of uncertainty in dielectronic recombination rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Il H

    2003-01-01

    The available electron-impact ionization cross sections for Ti and Cr ions are reviewed, and calculations of the ionization balance for the ions under coronal equilibrium are presented. The calculated ionic abundance fractions are compared with those of previous works. The effects of modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination on isoelectronic line ratios, which are formed using the same spectral line from two elements of slightly different atomic numbers, are discussed concentrating on high temperature ranges. Also discussed are the effects of modelling uncertainty on inter-ionization stage line ratios formed from adjacent ionization stages. It is demonstrated that the modelling uncertainty in dielectronic recombination tends to cancel out only when the isoelectronic line ratio of He-like ions is considered, and that the sensitivity of the isoelectronic line ratios to the modelling uncertainty tends to increase for less ionized stages. It is also found that the interstage line ratios are less sensitive to the typical ∼20% uncertainties of dielectronic rates than the isoelectronic line ratios, and that the interstage line ratio of He-to Li-like ions in Ti and Cr plasmas is a better choice for a temperature diagnostic in the temperature ranges from ∼0.6 to ∼1.5 keV in which Li-like ions have maximum ionic abundances

  11. Effect of partial weight bearing program on functional ability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lilian A. Zaky

    2013-03-17

    Mar 17, 2013 ... essence of the importance of partial weight bearing program in rehabilitation of lower limb condi ... and long term physical and psychosocial impairments [11,12]. .... gram for their functional walking using the 6-min walking test,.

  12. Revisiting the thermal effect on shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated shock propagation in weakly ionized plasmas and observed the following anomalous effects: shock acceleration, shock recovery, shock weakening, shock spreading, and splitting. It was generally accepted that the thermal effect can explain most of the experimental results. However, little attention was paid to the shock recovery. In this paper, the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas is studied by fluid simulation. It is found that the shock acceleration, weakening, and splitting appear after it enters the plasma (thermal) region. The shock splits into two parts right after it leaves the thermal region. The distance between the splitted shocks keeps decreasing until they recover to one. This paper can explain a whole set of features of the shock wave propagation in weakly ionized plasmas. It is also found that both the shock curvature and the splitting present the same photoacoustic deflection (PAD) signals, so they cannot be distinguished by the PAD experiments.

  13. 'K' contribution to the biological effect of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissiere, Arnaud

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the importance of 'K' ionizations on DNA as critical physical events initiating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, in particular in human cells. Ultra-soft X-rays are used as a probe of core ionization events. A decisive test consists in comparing the biological effects at 250 eV and 350 eV (before and after the carbon K - threshold). The results show a sharp increase of the biological efficiency for both cellular inactivation and chromosomal exchange aberration above the carbon K-threshold, correlated with the one of core events occurring in DNA atoms. The heavy ion irradiation displays again the paradoxical behaviour of cellular inactivation cross sections as a function of LET. Finally, the 'K' event contribution to cellular inactivation of usual low LET radiation is estimated to be about 75%. (author) [fr

  14. Effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation on reproductive and child health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienefeld, M.K.; McLaughlin, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The evidence regarding the effects of occupational exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation on reproductive health is limited. However, exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation is associated with increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes. The resulting uncertainty about the effects of occupational exposures has caused concern among some workers, therefore, we have designed a study to examine this question among Canadian medical radiation technologists. A short mailed questionnaire will be sent to all CAMRT members to obtain information about reproductive history, and a sample of respondents will receive a second questionnaire requesting information about other important exposures. Occupational dose records will be retrieved from the National Dose Registry. Using this information, relative risks for each outcome will be calculated for different radiation dose levels. This article provides a brief review of the literature on ionizing radiation exposure and reproductive outcomes, and an outline of the proposed study

  15. Studies of the ionizing radiation effects on the effluents acute toxicity due to anionic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Maria Cristina Franco de

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have shown the negative effects of surfactants, as detergents active substance, when discharged on biological sewage wastewater treatment plants. High toxicity may represent a lower efficiency for biological treatment. When surfactants are in aquatic environment they may induce a loss of grease revetment on birds (feather). Depending on the surfactant concentration, several damages to all biotic systems can happen. Looking for an alternative technology for wastewater treatment, efficient for surfactant removal, the present work applied ionizing radiation as an advanced oxidation process for affluents and effluents from Suzano Treatment Station. Such wastewater samples were submitted to radiation using an electron beam from a Dynamic Electron Beam Accelerator from Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. In order to assess this proposed treatment efficacy, it was performed acute toxicity evaluation with two test-organisms, the crustacean Daphnia similis and the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The studied effluents were: one from a chemical industry (IND), three from sewage plant (affluents - GG, GM and Guaio) and the last biologically treated secondary effluent (EfF), discharged at Tiete river. The applied radiation doses varied from 3 kGy to 50 kGy, being 50 kGy enough for surfactant degradation contained at industrial effluent. For GG, GM and Guaio samples, doses of 6 kGy and 10 kGy were efficient for surfactant and toxicity reduction, representing an average removal that varied from 71.80% to 82.76% and toxicity from 30% to 91% for most the effluents. The final effluent was less toxic than the others and the radiation induced an average 11% removal for anionic surfactant. The industrial effluents were also submitted to an aeration process in order to quantify the contribution of surfactant to the whole sample toxicity, once it was partially removed as foam and several fractions were evaluated for toxicity. (author)

  16. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on production of animal virus (VSV)

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Hyun S.; Chang, Kern H.; Kim, Jung H.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of oxygen partial pressure on viral replication was investigated with Vero/VSV system. At 10% oxygen partial pressure in spinner culture, VSV titer was significantly increased 130 fold compared to that obtained at 21%. A similar result was obtained for viral production in 1liter bioreactor. This implies that oxygen partial pressure during viral production has to be low. In low oxygen partial pressure, malondialdehyde concentration was decreased about 5 fold. Thus, low oxygen partia...

  17. Model planetary nebulae: the effect of shadowed filaments on low ionization potential ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, A.

    1977-01-01

    Previous homogeneous model planetary nebulae calculations No. 4 have yielded emission strengths for low ionization potential No. 4 ions which are considerably lower than those observed. Several attempts were to correct this problem by the inclusion of optically thin condensations, the use of energy flux distributions from stellar model calculations instead of blackbody spectrum stars, and the inclusion of dust in the nebulae. The effect that shadowed filaments have on the ionization and thermal structure of model nebulae and the resultant line strengths are considered. These radial filaments are shielded from the direct stellar ionizing radiation by optically thick condensations in the nebula. Theoretical observational evidence exists for the presence of condensations and filaments. Since the only source of ionizing photons in the shadowed filaments is due to diffuse photons produced by recombination, ions of lower ionization potential are expected to exist there in greater numbers than those found in the rest of the nebula. This leads to increased line strengths from these ions and increases their values to match the observational values. It is shown that these line strengths in the filaments increase by over one to two orders of magnitude relative to values found in homogeneous models. This results in an increase of approximately one order of magnitude for these lines when contributions from both components of the nebula are considered. The parameters that determine the exact value of the increase are the radial location of the filaments in the nebula and the fraction of the nebular volume occupied by the filaments

  18. High doses of ionizing radiation on bone repair: is there effect outside the irradiated site?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Flaviana Soares; Dias, Pâmella Coelho; Limirio, Pedro Henrique Justino Oliveira; Lara, Vitor Carvalho; Batista, Jonas Dantas; Dechichi, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Local ionizing radiation causes damage to bone metabolism, it reduces blood supply and cellularity over time. Recent studies indicate that radiation promotes biological response outside the treatment field. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on bone repair outside the irradiated field. Ten healthy male Wistar rats were used; and five animals were submitted to radiotherapy on the left femur. After 4 weeks, in all animals were created bone defects in the right and left femurs. Seven days after surgery, animals were euthanized. The femurs were removed and randomly divided into 3 groups (n=5): Control (C) (right femur of the non-irradiated animals); Local ionizing radiation (IR) (left femur of the irradiated animals); Contralateral ionizing radiation (CIR) (right femur of the irradiated animals). The femurs were processed and embedded in paraffin; and bone histologic sections were evaluated to quantify the bone neoformation. Histomorphometric analysis showed that there was no significant difference between groups C (24.6±7.04) and CIR (25.3±4.31); and IR group not showed bone neoformation. The results suggest that ionizing radiation affects bone repair, but does not interfere in bone repair distant from the primary irradiated site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of negative ions on current growth and ionizing wave propagation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    The spatiotemporal development of electron and ion densities, electric fields, and luminosity are calculated for electron pulse experiments in overvolted parallel-plane gaps by numerically solving continuity equations together with Poisson's equation. Experimental coefficients for primary ionization, cathode photoemission, photoionization, and luminosity are used. Unambiguous determination of the coefficients for attachment, detachment, and charge transfer is not possible from available experimental results. Therefore, the calculations are repeated for three sets of coefficients for these processes, corresponding to the following assumptions: unstable negative ions, stable negative ions, and no negative ions. The results of the calculations show, in each case, that the electron pulse initiates an avalanche which grows exponentially until the onset of space-charge effects. The calculated growth rate is strongly affected by the assumed attachment, detachment, and charge-transfer coefficients. When the total number of electrons in the avalanche reaches approx.10 8 , anode- and cathode-directed ionizing waves, or streamers, develop from the avalanche and produce a weakly ionized filamentary plasma. The calculated ionizing wave velocities are strongly increasing functions of the space-charge--enhanced electric field within the waves and are insensitive to the assumed attachment, detachment, and charge-transfer coefficients. The numerically calculated ionizing wave velocities are in approximate agreement with a simple analytical theory

  20. Effect of ionization, bedding, and feeding on air quality in a horse stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegers, Esther Willemijn; Anthonisse, Milou; van Eerdenburg, Frank J C M; van den Broek, Jan; Wouters, Inge M; Westermann, Cornélie Martine

    2018-05-01

    Organic dust is associated with Equine asthma. Ionization should reduce airborne dust levels. To determine the effect of ionization of air, type of bedding, and feed on the levels of airborne dust, endotoxin, and fungal colonies in horse stables. 24 healthy University-owned horses occupied the stables. A randomized controlled cross-over study. Four units with 6 stables were equipped with an ionization installation (25 VA, 5000 Volt Direct Current). Horses were kept either on wood shavings and fed haylage (2 units), or on straw and fed dry hay (2 units). Measurements were performed with and without activated ionization, during daytime and nighttime, repeatedly over the course of a week and repeatedly during 4-6 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using a mixed effect model with Akaike's Information Criterion for model reduction and 95% profile (log) likelihood confidence intervals (CI). Ionization did not alter concentrations of dust, endotoxin, or fungi, fewer. In the units with straw and hay, the concentration of dust, endotoxin, and fungi (difference in logarithmic mean 1.92 (95%CI 1.71-2.12); 2.86 (95%CI 2.59-3.14); 1.75 (95%CI 1.13-2.36)) were significantly higher compared to wood shavings and haylage. The installation of a negative air-ionizer in the horse stable did not reduce concentrations of dust, endotoxin, and viable fungal spores. The substantial effect of low dust bedding and feed is confirmed. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  2. Modeling the effect of deep impurity ionization on GaAs photoconductive switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, J.H.; Khanaka, G.H.; Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization coefficient of deep traps in GaAs is determined from a gas breakdown model together with the recent experimental data obtained at LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and Boeing. Using this coefficient in our nonlinear device transport code, we have investigated theoretically the nonlinear switching phenomena in GaAs devices. The results obtained from our investigations show that if we take into consideration the effect of the field ionization of the deep traps, we can show how the Lock-On'' phenomena could occur in the device.

  3. Modeling the effect of deep impurity ionization on GaAs photoconductive switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, J.H.; Khanaka, G.H.; Druce, R.L.; Pocha, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization coefficient of deep traps in GaAs is determined from a gas breakdown model together with the recent experimental data obtained at LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and Boeing. Using this coefficient in our nonlinear device transport code, we have investigated theoretically the nonlinear switching phenomena in GaAs devices. The results obtained from our investigations show that if we take into consideration the effect of the field ionization of the deep traps, we can show how the ``Lock-On`` phenomena could occur in the device.

  4. Effects of autoionizing states on two-photon double ionization of the H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Schneider, Barry I; Koesterke, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Treating the effects of autoionizing intermediate states on two-photon double ionization (DI) of the H 2 molecule using time-dependent laser pulses is a significant computational challenge. Relatively long exposure times are critical to understanding the dynamics. Using the fixed-nuclei approximation, we demonstrate how the doubly excited states enhance the angle-integrated generalized cross sections in H 2 , and how they affect the angular distribution pattern of the ejected electrons. As the energy approaches the threshold for sequential DI, there is a sharp rise in the cross section due to virtual sequential ionization

  5. Effect of ''pasteurizing'' doses of ionizing radiations on drug sensitivity of microbes isolated at pharmacentical factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, E.P.; Shcheglova, S.G.; Sedov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiations on drug sensitivity of microorganisms has been investigated, particularly, the influence of pasteurizing'' doses of ionizing radia''ons on the drug sensitivity of microorganisms isolated at a Moscow pharmaceutical factory to a number of widely used antibiotics. 250 krad single irradiation of dry microbial culture resulted in a change of the antibiotic sensitivity in 0.5% of 686 strains studied. All changes were toward the appearance of sensitivity to one or several antibiotics. When cultures were irradiated 3 times, this value increased up to 9%. In no case the appearance of resistance to antibiotics was observed

  6. Numerical simulation of the ionization effects of low- and high-altitude nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhengyu; Wang Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Low-altitude and high-altitude nuclear explosions are sources of intensive additional ionization in ionosphere. In this paper, in terms of the ionization equilibrium equation system and the equation of energy deposition of radiation in atmosphere, and considering the influence of atmosphere, the temporal and spatial distribution of ionization effects caused by atmospheric nuclear detonation are investigated. The calculated results show that the maximum of additional free electron density produced by low-altitude nuclear explosion is greater than that by the high-altitude nuclear burst. As to the influence of instant nuclear radiation, there is obvious difference between the low-altitude and the high-altitude explosions. The influence range and the continuance time caused by delayed nuclear radiation is less for the low-altitude nuclear detonation than that for the high-altitude one. (authors)

  7. Interference effects in double ionization of spatially aligned hydrogen molecules by fast highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landers, A.L.; Alnaser, A.S.; Tanis, J.A.; Wells, E.; Osipov, T.; Carnes, K.D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C.L.; McGuire, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Cross sections differential in target orientation angle were measured for 19 MeV F 8+ +D 2 collisions. Multihit position-sensitive detectors were used to isolate the double-ionization channel and determine a posteriori the full momentum vectors of both ejected D + fragments. A strong dependence of the double ionization cross section on the angle between the incident ion direction and the target molecular axis is observed with a ≅3.5:1 enhancement for molecules aligned perpendicular to the projectile axis. This clear asymmetry is attributed to interference effects, analogous to Young's two-slit experiment, arising from coherent contributions to the ionization from both atomic centers. The data are compared to a simple scattering model based on two center interference

  8. Theory of tunneling ionization of molecules: Weak-field asymptotics including dipole effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of the parabolic adiabatic expansion approach to the problem of ionization of atomic systems in a static electric field, originally developed for the axially symmetric case [ Phys. Rev. A 82 023416 (2010)], is generalized to arbitrary potentials. This approach is used to rederive...... the asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization in the weak-field limit. In the atomic case, the resulting formulas for the ionization rate coincide with previously known results. In addition, the present theory accounts for the possible existence of a permanent dipole moment of the unperturbed system and, hence......, applies to polar molecules. Accounting for dipole effects constitutes an important difference of the present theory from the so-called molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory. The theory is illustrated by comparing exact and asymptotic results for a set of model polar molecules and a realistic molecular...

  9. Effect of pH and dissociation on the fate and exposure of ionizable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Ionizable organic chemicals comprise an important fraction of pharmaceuticals, pesticides as well as industrial chemicals. It has been estimated that 33% of the preregistered REACH substances is mostly ionized at pH 7. To extend the appliccability of existing exposure models, a Multimedia Activity...... parameters. The sensitivity analysis showed that the parameters describing ionization, pH and the dissociation constant (pKa), are among the most sensitive model parameters. The uncertainty analysis, however, indicated that these parameters are not the major source of uncertainty, which statistically...... and sediments. In most cases, the uncertainty of PECs and of persistance is largely explained by the uncertainty of (bio)degradation rates, which may be caused by model assumptions, experimental or estimation errors or by the environmental variability, including the effect of pH....

  10. Chemical effects and their consequences for individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, C.; Kahl, G.G.; Kühn, P.; Zottis, A.D.; Flôr, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    By legal determination, workers exposed to ionizing radiation should use individual dosimeters in the most exposed region of the body, designed to estimate the effective dose, as well as radiation protective clothing to minimize occupational exposures. Regarding dosimetry, in most cases it is perceived that the monthly values of exposure are within the limits of normality, however, even being below the limit can not rule out the possibility of damage that the low dose of ionizing radiation can cause. The objective of this article is to highlight the main chemical effects caused by exposure to ionizing radiation, especially biochemical damage in DNA, chromosomal aberrations and the correlation with the exposure of occupationally exposed individuals, as well as individuals from the public. A bibliographic search was carried out in indexed databases from February to April 2017 with the following descriptors: Radiation Ionizing, DNA Damage and Occupational Exposure. In the 'Science Direct' database were found 1205 articles, in the 'Scopus' 19 articles, in the 'Web of Science' 83 articles, in the 'PubMed' 22 articles and in the 'VHL' 60 articles related to the theme. It was concluded that exposure to ionizing radiation can affect the DNA molecule despite its repair mechanisms, which may result in genotoxicity. It has been reported a correlation between occupationally exposed individuals and chromosomal aberrations, demonstrating that even low doses of ionizing radiation can compromise the genetic material integrity of exposed workers, leading to the need for a periodic cytogenetic study for this group of workers

  11. Acceleration of electrons and supplementary ionization during parametrical plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grach, S.M.; Mityakov, N.A.; Trakhtengerts, V.Yu.; AN SSSR, Gor'kij. Inst. Prikladnoj Fiziki)

    1986-01-01

    Acceleration of electrons by plasma waves in partially ionized plasma is considered with provision for the effects of turbulent scattering and formation of secondary electrons, which are produced in the process of electron shock ionization. It is shown that the avalanche density growth of electrons accelerated up to 1-2 ionization potential (instability) takes place beginning from some critical density of plasma waves. Density of fast electrons is found out along with plasma wave energy density at the stage of instability saturation. Additional concentration of a background plasma, which manifests itself due to ionization, is evaluated

  12. Microbial exopolysaccharides: Effect on corrosion and partial chemical characterization

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majumdar, I; DeSouza, F.P.; Bhosle, N.B.

    gas chromatograph MICROBIAL EXOPOLYSACCHARIDES 543 Fig. I. Changes in the biofilm organic carbon (a) and EPS (b) associated with corrosion products and corrosion rate (c) of mild steel. Fig. 2. Linear correlation coeffiient (r) between EPS and organic... carbon (a), corrosion rate and organic carbon (b). and corrosion rate and EPS (c). (Chrompack model CP-9002) equipped with a fused silica capillary column coated with CP Sil-88 (25 m, i.d. = 0.32 mm) and flame ionization detector (FID) was used...

  13. Ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C. A.; Grigoryev, Y. G.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of ionizing radiation encountered in space are considered. Biological experiments conducted in space and some experiences of astronauts during space flight are described. The effects of various levels of radiation exposure and the determination of permissible dosages are discussed.

  14. Influence of γ ionizing radiation on anti-oxidative effect of vegetables polyphenolic parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuyck, S.; Connaulte, J.; Lesgards, G.; Prost, M.; Raffi, J.

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of vegetables is a cleaning up and preservation physical treatment which consists in submitting them to γ radiation, X radiation or electrons beam. This study deals with the influence of γ radiation on anti-oxidative effect of vegetables polyphenolic parts. In that purpose, we use a simple biological test based on erythrocytes hemolysis. (authors)

  15. Mercury, phthalates, and ionizing radiations in neonatal intensive care controls. Adverse effects and preventive measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, Mercedes; Somaruga, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Studies realized by important institutions in the world have demonstrated that the load of illnesses associated with environmental and occupational conditions are affected by the current generation, especially to the most vulnerable populations as are the newborn babies. In the present work, the effects of the mercury, the phthalates and the ionizing radiations on the neonates health are described [es

  16. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that t he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... . In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved

  17. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  18. Effect of ionizing radiation on solid and water solution Penicillin G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salem, I.; Amine, Kh.M.; Mabrouk, Y.; Saidi, M.; Mezni, M; Boulila, N; Hafez, E

    2015-01-01

    Penicillin G is a conventional antibiotic used for treatment of different kinds of infectious diseases. Due to its huge quantity production and resistance to biodegradability, this molecule has been a serious concern for clinicians and environmentalists. In this study, the effect of ionizing radiation on the penicillin G powder and in water solution was investigated. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis showed that the ionizing radiation at 50 kGy has no effect on the integrity of solid Penicillin G. The anti-microbial assays revealed that the activity of irradiated solid Penicillin G did not reduce and was stable after storage for one month. Ionizing radiation at 50 kGy led to degradation of water solution Penicillin G. The complete disappear of peaks observed in the control sample confirmed the broken of β-lactam ring, the decarboxylation and cleavage of the thiazolidine ring. The product issued from the irradiation of Penicillin G, was completely removed by the bacterium Cupriavidus.metallidurans. Thus, the ionizing irradiation followed by a biological treatment was very effective method for removing of Penicillin G antibiotics residuals from water solution.

  19. Minimizing matrix effect by femtosecond laser ablation and ionization in elemental determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bochao; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2013-05-07

    Matrix effect is unavoidable in direct solid analysis, which usually is a leading cause of the nonstoichiometric effect in quantitative analysis. In this research, experiments were carried out to study the overall characteristics of atomization and ionization in laser-solid interaction. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) lasers were applied in a buffer-gas-assisted ionization source coupled with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twenty-nine solid standards of ten different matrices, including six metals and four dielectrics, were analyzed. The results indicate that the fs-laser mode offers more stable relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) with irradiance higher than 7 × 10(13) W·cm(-2), which could be more reliable in the determination of element composition of solids. The matrix effect is reduced by half when the fs-laser is employed, owing to the fact that the fs-laser ablation and ionization (fs-LAI) incurs an almost heat-free ablation process and creates a dense plasma for the stable ionization.

  20. Partial Molar Volume of Methanol in Water: Effect of Polarizability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2009), s. 559-563 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : water–methanol mixtures * partial molar volume * polarizability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  1. Effects of quenching and partial quenching on penguin matrix elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golterman, Maarten; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2001-01-01

    In the calculation of non-leptonic weak decay rates, a "mismatch" arises when the QCD evolution of the relevant weak hamiltonian down to hadronic scales is performed in unquenched QCD, but the hadronic matrix elements are then computed in (partially) quenched lattice QCD. This mismatch arises

  2. The effect of extreme ionization rates during the initial collapse of a molecular cloud core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R.; Price, Daniel J.

    2018-05-01

    What cosmic ray ionization rate is required such that a non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of a collapsing molecular cloud will follow the same evolutionary path as an ideal MHD simulation or as a purely hydrodynamics simulation? To investigate this question, we perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal MHD simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating, one solar mass, magnetized molecular cloud cores, which include Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. We assume a uniform grain size of ag = 0.1 μm, and our free parameter is the cosmic ray ionization rate, ζcr. We evolve our models, where possible, until they have produced a first hydrostatic core. Models with ζcr ≳ 10-13 s-1 are indistinguishable from ideal MHD models, and the evolution of the model with ζcr = 10-14 s-1 matches the evolution of the ideal MHD model within 1 per cent when considering maximum density, magnetic energy, and maximum magnetic field strength as a function of time; these results are independent of ag. Models with very low ionization rates (ζcr ≲ 10-24 s-1) are required to approach hydrodynamical collapse, and even lower ionization rates may be required for larger ag. Thus, it is possible to reproduce ideal MHD and purely hydrodynamical collapses using non-ideal MHD given an appropriate cosmic ray ionization rate. However, realistic cosmic ray ionization rates approach neither limit; thus, non-ideal MHD cannot be neglected in star formation simulations.

  3. Zebrafish as an In Vivo Model to Assess Epigenetic Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Yi Kong; Shuk Han Cheng; Kwan Ngok Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiations (IRs) is ubiquitous in our environment and can be categorized into ?targeted? effects and ?non-targeted? effects. In addition to inducing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, IR exposure leads to epigenetic alterations that do not alter DNA sequence. Using an appropriate model to study the biological effects of radiation is crucial to better understand IR responses as well as to develop new strategies to alleviate exposure to IR. Zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a sci...

  4. Heath effects and medical application of non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusslin, F.; Van Deventer, E.; Shannoun, F.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term effects (Cancer) Childhood leukemia ELF magnetic fields classified as Group 2B Possibly Carcinogenic based on limited human data (epidemiologic studies) of childhood leukemia and inadequate animal data Other exposures and outcomes considered inadequate to classify IARC Monograph (vol. 80, 2002) WHO EHC Monograph (vol. 238, 2007) Breast cancer The evidence has been weakened considerably and does not support an association Adult brain cancer and leukaemia. Short-term effects Established biological effects from acute exposure at high levels (well above 100 µT) that are explained by recognized biophysical mechanisms Consistent epidemiological evidence suggests that an increased risk for childhood leukaemia is associated with chronic low intensity ELF magnetic field exposure However, the evidence for a causal association is weak and the impact on public health uncertain.Thermal effects Radiofrequency waves can cause tissue heating, so-called thermal effects Heating >1oC activates physiological processes, which can influence activity of the nervous system, influence fertility, fetal development, cause cataracts All established health effects of RF exposure are clearly related to heating Non-thermal effects (?)While RF energy can interact with body tissues at levels too low to cause any significant heating, no study has shown adverse health effects at exposure levels below international guideline limits

  5. Effect of Ionizing Beta Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of Poly(ethylene under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarik Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found in this study, that ionizing beta radiation has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of poly(ethylene. In recent years, there have been increasing requirements for quality and cost effectiveness of manufactured products in all areas of industrial production. These requirements are best met with the polymeric materials, which have many advantages in comparison to traditional materials. The main advantages of polymer materials are especially in their ease of processability, availability, and price of the raw materials. Radiation crosslinking is one of the ways to give the conventional plastics mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of expensive and highly resistant construction polymers. Several types of ionizing radiation are used for crosslinking of polymers. Each of them has special characteristics. Electron beta and photon gamma radiation are used the most frequently. The great advantage is that the crosslinking occurs after the manufacturing process at normal temperature and pressure. The main purpose of this paper has been to determine the effect of ionizing beta radiation on the tensile modulus, strength and elongation of low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 99 kGy were compared and on the test temperature. Radiation cross-linking of LDPE and HDPE results in increased tensile strength and modulus, and decreased of elongation. The measured results indicate that ionizing beta radiation treatment is effective tool for improvement of mechanical properties of LDPE and HDPE under thermal stress.

  6. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  7. Stimulatory effects of low ionizing radiation on plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, S.; Kurisu, Y.; Murata, I.; Takahashi, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Masui, H.; Iida, T. [Department of Electronic, Information Systems and Energy Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis was strongly carried out for animals and plants; subharmful dose of radiation may stimulate any organism. The concept of radiation hormesis effect consists of 1) biopositive effects of low dose radiation; influence caused by low dose radiation is totally different from one caused by high dose radiation, low dose radiation produces physiological useful effects against high dose radiation, and 2) radio-adaptive response; radiation also acts the organism as stress. Irradiated with small dose radiation previously, it raises its own defense response against the stress (radiation), resulting in the phenomenon that radiation influence decreases in appearance. In this paper we have investigated the phenomenon of radiation hormesis effects for plants through irradiation experiments with neutrons and gamma-rays to find out the mechanism. In the present experiment, dry seeds of Raphanus sativus were irradiated with D-T neutrons (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 100 kGy), D-D neutrons (1 mGy {approx} 100 mGy), thermal and fast neutrons (irradiation in a nuclear reactor: 100 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy), 60Co gamma-rays (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy). To confirm existence of the radiation hormesis effects, germination percentage, length of hypocotyl, length of root and total weight of seed leaf were measured at 7th day after starting cultivation. We estimated relative effectiveness as the hormesis effect, that is the ratio of mean values of measured subjects for the irradiated and control groups. For Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effect on seed leaf growth has been observed in the seed group irradiated by D-T neutrons and D-D neutrons. The observed hormesis effect is from 5 to 25 percents. (author)

  8. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C D; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-22

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF THE HUMIDITY EFFECT ON THE FAC-IR-300 IONIZATION CHAMBER RESPONSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyed Mostafa; Tavakoli-Anbaran, Hossein

    2018-02-01

    The free-air ionization chamber is communicating with the ambient air, therefore, the atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure and humidity effect on the ionization chamber performance. The free-air ionization chamber, entitled as FAC-IR-300, that design at the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, AEOI, is required the atmospheric correction factors for correct the chamber reading. In this article, the effect of humidity on the ionization chamber response was investigated. For this reason, was introduced the humidity correction factor, kh. In this article, the Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the kh factor. The simulation results show in relative humidities between 30% to 80%, the kh factor is equal 0.9970 at 20°C and 0.9975 at 22°C. From the simulation results, at low energy the energy dependence of the kh factor is significant and with increasing energy this dependence is negligible. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Specific Effects of Ionizing Energy on the Displacement Damage Calculation in Insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, R.; Mota, F.; Ortiz, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The level of damage expected in functional materials for future fusion reactors is generally much lower than structural materials, but the degradation of their physical properties is also generally observed at very low dose levels compared to the latter. Normally the properties of interest (DC Electrical resistivity, HF dielectric absorption, optical transmission etc.) degrade long before mechanical integrity is an issue. This weakness is in part related to the more important effects of ionizing energy on both, covalent and ionic, insulators or semiconductors. As irradiation in fission and fusion reactors (even spallation sources) also involves the participation of gamma radiation, it has to be taken into account for total damage calculation. In the case of ions, the energy partition provides the amount of electronic (ionizing) energy lost in the material. In general and regarding radiation, insulating materials can be divided in two groups depending on whether they experience radiolysis, (i.e. purely ionizing radiation can produce noticeable amounts of atomic displacements) or not. First group includes for example alkali halides and fluorides. But, although radiolysis is negligible in the second group (radiation-hard materials), collateral effects of ionizing radiation have been observed (when combined with displacement damage). Therefore it is important to make some comments about the concept and use of dpa (displacements per atom) in this large family of materials

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation on Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum (Solanaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaldaferro, M.A.; Prina, A.R.; Moscone, E.A.; Kwasniewska, J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic and somatic effects of various x-ray treatments were evaluated in pepper, Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum cv. “Cayenne”, with the aim to assess optimal conditions for obtaining viable lines. The cytogenetic effects were quantified by counting chromosome aberrations. The level of DNA fragmentation was estimated with TUNEL test (terminal transferase mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling). Irradiation to 20 Gy with 16-h presoaking can be a suitable treatment of the selected pepper cultivar for a mutagenesis program. - Highlights: • Cytogenetic and somatic effects of x-rays treatments in Capsicum were evaluated. • Frequencies of chromosome aberrations correlated with radiation doses. • Highest frequency of chromosome aberrations occurred with 20 Gy+soaking seeds. • In TUNEL test, the nuclei with DNA fragmentation were higher than in the control. • The strongest effects were observed with doses of 300 Gy or 20 Gy after soaking

  12. Radiotherapy and antitumor immunity. An immunomodifying effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimovich, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    It has been found that a tumor is formed and spread under the influence of opposite but not mutually exlusive immune reactions. Radiation effect along with direct injury of tumoral cells and feeding neoplasms vessels changes the established equilibrium of immunologic factors, therefore it should be considered as immunomodifying one. The wide spread opinion according to which the therapeutic effect in case of radiotherapy is attained despite its depressive effect on immunity, should be revised as not corresponding to the facts. The data available allow one to assume that immunologic factors may play an essential role in realization of therapeutic effect of irradiation as well as in limitation of its efficiency. Investigations into immunologic aspects of oncology and radiology should be therefore directed to the search of methods of control of immune reactions of organism - the tumor bearer. This may discover considerable reserves of increasing radiotherapeutic efficiency

  13. The effects of ionizing radiations on in utero development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lallemand, J.

    1984-01-01

    Following a reminder of embryology and methodology, a review is made of the main teratogenic effects related to radiation exposure, i.e. lethal effects, radioinduced malformations, maldevelopment and cancers. The sensitivity of the embryo and foetus to radiation seems to last during the whole gestation. Howewer, the latest investigations indicate that the main damage is mental retardation. This review concludes on practical considerations of radiation protection in the field of radiographic examinations of pregnant women [fr

  14. Epidemiological studies on the effects of low-level ionizing radiation on cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    2010-01-01

    The health effects of low-level ionizing radiation are yet unclear. As pointed out by Upton in his review (Upton, 1989), low-level ionizing radiation seems to have different biological effects from what high-level radiation has. If so, the hazard identification of ionizing radiation should he conducted separately for low- and high-level ionizing radiation; the hazard identification of low-level radiation is yet to be completed. What makes hazard identification of ionizing radiation difficult, particularly in the case of carcinogenic effect, is the difficulty in distinguishing radiation-induced cancer from other cancers with respect to clinicopathological features and molecular biological characteristics. Actually, it is suspected that radiation-induced carcinogenesis involves mechanisms not specific for radiation, such as oxidative stress. Excess risk per dose in medium-high dose ranges can be extrapolated to a low-dose range if dose-response can be described by the linear-non-threshold model. The cancer risk data of atomic-bomb survivors describes leukemia risk with a linear-quadratic (LQ) model and solid-cancer risk with linear non-threshold (LNT) model. The LQ model for leukemia and the LNT model for solid cancer correspond to the two-hit model and the one-hit model, respectively. Although the one-hit model is an unlikely dose-response for carcinogenesis, there is no convincing epidemiological evidence supporting the LQ model or non-threshold model for solid cancer. It should be pointed out, however, even if the true dose response is non-linear various noises involved in epidemiological data may mask the truth. In this paper, the potential contribution of epidemiological studies on nuclear workers and residents in high background radiation areas will be discussed. (author)

  15. Resolving the controversy over beneficial effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    In spite of the extensive research carried out during the past century, intense controversy continues over the health effects of low-level radiation. This controversy is largely due to political, social and economic issues among scientists and analysts in a variety of disciplines. These issues cloud objectivity and strengthen paradigms. Over the past ten years, in 14 universities and two research institutes, Japanese scientists have conducted exceptional research which clearly demonstrates beneficial effects of low-level radiation and cancer cures following therapy with low doses of radiation. Assessment, replication and extension of this work in North America could lead to greater appreciation of its significance. Cancer patients would demand such treatments, leading to universal acceptance of these bio-positive effects and reducing public fear of nuclear technology. (author)

  16. Bio-effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in context of cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliev, Timur; Tachibana, Katsuro; Bulanin, Denis; Mikhalovsky, Sergey; Whitby, Ray D L

    2014-01-01

    Bio-effects mediated by non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMF) have become a hot topic of research in the last decades. This interest has been triggered by a growing public concern about the rapid expansion of telecommunication devices and possible consequences of their use on human health. Despite a feasibility study of potential negative impacts, the therapeutic advantages of EMF could be effectively harnessed for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This review aims to examine recent findings relating to the mechanisms of action underlying the bio-effects induced by non-ionizing EMF. The potential of non-thermal and thermal effects is discussed in the context of possible applications for the induction of apoptosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, and increase of membrane permeability in malignant cells. A special emphasis has been put on the combination of EMF with magnetic nano-particles and ultrasound for cancer treatment. The review encompasses both human and animal studies.

  17. Effect of complete and partial removable dentures on chewing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, T M S V; Vilanova, L S R; Gonçalves, L M; Rodrigues Garcia, R C M

    2014-03-01

    Partial or complete edentulism impairs mastication. However, it is unclear how the chewing cycle is affected by prosthetics. We evaluated the chewing movements of patients fitted with complete (CD) or removable partial denture (RPD). A total of 29 subjects were kinesiographically evaluated during chewing of peanuts and Optocal portions in a random sequence. The subjects were divided into two groups according to prosthesis type. Group RPD was composed of 14 partially edentulous patients using a lower distal extension RPD (mean age 61 ± 8 years), and group CD contained 15 completely edentulous patients using CD (mean age 65·9 ± 7·9 years) in both jaws. Opening, closing, occlusal and masticatory cycle times, movement angle (opening and closing), maximum velocity (opening and closing), total area and chewing cycle amplitudes were evaluated. The results were subjected to anova and Tukey's HSD test at a significance level of 5%. The RPD group exhibited shorter opening and closing phases and masticatory cycle time (P chewing envelope was smaller in the CD group (P chewing cycles in any of the parameters evaluated (P > 0·05). RPD wearers use a faster chewing sequence with greater vertical and lateral jaw excursions compared with CD wearers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    OpenAIRE

    M?ller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null...

  19. Effect of Ionizing Radiation on Luminous Bacteria Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryasheva, N.; Rozhko, T.; Alexandrova, M.; Vasyunkina, E.; Arkhipova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Marine luminous bacteria were used to monitor toxicity of alpha- (Am-241, U-235+238) and beta- (tritium) radionuclide solutions. Increase or inhibition of bacterial luminescence was observed under exposure to radionuclides. Radiation toxicity of Am and chemical toxicity of U were demonstrated. Effects of U were similar to those of stable heavy metals: sensitivity was about 10-5 M. Sensitivity of the bacteria to Am-241 was 300 Bq/L (10 -11 M). Inhibition of bacterial growth was observed under exposure to Am-241 and tritium. Role of peroxides and electron transfer processes in the effects of radionuclides on luminous bacteria is discussed.

  20. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: characteristics of ionizing radiations; biological effects; comparison of radiation and other industrial risks; principles of protection; cost-benefit analysis; dose limits; the control and monitoring of radiation; reference levels; emergency reference levels. (U.K.)

  1. The effect of ionizing radiation on immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyuleva, I.

    1999-01-01

    Delayed radiation effects of irradiation at relatively high doses - 0.52- 2 Gy in result of severe accidents are discussed. The immune response of lymphocyte populations manifested in formation of different kind of mutant cells at Hiroshima-A-bombing and Chernobyl accident are presented. It is of great interest the hypothesis presented launched by RERF (Japanese Foundation for Radiation Effect Research, Hiroshima) for radiation induced predominant of T H2 -lymphocytes in comparison to T H1 as delayed immune response at the Hiroshima-A-bomb survivors. The aspect of immune status is quite different at low doses irradiation (0.02 - 0.2 Gy). There is some stimulation in immune response known as hormesis effect. It is suggested that T-cell activation has key role in immune system stimulation at doses under 0.2 Gy. There is also activation of DNA-reparation mechanisms. Suppression of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-suprarenal axis brings to enhancing of immune potential. Chinese people living in a region with three-times higher background radiation, X-ray examined patients as well as occupationally exposed personnel have been investigated. Radioprotective effect of some cytokines and their influence on the individual radiosensitivity are also discussed.The investigations have to be continued because of some inconsistent results

  2. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-01-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed

  3. Progress on Beam-Plasma Effect Simulations in Muon Ionization Cooling Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, James [IIT, Chicago; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    New computational tools are essential for accurate modeling and simulation of the next generation of muon-based accelerators. One of the crucial physics processes specific to muon accelerators that has not yet been simulated in detail is beam-induced plasma effect in liquid, solid, and gaseous absorbers. We report here on the progress of developing the required simulation tools and applying them to study the properties of plasma and its effects on the beam in muon ionization cooling channels.

  4. Effect of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse Peyer's patches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    The relationship of time-effect and dose-effect of apoptosis in mouse Peyer's patches after whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays was studied by the method of TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). The results showed that the number of TUNEL positive cells in mouse Peyer's patches were significantly increased following WBI with 2 Gy irradiation, While the number of TUNEL positive cells were decreased after WBI with doses of 0.05 Gy and 0.075 Gy X-rays. the results support the view that 2 Gy irradiation promote the apoptosis of immune cells and the low doses of radiation suppress the apoptosis of immune cells

  5. Long term effects of ionizing radiation on mouse spermatogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker-Klom, U.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of acute or split dose exposure to radiation on murine stem cell spermatogonia were analysed. Flow cytometry was applied to estimate the percentages of haploid germ cells (round and elongated spermatids) up to 12 months after irradiation. The recovery in the number of haploid germ cells continued gradually during the period under observation. The intervals between the two equal doses in split dose exposures were 0, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours. Split doses that were 24 h or 48 h apart had more harmful effects on spermatogenesis than split doses with 4 or 8 hours intervals or acute exposures. The repair capacity of the stem cell spermatogonia was remarkably high. (orig.)

  6. Studying the Effect of Ionization Radiation of 60Co on the Spirulina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuang-Sheng; Ai, Weidang; Dong, Wen-Ping; Qin, Li-Feng; Tang, Yong-Kang

    It studied the effect of ionization radiation on the Spirulina plastensis(No.6) by using the γ-rays of 60 Co. In the experiment, Spirulina were irradiated, and the dose of the ionization radiation covered 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0kGy. After irradiating, these Spirulina were cultured under the same conditions. During the course of the experiment, the growth rate, photosynthetic efficiency and nutrition quality of the Spirulina, were analyzed. From the results, low dose of γ-rays (less than 1.5kGy) could improve the content of phycobilin and protein of Spirulina. Only small changes in the morphology of algae filament were found at dose less than 1.0kGy. But with the increase of the dose of γ-rays (more than 1.5kGy), the filaments would break up or even disintegrate. Spirulina had stronger ionization radiation proof and self-rehabilitation capacity, but the growth of Spirulina was stagnated. The LD50 (i.e. the dose resulted in 50% death of the Spirulina) of the colony was 2.0kGy. Considering the capacity of being resistant to γ-rays irradiation, Spirulina can be considered as one of the key biological components in the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) for future long-term space missions. Keywords: Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS); Spirulina; ionization radiation; biological component

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on salamander orientation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoop, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Pens were stocked with larvae of Am, bystoma opacum, A. maculatum, and Rana sylvatica and observations were made on survivorship, metamorphosis, size of juveniles, length of larval period, and migration. Migrating adults were irradiated with a 137 Cs source; the control and experimental animals were then returned to their points of capture and released. Radiation effects were not evident. Studies were conducted on the uptake and turnover of sodium, praseodymium, and europium by larval and hatchling amphibians and reptiles

  8. Biological and sanitary effects of non ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugere, H.; Hours, M.; Seze, R. de; Bernier, M.; Letertre, Th.; Aurengo, A.; Burais, N.; Bedja, M.; Merckel, O.; Decat, G.; Lagroye, I.; Perrin, A.; Poulletier de Gannes, F.; Aurengo, A.; Souques, M.; Cesarini, J.P.; Lagroye, I.; Aurengo, A.; Cesarini, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this day was to encourage the collaborations, especially multidisciplinary, on the biological, clinical, epidemiological and dosimetry aspects. The different presentations are as follow: the magneto reception among animals; the health and radio frequencies foundation; expo-metry to radio frequency fields: dosemeters evaluation; the electro-optical probes as tool of hyper frequency dosimetry; characterisation of emissions produced by the low consumption fluo-compact lamps in the perspective of persons exposure; strong and weak points of epidemiology; numerical dosimetry in low frequency magnetic and/or electric field; exposure of the French population to the 50 Hz magnetic field: first results for the Ile-de-france and Rhone alpes areas; characterisation of the exposure to the very low frequency magnetic fields in the town of Champlan; measurement of the residential exposure of children to the extremely low frequency, very low frequency and radiofrequency (E.L.F., V.L.F. and R.F.) fields and modeling of the high voltage magnetic field face to the child leukemia; effects of radiofrequency signals of wireless communications on the young animals; study of combined effects of 2.45 GHz microwaves and a known mutagen on DNA by two different approaches; effects on the oxidizing stress of nervous cells exposure to an (enhanced data rates for GSM evolution) E.D.G.E. signal; is environmental epidemiology still a science; cardiac implants and exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields in occupational environment; the tanning by artificial UV radiation: norms and legislation; mobiles phones, Wi Fi and other wireless communications; effects on health of 50-60 Hz electromagnetic fields; natural and artificial ultraviolet radiations: a proved risk. (N.C.)

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation and the molecular and cellular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This symposium with its 60 contributions presents a survey of the current state of the art in molecular radiation biophysics and radiobiology in the FRG. Many contributions show the trend of applying findings in these fields to cancer research. The various sessions have been devoted to: 1) Radiation chemistry of biomolecules; 2) DNA damage and repair; 3) Repair of DNA damage; 4) Cell proliferation and cell inactivation; 5) Cancerogenesis, mutation and chromosomal damage; 6) Effects of heavy ions. (AJ) [de

  10. Ionizing radiation effects in Brazilian grape tree wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, Marcia N.C.; Gutierrez, Érika M.R.; Arthur, Valter; Silva, Lúcia C.A.S.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to irradiate brazilian grape tree wines with gamma radiation (Co 60 ) to investigate the effect of radiation on its components and to create a new product for the superior quality fermented beverages market. For this wine was produced in an artisan way, but with all the care of hygiene and sanitation. The brazilian grape tree was fermented for five days and the wine was then filtered and stored in inert material containers then irradiated at 2.5 and 5 kGy doses. The samples were evaluated in relation to the radiation doses used. Physical and chemical analyzes of pH; total and volatile acidity; alcohol content; anthocyanins; tannins and colorimetry were performed. As a result, in most product analysis, had little effect on irradiation, except for anthocyanins and tannins. For this can be concluded that it is possible to develop a new fermented drink based on brazilian grape tree, according to the standards required by the legislation and that the irradiation at the dose of 5kGy was the sample that shown to have the most effect on the color because it was the one that degraded most molecules of anthocyanins and tannins. (author)

  11. Ionizing radiation effects in Brazilian grape tree wine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, Marcia N.C.; Gutierrez, Érika M.R., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br, E-mail: emrgutierrez@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Piracicaba (FATEC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Curso de Tecnologia em Alimentos. Dep. Roque Trevisan; Pires, Juliana A., E-mail: juliana.angelo@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Silva, Lúcia C.A.S., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br, E-mail: lcasilva@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work was to irradiate brazilian grape tree wines with gamma radiation (Co{sup 60}) to investigate the effect of radiation on its components and to create a new product for the superior quality fermented beverages market. For this wine was produced in an artisan way, but with all the care of hygiene and sanitation. The brazilian grape tree was fermented for five days and the wine was then filtered and stored in inert material containers then irradiated at 2.5 and 5 kGy doses. The samples were evaluated in relation to the radiation doses used. Physical and chemical analyzes of pH; total and volatile acidity; alcohol content; anthocyanins; tannins and colorimetry were performed. As a result, in most product analysis, had little effect on irradiation, except for anthocyanins and tannins. For this can be concluded that it is possible to develop a new fermented drink based on brazilian grape tree, according to the standards required by the legislation and that the irradiation at the dose of 5kGy was the sample that shown to have the most effect on the color because it was the one that degraded most molecules of anthocyanins and tannins. (author)

  12. Biological effects of radiation and health risks from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotian, Rahul P.; Kotian, Sahana Rahul; Sukumar, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    The very fact that ionizing radiation produces biological effects is known from many years. The first case of injury reported by Sir Roentgen was reported just after a few months after discovery of X-rays in 1895. As early as 1902, the first case of X-ray induced cancer was reported in the literature. Early human evidence of harmful effects as a result of exposure to radiation in large amounts existed in the 1920s and 1930s, based upon the experience of early radiologists, miners exposed to airborne radioactivity underground, persons working in the radium industry, and other special occupational groups. The long-term biological significance of smaller, repeated doses of radiation, however, was not widely appreciated until relatively recently, and most of our knowledge of the biological effects of radiation has been accumulated since World War II. The mechanisms that lead to adverse health effects after exposure to ionizing radiation are still not fully understood. Ionizing radiation has sufficient energy to change the structure of molecules, including DNA, within the cells of the body. Some of these molecular changes are so complex that it may be difficult for the body's repair mechanisms to mend them correctly. However, the evidence is that only a small fraction of such changes would be expected to result in cancer or other health effects. The most thoroughly studied individuals for the evaluation of health effects of ionizing radiation are the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings, a large population that includes all ages and both sexes.The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Japan has conducted followup studies on these survivors for more than 50 years. An important finding from these studies is that the occurrence of solid cancers increases in proportion to radiation dose. More than 60% of exposed survivors received a dose of radiation of less than 100 mSv (the definition of low dose used by the BEIR VII report). (author)

  13. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  14. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  15. Investigation of ionizing radiation effect on albumin aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizikov, A.M.; Adeeva, L.N.; Ogryzkova, I.F.

    1986-01-01

    Gamma radiation effect on 0.1-0.5%-albumin aqueous solutions has been investigated; variations of viscosity and optical density of solutions at pH medium different values and completeness of protein separation owing to radiation coagulation have been determined. It is shown that due to radiation coagulation it is possible to quantitatively separate albumin from irradiated aqueous solutions. The albumin coagulation is caused by OH radicals the action of which on albumin macromolecules results in destruction of intramolecular bonds and albumin conformation transformations

  16. The effect of ionizing radiation on analog characteristics of MOSFET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Diyuan; Yu Xuefeng; Lu Wu; Gao Wenyu; Fan Long; Zhang Guoqiang; Yan Rongliang

    1994-01-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ-ray on the linearity and output characteristics of MOSFETs were investigated. The relations of oxide-trapped charge and Si/SiO 2 interface state density to the decrease of mobility μ-bar and transconductance g m , and the shift of the output curves for both P-MOSFETs and N-MOSFETs were qualitatively described. It was shown that degradation of analog characteristics, for P-MOSFETs, resulted from both oxide-trapped charge and interface state, but the degradation for N-MOSFETs was mainly due to the increase of radiation induced Si-SiO 2 interface state density

  17. Anatomically guided voxel-based partial volume effect correction in brain PET : Impact of MRI segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Assal, Frederic; Allaoua, Mohamed; Ratib, Osman; Loevblad, Karl-Olof; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Partial volume effect is still considered one of the main limitations in brain PET imaging given the limited spatial resolution of current generation PET scanners. The accuracy of anatomically guided partial volume effect correction (PVC) algorithms in brain PET is largely dependent on the

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on nitric oxide myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarei, A.R.; Karel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Bovine nitric oxide myoglobin (NOMb) was irradiated with 40-4000 krad of γ-radiation, and the effects on the haem studied using absorption spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (e.s.r.) spectroscopy. The results show the following behaviour: (a) The bright red colour of NOMb changes to brown upon irradiation. This is similar to changes observed in radiation sterilized, nitrite-containing meats. (b) NOMb becomes progressively denitrosylated, with met-myoglobin (metMb) as the immediate product. (c) Upon increasing doses of radiation (up to 800 krad) at O 0 C parallel to NOMb denitrosylation, metMb is gradually converted, by water radiolytic products, to other products, believed to be ferromyoglobin and ferrimyoglobin peroxide. A minor quantity of 'choleglobin-type' pigments may also be formed at the highest doses. (d) Freezing of NOMb has a substantial protective effect against radiation. (e) Native bovine NOMb behaves as a pentaco-ordinate (hfs of 3 peaks with equal intensity); the bond between iron and Nsub(epsilon) is thus dramatically stretched and weakened. (f) Using a thermal energy analyser, no NO could be detected over irradiated NOMb solution, indicating rapid reaction of NO liberated from NOMb by radiation, with radiolytic products of water. (author)

  19. Effect on intelligence of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.; Otake, Masanori.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of intelligence test scores at 10 - 11 years of age of individuals exposed prenatally to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has revealed the following: 1) For those individuals exposed in the first eight weeks after fertilization or after the 25th week, there is no evidence of a radiation-related effect on intelligence; 2) The mean test scores but not the variances are significantly heterogeneous among exposure categories for individuals exposed at 8 - 15 weeks after fertilization, and to a lesser extent those exposed at 16 - 25 weeks; 3) The regression of intelligence score on estimated fetal tissue dose is linear or linear-quadratic for the 8 - 15 week group and possibly linear for the 16 - 25 week group; 4) The cumulative distributions of test scores suggest a progressive shift downwards in the scores with increasing exposure; and 5) Within the group most sensitive to the occurrence of clinically recognizable, severe mental retardation, individuals exposed 8 to 15 weeks after fertilization, the diminution in intelligence score under the linear-quadratic model is 21 - 27 points at 1 gray (Gy = 100 cGy = 100 rad). The effect is somewhat greater when the controls receiving less than 0.01 Gy are excluded, 33 - 41 points at 1 Gy; but the two estimates are not statistically significantly different. (author)

  20. Scientific projection paper on biologic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.

    1980-01-01

    There is widespread knowledge about the effects of radiation in human populations but the studies have had some limitations which have left gaps in our knowledge. Most populations have had exposure to high doses with little information on the effect of dose rate. The characteristics of the populations have been restricted by the location of the disaster, the occupational limitations, or the basic risks associated with the under-lying disease for which radiation was given. All doses have been estimated and such values are subject to marked variability particularly when they rely on sources of data such as hospital records. The biological data although extensive have several deficits in information. Which are the sites in which cancer is produced by irradiation and what are the cell types which are produced. The sensitivity of various tissues and organs are not similar and it is important to rank them according to susceptibility. This has been done in the past but the results are not complete for all cell types and organs. The temporal patterns for tumor development, the latent period, the period of expressed excess, the life-time risks need to be defined more precisely for the cancers. Many populations have not been followed long enough to express the complete risk

  1. Oxidation-reduction enzymes of myocardium under ionizing radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uteshev, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Tissue respiration proceses under radiation effect were investigated which allowed one to reveal slight biochemical disturbances in a cell which make up the base of functional changes of different organs and tissues and to get to know the essence of tissue respiration processes. An attempt to explain significant value of oxidation enzyme system radiosensitivity in the course of cell respiration process altogether is made when studying the state of separate links of oxidation-reduction chain. It is shown that at early periods of radiation injury activity of catalase, dehydrogenases (isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, malic, succinic acids) is suppressed, concentration of a number of cytochromes is reduced and general ferrum content is increased which is connected with conformation changes of ultrastructure of mitochondrial membranes

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on moist air systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of nitrogen/oxygen/water systems is reviewed. General radiolytic effects in dry nitrogen/oxygen systems are relatively well characterized. Irradiation results in the formation of steady state concentrations of ozone, nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide. In closed systems, the concentration observed depends on the total dose, temperature and initial gas composition. Only three studies have been published that focus on the radiation chemistry of nitrogen/oxygen/water homogeneous gas systems. Mixed phase work that is relevant to the gaseous system is also summarized. The presence of water vapor results in the formation of nitric acid and significantly changes the chemistry observed in dry air systems. Mechanistic evidence from the studies reviewed are summarized and discussed in relation to characterizing the gas phase during the containment period of a repository in tuff

  3. A Role for Bioelectric Effects in the Induction of Bystander Signals by Ionizing Radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, C.; Moran, G.; McNeill, F.; Gow, M.D.; Denbeigh, J.; Prestwich, W.; Seymour, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    The induction of “bystander effects” i.e. effects in cells which have not received an ionizing radiation track, is now accepted but the mechanisms are not completely clear. Bystander effects following high and low LET radiation exposure are accepted but mechanisms are still not understood. There is some evidence for a physical component to the signal. This paper tests the hypothesis that bioelectric or biomagnetic phenomena are involved. Human immortalized skin keratinocytes and primary explants of mouse bladder and fish skin, were exposed directly to ionizing radiation or treated in a variety of bystander protocols. Exposure of cells was conducted by shielding one group of flasks using lead, to reduce the dose below the threshold of 2mGy 60Cobalt gamma rays established for the bystander effect. The endpoint for the bystander effect in the reporter system used was reduction in cloning efficiency (RCE). The magnitude of the RCE was similar in shielded and unshielded flasks. When cells were placed in a Faraday cage the magnitude of the RCE was less but not eliminated. The results suggest that liquid media or cell-cell contact transmission of bystander factors may be only part of the bystander mechanism. Bioelectric or bio magnetic fields may have a role to play. To test this further, cells were placed in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine for 10min using a typical head scan protocol. This treatment also induced a bystander response. Apart from the obvious clinical relevance, the MRI results further suggest that bystander effects may be produced by non-ionizing exposures. It is concluded that bioelectric or magnetic effects may be involved in producing bystander signaling cascades commonly seen following ionizing radiation exposure. PMID:18648606

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tak- Hyun; Nam, Yun-Ku; Joo Lim, Seung

    2014-01-01

    Livestock wastewater is generally very difficult to be treated by conventional wastewater treatment techniques because it contains high-strength organics (COD), ammonium (NH 4 + ), phosphate (PO 4 3− ) and suspended solids. Struvite crystallization has been recently studied for the simultaneous removal of NH 4 + and PO 4 3− . In this study, gamma ray irradiation was carried out prior to struvite crystallization of the anaerobically digested livestock wastewater. The effects of gamma ray irradiation on the struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater were investigated. As a result, gamma ray irradiation can decrease the concentration of COD, NH 4 + and PO 4 3− contained in the livestock wastewater. This results in not only an enhancement of the struvite crystallization efficiency but also a decrease in the chemical demands for the struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater. - Highlights: • Gamma ray was applied prior to struvite crystallization of livestock wastewater. • Gamma ray resulted in an enhancement of struvite crystallization efficiency. • This is due to the decrease of COD concentration by gamma ray irradiation

  5. [Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the ''apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference

  6. Effect of ionizing radiations on sperm of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, F.I.; Hassan, N.H.A.; Eldawt, H.A.; Roushdy, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of both gamma rays and reactor beams of mixed neutrons and gamma rays on sperms were investigated. Caudal sperms of adult male mice were examined 3 and 6 weeks post-exposure to 0.5 , 1.5, 3.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma rays and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks in animals exposed to 42.5 and 58.5 R of mixed neutrons and gamma-rays. Sperms were seriously affected due to exposure to both types of irradiation. There were dose dependent changes in the mean frequency of abnormal sperms. The peak values were at dose level of 3.0 Gy recording 26.43% and 29.82% in both groups sacrificed 3 and 6 weeks respectively compared with 1.57% for the control group. The increase in the abnormal sperms in the groups of the animals exposed to the reactor beam was always related to the time interval between treatment and observation, the longer the time the more sperms with abnormal head were encountered. 14 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Microscale Solubility Measurements of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization (MALDI) Matrices Using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) Coupled with Partial Least Squares (PLS) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorre, Elsa; Owens, Kevin G

    2016-11-01

    In this work an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption based method is used to measure the solubility of two matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) matrices in a few pure solvents and mixtures of acetonitrile and water using low microliter amounts of solution. Results from a method that averages the values obtained from multiple calibration curves created by manual peak picking are compared to those predicted using a partial least squares (PLS) chemometrics approach. The PLS method provided solubility values that were in good agreement with the manual method with significantly greater ease of analysis. As a test, the solubility of adipic acid in acetone was measured using the two methods of analysis, and the values are in good agreement with solubility values reported in literature. The solubilities of the MALDI matrices α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHCA) and sinapinic acid (SA) were measured in a series of mixtures made from acetonitrile (ACN) and water; surprisingly, the results show a highly nonlinear trend. While both CHCA and SA show solubility values of less than 10 mg/mL in the pure solvents, the solubility value for SA increases to 56.3 mg/mL in a 75:25 v/v ACN:water mixture. This can have a significant effect on the matrix-to-analyte ratios in the MALDI experiment when sample protocols call for preparation of a saturated solution of the matrix in the chosen solvent system. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Radiation effect on partially synchronized Yoshida sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bippus, P.H.; Heitz, J.; Ruehl, U.; Averdunk, R.

    1982-01-01

    Yoshida sarcoma cells, which have the same growth characteristics as ascites cells in the mouse and in cell suspension, were partially synchronized in vitro by means of excess thymidine (0.1 mM thymidine for 18 h). The growth of non-synchronized cultures was inhibited by irradiation, the degree depending on the dose of radiation. At the same time, a 50% inhibition in vivo (380 rad) and in vitro (480 rad) was determined. The incorporation of 3 H-thymidine into the DNA is inhibited by 10-32%, depending on the radiation dose. The mitotic index decreases 2 h after irradiation by a dose-dependent amount. A mitotic maximum develops later; the delay is dose-dependent. Partially synchronized cells were irradiated in the G 1 /S-, S-, G 2 -, and G 1 -phase. As compared to the 3 H-thymidine incorporation and the mitotic index there were no significant differences between the cultures which were irradiated in the individual phases of the non-synchronized control cultures. The cultures which were irradiated in the G 2 -phase, however, showed a significantly reduced growth in vivo after 48 h. If the cells were cultured for more than 72 h after irradiation, the differences between the cultures irradiated in the G 2 -phase and the other phases were reduced. (orig.)

  9. Effect of the ionizing radiation in the sensorial characteristics of the pineapple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Josenilda Maria da; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet; Silva, Juliana Pizarro

    2007-01-01

    The post-harvest quality of the pineapple cultivar Smooth Cayenne was evaluated after the fruit was irradiated with doses of 100 and 150 Gy and stored for 10, 20 and 30 days at 12 deg C ( +-1) and relative humidity of 85% (+- 5). The controls were untreated fruits. Sensorial analyses were made for each storage period to obtain information about the effects of ionizing radiation on the quality of the fruit. The ionizing radiation dosage had little effect on the sensorial characteristics of the pineapple, although the best results were obtained with fruit irradiated with 100 Gy. The 20-day storage period resulted in the highest consumer acceptability, while the 30-day storage period impaired the fruit's external and internal appearance. (author)

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on blood and blood components: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The present publication reviews, in a comprehensive manner, the relevant literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on whole blood, blood cells, and other blood components. It presents the interested reader with sufficient information and data to facilitate rational decisions in relation to the feasibility of irradiation of blood and blood products for the purposes stated above. The IAEA expects that this can promote a wider use of the technology for improving health care practice in Member States, particularly in view of the recent spread of conventional as well as ''modern'' diseases which exert immunosuppressive effects in afflicted patients, with pathological consequences. Innumerable patients could thus benefit from this application of ionizing energy. 209 refs, 1 tab

  11. Graphene Field Effect Transistor-Based Detectors for Detection of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Cazalas, Edward; Childres, I.; Patil, A.; Koybasi, O.; Chen, Y-P.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of our recent efforts to develop novel ionizing radiation sensors based on the nano-material graphene. Graphene used in the field effect transistor architecture could be employed to detect the radiation-induced charge carriers produced in undoped semiconductor absorber substrates, even without the need for charge collection. The detection principle is based on the high sensitivity of graphene to ionization-induced local electric field perturbations in the electrically biased substrate. We experimentally demonstrated promising performance of graphene field effect transistors for detection of visible light, X-rays, gamma-rays, and alpha particles. We propose improved detector architectures which could result in a significant improvement of speed necessary for pulsed mode operation. (authors)

  12. Mechanism of effect of ionizing radiation on bcl-2 protein expression and apoptosis in mouse thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Chen Dong; Liu Shuzheng

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of effect of ionizing radiation in varied doses of X-rays on bcl-2 express and apoptosis in mouse thymus. Methods: Immunohistochemistry, image analysis and transmission electron microscope were used in the study. Results: The expression of bcl-2 protein was limited within thymic medulla, decreased with 2 Gy, however, increased with 0.075 Gy after whole-body irradiation. Some typical apoptotic cells were found in thymic cortex after 2 Gy irradiation. The apoptotic cells decreased and mitotic metaphase increased after 0.075 Gy irradiation. Conclusion: The mechanism of effect of ionizing radiation on apoptosis of thymus was related with the expression of bcl-2 proteins

  13. Effects of stellar evolution and ionizing radiation on the environments of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Mohamed, S.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Neilson, H. R.; Meyer, D. M.-A.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss two important effects for the astrospheres of runaway stars: the propagation of ionizing photons far beyond the astropause, and the rapid evolution of massive stars (and their winds) near the end of their lives. Hot stars emit ionizing photons with associated photoheating that has a significant dynamical effect on their surroundings. 3-D simulations show that H ii regions around runaway O stars drive expanding conical shells and leave underdense wakes in the medium they pass through. For late O stars this feedback to the interstellar medium is more important than that from stellar winds. Late in life, O stars evolve to cool red supergiants more rapidly than their environment can react, producing transient circumstellar structures such as double bow shocks. This provides an explanation for the bow shock and linear bar-shaped structure observed around Betelgeuse.

  14. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  15. Ethical considerations in protecting the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is based on providing for the protection of humans. The current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) include the statement that {sup t}he standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk... {sup .} In the light of the new focus of concern for the environment, this statement is being critically reviewed in several international fora. The IAEA has, over many years, sponsored studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on species other than humans. Most recently it published a discussion report as IAEA-TECDOC-1091 (1999) in which the need for developing a system for protecting the environment against the effects of ionizing radiation was elaborated and in which various related technical and philosophical issues for resolution were discussed. The current report explores the ethical principles that could underlie a system of environmental protection. It is intended as one step in the development of a framework for the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, and is being published in order to promote awareness of the current developments in this field as well as to encourage discussion amongst those involved.

  16. Low pressure electrospray ionization system and process for effective transmission of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Kelly, Ryan T [Wet Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-03-02

    A system and method are disclosed that provide up to complete transmission of ions between coupled stages with low effective ion losses. A novel "interfaceless" electrospray ionization system is further described that operates the electrospray at a reduced pressure such that standard electrospray sample solutions can be directly sprayed into an electrodynamic ion funnel which provides ion focusing and transmission of ions into a mass analyzer.

  17. Studies on the effects of ionizing radiation on the normal and diseased liver in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the present study primarily concerned with the effects of ionizing radiations on the normal and diseased liver in experimental animals (mice). Different radiation intensities and different exposure schemes were used to irradiate both healthy and schistosoma mansoni infected animals. A group of uninfected and unirradiated animals were used as controls. Follow up studies were performed every 6 weeks for 30 weeks. These included histopathological studies of the liver damage at every observation periods for all animal groups

  18. The damaging effect of densely ionizing radiations on stem cells of mammalian critical organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplyannikov, A.G.; Konoplyannikova, O.A.

    1985-01-01

    Literature and experimental data on foundation of conceptions for cell determinants of survival rate in irradiated animals are analysed. Experimental confirmation of conceptions for cell determinants for both CFU of hemopoietic organs and for cases of intestinal death after densely ionizing radiation effect is obtained. The explanation of causes for difference in interrelation of two types of radiation death of animals in such a case is suggested

  19. Comparison of two equation-of-state models for partially ionized aluminum: Zel'dovich and Raizer's model versus the activity expansion code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrach, Robert J.; Rogers, Forest J.

    1981-09-01

    Two equation-of-state (EOS) models for multipy ionized matter are evaluated for the case of an aluminum plasma in the temperature range from about one eV to several hundred eV, spanning conditions of weak to strong ionization. Specifically, the simple analytical mode of Zel'dovich and Raizer and the more comprehensive model comprised by Rogers' plasma physics avtivity expansion code (ACTEX) are used to calculate the specific internal energy ɛ and average degree of ionization Z¯*, as functons of temperature T and density ρ. In the absence of experimental data, these results are compared against each other, covering almost five orders-of-magnitude variation in ɛ and the full range of Z¯* We find generally good agreement between the two sets of results, especially for low densities and for temperatures near the upper end of the rage. Calculated values of ɛ(T) agree to within ±30% over nearly the full range in T for densities below about 1 g/cm3. Similarly, the two models predict values of Z¯*(T) which track each other fairly well; above 20 eV the discrepancy is less than ±20% fpr ρ≲1 g/cm3. Where the calculations disagree, we expect the ACTEX code to be more accurate than Zel'dovich and Raizer's model, by virtue of its more detailed physics content.

  20. Comparison of two equation-of-state models for partially ionized aluminum: Zel'dovich and Raizer's model versus the activity expansion code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, R.J.; Rogers, F.J.

    1981-09-01

    Two equation-of-state (EOS) models for multipy ionized matter are evaluated for the case of an aluminum plasma in the temperature range from about one eV to several hundred eV, spanning conditions of weak to strong ionization. Specifically, the simple analytical mode of Zel'dovich and Raizer and the more comprehensive model comprised by Rogers' plasma physics avtivity expansion code (ACTEX) are used to calculate the specific internal energy epsilon and average degree of ionization Z-bar*, as functons of temperature T and density rho. In the absence of experimental data, these results are compared against each other, covering almost five orders-of-magnitude variation in epsilon and the full range of Z-bar* We find generally good agreement between the two sets of results, especially for low densities and for temperatures near the upper end of the rage. Calculated values of epsilon(T) agree to within +- 30% over nearly the full range in T for densities below about 1 g/cm/sup 3/. Similarly, the two models predict values of Z-bar*(T) which track each other fairly well; above 20 eV the discrepancy is less than +- 20% fpr rho< or approx. =1 g/cm/sup 3/. Where the calculations disagree, we expect the ACTEX code to be more accurate than Zel'dovich and Raizer's model, by virtue of its more detailed physics content.

  1. Apparent CBF decrease with normal aging due to partial volume effects: MR-based partial volume correction on CBF SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Goto, Ryoi; Nakagawa, Manabu; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Tachio; Sato, Kazunori; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    Several studies using single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have shown changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) with age, which were associated with partial volume effects by some authors. Some studies have also demonstrated gender-related differences in CBF. The present study aimed to examine age and gender effects on CBF SPECT images obtained using the 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer and a SPECT scanner, before and after partial volume correction (PVC) using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Forty-four healthy subjects (29 males and 15 females; age range, 27-64 y; mean age, 50.0 +/- 9.8 y) participated. Each MR image was segmented to yield grey and white matter images and coregistered to a corresponding SPECT image, followed by convolution to approximate the SPECT spatial resolution. PVC-SPECT images were produced using the convoluted grey matter MR (GM-MR) and white matter MR images. The age and gender effects were assessed using SPM99. Decreases with age were detected in the anterolateral prefrontal cortex and in areas along the lateral sulcus and the lateral ventricle, bilaterally, in the GM-MR images and the SPECT images. In the PVC-SPECT images, decreases in CBF in the lateral prefrontal cortex lost their statistical significance. Decreases in CBF with age found along the lateral sulcus and the lateral ventricle, on the other hand, remained statistically significant, but observation of the spatially normalized MR images suggests that these findings are associated with the dilatation of the lateral sulcus and lateral ventricle, which was not completely compensated for by the spatial normalization procedure. Our present study demonstrated that age effects on CBF in healthy subjects could reflect morphological differences with age in grey matter.

  2. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1988-01-01

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  3. Effects of non-uniformities on electrical conduction in weakly ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, M.; Murakami, Y.; Nitta, T.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of non-uniformities on the flow of electric current in weakly ionized plasmas is investigated by taking into account the ion slip as well as the Hall current. An Ohm's law for a non-uniform plasma is derived, from which the formula previously obtained by Numano, i.e. an extension of Rosa's equation, is obtainable as a special case. Making use of this new Ohm's law, the effective electrical conductivity and the effective Hall parameter are determined for isotropically turbulent plasmas. It is found that when the ion-slip effect is absent they are in good agreement with the results obtained previously. (author)

  4. The unfolding effects on the protein hydration shell and partial molar volume: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Galdo, Sara; Amadei, Andrea

    2016-10-12

    In this paper we apply the computational analysis recently proposed by our group to characterize the solvation properties of a native protein in aqueous solution, and to four model aqueous solutions of globular proteins in their unfolded states thus characterizing the protein unfolded state hydration shell and quantitatively evaluating the protein unfolded state partial molar volumes. Moreover, by using both the native and unfolded protein partial molar volumes, we obtain the corresponding variations (unfolding partial molar volumes) to be compared with the available experimental estimates. We also reconstruct the temperature and pressure dependence of the unfolding partial molar volume of Myoglobin dissecting the structural and hydration effects involved in the process.

  5. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  6. Evaluation of ionizing radiation effects in bone tissue by FTIR spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo N.; Santin, Stefany P.; Benetti, Carolina; Pereira, Thiago M.; Mattor, Monica B.; Politano, Rodolfo; Zezell, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    In many medical practices the bone tissue exposure to ionizing radiation is necessary. However, this radiation can interact with bone tissue in a molecular level, causing chemical and mechanical changes related with the dose used. The aim of this study was verify the changes promoted by different doses of ionizing radiation in bone tissue using spectroscopy technique of Attenuate Total Reflectance - Fourier Transforms Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and dynamic mechanical analysis. Samples of bovine bone were irradiated using irradiator of Cobalt-60 with five different doses between 0.01 kGy, 0.1 kGy,1 kGy, 15 kGy and 75 kGy. To study the effects of ionizing irradiation on bone chemical structure the sub-bands of amide I and the crystallinity index were studied. The mechanical changes were evaluated using the elastic modulus and the damping value. To verify if the chemical changes and the bone mechanic characteristics were related, it was made one study about the correlation between the crystallinity index and the elastic modulus, between the sub-bands ratio and the damping value and between the sub-bands ratio and the elastic modulus. It was possible to evaluate the effects of different dose of ionizing radiation in bone tissue. With ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analysis, it was possible observe changes in the organic components and in the hydroxyapatite crystals organization. Changes were also observed in the mechanical properties. A good correlation between the techniques was found, however, it was not possible to establish a linear or exponential dependence between dose and effect. (author)

  7. Ecological effects of various toxic agents on the aquatic microcosm in comparison with acute ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuma, S.; Ishii, N.; Takeda, H.; Miyamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Ichimasa, Y.; Saito, M.; Kawabata, Z.; Polikarpov, G.G.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was an evaluation of the effect levels of various toxic agents compared with acute doses of ionizing radiation for the experimental model ecosystem, i.e., microcosm mimicking aquatic microbial communities. For this purpose, the authors used the microcosm consisting of populations of the flagellate alga Euglena gracilis as a producer, the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila as a consumer and the bacterium Escherichia coli as a decomposer. Effects of aluminum and copper on the microcosm were investigated in this study, while effects of γ-rays, ultraviolet radiation, acidification, manganese, nickel and gadolinium were reported in previous studies. The microcosm could detect not only the direct effects of these agents but also the community-level effects due to the interspecies interactions or the interactions between organisms and toxic agents. The authors evaluated doses or concentrations of each toxic agent which had the following effects on the microcosm: (1) no effects; (2) recognizable effects, i.e., decrease or increase in the cell densities of at least one species; (3) severe effects, i.e., extinction of one or two species; and (4) destructive effects, i.e., extinction of all species. The resulting effects data will contribute to an ecological risk assessment of the toxic agents compared with acute doses of ionizing radiation

  8. Partial Picture Effects on Children's Memory for Sentences Containing Implicit Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gloria E.; Pressley, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted examining the effects of partial picture adjuncts on young children's coding of information implied in sentences. Developmental differences were found in whether (l) partial pictures facilitated inferencing and (2) pictures containing information not explicitly stated in sentences promoted cue recall of the…

  9. Importance of polarization effects in electron impact single ionization of argon atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, G., E-mail: g_vpurohit@yahoo.co [Department of Basic Sciences, School of Engineering, Sir Padampat Singhania University, Bhatewar, Udaipur 313 601 (India); Patidar, Vinod; Sud, K.K. [Department of Basic Sciences, School of Engineering, Sir Padampat Singhania University, Bhatewar, Udaipur 313 601 (India)

    2009-12-15

    We report the results of our calculations of triple differential cross section (TDCS) for electron impact single ionization (i.e. (e, 2e) processes) from the 3s shell of argon using a modified distorted wave Born approximation formalism by including correlation-polarization potential, which accounts for both correlation and polarization effects. We observe that DWBA formalism including polarization potential is able to reproduce most of the trends of experimental data and hence provide a future direction for further investigation of ionization process from the 3s shell of argon. We also compare our results with the available theoretical and experimental results. The present calculations significantly improve the agreement with the experimental results but still there are certain discrepancies, which is a matter of further investigation.

  10. Comparison of the PCI distortion effects on the Auger lineshape for electron and photon impact ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paripas, B.; Vitez, G.; Vikor, Gy.; Tokesi, K.; Sankari, R.; Calo, A.

    2005-01-01

    The distortion effects of the post-collision interaction (PCI) on the Ar LMM Auger electron lineshape for electron and photon impact ionization have been calculated. The calculations were based on the eikonal model of Kuchiev and Sheinerman [Sov. Phys. - Tech. Phys. 32 (1987) 879]. It is shown that the Auger peak asymmetry depends on the emission angle of the Auger electron relative to the primary beam (and the polarization vector of the photon beam). At a given excess energy, defined as the difference between the impact energy and the binding energy, the absolute value of the Auger peak asymmetry is always larger for electron impact ionization than for photoionization. At the same time, the angular dependence of the PCI distortion is stronger for photoionization. In both cases the Auger peak asymmetry has a maximum when the energy of the ejected electron and that of the Auger electron are nearly equal. The calculations are in good agreement with our previous experimental results

  11. The effect of ionizing radiation on the filamentous actin of vascular endothelial cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Xiaowu; Chen Shisheng; Yang Lihe; Lin Juelong; Yang Haiwei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the ionizing radiation effect on filamentous actin of vascular endothelial cell and explore its mechanism. Methods: The vascular endothelial cells were irradiated with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 Gy 60 Co γ-rays. The cytoskeleton was observed with CLSM at 6 hs after the irradiation and the cytoskeleton protein F-actin detected with flow cytometry after 12 and 24 hs. Results: The damage to cytoskeletons increased with the radiation dose. The cytoskeleton protein F-actin was significantly decreased at 12 hs after the irradiation, and then recovered after 24 hs. Conclusion: Ionizing radiation caused vascular endothelial cell injury by damaging the cytoskeleton and depolymerizating the F-actin. (authors)

  12. Effects of ionizing scrape-off layers on local recycling in Tore Supra pump limiter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, L.W.; Hogan, J.T.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Uckan, T.; Chatelier, M.; Loarer, T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of ohmic discharges with active pumping in the Tore Supra outboard pump limiter has been analyzed with the DEGAS neutrals transport code and an analysis scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma model. Pumping speed and plenum pressure measurements indicated 5--10 torr-L/s throughput with only modest effects on density (dN core /dt + source rate from ionization and dissociation of wall-desorbed molecules is seen to peak very near the radial position of the limiter throat. Consequently, a strong recycling vortex is created in the region of the limiter, with the ion flux amplified by factors of ∼2 at the outer limiter surfaces and >3 within the limiter throat. The calculations indicate that less than 30% of the pump throughput is due to first-generation ions from the core efflux, with the balance from local recycling in the strongly ionizing scrape-off layer

  13. Combined effect of thermal sterilization and ionizing radiation on storage life of preserved foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozova, B.; Sorman, L.; Fazekasova, H.

    1986-01-01

    The effect was studied of the binary combination of preservation methods, i.e., of a reduced intensity of thermosterilization and diverse doses of ionizing radiation, on the content of microorganisms in single-component tinned products (tinned beef and gravy, tinned pickled cauliflower) and in tins containing two components (beef with cauliflower) over a period of 115 days of storage at a laboratory temperature of 20 degC ± 2 degC. The experimental results showed that the chosen combined process of preservation guaranteed sufficient storage stability to the products over several months of storage. An ionizing radiation dose of 5 kGy was sufficient for both types of model samples, this both from microbiological, nutritional aspects (some group B vitamins, vitamin C, -SH groups, etc.) and with regard to organoleptic properties (outlook, color, odor, flavor, consistence, juiciness). The problems will further be studied. (author) 2 tabs., 4 figs., 14 refs

  14. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Loughlin, J.E.; Friedlander, E.R.; Clapp, R.W.; Fahey, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public

  15. Effects of ionizing scrape-off layers on local recycling in Tore Supra pump limiter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.; Loarer, T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of ohmic discharges with active pumping in the Tore Supra outboard pump limiter has been analyzed with the DEGAS neutrals transport code and an analytic scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma model. Pumping speed and plenum pressure measurements indicated 5-10 torr.L/s throughput with only modest effects on density. A model is developed in which large exhaust fluxes, with little attendant effect on core plasma density, are explained in terms of SOL ionization of recycled and wall-desorbed neutrals. Particle balance with active pumping and constant line density requires that the wall return flux exceed the incident flux by approximately the pump throughput in the absence of external fueling. The radial profile of the H + source rate from ionization and dissociation of wall-desorbed molecules is seen to peak very near the radial position of the limiter throat. Consequently, a strong recycling vortex is created in the region of the limiter, with the ion flux amplified by factors of 2 at the outer limiter surfaces and > 3 within the limiter throat. The calculations indicate that less than 30% of the pump throughput is due to first-generation ions from the core efflux, with the balance from local recycling in the strongly ionizing SOL

  16. Effective ionization coefficient of C5 perfluorinated ketone and its mixtures with air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aints, Märt; Jõgi, Indrek; Laan, Matti; Paris, Peeter; Raud, Jüri

    2018-04-01

    C5 perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK with UIPAC chemical name 1,1,1,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)-2-butanone and sold by 3M as Novec™ 5110) has a high dielectric strength and a low global warming potential, which makes it interesting as an insulating gas in medium and high-voltage applications. The study was carried out to determine the effective Townsend ionization coefficient α eff as a function of electric field strength and gas density for C5 PFK and for its mixtures with air. The non-self-sustained Townsend discharge between parallel plate electrodes was initiated by illuminating the cathode by UV radiation. The discharge current, I, was measured as a function of inter-electrode distance, d, at different gas densities, N, and electric field strengths, E. The effective ionization coefficient α eff was determined from the semi-logarithmic plots of I/I 0 against d. For each tested gas mixture, the density normalized effective ionization coefficient α eff/N was found to be a unique function of reduced electric field strength E/N. The measurements were carried out in the absolute pressure range of 0.05-1.3 bar and E/N range of 150-1200 Td. The increasing fraction of C5 PFK in air resulted in the decrease of effective ionization coefficient. The limiting electric field strength (E/N)lim where the effective ionization coefficient α eff became zero was 770 Td (190 kV cm-1 at 1 bar) for pure C5 PFK and decreased to 225 Td (78 kV cm-1 at 1.4 bar) for 7.6% C5 PFK/air mixture. The latter value of (E/N)lim is still more than two times higher than the (E/N)lim value of synthetic air and about two-thirds of the value corresponding to pure SF6. The investigated gas mixtures have the potential to become an alternative to SF6 in numerous high- and medium-voltage applications.

  17. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  18. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2005-06-01

    The efficacy of Adra wastewater treatment plant for removing of parasitic eggs and other pathogens was various as the results of this work showed many eggs detected on and numeration referenced methods were applied for liquid and dried sledges. Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. In conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the division of the ascaris eggs embryo nations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts not affected. Therefor the UV technique couldn't be the alternative technology of ionizing radiation. (author)

  19. Effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on Protozoan and Parasites Ova causing gastroenteritis presents in sewage sludge wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamma, M.; Al-Adawi, M.A.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    Helminths eggs viability was determined by aid of methods and techniques which depend on the morphological parameters, studying the motility incubation and applying the vital staining. The protozoa viability was studied by using many vital staining, but applying culture techniques on specific composed media did not give any results. The disinfection results showed that for ascaris eggs, protozoa and amoeba oocysts irradiated by 6 KGy of gamma (Co 6 0) which was sufficient to kill all types of such parasites. On the contrary, conflict the UV radiation was able to motivate the ascaris eggs embryonations. Also, the viability of the Giardia and Entamoeba oocysts were not affected. In the light of the current experiments, it is possible to conclude that using the UV technique instead of the ionizing radiation for killing the helminths eggs and protozoa is not usable. (Authors)

  20. Study on ionizing radiation effects of bipolar transistor with BPSG films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Man; Zhang Xiaoling; Xie Xuesong; Sun Jiangchao; Wang Pengpeng; Lu Changzhi; Zhang Yanxiu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because of the damage induced by ionizing radiation, bipolar transistors in integrated voltage regulator could induce the current gain degradation and increase leakage current. This will bring serious problems to electronic system. Purpose: In order to ensure the reliability of the device work in the radiation environments, the device irradiation reinforcement technology is used. Methods: The characteristics of 60 Co γ irradiation and annealing at different temperatures in bipolar transistors and voltage regulators (JW117) with different passive films for SiO 2 +BPSG+SiO 2 and SiO 2 +SiN have been investigated. Results: The devices with BPSG film enhanced radiation tolerance significantly. Because BPSG films have better absorption for Na + in SiO 2 layer, the surface recombination rate of base region in a bipolar transistor and the excess base current have been reduced. It may be the main reason for BJT with BPSG film having a good radiation hardness. And annealing experiments at different temperatures after irradiation ensure the reliability of the devices with BPSG films. Conclusions: A method of improving the ionizing irradiation hardness of bipolar transistors is proposed. As well as the linear integrated circuits which containing bipolar transistors, an experimental basis for the anti-ionizing radiation effects of bipolar transistors is provided. (authors)

  1. Time- and dose-dependent effects of total-body ionizing radiation on muscle stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinya; Hisamatsu, Tsubasa; Seko, Daiki; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Li, Tao-Sheng; Ono, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of genotoxic stress, such as high-dose ionizing radiation, increases both cancer and noncancer risks. However, it remains debatable whether low-dose ionizing radiation reduces cellular function, or rather induces hormetic health benefits. Here, we investigated the effects of total-body γ-ray radiation on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to γ-radiation at low- to high-dose rates (low, 2 or 10 mGy/day; moderate, 50 mGy/day; high, 250 mGy/day) for 30 days. No hormetic responses in proliferation, differentiation, or self-renewal of satellite cells were observed in low-dose radiation-exposed mice at the acute phase. However, at the chronic phase, population expansion of satellite cell-derived progeny was slightly decreased in mice exposed to low-dose radiation. Taken together, low-dose ionizing irradiation may suppress satellite cell function, rather than induce hormetic health benefits, in skeletal muscle in adult mice. PMID:25869487

  2. Ionization effects on Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Shirou; Imaizumi, Mitsuru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0031 (Japan); Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime [Institute of National Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Okuda, Shuichi [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuenmachi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Cu (In, Ga) Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells were irradiated with 60, 100, and 250 keV electrons to reveal the characteristics of radiation induced defects. Electrons with less than 200 keV energy cannot generate any displacement defects in CIGS materials. In addition, a low amount of the electrons can improve the roll-over behavior in current-voltage characteristics of CIGS solar cells. However, the deterioration of the electrical performance in CIGS solar cells irradiated with a high amount of electrons was observed. The deterioration rate on the cells irradiated with lower-energy electrons was higher than that induced by electrons with higher-energy. The degradation curve of J{sub SC} based on the ionizing dose estimated from the ionizing energy loss model does not depend on the energy of electrons. Therefore, it implies that the electrons can degrade CIGS solar cells due to the ionization effect. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Solitary wave evolution in a magnetized inhomogeneous plasma under the effect of ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyoti; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2011-01-01

    A modified form of Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation appropriate to nonlinear ion acoustic solitary waves in an inhomogeneous plasma is derived in the presence of an external magnetic field and constant ionization in the plasma. This equation differs from usual version of the KdV equation because of the inclusion of two terms arising due to ionization and density gradient present in the plasma. In this plasma, only the compressive solitary waves are found to propagate corresponding to the fast and slow modes. The amplitude of the solitary wave increases with an enhancement in the ionization for the fast mode as well as for the slow mode. The effect of magnetic field is to enhance the width of the solitary structure. The amplitude is found to increase (decrease) with an enhancement in charge number of the ions for the fast (slow) mode. The tailing structure becomes more (less) prominent with the rise in ion drift velocity for the case of fast (slow) mode.

  4. Effect of complexing reagents on the ionization constant of boric acid and its relation to isotopic exchange separation factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of change in concentration of complexing reagents having two or more hydroxyl groups, viz., ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, dextrose and mannitol on the ionization constant of boric acid has been studied by pH-metric titration method. The effect of increase in ionization constant of boric acid on isotopic exchange separation factor for the separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography has been studied by the batch method. (author). 9 refs

  5. Bilogical effects of ionizing radiation: epidemiological surveys and laboratory animal experiments. Implications for risk evaluation and decision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-04-01

    General background is given for an understanding of the potential health effects in populations exposed to low-level ionizing radiations. The discussion is within the framework of the scientific deliberations and controversies that arose during preparation of the current report of the committee on the biological effects of ionizing radiation of the National Academy of Science - National Research Council (1980 Beir-III Report)

  6. Ionization and charge exchange in atom collision with multicharged ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presnyakov, L.P.; Uskov, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Single-electron ionization and charge exchange are considered in collisions of an atom with an ion of charge Z> or =3 and at velocities v>Z -1 /sup // 3 . The approach is based on the Keldysh quasiclassical method. The ionization and charge exchange processes are described within the framework of a single formalism. Effects of rotation and translation are taken into account. The calculated total and partial cross sections agree well with the available experimental data. OFF

  7. Effect of ionizing radiation on DNA-mediated gene transfer efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, J.S.; Hall, E.J.; Hei, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes a number of molecular changes in cells including DNA damage and gene amplification. In this study the authors examined whether radiation can effect the efficiency of integration and expression of exogenous DNA sequences. They examined both 137 Cs γ rays and various monoenergetic neutron beams. This enabled them to test whether the LET or RBE of the radiation had any effect. Rat2 cells were transfected with various amounts of the bacterial plasmid pSV2-GPT along with carrier DNA for 24 hours

  8. Polarization effects in above-threshold ionization with a mid-infrared strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hui-Peng; Xu, Song-Po; Wang, Yan-Lan; Yu, Shao-Gang; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Hao, Xiao-Lei; Lai, Xuan-Yang; Pfeifer, Thomas; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2018-05-01

    Using a semiclassical approach, we theoretically study the above-threshold ionization of magnesium by intense, mid-infrared laser pulses. The formation of low-energy structures in the photoelectron spectrum is found to be enhanced by comparing with a calculation based on the single-active electron approximation. By performing electron trajectory and recollision-time distribution analysis, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to the laser-induced ionic core polarization effects on the recolliding electrons. We also show that the polarization effects should be experimentally detectable. Our finding provides new insight into ultrafast control of strong-field photoionization and imaging of polar molecules.

  9. Bystander effects of the ionizing radiation and his implications in radiotherapy and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Ayala, Irene Maria; Sanchez Luthard, Maria de los Angeles; Martins Schmitz; Gomez, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    According to the classical paradigm, biological effects of ionizing radiation are attributed to DNA damage induced in each irradiated cell. Demonstration of ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) has generated a deep change in current understanding of radiobiology. RIBE are radiation-induced effects produced in cells that have not been actually irradiated. Several technical advances, particularly the use of microbeams, allowed in vitro study of RIBE. There are two known ways by which irradiated cells can communicate with non-irradiated cells, namely: through gap junctions connecting the cytoplasms of adjacent cells, and through the secretion of soluble factors to the extracellular medium. These factors include several cytokines and reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. In the affected cells, signalling pathways mostly involve activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), NF-kB transcription factor and of the enzymes cyclooxygenase 2, nitric oxide synthase 2 and NAD (P)H oxidase. RIBE induce point mutations and epigenetic changes. Effects on cellular signalling pathways can persist indefinitely and even be transmitted to the progeny of affected cells. Paradoxically, under certain conditions RIBE may be adaptive, which means that they turn affected cells more resistant to ionizing radiation. Adaptation demands protein synthesis. It enhances DNA repair mechanisms and resistance to oxidative stress. RIBE have also been demonstrated in vivo. Thus, they may have important implications for radiotherapy, both to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce the incidence of adverse effects. Furthermore, a better understanding of RIBE may have an influence on international radioprotection standards. (authors) [es

  10. Effects of partial crystallinity and quenched-in defects on corrosion of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Rapid solidification by planar flow casting has been found to have introduced deficiencies, viz. ... alloy. In order to investigate the effects of these deficiencies on the corrosion of rapidly ... Partial crystallinity (Dutta et al 1995; Savalia et al 1996),.

  11. Trans-generational effects induced by alpha and gamma ionizing radiations at Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisot, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities related to the nuclear industry contribute to continuous discharges of radionuclides into terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Over the past decades, the ecological risk of ionizing radiation has become a growing public, regulatory and scientific concern for ecosystems protection. Until recently, only few studies focus on exposure situations at low doses of irradiation, although these situations are representative of realistic environmental conditions. Understanding how ionizing radiation affects species over several generations and at various levels of biological organization is a major research goal in radioecology. The aim of this PhD was to bring new knowledge on the effects of ionizing radiation during a multi-generational expose of the aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna. A two-step strategy was implemented. First, an external gamma radiation at environmentally relevant dose rates was performed on D. magna over three successive generations (F0, F1 and F2). The objective of this experiment was to examine whether low dose rates of radiation induced increasing effects on survival, growth and reproduction of daphnids over generations and to test a possible accumulation and transmission of DNA alterations from adults to offspring. Results showed an accumulation and a transmission of DNA alterations over generations, together with an increase in effect severity on growth and reproduction from generation F0 to generation F2. Transiently more efficient DNA repair leading to some recovery at the organism level was suggested in generation F1. Second, data from the external gamma irradiation and those from an earlier study of internal alpha contamination were analyzed with DEBtox models (Dynamic Energy Budget applied to toxicology), to identify and compare the causes of the trans-generational increase in effect severity between the two types of radiation. In each case, two distinct metabolic modes of action were necessary to explain effects on

  12. [Dose rate-dependent cellular and molecular effects of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Wideł, Maria; Szurko, Agnieszka; Maniakowski, Zbigniew

    2008-09-11

    The aim of radiation therapy is to kill tumor cells while minimizing damage to normal cells. The ultimate effect of radiation can be apoptotic or necrotic cell death as well as cytogenetic damage resulting in genetic instability and/or cell death. The destructive effects of radiation arise from direct and indirect ionization events leading to peroxidation of macromolecules, especially those present in lipid-rich membrane structures as well as chromatin lipids. Lipid peroxidative end-products may damage DNA and proteins. A characteristic feature of radiation-induced peroxidation is an inverse dose-rate effect (IDRE), defined as an increase in the degree of oxidation(at constant absorbed dose) accompanying a lower dose rate. On the other hand, a low dose rate can lead to the accumulation of cells in G2, the radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle since cell cycle control points are not sensitive to low dose rates. Radiation dose rate may potentially be the main factor improving radiotherapy efficacy as well as affecting the intensity of normal tissue and whole-body side effects. A better understanding of dose rate-dependent biological effects may lead to improved therapeutic intervention and limit normal tissue reaction. The study reviews basic biological effects that depend on the dose rate of ionizing radiation.

  13. Intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways mediating ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Hara, Takamitsu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    A rapidly growing body of experimental evidence indicates that ionizing radiation induces biological effects in non-irradiated bystander cells that have received signals from adjacent or distant irradiated cells. This phenomenon, which has been termed the ionizing radiation-induced bystander effect, challenges the long-standing paradigm that radiation traversal through the nucleus of a cell is a prerequisite to elicit genetic damage or a biological response. Bystander effects have been observed in a number of experimental systems, and cells whose nucleus or cytoplasm is irradiated exert bystander responses. Bystander cells manifest a multitude of biological consequences, such as genetic and epigenetic changes, alterations in gene expression, activation of signal transduction pathways, and delayed effects in their progeny. Several mediating mechanisms have been proposed. These involve gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, secreted soluble factors, oxidative metabolism, plasma membrane-bound lipid rafts, and calcium fluxes. This paper reviews briefly the current knowledge of the bystander effect with a focus on proposed mechanisms. The potential benefit of bystander effects to cancer radiotherapy will also be discussed. (author)

  14. Partial admission effect on the performance and vibration of a supersonic impulse turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hang Gi; Shin, Ju Hyun; Choi, Chang-Ho; Jeong, Eunhwan; Kwon, Sejin

    2018-04-01

    This study experimentally investigates the effects of partial admission on the performance and vibration outcomes of a supersonic impulse turbine with circular nozzles. The turbine of a turbopump for a gas-generator-type liquid rocket engine in the Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II is of the supersonic impulse type with the partial admission configuration for obtaining a high specific power. Partial admission turbines with a low-flow-rate working gas exhibit benefits over turbines with full admission, such as loss reduction, ease of controllability of the turbine power output, and simple turbine configurations with separate starting sections. However, the radial force of the turbine rotor due to the partial admission causes an increase in turbine vibration. Few experimental studies have previously been conducted regarding the partial admission effects on supersonic impulse turbines with circular nozzles. In the present study, performance tests of supersonic impulse turbines with circular nozzles were conducted for various partial admission ratios using a turbine test facility with high-pressure air in order to investigate the resulting aerodynamic performance and vibration. Four types of turbines with partial admission ratios of 0.17, 0.42, 0.75 and 0.83 were tested. Results show that the efficiencies at the design point increase linearly as the partial admission ratios increase. Moreover, as the velocity ratios increase, the difference in efficiency from the reference turbine with a partial admission ratio of 0.83 becomes increasingly significant, and the magnitudes of these differences are proportional to the square of the velocity ratios. Likewise, the decrease in the partial admission ratio results in an increase in the turbine vibration level owing to the increase in the radial force.

  15. Developmental effects of magnetic field (50 Hz) in combination with ionizing radiation and chemical teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafková, H; Jerábek, J; Tejnorová, I; Bednár, V

    1996-11-01

    The influence of a 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) on avian and mammalian embryogenesis, the MF level and vector, as well as the effect of exposure to MF (50 Hz, 10 mT) in combination with X-rays has been recently reported [2,3]. No significant alterations of chick or rat embryogenesis were found after repeated exposures to 50 Hz MF at 10 mT or 6 microT or with different vectors. However, X-ray chick embryotoxicity was significantly affected by repeated exposures of developing organisms to MF. A strong dependence of effect on the type of interaction was revealed. A decrease of X-ray induced teratogenicity was observed when MF preceded X-ray exposure (indirect interaction), while MF exposure applied immediately after X-ray radiation (direct interaction) non-significantly potentiated adverse developmental effects of ionizing radiation. This study deals with the effects of MF in combination with insulin or tetracycline. Exposure of chick embryos to MF influenced the sensitivity of embryonic morphogenetic systems to the subsequently administered chemical teratogens, insulin and/or tetracycline. A protective effect of MF was detected similarly as in the case of indirect interaction with ionizing radiation.

  16. Effects of the ionizing radiations in the different stages of the embryo-fetal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Maria R.

    2001-01-01

    'In utero' exposures to ionizing radiation are a very important subject in radiological protection concerning not only the prevention but also the estimation of the associated risks. In these situations the perception of risks by the pregnant woman and the involved professionals could not always be correlated with their objective magnitude. In this communication we describe the effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation, the thresholds and their relation with the gestational age, taking into account occupationally exposed women, patients undergoing medical procedures and public members. The dose estimation, the evaluation of the potential associated risks and the relation with the spontaneous incidence of the considered effects are analyzed in the framework of the basic principles of radiological protection. Most of diagnostic procedures properly done do not imply induction of deterministic effects in embryo/fetus. Therapeutical procedures and accidental overexposures could be associated with significant risks of deterministic effects. Childhood cancer induction is an stochastic effect without threshold and every 'in utero' exposure will increase their probability. (author)

  17. Studies on the effects of ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents on hematopoiesis according to the stem-cell kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Kunitake

    1975-01-01

    The fundamental problem of the effects of ionizing radiation and antineoplastic drugs on hematopoiesis can be explained by the kinetic study on the hematopoietic stem-cell population. Quantitative comparison of a single x-irradiation and a single administration of several antineoplastic drugs on the stem-cell population was performed by the splenic colony-forming method. The repopulation pattern of stem-cells in mice after a single 150 rad irradiation was compared with that after the administration of corresponding dose of cyclophosphamide. It was demonstrated that the additional administration of cyclophosphamide immediately after the x-irradiation significantly accelerated repopulation of the stem-cell compartment. The mechanism of repopulation of the stem-cell compartment after partial irradiation was also studied according to the immigration theory of stem-cells. An in vitro colony-forming technique for the human bone marrow cells was introduced and compared with other assay methods for stem-cells. From the hematological observations of accidentally irradiated patients, it was determined that the thromboelastogram values were regarded as one of the most useful indicators for detecting the earliest recovery sign of the hematopoietic stem-cells. (Evans, J.)

  18. Effects of Partially Ionised Medical Oxygen, Especially with O2•−, in Vibration White Finger Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomír Perečinský

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A major symptom of hand-arm vibration syndrome is a secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon—vibration white finger (VWF—which results from a vasospasm of the digital arteries caused by work with vibration devices leading to occupational disease. Pharmacotherapy of VWF is often ineffective or has adverse effects. The aim of this work was to verify the influence of inhalation of partially ionized oxygen (O2•− on peripheral blood vessels in the hands of patients with VWF. Ninety one (91patients with VWF underwent four-finger adsorption plethysmography, and the pulse wave amplitude was recorded expressed in numeric parameters—called the native record. Next, a cold water test was conducted following with second plethysmography. The patients were divided in to the three groups. First and second inhaled 20-min of ionized oxygen O2•− or oxygen O2 respectively. Thirth group was control without treatment. All three groups a follow-up third plethysmography—the post-therapy record. Changes in the pulse wave amplitudes were evaluated. Inpatients group inhaling O2•− a modest increase of pulse wave amplitude was observed compared to the native record; patients inhaling medical oxygen O2 and the control showed a undesirable decline of pulse wave amplitude in VWF fingers. Strong vasodilatation were more frequent in the group inhaling O2•− compare to O2 (p < 0.05. Peripheral vasodilatation achieved by inhalation of O2•− could be used for VWF treatment without undesirable side effect in hospital as well as at home environment.

  19. Performance and economic effects of partially replacing soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance and economic effects of replacing soybean meal with palm kernel cake (PKC) in broiler diet was investigated in other to determine the optimal level of inclusion for maximum production in broilers. A total of 120 broiler chicks were randomly distributed into four treatment groups of 30 birds each.

  20. Effects of Partial Replacement of Soybean Meal with Cassava Leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty (150) four weeks old broilers were raised in eight litter pens for the period of four weeks to observe the effect of cassava leaf meal (CLM) on the comparative body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, feed efficiency and feed cost of the birds. Five experimental broiler finisher diets containing ...

  1. Effect of Partial Replacement of Chromolaena Odorata for Soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty point-of-lay pullets were used in a 56-day feeding trial to assess the effect of varying dietary inclusion levels of Chromolaena odorata leaf meal (COLM) on the hematology and serum biochemistry of laying birds. The birds (Nira black layer stain), were shared into four groups of 15 each and each group fed a diet ...

  2. The Hypolipidaemic Effects of the Partially Purified “Hypoglycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicated that the aqueous leaf extract caused significant (P<0.05) decrease in triacylglycerol (14 %), LDL-cholesterol (16 %), VLDL-cholesterol (19 %) and atherogenic index (45 %). The hexane fraction of the aqueous extract which was reported to possess significant hypoglycaemic effect caused significant ...

  3. The partial-reinforcement extinction effect and the contingent-sampling hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Guy; Erev, Ido

    2013-12-01

    The partial-reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) implies that learning under partial reinforcements is more robust than learning under full reinforcements. While the advantages of partial reinforcements have been well-documented in laboratory studies, field research has failed to support this prediction. In the present study, we aimed to clarify this pattern. Experiment 1 showed that partial reinforcements increase the tendency to select the promoted option during extinction; however, this effect is much smaller than the negative effect of partial reinforcements on the tendency to select the promoted option during the training phase. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the overall effect of partial reinforcements varies inversely with the attractiveness of the alternative to the promoted behavior: The overall effect is negative when the alternative is relatively attractive, and positive when the alternative is relatively unattractive. These results can be captured with a contingent-sampling model assuming that people select options that provided the best payoff in similar past experiences. The best fit was obtained under the assumption that similarity is defined by the sequence of the last four outcomes.

  4. Biological effects of the ionizing radiation. Press breakfast; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants. Petit dejeuner de presse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flury-Herard, A [CEA, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 75 - Paris (France); Boiteux, S; Dutrillaux, B [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 92 (France); Toledano, M [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences du Vivant, DSV, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2000-06-01

    This document brings together the subjects discussed during the Press breakfast of 29 june 2000 on the biological effects of the ionizing radiations, with scientists of the CEA and the CNRS. It presents the research programs and provides inquiries on the NDA operating to introduce the NDA damages by ionizing radiations, the possible repairs and the repair efficiency facing the carcinogenesis. Those researches allow the scientists to define laws on radiation protection. (A.L.B.)

  5. A technical review and assessment of the BEIR V [Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V] report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report was prepared by the DOE BEIR V Technical Review Committee (TRC) to provide a technical review and assessment of the National Research Council's Bilogical Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) Committee's Report entitled ''Health Effects of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation'' (BEIR V). This report contains seven sections. The first section serves as an introduction and reviews the charge to the TRC. The second section is a chapter-by- chapter summary of the BEIR V Report. The third section is a summary of the risk estimates and conclusions of the BEIR V Committee for genetic effects, cancer induction, and in utero effects. The fourth section is a summary and analysis of the new scientific information used by the BEIR V Committee in developing its risk recommendations and conclusions. The fifth section is an assessment of the scientific information and methods used by the BEIR V Committee in developing their risk estimates and conclusions and an analysis of the key assumptions underlying the use of these risk estimates in risk assessment. The sixth section is the TRC'S assessment of the regulatory implications of the BEIR V risk estimates and conclusions for DOE nuclear operations. The seventh and final section is the TRC'S recommended actions for DOE's consideration concerning the BEIR V Report risk estimates and conclusions. 23 refs., 5 tabs

  6. The effect of ionizing radiation and radionuclides on the embrional development of fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, K.

    1975-01-01

    The work is an attempt to review the bibliography on the effect of ionizing radiation on embrional development of fish, based mainly on Russian literature. The effect of ionizing radiation from exterior sources, as also of radioactive elements in a solution on successive fish embrional development was examined. A list of works on studies carried out with different radioactive elements affecting selected fish species is given. From several indices expressing the effects of radiation, the following are discussed in detail: survival rate, normality of development, histological changes, chromosomal changes, biochemical and physiological indexes. It is pointed out that due to varying experimental conditions it is impossible to compare the results of different authors. The phenomenon of stimulating effect of radiation on production of sex hormones, development of sexual products, survival rate of progeny, and heredity of such features, observed by several authors is still unexplained. Nevertheless, embrional development of fish remains a very sensitive biological element, suitable for testing the toxicity of radioactive substance. (author)

  7. Effect of ionization of impurity centres by electric field on the conductivity of superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Clement, A.

    1994-11-01

    The study of the effect of ionization of impurity centres by electric field E 0 on the conductivity of superlattice (SL) has been studied theoretically. It is observed that as the field E 0 increases the current rises reaches a maximum then falls off i.e. show a negative differential conductivity (NDC). Further increase in E 0 leads to an exponential rise of the current. This occur around E 0 = 3 x 10 4 V cm -1 . Hence the current density field shows a ''N'' shape characteristics as against the ''n'' shape characteristics in the absence of impurity. (author). 23 refs, 3 figs

  8. ICRP and UNSCEAR: Their roles in defining the most important biomedical effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.C.

    The history of ICRP from its origin in the British X-ray and Radiation Protection Committee (1921) to the present is described. Particular attention is directed to the evolution of occupational dose limits, which show a gradual decline, and to the perceptions of the most important effects on human beings. Recent developments in derived (or secondary) dose limits are also described. Basic to the dose limits are the risk estimates. UNSCEAR, since its establishment in 1955, has provided leadership in estimating numerically the risks of genetic defects and malignancy from exposure to ionizing radiation. The usefulness of providing risk estimates for public education has severe limitations. (author)

  9. Information value and prospects of rhythmocardiography in assessment of ionizing radiation effect on the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalenko, O.S.; Ivasenko, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work is to select methods for evaluation of heart operation and substantiate its information value for determination of radiation factor effect on the organism of mongrel white rats. Study results of cardiovascular system state, using rhythmography show, that integral indicators of regulatory mechanisms of chronotropic heart function, determined in the course of functional samples, may be considered as indicator of early reaction of the organism to ionizing radiation. Prospects of rhythmography application, which along with registration of other biologically essential functions, allows to determine in dynamics which regulatory mechanisms influence functional changes in the organism are shown. 11 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation in the physico-chemical characteristics of red wine Cabernet Sauvignon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fellipe Souza da; Leiras, Anderson; Wagner, Walsan

    2014-01-01

    The oenology in the current days is increasingly aimed obtain improvements on wine quality produced without there the deterioration of characteristics of the same, using new technologies for such order. The objective of present work will be the application of the radiation ionizing in wines Cabernet Sauvignon, with the interest of analyzing its effects on physic-chemical characteristics of this wines, such as quality, aging and etc. Were analyzed the following strands: degree alcoholic; dry extract; density and absorbance with spectrometer (420, 520 and 620 nm). (author)

  11. Radiation effect of polyether-urethane under action of different ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Chen Xiaojun; Gao Xiaoling; Xu Yunshu; Fu Yibei

    2006-01-01

    The research concerns in the radiation effect of γ-ray and electron beam on polyether-urethane. The thermal property and radical intensity were determined by differential thermal gravimetric analysis and electron spin resonance. The composition and content of gas products from samples irradiated by different ionizing radiation were analyzed by gas chromatography. The action mechanism of these two radiation resources of γ-ray and electron beam are same, but the means of energy deposit is different. It results in the differences of radical intensity and the thermal property of polyether-urethane as well as its gas products from the radiation decomposition. (authors)

  12. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  13. Plasma-screening effects upon energy levels and electron scattering from neutral and ionized caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.J.; Radtke, R.; Zimmermann, R.

    1988-01-01

    Using interaction potentials screened with the Debye-Hueckel length, the effects of plasma shielding on energy levels and electrons scattering from neutral and ionized caesium are estimated. Both energy levels and atomic scattering cross-sections are found to be sensitive to the inclusion of screening. Relating to the scattering by the Cs + ion, a low-energy resonance near E = 0.3 Ryd is found which arises from the f-wave phase shift and reflects the individual behaviour of the scattering ion. (author)

  14. Plasma-screening effects upon energy levels and electron scattering from neutral and ionized caesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Y J; Radtke, R; Zimmermann, R

    1988-01-01

    Using interaction potentials screened with the Debye-Hueckel length, the effects of plasma shielding on energy levels and electrons scattering from neutral and ionized caesium are estimated. Both energy levels and atomic scattering cross-sections are found to be sensitive to the inclusion of screening. Relating to the scattering by the Cs/sup +/ ion, a low-energy resonance near E = 0.3 Ryd is found which arises from the f-wave phase shift and reflects the individual behaviour of the scattering ion.

  15. Application of spectroscopic methods to the study of ionizing radiation effects in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez P, G.

    1995-01-01

    In general the interaction of ionizing radiation with polymers generates physic-chemical changes. Aiming to quantity these changes, three spectroscopic analytical techniques were used (UV, IR and EPR) and the chemical corrosion technique was used for three DSTN (CR39, Lexan and Makrofol) which were exposed to two radiation types: electrons and gammas. The effects of radiation are compared. Also a correlation between the UV and Vg results in function of dose is presented. The possible causes of the increase in chemical corrosion are discussed. (Author)

  16. Electron-ion correlation effects in ion-atom single ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colavecchia, F.D.; Garibotti, C.R. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Gasaneo, G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2000-06-28

    We study the effect of electron-ion correlation in single ionization processes of atoms by ion impact. We present a distorted wave model where the final state is represented by a correlated function solution of a non-separable three-body continuum Hamiltonian, that includes electron-ion correlation as coupling terms of the wave equation. A comparison of the electronic differential cross sections computed with this model with other theories and experimental data reveals that the influence of the electron-ion correlation is more significant for low energy emitted electrons. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  17. Information on biological health effects of ionizing radiation and radionuclides: the rule of a web site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comte, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Flury-Herard, A.; Ourly, F.; Hemidy, P.; Lallemand, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a source of information on biological and health effects of radionuclides and ionizing radiation in an easy to use format. Reported work is made up of two distinct parts: data sheets for selected radionuclides and a web file. Data sheets: Specific radiation data sheets provide an overview of the properties, the environmental behaviour, the different pathways of human exposure and the biological and health consequences of selected radionuclides. Radionuclides that have been selected are those commonly dealt with in nuclear industry (and in other areas such as medicine) and released to the environment or naturally occurring (plutonium, tritium, carbon 14). Data sheets corresponding to the different radionuclides are based on the main sources of scientific information in dosimetry, epidemiology, radiobiology and radiation protection. These data sheets are intended for radiation protection specialists and physicians. They include: main physical and chemical characteristics, main radiation protection data: dose coefficients (public, workers), dose limits sources, total released estimate (nuclear industry, atmospheric tests, main pathway of human exposure and biological behaviour, biological and health effects, medical supervision, treatment a list of the main references, appendix providing accurate information. Web file: http://www-dsv.cea.fr/doc/carmin_ext/fond.php This web file provides a source of information on biological and health effects of ionizing radiation and biological basic knowledge of radiation protection. Available for consultation via Internet, compiled information provides, in a same file, subjects as varied as biological mechanisms, ionizing radiations action, biological and health effects, risk assessment This file is mainly intended to assist in informing and training of non-specialist readership (students, teaching on radiation protection basic knowledge. This electronic document is divided in three

  18. Ionizing radiation effect on physico-mechanical characteristics of thermoplastic polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankevich, V.M.; Pleskachevsky, Yu.M.; Smirnov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Investigation results in the field of ionizing radiation effect on structure and physico-mechanical properties of novel polymer materials are presented. The materials under study are various grades of PETP, PA-6 and polyethylene concentrate of technical carbon (PECC) commercially produced and extensively used in Belarus and abroad. It has been proved using EPR, thermomechanical and gel analyses that a combined effect of ionizing radiation within 0 to 10 MGy of absorbed dose range under different concentrations of mineral fillers (TiO 2 , kaolin, carbon black, graphite) and intensive cross-linking processes in amorphous phase are able to considerably improve strength characteristics of the studied polymers and their compositions. Most informative parameter was found to be breaking strength at rapture (σ r ) which enables to estimate the character of ionizing effect on the targets. At 0.01-0.05 MGy absorbed dose the highest σ r was shown as compared to initial PETP by the following materials: PN grade - 9 times, D - two and a half. When absorbed dose of PETP reached 0.2 MGy, σ r of PN surpassed the initial material 7.8 times, that of D - by 30% and E - by 1,5%. This is the evidence of elevated resistance of named materials to ionizing radiation in contrast to non-filled PETP 215. Growth of σ r in PA-6 has been noticed at absorbed dose above 2 MGy in response to maximum gel-formation values. Abrupt reduction of the studied parameters of PP upon irradiation is attributed to its destruction. Domination of cross-linking processes has been observed in PEVP and PECC which reduces macromolecular mobility and elasticity of the material as a whole but promotes polymer strengthening. Drop of PEVP impact strength can be related to its embrittlement. Presence of the filler (carbon black) in PECC at the initial stage of exposure resulted in improvement of studied parameters. Their further impairment is the result of limited mobility of macromolecules owing to cross-linking in

  19. International conference on the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    An International Conference on the Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the European Commission (EC) and the International Union of Radioecology (IUR), will be held in Stockholm, Sweden, from 6-10 October 2003. This Conference will be hosted by the Government of Sweden through the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). This publication contains contributed papers submitted on issues within the scope of the conference, which were accepted following a review by the Conference Programme Committee. The primary objective of this Conference is to foster information exchange, with the aim of promoting the development of a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from effects attributable to ionizing radiation. This Conference is one in a series of meetings organized by, or held in co-operation with, the IAEA on this subject. It will include a review of recent developments in this area, and consideration of their implications for future work at national and international levels. The topics on which contributed papers were requested are as follows: Existing environmental protection approaches; Development of an international assessment framework; The scientific basis for environmental radiation assessment; Development of management approaches.

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on structural changes of energy nutrients in feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, J.; Smid, K.; Hrusovsky, J.

    1985-01-01

    For the purpose of testing the effect of ionizing radiation, feeds for dogs (meat feed mixture VETACAN and loose feed mixture VETAVIT) irradiated with 60 Co at a dose of 25 kGy/kg were studied for 60 days. It was found that the total volume of energetic and non-energetic nutrients did not change. Qualitative structure, however, displayed a significant, on the average 35% disintegration of essential amino acids, a decrease in proteins and increase in free ammoniacal bases. A significant oxidation effect of radiation is exerted on the decomposition of fats with a release of free fatty acids from the glycerol bond in a process similar to racidification (from 13.3 - 20.88 - 37.10 mg/g in meat mixture, from 103.1 - 130.04 - 135.04 mg/g in loose mixture). A certain disintegration of nutrients, only within the limits of significance, occurred also in the saccharide proportion of the loose feed mixture (acidity of water extract 348.8 - 403.99 -436.60 mg/100 g). It was proved that radiosterilization reliably secured microbiological and mycological sanitation of feeds and caused no sensory changes noticeable by human senses. It follows from the results that ionizing radiation had a pronounced antimicrobial and antimycotic effect. However, it caused significant structural changes in energetic nutrients in the feeds of animal as well as of vegetable origin. (author)

  1. Channel-closing effects in strong-field ionization by a bicircular field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2018-03-01

    Channel-closing effects, such as threshold anomalies and resonantlike intensity-dependent enhancements in strong-field ionization by a bicircular laser field are analyzed. A bicircular field consists of two coplanar corotating or counter-rotating circularly polarized fields having different frequencies. For the total detachment rate of a negative ion by a bicircular field we observe threshold anomalies and explain them using the Wigner threshold law and energy and angular momentum conservation. For the corotating bicircular case, these effects are negligible, while for the counter-rotating case they are pronounced and their position depends on the magnetic quantum number of the initial state. For high-order above-threshold ionization of rare-gas atoms by a counter-rotating bicircular laser field we observe very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements. We find all four types of threshold anomalies known from collision theory. Contrary to the case of linear polarization, channel-closing effects for a bicircular field are visible also in the cutoff region of the electron energy spectrum, which is explained using quantum-orbit theory.

  2. Bystander effects of ionizing radiation can be modulated by signaling amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, R.C.C.; Agnihotri, N.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C.

    2007-01-01

    Actual risk and risk management of exposure to ionizing radiation are among the most controversial areas in environmental health protection. Recent developments in radiobiology especially characterization of bystander effects have called into question established dogmas and are thought to cast doubt on the scientific basis of the risk assessment framework, leading to uncertainty for regulators and concern among affected populations. In this paper we test the hypothesis that small signaling molecules widely used throughout the animal kingdom for signaling stress or environmental change, such as 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin), L-DOPA, glycine or nicotine are involved in bystander signaling processes following ionizing radiation exposure. We report data which suggest that nano to micromolar concentrations of these agents can modulate bystander-induced cell death. Depletion of 5-HT present in tissue culture medium, occurred following irradiation of cells. This suggested that 5-HT might be bound by membrane receptors after irradiation. Expression of 5-HT type 3 receptors which are Ca 2+ ion channels was confirmed in the cells using immunocytochemistry and receptor expression could be increased using radiation or 5-HT exposure. Zofran and Kitryl, inhibitors of 5-HT type 3 receptors, and reserpine a generic serotonin antagonist block the bystander effect induced by radiation or by serotonin. The results may be important for the mechanistic understanding of how low doses of radiation interact with cells to produce biological effects

  3. Comparison of the dose-effect relationship for UV radiation and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenhouts, H.P.; Sijsma, M.J.; Chadwick, K.H.

    1990-06-01

    Ionizing radiation and ultraviolet radiation (UV) are both physical agents with mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. However, there are some basic differences in the fundamental mechanism of their interaction with biological material that may have consequences for risk assessment. In this paper the dose-effect relationships for gamma radiation and UV at cellular level will be used to demonstrate the different radio-biological effectiveness of both agents. The results will be discussed in the framework of a biophysical model, based on the assumption that DNA doublestranded lesions are crucial for the cytotoxic action. After exposure to ionizing radiation, the lesions are fixed immediately following irradiation, but after UV exposure the lethal lesions are recognized only in the next DNA synthesis phase. The combination of this concept with the mechanism of lesion induction and the possibility of repair, leads to different dose and time relationships for the radiation effects of both agents. The possible consequences for risk assessment at low levels will be discussed. (author). 9 refs.; 5 figs

  4. Antioxidant Approaches to Management of Ionizing Irradiation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Greenberger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing irradiation induces acute and chronic injury to tissues and organs. Applications of antioxidant therapies for the management of ionizing irradiation injury fall into three categories: (1 radiation counter measures against total or partial body irradiation; (2 normal tissue protection against acute organ specific ionizing irradiation injury; and (3 prevention of chronic/late radiation tissue and organ injury. The development of antioxidant therapies to ameliorate ionizing irradiation injury began with initial studies on gene therapy using Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (MnSOD transgene approaches and evolved into applications of small molecule radiation protectors and mitigators. The understanding of the multiple steps in ionizing radiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ injury, as well as total body effects is required to optimize the use of antioxidant therapies, and to sequence such approaches with targeted therapies for the multiple steps in the irradiation damage response.

  5. Incorporating partial shining effects in proton pencil-beam dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Lii Mingfwu; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, Ron X; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-01-01

    A range modulator wheel (RMW) is an essential component in passively scattered proton therapy. We have observed that a proton beam spot may shine on multiple steps of the RMW. Proton dose calculation algorithms normally do not consider the partial shining effect, and thus overestimate the dose at the proximal shoulder of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) compared with the measurement. If the SOBP is adjusted to better fit the plateau region, the entrance dose is likely to be underestimated. In this work, we developed an algorithm that can be used to model this effect and to allow for dose calculations that better fit the measured SOBP. First, a set of apparent modulator weights was calculated without considering partial shining. Next, protons spilled from the accelerator reaching the modulator wheel were simplified as a circular spot of uniform intensity. A weight-splitting process was then performed to generate a set of effective modulator weights with the partial shining effect incorporated. The SOBPs of eight options, which are used to label different combinations of proton-beam energy and scattering devices, were calculated with the generated effective weights. Our algorithm fitted the measured SOBP at the proximal and entrance regions much better than the ones without considering partial shining effect for all SOBPs of the eight options. In a prostate patient, we found that dose calculation without considering partial shining effect underestimated the femoral head and skin dose

  6. On the common mechanism for initiation of different effects of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1996-01-01

    Main regularities of different endpoints of ionizing radiation low dose effects (adaptive response, stimulation of proliferation, special radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells, and others) have been examined. It has been shown that these endpoints have a commonness for the dose interval, the shape of the dose-response curve, the reverse effect of dose rate, non-specificity toward initiating agents, and others. An explanation is suggested for the common mechanism of the initiation of all the studied low dose effects, basing on the theory of the non-specific reaction of cell to external influences. It is concluded that initiation of the low dose effects is conditioned by radiation induced damage of functions of plasmic and internal membranes

  7. Verification for the disagreement between effective point and geometrical center of thimble ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, K.; Tabushi, K.

    2005-01-01

    In radiotherapy, it is certainly necessary to grasp the quantity and the distribution of the radiation administered to the human body. To measure these correctly, the standard measurement method of the absorbed dose of water is recommended by AAPM, IAEA, and JSPM. The standard method also recommends that absolute measurements should be performed using the thimble ionization chamber (TIC). The absorbed dose of water measured by TIC should be corrected for diverse effects. There is the definition of measurement point for TIC based on these effects. Because TIC is cylindrical form and has finite volume, the measurement point differs from the geometrical center of TIC. In the standard definitions, the point is called the effective point and recommended that its location is a shift equal to 0.6 times of the inner radius of TIC from the geometrical center. In this work, we examined the accuracy of the definitions of the effective point for TIC by simulation with EGS4. (author)

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation upon natural populations and ecosystems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    Accomplishments throughout a 10-year period summarized include: a study of the effects of radiation from a γ source on the ecology of the El Verde rain forest in Puerto Rico, with emphasis on the role of secondary succession in the recovery of forest ecosystems following irradiation; the effects of light and temperature on gaseous exchange in trees using 14 CO 2 as a tracer in Palcourea; the nature of the sensitivity of pine trees to ionizing radiation and the possible synergistic effects of elevated ozone levels on radiosensitivity; the combined effects of radioactive and thermal effluents on plant communities of a swamp hardwood forest; and the development of a new conceptual approach to the evaluation of environmental quality, with emphasis on ecological perspectives in land use planning

  9. 76 FR 22414 - Amended Proposed Withdrawal, Notice of Public Meetings, Partial Termination of Segregative Effect...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Withdrawal, Notice of Public Meetings, Partial Termination of Segregative Effect; Arizona, California... the proposed SEZs to include some additional lands. It also terminates the segregative effect as to... proposal is cancelled and the segregative effect established by the June 30, 2009, Notice of Proposed...

  10. Ionizing radiation effect study by electron beam on acrylonitrile butadiene styrene - ABS terpolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, Tania Regina Lourenco

    2003-01-01

    The great advantage in the researches involving development has as objective to increase significantly the quality of the products. The ABS (acrylonitrile, butadiene, styrene) resins are terpolymers formed by an elastomer and two thermoplastics amorphous components. The three different monomeric units from the terpolymer ABS contribute separately to the material characteristics exhibited. The molecular stiffness originating from polystyrene and the benzene ring hanging on the chain is responsible for the flexion module ABS. The acrylonitrile and the styrene incorporated butadiene exercises strong influence in the resistance to the impact because it reduces the bonding among them. The engineering use of this terpolymer became important due their mechanical properties and mainly, for the responses of this to tensions or deformations applied. The polymeric materials, when submitted to the ionizing radiation are modified by the transference of energy to these materials, introducing excitation and ionization of the molecules, generating chemical reactions that can produce permanent modifications in the polymeric physicochemical structure. The induced modifications can result in the polymeric material degradation or crosslinking, which can result in the improvement of some properties. This work has, as objective, to study the electron beam ionizing radiation effect, at different doses, in the properties of the polymer ABS. The studied properties were: tensile strength at break, elongation at break, Izod impact strength, flexural strength, melt flow index, Vicat softening temperature and the thermic distortion temperature. Also researches on Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analyses (TGA) were accomplished. From the experimental results, it was showed that for doses until 500 kGy, at 22.6 kGy/s dose rate, in the presence of air, the crosslinking process of ABS prevails. (author)

  11. Nitric oxide coordinates development of genomic instability in realization of combined effect with ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V M; Diomina, E A; Muzalov, I I; Gerashchenko, B I

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of environmental nitrogen oxides or natural nitric oxide (NO) donors to modify free radicals ba-lance and development of genomic instability alone or in combination with ionizing radiation. Genotoxicity and cytogenetic abnormalities were assessed in vitro in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) isolated from healthy humans or in vivo in rats PBL. Human PBL were treated with physiologically relevant NO donor - S-Nitrosoglutathione and X-ray irradiation. The inhalation treatment of animals with NO was carried out in chamber with purified gaseous NO mixed inside with air. Levels of S-Nitrosohemoglobin and methemoglobin in the blood were assessed with electron paramagnetic resonance. The total level of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in PBL was determined fluorometrically, and serum levels of reactive oxygen species was determined by spectrophotometric assay. DNA damages were assessed by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in human PBL measured with the conventional cytogenetic assay in metaphase cells on short-term (52 h) and long-term (72 h) cultures. Environmental nitrogen oxides or release of NO from stable complexes with biomolecules (such as S-Nitrosothiols) intensified generation of free radicals, DNA damage and development of genomic instability alone or in combination with ionizing radiation. Treatment of PBL by S-Nitrosoglutathione caused prevalent induction of chromatid type but irradiation - chromosome aberrations. The dose dependence of chromatid-type aberrations observed in human PBL after combined influence of S-Nitrosoglutathione and ionizing radiation indicates a crucial role of NO in the formation of chromosomal instability. NO can deregulate free radicals balance resulted in genotoxic effect, posttranslational modification of repair enzymes and thus coordinated development of genomic instability and increase of cancer risk.

  12. Evaluation of effects of ionizing radiation on the titanium used in dental restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos; Fernandes, Marco A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on titanium, a material used in dental restorations. Titanium is used to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, seen when the teeth are restored within in the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to X-radiation beams from 6 and 10 Mega - Volt (MV) from a linear accelerator, VARIAN 2100C model. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence techniques to compare the chemical composition before and after the irradiation. Sample dose measurements were performed employing Geiger-Mueller detectors and the ionization chamber in order to verify any residual radiation in the samples. The samples were also analyzed by gamma spectrometry by a HPGe detector. These tests were performed to determine small changes in the composition in the samples due to the radiation interaction. The results of this study may encourage the development of new research for alternative materials in dental restorations that can contribute to improve the quality of life of those patients with tumors of the mouth. (author)

  13. Alignment effects in two-photon double ionization of H2 in femtosecond xuv laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Xiaoxu; Bartschat, Klaus; Schneider, Barry I.

    2011-01-01

    Triple-differential cross sections for two-photon double ionization of the aligned hydrogen molecule at the equilibrium distance are presented for a central photon energy of 30 eV. The temporal response of the laser-driven molecule is investigated by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in full dimensionality using two-center elliptical coordinates and a finite-element discrete-variable-representation approach. The molecular orientation is found to have a strong effect on the emission modes of the two correlated photoelectrons. This molecular effect is most noticeable when the molecular axis and the laser polarization vector are oriented parallel to each other. For intermediate cases between the parallel and perpendicular geometries, the dominant emission modes for two-electron ejection oscillate between those for the two extreme cases. The contributions from different ionization channels are also analyzed in detail. Depending on the emission direction of the reference electron, the interference contributions from the various channels can be constructive or destructive at small alignment angles, while they always contribute constructively to the triple-differential cross sections near the perpendicular geometry.

  14. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility.

  15. Long-term effects of ionizing radiation on the rat spinal cord: intramedullary connective tissue formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, S.A.

    1973-01-01

    Light microscopy was used to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on spinal cords of rats irradiated when three days of age and killed at intervals up to 28 months after irradiation. The amounts of x-rays administered (2,000 R; 1,000 R; 500 R) were those which had been demonstrated by short-term studies to cause either no histopathologic changes or only transient, reparable alterations. The most significant and previously unreported finding was the development, usually restricted to the gray matter, of elongated, spindle-shaped cells that produce prodigious amounts of fibers clearly demonstrated by the Wilder's reticular stain. In cases where extensive cellular development had occurred, these cells were oriented around the perikarya of the large ventral motor neurons and formed a well-developed capsule of reticular fibers. This phenomenon occurred more frequently in rats receiving the greater amounts of radiation and killed 12 months or more after exposure. The other observation of interest was the development of lesser amounts of connective tissue-producing cells in the dorsal gray matter, where these cells were seen initially in the substantia gelatinosa. The significance of these changes is discussed in relation to previously reported long-term effects of ionizing radiation on the central nervous system

  16. Protective effects of melatonin on damage of thymocytes in mice induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuan; Wang Zhenqi; Liu Yang; Gong Shouliang; Zhang Ming; Liu Shuzheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of melatonin (MLT) on the damage of mouse thymocytes in vivo induced by ionizing radiation and its mechanism. Methods: The exogenous MLT was given to Kunming mice to establish the animal models of single and successive administration of MLT through intraperitoneal injection before whole-body irradiation with 1 Gy X-rays. For single administration of MLT, the apoptotic body percentage (ABP) and DNA lytic rate (DLR) in the thymocytes were determined with flow cytometry and fluorospectrophotometry, respectively, 12 h after irradiation. For successive administration of MLT, 3 H-TdR incorporative rate (HTIR ) was determined 24 h after irradiation. Results: The number of thymocytes in single administration group was significantly lower than that in the sham-irradiation group 12 h after irradiation with 1 Gy X-rays (P -1 MLT group was significantly higher, while the ABP and DLR were significantly lower than those in 0 mg·kg -1 MLT group (simple irradiation, P -1 MLT were significantly higher than that in 0 mg·kg -1 MLT group (P -1 MLT group was also significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusion: The administration of exogenous MLT before irradiation can decrease the damage of mouse thymocytes induced by ionizing radiation, and has the protective effect on immune functions in mice. (authors)

  17. Effects of classical resonances on the chaotic microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R V

    1987-05-01

    Experimental measurements of the microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from n = 32 to 90 are well described by a classical treatment of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In particular, the measurements of the threshold field for the onset of significant ionization exhibits a curious dependence on the microwave frequency with distinct peaks at rational values of the scaled frequency, n/sup 3/..cap omega.. = 1, 2/3, 1/2, 2/5, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, which is in excellent agreement with the predictions for the onset of classical chaos in a one-dimensional model of the experiment. In the classical theory this frequency dependence of the threshold fields is due to the stabilizing effect of nonlinear resonances (''islands'') in the classical phase space which is greatly enhanced when the microwave perturbation is turned on slowly (adiabatically) as in the experiments. Quantum calculations for this one-dimensional model also exhibit this stabilizing effect due to the preferential excitation of localized quasi-energy states.

  18. Evaluation of effects of ionizing radiation on the glass ionomer used in dental restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, F.M.; Santos, A.; Fernandes, M.A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on glass ionomer, a material used in dental restorations. Glass ionomer is used to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, seen when the teeth are restored within in the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to X-radiation beams from 6 MV from a linear accelerator, VARIAN 2100C model. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence techniques to compare the chemical composition before and after the irradiation. Sample dose measurements were performed employing Geiger-Mueller detectors and the ionization chamber in order to verify any residual radiation in the samples. The samples were also analyzed by gamma spectrometry by a HPGe detector. These tests were performed to determine small changes in the composition in the samples due to the radiation interaction. The results of this study may encourage the development of new research for alternative materials in dental restorations that can contribute to improve the quality of life of those patients with tumors of the mouth. (author)

  19. Cooperative biological effects between ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, Lorenzo; D'Arco, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), at environmentally and therapeutically relevant doses or as a result of diagnostics or accidents, causes cyto- and genotoxic damage. However, exposure to IR alone is a rare event as it occurs in spatial and temporal combination with several physico-chemical agents. Some of these are of known noxiousness, as is the case with chemical compounds at high dose, hence additive/synergistic effects can be expected or have been demonstrated. Conversely, the cellular toxicity of other agents, such as non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), is only presumed and their short- and long-term cooperation on IR-induced damage remains undetermined. In this review, we shall examine evidence in support of the interplay between spatially and/or temporally related environmentally relevant stressors. In vitro or animal-based studies as well as epidemiological surveys have generally examined the combined action of no more than a couple of known or potentially DNA-damaging agents. Moreover, most existing research mainly focused on short-term effects of combined exposures. Hence, it is important that quantitative research addresses the issue of the possible cooperation between chronic exposure to environmental trace contaminants and exposure to EMFs, examining not only the modulation of damage acutely induced by IR but also long-term genome stability. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of effects of ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio

    2009-01-01

    This work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations (Titanium, Amalgam, Resin Composite and Glass Ionomer) aiming the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, arising when the teeth are restored within in the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to X-ray beams of 6 MV from a linear accelerator, VARIAN 2100C model. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence techniques to compare the chemical composition before and after the irradiation. The sample were submitted to Geiger-Mueller detectors and the ionization chambers in order to verify any residual radiation in the samples. The samples were also analyzed by gamma spectrometry by a Germanium detector. These tests were performed to determine small changes in the composition in the samples due to the radiation interaction. The results of this study may encourage the development of new research for alternative materials in dental restorations that can contribute to improve the quality of life of those patients with tumors of the mouth. (author)