WorldWideScience

Sample records for partial breast radiation

  1. Radiation recall secondary to adjuvant docetaxel after balloon-catheter based accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Nathan W.; Wong, William W.; Karlin, Nina J.; Gray, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    For early stage breast cancer, wide local excision and post-operative whole breast irradiation is a standard treatment. If adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended, radiation is usually given after completion of chemotherapy. In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy has become an option for selected patients. For these patients, adjuvant chemotherapy would have to be administered after radiation. The sequence of treatment with radiation followed by chemotherapy results in increased risk of radiation recall reaction (RRD) in these patients. Docetaxel is becoming a more commonly used drug as adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. Here we report a case of docetaxel induced RRD after APBI with balloon-cathetered based brachytherapy. Such reaction would have an adverse impact on the cosmetic outcome and quality of life of the patient. For patients who develop an intense skin reaction after the administration of docetaxel following APBI, RRD should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  2. A treatment planning study comparing whole breast radiation therapy against conformal, IMRT and tomotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Mike; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene; Van Dyk, Jake; Perera, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose and background: Conventional early breast cancer treatment consists of a lumpectomy followed by whole breast radiation therapy. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an investigational approach to post-lumpectomy radiation for early breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to compare four external beam APBI techniques, including tomotherapy, with conventional whole breast irradiation for their radiation conformity index, dose homogeneity index, and dose to organs at risk. Methods and materials: Small-field tangents, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy were compared for each of 15 patients (7 right, 8 left). One radiation conformity and two dose homogeneity indices were used to evaluate the dose to the target. The mean dose to organs at risk was also evaluated. Results: All proposed APBI techniques improved the conformity index significantly over whole breast tangents while maintaining dose homogeneity and without a significant increase in dose to organs at risk. Conclusion: The four-field IMRT plan produced the best dosimetric results; however this technique would require appropriate respiratory motion management. An alternative would be to use a four-field conformal technique that is less sensitive to the effects of respiratory motion

  3. Dosimetric Comparison of Three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Radiotherapy and Helical Tomotherapy Partial Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Yun Kyeong; Kim, Jung Soo; Hwang, Jae Woong; Jeong, Kyeong Sik; Choi, Gye Suk

    2008-01-01

    The goal of radiation treatment is to deliver a prescribed radiation dose to the target volume accurately while minimizing dose to normal tissues. In this paper, we comparing the dose distribution between three dimensional conformal radiation radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and helical tomotherapy (TOMO) plan for partial breast cancer. Twenty patients were included in the study, and plans for two techniques were developed for each patient (left breast:10 patients, right breast:10 patients). For each patient 3D-CRT planning was using pinnacle planning system, inverse plan was made using Tomotherapy Hi-Art system and using the same targets and optimization goals. We comparing the Homogeneity index (HI), Conformity index (CI) and sparing of the organs at risk for dose-volume histogram. Whereas the HI, CI of TOMO was significantly better than the other, 3D-CRT was observed to have significantly poorer HI, CI. The percentage ipsilateral non-PTV breast volume that was delivered 50% of the prescribed dose was 3D-CRT (mean: 40.4%), TOMO (mean: 18.3%). The average ipsilateral lung volume percentage receiving 20% of the PD was 3D-CRT (mean: 4.8%), TOMO (mean: 14.2), concerning the average heart volume receiving 20% and 10% of the PD during treatment of left breast cancer 3D-CRT (mean: 1.6%, 3.0%), TOMO (mean: 9.7%, 26.3%) In summary, 3D-CRT and TOMO techniques were found to have acceptable PTV coverage in our study. However, in TOMO, high conformity to the PTV and effective breast tissue sparing was achieved at the expense of considerable dose exposure to the lung and heart.

  4. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Janet K.; Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua; Geradts, Joseph; Chang, Zheng; Baker, Jay A.; Georgiade, Gregory S.; Chen, Wei; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao; Broadwater, Gloria; Groth, Jeff; Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark; Barry, William T.; Duffy, Eileen A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  5. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Geradts, Joseph [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Baker, Jay A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Georgiade, Gregory S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Wei [Department of Bioinformatics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Groth, Jeff [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Barry, William T. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duffy, Eileen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  6. Partial Breast Radiation Therapy With Proton Beam: 5-Year Results With Cosmetic Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Do, Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Lum, Sharon; Garberoglio, Carlos [Department of Surgical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Patyal, Baldev; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: We updated our previous report of a phase 2 trial using proton beam radiation therapy to deliver partial breast irradiation (PBI) in patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had invasive nonlobular carcinoma with a maximal dimension of 3 cm. Patients underwent partial mastectomy with negative margins; axillary lymph nodes were negative on sampling. Subjects received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy to the surgical bed. The dose delivered was 40 Gy in 10 fractions, once daily over 2 weeks. Multiple fields were treated daily, and skin-sparing techniques were used. Following treatment, patients were evaluated with clinical assessments and annual mammograms to monitor toxicity, tumor recurrence, and cosmesis. Results: One hundred subjects were enrolled and treated. All patients completed the assigned treatment and were available for post-treatment analysis. The median follow-up was 60 months. Patients had a mean age of 63 years; 90% had ductal histology; the average tumor size was 1.3 cm. Actuarial data at 5 years included ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence-free survival of 97% (95% confidence interval: 100%-93%); disease-free survival of 94%; and overall survival of 95%. There were no cases of grade 3 or higher acute skin reactions, and late skin reactions included 7 cases of grade 1 telangiectasia. Patient- and physician-reported cosmesis was good to excellent in 90% of responses, was not changed from baseline measurements, and was well maintained throughout the entire 5-year follow-up period. Conclusions: Proton beam radiation therapy for PBI produced excellent ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival with minimal toxicity. The treatment proved to be adaptable to all breast sizes and lumpectomy cavity configurations. Cosmetic results appear to be excellent and unchanged from baseline out to 5 years following treatment. Cosmetic results may be improved over those reported with photon

  7. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Consensus Statement From the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Benjamin D.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Hahn, Carol A.; Hardenbergh, Patricia H.; Julian, Thomas B.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Todor, Dorin A. Ph.D.; Vicini, Frank A.; Whelan, Timothy J.; White, Julia; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Harris, Jay R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present guidance for patients and physicians regarding the use of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI), based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials: A systematic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database yielded 645 candidate original research articles potentially applicable to APBI. Of these, 4 randomized trials and 38 prospective single-arm studies were identified. A Task Force composed of all authors synthesized the published evidence and, through a series of meetings, reached consensus regarding the recommendations contained herein. Results: The Task Force proposed three patient groups: (1) a 'suitable' group, for whom APBI outside of a clinical trial is acceptable, (2) a 'cautionary' group, for whom caution and concern should be applied when considering APBI outside of a clinical trial, and (3) an 'unsuitable' group, for whom APBI outside of a clinical trial is not generally considered warranted. Patients who choose treatment with APBI should be informed that whole-breast irradiation (WBI) is an established treatment with a much longer track record that has documented long-term effectiveness and safety. Conclusion: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation is a new technology that may ultimately demonstrate long-term effectiveness and safety comparable to that of WBI for selected patients with early breast cancer. This consensus statement is intended to provide guidance regarding the use of APBI outside of a clinical trial and to serve as a framework to promote additional clinical investigations into the optimal role of APBI in the treatment of breast cancer.

  8. The impact of dose calculation algorithms on partial and whole breast radiation treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basran, Parminder S; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Berrang, Tanya; Olivotto, Ivo A; Beckham, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the calculated dose to target and normal tissues when using pencil beam (PBC), superposition/convolution (AAA) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for whole breast (WBI) and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) treatment plans. Plans for 10 patients who met all dosimetry constraints on a prospective APBI protocol when using PBC calculations were recomputed with AAA and MC, keeping the monitor units and beam angles fixed. Similar calculations were performed for WBI plans on the same patients. Doses to target and normal tissue volumes were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test. For WBI plans the average dose to target volumes when using PBC calculations was not significantly different than AAA calculations, the average PBC dose to the ipsilateral breast was 10.5% higher than the AAA calculations and the average MC dose to the ipsilateral breast was 11.8% lower than the PBC calculations. For ABPI plans there were no differences in dose to the planning target volume, ipsilateral breast, heart, ipsilateral lung, or contra-lateral lung. Although not significant, the maximum PBC dose to the contra-lateral breast was 1.9% higher than AAA and the PBC dose to the clinical target volume was 2.1% higher than AAA. When WBI technique is switched to APBI, there was significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral breast when using PBC, a significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral lung when using AAA, and a significant reduction in dose to the ipsilateral breast and lung and contra-lateral lung when using MC. There is very good agreement between PBC, AAA and MC for all target and most normal tissues when treating with APBI and WBI and most of the differences in doses to target and normal tissues are not clinically significant. However, a commonly used dosimetry constraint, as recommended by the ASTRO consensus document for APBI, that no point in the contra-lateral breast volume should receive >3% of the prescribed dose needs

  9. Three-Year Outcomes of a Canadian Multicenter Study of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Conformal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrang, Tanya S., E-mail: tberrang@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Kim, Do-Hoon [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Nichol, Alan [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Cho, B.C. John [Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mohamed, Islam G. [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Southern Interior, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Parhar, Tarnjit [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Wright, J.R. [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Truong, Pauline [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Sussman, Jonathan [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada); Wai, Elaine [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island, BC (Canada); University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Whelan, Tim [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Ontario (Canada); McMaster University, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To report 3-year toxicity, cosmesis, and efficacy of a multicenter study of external beam, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and August 2006, 127 women aged {>=}40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer {<=}3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study involving five Canadian cancer centers. Women meeting predefined dose constraints were treated with APBI using 3 to 5 photon beams, delivering 35 to 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions, twice a day, over 1 week. Patients were assessed for treatment-related toxicities, cosmesis, and efficacy before APBI and at specified time points for as long as 3 years after APBI. Results: 104 women had planning computed tomography scans showing visible seromas, met dosimetric constraints, and were treated with APBI to doses of 35 Gy (n = 9), 36 Gy (n = 33), or 38.5 Gy (n = 62). Eighty-seven patients were evaluated with minimum 3-year follow-up after APBI. Radiation dermatitis, breast edema, breast induration, and fatigue decreased from baseline levels or stabilized by the 3-year follow-up. Hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, breast pain, and telangiectasia slightly increased from baseline levels. Most toxicities at 3 years were Grade 1. Only 1 patient had a Grade 3 toxicity with telangiectasia in a skin fold inside the 95% isodose. Cosmesis was good to excellent in 86% (89/104) of women at baseline and 82% (70/85) at 3 years. The 3-year disease-free survival was 97%, with only one local recurrence that occurred in a different quadrant away from the treated site and two distant recurrences. Conclusions: At 3 years, toxicity and cosmesis were acceptable, and local control and disease-free survival were excellent, supporting continued accrual to randomized APBI trials.

  10. Impact of partial versus whole breast radiation therapy on fatigue, perceived stress, quality of life and natural killer cell activity in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Tell, Dina; Lobo, Philip; Millbrandt, Linda; Mathews, Herbert L; Janusek, Linda Witek

    2012-06-18

    This pilot study used a prospective longitudinal design to compare the effect of adjuvant whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) versus partial breast radiation therapy (PBRT) on fatigue, perceived stress, quality of life and natural killer cell activity (NKCA) in women receiving radiation after breast cancer surgery. Women (N = 30) with early-stage breast cancer received either PBRT, Mammosite brachytherapy at dose of 34 Gy 10 fractions/5 days, (N = 15) or WBRT, 3-D conformal techniques at dose of 50 Gy +10 Gy Boost/30 fractions, (N = 15). Treatment was determined by the attending oncologist after discussion with the patient and the choice was based on tumor stage and clinical need. Women were assessed prior to initiation of radiation therapy and twice after completion of radiation therapy. At each assessment, blood was obtained for determination of NKCA and the following instruments were administered: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F), and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G). Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to evaluate group differences in initial outcomes and change in outcomes over time. Fatigue (FACT-F) levels, which were similar prior to radiation therapy, demonstrated a significant difference in trajectory. Women who received PBRT reported progressively lower fatigue; conversely fatigue worsened over time for women who received WBRT. No difference in perceived stress was observed between women who received PBRT or WBRT. Both groups of women reported similar levels of quality of life (FACT-G) prior to initiation of radiation therapy. However, HLM analysis revealed significant group differences in the trajectory of quality of life, such that women receiving PBRT exhibited a linear increase in quality of life over time after completion of radiation therapy; whereas women receiving WBRT showed a decreasing trajectory. NKCA was also similar between therapy

  11. Accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Whole breast radiotherapy afier tumor lumpectomy is based on the premise that that the breast cancer recurrence rate is reduced through the elimination of residual cancer foci in the remaining tissue immediately adjacent to the lumpectomy site and occult multicentric areas of in situ or infiltrating cancer in remote areas of the breast. The relevance of remote foci to ipsilateral breast failure rates after breast conserving treatment is debatable, because 65%~100% of recurrences develop in the same quadrant as the initial tumor. This has led several investigators to question whether radiotherapy must be administered to the entire breast.

  12. NRG Oncology-Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 1014: 1-Year Toxicity Report From a Phase 2 Study of Repeat Breast-Preserving Surgery and 3-Dimensional Conformal Partial-Breast Reirradiation for In-Breast Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Douglas W; Winter, Kathryn A; Kuerer, Henry M; Haffty, Bruce G; Cuttino, Laurie W; Todor, Dorin A; Simone, Nicole L; Hayes, Shelly B; Woodward, Wendy A; McCormick, Beryl; Cohen, Randi J; Sahijdak, Walter M; Canaday, Daniel J; Brown, Doris R; Currey, Adam D; Fisher, Christine M; Jagsi, Reshma; White, Julia

    2017-08-01

    To determine the associated toxicity, tolerance, and safety of partial-breast reirradiation. Eligibility criteria included in-breast recurrence occurring >1 year after whole-breast irradiation, 1 to ≤2 cm, and 1 >2 cm. All patients were clinically node negative. Systemic therapy was delivered in 51%. All treatment plans underwent quality review for contouring accuracy and dosimetric compliance. All treatment plans scored acceptable for tumor volume contouring and tumor volume dose-volume analysis. Only 4 (7%) scored unacceptable for organs at risk contouring and organs at risk dose-volume analysis. Treatment-related skin, fibrosis, and/or breast pain AEs were recorded as grade 1 in 64% and grade 2 in 7%, with only 1 (<2%) grade ≥3 and identified as grade 3 fibrosis of deep connective tissue. Partial-breast reirradiation with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy after second lumpectomy for patients experiencing in-breast failures after whole-breast irradiation is safe and feasible, with acceptable treatment quality achieved. Skin, fibrosis, and breast pain toxicity was acceptable, and grade 3 toxicity was rare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of Partial Breast Reirradiation with Intraoperative Radiotherapy after Prior Thoracic Radiation: A Single-Institution Report of Outcomes and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Chin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMastectomy is the current standard of care for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences after prior whole breast irradiation (WBI. We report our single-institution experience with breast-conserving surgery (BCS followed by intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT as an alternative to salvage mastectomy for new or recurrent breast cancers that develop in the setting of prior thoracic radiation.MethodsWe performed an IRB-approved retrospective review of patients treated with breast IORT between September 2013 and November 2016. We identified 12 patients who declined salvage mastectomy for their breast cancer after prior thoracic radiation. IORT was delivered using the Intrabeam™ device (Carl Zeiss, Germany. A dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to the lumpectomy cavity surface using 50 kV X-rays. We graded both acute and late treatment-related breast toxicities using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Local control, mastectomy-free survival, distant metastasis, and overall survival were determined.ResultsOur study included nine patients who developed a new or recurrent ipsilateral breast cancer after prior WBI for early-stage breast cancer, two patients with primary breast cancer after mantle-field radiation for Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and one patient with a synchronous stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation to the ipsilateral lung and mediastinum. The median time from prior radiation to presentation was 18 years (range: 2 months to 46 years. All patients successfully underwent partial breast reirradiation with IORT and were able to preserve their breast. At a median follow-up of 14 months (4–25 months, there were no local or distant recurrences. There was a single non-cancer-related death. In the acute setting, we observed grade 1 toxicity in 58% (n = 7, grade 2 toxicity in 17% (n = 2, and no grade 3 or higher toxicity. In the late setting, at

  14. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: Using the CyberKnife as the radiation delivery platform in the treatment of early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eVermeulen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the CyberKnife (Accuray, Incorporated, Sunnyvale, CA for non-invasive delivery of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI in early breast cancer patients. Between 6/2009 and 5/2011, 9 patients were treated with CyberKnife APBI. Normal tissue constraints were imposed as outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP/RTOG Protocol (Vicini and White, 2007. Patients received a total dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions (group 1, n=2 or 34 Gy in 10 fractions (group 2, n=7 delivered to the planning treatment volume (PTV defined as the clinical target volume (CTV + 2 mm. The CTV was defined as either the lumpectomy cavity plus 10 mm (n=2 or 15 mm (n=7. The cavity was defined by a T2-weighted non-contrast breast MRI fused to a planning non-contrast thoracic CT. The CyberKnife Synchrony system tracked gold fiducials sutured into the cavity wall during lumpectomy. Treatments started 4-5 weeks after lumpectomy. The mean PTV was 100 cm3 (range, 92-108 cm3 and 105 cm3 (range, 49-241 cm3 and the mean PTV isodose prescription line was 70% for groups 1 and 2, respectively. The mean percent of whole breast reference volume receiving 100% and 50% of the dose (V100 and V50 for group 1 was 11% (range, 8-13% and 23% (range, 16-30% and for group 2 was 11% (range, 7-14% and 26% (range, 21- 35.0% , respectively. At a median 7 months follow-up (range, 4-26 months, no acute toxicities were seen. Acute cosmetic outcomes were excellent or good in all patients; for those patients with more than 12 months follow-up the late cosmesis outcomes were excellent or good. In conclusion, the lack of observable acute side effects and current excellent/good cosmetic outcomes is promising. We believe this suggests the CyberKnife is a suitable non-invasive radiation platform for delivering APBI with achievable normal tissue constraints.

  15. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Asal; Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann; Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha; Seiler, Stephen; Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella; Goudreau, Sally; Garwood, Dan; Haley, Barbara; Euhus, David; Heinzerling, John; Ding, Chuxiong; Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul; Timmerman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  16. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Asal, E-mail: asal.rahimi@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Seiler, Stephen [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Goudreau, Sally [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Garwood, Dan [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Haley, Barbara [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Euhus, David [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heinzerling, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Ding, Chuxiong [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul [Department of Statistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  17. A Prospective Pathologic Study to Define the Clinical Target Volume for Partial Breast Radiation Therapy in Women With Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Brandon T., E-mail: Brandon.Nguyen@act.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Canberra Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Garran, ACT (Australia); Deb, Siddhartha [Department of Anatomical Pathology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Victorian Cancer Biobank, Cancer Council of Victoria, Carlton, Victoria (Australia); Fox, Stephen [Department of Anatomical Pathology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hill, Prudence [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent' s Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Collins, Marnie [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Chua, Boon H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine an appropriate clinical target volume for partial breast radiation therapy (PBRT) based on the spatial distribution of residual invasive and in situ carcinoma after wide local excision (WLE) for early breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective pathologic study of women potentially eligible for PBRT who had re-excision and/or completion mastectomy after WLE for early breast cancer or DCIS. A pathologic assessment protocol was used to determine the maximum radial extension (MRE) of residual carcinoma from the margin of the initial surgical cavity. Women were stratified by the closest initial radial margin width: negative (>1 mm), close (>0 mm and {<=}1 mm), or involved. Results: The study population was composed of 133 women with a median age of 59 years (range, 27-82 years) and the following stage groups: 0 (13.5%), I (40.6%), II (38.3%), and III (7.5%). The histologic subtypes of the primary tumor were invasive ductal carcinoma (74.4%), invasive lobular carcinoma (12.0%), and DCIS alone (13.5%). Residual carcinoma was present in the re-excision and completion mastectomy specimens in 55.4%, 14.3%, and 7.2% of women with an involved, close, and negative margin, respectively. In the 77 women with a noninvolved radial margin, the MRE of residual disease, if present, was {<=}10 mm in 97.4% (95% confidence interval 91.6-99.5) of cases. Larger MRE measurements were significantly associated with an involved margin (P<.001), tumor size >30 mm (P=.03), premenopausal status (P=.03), and negative progesterone receptor status (P=.05). Conclusions: A clinical target volume margin of 10 mm would encompass microscopic residual disease in >90% of women potentially eligible for PBRT after WLE with noninvolved resection margins.

  18. A Prospective Pathologic Study to Define the Clinical Target Volume for Partial Breast Radiation Therapy in Women With Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Brandon T.; Deb, Siddhartha; Fox, Stephen; Hill, Prudence; Collins, Marnie; Chua, Boon H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine an appropriate clinical target volume for partial breast radiation therapy (PBRT) based on the spatial distribution of residual invasive and in situ carcinoma after wide local excision (WLE) for early breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective pathologic study of women potentially eligible for PBRT who had re-excision and/or completion mastectomy after WLE for early breast cancer or DCIS. A pathologic assessment protocol was used to determine the maximum radial extension (MRE) of residual carcinoma from the margin of the initial surgical cavity. Women were stratified by the closest initial radial margin width: negative (>1 mm), close (>0 mm and ≤1 mm), or involved. Results: The study population was composed of 133 women with a median age of 59 years (range, 27-82 years) and the following stage groups: 0 (13.5%), I (40.6%), II (38.3%), and III (7.5%). The histologic subtypes of the primary tumor were invasive ductal carcinoma (74.4%), invasive lobular carcinoma (12.0%), and DCIS alone (13.5%). Residual carcinoma was present in the re-excision and completion mastectomy specimens in 55.4%, 14.3%, and 7.2% of women with an involved, close, and negative margin, respectively. In the 77 women with a noninvolved radial margin, the MRE of residual disease, if present, was ≤10 mm in 97.4% (95% confidence interval 91.6-99.5) of cases. Larger MRE measurements were significantly associated with an involved margin (P 30 mm (P=.03), premenopausal status (P=.03), and negative progesterone receptor status (P=.05). Conclusions: A clinical target volume margin of 10 mm would encompass microscopic residual disease in >90% of women potentially eligible for PBRT after WLE with noninvolved resection margins.

  19. A novel schedule of accelerated partial breast radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy in elderly patients: survival and toxicity analysis of a prospective clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayan, Mutlay; Nelson, Carl; Gagne, Havaleh; Rubin, Deborah; Heimann, Ruth [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington (United States); Wilson, Karen [University of Vermont Cancer Center, Burlington (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Several accelerated partial breast radiation (APBR) techniques have been investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer (BC); however, the optimal treatment delivery techniques remain unclear. We evaluated the feasibility and toxicity of APBR delivered using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in elderly patients with stage I BC, using a novel fractionation schedule. Forty-two patients aged ≥65 years, with stage I BC who underwent breast conserving surgery were enrolled in a phase I/II study evaluating APBR using IMRT. Forty eligible patients received 40 Gy in 4 Gy daily fractions. Patients were assessed for treatment related toxicities, and cosmesis, before APBR, during, and after completion of the treatment. The median age was 73 years, median tumor size 0.8 cm and the median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year locoregional control was 97.5% and overall survival 90%. Erythema and skin pigmentation was the most common acute adverse event, reported by 27 patients (69%). Twenty-six patients (65%) reported mild pain, rated 1-4/10. This improved at last follow-up to only 2 (15%). Overall the patient and physician reported worst late toxicities were lower than the baseline and at last follow-up, patients and physicians rated cosmesis as excellent/good in 93% and 86 %, respectively. In this prospective trial, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control with daily APBR. The acceptable toxicity profile and cosmetic results of this study support the use of IMRT planned APBR with daily schedule in elderly patients with early stage BC.

  20. Five-Year Outcomes, Cosmesis, and Toxicity With 3-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiation Therapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Núria; Sanz, Xavier; Dengra, Josefa; Foro, Palmira; Membrive, Ismael; Reig, Anna; Quera, Jaume; Fernández-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Óscar; Lio, Jackson; Lozano, Joan; Algara, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the interim results from a study comparing the efficacy, toxicity, and cosmesis of breast-conserving treatment with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) using 3-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: 102 patients with early-stage breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were randomized to receive either WBI (n=51) or APBI (n=51). In the WBI arm, 48 Gy was delivered to the whole breast in daily fractions of 2 Gy, with or without additional 10 Gy to the tumor bed. In the APBI arm, patients received 37.5 Gy in 3.75 Gy per fraction delivered twice daily. Toxicity results were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria. Skin elasticity was measured using a dedicated device (Multi-Skin-Test-Center MC-750-B2, CKelectronic-GmbH). Cosmetic results were assessed by the physician and the patients as good/excellent, regular, or poor. Results: The median follow-up time was 5 years. No local recurrences were observed. No significant differences in survival rates were found. APBI reduced acute side effects and radiation doses to healthy tissues compared with WBI (P 75% of patients in the APBI arm had excellent or good cosmesis, and these outcomes appear to be stable over time. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results was similar in both groups. Conclusions: APBI delivered by 3D-CRT to the tumor bed for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI

  1. Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kron, Tomas, E-mail: Tomas.Kron@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Willis, David; Link, Emma [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lehman, Margot [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Campbell, Gillian [Auckland City Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland (New Zealand); O' Brien, Peter [Newcastle Calvary Mater Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Chua, Boon [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dose–volume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dose–volume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI.

  2. Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, Tomas; Willis, David; Link, Emma; Lehman, Margot; Campbell, Gillian; O'Brien, Peter; Chua, Boon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dose–volume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dose–volume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI

  3. Biologic comparison of partial breast irradiation protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenstein, Barry S.; Lymberis, Stella C.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the dose/fractionation schedules currently used in ongoing clinical trials of partial breast irradiation (PBI) by comparing their biologically effective dose (BED) values to those of three standard whole breast protocols commonly used after segmental mastectomy in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and materials: The BED equation derived from the linear-quadratic model for radiation-induced cell killing was used to calculate the BEDs for three commonly used whole breast radiotherapy regimens, in addition to a variety of external beam radiotherapy, as well as high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy, PBI protocols. Results: The BED values of most PBI protocols resulted in tumor control BEDs roughly equivalent to a 50-Gy standard treatment, but consistently lower than the BEDs for regimens in which the tumor bed receives a total dose of either 60 Gy or 66 Gy. The BED values calculated for the acute radiation responses of erythema and desquamation were nearly all lower for the PBI schedules, and the late-response BEDs for most PBI regimens were in a similar range to the BEDs for the standard treatments. Conclusion: Biologically effective dose modeling raises the concern that inadequate doses might be delivered by PBI to ensure optimal in-field tumor control

  4. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chafe, Susan, E-mail: susan.chafe@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute-University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Moughan, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pass, Helen [Womens' Breast Center, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Connecticut (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ≤3 cm, negative margins, and ≤3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  5. Dosimetric investigation depending on tumor location in patient breast in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Joo; Park, So Hyun; Jung, Joo Young; Woong, Cho; Suh, Tae Suk

    2012-01-01

    The Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique, which involves radiation beam delivery techniques that use a limited range of treatment volumes, has been a challenging approach that is worthy of consideration compared to whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Because of a small target volumes used in the PBI technique, the radiation dose can be safely delivered to the targeted tissue without the unwanted delivery of radiation to normal breast tissues and organ at risk (OAR), such as contralateral breast, lung and heart.Through PBI technique, better cosmetic outcomes and minimizing damages to OARs could be expected and also the daily dose can be increased with smaller number of fractionation in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects according to tumor locations in patient's breast for Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) technique using three Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT), Electron Beam Radiation therapy (EBRT) and Helical-tomotherapy (H-TOMO). Dosimetric comparisons of PBI technique for 3DCRT, EBRT, and H-TOMO depending on the classified tumor locations were performed. H-TOMO delivered the low dose to lager volume to surrounding normal tissue, such as the heart and lungs compared to 3DCRT and EBRT although it had the same degree of target coverage as the other methods (3DCRT, EBRT). EBRT had a curative effect for early-stage breast cancers located in the lower and inner sections (LIQ-S, LIQ-D)

  6. First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The First symposium accelerated partial breast irradiation, was organized by the Marie Curie Foundation, between the 14 to 16 june 2012, in the Cordoba city of Argentina. In this event were presented some papers on the following topics: radiotherapy in breast cancer; interaction between systemic treatments and radiotherapy; interstitial brachytherapy.

  7. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarek Abdel Halim El-Fayoumi

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer. Tarek Abdel Halim El-Fayoumi *. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt. Received 16 October 2012; accepted 7 January 2013. Available online 7 March 2013. KEYWORDS. Breast cancer;. Axillary lymph nodes.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Image Guided Radiation Therapy for External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: Evaluation of Delivered Dose and Intrafractional Cavity Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Curcuru, Austen; Sona, Karl; Kashani, Rojano; Green, Olga; Ochoa, Laura; Mutic, Sasa; Zoberi, Imran; Li, H. Harold; Thomas, Maria A., E-mail: mthomas@radonc.wustl.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To use magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) to (1) determine intrafractional motion of the breast surgical cavity; and (2) assess delivered dose versus planned dose. Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer (stages 0-I) who underwent breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in a prospective registry evaluating APBI using a 0.35-T MR-IGRT system. Clinical target volume was defined as the surgical cavity plus a 1-cm margin (excluding chest wall, pectoral muscles, and 5 mm from skin). No additional margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). A volumetric MR image was acquired before each fraction, and patients were set up to the surgical cavity as visualized on MR imaging. To determine the delivered dose for each fraction, the electron density map and contours from the computed tomography simulation were transferred to the pretreatment MR image via rigid registration. Intrafractional motion of the surgical cavity was determined by applying a tracking algorithm to the cavity contour as visualized on cine MR. Results: Median PTV volume was reduced by 52% when using no PTV margin compared with a 1-cm PTV margin used conventionally. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between planned and delivered dose to the PTV (V95) was 0.6% ± 0.1%. The mean cavity displacement in the anterior–posterior and superior–inferior directions was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm and 0.6 ± 0.3 mm, respectively. The mean margin required for at least 90% of the cavity to be contained by the margin for 90% of the time was 0.7 mm (5th-95th percentile: 0-2.7 mm). Conclusion: Minimal intrafractional motion was observed, and the mean difference between planned and delivered dose was less than 1%. Assessment of efficacy and cosmesis of this MR-guided APBI approach is under way.

  9. Decline of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Results of a Single-Institution Prospective Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liss, Adam L.; Ben-David, Merav A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Hayman, James A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Marsh, Robin B.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the final cosmetic results from a single-arm prospective clinical trial evaluating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with active-breathing control (ABC). Methods and Materials: Women older than 40 with breast cancer stages 0-I who received breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study evaluating APBI using IMRT administered with deep inspiration breath-hold. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85-Gy fractions given twice daily over 5 consecutive days. The planning target volume was defined as the lumpectomy cavity with a 1.5-cm margin. Cosmesis was scored on a 4-category scale by the treating physician. Toxicity was scored according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0). We report the cosmetic and toxicity results at a median follow-up of 5 years. Results: A total of 34 patients were enrolled. Two patients were excluded because of fair baseline cosmesis. The trial was terminated early because fair/poor cosmesis developed in 7 of 32 women at a median follow-up of 2.5 years. At a median follow-up of 5 years, further decline in the cosmetic outcome was observed in 5 women. Cosmesis at the time of last assessment was 43.3% excellent, 30% good, 20% fair, and 6.7% poor. Fibrosis according to CTCAE at last assessment was 3.3% grade 2 toxicity and 0% grade 3 toxicity. There was no correlation of CTCAE grade 2 or greater fibrosis with cosmesis. The 5-year rate of local control was 97% for all 34 patients initially enrolled. Conclusions: In this prospective trial with 5-year median follow-up, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control using IMRT-planned APBI. Cosmetic outcomes, however, continued to decline, with 26.7% of women having a fair to poor cosmetic result. These results underscore the need for continued cosmetic assessment for patients treated with APBI by technique

  10. Decline of Cosmetic Outcomes Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Results of a Single-Institution Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, Adam L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ben-David, Merav A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan (Israel); Jagsi, Reshma; Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M.; Marsh, Robin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To report the final cosmetic results from a single-arm prospective clinical trial evaluating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with active-breathing control (ABC). Methods and Materials: Women older than 40 with breast cancer stages 0-I who received breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective study evaluating APBI using IMRT administered with deep inspiration breath-hold. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85-Gy fractions given twice daily over 5 consecutive days. The planning target volume was defined as the lumpectomy cavity with a 1.5-cm margin. Cosmesis was scored on a 4-category scale by the treating physician. Toxicity was scored according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0). We report the cosmetic and toxicity results at a median follow-up of 5 years. Results: A total of 34 patients were enrolled. Two patients were excluded because of fair baseline cosmesis. The trial was terminated early because fair/poor cosmesis developed in 7 of 32 women at a median follow-up of 2.5 years. At a median follow-up of 5 years, further decline in the cosmetic outcome was observed in 5 women. Cosmesis at the time of last assessment was 43.3% excellent, 30% good, 20% fair, and 6.7% poor. Fibrosis according to CTCAE at last assessment was 3.3% grade 2 toxicity and 0% grade 3 toxicity. There was no correlation of CTCAE grade 2 or greater fibrosis with cosmesis. The 5-year rate of local control was 97% for all 34 patients initially enrolled. Conclusions: In this prospective trial with 5-year median follow-up, we observed an excellent rate of tumor control using IMRT-planned APBI. Cosmetic outcomes, however, continued to decline, with 26.7% of women having a fair to poor cosmetic result. These results underscore the need for continued cosmetic assessment for patients treated with APBI by technique.

  11. SU-F-T-432: Magnetic Field Dose Effects for Various Radiation Beam Geometries for Patients Treated with Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim-Reinders, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Physics (Canada); Keller, B; McCann, C; Sahgal, A; Lee, J; Kim, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated partial breast irradiation (HPBI) is being used at our clinic to treat inoperable breast cancer patients who have advanced disease. We are investigating how these patients could benefit from being treated in an MRI-linac, where real-time daily MRI tumor imaging and plan adaptation would be possible. As a first step, this study evaluates the dosimetric impact of the magnetic field for different radiation beam geometries on relevant OARs. Methods: Five patients previously treated using HPBI were selected. Six treatment plans were generated for each patient, evaluating three beam geometries (VMAT, IMRT, 3DCRT) with and without B{sub 0}=1.5 T. The Monaco TPS was used with the Elekta MRI-Linac beam model, where the magnetic field is orthogonal to the radiation beam. All plans were re-scaled to the same isocoverage with a prescription of 40Gy/5 to the PTV. Plans were evaluated for the effect of the magnetic field and beam modality on skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}, lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} and mean heart dose. Results: Averaged over all patients, skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT was higher than VMAT and IMRT (by +22% and +21%, with B{sub 0}-ON). The magnetic field caused larger increases in skin V{sub 3} {sub 0}for 3DCRT (+8%) than VMAT (+3%) and IMRT (+4%) compared with B{sub 0}-OFF. With B{sub 0}-ON, 3DCRT had a markedly lower mean heart dose than VMAT (by 538cGy) and IMRT (by 562cGy); for lung V{sub 2} {sub 0}, 3DCRT had a marginally lower dose than VMAT (by −2.2%) and IMRT (also −2.2%). The magnetic field had minimal effect on the mean heart dose and lung V{sub 2} {sub 0} for all geometries. Conclusion: The decreased skin dose in VMAT and IMRT can potentially mitigate the effects of skin reactions for HPBI in an MRI-linac. This study illustrated that more beam angles may result in lower skin toxicity and better tumor conformality, with the trade-off of elevated heart and lung doses. We are receiving funding support from Elekta.

  12. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Abdel Halim El-Fayoumi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to reduce the probability of later clinical involvement of the axilla and at establishing a sound basis for adjuvant treatment planning axillary dissection is an important operative procedure. So, partial axillary dissection has been applied to decrease the morbidity and postoperative axillary complications.Aim of the work was to study the reliability of partial axillary lymph node dissection in patients with breast carcinoma with clinically negative axilla. Methods: Eighteen patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the other two patients who were fulfilling the criteria for conservative breast surgery underwent lumpectomy. All patients did complete axillary lymph nodes dissection. Intraoperative leveling of the axilla was performed and level I axillary lymph nodes were identified according to their relation to pectoralis minor muscle; then they were subjected to intraoperative pathological examination by frozen section examination followed by complete axillary clearance. Then post operative histopathological examination of the tumor and all lymph nodes was done. Results: By intraoperative pathological examination; five patients (25% were found positive for malignant invasion, while 15 patients (75% were pathologically free. While paraffin section showed six patients (30% with malignant invasion, and 14 patients (70% were pathologically free. There was a false negative rate of 5% in level I axillary lymph nodes by intraoperative pathological examination which was positive for metastasis by paraffin section that revealed microinvasion in one lymph node out of 8 in level I. Only two cases out of 20 were found positive for metastasis in level II and III. Conclusion: Partial axillary lymph node dissection is a minimally invasive, feasible and sufficient technique that can predict the axillary lymph node status. KEYWORDS: Breast cancer, Axillary lymph nodes clearance

  13. Practical Implications of the Publication of Consensus Guidelines by the American Society for Radiation Oncology: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation and the National Cancer Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaitelman, Simona F., E-mail: sfshaitelman@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Heather Y.; Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shen, Yu; Bedrosian, Isabelle [Department of Breast Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Marsh, Gary D.; Bloom, Elizabeth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, MI (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Babiera, Gildy V. [Department of Breast Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To examine utilization trends of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the American College of Surgeons' National Cancer Database and changes in APBI use after the 2009 publication of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guidelines. Methods and Materials: A total of 399,705 women were identified who were diagnosed from 2004 to 2011 with nonmetastatic invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ who were treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy to the breast. Patients were divided by the type of treatment received (whole breast irradiation or APBI) and by suitability to receive APBI as defined by the ASTRO guidelines. Logistic regression was applied to study APBI use overall and within guideline categorization, and a multivariable model was created to determine predictors of treatment with brachytherapy-based APBI based on guideline categorization. Results: For all patients, APBI use increased, from 3.8% in 2004 to 10.6% in 2011 (P<.0001). Overall rates of APBI utilization were higher among “suitable” than “cautionary”/“unsuitable” patients (14.8% vs 7.1%, P<.0001). The majority of APBI treatment was delivered using brachytherapy, for which use peaked in 2008. Starting in 2009, among “suitable” patients, utilization of APBI via brachytherapy plateaued, whereas for “cautionary”/“unsuitable” patients, treatment with brachytherapy-based APBI declined and then plateaued. Conclusion: Use of APBI across all patient groups increased from 2004 through 2008. After publication of the ASTRO APBI guidelines in 2009, rates of brachytherapy-based APBI treatment plateaued among “suitable” patients and declined and then plateaued among “cautionary”/“unsuitable” patients. Our study highlights how large national databases can be used to assess national trends in radiation use in response to the publication of guidelines.

  14. Aesthetic results following partial mastectomy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matory, W.E. Jr.; Wertheimer, M.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Walton, R.L.; Love, S.; Matory, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the aesthetic changes inherent in partial mastectomy followed by radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I and stage II breast cancer. A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Project Protocol B-06 was undertaken in 57 patients from 1984 to the present. The size of mastectomy varied between 2 x 1 cm and 15 x 8 cm. Objective aesthetic outcome, as determined by physical and photographic examination, was influenced primarily by surgical technique as opposed to the effects of radiation. These technical factors included orientation of resections, breast size relative to size of resection, location of tumor, and extent and orientation of axillary dissection. Regarding cosmesis, 80 percent of patients treated in this study judged their result to be excellent or good, in comparison to 50 percent excellent or good as judged by the plastic surgeon. Only 10 percent would consider mastectomy with reconstruction for contralateral disease. Asymmetry and contour abnormalities are far more common than noted in the radiation therapy literature. Patients satisfaction with lumpectomy and radiation, however, is very high. This satisfaction is not necessarily based on objective criteria defining aesthetic parameters, but is strongly influenced by retainment of the breast as an original body part

  15. Comparison study of the partial-breast irradiation techniques: Dosimetric analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, electron beam therapy, and helical tomotherapy depending on various tumor locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Joo; Park, So-Hyun; Son, Seok-Hyun; Cheon, Keum-Seong; Choi, Byung-Ock; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The partial-breast irradiation (PBI) technique, an alternative to whole-breast irradiation, is a beam delivery method that uses a limited range of treatment volume. The present study was designed to determine the optimal PBI treatment modalities for 8 different tumor locations. Treatment planning was performed on computed tomography (CT) data sets of 6 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Tumor locations were classified into 8 subsections according to breast quadrant and depth. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), electron beam therapy (ET), and helical tomotherapy (H-TOMO) were utilized to evaluate the dosimetric effect for each tumor location. Conformation number (CN), radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and dose delivered to healthy tissue were estimated. The Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analysis. The ET approach showed good sparing effects and acceptable target coverage for the lower inner quadrant—superficial (LIQ-S) and lower inner quadrant—deep (LIQ-D) locations. The H-TOMO method was the least effective technique as no evaluation index achieved superiority for all tumor locations except CN. The ET method is advisable for treating LIQ-S and LIQ-D tumors, as opposed to 3D-CRT or H-TOMO, because of acceptable target coverage and much lower dose applied to surrounding tissue

  16. Interfractional Target Variations for Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Robbins, Jared; Christian, Robert; Godley, Andrew; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, we quantify the interfractional variations in the shape of the clinical target volume (CTV) by analyzing the daily CT data acquired during CT-guided partial breast irradiation (PBI) and compare the effectiveness of various repositioning alignment strategies considered to account for the variations. Methods and Materials: The daily CT data for 13 breast cancer patients treated with PBI in either prone (10 patients) or supine (3 patients) with daily kV CT guidance using CT on Rails (CTVision, Siemens, Malvern, PA) were analyzed. For approximately 25 points on the surface of the CTV, deformation vectors were calculated by means of deformable image registration and verified by visual inspection. These were used to calculate the distances along surface normals (DSN), which directly related to the required margin expansions for each point. The DSN values were determined for seven alignment methods based on volumetric imaging and also two-dimensional projections (portal imaging). Results: The margin expansion necessary to cover 99% of all points for all days was 2.7 mm when utilizing the alignment method based on deformation field data (the best alignment method). The center-of-mass based alignment yielded slightly worse results (a margin of 4.0 mm), and shifts obtained by operator placement (7.9 mm), two-dimensional-based methods (7.0–10.1 mm), and skin marks (13.9 mm) required even larger margin expansions. Target shrinkage was evident for most days by the negative values of DSN. Even with the best alignment, the range of DSN values could be as high as 7 mm, resulting in a large amount of normal tissue irradiation, unless adaptive replanning is employed. Conclusion: The appropriate alignment method is important to minimize the margin requirement to cover the significant interfractional target deformations observed during PBI. The amount of normal tissue unnecessarily irradiated is still not insignificant, and can be minimized if adaptive

  17. Breast radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underwire. Ask your provider about wearing your breast prosthesis, if you have one. Self-care You need ... swelling ( edema ) in your arm. You have a feeling of tightness in your arm. Rings on your ...

  18. Exergy of partially coherent thermal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijewardane, S.; Goswami, Yogi

    2012-01-01

    Exergy of electromagnetic radiation has been studied by a number of researchers for well over four decades in order to estimate the maximum conversion efficiencies of thermal radiation. As these researchers primarily dealt with solar and blackbody radiation, which have a low degree of coherence, they did not consider the partial coherence properties of thermal radiation. With the recent development of surface structures, which can emit radiation with high degree of coherence, the importance of considering the partial coherent properties in exergy calculation has become a necessity as the coherence properties directly influence the entropy of the wave field. Here in this paper we derive an expression for the exergy of quasi-monochromatic radiation using statistical thermodynamics and show that it is identical with the expressions derived using classical thermodynamics. We also present a method to calculate the entropy, thereby the exergy of partially coherent radiation using statistical thermodynamics and a method called matrix treatment of wave field. -- Highlights: ► Considered partial coherence of radiation for the first time to calculate exergy. ► The importance of this method is emphasized with energy conversion examples. ► Derived an expression for the exergy of radiation using statistical thermodynamics. ► Adopted a method to calculate intensity of statistically independent principle wave.

  19. Outcomes of breast cancer patients with triple negative receptor status treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J Ben; Reid, Robert E; Shaitelman, Simona F; Chen, Peter Y; Mitchell, Christine K; Wallace, Michelle F; Marvin, Kimberly S; Grills, Inga S; Margolis, Jeffrey M; Vicini, Frank A

    2011-11-01

    Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Outcomes of Breast Cancer Patients With Triple Negative Receptor Status Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Reid, Robert E.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Chen, Peter Y.; Mitchell, Christine K.; Wallace, Michelle F.; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Grills, Inga S.; Margolis, Jeffrey M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Results: Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). Conclusions: In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer.

  1. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrino, R.; Carvalho, H.A.; Gomes, H.C.; Kuang, L.F.; Aguilar, P.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-nine observations of patients with breast cancer frm 1980 to 1985 were reviewed. All of them received radiotherapy. In 44.9% radiologic findings of radiation pneumonitis were detected and only 9% presented mild or moderate respiratory symptoms. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. Tamoxifen with and without radiation after partial mastectomy in patients with involved nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Andrew L; Perera, Francisco; Fisher, Barbara; Opeitum, Abiola; Yu, Norman

    1995-02-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of tamoxifen on local control after partial mastectomy with and without adjuvant breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 97 node positive patients identified from the records of the London Regional Cancer Center included 44 patients who received tamoxifen and breast irradiation (40 or 50 Gy plus booster dose) after partial mastectomy, and 53 patients who received tamoxifen only after partial mastectomy. Base line characteristics of the two groups were similar. Results: At 39 months actuarial follow-up there was a breast tumor recurrence (BTR) in 5% vs. 21% of patients when radiation was omitted (p = 0.0388), but there was no difference in the cause-specific mortality of the two treatment groups. Cox Regression analysis (on only 10 BTR) showed age and adjuvant radiation as significant predictors of BTR. In patients not receiving radiation, no BTR was seen in 22 patients {>=}70 years of age at diagnosis vs. 8 BTR in 31 patients <70 years (p = 0.0130). All BTR occurred while patients were receiving tamoxifen. Conclusion: Tamoxifen alone with omission of radiation after partial mastectomy provides inferior breast tumor control in node positive patients. This is especially true for patients under 70 years of age. Patients aged 70 years or older at the time of diagnosis of breast cancer who receive tamoxifen have a low rate of breast tumor recurrence when radiation is omitted. These patients represent a group for whom radiation might not be necessary.

  3. Defining the Role of Free Flaps in Partial Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark L; Molina, Bianca J; Dayan, Erez; Jablonka, Eric M; Okwali, Michelle; Kim, Julie N; Dayan, Joseph H

    2018-03-01

     Free flaps have a well-established role in breast reconstruction after mastectomy; however, their role in partial breast reconstruction remains poorly defined. We reviewed our experience with partial breast reconstruction to better understand indications for free tissue transfer.  A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing partial breast reconstruction at our center between February 2009 and October 2015. We evaluated the characteristics of patients who underwent volume displacement procedures versus volume replacement procedures and free versus pedicled flap reconstruction.  There were 78 partial breast reconstructions, with 52 reductions/tissue rearrangements (displacement group) and 26 flaps (replacement group). Bra cup size and body mass index (BMI) were significantly smaller in the replacement group. Fifteen pedicled and 11 free flaps were performed. Most pedicled flaps (80.0%) were used for lateral or upper pole defects. Most free flaps (72.7%) were used for medial and inferior defects or when there was inadequate donor tissue for a pedicled flap. Complications included hematoma, cellulitis, and one aborted pedicled flap.  Free and pedicled flaps are useful for partial breast reconstruction, particularly in breast cancer patients with small breasts undergoing breast-conserving treatment (BCT). Flap selection depends on defect size, location, and donor tissue availability. Medial defects are difficult to reconstruct using pedicled flaps due to arc of rotation and intervening breast tissue. Free tissue transfer can overcome these obstacles. Confirming negative margins before flap reconstruction ensures harvest of adequate volume and avoids later re-operation. Judicious use of free flaps for oncoplastic reconstruction expands the possibility for breast conservation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Reduced Mortality With Partial-Breast Irradiation for Early Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, Jayant S., E-mail: jayant.vaidya@ucl.ac.uk [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Surgery, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Department of Surgery, Whittington Health, London (United Kingdom); Bulsara, Max [Department of Biostatistics, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, WA (Australia); Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Coombs, Nathan [Department of Surgery, Great Western Hospital, Swindon (United Kingdom); Singer, Julian [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Princess Alexandra Hospital, Harlow (United Kingdom); Ebbs, Stephen [Croydon University Hospital, Croydon (United Kingdom); Massarut, Samuele [National Cancer Institute, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (Italy); Saunders, Christobel [School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA (Australia); Douek, Michael [Department of Surgery, Kings College London, London (United Kingdom); Williams, Norman R. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Joseph, David [Departments of Radiation Oncology, and Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia); Tobias, Jeffrey S. [Department of Clinical Oncology, University College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Baum, Michael [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: With earlier detection and more effective treatment, mortality from breast cancer continues to fall and it has become increasingly important to reduce the toxicity of treatments. Partial-breast radiation therapy, which focuses radiation to the tumor bed, may achieve this aim. We analyzed mortality differences in randomized trials of partial-breast irradiation (PBI). Methods and Materials: We included data from published randomized trials of PBI (alone or as part of a risk-adapted approach) versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI) for invasive breast cancer suitable for breast-conserving therapy. We identified trials using PubMed and Google searches with the terms “partial breast irradiation” OR “intraoperative radiotherapy” OR “IMRT” OR (“accelerated” AND “radiation”) AND “randomised/randomized,” as well as through discussion with colleagues in the field. We calculated the proportion of patients who had events in each randomized arm at 5 years' follow-up and created a forest plot using Stata, version 14.1. Results: We identified 9 randomized trials of PBI versus WBI in invasive breast cancer; 5-year outcomes were available for non–breast cancer mortality in 5 trials (n=4489) and for breast cancer mortality in 4 trials (n=4231). The overall mortality was 4.9%. There was no detectable heterogeneity between the trials for any of the outcomes. There was no difference in the proportion of patients dying of breast cancer (difference, 0.000% [95% confidence interval (CI), −0.7 to +0.7]; P=.999). Non–breast cancer mortality with PBI was lower than with WBI (difference, 1.1% [95% CI, −2.1% to −0.2%]; P=.023). Total mortality with PBI was also lower than with WBI (difference, 1.3% [95% CI, −2.5% to 0.0%]; P=.05). Conclusions: Use of PBI instead of WBI in selected patients results in a lower 5-year non–breast cancer and overall mortality, amounting to a 25% reduction in relative terms. This information should be included when

  5. Reduced Mortality With Partial-Breast Irradiation for Early Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Bulsara, Max; Wenz, Frederik; Coombs, Nathan; Singer, Julian; Ebbs, Stephen; Massarut, Samuele; Saunders, Christobel; Douek, Michael; Williams, Norman R.; Joseph, David; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Baum, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With earlier detection and more effective treatment, mortality from breast cancer continues to fall and it has become increasingly important to reduce the toxicity of treatments. Partial-breast radiation therapy, which focuses radiation to the tumor bed, may achieve this aim. We analyzed mortality differences in randomized trials of partial-breast irradiation (PBI). Methods and Materials: We included data from published randomized trials of PBI (alone or as part of a risk-adapted approach) versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI) for invasive breast cancer suitable for breast-conserving therapy. We identified trials using PubMed and Google searches with the terms “partial breast irradiation” OR “intraoperative radiotherapy” OR “IMRT” OR (“accelerated” AND “radiation”) AND “randomised/randomized,” as well as through discussion with colleagues in the field. We calculated the proportion of patients who had events in each randomized arm at 5 years' follow-up and created a forest plot using Stata, version 14.1. Results: We identified 9 randomized trials of PBI versus WBI in invasive breast cancer; 5-year outcomes were available for non–breast cancer mortality in 5 trials (n=4489) and for breast cancer mortality in 4 trials (n=4231). The overall mortality was 4.9%. There was no detectable heterogeneity between the trials for any of the outcomes. There was no difference in the proportion of patients dying of breast cancer (difference, 0.000% [95% confidence interval (CI), −0.7 to +0.7]; P=.999). Non–breast cancer mortality with PBI was lower than with WBI (difference, 1.1% [95% CI, −2.1% to −0.2%]; P=.023). Total mortality with PBI was also lower than with WBI (difference, 1.3% [95% CI, −2.5% to 0.0%]; P=.05). Conclusions: Use of PBI instead of WBI in selected patients results in a lower 5-year non–breast cancer and overall mortality, amounting to a 25% reduction in relative terms. This information should be included when

  6. Patterns of Failure After MammoSite Brachytherapy Partial Breast Irradiation: A Detailed Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Sea; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael; Shah, Anand; Jokich, Peter; Solmos, Gene; Strauss, Jonathan; Dowlatshahi, Kambiz; Nguyen, Cam; Griem, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a detailed analysis of treatment failures after MammoSite breast brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation from our single-institution experience. Methods and Materials: Between October 14, 2002 and October 23, 2006, 78 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving surgery and accelerated partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator. We identified five treatment failures in the 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up. Pathologic data, breast imaging, and radiation treatment plans were reviewed. For in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, the doses delivered to the areas of recurrence by partial breast irradiation were calculated. Results: At a median follow-up time of 26.1 months, five treatment failures were identified. There were three in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, one failure directly adjacent to the original surgical bed, and one failure in the axilla with synchronous distant metastases. The crude failure rate was 7.1% (5 of 70), and the crude local failure rate was 5.7% (4 of 70). Estimated progression-free survival at 48 months was 89.8% (standard error 4.5%). Conclusions: Our case series of 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up and a median follow-up of 26 months is the largest single-institution report to date with detailed failure analysis associated with MammoSite brachytherapy. Our failure data emphasize the importance of patient selection when offering partial breast irradiation

  7. Recent advances in radiotherapy: Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) in breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwinska, A.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) after conservative surgery has increased over the past decade as a result of many factors, including clinical and pathological data questioning the efficacy of whole breast irradiation in highly selected patients, as well as factors related to patient's convenience. High dose rate and low dose rate brachytherapy, brachytherapy MammoSite, Electron Intraoperative Therapy - ELIOT and Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy - TARGIT are the subject of investigation. The tolerability and efficacy of the treatment are of special interest. In this review article, methods of accelerated PBI, eligibility criteria, techniques of radiotherapy, early results and side effects are reviewed. (author)

  8. Case Report and Dosimetric Analysis of an Axillary Recurrence After Partial Breast Irradiation with Mammosite Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Anand P.; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael C.; Chen, Sea S.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Coon, Alan B.; Turian, Julius V.; Siziopikou, Kalliopi; Dowlat, Kambiz; Griem, Katherine L.

    2008-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) was designed in part to decrease overall treatment times associated with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). WBRT treats the entire breast and usually portions of the axilla. The goal of PBI is to treat a smaller volume of breast tissue in less time, focusing the dose around the lumpectomy cavity. The following is a case of a 64-year-old woman with early-stage breast cancer treated with PBI who failed regionally in the ipsilateral axilla. With our dosimetric analysis, we found that the entire area of this axillary failure would have likely received at least 45 Gy if WBRT had been used, enough to sterilize microscopic disease. With PBI, this area received a mean dose of only 2.8 Gy, which raises the possibility that this regional failure may have been prevented had WBRT been used instead of PBI

  9. Partial-Breast Irradiation Versus Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Wittenberg, Eve; Suh, W. Warren; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (PBI) is a new treatment paradigm for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Although PBI may lead to greater local recurrence rates, it may be cost-effective because of better tolerability and lower cost. We aim to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of PBI compared with whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive postmenopausal women treated for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. External beam (EB) and MammoSite (MS) PBI were considered and assumed to be equally effective, but carried different costs. Patients received tamoxifen, but not chemotherapy. Utilities, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature; the baseline utility for no disease after radiotherapy was set at 0.92. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in the PBI hazard ratio, recurrence pattern, and patient utilities. Costs (in 2004 US dollars) and quality-adjusted life-years were discounted at 3%/y. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for WBRT compared with EB-PBI was $630,000/quality-adjusted life-year; WBRT strongly dominated MS-PBI. One-way sensitivity analysis found that results were sensitive to PBI hazard ratio, recurrence pattern, baseline recurrence risk, and no evidence of disease PBI utility values. Probabilistic sensitivity showed that EB-PBI was the most cost-effective technique over a wide range of assumptions and societal willingness-to-pay values. Conclusions: EB-PBI was the most cost-effective strategy for postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer. Unless the quality of life after MS-PBI proves to be superior, it is unlikely to be cost-effective.

  10. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Bixiu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences

  11. [Partial breast irradiation (PBI): the therapy of the future?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Caro C E; Bijker, Nina; van Tienhoven, Geertjan

    2010-01-01

    Breast-conserving therapy with radiation therapy of 50 Gy over 5 weeks to the entire breast plus a tumour bed boost is the standard treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer. Several attempts have been made to lower the treatment burden, such as omitting either all radiotherapy or the tumour bed boost, without success. Phase III trials are now being carried out to evaluate the treatment of the primary tumour area only (PBI). Various methods for selection of patient groups and of delivering the radiation dose have been employed. Vaidya et al. report the same favourable local recurrence rates following PBI with single dose intraoperative radiotherapy as with whole-breast irradiation. As the follow-up period so far has been short, long-time results should be awaited.

  12. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Concern is expressed over a recent U.K. newspaper report (The Times, 21 January 1977, 5) on the possible hazards of mammography, as women may over-react to the extent of refusing mammography. The problems of radiation risk estimates, particularly at low dose levels, are very briefly reviewed. Recent improvements in mammography techniques have minimised the radiation hazard. Conflicting reports of the mortality rates following mammography screening programmes are discussed. In England and Wales, breast cancer is the commonest cause of death in women aged 35 to 54, and it would be unfortunate if the possible benefits of screening were denied to this age group before the latest mammographic techniques have been fully evaluated. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J L [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). Postgraduate Medical School

    1977-03-12

    Concern is expressed over a recent U.K. newspaper report (The Times, 21 January 1977, 5) on the possible hazards of mammography, as women may over-react to the extent of refusing mammography. The problems of radiation risk estimates, particularly at low dose levels, are very briefly reviewed. Recent improvements in mammography techniques have minimised the radiation hazard. Conflicting reports of the mortality rates following mammography screening programmes are discussed. In England and Wales, breast cancer is the commonest cause of death in women aged 35 to 54, and it would be unfortunate if the possible benefits of screening were denied to this age group before the latest mammographic techniques have been fully evaluated.

  14. Partial Breast Irradiation Versus Whole Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Wittenberg, Eve; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy between women treated with partial breast irradiation (PBI) vs. whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrences were separated into local recurrences and elsewhere failures. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) risk was extracted from the Oxford overview, and rates and utilities were adapted from the literature. We studied two cohorts of women (aged 40 and 55 years), both of whom received adjuvant tamoxifen. Results: Assuming a no evidence of disease (NED)-PBI utility of 0.93, quality-adusted life expectancy after PBI (and WBRT) was 12.61 (12.57) and 12.10 (12.06) years for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively. The NED-PBI utility thresholds for preferring PBI over WBRT were 0.923 and 0.921 for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively, both slightly greater than the NED-WBRT utility. Outcomes were sensitive to the utility of NED-PBI, the PBI hazard ratio for local recurrence, the baseline IBTR risk, and the percentage of IBTRs that were local. Overall the degree of superiority of PBI over WBRT was greater for 55-year-old women than for 40-year-old women. Conclusions: For most utility values of the NED-PBI health state, PBI was the preferred treatment modality. This result was highly sensitive to patient preferences and was also dependent on patient age, PBI efficacy, IBTR risk, and the fraction of IBTRs that were local

  15. Breast milk and energy intake in exclusively, predominantly, and partially breast-fed infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, H; Coward, WA; Albernaz, E; Visser, GH; Wells, JCK; Wright, A; Victoria, CG; Victora, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the extent to which breast milk is replaced by intake of other liquids or foods, and to estimate energy intake of infants defined as exclusively (EBF), predominantly (PBF) and partially breast-fed (PartBF). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Community-based study in urban

  16. Dosimetric validation of planning system Eclipse 10 in partial breast irradiation treatments with IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez T, J. J.; Gutierrez M, J. G.; Ortiz A, C. S.; Chagoya G, A.; Gutierrez C, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    Partial breast irradiation is a new type of external radiation therapy to treat breast cancer in early clinical stages. Consist of administering to the channel surgical high doses of radiation in few treatment sessions. In this paper the dose calculations of the planning system Eclipse version 10 for a treatment of partial breast irradiation with X-rays beams (6 MV) intensity modulated were compared against the measurements made with OSL dosimeters and radio-chromic dye film. An anthropomorphic mannequin was used in which OSL dosimeters were collocated near the surface, an inside the radio-chromic dye film one plate; with this latest one dimensional dose distribution was measured. Previously dosimeters were calibrated irradiating them with a beam of X-rays 6 MV under the conditions specified in the IAEA-398 protocol. The OSL dosimeters were read in the Micro star Landauer equipment, the radio-chromic dye films were read with a scanner Epson 10000-Xl and analyzed with FilmCal and PTW Verisoft programs. The differences between measured and calculated dose were as follows: 3.6±1% for the OSL dosimeter and 96.3±1% of the analyzed points approved the gamma index criterion (3%, 3m m) when comparing the matrices of calculated dose and measured with the radio-chromic dye film. These results confirm the good dosimetric performance of planning system used under specific conditions used in the partial breast irradiation technique. (Author)

  17. Partial radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samour, C.

    1969-01-01

    The radiative capture of resonance neutrons has been studied near the Saclay linac between 0.5 and 700 eV with time-of-flight method and a Ge(Li) detector. 195 Pt + n and 183 W + n allow the study of the distribution of partial radiative widths and their eventual correlation and also the variation of γ i > with E γ . The mean values of Ml and El transition intensities are compared in several tin isotopes. Interference effects, either between resonances or between direct capture and resonant capture are found in 195 Pt + n, 197 Au + n and 59 Co + n. The excited level schemes of a great deal of nuclei are obtained and compared with theoretical predictions. This study has been completed by an analysis of thermal spectrum. (author) [fr

  18. Transforming Growth Factor β-1 (TGF-β1) Is a Serum Biomarker of Radiation Induced Fibrosis in Patients Treated With Intracavitary Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothe, Dustin L. [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Coplowitz, Shana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Greenwood, Eleni [Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Barney, Christian L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Christos, Paul J. [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K. S. Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States); Wernicke, A. Gabriella, E-mail: gaw9008@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stich Radiation Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To examine a relationship between serum transforming growth factor β -1 (TGF-β1) values and radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective analysis of the development of RIF in 39 women with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0-I breast cancer treated with lumpectomy and accelerated partial breast irradiation via intracavitary brachytherapy (IBAPBI). An enzyme-linked immunoassay (Quantikine, R and D, Minneapolis, MN) was used to measure serum TGF-β1 before surgery, before IBAPBI, and during IBAPBI. Blood samples for TGF-β1 were also collected from 15 healthy, nontreated women (controls). The previously validated tissue compliance meter (TCM) was used to objectively assess RIF. Results: The median time to follow-up for 39 patients was 44 months (range, 5-59 months). RIF was graded by the TCM scale as 0, 1, 2, and 3 in 5 of 20 patients (25%), 6 of 20 patients (30%), 5 of 20 patients (25%), and 4 of 20 patients (20%), respectively. The mean serum TGF-β1 values were significantly higher in patients before surgery than in disease-free controls, as follows: all cancer patients (30,201 ± 5889 pg/mL, P=.02); patients with any type of RIF (32,273 ± 5016 pg/mL, P<.0001); and women with moderate to severe RIF (34,462 ± 4713 pg/mL, P<0.0001). Patients with moderate to severe RIF had significantly elevated TGF-β1 levels when compared with those with none to mild RIF before surgery (P=.0014) during IBAPBI (P≤0001), and the elevation persisted at 6 months (P≤.001), 12 months (P≤.001), 18 months (P≤.001), and 24 months (P=.12). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of TGF-β1 values predicting moderate to severe RIF was generated with an area under the curve (AUC){sub ROC} of 0.867 (95% confidence interval 0.700-1.000). The TGF-β1 threshold cutoff was determined to be 31,000 pg/mL, with associated sensitivity and specificity of 77.8% and 90.0%, respectively. Conclusions: TGF-β1 levels correlate with

  19. Dosimetry studies during breast cancer radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. O. M.

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies indicated that breast cancer is wildly spread especially in women as compared to men. It is increased after an age of thirty five years in women so it is important to study the effect of exposure to the radiation on the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer. In this work the scattered doses for the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer were measured and also the probability of inducing cancer in it is also discussed. The study was performed for a group of patients composed of twenty five females. Also the backscattered doses to the intact breast were measured for thirteen female patients. During the treatment using gamma rays from Co-60 source the two tangential fields (lateral and medial) were selected for the measurements. The results of exposure to gamma radiation for the lateral and medial fields showed that the mean scattered and backscattered doses to the intact breast were (241.26 cGY,47.49 cGY) and (371.6 cGY,385.4 cGY), respectively. Beside that the somatic risk of induced cancer to the intact breast was found to be (6 .1X10 -3 ,1.2X10 -3 ) and (9.29X10 -3 , 9.63X10 -3 ), respectively. From the results obtained it was concluded that the intact breast received small amounts of radiation doses which may lead to breast cancer for the healthy breast. The recommendations from the present study are to take care of radiation protection to the patient, and also to take care of the patient treatment conditions like temperature, pressure and humidity during the radiation exposure.(Author)

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes following Breast Conservation Therapy and Barriers to Referral for Partial Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrouwe, Sebastian Q; Somogyi, Ron B; Snell, Laura; McMillan, Catherine; Vesprini, Danny; Lipa, Joan E

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-reported aesthetic outcome of breast conservation therapy in a generalized sample of patients, and to describe potential barriers to referral for partial breast reconstruction. Consecutive breast conservation therapy patients completing radiotherapy over a 1-year period at a regional cancer center were identified. Eligible patients were contacted by means of mail/e-mail and invited to participate. Participants completed the BREAST-Q breast conservation therapy module along with a questionnaire examining feelings about breast reconstruction. Multiple regression analysis was performed using the satisfaction with breasts scale as the dependent variable. Surveys were completed by 185 of 592 eligible participants (response rate, 31.3 percent; mean age, 61 years) an average of 38 months after lumpectomy. The mean score for the BREAST-Q satisfaction with breasts scale was 59 of 100. Younger age (p = 0.038), lumpectomy reexcision (p = 0.018), and lumpectomy at a nonacademic center (p = 0.026) were significantly associated with lower satisfaction. Bra size, months from lumpectomy, and tumor quadrant/size were not significantly associated with satisfaction (p > 0.05). The most common statements regarding reconstruction were "I don't feel the need for it" (60.0 percent), "I don't like the thought of having breast implants" (22.7 percent), and "I don't want any more surgeon/doctor visits" (22.2 percent). Before lumpectomy, only 1.6 percent had a consultation for reconstruction, and only 22.7 percent were aware of this option. If offered, 33.1 percent of patients would have attended this consultation. There is an unmet demand for partial breast reconstruction, with an opportunity to advocate and increase awareness on behalf of patients undergoing breast conservation therapy.

  1. Dosimetric considerations and early clinical experience of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multi-lumen applicators in the setting of breast augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari, Mani; Pino, Ramiro; Scarboro, Sarah B.; Bass, Barbara L.; Miltenburg, Darlene M.; Butler, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an accepted treatment option in breast-conserving therapy for early stage breast cancer. However, data regarding outcomes of patients treated with multi-lumen catheter systems who have existing breast implants is limited. The purpose of this study was to report treatment parameters, outcomes, and possible dosimetric correlation with cosmetic outcome for this population of patients at our institution. Material and methods We report the treatment and outcome of seven consecutive patients with existing breast implants and early stage breast cancer who were treated between 2009 and 2013 using APBI following lumpectomy. All patients were treated twice per day for five days to a total dose of 34 Gy using a high-dose-rate 192Ir source. Cosmetic outcomes were evaluated using the Harvard breast cosmesis scale, and late toxicities were reported using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late radiation morbidity schema. Results After a mean follow-up of 32 months, all patients have remained cancer free. Six out of seven patients had an excellent or good cosmetic outcome. There were no grade 3 or 4 late toxicities. The average total breast implant volume was 279.3 cc, received an average mean dose of 12.1 Gy, and a maximum dose of 234.1 Gy. The average percentage of breast implant volume receiving 50%, 75%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose was 15.6%, 7.03%, 4.6%, 1.58%, and 0.46%, respectively. Absolute volume of breast implants receiving more than 50% of prescribed dose correlated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Conclusions Accelerated partial breast irradiation using a multi-lumen applicator in patients with existing breast implants can safely be performed with promising early clinical results. The presence of the implant did not compromise the ability to achieve dosimetric criteria; however, dose to the implant and the irradiated implant volume may be related with worse cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26816499

  2. Preoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Prospective, Phase 2 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Kesmodel, Susan B.; Bellavance, Emily; Drogula, Cynthia; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Cohen, Randi J.; Citron, Wendla; Morgan, Michelle; Staats, Paul; Feigenberg, Steven; Regine, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of utilizing 3-dimensional conformal accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) in the preoperative setting followed by standard breast-conserving therapy. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective trial testing the feasibility of preoperative APBI followed by lumpectomy for patients with early-stage invasive ductal breast cancer. Eligible patients had T1-T2 ( 21 days after radiation therapy. Adjuvant therapy was given as per standard of care. Results: Twenty-seven patients completed treatment. With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.5-5 years), there have been no local or regional failures. A complete pathologic response according to hematoxylin and eosin stains was seen in 4 patients (15%). There were 4 grade 3 seromas. Patient-reported cosmetic outcome was rated as good to excellent in 79% of patients after treatment. Conclusions: Preoperative 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy−APBI is feasible and well tolerated in select patients with early-stage breast cancer, with no reported local recurrences and good to excellent cosmetic results. The pathologic response rates associated with this nonablative APBI dose regimen are particularly encouraging and support further exploration of this paradigm.

  3. Preoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Prospective, Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Elizabeth, E-mail: Enichols1@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kesmodel, Susan B.; Bellavance, Emily; Drogula, Cynthia [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tkaczuk, Katherine [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Cohen, Randi J.; Citron, Wendla; Morgan, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Staats, Paul [Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Feigenberg, Steven; Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of utilizing 3-dimensional conformal accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) in the preoperative setting followed by standard breast-conserving therapy. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective trial testing the feasibility of preoperative APBI followed by lumpectomy for patients with early-stage invasive ductal breast cancer. Eligible patients had T1-T2 (<3 cm), N0 tumors. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85-Gy fractions delivered twice daily. Surgery was performed >21 days after radiation therapy. Adjuvant therapy was given as per standard of care. Results: Twenty-seven patients completed treatment. With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 0.5-5 years), there have been no local or regional failures. A complete pathologic response according to hematoxylin and eosin stains was seen in 4 patients (15%). There were 4 grade 3 seromas. Patient-reported cosmetic outcome was rated as good to excellent in 79% of patients after treatment. Conclusions: Preoperative 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy−APBI is feasible and well tolerated in select patients with early-stage breast cancer, with no reported local recurrences and good to excellent cosmetic results. The pathologic response rates associated with this nonablative APBI dose regimen are particularly encouraging and support further exploration of this paradigm.

  4. Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannan, Raquibul, E-mail: Raquibul.Hannan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Chin C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable

  5. Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannan, Raquibul; Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William; Chen, Chin C.; Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm 3 ) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation 3 ) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable to that reported in the

  6. Radiation as a cause of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Silverstone, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    The possible role of radiation as a factor in the causation of breast cancer was investigated. Some variables said to be associated with a high risk of breast cancer include genetic factors, pre-existing breast disease, artificial menopause, family history of breast cancer, failure to breast feed, older than usual age at time of first pregnancy, high socioeconomic status, specific blood groups, fatty diet, obesity, and hormonal imbalances. To this list we must add ionizing radiation as an additional and serious risk factor in the causation of breast cancer. Among the irradiated groups which have an increase in the incidence of cancer of the breast are: tuberculous women subjected to repeated fluoroscopy; women who received localized x-ray treatments for acute post-partum mastitis; atom-bomb survivors; other x-ray exposures involving the breast, including irradiation in children and in experimental animals; and women who were treated with x rays for acne or hirsuitism. The dose of radiation received by the survivors of the atom bomb who subsequently developed cancer of the breast ranged from 80 to 800 rads, the tuberculous women who were fluoroscoped received an estimated 50 to 6,000 rads, the women who were treated for mastitis probably were exposed to 30 to 700 rads, and the patients with acne received 100 to 6,000 rads. These imprecise estimates are compared with mammographic doses in the range of 10s of rads to the breast at each examination, an imprecise estimate depending on technique and equipment. However imprecise these estimates may be, it is apparent that younger women are more likely than older women to develop cancer from exposure to radiation. It is pointed out that the American Cancer Society advises that women under 35 years should have mammography only for medical indication, not for so-called screening

  7. Tumor bed delineation for external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Tao, Randa; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Li, Guang; Powell, Simon N.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been considered an alternative to whole breast irradiation for patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy. APBI delivers higher doses of radiation in fewer fractions to the post-lumpectomy tumor bed with a 1–2 cm margin, targeting the area at the highest risk of local recurrence while sparing normal breast tissue. However, there are inherent challenges in defining accurate target volumes for APBI. Studies have shown that significant interobserver variation exists among radiation oncologists defining the lumpectomy cavity, which raises the question of how to improve the accuracy and consistency in the delineation of tumor bed volumes. The combination of standardized guidelines and surgical clips significantly improves an observer’s ability in delineation, and it is the standard in multiple ongoing external-beam APBI trials. However, questions about the accuracy of the clips to mark the lumpectomy cavity remain, as clips only define a few points at the margin of the cavity. This paper reviews the techniques that have been developed so far to improve target delineation in APBI delivered by conformal external beam radiation therapy, including the use of standardized guidelines, surgical clips or fiducial markers, pre-operative computed tomography imaging, and additional imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Alternatives to post-operative APBI, future directions, and clinical recommendations were also discussed

  8. New approach to breast cancer CAD using partial least squares and kernel-partial least squares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; Heine, John; Embrechts, Mark; Smith, Tom; Choma, Robert; Wong, Lut

    2005-04-01

    Breast cancer is second only to lung cancer as a tumor-related cause of death in women. Currently, the method of choice for the early detection of breast cancer is mammography. While sensitive to the detection of breast cancer, its positive predictive value (PPV) is low, resulting in biopsies that are only 15-34% likely to reveal malignancy. This paper explores the use of two novel approaches called Partial Least Squares (PLS) and Kernel-PLS (K-PLS) to the diagnosis of breast cancer. The approach is based on optimization for the partial least squares (PLS) algorithm for linear regression and the K-PLS algorithm for non-linear regression. Preliminary results show that both the PLS and K-PLS paradigms achieved comparable results with three separate support vector learning machines (SVLMs), where these SVLMs were known to have been trained to a global minimum. That is, the average performance of the three separate SVLMs were Az = 0.9167927, with an average partial Az (Az90) = 0.5684283. These results compare favorably with the K-PLS paradigm, which obtained an Az = 0.907 and partial Az = 0.6123. The PLS paradigm provided comparable results. Secondly, both the K-PLS and PLS paradigms out performed the ANN in that the Az index improved by about 14% (Az ~ 0.907 compared to the ANN Az of ~ 0.8). The "Press R squared" value for the PLS and K-PLS machine learning algorithms were 0.89 and 0.9, respectively, which is in good agreement with the other MOP values.

  9. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACTH CAF CMF FAC TAC TC TCH TH THP Radiation Therapy Whole Breast Radiation Partial Breast Radiation ... Basics Treatments and Your Bone Health Bone Health Tests Improving Bone Health Medicines To Protect Bones Diet, ...

  10. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Andrea M.; Portschy, Pamela R. [Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Lee, Chung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Le, Chap T. [Division of Biostatistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Han, Linda K. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Washington, Tara [Vantage Oncology, Redhawk and Wildomar Centers California, Wildomar, California (United States); Kinney, Michael [Center for Advanced Breast Care, Arlington Heights, Illinois (United States); Bretzke, Margit [Surgical Specialists of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Tuttle, Todd M., E-mail: tuttl006@umn.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended.

  11. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, Andrea M.; Portschy, Pamela R.; Lee, Chung; Le, Chap T.; Han, Linda K.; Washington, Tara; Kinney, Michael; Bretzke, Margit; Tuttle, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended

  12. A case report on bilateral partial breast irradiation using SAVI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloi, Aime M., E-mail: agloi@stvgb.org [Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent Hospital, Green Bay, WI (United States); Buchanan, Robert [Southeast Alabama Medical Center, Radiation Oncology Department, Dothan, AL 36301 (United States); Nuskind, Jeff; Zuge, Corrie; Goettler, Anndrea [Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent Hospital, Green Bay, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    To assess dosimetric parameters in a case study where bilateral accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is delivered using a strut-adjusted volume implant (SAVI) device. A 59-year-old female received APBI in both breasts over 5 days, with fractions of 3.4 Gy twice daily. A Vac-lok system was used for immobilization, and a C-arm was used for daily imaging. We generated dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the brachytherapy plans to derive several important biologic factors. We calculated the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), and tumor control probability (TCP) using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters {alpha} = 0.3 Gy{sup -1}, {alpha}/{beta} = 4 Gy, n = 0.1, and m = 0.3. In addition, we assessed the dose homogeneity index (DHI), overdose index, and dose nonuniformity ratio. D95 was >95% and V150 was <50 mL for both breasts. The DHIs were 0.469 and 0.512 for the left and right breasts, respectively. The EUDs (normalized to 3.4 Gy b.i.d.) were 33.53 and 29.10 Gy. The TCPs were estimated at 99.2% and 99.9%, whereas the NTCP values were 4.2% and 2.57%. In this clinical case, we were able to quantify the dosimetric parameters of an APBI treatment performed with a SAVI device.

  13. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Jonathan [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Small, William [Loyola Univ. Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States). Stritch School of Medicine, Cardianl Bernardin Cancer Center; Woloschak, Gayle E. (ed.) [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  14. Breast cancer biology for the radiation oncologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Jonathan; Small, William; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first textbook of its kind devoted to describing the biological complexities of breast cancer in a way that is relevant to the radiation oncologist. Radiation Oncology has long treated breast cancer as a single biological entity, with all treatment decisions being based on clinical and pathologic risk factors. We are now beginning to understand that biological subtypes of breast cancer may have different risks of recurrence as well as different intrinsic sensitivity to radiotherapy. Multi-gene arrays that have for years been used to predict the risk of distant recurrence and the value of systemic chemotherapy may also have utility in predicting the risk of local recurrence. Additionally, the targeted agents used to treat breast cancer may interact with radiotherapy in ways that can be beneficial or undesirable. All of these emerging issues are extensively discussed in this book, and practical evidence-based treatment recommendations are presented whenever possible.

  15. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patey, D

    1977-02-12

    Following on the suggestion (Simon, N., and Silverstone, S.M., Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 52: 741 (1976)) that repeated mammography should be avoided in fit women with a life expectancy greater than 20 years, it is suggested that it should also be avoided in breasts in which the malignant potentiality of the epithelium is known to be relatively high. The best example is the opposite breast following the development of carcinoma in one breast, a situation in which regular follow-up mammography was once regarded as particularly indicated. The same theoretical considerations are an argument against the treatment of carcinoma of the breast by excision of the lump and radiotherapy to the remaining breast tissue.

  16. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnerty, N.A.; Buzdar, A.U.; Blumenschein, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1983, sixteen patients with a history of irradiation at an early age to the head, neck, or chest areas for a variety of conditions in whom breast cancer subsequently developed were seen at out institute. The median latent period between the irradiation and the development of breast cancer was 420 months. The distribution of patients by stage of the disease and the median age at diagnosis of this subgroup was similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. The subsequent course of this disease was also similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. A substantial number of women have been exposed to irradiation at a young age, and these women are at a higher risk of having breast cancer develop. These women should be closely observed to discover the disease in an early curable stage

  17. The implications of breast cancer molecular phenotype for radiation oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin eSioshansi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence in the hormone receptor positive luminal subtypes compared to hormone receptor negative subtypes (triple negative and HER2-enriched. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of local recurrence. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of local recurrence for patients with triple negative tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and local recurrence following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased local recurrence in triple negative breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  18. The Implications of Breast Cancer Molecular Phenotype for Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sioshansi, Shirin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Huber, Kathryn E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Wazer, David E., E-mail: dwazer@tuftsmedicalcenter.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-06-28

    The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence, and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence (LR) in the hormone receptor (HR) positive luminal subtypes compared to HR negative subtypes [triple negative (TN) and HER2-enriched]. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of LR. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of LR for patients with TN tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and LR following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased LR in TN breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation, and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  19. The Implications of Breast Cancer Molecular Phenotype for Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioshansi, Shirin; Huber, Kathryn E.; Wazer, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of distinct molecular subtypes of breast cancer has advanced the understanding and treatment of breast cancer by providing insight into prognosis, patterns of recurrence, and effectiveness of therapy. The prognostic significance of molecular phenotype with regard to distant recurrences and overall survival are well established in the literature and has been readily incorporated into systemic therapy management decisions. However, despite the accumulating data suggesting similar prognostic significance for locoregional recurrence, integration of molecular phenotype into local management decision making has lagged. Although there are some conflicting reports, collectively the literature supports a low risk of local recurrence (LR) in the hormone receptor (HR) positive luminal subtypes compared to HR negative subtypes [triple negative (TN) and HER2-enriched]. The development of targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab for the treatment of HER2-enriched subtype, has been shown to mitigate the increased risk of LR. Unfortunately, no such remedy exists to address the increased risk of LR for patients with TN tumors, making it a clinical challenge for radiation oncologists. In this review we discuss the correlation between molecular subtype and LR following either breast conservation therapy or mastectomy. We also explore the possible mechanisms for increased LR in TN breast cancer and radiotherapeutic implications for this population, such as the safety of breast conservation, consideration of dose escalation, and the appropriateness of accelerated partial breast irradiation.

  20. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  1. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change

  2. Radiation detection and diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The value of mammography in the symptomatic patient has been adequately documented, but its use as a detection procedure remains a question. Risk-benefit ratios, based primarily upon the study carried out by the Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York, have suggested that the technique has little value in individuals under age 50. Emphasis has been placed upon the possible carcinogenic effects of radiation as compared with the efficacy of mammography and the questionable influence of early diagnosis upon end results. Although technical advances have substantially reduced the exposure of the patient to radiation, the possibility of significant information loss as the result of these developments has been considered a potential drawback to their routine use. All of these factors have served to diminish both public and professional acceptance of the examination. Although current data do not allow complete resolution of these problems, certain conclusions may be drawn and trends established. The sum of these may indicate that minimal dose mammography is an accurate, low-risk procedure, capable of significantly altering the natural history of breast cancer. Whether or not the examination should be routinely used in women under age 50 remains open to question since the lack of experimental controls prohibits validation of the technique in terms of reduced mortality rates. Documentation of increased survival rates may partially assist in the established of a reliable risk-benefit ratio, but will not satisfy the statistical requirements of eliminating lead-bias, and self-selection. These questions may be resolved by studies now underway

  3. A spreadsheet to determine the volume ratio for target and breast in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, T.; Willis, D.; Miller, J.; Hubbard, P.; Oliver, M.; Chua, B.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The technical feasibility of Partial Breast Irradiation (PBI) using external beam radiotherapy depends on the ratio between the evaluation planning target volume (PTV e val) and the whole breast volume (PBI volume ratio = PVR). We aimed to develop a simple method to determine PVR using measurements performed at the time of the planning CT scan. A PVR calculation tool was developed using a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to determine the PTV from three orthogonal dimensions of the seroma cavity and a given margin on the CT scans. The breast volume is estimated from the separation and breast height in five equally spaced CT slices. The PTV e val and whole breast volume were determined for 29 patients from two centres using the spreadsheet calculation tool and compared to volumes delineated on computerised treatment planning systems. Both the PTV e val and whole breast volumes were underestimated by approximately 25% using the spreadsheet. The resulting PVRs were 1.05 +/- 0.35 (mean +/- 1 S D) times larger than the ones determined from planning. Estimations of the PVR using the calculation tool were achievable in around 5 minutes at the time of CT scanning and allow a prompt decision on the suitability of the patients for PBI.

  4. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-05-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  5. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-01-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD) cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  6. Investigation of Accelerated Partial Breast Patient Alignment and Treatment With Helical Tomotherapy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, Katja M.; Buchholz, Daniel J.; Burch, Doug R. C.; Burkavage, Rob C.; Limaye, Arti U.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Henderson, Doug; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the precision of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)-based alignment of the seroma cavity for patients undergoing partial breast irradiation; and to determine whether accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) plans can be generated for TomoTherapy deliveries that meet the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 protocol guidelines for target coverage and normal tissue dose limitations. Methods and Materials: We obtained 50 MVCT images from 10 patients. An interuser study was designed to assess the alignment precision. Using a standard helical and a fixed beam prototype ('topotherapy') optimizer, two APBI plans for each patient were developed. Results: The precision of the MVCT-based seroma cavity alignment was better than 2 mm if averaged over the patient population. Both treatment techniques could be used to generate acceptable APBI plans for patients that fulfilled the recommended NSABP B-39/RTOG-0413 selection criteria. For plans of comparable treatment time, the conformation of the prescription dose to the target was greater for helical deliveries, while the ipsilateral lung dose was significantly reduced for the topotherapy plans. Conclusions: The inherent volumetric imaging capabilities of a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit allow for alignment of patients undergoing partial breast irradiation that is determined from the visibility of the seroma cavity on the MVCT image. The precision of the MVCT-based alignment was better than 2 mm (± standard deviation) when averaged over the patient population. Using the NSABP B-39/RTOG-0413 guidelines, acceptable APBI treatment plans can be generated using helical- or topotherapy-based delivery techniques

  7. Impact of MLC leaf width on the quality of the dose distribution in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Height, Felicity J.; Kron, Tomas; Willis, David; Chua, Boon H.

    2012-01-01

    Partial-breast irradiation (PBI) aims to limit the target volume for radiotherapy in women with early breast cancer after partial mastectomy to the region at highest risk of local recurrence, the tumor bed. Multileaf collimators are used to achieve conformal radiation beam portals required for PBI. Narrower leaf widths are generally assumed to allow more conformal shaping of beam portals around irregularly shaped target volumes. The aim was to compare 5-mm and 10-mm leaf widths for patients previously treated using PBI and assess subsequent planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organ at risk (OAR) doses for 16 patients. Several plans (5-mm leaf width or 10-mm leaf width) were generated for each patient using the original treated plan as the basis for attempts at further optimization. Alternating between different leaf widths found no significant difference in terms of overall PTV coverage and OAR doses between treatment plans. Optimization of the original treated plan allowed a small decrease in ipsilateral breast dose, which was offset by a lower PTV minimum. No significant dosimetric difference was found to support an advantage of 5-mm over 10-mm leaf width in this setting.

  8. Preoperative breast radiation therapy: Indications and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lightowlers, S V; Boersma, L J; Fourquet, A

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative breast radiation therapy (RT) is not a new concept, but older studies failed to change practice. More recently, there has been interest in revisiting preoperative RT using modern techniques. This current perspective discusses the indications, summarises the published literature and t...

  9. Dosimetric comparison of partial and whole breast external beam irradiation in the treatment of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yongbok; Parda, David S.; Trombetta, Mark G.; Colonias, Athanasios; Werts, E. Day; Miller, Linda; Miften, Moyed

    2007-01-01

    A dosimetric comparison was performed on external-beam three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (PBI) and whole breast irradiation (WBI) plans for patients enrolled in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 protocol at our institution. Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with either PBI (12 patients) or WBI (12 patients). In the PBI arm, the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 38.5 Gy at 3.85 Gy per fraction twice daily using a four-field noncoplanar beam setup. A minimum 6 h interval was required between fractions. In the WBI arm, the whole breast including the entirety of the lumpectomy cavity was treated to a total dose of 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction daily using opposed tangential beams. The lumpectomy cavity volume, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV E VAL), and critical structure volumes were contoured for both the PBI and WBI patients. Dosimetric parameters, dose volume histograms (DVHs), and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for target and critical structures were compared. Dosimetric results show the PBI plans, compared to the WBI plans, have smaller hot spots in the PTV E VAL (maximum dose: 104.2% versus 110.9%) and reduced dose to the ipsilateral breast (V50: 48.6% versus 92.1% and V100: 10.2% versus 50.5%), contralateral breast (V3: 0.16% versus 2.04%), ipsilateral lung (V30: 5.8% versus 12.7%), and thyroid (maximum dose: 0.5% versus 2.0%) with p values ≤0.01. However, similar dose coverage of the PTV E VAL (98% for PBI and 99% for WBI, on average) was observed and the dose difference for other critical structures was clinically insignificant in both arms. The gEUD data analysis showed the reduction of dose to the ipsilateral breast and lung, contralateral breast and thyroid. In addition, preliminary dermatologic adverse event assessment data suggested reduced skin toxicity for patients treated with the PBI technique

  10. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction of the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was

  11. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah; Smith, Wendy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction of the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was

  12. Analysis of radiation-induced angiosarcoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanova, M; Rauova, K; Boljesikova, E; Machalekova, K; Krajcovicova, I; Lehotska, V; Mikulova, M; Svec, J

    2014-01-01

    Breast angiosarcoma may occur de novo, or as a complication of radiation therapy, or chronic lymphedema secondary to axillary lymph node dissection for mammary carcinoma. Both primary and secondary angiosarcomas may present with bruise like skin discoloration, which may delay the diagnosis. Imaging findings are nonspecific. In case of high-grade tumours, MRI may be used effectively to determine lesion extent by showing rapid enhancement, nevertheless earliest possible diagnostics is crucial therefore any symptoms of angiosarcoma have to be carefully analysed. The case analysed here reports on results of 44-year old premenopausal woman who was treated for a T1N1M0 invasive ductal carcinoma. After a biopsy diagnosis of carcinoma, the patient underwent quadrantectomy with axillary lymph node dissection. She received partial 4 cycles of chemotherapy with adriamycin and cyclophosphamide, followed by radiation treatment. Thereafter, a standard postoperative radiotherapy was applied at our institution four months after chemotherapy (TD 46 Gy in 23 fractions followed by a 10 Gy electron boost to the tumour bed). Adjuvant chemotherapy was finished six months after operation, followed by tamoxifen. Follow up: no further complications were detected during regular check-ups. However, 12-years later, patient reported significant changes at breast region which was exposed to radiation during treatment of original tumour. In this article, we describe the clinical presentation, imaging and pathological findings of secondary angiosarcoma of the breast after radiotherapy (Fig. 2, Ref. 26).

  13. Phase II trial of proton beam accelerated partial breast irradiation in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Hyun; Lee, Nam Kwon; Kim, Ja Young; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Here, we report the results of our phase II, prospective study of proton beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PB-APBI) in patients with breast cancer after breast conserving surgery (BCS). Materials and methods: Thirty patients diagnosed with breast cancer were treated with PB-APBI using a single-field proton beam or two fields after BCS. The treatment dose was 30 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in six CGE fractions delivered once daily over five consecutive working days. Results: All patients completed PB-APBI. The median follow-up time was 59 months (range: 43–70 months). Of the 30 patients, none had ipsilateral breast recurrence or regional or distant metastasis, and all were alive at the last follow-up. Physician-evaluated toxicities were mild to moderate, except in one patient who had severe wet desquamation at 2 months that was not observed beyond 6 months. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 83% and 80% of the patients at the end of PB-APBI and at 2 months, respectively, and decreased to 69% at 3 years. A good or excellent cosmetic outcome was noted in all patients treated with a two-field proton beam at any follow-up time point except for one. For all patients, the mean percentage breast retraction assessment (pBRA) value increased significantly during the follow-up period (p = 0.02); however, it did not increase in patients treated with two-field PB-APBI (p = 0.3). Conclusions: PB-APBI consisting of 30 CGE in six CGE fractions once daily for five consecutive days can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity to properly selected patients with early-stage breast cancer. Multiple-field PB-APBI may achieve a high rate of good-to-excellent cosmetic outcomes. Additional clinical trials with larger patient groups are needed

  14. Breast cancer induced by protracted radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The experience at Hiroshima/Nagasaki demonstrated that breast cancer can be induced by single doses of ionizing radiation following latencies of 10-40 years. Several epidemiological studies, usually involving ancillary low-LET radiation to the breast, have demonstrated that breast cancer can be induced by protracted exposures, with similar latencies, and with similar dependencies on dose. Radiobiologically these results suggest that the target cells involved were deficient in repair of low-LET damage even when the protraction was over months to years. Since three-quarters of breast tumors originate in the ducts where their proliferation is controlled by menstrual-cycle timed estrogen/progesterone secretions, these cells periodically were in cycle. Thus, the two main elements of a conceptual model for radon-induced lung cancer -- kinetics and deficient repair -- are satisfied. The model indicates that breast cancer could be the cumulative effect of protracted small exposures, the risk from any one of which ordinarily would be quite small. (author)

  15. Generalized Morphea after Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 69-year-old woman who received external beam radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. Seven months later, she developed generalized morphea involving the area of irradiated skin of the breast as well as distant sites of the groin and distal lower extremity. Postirradiation morphea is an uncommon yet well-documented phenomenon, usually confined to the radiated site and the immediate surrounding tissue. To our knowledge, this is only the fourth reported case of morphea occurring distant from the radiation field. While most cases of postirradiation morphea have been shown to either resolve spontaneously or respond to topical corticosteroids, our patient required systemic therapy with methotrexate, which resulted in clinical improvement. With this paper, we hope to bring further awareness to this phenomenon and demonstrate a successful treatment response with the use of methotrexate in postirradiation generalized morphea.

  16. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  17. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, Silvia; Longo, Renata; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Olivo, Alessandro; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bergamaschi, Anna; Poropat, Paolo; Rigon, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico Dalla; Castelli, Edoardo

    2004-01-01

    A system for in vivo breast imaging with monochromatic x-rays has been designed and built at the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste (Italy) and will be operational in 2004. The system design involves the possibility of performing both planar mammography and breast tomography. In the present work, the first results obtained with a test set-up for breast tomography are shown and discussed. Tomographic images of in vitro breasts were acquired using monochromatic x-ray beams in the energy range 20-28 keV and a linear array silicon pixel detector. Tomograms were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection algorithms; the effect of different filters was evaluated. The attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissue were measured, and a quantitative comparison of images acquired at different energies was performed by calculating the differential signal-to-noise ratio of fibroglandular details in adipose tissue. All images required a dose comparable to the dose delivered in clinical, conventional mammography and showed a high resolution of the breast structures without the overlapping effects that limit the visibility of the structures in 2D mammography. A quantitative evaluation of the images proves that the image quality at a given dose increases in the considered energy range and for the considered breast sizes

  18. Castration in breast cancer. Surgery or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Munoz, G.

    1977-01-01

    A summary is done on the indication of oophorectomy - by surgery or radiation - in the treatment of breast cancer. Prophylactic - and therapeutic oophorectomy are analysed. It is concluded that the treatment of advanced cancer is a fight against time, once the survival of patients ought to be prolonged with the minor number of therapeutic agents, avoiding the usage of them all at once not to exaust them. Castration performed with therapeutic purposes in pre-or post-menopause patients with hyperestrogenism is the first link in the chain of paliative treatment of advanced breast cancer. (M.A.) [pt

  19. Preoperative single fraction partial breast radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Horton, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A "virtual plan" was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. The median breast volume was 1,713 cm(3) (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm(3) (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm(3) of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple Aperture Radiation Therapy (MART) for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Tianfang

    2006-01-01

    Conventional breast radiotherapy utilizes two opposed tangential fields (OTF) can result in high radiation dose to lung and heart and inhomogeneous dose distribution in the target for large-size breast...

  1. Dosimetric comparison of proton and photon three-dimensional, conformal, external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Katz, Angela; Adams, Judith C.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Nyamwanda, Jacqueline A.C.; Feng, Jennifer K.C.; Doppke, Karen P.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of proton and photon-electron three-dimensional, conformal, external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (3D-CPBI). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients with fully excised, Stage I breast cancer treated with adjuvant proton 3D-CPBI had treatment plans generated using the mixed-modality, photon-electron 3D-CPBI technique. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, planning target volumes (PTVs; lumpectomy site plus 1.5-2.0 cm margin) and prescribed dose (32 Gy) were held constant. Plans were optimized for PTV coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Proton and mixed-modality plans both provided acceptable PTV coverage with 95% of the PTV receiving 90% of the prescribed dose in all cases. Both techniques also provided excellent dose homogeneity with a dose maximum exceeding 110% of the prescribed dose in only one case. Proton 3D-CPBI reduced the volume of nontarget breast tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose by an average of 36%. Statistically significant reductions in the volume of total ipsilateral breast receiving 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the prescribed dose were also observed. The use of protons resulted in small, but statistically significant, reductions in the radiation dose delivered to 5%, 10%, and 20% of ipsilateral and contralateral lung and heart. The nontarget breast tissue dosimetric advantages of proton 3D-CPBI were not dependent on tumor location, breast size, PTV size, or the ratio of PTV to breast volume. Conclusions: Compared to photon-electron 3D-CPBI, proton 3D-CPBI significantly reduces the volume of irradiated nontarget breast tissue. Both approaches to accelerated partial breast irradiation offer exceptional lung and heart sparing

  2. Analysis of radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field in breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2002-01-01

    In a retrospective study of radiation-induced pulmonary changes for patients with breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer, we sent questionnaires to the main hospitals in Japan. In this study, we analyzed pulmonary changes after tangential whole-breast irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field. The questionnaires included patients data, therapy data, and lung injury information between August 1999 and May 2000. On the first questionnaires, answer letters were received from 107 institutions out of 158 (67.7%). On the second questionnaires, response rate (hospitals which had radiation pneumonitis outside the radiation field) was 21.7% (23/106). We could find no risk factors of this type of pneumonitis. We suggested that lung irradiation might trigger this type of pneumonitis which is clinically similar to BOOP (bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia). It developed in 1.5-2.1% among the patients with breast conserving surgery and tangential whole-breast irradiation. And it is likely appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy. (author)

  3. In vivo dosimetry with MOSFETs and GAFCHROMIC films during electron IORT for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petoukhova, Anna; Rüssel, Iris; Nijst-Brouwers, Julienne; van Wingerden, Ko; van Egmond, Jaap; Jacobs, Daphne; Marinelli, Andreas; van der Sijp, Joost; Koper, Peter; Struikmans, Henk

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the delivered dose to the expected intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) dose with in vivo dosimetry. For IORT using electrons in accelerated partial breast irradiation, this is especially relevant since a high dose is delivered in a single fraction. For 47 of breast cancer patients, in vivo dosimetry was performed with MOSFETs and/or GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. A total dose of 23.33 Gy at d max was given directly after completing the lumpectomy procedure with electron beams generated with an IORT dedicated mobile accelerator. A protection disk was used to shield the thoracic wall. The results of in vivo MOSFET dosimetry for 27 patients and GAFROMIC film dosimetry for 20 patients were analysed. The entry dose for the breast tissue, measured with MOSFETs, (mean value 22.3 Gy, SD 3.4%) agreed within 1.7% with the expected dose (mean value 21.9 Gy). The dose in breast tissue, measured with GAFCHROMIC films (mean value 23.50 Gy) was on average within 0.7% (SD = 3.7%, range -5.5% to 5.6%) of the prescribed dose of 23.33 Gy. The dose measured with MOSFETs and GAFROMIC EBT2 films agreed well with the expected dose. For both methods, the dose to the thoracic wall, lungs and heart for left sided patents was lower than 2.5 Gy even when 12 MeV was applied. The positioning time of GAFCHROMIC films is negligible and based on our results we recommend its use as a standard tool for patient quality assurance during breast cancer IORT. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical significance of radiation therapy in breast recurrence and prognosis in breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Significant risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy, which has become a standard treatment for breast cancer, are positive surgical margins and the failure to perform radiation therapy. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of radiation therapy after primary surgery or breast recurrence. In 344 cases of breast-conserving surgery, disease recurred in 43 cases (12.5%), which were classified as follows: 17 cases of breast recurrence, 13 cases of breast and distant metastasis, and 13 cases of distant metastasis. Sixty-two patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. A positive surgical margin and younger age were significant risk factors for breast recurrence in patients not receiving postoperative radiation therapy but not in patients receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for younger patients with positive surgical margins. Furthermore, radiation therapy after recurrence was effective in the cases not treated with postoperative radiation but not in cases with inflammatory recurrence. Patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates than did patients with distant metastases regardless of breast recurrence. These findings suggest that the adaptation criteria of radiation therapy for local control must be clarified. (author)

  5. Clinical significance of radiation therapy in breast recurrence and prognosis in breast-conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1999-03-01

    Significant risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy, which has become a standard treatment for breast cancer, are positive surgical margins and the failure to perform radiation therapy. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of radiation therapy after primary surgery or breast recurrence. In 344 cases of breast-conserving surgery, disease recurred in 43 cases (12.5%), which were classified as follows: 17 cases of breast recurrence, 13 cases of breast and distant metastasis, and 13 cases of distant metastasis. Sixty-two patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. A positive surgical margin and younger age were significant risk factors for breast recurrence in patients not receiving postoperative radiation therapy but not in patients receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for younger patients with positive surgical margins. Furthermore, radiation therapy after recurrence was effective in the cases not treated with postoperative radiation but not in cases with inflammatory recurrence. Patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates than did patients with distant metastases regardless of breast recurrence. These findings suggest that the adaptation criteria of radiation therapy for local control must be clarified. (author)

  6. Does Three-Dimensional External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation Spare Lung Tissue Compared With Standard Whole Breast Irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Anudh K.; Vallow, Laura A.; Gale, Ashley A.; Buskirk, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether three-dimensional conformal partial breast irradiation (3D-PBI) spares lung tissue compared with whole breast irradiation (WBI) and to include the biologically equivalent dose (BED) to account for differences in fractionation. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy treatment plans were devised for WBI and 3D-PBI for 25 consecutive patients randomized on the NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. WBI plans were for 50 Gy in 25 fractions, and 3D-PBI plans were for 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Volume of ipsilateral lung receiving 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Gy was recorded for each plan. The linear quadratic equation was used to calculate the corresponding dose delivered in 10 fractions and volume of ipsilateral lung receiving these doses was recorded for PBI plans. Ipsilateral mean lung dose was recorded for each plan and converted to BED. Results: There was a significant decrease in volume of lung receiving 20 Gy with PBI (median, 4.4% vs. 7.5%; p 3 vs 4.85 Gy 3 , p = 0.07). PBI plans exposed more lung to 2.5 and 5 Gy. Conclusions: 3D-PBI exposes greater volumes of lung tissue to low doses of radiation and spares the amount of lung receiving higher doses when compared with WBI.

  7. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with multicatheters during breast conserving surgery for cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Spiteri Sagredo, Natalia; Martínez Regueira, Fernando; Olartecoechea Linaje, Begoña; Arredondo Chaves, Jorge; Cambeiro Vázquez, Mauricio; Pina Insausti, Luis Javier; Elizalde Pérez, Arlette; y García-Lallana, Amaya; Sola Gallego, Jose Javier

    2013-10-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with multicatheters after lumpectomy for breast cancer (BC) may be an alternative to whole breast irradiation in selected patients. The aim is to show our 5 year experience. Between June 2007 and June 2012, 87 BC patients have been evaluated for APBI. Inclusion criteria were: age over 40 years, unifocal tumour, infiltrating ductal or intraductal carcinoma, tumour size smaller than 3 cm and no lymph node involvement. Complications, cosmetic results and local and distant recurrences were evaluated. Treatment was completed in 48 patients and contraindicated in 39. The average age of treated patients was 59 years. Operating time was 123 min with 9 implanted catheters in each patient. No complications were observed during surgery or radiotherapy. Patients were discharged from hospital after 4 days. Tumour size was 11 mm. Of these, 35 were infiltrating ductal and 13 intraductal carcinomas. A total of 44 patients received adjuvant treatment. Mean follow-up was 22 months with no evidence of local or distant recurrence. The cosmetic outcome was good or excellent in 66% of cases. APBI with multicatheter placed after lumpectomy for BC is feasible and safe but requires a strict selection of patients. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Initial dosimetric experience using simple three-dimensional conformal external-beam accelerated partial-breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghian, Alphonse G.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Doppke, Karen P.; Katz, Angela; Smith, Barbara L.; Gadd, Michele; Specht, Michelle; Hughes, Kevin; Braaten, Kristina; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Recht, Abram; Powell, Simon N.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Several accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. We present our initial experience using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with tumors of 2 cm or less and negative axillary nodes were treated with 3D-CRT accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) between August 2003 and March 2005. The prescribed radiation dose was 32 Gy in 4-Gy fractions given twice daily. Efforts were made to minimize the number of beams required to achieve adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage. Results: A combination of photons and electrons was used in 85% of patients. A three-field technique that consisted of opposed, conformal tangential photons and enface electrons was employed in 43 patients (70%). Nine patients (15%) were treated with a four-field arrangement, which consisted of three photon fields and enface electrons. Mean PTV volumes that received 100%, 95%, and 90% of the prescribed dose were 93% ± 7%, 97% ± 4%, and 98% ± 2%, respectively. Dose inhomogeneity exceeded 10% in only 7 patients (11%). Mean doses to the ipsilateral lung and heart were 1.8 Gy and 0.8 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Simple 3D-CRT techniques of APBI can achieve appropriate PTV coverage while offering significant normal-tissue sparing. Therefore, this noninvasive approach may increase the availability of APBI to patients with early-stage breast cancer

  9. Stereotactic Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (SAPBI for Early Stage Breast Cancer: Rationale, Feasibility and Early Experience using the CyberKnife Radiosurgery Delivery Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola eOBAYOMI-DAVIES

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI utilizing brachytherapy or conventional external beam radiation has been studied in early stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery. Data regarding stereotactic treatment approaches are emerging. The CyberKnife linear accelerator enables excellent dose conformality to target structures while adjusting for target and patient motion. We report our institutional experience on the technical feasibility and rationale for SAPBI delivery using the CyberKnife radiosurgery system.Methods: Ten patients completed CyberKnife SAPBI in 2013 at Georgetown University Hospital. Four gold fiducials were implanted around the lumpectomy cavity prior to treatment under ultrasound guidance. The synchrony system tracked intrafraction motion of the fiducials. The clinical target volume (CTV was defined on contrast enhanced CT scans using surgical clips and post-operative changes. A 5 mm expansion was added to create the planning treatment volume (PTV. A total dose of 30 Gy was delivered to the PTV in 5 consecutive fractions. Target and critical structure doses were assessed as per the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39 study.Results: At least 3 fiducials were tracked in 100% of cases. The Mean treated PTV was 70 cm3 and the mean prescription isodose line was 80%. Mean dose to target volumes and constraints are as follows: 100% of the PTV received the prescription dose (PTV30. The volume of the ipsilateral breast receiving 30 Gy (V30 and above 15 Gy (V>15 was 14% and 31% respectively. The ipsilateral lung volume receiving 9 Gy (V9 was 3% and the contralateral lung volume receiving 1.5 Gy (V1.5 was 8%. For left sided breast cancers, the volume of heart receiving 1.5 Gy (V1.5 was 31%. Maximum skin dose was 36 Gy. At a median follow up of 1.3 years, all patients have experienced excellent/good breast cosmesis outcomes, and no breast events have been recorded

  10. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A 'virtual plan' was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm{sup 3} (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm{sup 3} (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm{sup 3} of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  11. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Horton, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A “virtual plan” was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm 3 (range: 1,014–2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm 3 (range: 26–73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70–1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2–6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5–20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3–42) and 53% (range: 24–65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm 3 of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  12. Breast conservation therapy for breast cancer. Radiation oncologist's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mitsumori, Michihide; Kokubo, Masaki; Fujishiro, Satsuki

    1998-01-01

    The roles and problems of radiation therapy in breast conserving therapy for breast cancer were presented. The roles of radiation therapy include decrease in breast recurrence, an alternative to axillary dissection for N0 cases, and neo-adjuvant radiation therapy. On the other hand, problems associated with radiation therapy are question of using radiation therapy for all cases, complications and worsening of cosmetics, and relatively high breast recurrence rates for margin-positive cases. The concept of breast conserving therapy is to improve QOL without decreasing treatment outcomes. It is considered that we should be more concentrated on the aspects of QOL because treatment outcomes of breast conserving therapy in Japan demonstrated sofar appear excellent. (author)

  13. Accelerated partial breast irradiation for elderly women with early breast cancer: A compromise between whole breast irradiation and omission of radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumodhee, Shakeel; Levy, Johan; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Lam Cham Kee, Daniel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Barranger, Emmanuel; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    Regarding adjuvant radiation therapy making decision for elderly women, Albert (2013) published a nomogram predicting the mastectomy-free survival (MFS) rate with or without adjuvant irradiation. Based on this approach, we proposed to investigate the use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) vs. whole breast irradiation (WBI) or endocrine therapy alone in elderly low-risk breast cancer patients. For each elderly woman treated by conserving surgery and APBI (multicatheter interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy), 5- and 10-year MFS rates were calculated. For each treated patient, using the Albert nomogram, we calculated the estimated MFS rates at 5 and 10 years, with and without WBI. Then, we compared the estimated MFS rates after no irradiation and WBI vs. observed MFS rates after APBI. From 2005 to 2016, 79 patients were treated. Median followup was 96.8 months [68.6-104.9], median age was 77 years [66-89]. Expected 5- and 10-year mastectomy rates calculated with the Albert nomogram without WBI were 2.95% and 7.25%, respectively, leading to a 10-year MFS rate of 92.7%. Expected 5- and 10-year mastectomy rates after WBI were 1.41% and 3.66%, respectively, leading to a 10-year MFS rate of 96.3%. Regarding observed MFS rate, 1 pt (1.3%) experienced a salvage mastectomy. The 10-year MFS rate after APBI was 97.4% vs. 96.3% after WBI (p = 1) and 92.7% after no irradiation (p = 0.27). No toxicity Grade 3 or more was observed. APBI seems to be an attractive compromise between WBI and no irradiation for elderly women with early stage breast cancer as far as local control, quality of life and cost benefit is concerned. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The therapy of gefitinib towards breast cancer partially through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Breast cancer remains the leading reason of cancer death among women worldwide, and gefitinib is the effi- cient drug for breast cancer. Aims: To use targeted metabolomics method to elucidate the therapeutic mechanism of gefitinib through profiling the amino acids. Methods: Healthy women (n=56) ...

  15. Radiation osteitis following irradiation for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlands, A O; Souter, W A; Samuel, E; Redpath, A T [Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh (UK)

    1977-01-01

    Radiographs of the shoulder girdle were examined in 180 women who attended the breast follow-up clinic at the Department of Radiotherapy, Edinburgh. These comprised 52 controls who had been treated by radical mastectomy alone and 128 patients who had received post-operative X-ray therapy. The significance of osteoporosis as a sequel to irradiation is doubtful as it occurred in a substantial proportion of the control cases. Osteitis of severe degree occurred in 13.3% of patients who had been irradiated and was present in a mild form in a further 8.6%. The development of severe osteitis requires an NSD of 1650 rets or more. Estimates of the frequency of radiation osteitis are of no value unless detailed information is also provided about the techniques and quality of radiation.

  16. Hypofractionated Breast Radiation: Shorter Scheme, Lower Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Isabel; Tovar, María Isabel; Zurita, Mercedes; Guerrero, Rosario; Expósito, Manuela; Del Moral, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the toxicity and cosmetic outcomes for patients who had undergone 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a hypofractionated schedule and identified the risk factors associated with such a schedule. A total of 143 patients were treated for breast cancer (stage 0-III) with a hypofractionated radiation schedule after breast-conserving surgery from 2006 to 2011. Most patients received 42.4 Gy in 16 daily fractions, 2.65 Gy per fraction to the whole breast plus an additional simultaneous integrated or sequential boost to the tumor bed. The median follow-up period was 36 months. Mild acute skin toxicity was observed in 62%; 7% of the patients developed moderate skin toxicity, but no grade 4 toxicity was observed. The prevalence of fibrosis within the boost area was 5%, but no grade ≥ 2 was observed. The prevalence of fibrosis of any grade was greater in the nonboost (23%) than in the boost area. Of all the patients, 91% had good or excellent cosmetic outcomes. From the multivariate analysis, the incidence of epithelitis correlated with the patient's treated volume (P = .044). The incidence of acute toxicity correlated with the boost type to the tumor bed and the total treatment dose (P = .012 and P = .002, respectively). Also, a poor to fair cosmetic outcome was significantly associated statistically with the surgery type (P = .05), boost type (P = .004), and total dose (P = .001). Delivering whole-breast irradiation with a hypofractionated schedule of 42.4 Gy plus a simultaneous integrated boost to the tumor bed appears to be a safe and effective technique, with good cosmetic results and lower toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Henrique Lima, E-mail: enriquecouto@hotmail.com [Santa Fe Women' s and Maternity Hospital, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital Geral; Ramires, Leandro Cruz; Castilho, Marcus Simoes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Dominguez, Lorena Lima Coto [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, EJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  18. Vertical mammaplasty associated with accelerated partial breast radiotherapy: how oncoplastic surgery techniques associated with modern techniques of radiotherapy can improve the aesthetic outcome in selected patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Henrique Lima; Amorim, Washington Cancado; Guimaraes, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world, being the most common among women, responsible for 22% of new cases each year. It's surgical and radiation treatment evolved from radical procedures (Halsted radical mastectomy and total external breast radiotherapy) to less radical and more conservative procedures. With the use of modern oncoplastic surgery techniques and accelerated partial breast radiotherapy, selected patients can benefit with better aesthetic results, fewer side effects, and more comfortable and brief treatments. (author)

  19. Interaction between radiation and other breast cancer risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Stone, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    A follow-up study was conducted of 1764 women institutionalized for pulmonary tuberculosis between 1930 and 1954. Among 1047 women exposed to fluoroscopic chest X-rays during air collapse therapy of the lung, an excess of breast cancer was observed and previously reported (41 cases observed versus 23.3 expected). Among 717 comparison patients who received other treatments, no excess breast cancer risk was apparent (15 cases observed versus 14.1 expected). To determine whether breast cancer risk factors modify the carcinogenic effect of radiation, analyses were performed evaluating the interaction of radiation with indicators of breast cancer risk. The greatest radiation risk was found when radiation exposure occurred just before and during menarche. Similarly, exposures during first pregnancy appeared substantially more hazardous than exposures occurring before or after first pregnancy, suggesting that the condition of the breast at the time of pregnancy modifies the effect of radiation in such a way as to enhance the risk. Age at menopause did not appear to influence the risk of radiation exposure. Other than radiation, benign breast disease was the most significant breast cancer risk indicator. Benign breast disease was not seen to modify the effect of radiation exposure; however, excessive radiation exposure might have increased the incidence of benign breast disease, complicating the interaction analysis. Because of the uncertainty due to small-number sampling variation, these study results will require confirmation by a larger series. They do, however, suggest that stages when breast tissue undergoes high mitotic activity, e.g. menarche and pregnancy, are times of special vulnerability to the harmful effects of ionizing radiation

  20. Predictors of Local Recurrence Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Lyden, Maureen; Beitsch, Peter; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze a pooled set of nearly 2,000 patients treated on the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS) Mammosite Registry Trial and at William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) to identify factors associated with local recurrence following accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,961 women underwent partial breast irradiation between April 1993 and November 2010 as part of the ASBS Registry Trial or at WBH. Rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional recurrence (RR), distant metastases (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed for each group and for the pooled cohort. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed including age, tumor stage/size, estrogen receptor status, surgical margins, and lymph node status to determine their association with IBTR. Results: The two groups weres similar, but WBH patients were more frequently node positive, had positive margins, and were less likely to be within the American Society for Radiation Oncology-unsuitable group. At 5 years, the rates of IBTR, RR, DM, DFS, CSS, and OS for the pooled group of patients were 2.9%, 0.5%, 2.4%, 89.1%, 98.5%, and 91.8%, respectively. The 5-year rate of true recurrence/marginal miss was 0.8%. Univariate analysis of IBTR found that negative estrogen receptor status (odds ratio [OR], 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.55–5.13, p = 0.0007) was the only factor significantly associated with IBTR, while a trend was seen for age less than 50 (OR 1.80, 95% confidence interval 0.90–3.58, p = 0.10). Conclusions: Excellent 5-year outcomes were seen following APBI in over 1,900 patients. Estrogen receptor negativity was the only factor associated with IBTR, while a trend for age less than 50 was noted. Significant differences in factors associated with IBTR were noted between cohorts, suggesting that factors driving IBTR may be predicated based on the risk

  1. Breast Cancer Patients' Preferences for Adjuvant Radiotherapy Post Lumpectomy: Whole Breast Irradiation vs. Partial Breast Irradiation-Single Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Katija; McGuffin, Merrylee; Presutti, Roseanna; Harth, Tamara; Mesci, Aruz; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Chow, Edward; Di Prospero, Lisa; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Lee, Justin; Paszat, Lawrence; Doherty, Mary; Soliman, Hany; Ackerman, Ida; Cao, Xingshan; Kiss, Alex; Szumacher, Ewa

    2018-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate patients with early breast cancer preference for standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) or partial breast irradiation (PBI) following lumpectomy, as well as identify important factors for patients when making their treatment decisions. Based on relevant literature and ASTRO consensus statement guidelines, an educational tool and questionnaire were developed. Consenting, eligible women reviewed the educational tool and completed the trade-off questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated, as well as chi-squares and a logistic regression model. Of the 90 patients who completed the study, 62 % preferred WBI, 30 % preferred PBI, 4 % required more information, and 3 % had no preferences. Of the patients who chose WBI, 58 % preferred hypofractionated RT, whereas 25 % preferred the conventional RT regimen. The majority of patients rated recurrence rate [WBI = 55/55 (100 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] and survival [WBI = 54/55 (98 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] as important factors contributing to their choice of treatment preference. Financial factors [WBI = 21/55 (38 %), PBI = 14/26 (53 %)] and convenience [WBI = 36/54 (67 %), PBI = 18/26 (69 %)] were rated as important less frequently. Significantly, more patients who preferred WBI also rated standard method of treatment as important when compared to patients who preferred PBI [WBI = 52/54 (96 %), PBI = 16/26 (61 %), χ 2  = 16.63, p = 0.001]. The majority of patients with early breast cancer who were surveyed for this study preferred WBI as an adjuvant treatment post lumpectomy, yet there was a sizeable minority who preferred PBI. This was associated with the importance patients place on standard treatment. These results will help medical professionals treat patients according to patient values.

  2. Delayed development of radiation sickness in animals following partial exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vershinina, S.F.; Markochev, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Causes of reduction of the life span of animals after partial exposure of the head, thorax, and abdomen are analyzed. Pulmonosclerosis and cardiosclerosis were mainly responsible for animal death following partial radiation exposure of the thorax; these conditions appreciably shortened the life span of the animals. After exposure of the head deaths were due to pneumonias which negligibly reduced the duration of life. Exposure of the abdomen led to the development of diabetes mellitus which shortened the life span by half. 18 refs., 1 tab

  3. Partial breast irradiation as second conservative treatment for local breast cancer recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Ellis, Steve; Teissier, Eric; Alzieu, Claude; Lallement, Michel; Cowen, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Mastectomy is the treatment of reference for local relapse after breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to document the feasibility and the results of associating lumpectomy with partial breast irradiation by interstitial brachytherapy (IB) as local treatment for an isolated ipsilateral BC local recurrence (LR). Methods and materials: Between 1975 and 1996 at Marseille and Nice Cancer Institutes, 4026 patients received lumpectomy and radiotherapy (RT) (50-80 Gy) for a localized breast cancer of which 473 presented a LR. Among these patients, 69 (14.6%) received a second lumpectomy followed by IB, which delivered 30 Gy (Nice, n = 24) or 45-50 Gy (Marseille, n = 45) with 3 to 8 192 Ir wires in 1 or 2 planes on the 85% isodose. Results: Median age at LR was 58.2 years, median follow-up since primary BC was 10 years, and median follow-up after the second conservative treatment was 50.2 months (range, 2-139 months). Immediate tolerance was good in all cases. Grade 2 to 3 long-term complications (LTC) according to IB dose were 0%, 28%, and 32%, respectively, for 30 Gy, 45 to 46 Gy, and 50 Gy (p 0.01). Grade 2 to 3 LTC according to total dose were 4% and 30%, respectively, for total doses (initial RT plus IB) ≤ 100 Gy or >100 Gy (p = 0.008). Logistic regression showed that the only factor associated with Grade 2 to 3 complications was higher IB doses (p = 0.01). We noted 11 second LRs (LR2), 10 distant metastases (DM), and 5 specific deaths. LR2 occurred either in the tumor bed (50.8%) or close to the tumor bed (34.3%) or in another quadrant (14.9%). Kaplan-Meier 5-year freedom from (FF) LR2 (FFLR2), FFDM, and DFS were 77.4%, 86.7%, and 68.9%, respectively. Overall 5-year survival (OS) was 91.8%. Univariate analysis showed the following factors associated with a higher FFLR2: (1) number of wires used for IB (3-4 vs. 5-8 wires, p = 0.006), (2) IB doses (30-45 Gy vs. 46-60 Gy, p = 0.05), (3) number of planes (1 vs. 2, p = 0.05), (4) interval between

  4. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at ≥6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed ≥1 year, 11 (24%) ≥2 years, and 7 (16%) ≥3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At ≥6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at ≥6 months. Persistent seroma ≥6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  5. Scan Quality and Entrance Skin Dose in Thoracic CT: A Comparison between Bismuth Breast Shield and Posteriorly Centered Partial CT Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tappouni, Rafel; Mathers, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of the bismuth breast shield and partial CT scan in reducing entrance skin dose and to evaluate the effect of the breast shield on image quality (IQ). Methods. Nanodots were placed on an adult anthropomorphic phantom. Standard chest CT, CT with shield, and partial CT were performed. Nanodot readings and effective doses were recorded. 50 patients with chest CTs obtained both with and without breast shields were reviewed. IQ was evaluated by two radiologists and by measuring Hounsfield units (HUs) and standard deviation (SD) of HU in anterior subcutaneous region. Results. Breast shield and the partial CT scans reduced radiation to the anterior chest by 38% and 16%, respectively. Partial CT increased dose to the posterior chest by 37% and effective dose by 8%. Change in IQ in shield CT was observed in the anterior chest wall. Significant change in IQ was observed in 5/50 cases. The shield caused an increase of 20 HU (P = 0.021) and a 1.86 reduction in SD of HU (P = 0.027) in the anterior compared to posterior subcutaneous regions. Summary. Bismuth breast shield is more effective than the partial CT in reducing entrance skin dose while maintaining image quality

  6. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V.; Vallow, Laura A.; McDonough, Michelle; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Peterson, Jennifer L.; Adkisson, Cameron D.; Serago, Christopher; McLaughlin, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of

  7. Guide to Understanding Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACTH CAF CMF FAC TAC TC TCH TH THP Radiation Therapy Whole Breast Radiation Partial Breast Radiation ... Basics Treatments and Your Bone Health Bone Health Tests Improving Bone Health Medicines To Protect Bones Diet, ...

  8. Four cases of radiation pneumonia after breast conservative therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, Rie; Fukuuchi, Atushi; Nishi, Tsunehiro

    1997-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1996, a series of 240 patients with early stage breast cancer were treated with breast conservative treatment, and 201 patients of them all received irradiation at a dose of 46-60 Gy to the affected breast. Among the 201 patients who received breast irradiation, four (2.0%) patients experienced radiation pneumonia. These four patients with radiation pneumonia presented with coughing from 7 to 20 weeks after irradiation. Chest X-ray film revealed interstitial pneumonia in a lung field where coincided with the irradiated field in them. Three out of four patients demanded steroids, but all patients got well within 4 months. Radiation pneumonia following conservative surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer is an infrequent complication, but attention should be paid to radiation pneumonia if the patient suffers from persistent coughing after radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Breast reconstruction and post-mastectomy radiation practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Susie A; Hiley, Crispin; Nickleach, Dana; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Andic, Fundagul; Riesterer, Oliver; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Torres, Mylin A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the perspectives and practice of radiation oncologists who treat breast cancer patients who have had breast reconstruction. In 2010, an original electronic survey was sent to all physician members of the American Society of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Research Institute-Breast Cancer Studies Group in the United Kingdom, Thai Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Swiss Society of Radiation Oncology, and Turkish Radiation Oncology Society. We identified factors associated with radiation oncologists who treat breast cancer patients with reconstruction performed prior to radiation and obtained information regarding radiation management of the breast reconstruction. 358 radiation oncologists responded, and 60% of the physicians were from the United States. While 64% of participants agree or strongly agree that breast image affects a woman’s quality of life during radiation, 57% feel that reconstruction challenges their ability to deliver effective breast radiation. Compared with other countries, treatment within the United States was associated with a high reconstruction rate (>/= 50% of mastectomy patients) prior to radiation (p < 0.05). Delayed-immediate reconstruction with a temporary tissue expander was more common in the United States than in other countries (52% vs. 23%, p = 0.01). Among physicians who treat patients with tissue expanders, the majority (60%) prefer a moderately inflated implant with 150-250 cc of fluid rather than a completely deflated (13%) or inflated expander (28%) during radiation. Among radiation oncologists who treat reconstructions, 49% never use bolus and 40% never boost a breast reconstruction. United States physicians were more likely than physicians from other countries to boost or bolus the reconstruction irrespective of the type of reconstruction seen in their clinic patients (p < 0.01). Great variation in practice is evident from our study of radiation treatment for breast

  10. Radiation-induced morphea of the breast: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Nellie LC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiation-induced morphea (RIM of the breast is a rare complication of radiotherapy. It is disfiguring, painful and defeats the purpose of achieving a good cosmesis in breast-conservation surgery. This report describes a severe case of RIM in a breast cancer patient together with photographic illustrations of the serial changes over time and histopathology slides. A review of the literature is provided.

  11. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer | El-Fayoumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of later clinical involvement of the axilla and at establishing a sound basis for adjuvant treatment planning axillary dissection is an important operative procedure. ... Methods: Eighteen patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the other two patients who were fulfilling the criteria for conservative breast surgery ...

  12. Patient-reported outcomes of catheter-based accelerated partial breast brachytherapy and whole breast irradiation, a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethwa, Krishan R; Kahila, Mohamed M; Mara, Kristin C; Harmsen, William S; Routman, David M; Pumper, Geralyn M; Corbin, Kimberly S; Sloan, Jeff A; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Hieken, Tina J; Park, Sean S; Mutter, Robert W

    2018-05-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and whole breast irradiation (WBI) are treatment options for early-stage breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare patient-reported-outcomes (PRO) between patients receiving multi-channel intra-cavitary brachytherapy APBI or WBI. Between 2012 and 2015, 131 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or early stage invasive breast cancer were treated with adjuvant APBI (64) or WBI (67) and participated in a PRO questionnaire. The linear analog scale assessment (LASA), harvard breast cosmesis scale (HBCS), PRO-common terminology criteria for adverse events- PRO (PRO-CTCAE), and breast cancer treatment outcome scale (BCTOS) were used to assess quality of life (QoL), pain, fatigue, aesthetic and functional status, and breast cosmesis. Comparisons of PROs were performed using t-tests, Wilcoxon rank-sum, Chi square, Fisher exact test, and regression methods. Median follow-up from completion of radiotherapy and questionnaire completion was 13.3 months. There was no significant difference in QoL, pain, or fatigue severity, as assessed by the LASA, between treatment groups (p > 0.05). No factors were found to be predictive of overall QoL on regression analysis. BCTOS health-related QoL scores were similar between treatment groups (p = 0.52).The majority of APBI and WBI patients reported excellent/good breast cosmesis, 88.5% versus 93.7% (p = 0.37). Skin color change (p = 0.011) and breast elevation (p = 0.01) relative to baseline were more common in the group receiving WBI. APBI and WBI were both associated with favorable patient-reported outcomes in early follow-up. APBI resulted in a lesser degree of patient-reported skin color change and breast elevation relative to baseline.

  13. Patterns of intrafractional motion and uncertainties of treatment setup reference systems in accelerated partial breast irradiation for right- and left-sided breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ning J; Goyal, Sharad; Kim, Leonard H; Khan, Atif; Haffty, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the patterns of intrafractional motion and accuracy of treatment setup strategies in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for right- and left-sided breast cancers. Sixteen right-sided and 17 left-sided breast cancer patients were enrolled in an institutional APBI trial in which gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surgical cavity walls. Daily pre- and postradiation therapy kV imaging were performed and were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion. The positioning differences of the laser-tattoo and the bony anatomy-based setups with respect to the marker-based setup (benchmark) were determined to evaluate their accuracy. Statistical differences were found between the right- and left-sided APBI treatments in vector directions of intrafractional motion and treatment setup errors in the reference systems, but less in their overall magnitudes. The directional difference was more pronounced in the lateral direction. It was found that the intrafractional motion and setup reference systems tended to deviate in the right direction for the right-sided breast treatments and in the left direction for the left-sided breast treatments. It appears that the fiducial markers placed in the seroma cavity exhibit side dependent directional intrafractional motion, although additional data may be needed to further validate the conclusion. The bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy over laser-tattoo. But it is inadequate to rely on bony anatomy to assess intrafractional target motion in both magnitude and direction. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Breast Cancer After Chest Radiation Therapy for Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Malhotra, Jyoti; Friedman, Danielle Novetsky; Mubdi, Nidha Z.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hammond, Sue; Smith, Susan A.; Henderson, Tara O.; Boice, John D.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Diller, Lisa R.; Bhatia, Smita; Kenney, Lisa B.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Begg, Colin B.; Robison, Leslie L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The risk of breast cancer is high in women treated for a childhood cancer with chest irradiation. We sought to examine variations in risk resulting from irradiation field and radiation dose. Patients and Methods We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 1,230 female childhood cancer survivors treated with chest irradiation who were participants in the CCSS (Childhood Cancer Survivor Study). Results Childhood cancer survivors treated with lower delivered doses of radiation (median, 14 Gy; range, 2 to 20 Gy) to a large volume (whole-lung field) had a high risk of breast cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 43.6; 95% CI, 27.2 to 70.3), as did survivors treated with high doses of delivered radiation (median, 40 Gy) to the mantle field (SIR, 24.2; 95% CI, 20.7 to 28.3). The cumulative incidence of breast cancer by age 50 years was 30% (95% CI, 25 to 34), with a 35% incidence among Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (95% CI, 29 to 40). Breast cancer–specific mortality at 5 and 10 years was 12% (95% CI, 8 to 18) and 19% (95% CI, 13 to 25), respectively. Conclusion Among women treated for childhood cancer with chest radiation therapy, those treated with whole-lung irradiation have a greater risk of breast cancer than previously recognized, demonstrating the importance of radiation volume. Importantly, mortality associated with breast cancer after childhood cancer is substantial. PMID:24752044

  15. Radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Inoue, Masayoshi; Uehara, Tomoko; Miyasaka, T.; Miyasaka, M.; Tabata, Yoji; Sakamoto, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen cases of inoperable advanced breast cancer were treated with radiotherapy between 2002 to 2012 at Nara Prefectural Hospital. All cases were treated by radiotherapy and chemo-endocrine therapy. Patients received 60-81 Gy (median 60 Gy) to the primary breast tumor. Response of the breast tumors were complete response in 3 cases (23%), partial response in 8 cases (62%) and stable disease in 2 cases (15%) (response rate: 85%). All breast tumors had been controlled and skin troubles were reduced. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is useful for primary tumor control and improved quality of life (QOL). Radiotherapy should be considered to be useful modality in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author)

  16. Four-Week Course of Radiation for Breast Cancer Using Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Ma Changming; Li Jinsheng; Swaby, Ramona F.; Litwin, Samuel; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Morrow, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Standard radiation for early breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6 to 7 weeks. This is an inconvenience to many women, and for some a barrier for breast conservation. We present the acute toxicity of a 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients completed radiation on a Phase II trial approved by the hospital institutional review board. Eligibility criteria were broad to include any patient normally eligible for standard radiation: age ≥18 years, invasive or in situ cancer, American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage 0 to II, breast-conserving surgery, and any systemic therapy not given concurrently. The median age was 52 years (range, 31-81 years). Of the patients, 15% had ductal carcinoma in situ, 67% T1, and 19% T2; 71% were N0, 17% N1, and 12% NX. Chemotherapy was given before radiation in 44%. Using photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy and incorporated electron beam boost, the whole breast received 45 Gy and the lumpectomy bed 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Results: The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 9 patients (12%), Grade 1 in 49 (65%) and Grade 2 in 17 (23%). There was no Grade 3 or higher skin toxicity. After radiation, all Grade 2 toxicity had resolved by 6 weeks. Hematologic toxicity was Grade 0 in most patients except for Grade 1 neutropenia in 2 patients, and Grade 1 anemia in 11 patients. There were no significant differences in baseline vs. 6-week posttreatment patient-reported or physician-reported cosmetic scores. Conclusions: This 4-week course of postoperative radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy is feasible and is associated with acceptable acute skin toxicity and quality of life. Long-term follow-up data are needed. This radiation schedule may represent an alternative both to longer 6-week to 7-week standard whole-breast radiation and more radically shortened 1-week, partial-breast treatment schedules

  17. Radiation dose to contra lateral breast during treatment of breast malignancy by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chougule Arun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: External beam radiotherapy is being used regularly to treat the breast malignancy postoperatively. The contribution of collimator leakage and scatter radiation dose to contralateral breast is of concern because of high radio sensitivity of breast tissue for carcinogenesis. This becomes more important when the treated cancer breast patient is younger than 45 years and therefore the contralateral breast must be treated as organ at risk. Quantification of contralateral dose during primary breast irradiation is helpful to estimate the risk of radiation induced secondary breast malignancy. Materials and Methods: In present study contralateral breast dose was measured in 30 cancer breast patients undergoing external beam therapy by Co-60 teletherapy machine. Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered by medial and lateral tangential fields on alternate days in addition to supraclavicle field daily with 200 cGy/F to a total dose of 5000 cGy in 25 fractions. CaSO4: Dy themoluminescence dosimeter discs were employed for these measurements. Three TLD discs were put on the surface of skin of contra lateral breast, one at the level of nipple and two at 3 cms away from nipple on both side along the midline for each field. At the end treatment of each filed, TLD discs were removed and measured for dose after 24h on Thelmador - 6000 TLD reader. Results: The dose at the contra lateral breast nipple was to be 152.5 to 254.75 cGy for total primary breast dose of 5000 cGy in 25 equal fractions which amounted to 3.05-6.05% of total dose to diseased breast. Further it was observed that the maximum contribution of contralateral breast dose was due to medical tangential half blocked field. Conclusion: CaSO4; Dy thermoluminescence dosimetry is quite easy, accurate and convenient method to measure the contra lateral breast dose.

  18. Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Reduces Time Spent With Acute Dermatitis for Women of All Breast Sizes During Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Chen Yan; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Anderson, Penny R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the time spent with radiation-induced dermatitis during a course of radiation therapy for breast cancer in women treated with conventional or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 804 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation from 2001 to 2006. All patients were treated with whole-breast radiation followed by a boost to the tumor bed. Whole-breast radiation consisted of conventional wedged photon tangents (n = 405) earlier in the study period and mostly of photon IMRT (n = 399) in later years. All patients had acute dermatitis graded each week of treatment. Results: The breakdown of the cases of maximum acute dermatitis by grade was as follows: 3%, Grade 0; 34%, Grade 1; 61%, Grade 2; and 2%, Grade 3. The breakdown of cases of maximum toxicity by technique was as follows: 48%, Grade 0/1, and 52%, Grade 2/3, for IMRT; and 25%, Grade 0/1, and 75%, Grade 2/3, for conventional radiation therapy (p < 0.0001). The IMRT patients spent 82% of weeks during treatment with Grade 0/1 dermatitis and 18% with Grade 2/3 dermatitis, compared with 29% and 71% of patients, respectively, treated with conventional radiation (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the time spent with Grade 2/3 toxicity was decreased in IMRT patients with small (p = 0.0015), medium (p < 0.0001), and large (p < 0.0001) breasts. Conclusions: Breast IMRT is associated with a significant decrease both in the time spent during treatment with Grade 2/3 dermatitis and in the maximum severity of dermatitis compared with that associated with conventional radiation, regardless of breast size.

  19. TH-AB-BRB-01: Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristov, D. [Stanford University Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  20. TH-AB-BRB-01: Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, D.

    2016-01-01

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  1. Promoting effects of adipose-derived stem cells on breast cancer cells are reversed by radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaße, Annemarie; Juerß, Dajana; Reape, Elaine; Manda, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Guido

    2018-04-01

    Partial breast irradiation of early breast cancer patients after lumpectomy and the use of endogenous adipose tissue (AT) for breast reconstruction are promising applications to reduce the side effects of breast cancer therapy. This study tries to investigate the possible risks associated with these therapeutic approaches. It also examines the influence of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) as part of the breast cancer microenvironment, and endogenous AT on breast cancer cells following radiation therapy. ADSCs, isolated from human reduction mammoplasties of healthy female donors, exhibited multilineage capacity and specific surface markers. The promoting effects of ADSCs on the growth and survival fraction of breast cancer cells were reversed by treatment with high (8 Gy) or medium (2 Gy) radiation doses. In addition, a suppressing influence on breast cancer growth could be detected by co-culturing with irradiated ADSCs (8 Gy). Furthermore the clonogenic survival of unirradiated tumor cells was reduced by medium of irradiated ADSCs. In conclusion, radiation therapy changed the interactions of ADSCs and breast cancer cells. On the basis of our work, the importance of further studies to exclude potential risks of ADSCs in regenerative applications and radiotherapy has been emphasized.

  2. Phase II trial of 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation: Lessons learned from patients and physicians’ evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoury, Fares; Heymann, Steve; Acevedo, Catalina; Spielmann, Marc; Vielh, Philippe; Garbay, Jean-Rémi; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Marsiglia, Hugo; Bourgier, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The present study prospectively reported both physicians’ and patients’ assessment for toxicities, cosmetic assessment and patients’ satisfaction after 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Materials and Methods: From October 2007 to September 2009, 30 early breast cancer patients were enrolled in a 3D-conformal APBI Phase II trial (40 Gy/10 fractions/5 days). Treatment related toxicities and cosmetic results were assessed by both patients and physicians at each visit (at 1, 2, 6 months, and then every 6 months). Patient satisfaction was also scored. Results: After a median follow-up of 27.7 months, all patients were satisfied with APBI treatment, regardless of cosmetic results or late adverse events. Good/excellent cosmetic results were noticed by 80% of patients versus 92% of cases by radiation oncologists. Breast pain was systematically underestimated by physicians (8–20% vs. 16.6–26.2%; Kappa coefficient KC = 0.16–0.44). Grade 1 and 2 fibrosis and/or breast retraction occurred in 7–12% of patients and were overestimated by patients (KC = 0.14–0.27). Conclusions: Present results have shown discrepancies between patient and physician assessments. In addition to the assessment of efficacy and toxicity after 3D-conformal APBI, patients’ cosmetic results consideration and satisfaction should be also evaluated.

  3. Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With ASTRO Consensus Statement Cautionary Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHaffie, Derek R.; Patel, Rakesh R.; Adkison, Jarrod B.; Das, Rupak K.; Geye, Heather M.; Cannon, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes among women with American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) consensus statement cautionary features treated with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Between March 2001 and June 2006, 322 consecutive patients were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) APBI at the University of Wisconsin. A total of 136 patients were identified who met the ASTRO cautionary criteria. Thirty-eight (27.9%) patients possessed multiple cautionary factors. All patients received 32 to 34 Gy in 8 to 10 twice-daily fractions using multicatheter (93.4%) or Mammosite balloon (6.6%) brachytherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 60 months, there were 5 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR), three local, and two loco-regional. The 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 4.8% ± 4.1%. The 5-year disease-free survival was 89.6%, with a cause-specific survival and overall survival of 97.6% and 95.3%, respectively. There were no IBTRs among 32 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) vs. 6.1% for patients with invasive carcinoma (p = 0.24). Among 104 patients with Stage I or II invasive carcinoma, the IBTR rate for patients considered cautionary because of age alone was 0% vs. 12.7% in those deemed cautionary due to histopathologic factors (p = 0.018). Conclusions: Overall, we observed few local recurrences among patients with cautionary features. Women with DCIS and patients 50 to 59 years of age with Stage I/II disease who otherwise meet the criteria for suitability appear to be at a low risk of IBTR. Patients with tumor-related cautionary features will benefit from careful patient selection.

  4. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todor, D.

    2015-01-01

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  5. MO-E-BRD-02: Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Brachytherapy: Is Shorter Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todor, D. [Virginia Commonwealth University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Is Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Good? – Jess Hiatt, MS Non-invasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy (NIBB) is an emerging therapy for breast boost treatments as well as Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) using HDR surface breast brachytherapy. NIBB allows for smaller treatment volumes while maintaining optimal target coverage. Considering the real-time image-guidance and immobilization provided by the NIBB modality, minimal margins around the target tissue are necessary. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in brachytherapy: is shorter better? - Dorin Todor, PhD VCU A review of balloon and strut devices will be provided together with the origins of APBI: the interstitial multi-catheter implant. A dosimetric and radiobiological perspective will help point out the evolution in breast brachytherapy, both in terms of devices and the protocols/clinical trials under which these devices are used. Improvements in imaging, delivery modalities and convenience are among the factors driving the ultrashort fractionation schedules but our understanding of both local control and toxicities associated with various treatments is lagging. A comparison between various schedules, from a radiobiological perspective, will be given together with a critical analysis of the issues. to review and understand the evolution and development of APBI using brachytherapy methods to understand the basis and limitations of radio-biological ‘equivalence’ between fractionation schedules to review commonly used and proposed fractionation schedules Intra-operative breast brachytherapy: Is one stop shopping best?- Bruce Libby, PhD. University of Virginia A review of intraoperative breast brachytherapy will be presented, including the Targit-A and other trials that have used electronic brachytherapy. More modern approaches, in which the lumpectomy procedure is integrated into an APBI workflow, will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To review past and current

  6. Radiation effect on partially synchronized Yoshida sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bippus, P.H.; Heitz, J.; Ruehl, U.; Averdunk, R.

    1982-01-01

    Yoshida sarcoma cells, which have the same growth characteristics as ascites cells in the mouse and in cell suspension, were partially synchronized in vitro by means of excess thymidine (0.1 mM thymidine for 18 h). The growth of non-synchronized cultures was inhibited by irradiation, the degree depending on the dose of radiation. At the same time, a 50% inhibition in vivo (380 rad) and in vitro (480 rad) was determined. The incorporation of 3 H-thymidine into the DNA is inhibited by 10-32%, depending on the radiation dose. The mitotic index decreases 2 h after irradiation by a dose-dependent amount. A mitotic maximum develops later; the delay is dose-dependent. Partially synchronized cells were irradiated in the G 1 /S-, S-, G 2 -, and G 1 -phase. As compared to the 3 H-thymidine incorporation and the mitotic index there were no significant differences between the cultures which were irradiated in the individual phases of the non-synchronized control cultures. The cultures which were irradiated in the G 2 -phase, however, showed a significantly reduced growth in vivo after 48 h. If the cells were cultured for more than 72 h after irradiation, the differences between the cultures irradiated in the G 2 -phase and the other phases were reduced. (orig.)

  7. An anthropomorphic phantom study of visualisation of surgical clips for partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Carys W.; Nichol, Alan M.; Park, Julie E.; Hui, Jason F.; Giddings, Alison A.; Grahame, Sheri; Otto, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Surgical clips were investigated for partial breast image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Small titanium clips were insufficiently well visualised. Medium tantalum clips were best for megavoltage IGRT and small tantalum clips were best for floor mounted kilovoltage IGRT (ExacTrac TM ). Both small tantalum and medium titanium clips were suitable for isocentric kilovoltage IGRT

  8. An anthropomorphic phantom study of visualisation of surgical clips for partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carys W; Nichol, Alan M; Park, Julie E; Hui, Jason F; Giddings, Alison A; Grahame, Sheri; Otto, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Surgical clips were investigated for partial breast image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Small titanium clips were insufficiently well visualised. Medium tantalum clips were best for megavoltage IGRT and small tantalum clips were best for floor mounted kilovoltage IGRT (ExacTrac). Both small tantalum and medium titanium clips were suitable for isocentric kilovoltage IGRT.

  9. Impact of Lymph Node Status on Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Shaitelman, Simona [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Grills, Inga S.; Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Dekhne, Nayana [Breast Care Center, Beaumont Health System, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Jaiyesimi, Ishmael [Department of Medical Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) between node-negative and node-positive patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 534 patients with early-stage breast cancer received APBI including 39 node-positive (N+) cases. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors were compared between node-negative (N-) and N+ cohorts. Local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), axillary failure (AF), distant metastases (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: N+ patients were younger (p = 0.04), had larger tumors (p < 0.001), and were more likely to receive chemotherapy (p < 0.001). Mean follow-up was 7.8 years for N+ patients and 6.3 years for N- patients (p = 0.06). No differences were seen in 5-year actuarial rates of LR (2.2% vs. 2.6%, p = 0.86), AF (0% vs. 0%, p = 0.69), DFS (90.0% vs. 88.0%, p = 0.79), or OS (91.0 vs. 84.0%, p = 0.65) between the two groups, whereas higher rates of RR (0% vs. 6.1%, p < 0.001) and DM (2.2% vs. 8.9%, p = 0.005) were noted in N+ patients. A trend for improved CSS (p = 0.06), was seen in N- patients. Age, tumor size, receptor status, T-stage, chemotherapy, APBI technique, and nodal status (p = 0.86) were not associated with LR, while a trend for an association with LR was noted with close/positive margins, (p = 0.07), and failure to receive adjuvant hormonal therapy (p = 0.06). Conclusions: No differences were seen in the rates of LR or AF between N- and N+ patients after APBI. These results support the continued enrollment of node-positive patients in Phase III trials evaluating the efficacy of APBI including the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project-B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413.

  10. Primary radiation therapy for early breast cancer: the experience at the joint center for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.R.; Botnick, L.; Bloomer, W.D.; Chaffey, J.T.; Hellman, S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of primary radiation therapy in 176 consecutive patients with clinical State I and II carcinoma of the breast were reviewed. Median follow-up time was 47 months. The overall breast relapse rate was 7%. Patients undergoing interstitial implantation had a significantly lower breast relapse rate (1%) than patients not undergoing implantation (11%). Breast relapse was more common in patients undergoing incisional or needle biopsy (17%), compared to patients treated after excisional biopsy (5%). In patients undergoing excisional biopsy, but not interstitial implantation, breast relapse was related to external beam dose. Twelve percent of the patients who received less than 1600 ret dose relapsed in the breast, compared to none of the 19 patients who received more than 1700 ret dose. These results imply that supplemental irradiation to the primary tumor area is required following excisional biopsy of a primary breast cancer when 4500-5000 rad is delivered to the entire breast

  11. Breast-conserving therapy with partial or whole breast irradiation: ten-year results of the Budapest randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, Csaba; Fodor, János; Major, Tibor; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kásler, Miklós

    2013-08-01

    To report the long-term results of a single-institution randomized study comparing the results of breast-conserving treatment with partial breast irradiation (PBI) or conventional whole breast irradiation (WBI). Between 1998 and 2004, 258 selected women with pT1 pN0-1mi M0, grade 1-2, non-lobular breast cancer without the presence of extensive intraductal component and resected with negative margins were randomized after BCS to receive 50 Gy WBI (n=130) or PBI (n=128). The latter consisted of either 7 × 5.2 Gy high-dose-rate (HDR) multi-catheter brachytherapy (BT; n=88) or 50 Gy electron beam (EB) irradiation (n=40). Primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR) as a first event. Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), disease-free survival (DFS), and cosmetic results. After a median follow up of 10.2 years, the ten-year actuarial rate of LR was 5.9% and 5.1% in PBI and WBI arms, respectively (p=0.77). There was no significant difference in the ten-year probability of OS (80% vs 82%), CSS (94% vs 92%), and DFS (85% vs 84%), either. The rate of excellent-good cosmetic result was 81% in the PBI, and 63% in the control group (p<0.01). Partial breast irradiation delivered by interstitial HDR BT or EB for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces similar ten-year results to those achieved with conventional WBI. Significantly better cosmetic outcome can be achieved with HDR BT implants compared with the outcome after WBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast-conserving therapy with partial or whole breast irradiation: Ten-year results of the Budapest randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgár, Csaba; Fodor, János; Major, Tibor; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kásler, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report the long-term results of a single-institution randomized study comparing the results of breast-conserving treatment with partial breast irradiation (PBI) or conventional whole breast irradiation (WBI). Patients and methods: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 selected women with pT1 pN0-1mi M0, grade 1–2, non-lobular breast cancer without the presence of extensive intraductal component and resected with negative margins were randomized after BCS to receive 50 Gy WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 × 5.2 Gy high-dose-rate (HDR) multi-catheter brachytherapy (BT; n = 88) or 50 Gy electron beam (EB) irradiation (n = 40). Primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR) as a first event. Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), disease-free survival (DFS), and cosmetic results. Results: After a median follow up of 10.2 years, the ten-year actuarial rate of LR was 5.9% and 5.1% in PBI and WBI arms, respectively (p = 0.77). There was no significant difference in the ten-year probability of OS (80% vs 82%), CSS (94% vs 92%), and DFS (85% vs 84%), either. The rate of excellent-good cosmetic result was 81% in the PBI, and 63% in the control group (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation delivered by interstitial HDR BT or EB for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces similar ten-year results to those achieved with conventional WBI. Significantly better cosmetic outcome can be achieved with HDR BT implants compared with the outcome after WBI

  13. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing balloon brachytherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Jonathan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the barriers to BCT, methods of PBI in the setting of breast conservation have been explored. The method of PBI with the longest published follow-up is multi-catheter interstitial brachytherapy. Balloon-based brachytherapy with the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator was designed to simplify the brachytherapy procedure for PBI, enhance the reproducibility of the dosimetry, and improve patient comfort. The rates of local recurrence following PBI with the MammoSite applicator have been low, but there are few published reports and follow-up has been relatively short. The cosmetic outcomes and toxicity of MammoSite PBI are comparable to those seen after multicatheter-based PBI. Additional methods of balloon brachytherapy, including Xoft and SenoRx Contura have been developed. Finally, long-term follow-up after PBI is important for the welfare of individual patients and in order to establish the efficacy, late toxicity and cosmetic outcomes of this technique.

  14. Coronary artery calcium in breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takx, Richard A P; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Schoepf, U Joseph; Pilz, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Morris, Pamela B; Henzler, Thomas; Apfaltrer, Paul

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate whether breast cancer survivors after radiation therapy have a higher burden of coronary artery calcium as a potential surrogate of radiation-induced accelerated coronary artery disease. 333 patients were included. 54 patients underwent chest CT ae

  15. Partial lower axillary dissection for patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, H; Mise, K; Kan, N

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the outcomes of partial lower axillary lymph node dissection caudal to the intercostobrachial nerve in patients with clinically node-negative (N(0)) breast cancer. Numbers of dissected and metastatic nodes, overall and disease-free survival rates, postoperative complication rates, and axillary recurrence were compared between patients who underwent breast cancer surgery with partial axillary node dissection (n = 1043) and historical controls who underwent conventional dissection (n = 1084). The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 95.6% and 89.7%, and 94.9% and 88.4%, respectively, in the partial dissection and conventional dissection groups; the differences were not significant. Mean duration of surgery (41.6 min versus 60.9 min), intraoperative blood loss (28.0 ml versus 51.3 ml), volume of lymphatic drainage at 2 weeks postoperatively (488 ml versus 836 ml), and persistent arm lymphoedema (0.0% versus 11.8%) were significantly different between the partial and conventional dissection groups, respectively. Partial axillary lymph node dissection was associated with similar survival rates (but lower postoperative complication rates) compared with conventional axillary dissection and is recommended in patients with N(0) breast cancer.

  16. Radiation and breast cancer: a review of current evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronckers, Cécile M; Erdmann, Christine A; Land, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes current knowledge on ionizing radiation-associated breast cancer in the context of established breast cancer risk factors, the radiation dose–response relationship, and modifiers of dose response, taking into account epidemiological studies and animal experiments. Available epidemiological data support a linear dose–response relationship down to doses as low as about 100 mSv. However, the magnitude of risk per unit dose depends strongly on when radiation exposure occurs: exposure before the age of 20 years carries the greatest risk. Other characteristics that may influence the magnitude of dose-specific risk include attained age (that is, age at observation for risk), age at first full-term birth, parity, and possibly a history of benign breast disease, exposure to radiation while pregnant, and genetic factors

  17. Radiation-induced lung damage promotes breast cancer lung-metastasis through CXCR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feys, Lynn; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Vral, Anne; Veldeman, Liv; Vermeulen, Stefan; De Wagter, Carlos; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-09-29

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer as it reduces the risks of local recurrence and mortality after both conservative surgery and mastectomy. Despite recent efforts to decrease irradiation volumes through accelerated partial irradiation techniques, late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity still occurs after breast irradiation. The importance of this pulmonary injury towards lung metastasis is unclear. Preirradiation of lung epithelial cells induces DNA damage, p53 activation and a secretome enriched in the chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and MIF. Irradiated lung epithelial cells stimulate adhesion, spreading, growth, and (transendothelial) migration of human MDA-MB-231 and murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. These metastasis-associated cellular activities were largely mimicked by recombinant CXCL12 and MIF. Moreover, an allosteric inhibitor of the CXCR4 receptor prevented the metastasis-associated cellular activities stimulated by the secretome of irradiated lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, partial (10%) irradiation of the right lung significantly stimulated breast cancer lung-specific metastasis in the syngeneic, orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model.Our results warrant further investigation of the potential pro-metastatic effects of radiation and indicate the need to develop efficient drugs that will be successful in combination with radiotherapy to prevent therapy-induced spread of cancer cells.

  18. Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Harris, Emma J.; Kirby, Anna M.; Evans, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue segmentation

  19. Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, Prabhjot, E-mail: Prabhjot.Juneja@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Harris, Emma J. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kirby, Anna M. [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Evans, Philip M. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue

  20. Potential Impact of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühr, Marietta; Wolfgarten, Matthias; Stölzle, Marco; Leutner, Claudia; Höller, Tobias; Schrading, Simone; Kuhl, Christiane; Schild, Hans; Kuhn, Walther; Braun, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) after breast-conserving therapy is currently under investigation in prospective randomized studies. Multifocality and multicentricity are exclusion criteria for APBI. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect ipsilateral and contralateral invasive tumor foci or ductal carcinoma in situ in addition to conventional diagnostic methods (clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasonography). The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative MRI on patient selection for APBI. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2007, a total of 579 consecutive, nonselected patients with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer received preoperative breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging studies at the Bonn University Breast Cancer Center. In retrospect, 113 patients would have met the criteria for APBI using conventional imaging workup (clinical tumor size ≤3 cm; negative axillary lymph node status; unifocal disease; no evidence of distant metastases; no invasive lobular carcinoma, ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ, or Paget’s disease). We analyzed the amount of additional ipsilateral and contralateral tumor foci detected by MRI. Results: MRI detected additional tumor foci in 8.8% of patients eligible for APBI (11 tumor foci in 10 of 113 patients), either ipsilateral (n = 7, 6.2%) or contralateral (n = 4, 3.5%). In 1 patient, MRI helped detect additional tumor focus both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Conclusions: Preoperative breast MRI is able to identify additional tumor foci in a clinically relevant number of cases in this highly selected group of patients with low-risk disease and may be useful in selecting patients for APBI.

  1. Potential Impact of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehr, Marietta, E-mail: marietta.kuehr@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Wolfgarten, Matthias; Stoelzle, Marco [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Leutner, Claudia [Department of Radiology, Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Hoeller, Tobias [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Schrading, Simone; Kuhl, Christiane; Schild, Hans [Department of Radiology, Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Kuhn, Walther; Braun, Michael [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center of Integrated Oncology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) after breast-conserving therapy is currently under investigation in prospective randomized studies. Multifocality and multicentricity are exclusion criteria for APBI. Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect ipsilateral and contralateral invasive tumor foci or ductal carcinoma in situ in addition to conventional diagnostic methods (clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasonography). The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of preoperative MRI on patient selection for APBI. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2007, a total of 579 consecutive, nonselected patients with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer received preoperative breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging studies at the Bonn University Breast Cancer Center. In retrospect, 113 patients would have met the criteria for APBI using conventional imaging workup (clinical tumor size {<=}3 cm; negative axillary lymph node status; unifocal disease; no evidence of distant metastases; no invasive lobular carcinoma, ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ, or Paget's disease). We analyzed the amount of additional ipsilateral and contralateral tumor foci detected by MRI. Results: MRI detected additional tumor foci in 8.8% of patients eligible for APBI (11 tumor foci in 10 of 113 patients), either ipsilateral (n = 7, 6.2%) or contralateral (n = 4, 3.5%). In 1 patient, MRI helped detect additional tumor focus both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Conclusions: Preoperative breast MRI is able to identify additional tumor foci in a clinically relevant number of cases in this highly selected group of patients with low-risk disease and may be useful in selecting patients for APBI.

  2. Coronary calcium scoring with MDCT: The radiation dose to the breast and the effectiveness of bismuth breast shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Mehmet Halit; Yasar, Dogan; Albayram, Sait; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Ozer, Harun; Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Mihmanli, Ismail; Akman, Canan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine the breast radiation dose during coronary calcium scoring with multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT). We also evaluated the degree of dose reduction by using a bismuth breast shield when performing coronary calcium scoring with MDCT. Materials and methods: The dose reduction achievable by shielding the adult (35 years or older) female breasts was studied in 25 women who underwent coronary calcium scoring with MDCT. All examinations were performed with a 16-MDCT scanner. To compare the shielded versus unshielded breast dose, the examinations were performed with (right breast) and without (left breast) breast shielding in all patients. With this technique the superficial breast doses were calculated. To determine the average glandular breast radiation dose, we imaged an anthropomorphic dosimetric phantom into which calibrated dosimeters were placed to measure the dose to the breast. The phantom was imaged using the same protocol. Radiation doses to the breasts with and without the breast shielding were measured and compared using the Student's t-test. Results: The mean radiation doses with and without the breast shield were 5.71 ± 1.1 mGy versus 9.08 ± 1.5 mGy, respectively. The breast shield provided a 37.12% decrease in radiation dose to the breast with shielding. The difference between the dose received by the breasts with and without bismuth shielding was significant, with a p-value of less than 0.001. Conclusion: The high radiation during MDCT greatly exceeds the recommended doses and should not be underestimated. Bismuth in plane shielding for coronary calcium scoring with MDCT decreased the radiation dose to the breast. We recommend routine use of breast shields in female patients undergoing calcium scoring with MDCT

  3. Radiation therapy for breast cancer: Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaji, Karunakaran; Subramanian, Balaji; Yadav, Poonam; Anu Radha, Chandrasekaran; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2016-01-01

    Concave shape with variable size target volume makes treatment planning for the breast/chest wall a challenge. Conventional techniques used for the breast/chest wall cancer treatment provided better sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with poor conformity and uniformity to the target volume. Advanced technologies such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) improve the target coverage at the cost of higher low dose volumes to OARs. Novel hybrid techniques present promising results in breast/chest wall irradiation in terms of target coverage as well as OARs sparing. Several published data compared these technologies for the benefit of the breast/chest wall with or without nodal volumes. The aim of this article is to review relevant data and identify the scope for further research in developing optimal treatment plan for breast/chest wall cancer treatment.

  4. Radiation therapy for breast cancer: Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, Karunakaran, E-mail: karthik.balaji85@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Global Hospitals, Chennai (India); School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India); Subramanian, Balaji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Global Hospitals, Chennai (India); Yadav, Poonam [Department of Medical Physics and Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI and Aspirus UW Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Anu Radha, Chandrasekaran; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham [School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2016-10-01

    Concave shape with variable size target volume makes treatment planning for the breast/chest wall a challenge. Conventional techniques used for the breast/chest wall cancer treatment provided better sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with poor conformity and uniformity to the target volume. Advanced technologies such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) improve the target coverage at the cost of higher low dose volumes to OARs. Novel hybrid techniques present promising results in breast/chest wall irradiation in terms of target coverage as well as OARs sparing. Several published data compared these technologies for the benefit of the breast/chest wall with or without nodal volumes. The aim of this article is to review relevant data and identify the scope for further research in developing optimal treatment plan for breast/chest wall cancer treatment.

  5. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery - preliminary results of a phase II clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Stelczer, Gábor; Zaka, Zoltán; Mózsa, Emõke; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to implement accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by means of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for low-risk early invasive breast cancer. Between July 2011 and March 2014, 60 patients with low-risk early invasive (St I-II) breast cancer who underwent BCS were enrolled in our phase II prospective study. Postoperative APBI was given by means of step and shoot IG-IMRT using 4 to 5 fields to a total dose of 36.9 Gy (9×4.1 Gy) using a twice-a-day fractionation. Before each fraction, series of CT images were taken from the region of the target volume using a kV CT on-rail mounted in the treatment room. An image fusion software was used for automatic image registration of the planning and verification CT images. Patient set-up errors were detected in three directions (LAT, LONG, VERT), and inaccuracies were adjusted by automatic movements of the treatment table. Breast cancer related events, acute and late toxicities, and cosmetic results were registered and analysed. At a median follow-up of 24 months (range 12-44) neither locoregional nor distant failure was observed. Grade 1 (G1), G2 erythema, G1 oedema, and G1 and G2 pain occurred in 21 (35%), 2 (3.3%), 23 (38.3%), 6 (10%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No G3-4 acute side effects were detected. Among late radiation side effects G1 pigmentation, G1 fibrosis, and G1 fat necrosis occurred in 5 (8.3%), 7 (11.7%), and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No ≥G2 late toxicity was detected. Excellent and good cosmetic outcome was detected in 45 (75%) and 15 (25%) patients. IG-IMRT is a reproducible and feasible technique for the delivery of APBI following conservative surgery for the treatment of low-risk, early-stage invasive breast carcinoma. Preliminary results are promising, early radiation side effects are minimal, and cosmetic results are excellent.

  6. Trends in primary surgical and radiation therapy for localized breast cancer in the detroit metropolitan area 1973-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuba, Paul J.; Simon, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe trends in primary surgical and radiation therapy for localized breast cancer from 1973 through 1992 among residents of the Detroit Metropolitan area. Methods and Materials: Data on surgical and radiation therapy procedures for women with local stage breast cancer were obtained from the population-based Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System (MDCSS). Results: Women age 75 years and older were treated less aggressively than younger women (< age 75) as evidenced by higher rates of simple mastectomy or no treatment among older women. Younger women (< age 75) were more likely to have had optimal breast conservation therapy which consisted of partial mastectomy, axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and radiation therapy, than were women who were older than 75. Partial mastectomy has increased proportionally from 4% of all breast cancer surgeries in the time period 1973 to 1977, to 39% of all surgeries from 1988 through 1992. Conclusion: A marked difference in surgical treatment of breast cancer exists for younger vs. older women. Despite changes in surgical treatment trends for breast cancer, a large proportion of women who are candidates for conservative therapy continue to undergo mastectomy

  7. Nursing interventions for radiation dermatitis during breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shiho; Nagai, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Radiation dermatitis occurs in 95% of the women undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer. Radiation dermatitis is one of the common acute side effects of RT and includes erythema, dry desquamation, and moist desquamation. Radiation dermatitis may cause physical distress, such as pain and itchiness, and influence individual's quality of life as well. Nurses are to reduce the distress and improve quality of life by managing the symptoms and enhancing patient's self-care ability. This article describes the supportive care for radiation dermatitis from nurse's point of view. (author)

  8. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  9. Toxicity and cosmetic result of partial breast high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for conservatively operated early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Xia; Tripuraneni Prabhakar; Giap Huan; Lin Ray; Chu Colin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Objective To study the method, side effects and cosmetic outcome of high- dose-rate (HDR) accelerated partial breast interstitial irradiation (APBI) alone in early stage breast cancer' after conservative surgery. Methods: From February 2002 to June 2003,47 breast cancer lesions from 46 patients suffering from stage I/II breast cancer were treated with HDR 192 Ir APBI after conservative surgery. All patients were over 40 year-old, with T1-2N0-1 (≤3 lymph nodes positive), surgical margin > 1-2 mm, but those having lobular or inflammatory breast cancer were excluded. HDR brachytherapy with 34 Gy, 10 fractions/5 days was used after surgery, toxic reaction and cosmetic outcome were observed in one month, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results: Follow up of 1846 months, 34 months was carried out for the whole group. During the treatment, acute reactions including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection, all under I-II grade, none of III-IV grade were observed in 21 patients(46%); late toxicity reactions: skin fibrosis, breast tenderness, fat necrosis, and telangiectasia, totally 20 patients (43%) were observed: 2 patients in III grade but one patient received 6 cycle chemotherapy. The result of cosmetic outcome evaluation was excellent or good, at 6 months 95% and 12 months 98%, respectively, but there was no recurfence. Conclusions: Excellent and favorable cosmetic results are noted after APBI by interstitial alone. Acute and late reactions are few. Long term observation is necessary for the rate of' local control. (authors)

  10. Modern Radiation Therapy and Cardiac Outcomes in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Gillespie, Erin F.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Einck, John P.; Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Parikh, Sahil A. [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Harrington Heart and Vascular Institute, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Murphy, James D., E-mail: j2murphy@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy, which has proven benefit against breast cancer, has historically been associated with an increased incidence of ischemic heart disease. Modern techniques have reduced this risk, but a detailed evaluation has not recently been conducted. The present study evaluated the effect of current radiation practices on ischemia-related cardiac events and procedures in a population-based study of older women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,102 patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database. Medicare claims were used to identify the radiation therapy and cardiac outcomes. Competing risk models were used to assess the effect of radiation on these outcomes. Results: Patients with left-sided breast cancer had a small increase in their risk of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after radiation therapy—the 10-year cumulative incidence for these patients was 5.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9%-6.2%) and 4.5% (95% CI 4.0%-5.0%) for right-sided patients. This risk was limited to women with previous cardiac disease. For patients who underwent PCI, those with left-sided breast cancer had a significantly increased risk of cardiac mortality with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 2.02 (95% CI 1.23-3.34). No other outcome, including cardiac mortality for the entire cohort, showed a significant relationship with tumor laterality. Conclusions: For women with a history of cardiac disease, those with left-sided breast cancer who underwent radiation therapy had increased rates of PCI and a survival decrement if treated with PCI. The results of the present study could help cardiologists and radiation oncologists better stratify patients who need more aggressive cardioprotective techniques.

  11. Modern Radiation Therapy and Cardiac Outcomes in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Gillespie, Erin F.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Einck, John P.; Mell, Loren K.; Parikh, Sahil A.; Murphy, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy, which has proven benefit against breast cancer, has historically been associated with an increased incidence of ischemic heart disease. Modern techniques have reduced this risk, but a detailed evaluation has not recently been conducted. The present study evaluated the effect of current radiation practices on ischemia-related cardiac events and procedures in a population-based study of older women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,102 patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare database. Medicare claims were used to identify the radiation therapy and cardiac outcomes. Competing risk models were used to assess the effect of radiation on these outcomes. Results: Patients with left-sided breast cancer had a small increase in their risk of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after radiation therapy—the 10-year cumulative incidence for these patients was 5.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9%-6.2%) and 4.5% (95% CI 4.0%-5.0%) for right-sided patients. This risk was limited to women with previous cardiac disease. For patients who underwent PCI, those with left-sided breast cancer had a significantly increased risk of cardiac mortality with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 2.02 (95% CI 1.23-3.34). No other outcome, including cardiac mortality for the entire cohort, showed a significant relationship with tumor laterality. Conclusions: For women with a history of cardiac disease, those with left-sided breast cancer who underwent radiation therapy had increased rates of PCI and a survival decrement if treated with PCI. The results of the present study could help cardiologists and radiation oncologists better stratify patients who need more aggressive cardioprotective techniques.

  12. Increased detection of lymphatic vessel invasion by D2-40 (podoplanin) in early breast cancer: possible influence on patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debald, M.; Polcher, M.; Flucke, U.E.; Walgenbach-Brunagel, G.; Walgenbach, K.J.; Holler, T.; Wolfgarten, M.; Rudlowski, C.; Buttner, R.; Schild, H.; Kuhn, W.; Braun, M.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Several international trials are currently investigating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer. According to existing guidelines, patients with lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) do not qualify for APBI. D2-40 (podoplanin) significantly

  13. Local Control, Toxicity, and Cosmesis in Women >70 Years Enrolled in the American Society of Breast Surgeons Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Atif J.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Goyal, Sharad; Kuerer, Henry M.; Keisch, Martin; Quiet, Coral; Zannis, Victor; Keleher, Angela; Snyder, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Lyden, Maureen; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Breast Surgeons enrolled women in a registry trial to prospectively study patients treated with the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System breast brachytherapy device. The present report examined the outcomes in women aged >70 years enrolled in the trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,449 primary early stage breast cancers were treated in 1,440 women. Of these, 537 occurred in women >70 years old. Fisher’s exact test was performed to correlate age (≤70 vs. >70 years) with toxicity and with cosmesis. The association of age with local recurrence (LR) failure times was investigated by fitting a parametric model. Results: Older women were less likely to develop telangiectasias than younger women (7.9% vs. 12.4%, p = 0.0083). The incidence of other toxicities was similar. Cosmesis was good or excellent in 92% of the women >70 years old. No significant difference was found in LR as a function of age. The 5-year actuarial LR rate with invasive disease for the older vs. younger population was 2.79% and 2.92%, respectively (p = 0.5780). In women >70 years with hormone-sensitive tumors ≤2 cm who received hormonal therapy (n = 195), the 5-year actuarial rate of LR, overall survival, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival was 2.06%, 89.3%, 87%, and 97.5%, respectively. These outcomes were similar in women who did not receive hormonal therapy. Women with small, estrogen receptor-negative disease had worse LR, overall survival, and disease-free survival compared with receptor-positive patients. Conclusions: Accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system resulted in low toxicity and produced similar cosmesis and local control at 5 years in women >70 years compared with younger women. This treatment should be considered as an alternative to omitting adjuvant radiotherapy for older women with small-volume, early-stage breast cancer.

  14. Local Control, Toxicity, and Cosmesis in Women >70 Years Enrolled in the American Society of Breast Surgeons Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Registry Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Atif J., E-mail: atif_khan@rwjuh.edu [Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter [American Society of Breast Surgeons, Columbia, MD (United States); Goyal, Sharad [Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Kuerer, Henry M.; Keisch, Martin; Quiet, Coral; Zannis, Victor; Keleher, Angela; Snyder, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard [American Society of Breast Surgeons, Columbia, MD (United States); Lyden, Maureen [BioStat International, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); American Society of Breast Surgeons, Columbia, MD (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Breast Surgeons enrolled women in a registry trial to prospectively study patients treated with the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System breast brachytherapy device. The present report examined the outcomes in women aged >70 years enrolled in the trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,449 primary early stage breast cancers were treated in 1,440 women. Of these, 537 occurred in women >70 years old. Fisher's exact test was performed to correlate age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) with toxicity and with cosmesis. The association of age with local recurrence (LR) failure times was investigated by fitting a parametric model. Results: Older women were less likely to develop telangiectasias than younger women (7.9% vs. 12.4%, p = 0.0083). The incidence of other toxicities was similar. Cosmesis was good or excellent in 92% of the women >70 years old. No significant difference was found in LR as a function of age. The 5-year actuarial LR rate with invasive disease for the older vs. younger population was 2.79% and 2.92%, respectively (p = 0.5780). In women >70 years with hormone-sensitive tumors {<=}2 cm who received hormonal therapy (n = 195), the 5-year actuarial rate of LR, overall survival, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival was 2.06%, 89.3%, 87%, and 97.5%, respectively. These outcomes were similar in women who did not receive hormonal therapy. Women with small, estrogen receptor-negative disease had worse LR, overall survival, and disease-free survival compared with receptor-positive patients. Conclusions: Accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system resulted in low toxicity and produced similar cosmesis and local control at 5 years in women >70 years compared with younger women. This treatment should be considered as an alternative to omitting adjuvant radiotherapy for older women with small-volume, early-stage breast cancer.

  15. The role of a prone setup in breast radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; Dewyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  16. The role of a prone setup in breast radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly eHuppert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy (BCT receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  17. The Role of a Prone Setup in Breast Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara, E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  18. Nomogram for Predicting the Risk of Locoregional Recurrence in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobb, Jessica L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Chen, Peter Y., E-mail: PChen@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio (United States); Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington, Michigan (United States); Mbah, Alfred K.; Lyden, Maureen [Biostat International Inc, Tampa, Florida (United States); Beitsch, Peter [Department of Surgery, Dallas Breast Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To develop a nomogram taking into account clinicopathologic features to predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients treated with accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 2000 breasts (1990 women) were treated with APBI at William Beaumont Hospital (n=551) or on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Registry Trial (n=1449). Techniques included multiplanar interstitial catheters (n=98), balloon-based brachytherapy (n=1689), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (n=213). Clinicopathologic variables were gathered prospectively. A nomogram was formulated utilizing the Cox proportional hazards regression model to predict for LRR. This was validated by generating a bias-corrected index and cross-validated with a concordance index. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years (range, 0.9-18.3 years). Of the 2000 cases, 435 were excluded because of missing data. Univariate analysis found that age <50 years, pre-/perimenopausal status, close/positive margins, estrogen receptor negativity, and high grade were associated with a higher frequency of LRR. These 5 independent covariates were used to create adjusted estimates, weighting each on a scale of 0-100. The total score is identified on a points scale to obtain the probability of an LRR over the study period. The model demonstrated good concordance for predicting LRR, with a concordance index of 0.641. Conclusions: The formulation of a practical, easy-to-use nomogram for calculating the risk of LRR in patients undergoing APBI will help guide the appropriate selection of patients for off-protocol utilization of APBI.

  19. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC, Candiolo (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was < 10 mm in 33 patients (53%) and > 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long

  20. Toxicity and cosmetic outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, M.; Bresciani, S.; Ponzone, R.; Panaia, R.; Salatino, A.; Stasi, M.; Gabriele, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Purpose.- To analyse the incidence and severity of acute and late normal tissue toxicity and cosmetic outcome using three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Patients and Methods.- 70 patients with stage I disease were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation, in an approved protocol. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in all patients delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive days. On all CT scans gross tumor volume (GTV ) was defined around surgical clips. A 1.5 cm margin was added in order to account for clinical target volume (CTV) . A margin of 1 cm was added to CTI to define the planning target volume (PTV). The dose-volume constraints were followed in accordance with the specifications as dictated in the NSABP/RTOG protocol. After treatment, patients underwent a clinical and cosmetic evaluation every 3 months. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG grading schema. The cosmetic assessment was performed by the physicians using the controlateral untreated breast as the reference (Harvard scale). Results.- Median patient age was 66 years (range 51-80). Median follow-up was 15 months (range 6-46). Tumor size was 2 cm in 4(6%). The mean value of the ratio between the PTV and the whole ipsilateral breast volume was 38 % and the median percentage whole breast volume that received 95 % of prescribed dose was 34% (range 16%-55%). The rate of G1 and G2 acute skin toxicity was 28% and 2% respectively and the late toxicity was 17% (G1). G2 or greater toxicities were not observed. The most pronounced G1 late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis, developed in 3 patients. The cosmetic outcome was excellent in 83% and good in 17%. Conclusion.- Accelerated partial breast irradiation using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is technically feasible with very low acute and late toxicity. Long-term results are needed to assess

  1. Partial radiative recombination cross sections for excited states of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    In calculating the radiative recombination cross sections for interstellar H II regions, usually only the electric dipole term in the expansion of the interaction Hamiltonian is kept. The dipole and quadrupole transition strengths in closed analytical form are calculated here using the Coulomb wave functions because results for any electron energy and for recombination into any angular momentum state of hydrogen are needed. Several interesting effects are found. First, the transition probabilities are maximum for recombination into specific intermediate angular momentum states at low energies (w < 2eV) and where the free state angular momentum is greater than that of the bound state. Further, that specific intermediate angular momentum state depends on the kinetic energy of the free electron. This behavior is in contrast to the normal behavior of the transition strengths where recombination into s states is greatest and decreases with increasing angular momentum. Second, the quadrupole matrix elements vanish for certain velocities of the free electron. This leads to minima in the corresponding quadrupole cross sections when plotted as a function of the free electron's kinetic energy. Finally, the partial cross sections for highly excited states are greater than previously calculated because of the additional effects of the quadrupole transitions

  2. Changes in skin microcirculation during radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesselaar, Erik; Flejmer, Anna M; Farnebo, Simon; Dasu, Alexandru

    2017-08-01

    The majority of breast cancer patients who receive radiation treatment are affected by acute radiation-induced skin changes. The assessment of these changes is usually done by subjective methods, which complicates the comparison between different treatments or patient groups. This study investigates the feasibility of new robust methods for monitoring skin microcirculation to objectively assess and quantify acute skin reactions during radiation treatment. Laser Doppler flowmetry, laser speckle contrast imaging, and polarized light spectroscopy imaging were used to measure radiation-induced changes in microvascular perfusion and red blood cell concentration (RBC) in the skin of 15 patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Measurements were made before treatment, once a week during treatment, and directly after the last fraction. In the treated breast, perfusion and RBC concentration were increased after 1-5 fractions (2.66-13.3 Gy) compared to baseline. The largest effects were seen in the areola and the medial area. No changes in perfusion and RBC concentration were seen in the untreated breast. In contrast, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scores were increased only after 2 weeks of treatment, which demonstrates the potential of the proposed methods for early assessment of skin changes. Also, there was a moderate to good correlation between the perfusion (r = 0.52) and RBC concentration (r = 0.59) and the RTOG score given a week later. We conclude that radiation-induced microvascular changes in the skin can be objectively measured using novel camera-based techniques before visual changes in the skin are apparent. Objective measurement of microvascular changes in the skin may be valuable in the comparison of skin reactions between different radiation treatments and possibly in predicting acute skin effects at an earlier stage.

  3. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With IMRT: New Technical Approach and Interim Analysis of Acute Toxicity in a Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livi, Lorenzo; Buonamici, Fabrizio Banci; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Scotti, Vieri; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Compagnucci, Antonella; Paiar, Fabiola; Scoccianti, Silvia; Pallotta, Stefania; Detti, Beatrice; Agresti, Benedetta; Talamonti, Cinzia; Mangoni, Monica; Bianchi, Simonetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Marrazzo, Livia; Bucciolini, Marta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate with a randomized clinical trial the possibility of treating the index quadrant with external intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a selected group of patients with early-stage breast cancer and to analyze the acute toxicity. Methods and Materials: From September 2005, a randomized Phase III clinical trial has been conducted to compare conventional (tangential field) fractionated whole breast treatment (Arm A) with accelerated partial breast irradiation plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (Arm B). For intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the clinical target volume was drawn with a uniform 1-cm margin around the surgical clips in three dimensions. The ipsilateral and contralateral breast, ipsilateral and contralateral lung, heart, and spinal cord were contoured as organs at risk. All the regions of interest were contoured according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements reports 50 and 62 recommendations. Results: In September 2008, 259 patients were randomized and treated. The mean clinical target volume in Arm B was 44 cm 3 and the mean planning target volume was 123 cm 3 . The mean value of the ratio between the planning target volume and the ipsilateral breast volume was 21%. The rate of Grade 1 and Grade 2 acute skin toxicity was 22% and 19% in Arm A (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale), respectively. The tolerance in Arm B was excellent with only 5% Grade 1 and 0.8% Grade 2 acute skin toxicity. The planning constraints were fully satisfied in most patients. In a very few cases, this was not possible because of very unfavorable anatomy. Quality assurance procedures were performed according to our internal quality assurance protocol, with excellent results. Conclusion: In the present preliminary analysis, we have demonstrated that accelerated partial breast irradiation is feasible, with very low acute toxicity.

  4. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: Less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leij, Femke van der; Elkhuizen, Paula H.M.; Janssen, Tomas M.; Poortmans, Philip; Sangen, Maurice van der; Scholten, Astrid N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Boersma, Liesbeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of twenty-four breast cancer patients

  5. Reducing radiation dose to the female breast during conventional and dedicated breast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupcich, Franco John

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effectiveness of techniques intended to reduce dose to the breast during CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scans with respect to task-based image quality, and to evaluate the effectiveness of optimal energy weighting in improving contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and thus the potential for reducing breast dose, during energy-resolved dedicated breast CT. A database quantifying organ dose for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during CTCA, including the breast, was generated using Monte Carlo simulations. This database facilitates estimation of organ-specific dose deposited during CTCA protocols using arbitrary x-ray spectra or tube-current modulation schemes without the need to run Monte Carlo simulations. The database was used to estimate breast dose for simulated CT images acquired for a reference protocol and five protocols intended to reduce breast dose. For each protocol, the performance of two tasks (detection of signals with unknown locations) was compared over a range of breast dose levels using a task-based, signal-detectability metric: the estimator of the area under the exponential free-response relative operating characteristic curve, AFE. For large-diameter/medium-contrast signals, when maintaining equivalent AFE, the 80 kV partial, 80 kV, 120 kV partial, and 120 kV tube-current modulated protocols reduced breast dose by 85%, 81%, 18%, and 6%, respectively, while the shielded protocol increased breast dose by 68%. Results for the small-diameter/high-contrast signal followed similar trends, but with smaller magnitude of the percent changes in dose. The 80 kV protocols demonstrated the greatest reduction to breast dose, however, the subsequent increase in noise may be clinically unacceptable. Tube output for these protocols can be adjusted to achieve more desirable noise levels with lesser dose reduction. The improvement in CNR of optimally projection-based and image-based weighted images relative to photon

  6. Optimization of Adjuvant Radiation in Breast Conservation Therapy: Can We Minimize without Compromise?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards-Bennett, S.M.; Correa, C.R.; Harris, E.E.

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant breast radiation therapy after breast conservation surgery is recommended as it yields significant reduction in the risk of local recurrence, and confers a potential overall survival benefit. Although the standard breast radiation regimen has historically been delivered over 57 weeks; more novel, shorter courses of breast radiation are currently being employed, offering the advantage of more convenience and less time-commitment. Herein, we review the recent literature substantiating these abbreviated radiation treatment approaches and the methods of delivery thereof. In addition, we discuss imaged guided techniques currently being utilized to further refine the delivery of adjuvant breast radiation therapy

  7. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam El-Ashmawy

    Full Text Available Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs. In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF = 1.3, and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  8. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Keleher, Angela; Garcia, Delia; Snider, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Victor; Kuerer, Henry; Whitacre, Eric; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Keisch, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  9. American Brachytherapy Society consensus report for accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Arthur, Douglas; Shaitelman, Simona; Polgár, Csaba; Todor, Dorin; Zoberi, Imran; Kamrava, Mitchell; Major, Tibor; Yashar, Catheryn; Wazer, David E

    To develop a consensus report for the quality practice of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy (IMB). The American Brachytherapy Society Board appointed an expert panel with clinical and research experience with breast brachytherapy to provide guidance for the current practice of IMB. This report is based on a comprehensive literature review with emphasis on randomized data and expertise of the panel. Randomized trials have demonstrated equivalent efficacy of APBI using IMB compared with whole breast irradiation for select patients with early-stage breast cancer. Several techniques for placement of interstitial catheters are described, and importance of three-dimensional planning with appropriate optimization is reviewed. Optimal target definition is outlined. Commonly used dosing schemas include 50 Gy delivered in pulses of 0.6-0.8 Gy/h using pulsed-dose-rate technique and 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 32 Gy in eight fractions, or 30 Gy in seven fractions using high-dose-rate technique. Potential toxicities and strategies for toxicity avoidance are described in detail. Dosimetric constraints include limiting whole breast volume that receives ≥50% of prescription dose to 0.75 (>0.85 preferred), V 150  < 45 cc, and V 200  < 14 cc. Using an optimal implant technique coupled with optimal planning and appropriate dose constraints, a low rate of toxicity and a good-to-excellent cosmetic outcome of ≥90% is expected. IMB is an effective technique to deliver APBI for appropriately selected women with early-stage breast cancer. This consensus report has been created to assist clinicians in the appropriate practice of APBI using IMB. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Debate: Pro intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer; Debat: pour la radiotherapie peroperatoire dans le cancer du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J.B.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D. [Departement de radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Gutowski, M.; Rouanet, P.; Saint-Aubert, B. [Departement de chirurgie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, 208, rue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    The use of intraoperative radiation therapy in breast cancer patients started about 20 years ago. Several retrospective and prospective studies have been published. Intraoperative radiation therapy was initially given as a boost to the tumour bed, followed by whole-breast irradiation. These studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the technique, with local control rates and cosmetic results similar to those obtained with standard treatments. Accelerated partial breast irradiation yields local recurrence rates as low as those observed after whole-breast irradiation. Intraoperative radiation therapy as a single irradiation modality with a unique dose has been investigated in recent prospective studies showing satisfactory local results. Intraoperative radiation therapy can be proposed either as a boost or as a unique treatment in selected cases (tumour size, nodal and hormonal status, patient's age). Intraoperative radiation therapy can be delivered by orthovoltage (50 kV) X-rays from mobile generators, or by electrons from linear accelerators, mobile or fixed, dedicated or not to intraoperative radiation therapy. (authors)

  11. ATM, radiation, and the risk of second primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Concannon, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    It was first suggested more than 40 years ago that heterozygous carriers for the human autosomal recessive disorder Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T) might also be at increased risk for cancer. Subsequent studies have identified the responsible gene, Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), characterized genetic variation at this locus in A-T and a variety of different cancers, and described the functions of the ATM protein with regard to cellular DNA damage responses. However, an overall model of how ATM contributes to cancer risk, and in particular, the role of DNA damage in this process, remains lacking. This review considers these questions in the context of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Heterozygous carriers of loss of function mutations in ATM that are A-T causing, are at increased risk of breast cancer. However, examination of a range of genetic variants, both rare and common, across multiple cancers, suggests that ATM may have additional effects on cancer risk that are allele-dependent. In the case of CBC, selected common alleles at ATM are associated with a reduced incidence of CBC, while other rare and predicted deleterious variants may act jointly with radiation exposure to increase risk. Further studies that characterize germline and somatic ATM mutations in breast cancer and relate the detected genetic changes to functional outcomes, particularly with regard to radiation responses, are needed to gain a complete picture of the complex relationship between ATM, radiation and breast cancer.

  12. Exclusive radical radiation therapy in breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.B.; Salomon, A.; Gary-Bobo, J.; Pourquier, H.; Pujol, H.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of 186 breast cancer patients treated initially for locoregional disease by radiotherapy alone, combining cobalt therapy with external electron beam or interstitial iridium implants. According to the TNM classification, the patients were distributed as follows: 3 T 1 N 0 , 2 T 1 N 1 , 33 T 2 N 0 , 36 T 2 N 1 , 16 T 3 N 0 , 26 T 3 N 1 , 6 T 3 N 2 , 14 T 4 N 0 , 29 T 4 N 1 , 9 T 4 N 2 and 12 T 4 N 3 . The 5- and 10-year survival rates (52.7 and 36.5 per cent respectively, for all patients) were directly correlated with the size and location of the breast tumor, and the extent of lymph node involvement. Locoregional recurrence was observed in 39.8 per cent of the cases, metastases alone in 26.8 per cent, and a combination of local recurrence and distant metastasis in 14.5 per cent of the cases. The local recurrences and metastases were directly correlated with the extent of locoregional involvement. Late complications and sequelae were mostly minor and occurred in less than 25 per cent of the cases; severe sequelae in no more than 2 per cent. They depended on the initial tumor volume and the tumor dose. The results, along with those in the literature, indicate that radiotherapy administered alone is a valid therapeutic option in breast cancer. (author). 23 refs.; 5 tabs

  13. Radiation therapy as definitive treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Like surgery, radiation therapy is a local treatment modality, and also like surgery, the objective of therapy is to eradicate all cancer in the treated area, ensuring no recurrence. In addition, this objective should be achieved with maintenance of a cosmetically intact breast. If these two goals can be attained simultaneously, the ultimate result should be a substantial reduction in the physical and psychologic morbidity of treatment and an improvement in the patients's quality of life. It is to be hoped that by reducing women's fear of potentially disfiguring surgery, they will be encouraged to seek medical attention for breast cancer at an earlier, and hence potentially more curable, stage of the disease

  14. Scatter radiation in digital tomosynthesis of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis of the breast is being investigated as one possible solution to the problem of tissue superposition present in planar mammography. This imaging technique presents various advantages that would make it a feasible replacement for planar mammography, among them similar, if not lower, radiation glandular dose to the breast; implementation on conventional digital mammography technology via relatively simple modifications; and fast acquisition time. One significant problem that tomosynthesis of the breast must overcome, however, is the reduction of x-ray scatter inclusion in the projection images. In tomosynthesis, due to the projection geometry and radiation dose considerations, the use of an antiscatter grid presents several challenges. Therefore, the use of postacquisition software-based scatter reduction algorithms seems well justified, requiring a comprehensive evaluation of x-ray scatter content in the tomosynthesis projections. This study aims to gain insight into the behavior of x-ray scatter in tomosynthesis by characterizing the scatter point spread functions (PSFs) and the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) maps found in tomosynthesis of the breast. This characterization was performed using Monte Carlo simulations, based on the Geant4 toolkit, that simulate the conditions present in a digital tomosynthesis system, including the simulation of the compressed breast in both the cranio-caudal (CC) and the medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views. The variation of the scatter PSF with varying tomosynthesis projection angle, as well as the effects of varying breast glandular fraction and x-ray spectrum, was analyzed. The behavior of the SPR for different projection angle, breast size, thickness, glandular fraction, and x-ray spectrum was also analyzed, and computer fit equations for the magnitude of the SPR at the center of mass for both the CC and the MLO views were found. Within mammographic energies, the x-ray spectrum was found to have no appreciable

  15. Partial least squares based gene expression analysis in estrogen receptor positive and negative breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W; Zhang, T-F; Lu, P; Lu, S H

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is categorized into two broad groups: estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and ER negative (ER-) groups. Previous study proposed that under trastuzumab-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor initiating cell (TIC) featured ER- tumors response better than ER+ tumors. Exploration of the molecular difference of these two groups may help developing new therapeutic strategies, especially for ER- patients. With gene expression profile from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, we performed partial least squares (PLS) based analysis, which is more sensitive than common variance/regression analysis. We acquired 512 differentially expressed genes. Four pathways were found to be enriched with differentially expressed genes, involving immune system, metabolism and genetic information processing process. Network analysis identified five hub genes with degrees higher than 10, including APP, ESR1, SMAD3, HDAC2, and PRKAA1. Our findings provide new understanding for the molecular difference between TIC featured ER- and ER+ breast tumors with the hope offer supports for therapeutic studies.

  16. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm 3 , mean 19.65 cm 3 . In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm 3 , mean 1.59 cm 3 . There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and fractionation

  17. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  18. Occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and female breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelina, P.; Bliznakov, V.; Bairacova, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed and registered breast cancer [probability of causation - PC] among Bulgarian women who have used different ionizing radiation sources during their working experience. The National Institute of Health (NIH) in US has developed a method for estimating the probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed cancer. We have used this method. A group of 27 women with diagnosed breast cancer has been studied. 11 of them are former workers in NPP - 'Kozloduy', and 16 are from other sites using different sources of ionizing radiation. Analysis was performed for 14 women, for whom full personal data were available. The individual radiation dose for each of them is below 1/10 of the annual dose limit, and the highest cumulative dose for a period of 14 years of occupational exposure is 50,21 mSv. The probability of causation (PC) values in all analyzed cases are below 1%, which confirms the extremely low probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and occurring cases of breast cancer. (orig.)

  19. Tumour bed delineation for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy: What is the optimal number of implanted markers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna NM.; Jena, Rajesh; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Phil M.; Crowley, Clare; Gregory, Deborah L.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: International consensus has not been reached regarding the optimal number of implanted tumour bed (TB) markers for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy target volume delineation. Four common methods are: insertion of 6 clips (4 radial, 1 deep and 1 superficial), 5 clips (4 radial and 1 deep), 1 clip at the chest wall, and no clips. We compared TB volumes delineated using 6, 5, 1 and 0 clips in women who have undergone wide-local excision (WLE) of breast cancer (BC) with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity, in order to determine the additional margin required for breast boost or partial breast irradiation (PBI) when fewer than 6 clips are used. Methods: Ten patients with invasive ductal BC who had undergone WLE followed by implantation of six fiducial markers (titanium clips) each underwent CT imaging for radiotherapy planning purposes. Retrospective processing of the DICOM image datasets was performed to remove markers and associated imaging artefacts, using an in-house software algorithm. Four observers outlined TB volumes on four different datasets for each case: (1) all markers present (CT 6M ); (2) the superficial marker removed (CT 5M ); (3) all but the chest wall marker removed (CT CW ); (4) all markers removed (CT 0M ). For each observer, the additional margin required around each of TB 0M , TB CW , and TB 5M in order to encompass TB 6M was calculated. The conformity level index (CLI) and differences in centre-of-mass (COM) between observers were quantified for CT 0M , CT CW , CT 5M , CT 6M . Results: The overall median additional margins required to encompass TB 6M were 8 mm (range 0–28 mm) for TB 0M , 5 mm (range 1–13 mm) for TB CW , and 2 mm (range 0–7 mm) for TB 5M . CLI were higher for TB volumes delineated using CT 6M (0.31) CT 5M (0.32) than for CT CW (0.19) and CT 0M (0.15). Conclusions: In women who have undergone WLE of breast cancer with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity and who are proceeding to PBI or

  20. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation vs conventional whole-breast radiotherapy in early breast cancer: A case-control study of disease control, cosmesis, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadasadawala Tabassum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI using various approaches is being increasingly employed for selected women with early breast cancer (EBC. Aims: To conduct a case-control study comparing disease control, cosmesis, and complications in patients with EBC undergoing APBI using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy vs those receiving conventional whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT. Settings and Design: Women with EBC fulfilling the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS criteria were selected as ′cases′ if treated with APBI or as ′controls′ if offered WBRT during the period from May 2000 to December 2004. Materials and Methods: APBI patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR to a dose of 34 Gy/10#/6-8 days. WBRT was delivered to the whole breast to a dose of 45 Gy/25# followed by tumor bed boost, either with electrons (15 Gy/6# or interstitial brachytherapy (HDR 10 Gy/1#. Results: At the median follow-up of 43.05 months in APBI and 51.08 months in WBRT there was no difference in overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, late arm edema, and symptomatic fat necrosis between the two groups. However, APBI resulted in increase in mild breast fibrosis at the tumor bed. Telangiectasias were observed in three patients of the APBI group. The cosmetic outcome was significantly better in the APBI group as compared to the WBRT group (P = 0.003. Conclusions: This study revealed equivalent locoregional and distant disease control in the two groups. APBI offered better overall cosmetic outcome, though at the cost of a slight increase in mild breast fibrosis and telangiectasias.

  1. Investigation of variability in image acquisition and contouring during 3D ultrasound guidance for partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, Anthony; Olivotto, Ivo; Beckham, Wayne; Berrang, Tanya; Gagne, Isabelle; Popescu, Carmen; Mitchell, Tracy; Vey, Hazel; Sand, Letricia; Soh, Siew Yan; Wark, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) at simulation compared to 3DUS at treatment is an image guidance option for partial breast irradiation (PBI). This study assessed if user dependence in acquiring and contouring 3DUS (operator variability) contributed to variation in seroma shifts calculated for breast IGRT. Eligible patients met breast criteria for current randomized PBI studies. 5 Operators participated in this study. For each patient, 3 operators were involved in scan acquisitions and 5 were involved in contouring. At CT simulation (CT1), a 3DUS (US1) was performed by a single radiation therapist (RT). 7 to 14 days after CT1 a second CT (CT2) and 3 sequential 3DUS scans (US2a,b,c) were acquired by each of 3 RTs. Seroma shifts, between US1 and US2 scans were calculated by comparing geometric centers of the seromas (centroids). Operator contouring variability was determined by comparing 5 RT’s contours for a single image set. Scanning variability was assessed by comparing shifts between multiple scans acquired at the same time point (US1-US2a,b,c). Shifts in seromas contoured on CT (CT1-CT2) were compared to US data. From an initial 28 patients, 15 had CT visible seromas, met PBI dosimetric constraints, had complete US data, and were analyzed. Operator variability contributed more to the overall variability in seroma localization than the variability associated with multiple scan acquisitions (95% confidence mean uncertainty of 6.2 mm vs. 1.1 mm). The mean standard deviation in seroma shift was user dependent and ranged from 1.7 to 2.9 mm. Mean seroma shifts from simulation to treatment were comparable to CT. Variability in shifts due to different users acquiring and contouring 3DUS for PBI guidance were comparable to CT shifts. Substantial inter-observer effect needs to be considered during clinical implementation of 3DUS IGRT

  2. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [de

  3. An Optimized Online Verification Imaging Procedure for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, David J.; Kron, Tomas; Chua, Boon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of a kilovoltage (kV) on-board imager (OBI)-equipped linear accelerator in the setting of on-line verification imaging for external-beam partial breast irradiation. Available imaging techniques were optimized and assessed for image quality using a modified anthropomorphic phantom. Imaging dose was also assessed. Imaging techniques were assessed for physical clearance between patient and treatment machine using a volunteer. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs were identified as optimal in terms of image quality, clearance, and dose. After institutional review board approval, this approach was used for 17 patients receiving accelerated partial breast irradiation. Imaging was performed before every fraction verification with online correction of setup deviations >5 mm (total image sessions = 170). Treatment staff rated risk of collision and visibility of tumor bed surgical clips where present. Image session duration and detected setup deviations were recorded. For all cases, both image projections (n = 34) had low collision risk. Surgical clips were rated as well as visualized in all cases where they were present (n = 5). The average imaging session time was 6 min, 16 sec, and a reduction in duration was observed as staff became familiar with the technique. Setup deviations of up to 1.3 cm were detected before treatment and subsequently confirmed offline. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs allowed effective and efficient online verification for partial breast irradiation. It has yet to be tested in a multicenter study to determine whether it is dependent on skilled treatment staff.

  4. Radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis following breast conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoden, Eisaku; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imajo, Yoshinari

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the frequency, degree and risk factors of radiation-induced dermatitis and pneumonitis in 255 patients receiving breast conserving therapy between April 1987 and April 1998. The majority of the patients underwent a wide excision or quadrantectomy with a level I, II axillary dissection, followed by radiotherapy consisting of 50 Gy/25 Fr/5 weeks to the preserved breast with a 4 MV beam by tangentially opposed portals using the half-field technique. Eleven patients received an additional 10 Gy/5 Fr of electron therapy to the tumor bed. Most of the patients developed radiation dermatitis which was limited to reddening or dry desquamation, with the exception of 14 patients with a localized moist reaction. The skin reaction was transient in all patients and improved with conservative treatments. Radiation pneumonitis appeared on chest X-rays in 30 patients, with a slight appearance in 21 and patchy appearance in 9. Three patients presented with persistent symptoms requiring medication. They were treated with steroids, resulting in complete resolution of the symptoms. A large volume of the chest wall within the irradiation field and a large area of irradiated skin were the risk factors of radiation dermatitis. The volume of irradiated lung significantly correlated with the frequency and degree of radiation pneumonitis. It was preferable that the maximum thickness of the involved lung should not exceed 3 cm. Complicated disease, adjuvant therapy and boost irradiation had no impact on the radiation dermatitis or pneumonitis. (author)

  5. Change in Seroma Volume During Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rajiv; Spierer, Marnee; Mutyala, Subhakar; Thawani, Nitika; Cohen, Hillel W.; Hong, Linda; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: After breast-conserving surgery, a seroma often forms in the surgical cavity. If not drained, it may affect the volume of tumor bed requiring a boost after whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Our objective was to evaluate the change in seroma volume that occurs during WBRT, before boost planning. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed of women receiving breast-conserving therapy with evidence of seroma at the time of WBRT planning. Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed before WBRT and before the tumor bed boost. All patients received either a hypofractionated (42.4 Gy/16 fraction + 9.6 Gy/4 fraction boost) or standard fractionated (50.4 Gy/28 fraction + 10 Gy/5 fraction boost) regimen. Seroma volumes were contoured and compared on CT at the time of WBRT simulation and tumor bed boost planning. Results: Twenty-four patients with evidence of seroma were identified and all patients received WBRT without drainage of the seroma. Mean seroma volume before WBRT and at boost planning were significantly different at 65.7 cm 3 (SD, 50.5 cm 3 ) and 35.6 cm 3 (SD, 24.8 cm 3 ), respectively (p < 0.001). Mean and median reduction in seroma volume during radiation were 39.6% (SD, 23.8%) and 46.2% (range, 10.7-76.7%), respectively. Fractionation schedule was not correlated with change in seroma volume. Length of time from surgery to start of radiation therapy showed an inverse correlation with change in seroma volume (Pearson correlation r = -0.53, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The volume of seroma changes significantly during WBRT. Consequently, the accuracy of breast boost planning is likely affected, as is the volume of normal breast tissue irradiated. CT-based boost planning before boost irradiation is suggested to ensure appropriate coverage.

  6. Effect of breast augmentation after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer on radiation dose. Silicone prosthesis and changes in radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonari, Ayako; Nako, Yasunobu; Ikezaki, Hiromi; Maruyama, Yasushi; Ikeda, Ikuo; Kusuda, Junko; Harii, Kiyonori; Takayama, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    The results of a study simulating postoperative radiation therapy of remaining breast tissue with a silicone bag prosthesis implanted to examine the effects of the prosthesis on radiation dosage and surrounding tissue are reported. The evaluation was conducted in two stages: a water phantom was used to evaluate scattering effects of a prosthesis installed inside the phantom using glass rod detector (GRD) set around the prosthesis. Measurements were conducted on both entrance and rear sides of the prosthesis. A Rand phantom was used to measure radiation doses around the prosthesis. The first evaluation resulted in a less than 5.4% reduction in dose at the rear side of the prosthesis whereas the second evaluation, for opposing portal irradiation used with breast-conserving surgical treatment, showed the effects of the prosthesis on radiation dosage being within ±2%, the permitted treatment range. In conclusion, for treating breast cancer, combining surgical treatment of the cancer with implanting of prosthesis for breast reconstruction followed by radiation treatment appears feasible as no effects on dosage were observed on treatment effectiveness. (author)

  7. Fat necrosis in women with early-stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jagtap, Vikas; Kembhavi, Seema; Munshi, Anusheel; Jalali, Rakesh; Seth, Tanuja; Parmar, Vani; Raj Upreti, Ritu; Badwe, Rajendra; Sarin, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of clinical, pathological and radiological fat necrosis (FN) in women treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial brachytherapy (BRT) for early-stage breast cancer and to study certain variables associated with it. Methods and materials: Between May 2000 and August 2008, 171 women were treated with APBI using high dose rate (HDR) BRT. Patients were treated to a dose of 34 Gy/10 fractions/1 week with two fractions/day after intraoperative/postoperative placement of catheters. Results: At a median follow up of 48 months (SD: 28) 20 women developed FN with median time to detection being 24 months (range: 4–62 months, SD: 20). Actuarial 5 and 7 year FN rate was 18% and 23%, respectively. Grade 1 FN was seen in 4, grade 2 in 8 and grade 4 in 8 women. Additional investigations such as aspiration/biopsy were done in 9 patients. Volume of excision was the only significant factor affecting FN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Actuarial FN rate of 18% at 5 years in our study was comparable to other reported series of FN. Median time of detection of FN was 24 months. Higher volume of excision resulted in an increased incidence of fat necrosis.

  8. Variability Among Breast Radiation Oncologists in Delineation of the Postsurgical Lumpectomy Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, Daniel M.; Luo Weixiu; Song Jun; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Wong, Julia S.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Gelman, Rebecca; Harris, Jay R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is becoming more widely used. Accurate determination of the surgical lumpectomy cavity volume is more critical with PBI than with whole breast radiation therapy. We examined the interobserver variability in delineation of the lumpectomy cavity among four academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-four lumpectomy cavities in 33 consecutive patients were evaluated. Each physician contoured the cavity and a 1.5-cm margin was added to define the planning target volume (PTV). A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned (1-5). To eliminate bias, the physician of record was eliminated from the analysis in all cases. Three measures of variability of the PTV were developed: average shift of the center of mass (COM), average percent overlap between the PTV of two physicians (PVO), and standard deviation of the PTV. Results: Of variables examined, pathologic resection volume was significantly correlated with CVS, with larger volumes more easily visualized. Shift of the COM decreased and PVO increased significantly as CVS increased. For CVS 4 and 5 cases, the average COM shift was 3 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and PVO was 77% and 87%, respectively. In multiple linear regression, pathologic diameter >4 cm and CVS ≥3 were significantly associated with smaller COM shift. When CVS was omitted from analysis, PVO was significantly larger with pathologic diameter ≥5 cm, days to planning <36, and older age. Conclusions: Even among radiation oncologists who specialize in breast radiotherapy, there can be substantial differences in delineation of the postsurgical radiotherapy target volume. Large treatment margins may be prudent if the cavity is not clearly defined

  9. Radiation exposure and breast cancer: lessons from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Hudon, Tyler W; Nadkarni, Prakash M; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2013-04-01

    The lessons learned from the Chernobyl disaster have become increasingly important after the second anniversary of the Fukushima, Japan nuclear accident. Historically, data from the Chernobyl reactor accident 27 years ago demonstrated a strong correlation with thyroid cancer, but data on the radiation effects of Chernobyl on breast cancer incidence have remained inconclusive. We reviewed the published literature on the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on breast cancer incidence, using Medline and Scopus from the time of the accident to December of 2010. Our findings indicate limited data and statistical flaws. Other confounding factors, such as discrepancies in data collection, make interpretation of the results from the published literature difficult. Re-analyzing the data reveals that the incidence of breast cancer in Chernobyl-disaster-exposed women could be higher than previously thought. We have learned little of the consequences of radiation exposure at Chernobyl except for its effects on thyroid cancer incidence. Marking the 27th year after the Chernobyl event, this report sheds light on a specific, crucial and understudied aspect of the results of radiation from a gruesome nuclear power plant disaster.

  10. Thyroid and hypophysial function in radiation therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakimova, T.P.; Lozinskaya, I.N.

    1984-01-01

    In breast cancer a decrease in triiodothyronine concentration was revealed with the normal level of thyroxine that may be associated with the disturbed peripharal metabolism into triiodothyronine. The lowering of thyroid functional activity is noted during radiation therapy of patients at menopause. Administration of thyroidin during radiation therapy to elderly patients with the 3 stage of the disease compensated for hormone deficiency producing a sparing effect on the thyroid, and influenced the therapeutic results favorably. A high level of the somatotropic hormone was observed in patients, of the reproductive age and at menopause, the level of insulin was increased in all the patients

  11. Clinical implementation of a new HDR brachytherapy device for partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Rice, Roger; Pawlicki, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present the clinical implementation of a new HDR device for partial breast irradiation, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI), at the University of California, San Diego. Methods and materials: The SAVI device has multiple peripheral struts that can be differentially loaded with the HDR source. Planning criteria used for evaluation of the treatment plans included the following dose volume histogram (DVH) criteria: V90 >90%, V150 <50 cc and V200 <20 cc. Results: SAVI has been used on 20 patients to date at UC San Diego. In each case, the dose was modulated according to patient-specific anatomy to cover the tumor bed, while sparing normal tissues. The dosimetric data show that we can achieve greater than 90% coverage with respect to V90 (median of 95.3%) and also keep a low V150 and V200 dose at 24.5 and 11.2 cc, respectively. Complete treatment can be done within a 30-min time slot, which includes implant verification, setup, and irradiation time as well as wound dressing. Conclusion: SAVI has been implemented at UC San Diego for accelerated partial breast irradiation with excellent tumor bed conformance and minimal normal tissue exposure. Patient positioning is the key to identifying any inter-fraction device motion. Device asymmetry or tissue conformance has been shown to resolve itself 24 h after the device implantation. The device can be implemented into an existing HDR program with minimal effort

  12. Reversible brachial plexopathy following primary radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salner, A.L.; Botnick, L.E.; Herzog, A.G.; Goldstein, M.A.; Harris, J.R.; Levene, M.B.; Hellman, S.

    1981-01-01

    Reversible brachial plexopathy has occurred in very low incidence in patients with breast carcinoma treated definitively with radiation therapy. Of 565 patients treated between January 1968 and December 1979 with moderate doses of supervoltage radiation therapy (average axillary dose of 5000 rad in 5 weeks), eight patients (1.4%) developed the characteristic symptoms at a median time of 4.5 months after radiation therapy. This syndrome consists of paresthesias in all patients, with weakness and pain less commonly seen. The symptom complex differs from other previously described brachial plexus syndromes, including paralytic brachial neuritis, radiation-induced injury, and carcinoma. A possible relationship to adjuvant chemotherapy exists, though the etiology is not well-understood. The cases described demonstrate temporal clustering. Resolution is always seen

  13. Protection of the contralateral breast during radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrigo, E.; Zunino, S.; Germanier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT) and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) improve the relationship between tumor control and complications in normal tissue. However, these techniques may cause an increase of the normal tissue volume irradiated with low doses or an increase of the doses outside the beam. The aim of this work was to measure and compare the scatter dose to the contralateral breast using both the conventional two-field technique and the 3DCRT technique with blocks. The contralateral breast dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The present work is divided in three parts: 1)Characterization of the radiation field outside the treatment beam; 2) Determination of the dose to the contralateral breast; 3) Design and construction of a shield to reduce the scatter dose to the contralateral breast. Treatment using 3DCRT technique was delivered to a phantom. From one to ten 2 mm thick lead sheets were placed on the dosimeters to attenuate radiation to the contralateral breast from the head, without blocking the treatment beam. Using the conventional technique the average dose to the contralateral breast was 2.09 Gy,4.18%(2.9%-19%) of the 50 Gy prescribed dose. The contribution of the medial field was 3.36% (2.3%-21.1%) and of the lateral field 0.86%(0.4%-3.7%). When using 3DCRT technique the average dose to the opposite breast was 5,9 Gy,11.8% (7.9%-24%) of the prescribed dose. The contribution of the medial field was 10.3% (6.7%-20%) and of the lateral field 1.6% (1.1%-3.8%). A 2 mm thick lead shield with a 0.2 g/cm2 thick wax coat was constructed which reduced the dose from 11.8% to less than 2%. The blocks increase the dose to the contralateral breast, the highest dose being attributed to the medial field. Our shield reduced the dose, which allowed the regular use of 3DCRT with blocks. In addition, we found that this shield was comfortable for the patients and easy to position for the therapists. (author)

  14. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using proton beams: Initial clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Smith, Barbara L.; Adams, Judith C.; Kornmehl, Ellen; Katz, Angela; Gadd, Michele; Specht, Michelle; Hughes, Kevin; Gioioso, Valeria; Lu, H.-M.; Braaten, Kristina; Recht, Abram; Powell, Simon N.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We present our initial clinical experience with proton, three-dimensional, conformal, external beam, partial-breast irradiation (3D-CPBI). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated with proton 3D-CPBI in a Phase I/II clinical trial. Patients were followed at 3 to 4 weeks, 6 to 8 weeks, 6 months, and every 6 months thereafter for recurrent disease, cosmetic outcome, toxicity, and patient satisfaction. Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 8-22 months), no recurrent disease has been detected. Global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians to be good or excellent in 89% and 100% of cases at 6 months and 12 months, respectively. Patients rated global breast cosmesis as good or excellent in 100% of cases at both 6 and 12 months. Proton 3D-CPBI produced significant acute skin toxicity with moderate to severe skin color changes in 79% of patients at 3 to 4 weeks and moderate to severe moist desquamation in 22% of patients at 6 to 8 weeks. Telangiectasia was noted in 3 patients. Three patients reported rib tenderness in the treated area, and one rib fracture was documented. At last follow-up, 95% of patients reported total satisfaction with proton 3D-CPBI. Conclusions: Based on our study results, proton 3D-CPBI offers good-to-excellent cosmetic outcomes in 89% to 100% of patients at 6-month and 12-month follow-up and nearly universal patient satisfaction. However, proton 3D-CPBI, as used in this study, does result in significant acute skin toxicity and may potentially be associated with late skin (telangiectasia) and rib toxicity. Because of the dosimetric advantages of proton 3D-CPBI, technique modifications are being explored to improve acute skin tolerance

  15. SU-F-T-650: The Comparison of Robotic Partial Breast Stereotactic Irradiation Using MLC Vs. Iris Cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, C; Timmerman, R; Jiang, S; Rahimi, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric impact on treatment planning for partial breast stereotactic irradiation using Cyberknife with MLC versus Iris Cone. Methods: Ten patients whom underwent lumpectomy for DCIS or stage I invasive non-lobular epithelial breast cancer were included in this study. All patients were previously treated on the Cyberknife using Iris cone with the prescription dose of 37.5Gy in 5 fractions covering at least 95% of PTV on our phase I SBRT 5 fraction partial breast irradiation trial. Retrospectively, treatment planning was performed and compared using the new Cyberknife M6 MLC system for each patient. Using the same contours and critical organ constraints for both MLC and Iris cone plans, the dose on target and critical organs were analyzed accordingly. Results: Dose to critical organs such as ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, skin, ipsilateral breast, and rib were analyzed, as well as conformity index and high dose spillage of the target area. In 9 of 10 patients, the MLC plans had less total ipsilateral breast volume encompassing the 50% prescription isodose (mean:22.3±8.2% MLC vs. 31.6±8.0 Iris, p=0.00014) .The MLC plans mean estimated treatment delivery time was significantly less than the Iris plans (51±3.9min vs. 56.2±9min, p=0.03) Both MLC and Iris cone plans were able to meet all dose constraints and there was no statistical difference between those dose constraints. Conclusion: Both MLC and Iris Cone can deliver conformal dose to a partial breast target and satisfy the dose constraints of critical organs. The new Cyberknife with MLC can deliver a more conformal dose in the lower dose region and spare more ipsilateral breast tissue to the 50% prescription isodose. The treatment time for partial breast SBRT plans was also reduced using MLC. Project receives research support from Accuray Inc.

  16. Bolus effect to reduce skin dose of the caontralateral breast during breast cancer radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, InJe University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Radiation Oncology, KonYang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose comparison using Radon phantom with 5 mm and 10 mm tissue equivalent materials, FIF, Wedge(15, 30 angle) and IMRT, to reduce the skin dose of the contralateral breast during breast cancer radiation therapy(Total dose: 50.4Gy). The dose was measured for each treatment plan by attaching to the 8 point of the contralateral breast of the treated region using a optical-stimulated luminance dosimeter(OSLD) as a comparative dose evaluation method. Of the OSLD used in the study, 10 were used with reproducibility within 3%. As a result, the average reduction rates of 5 mm and 10 mm in the FIF treatment plan were 37.23 cGy and 41.77 cGy, respectively, and the average reduction rates in the treatment plan using Wedge 15 degrees were 70.69 cGy and 87.57 cGy, respectively. The IMRT showed a reduction of 67.37 cGy and 83.17 cGy, respectively. The results of using bolus showed that as the thickness of the bolus increased in all treatments, the dose reduction increased. We concluded that mastectomy as well as general radiotherapy for breast cancer would be very effective for patients who are more likely to be exposed to scattered radiation due to a more demanding or complex treatment plan.

  17. A Prospective Study of the Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Determining Candidacy for Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, Paige L.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Haq, Farah; Goldberg, Mira [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Abe, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hasan, Yasmin [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chmura, Steven J., E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Retrospective data have demonstrated that breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may change a patient's eligibility for partial breast irradiation (PBI) by identifying multicentric, multifocal, or contralateral disease. The objective of the current study was to prospectively determine the frequency with which MRI identifies occult disease and to establish clinical factors associated with a higher likelihood of MRI prompting changes in PBI eligibility. Methods and Materials: At The University of Chicago, women with breast cancer uniformly undergo MRI in addition to mammography and ultrasonography. From June 2009 through May 2011, all patients were screened prospectively in a multidisciplinary conference for PBI eligibility based on standard imaging, and the impact of MRI on PBI eligibility according to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0413 entry criteria was recorded. Univariable analysis was performed using clinical characteristics in both the prospective cohort and in a separate cohort of retrospectively identified patients. Pooled analysis was used to derive a scoring index predictive of the risk that MRI would identify additional disease. Results: A total of 521 patients were screened for PBI eligibility, and 124 (23.8%) patients were deemed eligible for PBI based on standard imaging. MRI findings changed PBI eligibility in 12.9% of patients. In the pooled univariable analysis, tumor size ≥2 cm on mammography or ultrasonography (P=.02), age <50 years (P=.01), invasive lobular histology (P=.01), and HER-2/neu amplification (P=.01) were associated with a higher likelihood of MRI changing PBI eligibility. A predictive score was generated by summing the number of significant risk factors. Patients with a score of 0, 1, 2, and 3 had changes to eligibility based on MRI findings in 2.8%, 13.2%, 38.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: MRI identified additional

  18. Radiation pneumonitis: a complication resulting from combined radiation and chemotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gez, E.; Sulkes, A.; Isacson, R.; Catane, R.; Weshler, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a patient with early breast carcinoma who developed clinical radiation pneumonitis during primary radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy that included prednisone. This syndrome developed three days following abrupt steroid withdrawal. Retrieval of steroids brought complete resolution of the clinical and radiological findings. Although this syndrome is rare, it is recommended that steroid therapy in a patient previously irradiated to the chest be avoided

  19. Diagnosis of partial body radiation exposure in mice using peripheral blood gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Meadows

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a terrorist-mediated attack in the United States using radiological or improvised nuclear weapons, it is expected that hundreds of thousands of people could be exposed to life-threatening levels of ionizing radiation. We have recently shown that genome-wide expression analysis of the peripheral blood (PB can generate gene expression profiles that can predict radiation exposure and distinguish the dose level of exposure following total body irradiation (TBI. However, in the event a radiation-mass casualty scenario, many victims will have heterogeneous exposure due to partial shielding and it is unknown whether PB gene expression profiles would be useful in predicting the status of partially irradiated individuals. Here, we identified gene expression profiles in the PB that were characteristic of anterior hemibody-, posterior hemibody- and single limb-irradiation at 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy and 10 Gy in C57Bl6 mice. These PB signatures predicted the radiation status of partially irradiated mice with a high level of accuracy (range 79-100% compared to non-irradiated mice. Interestingly, PB signatures of partial body irradiation were poorly predictive of radiation status by site of injury (range 16-43%, suggesting that the PB molecular response to partial body irradiation was anatomic site specific. Importantly, PB gene signatures generated from TBI-treated mice failed completely to predict the radiation status of partially irradiated animals or non-irradiated controls. These data demonstrate that partial body irradiation, even to a single limb, generates a characteristic PB signature of radiation injury and thus may necessitate the use of multiple signatures, both partial body and total body, to accurately assess the status of an individual exposed to radiation.

  20. Patterns of dose variability in radiation prescription of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Chee-Wai, Cheng; Fein, Douglas A.; Fowble, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Objective: Radiation dose distribution varies with breast size, beam energy, beam modifiers (wedge, bolus), and beam weights. A dose variation as low as ± 5% has been observed to change outcome of the radiation treatment. Various reports suggest that radiation dose >50 Gy and dose inhomogeneity >10% have unfavorable cosmesis. It is difficult to estimate treatment outcome and compare data in various protocols due to the variability of dose prescriptions. A retrospective analysis of the pattern of dose prescription and intercomparison of various protocols is presented for the treatment of breast cancer. Materials and Methods: In this study, five prescription points were chosen to represent the commonly used protocols for breast irradiation. All these points lie on a line of height, h, of the breast apex from the posterior non-divergent beam edge at half the chest-wall separation,s . The points are located at a distance 1.5 cm, chest wall-lung interface (2-3 cm), (h(3)), (h(2)), and at isocenter. One hundred consecutive patients treated with intact breast irradiation following excisional biopsy were selected. For analysis, treatment planning was carried out without lung correction with a 6 MV beam for all patients, even though some of the patients were treated with high energy beams. Dose distributions were optimized with proper wedges and beam weights to provide a symmetrical dose distribution on the central axis plane. A multivariate analysis of the different parameters, s,h , dose at the hot spot, and doses at various prescription points were carried out. The patients were divided into three groups based on the chest-wall separations: small ( 22.0 cm). The dose distributions related to various prescription points used in different protocols were analyzed for three groups of the patients. Results: The magnitudes of the hot spots varied from +5% to +27% among the patient population, were directly related to s, and appeared to be independent of h. The hot spots

  1. Once-Daily Radiation Therapy for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lindsay; Harmsen, William; Blanchard, Miran; Goetz, Matthew; Jakub, James; Mutter, Robert; Petersen, Ivy; Rooney, Jessica; Stauder, Michael; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare and aggressive breast cancer variant treated with multimodality therapy. A variety of approaches intended to escalate the intensity and efficacy of radiation therapy have been reported, including twice-daily radiation therapy, dose escalation, and aggressive use of bolus. Herein, we examine our outcomes for patients treated with once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive bolus utilization, focusing on treatment technique. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010, was performed. Locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS) and predictors thereof were assessed. Results: Fifty-two women with IBC were identified, 49 (94%) of whom were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiation therapy. Radiation was delivered in once-daily fractions of 1.8 to 2.25 Gy (median, 2 Gy). Patients were typically treated with daily 1-cm bolus throughout treatment, and 33 (63%) received a subsequent boost to the mastectomy scar. Five-year Kaplan Meier survival estimates for LRC, DFS, and OS were 81%, 56%, and 64%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence was associated with poorer OS (P<.001; hazard ratio [HR], 4.1). Extracapsular extension was associated with worse LRC (P=.02), DFS (P=.007), and OS (P=.002). Age greater than 50 years was associated with better DFS (P=.03). Pathologic complete response was associated with a trend toward improved LRC (P=.06). Conclusions: Once-daily radiation therapy with aggressive use of bolus for IBC results in outcomes consistent with previous reports using various intensified radiation therapy regimens. LRC remains a challenge despite modern systemic therapy. Extracapsular extension, age ≤50 years, and lack of complete response to chemotherapy appear to be associated with worse outcomes. Novel strategies are needed in IBC

  2. Radiation-associated breast tumors display a distinct gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Women who received irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma have a strong increased risk for developing breast cancer. Approximately 90% of the breast cancers in these patients can be attributed to their radiation treatment, rendering such series extremely useful to determine whether a common...... radiation-associated cause underlies the carcinogenic process. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this study we used gene expression profiling technology to assess gene expression changes in radiation-associated breast tumors compared with a set of control breast tumors of women unexposed to radiation, diagnosed...... at the same age. RNA was obtained from fresh frozen tissue samples from 22 patients who developed breast cancer after Hodgkin's lymphoma (BfHL) and from 20 control breast tumors. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the profile data resulted in a clustering of the radiation-associated tumors...

  3. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality From Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglioretti, Diana L; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Lee, Christoph I; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J; Hubbard, Rebecca A

    2016-02-16

    Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening while considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation among women. 2 simulation-modeling approaches. U.S. population. Women aged 40 to 74 years. Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 years until age 74 years. Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (harms) per 100,000 women screened. Annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancer cases (95% CI, 88 to 178) leading to 16 deaths (CI, 11 to 23), relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete examination (8% of population) were projected to have greater radiation-induced breast cancer risk (266 cancer cases and 35 deaths per 100,000 women) than other women (113 cancer cases and 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 years reduced risk for radiation-induced cancer 5-fold. Life-years lost from radiation-induced breast cancer could not be estimated. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are affected by dose variability from screening, resultant diagnostic work-up, initiation age, and screening frequency. Women with large breasts may have a greater risk for radiation-induced breast cancer. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, National Cancer Institute.

  4. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee

    2009-01-01

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis

  5. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University, School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis.

  6. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity modulated radiotherapy versus whole breast irradiation: Health-related quality of life final analysis from the Florence phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meattini, Icro; Saieva, Calogero; Miccinesi, Guido; Desideri, Isacco; Francolini, Giulio; Scotti, Vieri; Marrazzo, Livia; Pallotta, Stefania; Meacci, Fiammetta; Muntoni, Cristina; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Sanchez, Luis Jose; Bernini, Marco; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Nori, Jacopo; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2017-05-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) represents a valid option for selected early breast cancer (BC). We recently published the 5-year results of the APBI-IMRT-Florence phase 3 randomised trial (NCT02104895), showing a very low rate of disease failure, with acute and early-late toxicity in favour of APBI. We present the early and 2-year follow-up health-related quality of life (HRQoL) results. Eligible patients were women aged more than 40 years with early BC suitable for breast-conserving surgery. APBI consisted of 30 Gy in five fractions delivered with IMRT technique. Standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) consisted of 50 Gy in 25 fractions plus a 10 Gy in five fractions boost on tumour bed. A total of 520 patients were enrolled in the phase 3 trial. Overall, 205 patients (105 APBI and 100 WBI) fully completed all the given questionnaires and were therefore included in the present analysis. As HRQoL assessment, patients were asked to complete the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and the BR23 questionnaires at the beginning (T0), at the end (T1) and after 2 years from radiation (T2). No significant difference between the two arms at QLQ-C30 and BR23 scores emerged at T0. Global health status (p = 0.0001), and most scores of the functional and symptom scales of QLQ-C30 at T1 showed significant differences in favour of the APBI arm. Concerning the BR23 functional and symptom scales, the body image perception, future perspective and breast and arm symptoms were significantly better in the APBI group. Similar significant results emerged at T2: significant differences in favour of APBI emerged for GHS (p = 0.0001), and most functional and symptom QLQ-C30 scales. According to QLQ-BR23 module, among the functional scales, the body image perception and the future perspective were significantly better in the APBI group (p = 0.0001), whereas among the symptom scales significant difference emerged by breast and arm

  7. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Diehn, Felix E.; Boughey, Judy C.; Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Mutter, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted

  8. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Lindsay C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Diehn, Felix E. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Boughey, Judy C. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert W., E-mail: mutter.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  9. Impact of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Technique on Treatment With Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Jianjian; Chang Zheng; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Horton, Janet; Yin Fangfang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the technical feasibility of volumetric modulated arc therapy (V-MAT) in the delivery of partial breast irradiation (PBI). Methods and Materials: V-MAT and the standard, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), were compared retrospectively in 8 patients previously treated with PBI. These patients' plans were replanned with a single partial arc using V-MAT that included partial blocking to minimize normal tissue dose. Dosimetric parameters were calculated to evaluate plan quality. Quality assurance studies included verifying both the point and the multiple planar doses. Total monitor units and delivery time were also evaluated, and collision clearance was analyzed. Results: Volumes of ipsilateral lung irradiated to 10 Gy (V10) and 20 Gy (V20) by V-MAT were significantly less than those of 3D-CRT (p = 0.03 for V10 and p = 0.025 for V20). The volume of ipsilateral breast irradiated to 5 Gy was significantly less by using V-MAT than with 3D-CRT (p = 0.02), with a ratio of integrated dose of <1.00. The total mean monitor units (489 ± 38) for V-MAT were significantly less than those for 3D-CRT (634 ± 123) (p = 0.017), with a 23% reduction. The average machine delivery time was 1.21 ± 0.10 min for the V-MAT plans and 6.28 ± 1.40 min for the 3D-CRT plans, resulting in a reduction factor of 80.1%. The conformity indexes were 1.3 in the V-MAT plans and 1.5 in the 3D-CRT plans (p = 0.102). Conclusions: V-MAT technology is feasible for PBI patients. Compared to a conventional 3D-CRT technique, it is more efficient, offers equivalent or better dose conformity, delivers lower doses to the ipsilateral lung and breast, and may potentially reduce intrafractional motion.

  10. Optimal application of the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter vacuum port to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Kenneth M; Cuttino, Laurie W; Vicini, Frank A; Arthur, Douglas W; Todor, Dorin A; Julian, Thomas B; Lyden, Maureen R

    2011-01-01

    The impact of using the Contura multilumen balloon (MLB) (SenoRx, Inc., Irvine, CA) breast brachytherapy catheter's vacuum port in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) was analyzed. Data from 32 patients at two sites were reviewed. Variables analyzed included the seroma fluid (SF):air volume around the MLB before and after vacuum port use and on its ability to improve (1) the eligibility of patients for APBI and (2) dose coverage of the planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) in eligible patients. The median SF/air volume before vacuum removal was 6.8 cc vs. 0.8 cc after vacuum removal (median reduction in SF/air volume was 90.5%). Before vacuum port use, the median SF/air volume expressed as percentage of the PTV_EVAL was 7.8% (range, 1.9-26.6) in all patients. After application of the vacuum, this was reduced to 1.2%. Before vacuum port use, 10 (31.3%) patients were not considered acceptable candidates for APBI because the SF/air volume:PTV_EVAL ratio (SF:PTV) was greater than 10% (range, 10.1-26.6%; median, 15.2%). After vacuum port use, the median SF:PTV ratio was 1.6% for a median reduction of 91.5%. In addition, the percentage of the prescribed dose covering greater than or equal to 90% of the PTV_EVAL proportionally increased a median of 8% (range, 3-10%) in eligible patients. Use of the Contura MLB vacuum port significantly improved the conformity of the target tissue to the balloon surface, leading to reproducible dose delivery and increased target volume coverage. In addition, application of the vacuum allowed the safe treatment of unacceptable patients with APBI. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  12. Radiation efficacy and biological risk from whole-breast irradiation via intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desantis, David M.

    Radiotherapy is an established modality for women with breast cancer. During the delivery of external beam radiation to the breast, leakage, scattered x-rays from the patient and the linear accelerator also expose healthy tissues and organs outside of the breast, thereby increasing the patient's whole-body dose, which then increases the chance of developing a secondary, radiation-induced cancer. Generally, there are three IntensityModulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery techniques from a conventional linear accelerator; forward planned (FMLC), inverse planned 'sliding window' (DMLC), and inverse planned 'step-and-shoot' (SMLC). The goal of this study was to determine which of these three techniques delivers an optimal dose to the breast with the least chance of causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. A conventional, non-IMRT, 'Wedge' plan also was compared. Computerized Tomography (CT) data sets for both a large and small sized patient were used in this study. With Varian's Eclipse AAA algorithm, the organ doses specified in the revised ICRP 60 publication were used to calculate the whole-body dose. Also, an anthropomorphic phantom was irradiated with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) at each organ site for measured doses. The risk coefficient from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII report of 4.69 x 10-2 deaths per Gy was used to convert whole-body dose to risk of a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. The FMLC IMRT delivered superior tumor coverage over the 3D conventional plan and the inverse DMLC or SMLC treatment plans delivered clinically equivalent tumor coverage. However, the FMLC plan had the least likelihood of inadvertently causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer compared to the inverse DMLC, SMLC, and Wedge plans.

  13. Interobserver variations of target volume delineation and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation with intraoperative interstitial breast implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Raj Upreti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the interobserver variations in delineation of lumpectomy cavity (LC and clinical target volume (CTV, and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation using intraoperative multicatheter brachytherapy. Material and methods : Delineation of LC and CTV was done by five radiation oncologists on planning computed tomography (CT scans of 20 patients with intraoperative interstitial breast implant. Cavity visualization index (CVI, four-point index ranging from (0 = poor to (3 = excellent was created and assigned by observers for each patient. In total, 200 contours for all observers and 100 treatment plans were evaluated. Spatial concordance (conformity index, CI common , and CIgen, average shift in the center of mass (COM, and ratio of maximum and minimum volumes (V max /V min of LC and CTV were quantified among all observers and statistically analyzed. Variation in active dwell positions (0.5 cm step for each catheter, total reference air kerma (TRAK, volume enclosed by prescription isodose (V100% among observers and its spatial concordance were analyzed. Results : The mean ± SD CI common of LC and CTV was 0.54 ± 0.09, and 0.58 ± 0.08, respectively. Conformity index tends to increase, shift in COM and V max /V min decrease significantly (p < 0.05, as CVI increased. Out of total 309 catheters, 29.8% catheters had no change, 29.8% and 17.5% catheters had variations of 1 and 2 dwell positions (0.5 cm and 1 cm, respectively. 9.3% catheters shown variations ≥ 10 dwell positions (5 cm. The mean ± SD CI common of V100% was 0.75 ± 0.11. The mean observed V max /V min of prescription isodose and TRAK was 1.18 (range, 1.03 to 1.56 and 1.11 (range, 1.03 to 1.35, respectively. Conclusions : Interobserver variability in delineation of target volume was found to be significantly related to CVI. Smaller variability was observed with excellent visualization of LC. Interobserver variations showed dosimetric

  14. Brachytherapy Partial Breast Irradiation: Analyzing Effect of Source Configurations on Dose Metrics Relevant to Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, the use of partial breast irradiation (PBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer with low-risk factors has increased. The volume of the high-dose regions has been correlated with toxicity in interstitial treatment. Although no such associations have been made in applicator-based experience, new applicators are being developed that use complex noncentered source configurations. This work studied the effect of noncentered source placements on the volume of the high-dose regions around a spherical applicator. Methods and Materials: Many applicator configurations were numerically simulated for a range of inflation radii. For each configuration, a dose homogeneity index was used as a dose metric to measure the volume of the high-dose region. Results: All multisource configurations examined resulted in an increase of the high-dose region compared with a single-center source. The resulting decrease in the prescription dose homogeneity index was more pronounced for sources further from the center of the applicator, and the effect was reduced as the number of dwell locations was increased. Conclusion: The geometries of particular applicators were not considered to achieve a more general result. On the basis of the calculations of this work, it would appear that treatment using noncentered dwell locations will lead to an increase in the volume of the high-dose regions

  15. Dosimetric effects of an air cavity for the SAVI partial breast irradiation applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Susan L.; Pino, Ramiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030 and Texas Cancer Clinic, San Antonio, Texas 78240 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effect of the air inside the SAVI partial breast irradiation device. Methods: The authors have investigated how the air inside the SAVI partial breast irradiation device changes the delivered dose from the homogeneously calculated dose. Measurements were made with the device filled with air and water to allow comparison to a homogenous dose calculation done by the treatment planning system. Measurements were made with an ion chamber, TLDs, and film. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the experiment were done using the EGSnrc suite. The MC model was validated by comparing the water-filled calculations to those from a commercial treatment planning system. Results: The magnitude of the dosimetric effect depends on the size of the cavity, the arrangement of sources, and the relative dwell times. For a simple case using only the central catheter of the largest device, MC results indicate that the dose at the prescription point 1 cm away from the air-water boundary is about 9% higher than the homogeneous calculation. Independent measurements in a water phantom with a similar air cavity gave comparable results. MC simulation of a realistic multidwell position plan showed discrepancies of about 5% on average at the prescription point for the largest device. Conclusions: The dosimetric effect of the air cavity is in the range of 3%-9%. Unless a heterogeneous dose calculation algorithm is used, users should be aware of the possibility of small treatment planning dose errors for this device and make modifications to the treatment delivery, if necessary.

  16. A case of fat necrosis with ulceration after breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Yuki; Kijima, Yuko; Hirata, Munetsugu; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Arima, Hideo; Nakajo, Akihiro; Hiraki, Tsubasa; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    An 82 year-old woman was diagnosed with right breast cancer, and partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed in another hospital. Lateral subcutaneous fat was mobilized and used to fill mammary gland defect. Two months after surgery, she received postoperative radiation therapy and endocrine therapy. Two years and six months after surgery, induration of the left breast was marked and skin redness appeared. It then became exposed, and the lesion was diagnosed as fat necrosis and abscess the core needle biopsy. Conservative observation was then conducted. Pain developed and pus exudatation continued from the necrotic tissue. Two years and nine months after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for treatment. Deformity, induration with a fistula, and skin redness were found in the surgically treated and irradiated right breast. The lesion was diagnosed as fat necrosis based on several imaging examinations. Simple mastectomy was performed for pain reduction and to treat the continuous fistula leakage. Since the mass showed firm adhesion with the major pectoral muscle, a part of the muscle was excised. Histology revealed necrotic fat and an abscess with a skin fistula, but not malignancy. The endocrine therapy has been continued, and she has survived without recurrent disease for a year and eight months since surgery. (author)

  17. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  18. Adjuvant radiation therapy versus surgery alone in operable breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, L.E.; Pettersson, D.; Johansson, H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents long-term results from a randomized trial of pre- or postoperative megavoltage radiation therapy versus surgery alone in pre- and postmenopausal women with operable breast cancer. Treatment outcome after relapse among patients who developed loco-regional recurrences was also analyzed. A total of 960 patients were included in the trial. The mean follow-up was 16 years (range: 13-19 years). The radiation therapy was individually planned. It included the chest wall (and the breast in the preoperative cases) and the regional lymph nodes. The tumor dose was 45 Gy/5 weeks. No adjuvant systemic therapy was used. The results showed a significant benefit with radiation therapy in terms of recurrence-free survival during the entire follow-up period. There was also an overall survival difference - corresponding to 16% reduction of deaths - in favour of the irradiated patients which, however, was not statistically significant (p=0.09). Among those 169 patients who developed loco-regional recurrences long-term control was only achieved in about one-third of the cases. This figure was similar among those who had received adjuvant radiation therapy (34%) compared to those initially treated with surgery alone (32%). This implied that the overall proportion of patients who eventually developed uncontrolled local disease was significantly higher among those initially allocated to surgery alone (16%) compared to those allocated to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy (6%, p<0.01). These results suggest that local undertreatment may be deleterious in subgroups of patients. (author) 5 tabs

  19. Long-term outcome of accelerated partial breast irradiation using a multilumen balloon applicator in a patient with existing breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari, Mani; Nitsch, Paige L; Bass, Barbara L; Teh, Bin S

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is now an accepted component of breast-conserving therapy. However, data regarding long-term outcomes of patients treated with multilumen catheter systems who have existing breast implants are limited. We report the treatment and outcome of our patient who had existing bilateral silicone subpectoral implants at the time of presentation. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of the right breast showed infiltrating mucinous carcinoma. Right breast lumpectomy revealed an 8 mm area of infiltrating ductal carcinoma with mucinous features and nuclear grade 1. A 4-5 cm Contura (Bard Biopsy Systems, Tempe, AZ) device was placed, and she was treated over the course of 5 days twice daily to a dose of 34 Gy using a high-dose-rate iridium-192 source. The planning target volume for evaluation was 73.9 cc. The percentage of the planning target volume for evaluation receiving 90%, 95%, and 100% of the prescribed dose was 99.9%, 99.3%, and 97.8%, respectively. The total implant volume was 234.5 cc and received a mean dose of 15.4 Gy and a maximum dose of 72.8 Gy. The percentage of implant volume receiving 50%, 75%, 100%, and 200% of the prescribed dose was 31.1%, 16.5%, 8.6%, 2.0%, and 0%, respectively. Maximum skin dose was 97% of the prescribed dose. With a followup of nearly 5 years, she continues to be cancer free with minimal late toxicities and good to excellent cosmetic outcome. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using a multilumen balloon applicator in patients with existing breast implants can safely be performed with excellent long-term cosmetic outcome. Further studies are needed to establish the absolute dosimetric tolerance of breast implants. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Partial radiative capture of resonance neutrons; Capture radiative partielle des neutrons de resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samour, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The radiative capture of resonance neutrons has been studied near the Saclay linac between 0.5 and 700 eV with time-of-flight method and a Ge(Li) detector. {sup 195}Pt + n and {sup 183}W + n allow the study of the distribution of partial radiative widths and their eventual correlation and also the variation of < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > with E{sub {gamma}}. The mean values of Ml and El transition intensities are compared in several tin isotopes. Interference effects, either between resonances or between direct capture and resonant capture are found in {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n and {sup 59}Co + n. The excited level schemes of a great deal of nuclei are obtained and compared with theoretical predictions. This study has been completed by an analysis of thermal spectrum. (author) [French] La capture radiative des neutrons de resonance a ete etudiee pres de l'accelerateur lineaire de Saclay entre 0,5 et 700 eV a l'aide de la methode du temps-de-vol et d'un detecteur Ge(Li). Les noyaux {sup 195}Pt + n et {sup 183}W + n permettent l'analyse de la distribution de resonance en resonance des largeurs radiatives partielles {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} et de leur eventuelle correlation, ainsi que l'etude de la variation de < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > en fonction de E{sub {gamma}}. Les intensites moyennes des transitions Ml et El sont comparees pour quelques isotopes de l'etain. Des effets d'interference, soit entre resonances, soit entre capture directe et capture resonnante sont mis en evidence dans {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n et {sup 59}Co + n. Enfin les schemas des etats excites d'un grand nombre de noyaux sont obtenus et compares avec les predictions theoriques. Cette etude a ete completee par une analyse des spectres thermiques. (auteur)

  1. Partial radiative capture of resonance neutrons; Capture radiative partielle des neutrons de resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samour, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The radiative capture of resonance neutrons has been studied near the Saclay linac between 0.5 and 700 eV with time-of-flight method and a Ge(Li) detector. {sup 195}Pt + n and {sup 183}W + n allow the study of the distribution of partial radiative widths and their eventual correlation and also the variation of < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > with E{sub {gamma}}. The mean values of Ml and El transition intensities are compared in several tin isotopes. Interference effects, either between resonances or between direct capture and resonant capture are found in {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n and {sup 59}Co + n. The excited level schemes of a great deal of nuclei are obtained and compared with theoretical predictions. This study has been completed by an analysis of thermal spectrum. (author) [French] La capture radiative des neutrons de resonance a ete etudiee pres de l'accelerateur lineaire de Saclay entre 0,5 et 700 eV a l'aide de la methode du temps-de-vol et d'un detecteur Ge(Li). Les noyaux {sup 195}Pt + n et {sup 183}W + n permettent l'analyse de la distribution de resonance en resonance des largeurs radiatives partielles {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} et de leur eventuelle correlation, ainsi que l'etude de la variation de < {gamma}{sub {gamma}{sub i}} > en fonction de E{sub {gamma}}. Les intensites moyennes des transitions Ml et El sont comparees pour quelques isotopes de l'etain. Des effets d'interference, soit entre resonances, soit entre capture directe et capture resonnante sont mis en evidence dans {sup 195}Pt + n, {sup 197}Au + n et {sup 59}Co + n. Enfin les schemas des etats excites d'un grand nombre de noyaux sont obtenus et compares avec les predictions theoriques. Cette etude a ete completee par une analyse des spectres thermiques. (auteur)

  2. Radiation therapy for metastatic lesions from breast cancer. Breast cancer metastasis to bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes radiation therapy in the treatment of bone metastases from breast cancer. Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 70% of breast cancer patients, and the goals of radiation therapy for bone metastasis are: palliation of pain, prevention and treatment of neuropathic symptoms, and prevention of pathologic fractures. The prognosis of bone metastasis from breast cancer is known to be better than that of bone metastasis from other solid tumors. Local-field radiation, hemibody (or wide-field) radiation, and systemic radionuclide treatment are the major methods of radiation therapy for pain palliation. Although many studies have shown that breast cancer is more responsive to radiation therapy for pain palliation than other solid tumors, some studies found no significant difference. Local-field radiation therapy, which includes multi-fraction irradiation and single-fraction irradiation, is currently the most generally used method of radiotherapy for pain palliation. Pain palliation has been reported to be achieved in approximately 80% to 90% of patients treated with local-field external beam irradiation. Three types of multi-fraction irradiation therapy are administered depending on the prognosis: high-dose fraction irradiation (36-50 Gy/12-25 Fr/2.4-5 wk), short-course irradiation (20-30 Gy/10-15 Fr/2-3 wk), and ultra-short-course irradiation (15-25 Gy/2-5 Fr/1 wk). The most common irradiation schedule is 30 Gy/10 Fr/2 wk. Although many reports indicate no significant difference in pain palliation according to the dose, the percentage of patients who show a complete cure is significantly higher in those treated with doses of 30 Gy or more, and thus the total irradiation dose should be at least 30 Gy. High-dose fraction irradiation is indicated for patients with an expected survival time of 6 months or more while short-course or single-fraction irradiation is indicated for those with an expected survival time of 3 months or more. Single

  3. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leij, F. van der; Elkhuizen, P.H.M.; Janssen, T.M.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Sangen, M. van der; Scholten, A.N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van; Boersma, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of

  4. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT : Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Min; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jung-In; Park, So-Yeon; Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Choi, Noorie; Kim, Jin Ho; Wu, Hong-Gyun

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm 2 , respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field.

  5. Breast cancer induced by radiation. Relation to mammography and treatment of acne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.

    1977-01-01

    A report is given of cases of 16 women in whom cancer of the breast developed after radiation therapy for acne or hirsutism, suggesting another group at higher risk than is generally expected for cancer of the breast. It is prudent to regard the carcinogenic effect of radiation on the breast as proportional to dose without a threshold. Mammography in young women should be ordered only selectively, not for screening

  6. Does partial expander deflation exacerbate the adverse effects of radiotherapy in two-stage breast reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celet Ozden, Burcu; Guven, Erdem; Aslay, Isik; Kemikler, Gonul; Olgac, Vakur; Soluk Tekkesin, Merva; Serarslan, Bengul; Tumerdem Ulug, Burcak; Bilgin Karabulut, Aylin; Arinci, Atilla; Emekli, Ufuk

    2012-02-20

    The optimum protocol for expander volume adjustment with respect to the timing and application of radiotherapy remains controversial. Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. Metallic port integrated anatomic breast expanders of 250 cc were implanted on the back of each animal and controlled expansion was performed. Group I underwent radiotherapy with full expanders while in Group II, expanders were partially deflated immediately prior to radiotherapy. Control group did not receive radiotherapy.The changes in blood flow at different volume adjustments were investigated in Group II by laser Doppler flowmetry. Variations in the histopathologic properties of the irradiated tissues including the skin, capsule and the pocket floor, were compared in the biopsy specimens taken from different locations in each group. A significant increase in skin blood flow was detected in Group II with partial expander deflation. Overall, histopathologic exam revealed aggravated findings of chronic radiodermatitis (epidermal atrophy, dermal inflammation and fibrosis, neovascularisation and vascular changes as well as increased capsule thickness) especially around the lower expander pole, in Group II. Expander deflation immediately prior to radiotherapy, may augment the adverse effects, especially in the lower expander pole, possibly via enhanced radiosensitization due to a relative increase in the blood flow and tissue oxygenation.

  7. Does partial expander deflation exacerbate the adverse effects of radiotherapy in two-stage breast reconstruction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celet Ozden Burcu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimum protocol for expander volume adjustment with respect to the timing and application of radiotherapy remains controversial. Methods Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. Metallic port integrated anatomic breast expanders of 250 cc were implanted on the back of each animal and controlled expansion was performed. Group I underwent radiotherapy with full expanders while in Group II, expanders were partially deflated immediately prior to radiotherapy. Control group did not receive radiotherapy. The changes in blood flow at different volume adjustments were investigated in Group II by laser Doppler flowmetry. Variations in the histopathologic properties of the irradiated tissues including the skin, capsule and the pocket floor, were compared in the biopsy specimens taken from different locations in each group. Results A significant increase in skin blood flow was detected in Group II with partial expander deflation. Overall, histopathologic exam revealed aggravated findings of chronic radiodermatitis (epidermal atrophy, dermal inflammation and fibrosis, neovascularisation and vascular changes as well as increased capsule thickness especially around the lower expander pole, in Group II. Conclusions Expander deflation immediately prior to radiotherapy, may augment the adverse effects, especially in the lower expander pole, possibly via enhanced radiosensitization due to a relative increase in the blood flow and tissue oxygenation.

  8. Dosimetric validation of planning system Eclipse 10 in partial breast irradiation treatments with IMRT; Validacion dosimetrica del sistema de planeacion Eclipse 10 en tratamientos de irradiacion parcial de mama con IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez T, J. J.; Gutierrez M, J. G.; Ortiz A, C. S.; Chagoya G, A.; Gutierrez C, J. G., E-mail: jvelaesfm@gmail.com [Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Hospital de Oncologia, Departamentos de Fisica Medica y Radioterapia, Av. Cuauhtemoc 330, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Partial breast irradiation is a new type of external radiation therapy to treat breast cancer in early clinical stages. Consist of administering to the channel surgical high doses of radiation in few treatment sessions. In this paper the dose calculations of the planning system Eclipse version 10 for a treatment of partial breast irradiation with X-rays beams (6 MV) intensity modulated were compared against the measurements made with OSL dosimeters and radio-chromic dye film. An anthropomorphic mannequin was used in which OSL dosimeters were collocated near the surface, an inside the radio-chromic dye film one plate; with this latest one dimensional dose distribution was measured. Previously dosimeters were calibrated irradiating them with a beam of X-rays 6 MV under the conditions specified in the IAEA-398 protocol. The OSL dosimeters were read in the Micro star Landauer equipment, the radio-chromic dye films were read with a scanner Epson 10000-Xl and analyzed with FilmCal and PTW Verisoft programs. The differences between measured and calculated dose were as follows: 3.6±1% for the OSL dosimeter and 96.3±1% of the analyzed points approved the gamma index criterion (3%, 3m m) when comparing the matrices of calculated dose and measured with the radio-chromic dye film. These results confirm the good dosimetric performance of planning system used under specific conditions used in the partial breast irradiation technique. (Author)

  9. Fat Necrosis After Partial-Breast Irradiation With Brachytherapy or Electron Irradiation Versus Standard Whole-Breast Radiotherapy-4-Year Results of a Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevey, Katalin; Fodor, Janos; Major, Tibor; Szabo, Eva; Orosz, Zsolt; Sulyok, Zoltan; Janvary, Levente; Froehlich, Georgina; Kasler, Miklos; Polgar, Csaba

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the incidence and clinical relevance of fat necrosis after accelerated partial-breast irradiation (PBI) using interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in comparison with partial-breast electron irradiation (ELE) and whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 early-stage breast cancer patients were randomized to receive 50 Gy WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 x 5.2 Gy HDR-BT (n = 88) or 50 Gy ELE (n = 40). The incidence of fat necrosis, its impact on cosmetic outcome, accompanying radiologic features, and clinical symptoms were evaluated. Results: The 4-year actuarial rate of fat necrosis was 31.1% for all patients, and 31.9%, 36.5%, and 17.7% after WBI, HDR-BT and ELE, respectively (p WBI/HDR-BT = 0.26; p WBI/ELE = 0.11; p ELE/HDR-BT = 0.025). The respective rate of asymptomatic fat necrosis was 20.2%, 25.3%, and 10% of patients. The incidence of symptomatic fat necrosis was not significantly different after WBI (8.5%), HDR-BT (11.4%), and ELE (7.5%). Symptomatic fat necrosis was significantly associated with a worse cosmetic outcome, whereas asymptomatic fat necrosis was not. Fat necrosis was detectable with mammography and/or ultrasound in each case. Additional imaging examinations were required in 21% of cases and aspiration cytology in 42%. Conclusions: Asymptomatic fat necrosis is a common adverse event of breast-conserving therapy, having no significant clinical relevance in the majority of the cases. The incidence of both symptomatic and asymptomatic fat necrosis is similar after conventional WBI and accelerated partial-breast HDR-BT

  10. Radiation therapy for metastatic lesions from breast cancer. Breast cancer metastasis to bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Shinya; Hoshi, Hiroaki [Gifu Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    This paper summarizes radiation therapy in the treatment of bone metastases from breast cancer. Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 70% of breast cancer patients, and the goals of radiation therapy for bone metastasis are: palliation of pain, prevention and treatment of neuropathic symptoms, and prevention of pathologic fractures. The prognosis of bone metastasis from breast cancer is known to be better than that of bone metastasis from other solid tumors. Local-field radiation, hemibody (or wide-field) radiation, and systemic radionuclide treatment are the major methods of radiation therapy for pain palliation. Although many studies have shown that breast cancer is more responsive to radiation therapy for pain palliation than other solid tumors, some studies found no significant difference. Local-field radiation therapy, which includes multi-fraction irradiation and single-fraction irradiation, is currently the most generally used method of radiotherapy for pain palliation. Pain palliation has been reported to be achieved in approximately 80% to 90% of patients treated with local-field external beam irradiation. Three types of multi-fraction irradiation therapy are administered depending on the prognosis: high-dose fraction irradiation (36-50 Gy/12-25 Fr/2.4-5 wk), short-course irradiation (20-30 Gy/10-15 Fr/2-3 wk), and ultra-short-course irradiation (15-25 Gy/2-5 Fr/1 wk). The most common irradiation schedule is 30 Gy/10 Fr/2 wk. Although many reports indicate no significant difference in pain palliation according to the dose, the percentage of patients who show a complete cure is significantly higher in those treated with doses of 30 Gy or more, and thus the total irradiation dose should be at least 30 Gy. High-dose fraction irradiation is indicated for patients with an expected survival time of 6 months or more while short-course or single-fraction irradiation is indicated for those with an expected survival time of 3 months or more. Single

  11. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50–60 Gy in 25–30 fractions within 5–6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a∗ (reddish) and reduction in L∗ (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6–12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b∗ values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b∗ values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  12. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae

    1994-01-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author)

  13. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-10-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author).

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation and partial hepatectomy on messenger RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Halim, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Newly synthesized messenger RNA, as measured by a 40 min uptake of the radioactive precursor (6- 14 C) orotic acid, was studied in the regenerating livers of non-irradiated and gamma-irradiated (1800 rad) adrenal-intact and adrenalectomized rats 24 and 48 hours after partial hepatectomy. Two groups of rats, one with and one without adrenal glands were each divided into four subgroups: (1) control rats, (2) irradiated rats, (3) partially hepatectomized rats and (4) irradiated, partially hepatectomized rats. The radioactive profile of polyribosome formation and distribution was determined by sucrose density gradient centrifugation (10 to 40 per cent). The result of this study indicates that ionizing radiation decreases the synthesis of newly formed messenger RNA in regenerating livers of adrenal-intact rats. However, adrenalectomy largely abolished that inhibition. These data suggest that the decrease in messenger RNA synthesis may be explained by the disturbance of adrenal hormones induced by partial hepatectomy and ionizing radiation. (author)

  15. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Anbiaei, Robabeh; Zamani, Hanie; Fallahi, Babak; Beiki, Davood; Ameri, Ahmad; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Seid Ratki, Kazem Razavi; Roknabadi, Alireza Momen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right-sided cancer. To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring) were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions) over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol) was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed) and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls)] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46). In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03) and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049) walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS) of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%), while in five of the controls (13.9%),(Odds ratio=1.3). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. The risk of radiation induced myocardial perfusion abnormality in patients treated with CRT on the

  16. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eftekhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46. In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03 and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049 walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%, while in five of the controls (13.9%,(Odds ratio=1.3. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial

  17. Radiation Gene-expression Signatures in Primary Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, Luigi; Bravatà, Valentina; Cammarata, Francesco P; Russo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Maria C; Forte, Giusi I

    2018-05-01

    In breast cancer (BC) care, radiation therapy (RT) is an efficient treatment to control localized tumor. Radiobiological research is needed to understand molecular differences that affect radiosensitivity of different tumor subtypes and the response variability. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression profiling (GEP) in primary BC cells following irradiation with doses of 9 Gy and 23 Gy delivered by intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in order to define gene signatures of response to high doses of ionizing radiation. We performed GEP by cDNA microarrays and evaluated cell survival after IOERT treatment in primary BC cell cultures. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to validate candidate genes. We showed, for the first time, a 4-gene and a 6-gene signature, as new molecular biomarkers, in two primary BC cell cultures after exposure at 9 Gy and 23 Gy respectively, for which we observed a significantly high survival rate. Gene signatures activated by different doses of ionizing radiation may predict response to RT and contribute to defining a personalized biological-driven treatment plan. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. An analysis of the incidence and related factors for radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Heui Kwan

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the incidence and related factors of radiation dermatitis; at first, to recognize whether a decrease in radiation dermatitis is possible or not in breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy. Of 338 patients, 284 with invasive breast cancer who received breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy at Chonbuk National University Hospital from January 2007 to June 2009 were evaluated. Patients who also underwent bolus, previous contralateral breast irradiation and irradiation on both breasts were excluded. For patients who appeared to have greater than moderate radiation dermatitis, the incidence and relating factors for radiation dermatitis were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 207 and 77 patients appeared to have RTOG grade 0/1 or above RTOG grade 2 radiation dermatitis, respectively. The factors found to be statistically significant for the 77 patients who appeared to have greater than moderate radiation dermatitis include the presence of lymphocele due to the stasis of lymph and lymph edema which affect the healing disturbance of radiation dermatitis (p=0.003, p=0.001). Moreover, an allergic reaction to plaster due to the immune cells of skin and the activation of cytokine and concomitant hormonal therapy were also statistically significant factors (p=0.001, p=0.025). Most of the breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy appeared to have a greater than mild case of radiation dermatitis. Lymphocele, lymphedema, an allergy to plaster and concomitant hormonal therapy which affect radiation dermatitis were found to be significant factors. Consequently, we should eliminate lymphocele prior to radiation treatment for patients who appear to have an allergic reaction to plaster. We should also instruct patients of methods to maintain skin moisture if they appear to have a greater than moderate case of radiation dermatitis.

  19. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation with interstitial implants. Analysis of factors affecting cosmetic outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Lotter, Michael; Fietkau, Rainer; Strnad, Vratislav

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors for their impact on cosmetic outcome (CO) after interstitial multicatheter accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Patients and Methods: Between April 2001 and January 2005, 171 patients with early breast cancer were recruited in Erlangen for this subanalysis of the German-Austrian APBI phase II-trial. 58% (99/171) of the patients received pulsed-dose-rate (PDR), and 42% (72/171) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Prescribed reference dose for HDR brachytherapy was 32 Gy in eight fractions of 4 Gy, twice daily. Prescribed reference dose in PDR brachytherapy was 49.8 Gy in 83 consecutive fractions of 0.6 Gy each hour. Total treatment time was 3-4 days. Endpoint of this evaluation was the CO, graded as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Patients were divided in two groups with an excellent (n = 102) or nonexcellent (n = 69) cosmetic result. Various factors were analyzed for their impact on excellent CO. Results: The median follow-up time was 52 months (range: 21-91 months). Cosmetic results were rated as excellent in 59.6% (102/171), good in 29.8% (51/171), fair in 9.9% (17/171), and poor in 0.6% (1/171). The initial cosmetic status was significantly worse for the nonexcellent CO group (p = 0.000). The percentage of patients who received PDR brachytherapy APBI was higher in the nonexcellent CO group (68.1% vs. 51%; p = 0.026). Acute toxicity was higher in the nonexcellent CO group (24.6% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.045). Furthermore, the presence of any late toxicity was found to be associated with a worse cosmetic result (65.2% vs. 18.6%; p = 0.000). In detail, the appearance of skin hyperpigmentation (p 0.034), breast tissue fibrosis (p = 0.000), and telangiectasia (p = 0.000) had a negative impact on CO. Conclusion: The initial, surgery-associated cosmetic status, brachytherapy modality, and the presence of acute and late toxicities were found to have an impact on overall CO. Our data have proven that

  20. SU-F-J-130: Margin Determination for Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geady, C [Ryerson University (Canada); Keller, B; Hahn, E; Vesprini, D; Soliman, H; Lee, J [University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ruschin, M; McCann, C [University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Makhani, N; Bosnic, S [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the Planning Target Volume (PTV) margin for Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation (HPBI) using the van Herk formalism (M=2.5∑+0.7σ). HPBI is a novel technique intended to provide local control in breast cancer patients not eligible for surgical resection, using 40 Gy in 5 fractions prescribed to the gross disease. Methods: Setup uncertainties were quantified through retrospective analysis of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) data sets, collected prior to (prefraction) and after (postfraction) treatment delivery. During simulation and treatment, patients were immobilized using a wing board and an evacuated bag. Prefraction CBCT was rigidly registered to planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) using the chest wall and tumor, and translational couch shifts were applied as needed. This clinical workflow was faithfully reproduced in Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems) to yield residual setup and intrafractional error through translational shifts and rigid registrations (ribs and sternum) of prefraction CBCT to 4DCT and postfraction CBCT to prefraction CBCT, respectively. All ten patients included in this investigation were medically inoperable; the median age was 84 (range, 52–100) years. Results: Systematic (and random) setup uncertainties (in mm) detected for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 0.4 (1.5), 0.8 (1.8) and 0.4 (1.0); net uncertainty was determined to be 0.7 (1.5). Rotations >2° in any axis occurred on 8/72 (11.1%) registrations. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest a non-uniform setup margin (in mm) of 2.2, 3.3 and 1.7 for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions is required for HPBI, given its immobilization techniques and online setup verification protocol. This investigation is ongoing, though published results from similar studies are consistent with the above findings. Determination of margins in breast radiotherapy is a paradigm shift, but a necessary

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of whole-breast radiation therapy: Clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest; Darko, Johnson; Fleck, Andre; White, Jana; Kiciak, Alexander; Redekop, Rachel; Gopaul, Darin

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the intact breast is the standard therapy for preventing local recurrence of early-stage breast cancer following breast conservation surgery. To improve patient standard of care, there is a need to define a consistent and transparent treatment path for all patients that reduces significance variations in the acceptability of treatment plans. There is lack of consistency among institutions or individuals about what is considered an acceptable treatment plan: target coverage vis-à-vis dose to organs at risk (OAR). Clinical trials usually resolve these issues, as the criteria for an acceptable plan within the trial (target coverage and doses to OAR) are well defined. We developed an institutional criterion for accepting breast treatment plans in 2006 after analyzing treatment data of approximately 200 patients. The purpose of this article is to report on the dosimetric review of 623 patients treated in the last 18 months to evaluate the effectiveness of the previously developed plan acceptability criteria and any possible changes necessary to further improve patient care. The mean patient age is 61.6 years (range: 25.2 to 93.0 years). The mean breast separation for all the patients is 21.0 cm (range: 12.4 to 34.9 cm), and the mean planning target volume (PTV-eval) (breast volume for evaluation) is 884.0 cm"3 (range: 73.6 to 3684.6 cm"3). Overall, 314 (50.4%) patients had the disease in the left breast and 309 (49.6%) had it in the right breast. A total of 147 (23.6%) patients were treated using the deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 92% (V_9_2_% _P_D) and 95% (V_9_5_% _P_D) of the prescribed dose (PD) are more than 99% and 97%, respectively, for all patients. The mean normalized PTV-eval receiving at least 105% (V_1_0_5_% _P_D) of the PD is less than 1% for all groups. The mean homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), and conformity index (CI) for the PTV-eval are 0.09 (range: 0

  2. Post-radiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma following treatment of breast cancer: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jun Won; Lee, Won Ae; Kim, You Me [Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Post-radiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of post-radiation MFH that presented a rapidly growing mass in a 52-year-old woman who underwent breast-conserving therapy and adjuvant whole breast irradiation 6 years ago. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of primary MFH of the female breast have been reported with sonographic findings. We analyzed the sonographic and MRI findings with correlative histopathologic features, and then confirmed with surgical excision.

  3. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Smith, Grace L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  4. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L., E-mail: glsmith@mdanderson.org [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  5. Prone versus supine positioning for whole and partial-breast radiotherapy: A comparison of non-target tissue dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna M.; Evans, Philip M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Convery, Helen M.; Haviland, Joanna S.; Yarnold, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare non-target tissue (including left-anterior-descending coronary-artery (LAD)) dosimetry of prone versus supine whole (WBI) and partial-breast irradiation (PBI). Methods and materials: Sixty-five post-lumpectomy breast cancer patients underwent CT-imaging supine and prone. On each dataset, the whole-breast clinical-target-volume (WB-CTV), partial-breast CTV (tumour-bed + 15 mm), ipsilateral-lung and chest-wall were outlined. Heart and LAD were outlined in left-sided cases (n = 30). Tangential-field WBI and PBI plans were generated for each position. Mean LAD, heart, and ipsilateral-lung doses (x mean ), maximum LAD (LAD max ) doses, and the volume of chest-wall receiving 50 Gy (V 50Gy ) were compared. Results: Two-hundred and sixty plans were generated. Prone positioning reduced heart and LAD doses in 19/30 WBI cases (median reduction in LAD mean = 6.2 Gy) and 7/30 PBI cases (median reduction in LAD max = 29.3 Gy) (no difference in 4/30 cases). However, prone positioning increased cardiac doses in 8/30 WBI (median increase in LAD mean = 9.5 Gy) and 19/30 PBI cases (median increase in LAD max = 22.9 Gy) (no difference in 3/30 cases). WB-CTV > 1000cm 3 was associated with improved cardiac dosimetry in the prone position for WBI (p = 0.04) and PBI (p = 0.04). Prone positioning reduced ipsilateral-lung mean in 65/65 WBI and 61/65 PBI cases, and chest-wall V 50Gy in all WBI cases. PBI reduced normal-tissue doses compared to WBI in all cases, regardless of the treatment position. Conclusions: In the context of tangential-field WBI and PBI, prone positioning is likely to benefit left-breast-affected women of larger breast volume, but to be detrimental in left-breast-affected women of smaller breast volume. Right-breast-affected women are likely to benefit from prone positioning regardless of breast volume.

  6. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique compared to whole breast irradiation for patients aged 70 years or older: subgroup analysis from a randomized phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meattini, Icro; Saieva, Calogero; Marrazzo, Livia; Di Brina, Lucia; Pallotta, Stefania; Mangoni, Monica; Meacci, Fiammetta; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Francolini, Giulio; Desideri, Isacco; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Scotti, Vieri; Furfaro, Ilaria Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Greto, Daniela; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Casella, Donato; Bernini, Marco; Sanchez, Luis; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Simoncini, Roberta; Nori, Jacopo; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the efficacy and the safety profile on the subset of selected early breast cancer (BC) patients aged 70 years or older from a single-center phase 3 trial comparing whole breast irradiation (WBI) to accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique. Between 2005 and 2013, 520 patients aged more than 40 years old were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either WBI or APBI in a 1:1 ratio. Eligible patients were women with early BC (maximum diameter 2.5 cm) suitable for breast conserving surgery. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02104895. A total of 117 patients aged 70 years or more were analyzed (58 in the WBI arm, 59 in the APBI arm). At a median follow-up of 5-years (range 3.4-7.0), the ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rate was 1.9 % in both groups. No significant difference between the two groups was identified (log-rank test p = 0.96). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates in the WBI group and APBI group were 6.1 and 1.9 %, respectively (p = 0.33). The APBI group presented significantly better results in terms of acute skin toxicity, considering both any grade (p = 0.0001) and grade 2 or higher (p = 0.0001). Our subgroup analyses showed a very low rate and no significant difference in terms of IBTR, using both WBI and APBI. A significant impact on patients compliance in terms of acute and early late toxicity was shown, which could translate in a consistent improvement of overall quality of life.

  7. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Increased Detection of Lymphatic Vessel Invasion by D2-40 (Podoplanin) in Early Breast Cancer: Possible Influence on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debald, Manuel; Poelcher, Martin; Flucke, Uta; Walgenbach-Bruenagel, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Several international trials are currently investigating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer. According to existing guidelines, patients with lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) do not qualify for APBI. D2-40 (podoplanin) significantly increases the frequency of LVI detection compared with conventional hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining in early-stage breast cancer. Our purpose was to retrospectively assess the hypothetical change in management from APBI to whole breast radiotherapy with the application of D2-40. Patients and Methods: Immunostaining with D2-40 was performed on 254 invasive breast tumors of 247 patients. The following criteria were used to determine the eligibility for APBI: invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of ≤3 cm, negative axillary node status (N0), and unifocal disease. Of the 247 patients, 74 with available information concerning LVI, as detected by D2-40 immunostaining and routine HE staining, formed our study population. Results: Using D2-40, our results demonstrated a significantly greater detection rate (p = .031) of LVI compared with routine HE staining. LVI was correctly identified by D2-40 (D2-40-positive LVI) in 10 (13.5%) of 74 tumors. On routine HE staining, 4 tumors (5.4%) were classified as HE-positive LVI. Doublestaining of these specimens with D2-40 unmasked false-positive LVI status in 2 (50%) of the 4 tumors. According to the current recommendations for APBI, immunostaining with D2-40 would have changed the clinical management from APBI to whole breast radiotherapy in 8 (10.8%) of 74 patients and from whole breast radiotherapy to APBI in 2 patients (2.7%). Conclusion: These data support the implementation of D2-40 immunostaining in the routine workup to determine a patient's eligibility for APBI.

  9. Alcohol intake and cigarette smoking and risk of a contralateral breast cancer: The Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knight, J.A.; Bernstein, L.; Largent, J.

    2009-01-01

    Women with primary breast cancer are at increased risk of developing second primary breast cancer. Few studies have evaluated risk factors for the development of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer in women with breast cancer. In the Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology St...

  10. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-12-01

    A survey of past case reports concerning radiation-induced breast cancer was carried out in order to find the lowest irradiation dose. The search of literature published since 1951 revealed 10 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer. Only 5 cases had precise descriptions of the irradiation dose. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 1470 rads in the case of external X-ray irradiation for tuberous angioma. All of cases of radiation-induced breast cancer had received radiation for the treatment of nonmalignant tumors, such as pulmonary tuberculosis, mastitis, and tuberous angioma. There also were three statistical studies. The first concerned atomic bomb survivors, the second, pulmoanry tuberculous patients subjected to frequent fluoroscopies, and the third, patients of acute post partum mastitis. These statistical studies had revealed a significant increase in the incidence of breast cancer in the irradiated group, but there was little information about the lowest irradiation dose. It was noticed that radiation-induced breast cancer was more numerous in the upper inner quadrant of the breast. Most histopathological findings of radiation-induced breast cancer involved duct cell carcinoma. The latent period was about 15 years.

  11. Are the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guidelines Accurate Predictors of Recurrence in Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Balloon-Based Brachytherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira K. Christoudias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO consensus statement (CS provides guidelines for patient selection for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI following breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recurrence rates based on ASTRO CS groupings. A single institution review of 238 early stage breast cancer patients treated with balloon-based APBI via balloon based brachytherapy demonstrated a 4-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR rate of 5.1%. There were no significant differences in the 4-year actuarial IBTR rates between the “suitable,” “cautionary,” and “unsuitable” ASTRO categories (0%, 7.2%, and 4.3%, resp., P=0.28. ER negative tumors had higher rates of IBTR than ER positive tumors. The ASTRO groupings are poor predictors of patient outcomes. Further studies evaluating individual clinicopathologic features are needed to determine the safety of APBI in higher risk patients.

  12. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  13. Clinical Outcomes Using Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Shaitelman, Simona; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Cancer Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We compared clinical outcomes of women diagnosed with either invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with ILC received APBI as part of their breast-conservation therapy (BCT) and were compared with 410 patients with IDC that received APBI as part of their BCT. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment related variables were analyzed including age, tumor size, hormone receptor status, surgical margins, lymph node status, adjuvant hormonal therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and APBI modality. Clinical outcomes including local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 3.8 years for the ILC patients and 6.0 years for the IDC patients. ILC patients were more likely to have positive margins (20.0% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.006), larger tumors (14.1 mm vs. 10.9 mm, p = 0.03) and less likely to be node positive (0% vs. 9.5%, p < 0.001) when compared with patients diagnosed with IDC. The 5-year rate of LR was 0% for the ILC cohort and 2.5% for the IDC cohort (p = 0.59). No differences were seen in the rates of RR (0% vs. 0.7%, p = 0.80), distant metastases (0% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.54), DFS (100% vs. 94%, p = 0.43), CSS (100% vs. 97%, p = 0.59), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.88) between the ILC and IDC patients, respectively. Additionally, when node-positive patients were excluded from the IDC cohort, no differences in the rates of LR (0% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.62), RR (0% vs. 0%), DFS (100% vs. 95%, p = 0.46), CSS (100% vs. 98%, p = 0.63), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.91) were noted between the ILC and IDC patients. Conclusion: Women with ILC had excellent clinical outcomes after APBI. No difference in local control was seen between patients with invasive lobular versus invasive ductal histology.

  14. Clinical Outcomes Using Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, J. Ben; Shaitelman, Simona; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Vicini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We compared clinical outcomes of women diagnosed with either invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with ILC received APBI as part of their breast-conservation therapy (BCT) and were compared with 410 patients with IDC that received APBI as part of their BCT. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment related variables were analyzed including age, tumor size, hormone receptor status, surgical margins, lymph node status, adjuvant hormonal therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, and APBI modality. Clinical outcomes including local recurrence (LR), regional recurrence (RR), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 3.8 years for the ILC patients and 6.0 years for the IDC patients. ILC patients were more likely to have positive margins (20.0% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.006), larger tumors (14.1 mm vs. 10.9 mm, p = 0.03) and less likely to be node positive (0% vs. 9.5%, p < 0.001) when compared with patients diagnosed with IDC. The 5-year rate of LR was 0% for the ILC cohort and 2.5% for the IDC cohort (p = 0.59). No differences were seen in the rates of RR (0% vs. 0.7%, p = 0.80), distant metastases (0% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.54), DFS (100% vs. 94%, p = 0.43), CSS (100% vs. 97%, p = 0.59), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.88) between the ILC and IDC patients, respectively. Additionally, when node-positive patients were excluded from the IDC cohort, no differences in the rates of LR (0% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.62), RR (0% vs. 0%), DFS (100% vs. 95%, p = 0.46), CSS (100% vs. 98%, p = 0.63), or OS (92% vs. 89%, p = 0.91) were noted between the ILC and IDC patients. Conclusion: Women with ILC had excellent clinical outcomes after APBI. No difference in local control was seen between patients with invasive lobular versus invasive ductal histology.

  15. A prospective study of quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canhua Xiao, PhD, RN

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Radiation therapy did not worsen QOL in breast cancer patients. However, pre-radiation therapy patient characteristics including BMI and perceived stress may be used to identify women who may experience decreased physical and mental function during and up to 1 year after radiation therapy.

  16. COMPARISON OF HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIATION THERAPY VERSUS CONVENTIONAL RADIATION THERAPY IN POST MASTECTOMY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death in females and accounts for 1.8 million new cases and approximately 0.5 million deaths annually. Patients who present with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC require multidisciplinary team approach that incorporates diagnostic imaging, surgery, chemotherapy and histopathological assessment, including molecular-based studies, radiation, and, if indicated, biologic and hormonal therapies. Hypofractionated radiation therapy following mastectomy has been used in many institutions for several decades and have demonstrated equivalent local control, cosmetic and normal tissues between 50 Gy in 25 fractions and various hypofractionated radiotherapy prescriptions employing 13-16 fractions. Evidence suggests that hypofractionated radiotherapy may also be safe and effective for regional nodal disease. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To compare the local control and side effects of hypofractionated radiation therapy with conventional radiation therapy in post mastectomy carcinoma breast with stage II and III and to compare the tolerability and compliance of both schedules. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted on 60 histopathologically proven patients of carcinoma of breast, treated surgically with modified radical mastectomy. Group I patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 39 Gy/13 fractions/3.1 weeks, a daily dose 3 Gy for 13 fractions in 4 days a week schedule and Group II patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks, to receive a daily dose 2 Gy for 25 fractions in a 5 days a week schedule. RESULTS The median age at presentation in Group I and II was 48 and 50 years respectively. Locoregional control after completion of radiotherapy in Group I vs. Group II was 26/30 (86.7% vs. 27/30 (90% respectively. Acute reactions and their grades in Group

  17. Efficacy of single-stage breast-conserving treatment using multicatheter partial breast brachytherapy evaluated by GEC-ESTRO phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhiko; Fuchikami, Hiromi; Kato, Masahiro; Shimo, Takahiro; Kubota, Jun; Takeda, Naoko; Inoue, Yuko; Seto, Hiroshi; Okawa, Tomohiko

    2017-10-01

    The GEC-ESTRO has reported the equivalent outcomes of partial breast irradiation (PBI) using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MCB) to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). We performed single-stage BCT with partial breast brachytherapy by intraoperative catheter placement. After the categorization of patients into inclusion and exclusion criteria on this trial, our databases were evaluated in order to translate it to Japanese patients. Patients undergoing BCT were retrospectively examined between November 2007 and December 2015. The technique is an open-cavity implant with a dose of 32 Gy in 8 fractions. The 4-year clinical outcomes of MCB-PBI were evaluated in the 2 distinct categories, and the comparison of the outcomes of MCB-PBI with WBI was performed in patients with unfavorable features. Of a total of 501 lesions undergoing BCT, 301 lesions were treated with MCB-PBI and 200 lesions with WBI. At the median follow-up time of 52 months, the 4-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR)-free, disease-free (DFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with MCB-PBI and WBI were 98.9% vs. 98.0% ( p = 0.56), 97.0% vs. 95.3% ( p = 0.78), and 99.6% vs. 98.2% ( p = 0.38), respectively. Although in exclusion cohort treated with MCB-PBI, IBTR-free, and disease-free survival were significantly worse than in inclusion cohort, non-significantly worse outcomes was demonstrated than in exclusion cohort with WBI; IBTR-free survival (95.0% vs. 97.2%, p = 0.24), and disease-free survival (95.0% vs. 95.8%, p = 0.31). Single-stage BCT using MCB-PBI offered similar tumor control rates compering to WBI. However, further research is needed to define the benefit for patients with an exclusion criteria.

  18. Radiation-associated breast tumors display a distinct gene expression profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; van de Vijver, Marc; de Bruin, Marie L.; Stovall, Marilyn; Russell, Nicola S.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; van 't Veer, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Women who received irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma have a strong increased risk for developing breast cancer. Approximately 90% of the breast cancers in these patients can be attributed to their radiation treatment, rendering such series extremely useful to determine whether a common

  19. Long-Term Cancer Outcomes From Study NRG Oncology/RTOG 9517: A Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Multicatheter Brachytherapy After Lumpectomy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Julia; Winter, Kathryn; Kuske, Robert R.; Bolton, John S.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Scroggins, Troy; Rabinovitch, Rachel A.; Kelly, Tracy; Toonkel, Leonard M.; Vicini, Frank A.; McCormick, Beryl

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To examine 10-year rates of local, regional, and distant recurrences, patterns of recurrence, and survival rates for breast cancer patients enrolled on Study NRG Oncology/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9517, a multi-institutional prospective trial that studied one of the earliest methods of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), multicatheter brachytherapy (MCT). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included stage I/II unifocal breast cancer <3 cm in size after lumpectomy with negative surgical margins and 0 to 3 positive axillary nodes without extracapsular extension. The APBI dose delivered was 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions over 5 days for high-dose-rate (HDR); and 45 Gy in 3.5 to 5 days for low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was HDR and LDR MCT reproducibility. This analysis focuses on long-term ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), contralateral breast cancer events (CBE), regional recurrence (RR), and distant metastases (DM), disease-free, and overall survival. Results: The median follow-up was 12.1 years. One hundred patients were accrued from 1997 to 2000; 98 were evaluable; 65 underwent HDR and 33 LDR MCT. Median age was 62 years; 88% had T1 tumors; 81% were pN0. Seventy-seven percent were estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor positive; 33% received adjuvant chemotherapy and 64% antiendocrine therapy. There have been 4 isolated IBRs and 1 IBR with RR, for 5.2% 10-year IBR without DM. There was 1 isolated RR, 1 with IBR, and 1 with a CBE, for 3.1% 10-year RR without DM. The 10-year CBE rate was 4.2%, with 5 total events. Eleven patients have developed DM, 8 have died of breast cancer, and 22 have died from other causes. The 10-year DFS and OS rates are 69.8% and 78.0%, respectively. Conclusion: This multi-institutional, phase 2 trial studying MCT-APBI continues to report durable in-breast cancer control rates with long-term follow-up.

  20. Long-Term Cancer Outcomes From Study NRG Oncology/RTOG 9517: A Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Multicatheter Brachytherapy After Lumpectomy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Julia, E-mail: Julia.White@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The James, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Winter, Kathryn [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kuske, Robert R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Bolton, John S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oschner Clinic, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Scroggins, Troy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oschner Clinic, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Kelly, Tracy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Toonkel, Leonard M. [Mount Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, Florida (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Botsford Hospital, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To examine 10-year rates of local, regional, and distant recurrences, patterns of recurrence, and survival rates for breast cancer patients enrolled on Study NRG Oncology/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9517, a multi-institutional prospective trial that studied one of the earliest methods of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), multicatheter brachytherapy (MCT). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included stage I/II unifocal breast cancer <3 cm in size after lumpectomy with negative surgical margins and 0 to 3 positive axillary nodes without extracapsular extension. The APBI dose delivered was 34 Gy in 10 twice-daily fractions over 5 days for high-dose-rate (HDR); and 45 Gy in 3.5 to 5 days for low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was HDR and LDR MCT reproducibility. This analysis focuses on long-term ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), contralateral breast cancer events (CBE), regional recurrence (RR), and distant metastases (DM), disease-free, and overall survival. Results: The median follow-up was 12.1 years. One hundred patients were accrued from 1997 to 2000; 98 were evaluable; 65 underwent HDR and 33 LDR MCT. Median age was 62 years; 88% had T1 tumors; 81% were pN0. Seventy-seven percent were estrogen receptor and/or progesterone receptor positive; 33% received adjuvant chemotherapy and 64% antiendocrine therapy. There have been 4 isolated IBRs and 1 IBR with RR, for 5.2% 10-year IBR without DM. There was 1 isolated RR, 1 with IBR, and 1 with a CBE, for 3.1% 10-year RR without DM. The 10-year CBE rate was 4.2%, with 5 total events. Eleven patients have developed DM, 8 have died of breast cancer, and 22 have died from other causes. The 10-year DFS and OS rates are 69.8% and 78.0%, respectively. Conclusion: This multi-institutional, phase 2 trial studying MCT-APBI continues to report durable in-breast cancer control rates with long-term follow-up.

  1. Evaluation of Breast Sentinel Lymph Node Coverage by Standard Radiation Therapy Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovitch, Rachel; Ballonoff, Ari; Newman, Francis M.S.; Finlayson, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Background: Biopsy of the breast sentinel lymph node (SLN) is now a standard staging procedure for early-stage invasive breast cancer. The anatomic location of the breast SLN and its relationship to standard radiation fields has not been described. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of radiotherapy treatment planning data sets was performed in patients with breast cancer who had undergone SLN biopsy, and those with a surgical clip at the SLN biopsy site were identified. The location of the clip was evaluated relative to vertebral body level on an anterior-posterior digitally reconstructed radiograph, treated whole-breast tangential radiation fields, and standard axillary fields in 106 data sets meeting these criteria. Results: The breast SLN varied in vertebral body level position, ranging from T2 to T7 but most commonly opposite T4. The SLN clip was located below the base of the clavicle in 90%, and hence would be excluded from standard axillary radiotherapy fields where the inferior border is placed at this level. The clip was within the irradiated whole-breast tangent fields in 78%, beneath the superior-posterior corner multileaf collimators in 12%, and outside the tangent field borders in 10%. Conclusions: Standard axillary fields do not encompass the lymph nodes at highest risk of containing tumor in breast cancer patients. Elimination of the superior-posterior corner MLCs from the tangent field design would result in inclusion of the breast SLN in 90% of patients treated with standard whole-breast irradiation

  2. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with external beam radiotherapy. First results of the German phase 2 trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Strnad, Vratislav; Stillkrieg, Wilhelm; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Uter, Wolfgang [University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Dept. of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, Matthias W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Gynecology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of external beam three-dimensional (3D) conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for selected patients with early breast cancer. Between 2011 and 2016, 72 patients were recruited for this prospective phase 2 trial. Patients were eligible for APBI if they had histologically confirmed breast cancer or pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a tumor diameter ≤3 cm, clear resection margins ≥2 mm, no axillary lymph node involvement, no distant metastases, tumor bed clips, and were aged ≥50 years. Patients were excluded if mammography showed a multicentric invasive growth pattern, or if they had residual diffuse microcalcifications postoperatively, an extensive intraductal component, or vessel invasion. Patients received 3D conformal external beam APBI with a total dose of 38 Gy in 10 fractions in 1-2 weeks. The trial had been registered at the German Clinical Trials Register, DRKS-ID: DRKS00004417. Median follow-up was 25.5 months (range 1-61 months). Local control was maintained in 71 of 72 patients. The 3-year local recurrence rate was 2.1% (95% confidence interval, CI: 0-6.1%). Early toxicity (grade 1 radiodermatitis) was seen in 34.7% (25/72). Late side effects ≥ grade 3 did not occur. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 96.7% (59/61). APBI with external beam radiotherapy techniques is feasible with low toxicity and, according to the results of the present and other studies, on the way to becoming a standard treatment option for a selected subgroup of patients. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Vertraeglichkeit und Sicherheit der externen, 3-D-konformalen akzelerierten Teilbrustbestrahlung (APBI) fuer ausgewaehlte Patientinnen mit einem fruehen Mammakarzinom. Von 2011 bis 2016 wurden 72 Patientinnen in diese prospektive Phase-2-Studie eingebracht. Einschlusskriterien waren ein histologisch gesichertes Mammakarzinom oder DCIS, ein Tumordurchmesser ≤ 3 cm, tumorfreie Resektionsraender ≥ 2

  3. High dose and low dose radiation exposure in the induction of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Vicioso, E.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Pastor Vega, Jose M.

    2001-01-01

    In today's modern practice of Radiation Oncology it is becoming increasingly common to follow many patients with breast cancer. There is a proven association between prior radiation and the development of breast cancer, although in many instances the available sources of data are confusing. Characteristic features of radiation induced breast cancer are the importance of age at first exposure to radiation and the long latency period. The risk of breast cancer is highest in women exposed in the first decade of life and lessens progressively with increased age at exposure. The latency period is typically 10 years or more; a time in which other age dependent factors may influence the expression of the malignant phenotype. Genetic factors may also (in theory) increase a particular patient's susceptibility. (author)

  4. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Guidance for Setup of Patients Receiving Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Elizabeth A.; Cho, John; Vallis, Katherine A.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Lee, Grace B.Sc.; Blackburn, Helen; Nageeti, Tahani; McGibney, Carol; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance for setup error reduction and soft tissue visualization in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients were recruited for the delivery of radiotherapy to the postoperative cavity (3850 cGy in 10 fractions over 5 days) using an APBI technique. Cone-beam CT data sets were acquired after an initial skin-mark setup and before treatment delivery. These were registered online using the ipsilateral lung and external contours. Corrections were executed for translations exceeding 3 mm. The random and systematic errors associated with setup using skin-marks and setup using CBCT guidance were calculated and compared. Results: A total of 315 CBCT data sets were analyzed. The systematic errors for the skin-mark setup were 2.7, 1.7, and 2.4 mm in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. These were reduced to 0.8, 0.7, and 0.8 mm when CBCT guidance was used. The random errors were reduced from 2.4, 2.2, and 2.9 mm for skin-marks to 1.5, 1.5, and 1.6 mm for CBCT guidance in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Conclusion: A skin-mark setup for APBI patients is sufficient for current planning target volume margins for the population of patients studied here. Online CBCT guidance minimizes the occurrence of large random deviations, which may have a greater impact for the accelerated fractionation schedule used in APBI. It is also likely to permit a reduction in planning target volume margins and provide skin-line visualization and dosimetric evaluation of cardiac and lung volumes

  5. Intrafractional Target Motions and Uncertainties of Treatment Setup Reference Systems in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.; Goyal, Sharad; Zhou Jinghao; Khan, Atif J.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the magnitude of intrafractional motion and level of accuracy of various setup strategies in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: At lumpectomy, gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surrounding walls of the cavity. Weekly fluoroscopy imaging was conducted at treatment to investigate the respiration-induced target motions. Daily pre- and post-RT kV imaging was performed, and images were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion magnitudes over the course of treatment. The positioning differences of the laser tattoo- and the bony anatomy-based setups compared with those of the marker-based setup (benchmark) were also determined. The study included 21 patients. Results: Although lung exhibited significant motion, the average marker motion amplitude on the fluoroscopic image was about 1 mm. Over a typical treatment time period, average intrafractional motion magnitude was 4.2 mm and 2.6 mm based on the marker and bony anatomy matching, respectively. The bony anatomy- and laser tattoo-based interfractional setup errors, with respect to the fiducial marker-based setup, were 7.1 and 9.0 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Respiration has limited effects on the target motion during APBI. Bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy relative to that of the laser tattoo-based setup approach. Since fiducial markers are sutured directly to the surgical cavity, the marker-based approach can further improve the interfractional setup accuracy. On average, a seroma cavity exhibits intrafractional motion of more than 4 mm, a magnitude that is larger than that which is otherwise derived based on bony anatomy matching. A seroma-specific marker-based approach has the potential to improve treatment accuracy by taking the true inter

  6. Partial coherence and imperfect optics at a synchrotron radiation source modeled by wavefront propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundy, David; Alcock, Simon G.; Alianelli, Lucia; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal J. S.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    A full wave propagation of X-rays from source to sample at a storage ring beamline requires simulation of the electron beam source and optical elements in the beamline. The finite emittance source causes the appearance of partial coherence in the wave field. Consequently, the wavefront cannot be treated exactly with fully coherent wave propagation or fully incoherent ray tracing. We have used the wavefront code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) to perform partially coherent wavefront propagation using a parallel computing cluster at the Diamond Light Source. Measured mirror profiles have been used to correct the wavefront for surface errors.

  7. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Compression force and radiation dose in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waade, Gunvor G.; Sanderud, Audun [Department of Life Sciences and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. 4 St. Olavs Plass, 0130 Oslo (Norway); Hofvind, Solveig, E-mail: solveig.hofvind@kreftregisteret.no [Department of Life Sciences and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, P.O. 4 St. Olavs Plass, 0130 Oslo (Norway); The Cancer Registry of Norway, P.O. 5313 Majorstuen, 0304 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Compression force and radiation dose for 17 951 screening mammograms were analyzed. • Large variations in mean applied compression force between the breast centers. • Limited associations between compression force and radiation dose. - Abstract: Purpose: Compression force is used in mammography to reduce breast thickness and by that decrease radiation dose and improve image quality. There are no evidence-based recommendations regarding the optimal compression force. We analyzed compression force and radiation dose between screening centers in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), as a first step towards establishing evidence-based recommendations for compression force. Materials and methods: The study included information from 17 951 randomly selected screening examinations among women screened with equipment from four different venors at fourteen breast centers in the NBCSP, January-March 2014. We analyzed the applied compression force and radiation dose used on craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) view on left breast, by breast centers and vendors. Results: Mean compression force used in the screening program was 116N (CC: 108N, MLO: 125N). The maximum difference in mean compression force between the centers was 63N for CC and 57N for MLO. Mean radiation dose for each image was 1.09 mGy (CC: 1.04mGy, MLO: 1.14mGy), varying from 0.55 mGy to 1.31 mGy between the centers. Compression force alone had a negligible impact on radiation dose (r{sup 2} = 0.8%, p = < 0.001). Conclusion: We observed substantial variations in mean compression forces between the breast centers. Breast characteristics and differences in automated exposure control between vendors might explain the low association between compression force and radiation dose. Further knowledge about different automated exposure controls and the impact of compression force on dose and image quality is needed to establish individualised and evidence

  9. Radiation induced depigmentation disorder in two patients with breast cancer: Exploring a rare accompaniment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, A.; Chaudhari, P.B.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Radiation induced depigmentation disorder is a rare accompaniment. We herein report two patients of bilateral breast cancer developing depigmentation disorder, initially confined to the radiation portal with subsequent generalization within few months of completion of whole breast radiotherapy. Both these patients had no prior history of vitiligo or other autoimmune disorder. This brief report highlights the importance of awareness of this association in appropriate decision making in susceptible patients thereby preventing this morbidity and its psychological ramifications

  10. Calculation of radiation dose to infants from radioactive breast milk and suspensions necessary to constrain dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, J.; Shearer, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: For nuclear medicine patients who are breast feeding an infant, special radiation safety precautions may need to be taken. An estimate of the potential radiation dose to the child from ingested milk must be made, and breast-feeding may need to be suspended until levels of radioactivity in the breast-milk have fallen to acceptable levels. The risk of radiation to the child must be weighed against the benefits of breast-feeding and the possible trauma to both mother and child arising from interruption or cessation of the milk supply. In the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has already published regulations which will necessitate an estimate of the infant's dose from breast milk to be made, in principle, for every breast-feeding patient. There is obviously, therefore, a need to provide a rapid and reliable means of estimating such doses. A spreadsheet template which automatically calculates the cumulative dose to breast feeding infants based on any multi-exponential clearance of activity from the breast milk, and any pattern of feeding, has been developed by the authors. The time (post administration) for which breast-feeding should be interrupted in order to constrain the radiation dose to a selected limit is also calculated along with the concentration of activity in breast milk at which feeding can resume. The effect of changing dose limits, feeding patterns and using individually derived breast milk clearance rates may be readily modelled using this spreadsheet template. Data has been included for many of the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals and new data can readily be incorporated as it becomes available. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. Air-electron stream interactions during magnetic resonance IGRT. Skin irradiation outside the treatment field during accelerated partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Robotics Research Laboratory for Extreme Environments, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan; Wu, Hong-Gyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-in; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seung Hyuck [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Noorie [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate and to prevent irradiation outside the treatment field caused by an electron stream in the air generated by the magnetic field during magnetic resonance image-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). In all, 20 patients who received APBI with a magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system were prospectively studied. The prescription dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions of 3.85 Gy and delivered with a tri-cobalt system (the ViewRay system). For each patient, primary plans were delivered for the first five fractions and modified plans with different gantry angles from those of the primary plan (in-treatment plans) were delivered for the remaining five fractions to reduce the skin dose. A 1 cm thick bolus was placed in front of the patient's jaw, ipsilateral shoulder, and arm to shield them from the electron stream. Radiochromic EBT3 films were attached to the front (towards the breast) and back (towards the head) of the bolus during treatment. Correlations between the measured values and the tumor locations, treatment times, and tumor sizes were investigated. For a single fraction delivery, the average areas of the measured isodoses of 14% (0.54 Gy), 12% (0.46 Gy), and 10% (0.39 Gy) at the front of the boluses were as large as 3, 10.4, and 21.4 cm{sup 2}, respectively, whereas no significant dose could be measured at the back of the boluses. Statistically significant but weak correlations were observed between the measured values and the treatment times. During radiotherapy for breast cancer with an MR-IGRT system, the patient must be shielded from electron streams in the air generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the beams of the three-cobalt treatment unit to avoid unwanted irradiation of the skin outside the treatment field. (orig.) [German] Beim Einsatz eines Magnetresonanztomographie(MRT)-gefuehrten Bestrahlungsgeraets kann durch die Wechselwirkung von Magnetfeld und Strahlenquelle unerwuenscht

  12. Scatter radiation breast exposure during head CT: impact of scanning conditions and anthropometric parameters on shielded and unshielded breast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasic, B. [Hospital for pulmonary diseases, Zagreb (Croatia); Knezevic, Z.; Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Brnic, Z.; Novacic, K. [Merkur Univ. Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Constantly increasing clinical requests for CT scanning of the head on our facility continue to raise concern regarding radiation exposure of patients, especially radiosensitive tissues positioned close to the scanning plane. The aim of our prospective study was to estimate scatter radiation doses to the breast from routine head CT scans, both with and without use of lead shielding, and to establish influence of various technical and anthropometric factors on doses using statistical data analysis. In 85 patient referred to head CT for objective medical reasons, one breast was covered with lead apron during CT scanning. Radiation doses were measured at skin of both breasts and over the apron simultaneously, by the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters. The doses showed a mean reduction by 37% due to lead shielding. After we statistically analyzed our data, we observed significant correlation between under-the-shield dose and values of technical parameters. We used multiple linear regression model to describe the relationships of doses to unshielded and shielded breast respectively, with anthropometric and technical factors. Our study proved lead shielding of the breast to be effective, easy to use and leading to a significant reduction in scatter dose. (author)

  13. Scatter radiation breast exposure during head CT: impact of scanning conditions and anthropometric parameters on shielded and unshielded breast dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasic, B.; Knezevic, Z.; Vekic, B.; Brnic, Z.; Novacic, K.

    2006-01-01

    Constantly increasing clinical requests for CT scanning of the head on our facility continue to raise concern regarding radiation exposure of patients, especially radiosensitive tissues positioned close to the scanning plane. The aim of our prospective study was to estimate scatter radiation doses to the breast from routine head CT scans, both with and without use of lead shielding, and to establish influence of various technical and anthropometric factors on doses using statistical data analysis. In 85 patient referred to head CT for objective medical reasons, one breast was covered with lead apron during CT scanning. Radiation doses were measured at skin of both breasts and over the apron simultaneously, by the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters. The doses showed a mean reduction by 37% due to lead shielding. After we statistically analyzed our data, we observed significant correlation between under-the-shield dose and values of technical parameters. We used multiple linear regression model to describe the relationships of doses to unshielded and shielded breast respectively, with anthropometric and technical factors. Our study proved lead shielding of the breast to be effective, easy to use and leading to a significant reduction in scatter dose. (author)

  14. Intrafractional baseline drift during free breathing breast cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christer Andre; Acosta Roa, Ana María; Lund, Jo-Åsmund; Frengen, Jomar

    2017-06-01

    Intrafraction motion in breast cancer radiation therapy (BCRT) has not yet been thoroughly described in the literature. It has been observed that baseline drift occurs as part of the intrafraction motion. This study aims to measure baseline drift and its incidence in free-breathing BCRT patients using an in-house developed laser system for tracking the position of the sternum. Baseline drift was monitored in 20 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving free breathing 3D-conformal RT by using an in-house developed laser system which measures one-dimensional distance in the AP direction. A total of 357 patient respiratory traces from treatment sessions were logged and analysed. Baseline drift was compared to patient positioning error measured from in-field portal imaging. The mean overall baseline drift at end of treatment sessions was -1.3 mm for the patient population. Relatively small baseline drift was observed during the first fraction; however it was clearly detected already at the second fraction. Over 90% of the baseline drift occurs during the first 3 min of each treatment session. The baseline drift rate for the population was -0.5 ± 0.2 mm/min in the posterior direction the first minute after localization. Only 4% of the treatment sessions had a 5 mm or larger baseline drift at 5 min, all towards the posterior direction. Mean baseline drift in the posterior direction in free breathing BCRT was observed in 18 of 20 patients over all treatment sessions. This study shows that there is a substantial baseline drift in free breathing BCRT patients. No clear baseline drift was observed during the first treatment session; however, baseline drift was markedly present at the rest of the sessions. Intrafraction motion due to baseline drift should be accounted for in margin calculations.

  15. Radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Ichiro; Miyaishi, Kazuo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Ito, Jun; Inoue, Tomio

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer were reported. Latent period of case 1 (cervical esophagus) was 12 years, and case 2 (middle thoracic esophagus) was 16 years. Radiographically the lesions were both serrated, and histologically, case 1 was ''poorly differentiated'' and case 2 was ''moderately differentiated'' squamous cell carcinoma. Histological types of basic breast cancer were both papillotubular carcinomas. Previous irradiation doses were 4180 rads for case 1 and 1860 rads for case 2. The esophageal cancers were remarkably improved by radiation therapy. It should be emphasized that radiation therapy is useful for the radiation-induced cancer of the esophagus. (author)

  16. Result of radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancers using partial attenuation filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Choi, Tae Jin [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    This study was to evaluate the survival and pattern of failure after radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancer using partial attenuation filer and wedged beams and to help radiotherapy planning of sino-nasal cancer. Between February 1992 and March 2003, 17 patients with sino-nasal cancers underwent radiation therapy using partial attenuation filter at Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung university. There were 9 male and 8 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 40 to 75 years (median 59 years). There were 10 patients of maxillary sinus cancer, 7 patients of nasal cancer. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 11, adenoid cystic carcinoma in 4 and olfactory neuroblastoma in 2. The distribution of clinical stage by the AJCC system was 3 for stage II, 7 for III and 6 for IV. The five patients were treated with radiation alone and 12 patients were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. The range of total radiation dose delivered to the primary tumor was from 44 to 76 Gy (median 60 Gy). The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 173 months with median of 78 months. The overall 2 year survival rate and disease free survival rate was 76.4%. The 5 year and 10 year survival rate were 76.4% and 45.6% and the 5 year and 10 year disease free survival rate was 70.6%. The 5 year disease free survival rate by treatment modality was 91.6% for postoperative radiation group and 20% for radiation alone group, statistical significance was found by treatment modality ({rho} = 0.006). There were no differences in survival by pathology and stage. There were local failure in 5 patients (29%) but no distant failure and no severe complication required surgical intervention. Radiation therapy of sino-nasal cancer using partial attenuation filter was safe and effective. Combined modality with conservative surgery and radiation therapy was more advisable to achieve loco-regional control in sino-nasal cancer. Also we considered high precision radiation therapy with

  17. A case of sarcoma of the chest wall after radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Junko; Nishi, Tsunehiro; Fukuuchi, Atsushi; Takanashi, Riichiro

    1998-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced sarcoma of the chest wall after radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 69-year-old woman underwent mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection followed by linac therapy of 50 Gy delivered to the left axilla, left supraclavicular area, and parasternal area. During therapy for bone and liver metastases, a tumor was noted in the left chest wall 15 years after radiation therapy. Incisional biopsy was performed. Histological diagnosis was spindle cell sarcoma. Radiation-induced sarcoma was suspected because the tumor developed 15 years after radiation therapy within the same area. Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare tumor, but radiation therapy following breast-conserving therapy is widely employed. It is important to be aware of the possibility of radiation-induced sarcoma. (author)

  18. The sensitivity of the human breast to cancer induction by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mole, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Available evidence for the induction of cancer in the human breast by small doses of radiation is reviewed. A comparison is made of risk estimates for the frequency of breast cancer in excess of controls, per rad of ionizing radiation, resulting from multiple fluoroscopy, radiotherapy of non-malignant diseases of the breast, or the exposure of Japanese bomb survivors. The significance of the age at exposure is discussed, and consideration is given to the application of the evidence to practical problems in radiography, radiotherapy, screening by mammography, and radiological protection for occupational exposure. (U.K.)

  19. Sensitivity of the human breast to cancer induction by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mole, R H [Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit

    1978-06-01

    Available evidence for the induction of cancer in the human breast by small doses of radiation is reviewed. A comparison is made of risk estimates for the frequency of breast cancer in excess of controls, per rad of ionizing radiation, resulting from multiple fluoroscopy, radiotherapy of non-malignant diseases of the breast, or the exposure of Japanese bomb survivors. The significance of the age at exposure is discussed, and consideration is given to the application of the evidence to practical problems in radiography, radiotherapy, screening by mammography, and radiological protection for occupational exposure.

  20. The results of local radiation application at organ-reserving treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakimova, T.P.; Ponomar'ov, Yi.M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the given study is the clinical morphological investigation of the breast cancer pre-operation radiotherapy effectiveness by the proposed method, and its influence to the apoptosis. The clinical morphological investigation has been carried out in 28 breast cancer patients, the treatment of which has been began with the pre-operation radiation therapy course by the dose large fractionating method on the breast gland with the local tumor radiation, inguinal lymph glands with the next execution of the organ-preserving operation. We can draw a conclusion, that this very method is effective, as it devitalizes the tumors, and gives the enough high indicator of survival

  1. Impact of prognostic factors for postmastectomy radiation therapy of breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, K. A.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 196 breast cancer patients with stages T1-3N0-3M0. The comprehensive therapy for breast cancer included surgical operation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Multivariate analysis showed that multifocality growth of tumor (p = 0.004), high grade III (p = 0.008), two metastatic lymph nodes (p = 0.02) were associated with an increased risk of regional node failure in the patients with one to three positive lymph nodes. The prognostic models describing the probability of local recurrences of breast cancer were developed for individualization of the radiation therapy tactics. Postmastectomy radiation therapy in the patients with high-risk breast cancer treated with modified radical mastectomy improves locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, does not increase late toxicity.

  2. Estimated risk for secondary cancer in the contra-lateral breast following radiation therapy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Safora; Danielsen, Turi; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To facilitate a discussion about the impact of dose heterogeneity on the risk for secondary contralateral breast (CB) cancer predicted with linear and non linear models associated with primary breast irradiation. Methods and materials. Dose volume statistics of the CB calculated for eight patients using a collapsed cone algorithm were used to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) for cancer induction in CB. Both linear and non-linear models were employed. A sensitivity analysis demonstrating the impact of different parameter values on calculated ERR for the eight patients was also included in this study. Results. A proportionality assumption was established to make the calculations with a linear and non-linear model comparable. ERR of secondary cancer predicted by the linear model varied considerably between the patients, while the predicted ERR for the same patients using the non-linear model showed very small variation. The predicted ERRs by the two models were indistinguishable for small doses, i.e. below ∼3 Gy. The sensitivity analysis showed that the quadratic component of the radiation-induction pre-malignant cell term is negligible for lower dose level. The ERR is highly sensitive to the value of agr1 and agr2. Conclusions. Optimization of breast cancer radiation therapy, where also the risk for radiation induced secondary malignancies in the contralateral breast is taken into account, requires robust and valid risk assessment. The linear dose-risk model does not account for the complexity in the mechanisms underlying the development of secondary malignancies following exposure to radiation; this is particularly important when estimating risk associated with highly heterogeneous dose distributions as is the case in the contralateral breast of women receiving breast cancer irradiation

  3. Investigation of normal tissue complication probabilities in prostate and partial breast irradiation radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, E.; Takam, R.; Bensaleh, S.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Normal- Tissue-Complication Probabilities of rectum, bladder and urethra following various radiation techniques for prostate cancer were evaluated using the relative-seriality and Lyman models. NTCPs of lungs, heart and skin, their dependence on sourceposition, balloon-deformation were also investigated for HDR mammosite brachytherapy. The prostate treatment techniques included external three dimentional conformal-radiotherapy, Low-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (1-125), High-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (Ir-I92). Dose- Volume-Histograms of critical structures for prostate and breast radiotherapy, retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems, were converted to Biological Effective Dose (BEffD)-based and Equivalent Dose(Deq)-based DVHs to account for differences in radiation delivery and fractionation schedule. Literature-based model parameters were used to calculate NTCPs. Hypofractionated 3D-CRT (2.75 Gy/fraction, total dose 55 Gy) NTCPs of rectum, bladder and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 4-field 3D-CRT (2-Gy/fraction, 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 4- and 5-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy). Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%) following the dose-escalated 4-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed techniques. The average NTCP for rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDRBT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. For Mammosite, NTCP was estimated to be 0.1 %, 0.1 %, 1.2% and 3.5% for skin desquamation, erythema, telangiectasia and fibrosis respectively (the source positioned at the balloon centre). A 4 mm Mammosite-balloon deformation leads to overdosing of PTV regions by ∼40%, resulting in excessive skin dose and increased NTCP. Conclusions Prostate brachytherapy resulted in NTCPs lower compared to external beam techniques. Mammosite-brachytherapy resulted in no heart/lung complications regardless of balloon deformation. However, 4 mm deformation caused 0.6% increase in tissue fibrosis NTCP.

  4. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beitsch, Peter D. [Dallas Surgical Group, Dallas, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Arthur, Doug [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts and Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Keisch, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Healthcare Associates, Miami, Florida (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lyden, Maureen [Biostat International, Inc, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@pol.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite® Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort.

  5. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Beitsch, Peter D.; Shah, Chirag; Arthur, Doug; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wazer, David E.; Keisch, Martin; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Lyden, Maureen; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite® Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort

  6. Increased risk of breast cancer in splenectomized patients undergoing radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chung T.; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Adams, James F.; Sagerman, Robert H.; Numann, Patricia J.; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos; Duggan, David B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Second malignancies have been reported among patients who were treated by radiation therapy or chemotherapy alone or in combination. Studies have implied an increased risk of breast cancer in women who received radiotherapy as part of their treatment for Hodgkin's disease. This review was performed to determine if there is an association between splenectomy and subsequent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and thirty-six female patients with histologically proven Hodgkin's disease were seen in the Division of Radiation Oncology between 1962 and 1985. All patients received mantle or mediastinal irradiation as part of their therapy. The risk of breast cancer was assessed and multiple linear regression analysis was performed on the following variables: patient age, stage, dose and extent of radiation field, time after completing radiation therapy, splenectomy, and chemotheraphy. Results: Breast cancer was observed in 11 of 74 splenectomized patients and in none of 62 patients not splenectomized. The mean follow-up was 13 years in splenectomized patients and 16 years, 7 months in nonsplenectomized patients. Nine patients developed invasive breast cancer and two developed ductal carcinoma in situ. Splenectomy was the only variable independently associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < 0.005) in multiple linear regression analysis; age, latency, and splenectomy considered together were also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Our data show an increased risk of breast cancer in splenectomized patients who had treatment for Hodgkin's disease. A multiinstitutional survey may better define the influence of splenectomy relative to developing breast cancer in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease. The risk of breast cancer should be considered when recommending staging laparotomy, and we recommend close follow-up examination including routine mammograms for female patients successfully treated for

  7. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Martina E.; Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine; Klassen, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R"2 effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. Results: The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. Conclusions: This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast

  8. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Martina E., E-mail: m.schmidt@dkfz.de [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiskemann, Joachim [Division of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Klassen, Oliver [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M. [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R{sup 2} effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. Results: The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. Conclusions: This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast

  9. Prototype volumetric ultrasound tomography image guidance system for prone stereotactic partial breast irradiation: proof-of-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D.; Parsons, David; Zhang, Yue; Hrycushko, Brian; Zhao, Bo; Chopra, Rajiv; Kim, Nathan; Spangler, Ann; Rahimi, Asal; Timmerman, Robert; Jiang, Steve B.; Lu, Weiguo; Gu, Xuejun

    2018-03-01

    Accurate dose delivery in stereotactic partial breast irradiation (S-PBI) is challenging because of the target position uncertainty caused by breast deformation, the target volume changes caused by lumpectomy cavity shrinkage, and the target delineation uncertainty on simulation computed tomography (CT) images caused by poor soft tissue contrast. We have developed a volumetric ultrasound tomography (UST) image guidance system for prone position S-PBI. The system is composed of a novel 3D printed rotation water tank, a patient-specific resin breast immobilization cup, and a 1D array ultrasound transducer. Coronal 2D US images were acquired in 5° increments over a 360° range, and planes were acquired every 2 mm in elevation. A super-compounding technique was used to reconstruct the image volume. The image quality of UST was evaluated with a BB-1 breast phantom and BioZorb surgical marker, and the results revealed that UST offered better soft tissue contrast than CT and similar image quality to MR. In the evaluated plane, the size and location of five embedded objects were measured and compared to MR, which is considered as the ground truth. Objects’ diameters and the distances between objects in UST differ by approximately 1 to 2 mm from those in MR, which showed that UST offers the image quality required for S-PBI. In future work we will develop a robotic system that will be ultimately implemented in the clinic.

  10. Risk of secondary malignancies after radiation therapy for breast cancer: Comprehensive results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Lindsay M; Ying, Jian; Poppe, Matthew M; Suneja, Gita; Gaffney, David K

    2017-10-01

    To assess risks of secondary malignancies in breast cancer patients who received radiation therapy compared to patients who did not. The SEER database was used to identify females with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer as their first malignancy, during 1973-2008. We excluded patients with metastatic disease, age breast cancer recurrence, or who developed a secondary malignancy within 1 year of diagnosis. Standardized incidence ratios and absolute excess risk were calculated using SEER*Stat, version 8.2.1 and SAS, version 9.4. There were 374,993 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, with 154,697 who received radiation therapy. With a median follow-up of 8.9 years, 13% of patients (49,867) developed a secondary malignancy. The rate of secondary malignancies was significantly greater than the endemic rate in breast cancer patients treated without radiation therapy, (O/E 1.2, 95% CI 1.19-1.22) and with radiation therapy (O/E 1.33, 95% CI 1.31-1.35). Approximately 3.4% of secondary malignancies were attributable to radiation therapy. The increased risk of secondary malignancies in breast cancer patients treated with radiation therapy compared to those without was significant regardless of age at breast cancer diagnosis (p breast cancer patients both with and without radiation therapy compared to the general population. There was an increased risk in specific sites for patients treated with radiation therapy. This risk was most evident in young patients and who had longer latency periods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-Year Outcomes of Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Godette, Karen D.; Whitaker, Daisy J.; Davis, Lawrence W.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report our clinical experience using breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review identified 354 Stage 0 to III breast cancer patients treated with SIB-IMRT after conservative surgery between 2003 and 2006. The most common fractionation (89%) simultaneously delivered 1.8 Gy to the ipsilateral breast tissue and 2.14 Gy to the resection cavity, yielding a breast dose of 45 Gy (25 fractions) and cavity dose 59.92 Gy (28 fractions), biologically equivalent for tumor control to 45 Gy to the breast with sequential 16-Gy boost (33 fractions). Results: A total of 356 breasts in 354 patients were treated: 282 with invasive breast cancer, and 74 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). For left breast radiation, median cardiac V 15 was 2.9% and left ventricular V 15 1.7%. Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 4-73 months). Acute toxicity was Grade 1 in 57% of cases, Grade 2 in 43%, and Grade 3 in <1%. For invasive breast cancer, the 3-year overall survival was 97.6% and risk of any locoregional recurrence was 2.8%. For ductal carcinoma in situ, 3-year overall survival was 98% and risk of locoregional recurrence 1.4%. In 142 cases at a minimum of 3 years follow-up, global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians as good or excellent in 96.5% and fair in 3.5%. Conclusions: Breast SIB-IMRT reduced treatment duration by five fractions with a favorable acute toxicity profile and low cardiac dose for left breast treatment. At 3 years, locoregional control was excellent, and initial assessment suggested good or excellent cosmesis in a high percentage of evaluable patients.

  12. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  13. Coordination of Breast Cancer Care Between Radiation Oncologists and Surgeons: A Survey Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Abrahamse, Paul; Morrow, Monica; Hamilton, Ann S.; Graff, John J.; Katz, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether radiation oncologists and surgeons differ in their attitudes regarding the local management of breast cancer, and to examine coordination of care between these specialists. Methods and Materials: We surveyed attending surgeons and radiation oncologists who treated a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer in metropolitan Detroit and Los Angeles. We identified 419 surgeons, of whom 318 (76%) responded, and 160 radiation oncologists, of whom 117 (73%) responded. We assessed demographic, professional, and practice characteristics; challenges to coordinated care; and attitudes toward management in three scenarios. Results: 92.1% of surgeons and 94.8% of radiation oncologists indicated access to a multidisciplinary tumor board. Nevertheless, the most commonly identified challenge to radiation oncologists, cited by 27.9%, was failure of other providers to include them in the treatment decision process early enough. Nearly half the surgeons (49.7%) stated that few or almost none of the breast cancer patients they saw in the past 12 months had consulted with a radiation oncologist before undergoing definitive surgery. Surgeons and radiation oncologists differed in their recommendations in management scenarios. Radiation oncologists were more likely to favor radiation than were surgeons for a patient with 3/20 lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy (p = 0.03); surgeons were more likely to favor more widely clear margins after breast conservation than were radiation oncologists (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Despite the widespread availability of tumor boards, a substantial minority of radiation oncologists indicated other providers failed to include them in the breast cancer treatment decision-making process early enough. Earlier inclusion of radiation oncologists may influence patient decisions, and interventions to facilitate this should be considered.

  14. Coordination of Breast Cancer Care Between Radiation Oncologists and Surgeons: A Survey Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Abrahamse, Paul [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hamilton, Ann S. [Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Graff, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine and Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether radiation oncologists and surgeons differ in their attitudes regarding the local management of breast cancer, and to examine coordination of care between these specialists. Methods and Materials: We surveyed attending surgeons and radiation oncologists who treated a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer in metropolitan Detroit and Los Angeles. We identified 419 surgeons, of whom 318 (76%) responded, and 160 radiation oncologists, of whom 117 (73%) responded. We assessed demographic, professional, and practice characteristics; challenges to coordinated care; and attitudes toward management in three scenarios. Results: 92.1% of surgeons and 94.8% of radiation oncologists indicated access to a multidisciplinary tumor board. Nevertheless, the most commonly identified challenge to radiation oncologists, cited by 27.9%, was failure of other providers to include them in the treatment decision process early enough. Nearly half the surgeons (49.7%) stated that few or almost none of the breast cancer patients they saw in the past 12 months had consulted with a radiation oncologist before undergoing definitive surgery. Surgeons and radiation oncologists differed in their recommendations in management scenarios. Radiation oncologists were more likely to favor radiation than were surgeons for a patient with 3/20 lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy (p = 0.03); surgeons were more likely to favor more widely clear margins after breast conservation than were radiation oncologists (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Despite the widespread availability of tumor boards, a substantial minority of radiation oncologists indicated other providers failed to include them in the breast cancer treatment decision-making process early enough. Earlier inclusion of radiation oncologists may influence patient decisions, and interventions to facilitate this should be considered.

  15. Five-Year Analysis of Treatment Efficacy and Cosmesis by the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Vic; Fine, Ricky; Whitworth, Pat; Kuerer, Henry; Haffty, Bruce; Keisch, Martin; Lyden, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present 5-year data on treatment efficacy, cosmetic results, and toxicities for patients enrolled on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite breast brachytherapy registry trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients (1449 cases) with early-stage breast cancer receiving breast-conserving therapy were treated with the MammoSite device to deliver accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) (34 Gy in 3.4-Gy fractions). Of 1449 cases, 1255 (87%) had invasive breast cancer (IBC) (median size, 10 mm) and 194 (13%) had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (median size, 8 mm). Median follow-up was 54 months. Results: Thirty-seven cases (2.6%) developed an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial rate of 3.80% (3.86% for IBC and 3.39% for DCIS). Negative estrogen receptor status (p = 0.0011) was the only clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variable associated with IBTR for patients with IBC and young age (<50 years; p = 0.0096) and positive margin status (p = 0.0126) in those with DCIS. The percentage of breasts with good/excellent cosmetic results at 60 months (n = 371) was 90.6%. Symptomatic breast seromas were reported in 13.0% of cases, and 2.3% developed fat necrosis. A subset analysis of the first 400 consecutive cases enrolled was performed (352 with IBC, 48 DCIS). With a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of IBTR was 3.04%. Conclusion: Treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity 5 years after treatment with APBI using the MammoSite device are good and similar to those reported with other forms of APBI with similar follow-up.

  16. Cosmetic Outcome and Seroma Formation After Breast-Conserving Surgery With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthi, Sashendra; Link, Emma; Chua, Boon H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and its association with breast wound seroma after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) with targeted intraoperative radiation therapy (tIORT) boost for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a single-arm prospective study of 55 patients with early breast cancer treated with BCS and tIORT boost followed by conventional whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) between August 2003 and January 2006 was performed. A seroma was defined as a fluid collection at the primary tumor resection site identified clinically or radiologically. Cosmetic assessments using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer rating system were performed at baseline before BCS and 30 months after WBRT was completed. Results: Twenty-eight patients (51%) developed a seroma, with 18 patients (33%) requiring at least 1 aspiration. Tumor location was significantly associated with seroma formation (P=.001). Ten of 11 patients with an upper inner quadrant tumor developed a seroma. Excellent or good overall cosmetic outcome at 30 months was observed in 34 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 53%-80%). Seroma formation was not associated with the overall cosmetic result (P=.54). Conclusion: BCS with tIORT boost followed by WBRT was associated with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Seroma formation was not significantly associated with an adverse cosmetic outcome.

  17. Target volume definition for external beam partial breast radiotherapy: Clinical, pathological and technical studies informing current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna M.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Yarnold, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is currently under investigation in several phase III trials and, following a recent consensus statement, its use off-study may increase despite ongoing uncertainty regarding optimal target volume definition. We review the clinical, pathological and technical evidence for target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (EB-PBI). The optimal method of tumour bed (TB) delineation requires X-ray CT imaging of implanted excision cavity wall markers. The definition of clinical target volume (CTV) as TB plus concentric 15 mm margins is based on the anatomical distribution of multifocal and multicentric disease around the primary tumour in mastectomy specimens, and the clinical locations of local tumour relapse (LR) after breast conservation surgery. If the majority of LR originate from foci of residual invasive and/or intraduct disease in the vicinity of the TB after complete microscopic resection, CTV margin logically takes account of the position of primary tumour within the surgical resection specimen. The uncertain significance of independent primary tumours as sources of preventable LR, and of wound healing responses in stimulating LR, increases the difficulties in defining optimal CTV. These uncertainties may resolve after long-term follow-up of current PBI trials. By contrast, a commonly used 10 mm clinical to planning target volume (PTV) margin has a stronger evidence base, although departmental set-up errors need to be confirmed locally. A CTV-PTV margin >10 mm may be required in women with larger breasts and/or large seromas, whilst the role of image-guided radiotherapy with or without TB markers in reducing CTV-PTV margins needs to be explored.

  18. Correlation of breast recurrence (inflammatory type or not) after breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy and clinicopathological factors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Koyama, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    To clarify risk factors for breast recurrence of inflammatory type after breast conserving therapy, we examined clinicopathological findings and therapies given after initial surgery. Nine cases of inflammatory breast recurrence out of 133 recurrent cases collected from a collaborative group supported by a grant-in-aid for Cancer Research by Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (7-24, Chairman: H. Koyama) were analyzed by a case control study. And forty-three recurrent cases in Kumamoto City Hospital were also analyzed similarly. Inflammatory breast recurrence after breast conserving surgery is characterized as follows: Most cases have negative surgical margin and may be unresponsive to radiation therapy, unlike non-inflammatory breast recurrence. Lymph node metastasis is involved in recurrence, but the difference in patients with only distant metastasis was positive lymphatic invasion. Distant metastasis coexisted at the time of recurrence, and secondary surgery was impossible in most cases. The prognosis after recurrence was unfavorable. These findings suggest that inflammatory recurrence is manifestation of so-called ''occult'' inflammatory breast cancer. (author)

  19. Correlation of breast recurrence (inflammatory type or not) after breast conserving surgery with radiation therapy and clinicopathological factors in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Koyama, Hiroki

    1998-09-01

    To clarify risk factors for breast recurrence of inflammatory type after breast conserving therapy, we examined clinicopathological findings and therapies given after initial surgery. Nine cases of inflammatory breast recurrence out of 133 recurrent cases collected from a collaborative group supported by a grant-in-aid for Cancer Research by Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare (7-24, Chairman: H. Koyama) were analyzed by a case control study. And forty-three recurrent cases in Kumamoto City Hospital were also analyzed similarly. Inflammatory breast recurrence after breast conserving surgery is characterized as follows: Most cases have negative surgical margin and may be unresponsive to radiation therapy, unlike non-inflammatory breast recurrence. Lymph node metastasis is involved in recurrence, but the difference in patients with only distant metastasis was positive lymphatic invasion. Distant metastasis coexisted at the time of recurrence, and secondary surgery was impossible in most cases. The prognosis after recurrence was unfavorable. These findings suggest that inflammatory recurrence is manifestation of so-called ``occult`` inflammatory breast cancer. (author)

  20. Lack of Prognostic Impact of Adjuvant Radiation on Oncologic Outcomes in Elderly Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Shapour; Talei, Abdolrasoul; Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Moaddabshoar, Leila; Dayani, Maliheh; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Ansari, Mansour; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role as adjuvant treatment in locally advanced breast cancer and in those patients who have undergone breast-conserving surgery. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic impact of adjuvant radiation on oncologic outcomes in elderly women with breast cancer. In this retrospective study, we reviewed and analyzed the characteristics, treatment outcome and survival of elderly women (aged ≥ 60 years) with breast cancer who were treated and followed-up between 1993 and 2014. The median follow up for the surviving patients was 38 (range 3-207) months. One hundred and seventy-eight patients with a median age of 74 (range 60-95) years were enrolled in the study. Of the total, 60 patients received postoperative adjuvant radiation (radiation group) and the remaining 118 did not (control group). Patients in the radiation group were significantly younger than those in the control group (P value=0.004). In addition, patients in radiation group had higher node stage (P value<0.001) and disease stage (P=0.003) and tended to have higher tumor grade (P=0.031) and received more frequent (P value <0.001) adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy compared to those in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding the local control, disease-free survival and overall survival rates. In this study, we did not find a prognostic impact for adjuvant radiation on oncologic outcomes in elderly women with breast cancer.

  1. First report of a permanent breast 103Pd seed implant as adjuvant radiation treatment for early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Rakovitch, Eileen; Sankreacha, Raxa; Easton, Harry; Que, William

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A new technique of adjuvant partial breast irradiation using 103 Pd permanent breast seed implants (PBSI) is presented. The procedure is performed in a single 1-hour session under local anesthesia. Methods and Materials: Patients referred to a single institution for adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy for an infiltrating ductal carcinoma ≤3 cm in diameter, surgical margin ≥2 mm, no extensive in situ carcinoma, no lymphovascular invasion, and minimal or negative lymph node involvement were offered a PBSI. Results: Between May and December 2004, 31 eligible patients underwent CT scan and ultrasound simulations assessing PBSI feasibility. Fifteen were excluded because of feasibility issues, and 16 received PBSI. A minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume corresponding to the clinical target volume identified on the CT scan plus a margin of 1 cm. The procedure was well tolerated; 56% of the patients reported no pain during the procedure, and 46% of the patients developed National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 1 acute reaction. None experienced toxicity Grade 2 or 3. Conclusions: Permanent breast seed implantation seems feasible and well tolerated on these preliminary clinical data and represents an ultimate step in the reduction of treatment fraction for partial breast irradiation

  2. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational

  3. Acute radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese breast cancer patients with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osako, Tomo; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kumada, Madoka; Nemoto, Keiko; Iwase, Takuji; Yamashita, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate acute morbidity, radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis, of Japanese patients treated with whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS), compared to conventional RT. Japanese patients who received whole breast RT after BCS between October 2003 and September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had selected the conventional or hypofractionated schedule received whole breast irradiation of 50 Gy in 25 fractions plus boost or 40 Gy in 16 fractions plus boost. Radiation dermatitis and symptomatic pneumonitis were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Of 443 consecutive patients, 377 (85%) received the conventional schedule and 66 (15%) received the hypofractionated schedule. Of patients treated with the conventional schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 radiation dermatitis were observed in 16 (4%), 278 (74%), 77 (20%) and 6 (2%), respectively. Of patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule, Grade 0, 1, 2 and 3 dermatitis were observed in 11 (17%), 49 (74%), 5 (8%) and 1 (1%), respectively. Grade 2-3 dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule (9%) was observed less frequently than that by the conventional schedule (22%) (chi-square test; P=0.016). Moreover, of patients treated with the conventional schedule, 4 (1%) had Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. No patient treated with the hypofractionated schedule had symptomatic pneumonitis. Radiation dermatitis and pneumonitis in Japanese patients treated with the hypofractionated schedule is acceptable. Especially, radiation dermatitis by the hypofractionated schedule is milder than that by the conventional schedule. (author)

  4. Long-Term Efficacy and Patterns of Failure After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Molecular Assay-Based Clonality Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Antonucci, J. Vito; Wallace, Michelle R.N.; Gilbert, Samuel; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kestin, Larry; Chen, Peter; Kunzman, Jonathan; Boike, Thomas; Benitez, Pamela; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term efficacy and cosmetic results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by reviewing our institution's experience. Methods and Materials: A total of 199 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated prospectively with adjuvant APBI after lumpectomy using interstitial brachytherapy. All patients had negative margins, 82% had Stage I disease, median tumor size was 1.1 cm, and 12% had positive lymph nodes. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 8.6 years. Fifty-three patients (27%) have been followed for ≥10 years. Results: Six ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) were observed, for a 5-year and 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6% and 3.8%, respectively. A total of three regional nodal failures were observed, for a 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6%. Five contralateral breast cancers developed, for a 5- and 10-year actuarial rate of 2.2% and 5.2%, respectively. The type of IBTR (clonally related vs. clonally distinct) was analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay. Eighty-three percent of IBTRs (n = 5) were classified as clonally related. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for an association with the development of an IBTR, regional nodal failure, or contralateral breast cancer. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with any of these events. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 99% of patients. Conclusions: Long-term results with APBI using interstitial brachytherapy continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local and regional control rates and cosmetic results. According to a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay, 83% of recurrences were classified as clonally related

  5. Evaluation of long-term cosmetic results and complications following breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujishiro, Satsuki; Mitsumori, Michihide; Kokubo, Masaki; Nagata, Yasushi; Sasai, Keisuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kodama, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Long-term cosmetic outcomes and complications were evaluated in 109 patients with breast cancer who had been treated by breast conservation therapy. Patients received radiation therapy at Kyoto University Hospital following quadrantectomy and level II or III axillary node dissection. Factors that might influence long-term cosmetic results were also analyzed. Irradiation to the breast was administered in 2 Gy fractions, 5 times a week for a total of 50 Gy in all patients. Cobalt-60 γ-rays were used in 108 patients with the exception of 1 patient who received 6 Mev X-ray. Some patients with positive or close margins received boost irradiation of 10 Gy using electron beams to the primary tumor bed. Cosmetic outcome was assessed by both a scoring method and breast retraction assessment (BRA). Forty-seven percent of patients were assessed as excellent to good before radiation therapy. The percent of excellent to good decreased shortly after termination of radiation therapy, but gradually improved and stabilized by 3 years. Seventy percent of patients showed a score of excellent to good 5 years after treatment. The average BRA of the 109 patients was 3.0 cm. This did not change between 3 and 5 years after treatment. A significant correlation between cosmetic score and BRA was shown at all follow-up times. Factors such as age over 50 years (p=0.008), tumor location in the outer quadrant (p=0.02) and boost irradiation (p=0.03) significantly affected the cosmetic score. Arm edema and restriction of shoulder movement were observed in 22% and 49% at the start of radiation therapy, these improved within approximately 3 years and 1 year after treatment, respectively. Mild skin change was observed in 60% of patients even 5 years after treatment. The results indicate that cosmetic outcome after breast conservation therapy is clinically acceptable, and the complication rate is low. (author)

  6. A genomic copy number signature predicts radiation exposure in post-Chernobyl breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Christina M; Braselmann, Herbert; Hess, Julia; Klymenko, Sergiy V; Chumak, Vadim V; Zakhartseva, Liubov M; Bakhanova, Elena V; Walch, Axel K; Selmansberger, Martin; Samaga, Daniel; Weber, Peter; Schneider, Ludmila; Fend, Falko; Bösmüller, Hans C; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Unger, Kristian

    2018-04-16

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide and besides life style, age and genetic risk factors, exposure to ionizing radiation is known to increase the risk for breast cancer. Further, DNA copy number alterations (CNAs), which can result from radiation-induced double-strand breaks, are frequently occurring in breast cancer cells. We set out to identify a signature of CNAs discriminating breast cancers from radiation-exposed and non-exposed female patients. We analyzed resected breast cancer tissues from 68 exposed female Chernobyl clean-up workers and evacuees and 68 matched non-exposed control patients for CNAs by array comparative genomic hybridization analysis (aCGH). Using a stepwise forward-backward selection approach a non-complex CNA signature, that is, less than ten features, was identified in the training data set, which could be subsequently validated in the validation data set (p value < 0.05). The signature consisted of nine copy number regions located on chromosomal bands 7q11.22-11.23, 7q21.3, 16q24.3, 17q21.31, 20p11.23-11.21, 1p21.1, 2q35, 2q35, 6p22.2. The signature was independent of any clinical characteristics of the patients. In all, we identified a CNA signature that has the potential to allow identification of radiation-associated breast cancer at the individual level. © 2018 UICC.

  7. How to identify partial exposures to ionizing radiation? Proposal for a cytogenetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, T.S.; Silva, E.B.; Pinto, M.M.P.L.; Amaral, A.; Lloyd, David

    2013-01-01

    In cases of radiological incidents or in occupational exposures to ionizing radiation, the majority of exposures are not related to the total body, but only partial. In this context, if the cytogenetic dosimetry is performed, there will be an underestimation of the absorbed dose due to the dilution of irradiated cells with non-irradiated cells. Considering the norms of NR 32 - Safety and Health in the Work of Health Service - which recommends cytogenetic dosimetry in the investigation of accidental exposures to ionizing radiations, it is necessary to develop of a tool to provide a better identification of partial exposures. With this aim, a partial body exposure was simulated by mixing, in vitro, 70% of blood irradiated with 4 Gy of X-rays with 30% of unirradiated blood from the same healthy donor. Aliquots of this mixture were cultured for 48 and 72 hours. Prolonging the time of cell culture from 48 to 72 hours produced no significant change in the yield of dicentrics. However, when only M1 (first division cells) were analyzed, the frequency of dicentrics per cell was increased. Prolonging the time of cell culture allowed cells in mitotic delay by irradiation to reach metaphase, and thus provides enough time for the damage to be visualized. The results of this research present the proposed method as an important tool in the investigation of exposed individuals, allowing associating the cytogenetic analysis with the real percentage of irradiated cells, contributing significantly for the decision making in terms of occupational health. (author)

  8. Effect of Gamma Radiation sterilization versus Disinfection on Removable Partial Dentures (Microbiological study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare between the effectiveness of disinfection, using commercially available Fittydent super cleansing tablets versus sterilization, using gamma radiation on candidal growth in maxillary removable partial dentures. Methods: Fourteen partially edentulous subjects were selected according to specific criteria and divided equally and randomly into two groups; Group I: disinfection group and Group II: sterilization group. Conventional maxillary removable partial dentures were constructed for all subjects. The swab technique was used to collect the samples one month after denture delivery, immediately after disinfection/sterilization, and then one week, two weeks, three weeks, four weeks, and five weeks after disinfection/sterilization respectively. Bacteriological candidal colony count was performed using a manual contact colony counter. Results: Both methods (disinfection and sterilization) led to a noticeable decrease in the candidal count. However this decrease was highly and markedly evident in Group II as compared to Group I. Infact, no candidal growth was recorded for group II immediately after strerilization and was maintained for two more weeks. Statistical analysis revealed highly significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions: Both methods were effective in decreasing the number of Candida albicans adhering to the denture. However, sterilization using Gamma radiation had a more superior immediate, as well as, long term efficiency as compared to disinfection using Fittydent super cleansing tablets.

  9. SU-F-T-01: Optimization of the Accelerated Partial Breast Brachytherapy Fractionation with Consideration of Physical Doses to Tumor and Organ at Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, W; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy prescribes 34Gy to be delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive working days without considering the physical dose to the target and organs at risk (OARs) for an individual patient. The purpose of this study is to optimize the fractionation scheme by evaluating the radiation effect on tumor and OARs with a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model based on dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Methods: Five breast patients treated with multilumen balloon brachytherapy were selected. The minimum skin and rib spacing were ranged from 2.5mm to 14.3mm and from 1.0mm to 25.0mm, respectively. The LQ model parameters were set as: (1) breast: α=0.08, β=0.028, doubling time Tpot=14.4 days, and starting time Tk=21days; (2) skin: acute reaction α=0.101, β=0.009; late reaction α=0.064, β=0.029; (3) rib: α=0.3, β=0.12. Boundary dose Dt was 6 Gy for both target and OARs. The relation between radiation effects on the tumor (ET) and OARs (EOAR) were plotted for fraction number from 1 to 20. Results: The value of radiation effect from routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions was used as reference, ETref and EOARref. If set ET=ETref, the fractionation that results in minimum EOAR values correspond to the optimal fractionation. For these patients, the optimal numbers are 10 fractions for skin acute reaction, 18 fractions for skin and rib late reaction while the doses per fraction are 3.4Gy and 2.05–2.10Gy, respectively. If set EOAR=EOARref, the fractionation that results in a maximum ET value corresponds to the optimal fractionation. The optimal fractionation is 3.4Gyx10 fractions for skin acute reaction, and 2.10–2.25Gyx18 fractions for skin late reaction and rib. Conclusion: For APBI brachytherapy, the routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions is optimal fractionation for skin acute reaction, while 2.05–2.25Gyx18 fractions is optimal fractionation for late reaction of skin and rib.

  10. Biological Dosimetry Using Micronucleus Assay in Simulated Partial-Body Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Purnami

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In radiation accidents, it is common that only several parts of the body are exposed to radiation. As a consequence there is a mixture of exposed and unexposed lymphocytes in peripheral blood cells of the samples. This phenomenon will cause the dose value estimated using the exposed lymphocytes to be lower than the actual dose. In this study, an assessment of partial body exposures using micronucleus assay by estimating the partial body dose and fraction of irradiated blood was conducted. An optimal D0 value also has been determined in this study to estimate the fraction of irradiated cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs from three healthy donors were irradiated in vitro with 2 Gy of X-rays. Partial radiation exposure was simulated by mixing the irradiated and non-irradiated blood in different proportions. The proportions of mixtures of blood samples irradiated in vitro were 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 %. Blood samples were then cultured and harvested based on micronuclei assay protocol. At least 2000 binucleated cells with well-preserved cytoplasm were scored for the MN frequency. Dose Estimate 5.1 software was used to calculate the dispersion index (σ2/y and normalized unit of this index (U in each proportion of bloods. The fractions of irradiated cells were calculated with CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software for several different D0 values (2.7; 3.8; 5.4. The results showed that D0 value at 5.4 gave the closest results to the actual proportion of irradiated bloods, while for the dose estimation the estimated doses value from all proportions in all donors were higher than the actual dose. The factor that may cause this phenomenon was that the dose response calibration curve used to predict the radiation dose was not constructed in the laboratory used. Overall it can be concluded that a biodosimetry using MN assay can be used to estimate the radiation dose in partial body exposure. In order to establish a biodosimetry using MN

  11. Results of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of a Solitary Sternal Relapse of Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Young; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Choi, Do Ho; Kang, Min Kyu; Yang, Jung Hyun; Nam, Seok Jin; Im, Young Hyuck

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the response and survival rate after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of patients with a solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. Seventeen patients between May 1996 and June 2005 were evaluated with the salvage 3D-CRT treatment of a solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. The treatment fields included the gross tumor volume with 2 cm margins. The total radiation dose was 35.0 ∼61.5 Gy (biologic effective dose of 43.7 ∼76.9 Gy10 using an α/β ratio of 10 Gy), with a daily dose of 1.8∼3.0 Gy. The tumor response was evaluated by the change in maximum tumor size via follow up CT scans 1∼3 months after the completion of treatment. An objective tumor response was achieved in all patients, with a complete response in 5 patients and a partial response in 12 patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 51.9% (median survival time: 27 months), and the most important factor affecting overall survival was the disease-free interval (interval from primary surgery of breast cancer to the development of sternal metastasis): The 5-year overall survival rate was 61.8% for patients with a disease-free interval ≥12 months and 0.0% for patients < with disease-free interval <12 months (p=0.03). The response to 3D-CRT was good in patients with solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. Particularly, patients with long disease-free interval from primary surgery survived significantly longer than patients with short disease-free interval from primary surgery

  12. Proportion of various dendromass components of spruce (Picea abies), and partial models for modification of wind speed and radiation by pure spruce stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmerstädt, J.; Sharma, S.C.; Marsch, M.

    1992-01-01

    Means for quantifying dendromass components of spruce stands have been discussed, and partial models for modification of radiation and wind by the pure spruce stand were developed. By means of a sampling procedure, the components needle dry mass and branchwood dry mass without needles of individual trees are recorded. Using the relationship between branch basal diameter and needle respectively branchwood dry mass, the total needle and branchwood dry mass of trees is estimated. Based on that, stand or regional parameters for the allometric function between diameter breast height and needle respectively branchwood dry mass can be determined for defined H/D-clusters. Published data from various sources were used in this paper. The lowest coefficients of determination were found in H/D-cluster 120 (H/D-values over 114). Therefore, further differentiation within this range seems to be necessary. For assimilation models, there should be quantification of needle dry mass separately for needle age classes and morphological characteristics of needles. Basis for the estimate of tree-bole volume is the relationship between H/D-value and oven-dry weight. There are problems as far as methods for quantifying the subterranean dendromass (e.g. dynamics of fine roots) are concerned; this is requiring considerable efforts, too. Spatial structure was also described by allometric functions (crown length and crown cover in relation to diameter breast height). For the partial model to express wind modification by the stand, standardized wind profiles as related to crown canopy density were used. The modification of radiation by the stand is closely related with the vertical needle mass distribution (sum curves). These two partial models have to be considered as an approach for the description of the modifying effect by the stocking [de

  13. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-02-27

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  14. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  15. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ≤3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis

  16. High expression of Rac1 is correlated with partial reversed cell polarity and poor prognosis in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingbing; Xiong, Jianhua; Liu, Guiqiu; Wu, Jing; Wen, Likun; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Chuanshan

    2017-07-01

    The change of cell polarity is usually associated with invasion and metastasis. Partial reverse cell polarity in IDC-NOS may play a role in lymphatic tumor spread. Rac1 is a kind of polarity related protein. It plays an important role in invasion and metastasis in tumors. We here investigated the expression of Rac1 and partial reverse cell polarity status in breast cancer and evaluated their value for prognosis in breast cancer. The association of the expression of Rac1 and MUC-1 with clinicopathological parameters and prognostic significance was evaluated in 162 cases of IDC-NOS paraffin-embedded tissues by immunohistochemical method. The Rac1 messenger RNA expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 30 breast cancer patients, which was divided into two groups of partial reverse cell polarity and no partial reverse cell polarity. We found that lymph node metastasis of partial reverse cell polarity patients was higher than no partial reverse cell polarity patients (Z = -4.030, p = 0.000). Rac1 was upregulated in partial reverse cell polarity group than no partial reverse cell polarity group (Z = -3.164, p = 0.002), and there was correlationship between the expression of Rac1 and partial reverse cell polarity status (r s  = 0.249, p = 0.001). The level of Rac1 messenger RNA expression in partial reverse cell polarity group was significantly higher compared to no partial reverse cell polarity group (t = -2.527, p = 0.017). Overexpression of Rac1 and partial reverse cell polarity correlates with poor prognosis of IDC-NOS patients (p = 0.011). Partial reverse cell polarity and lymph node metastasis remained as independent predictors for poor disease-free survival of IDC-NOS (p = 0.023, p = 0.046). Our study suggests that partial reverse cell polarity may lead to poor prognosis of breast cancer. Overexpression of Rac1 may lead to polarity change in IDC-NOS of the breast. Therefore, Rac1 could be a

  17. Sound Radiation from a Supersonic Jet Passing Through a Partially Open Exhaust Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    The radiation of sound from a perfectly expanded Mach 2.5 cold supersonic jet of 25.4 mm exit diameter flowing through a partially open rigid-walled duct with an upstream i-deflector has been studied experimentally. In the experiments, the nozzle is mounted vertically, with the nozzle exit plane at a height of 73 jet diameters above ground level. Relative to the nozzle exit plane (NEP), the location of the duct inlet is varied at 10, 5, and -1 jet diameters. Far-field sound pressure levels were obtained at 54 jet diameters above ground with the aid of acoustic sensors equally spaced around a circular arc of radius equal to 80 jet diameters from the jet axis. Data on the jet acoustic field for the partially open duct were obtained and compared with those with a free jet and with a closed duct. The results suggest that for the partially open duct the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) decreases as the distance between the NEP and the duct inlet plane decreases, while the opposite trend is observed for the closed duct. It is also concluded that the observed peak frequency in the partially open duct increases above the free jet value as the angle from the duct axis is increased, and as the duct inlet plane becomes closer to the NEP.

  18. Radiation therapy and patient age in the survival from early-stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joslyn, Sue A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the use of radiation therapy following local excision of invasive localized breast cancer and subsequent survival by 5-year age category. Methods: Data for 27,399 women diagnosed with localized stage of breast cancer and treated with local excision surgery from 1983 through 1992 were collected and provided by the national Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Use of radiation therapy was analyzed by race, ethnic background, geographic location, and age at diagnosis. Survival for women treated with local excision plus radiation therapy was compared to that of women treated with local excision alone for each 5-year age category. Results: Subjects in older age groups were significantly less likely (p < 0.001) to receive radiation following local excision compared to younger age groups. Statistically significant survival advantages were conferred on women receiving radiation therapy in each 5-year age category from age 35 to 84 years (ranging from p = 0.02 to p < 0.0001). Conclusion: While the use of radiation therapy following local excision of early-stage breast tumors drops significantly in older age groups, women aged 35-84 years receiving radiation therapy had significant reductions in mortality. These results did not appear to be influenced by the presence of mortal comorbid conditions. These results strongly suggest the need to consider carefully patient characteristics other than age in deciding the course of treatment for early-stage breast cancer

  19. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Sharad; Daroui, Parima; Khan, Atif J; Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie; Haffty, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen

  20. Computational Modeling of Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Radiation Dose Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Daniel L.; Debeb, Bisrat G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thames, Howard D. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) involves giving radiation to the entire brain with the goals of reducing the incidence of brain metastasis and improving overall survival. Experimentally, we have demonstrated that PCI prevents brain metastases in a breast cancer mouse model. We developed a computational model to expand on and aid in the interpretation of our experimental results. Methods and Materials: MATLAB was used to develop a computational model of brain metastasis and PCI in mice. Model input parameters were optimized such that the model output would match the experimental number of metastases per mouse from the unirradiated group. An independent in vivo–limiting dilution experiment was performed to validate the model. The effect of whole brain irradiation at different measurement points after tumor cells were injected was evaluated in terms of the incidence, number of metastases, and tumor burden and was then compared with the corresponding experimental data. Results: In the optimized model, the correlation between the number of metastases per mouse and the experimental fits was >95. Our attempt to validate the model with a limiting dilution assay produced 99.9% correlation with respect to the incidence of metastases. The model accurately predicted the effect of whole-brain irradiation given 3 weeks after cell injection but substantially underestimated its effect when delivered 5 days after cell injection. The model further demonstrated that delaying whole-brain irradiation until the development of gross disease introduces a dose threshold that must be reached before a reduction in incidence can be realized. Conclusions: Our computational model of mouse brain metastasis and PCI correlated strongly with our experiments with unirradiated mice. The results further suggest that early treatment of subclinical disease is more effective than irradiating established disease.

  1. When is respiratory management necessary for partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy: A respiratory amplitude escalation treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, Sarah; Conroy, Leigh; Smith, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of typical respiratory motion amplitudes (∼2 mm) on partial breast irradiation (PBI) is minimal; however, some patients have larger respiratory amplitudes that may negatively affect dose homogeneity. Here we determine at what amplitude respiratory management may be required to maintain plan quality. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were planned with PBI IMRT. Respiratory motion (2–20 mm amplitude) probability density functions were convolved with static plan fluence to estimate the delivered dose. Evaluation metrics included target coverage, ipsilateral breast hotspot, homogeneity, and uniformity indices. Results: Degradation of dose homogeneity was the limiting factor in reduction of plan quality due to respiratory motion, not loss of coverage. Hotspot increases were observed even at typical motion amplitudes. At 2 and 5 mm, 2/10 plans had a hotspot greater than 107% and at 10 mm this increased to 5/10 plans. Target coverage was only compromised at larger amplitudes: 5/10 plans did not meet coverage criteria at 15 mm amplitude and no plans met minimum coverage at 20 mm. Conclusions: We recommend that if respiratory amplitude is greater than 10 mm, respiratory management or alternative radiotherapy should be considered due to an increase in the hotspot in the ipsilateral breast and a decrease in dose homogeneity

  2. Cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients after surgery: a multicomponent model using partial least squares-path modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolon, Catherine; Krikorian, Alicia; Carayol, Marion; Brouillet, Denis; Romieu, Gilles; Ninot, Gregory

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine factors contributing to cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in breast cancer patients who have undergone surgery. Sixty women (mean age: 50.0) completed self-rated questionnaires assessing components of CRF, muscular and cognitive functions. Also, physiological and subjective data were gathered. Data were analyzed using partial least squares variance-based structural equation modeling in order to examine factors contributing to CRF after breast surgery. The tested model was robust in terms of its measurement quality (reliability and validity). According to the structural model results, emotional distress (β = 0.59; p accounting for 61% of the explained variance. Also, emotional distress (β = 0.41; p accounted for 41% of the explained variance. However, the relationship between low physical function and CRF was weak and nonsignificant (β = 0.01; p > 0.05). Emotional distress, altered vigilance capacity, and pain are associated with CRF in postsurgical breast cancer. In addition, emotional distress and pain are related to diminished physical function, which, in turn, has no significant impact on CRF. The current model should be examined in subsequent phases of the treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) when side effects are more pronounced and may lead to increased intensity of CRF and low physical function. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. How does imaging frequency and soft tissue motion affect the PTV margin size in partial breast and boost radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Poynter, Andrew; Rawlings, Christine; Wishart, Gordon C.; Evans, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates (i) the effect of verification protocols on treatment accuracy and PTV margins for partial breast and boost breast radiotherapy with short fractionation schema (15 fractions), (ii) the effect of deformation of the excision cavity (EC) on PTV margin size, (iii) the imaging dose required to achieve specific PTV margins. Methods and materials: Verification images using implanted EC markers were studied in 36 patients. Target motion was estimated for a 15 fraction partial breast regimen using imaging protocols based on on-line and off-line motion correction strategies (No Action Level (NAL) and the extended NAL (eNAL) protocols). Target motion was used to estimate a PTV margin for each protocol. To evaluate treatment errors due to deformation of the excision cavity, individual marker positions were obtained from 11 patients. The mean clip displacement and daily variation in clip position during radiotherapy were determined and the contribution of these errors to PTV margin calculated. Published imaging dose data were used to estimate total dose for each protocol. Finally the number of images required to obtain a specific PTV margin was evaluated and hence, the relationship between PTV margins and imaging dose was investigated. Results: The PTV margin required to account for excision cavity motion, varied between 10.2 and 2.4 mm depending on the correction strategy used. Average clip movement was 0.8 mm and average variation in clip position during treatment was 0.4 mm. The contribution to PTV margin from deformation was estimated to be small, less than 0.2 mm for both off-line and on-line correction protocols. Conclusion: A boost or partial breast PTV margin of ∼10 mm, is possible with zero imaging dose and workload, however, patients receiving boost radiotherapy may benefit from a margin reduction of ∼4 mm with imaging doses from 0.4 cGy to 25 cGy using an eNAL protocol. PTV margin contributions from deformation errors are likely

  4. Radiation dose, reproductive history, and breast cancer risk among Japanese A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Excess risk of female breast cancer is among the most comprehensively documented late effects of exposure to substantial doses of ionizing radiation, based on studies of medically irradiated populations and the survivors of the A-bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This study looks at the interaction of dose with epidemiological factors like age at first full-term pregnancy and family history of breast cancer, most closely associated with risk in epidemiological studies of non-irradiatied populations. 1 fig., 2 tabs

  5. Post-mastectomy radiation in large node-negative breast tumors: Does size really matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, Scott R.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment decisions regarding local control can be particularly challenging for T3N0 breast tumors because of difficulty in estimating rates of local failure after mastectomy. Reports in the literature detailing the rates of local failure vary widely, likely owing to the uncommon incidence of this clinical situation. The literature regarding this clinical scenario is reviewed, including recent reports that specifically address the issue of local failure rates after mastectomy in the absence of radiation for large node-negative breast tumors.

  6. Cancer of the breast: induction by radiation and role of mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N

    1977-10-01

    Conflict in the management of cancer of the breast exists. Diagnosis by x-ray mammography provides early effective treatment, but x-ray exposure to the breast is cancerogenic. Prudence requires the use of low dose x-rays in mammography, and limits the use of x-ray mammography in the young. Guide lines for the indications for mammography are changing, and large scale population exposure to radiation should await results of demonstration projects in the United States.

  7. Partial inhibition of in vitro pollen germination by simulated solar ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, S.D.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Pollen from four temperate-latitude taxa were treated with UV radiation in a portion of the UV-B (280-320 nm) waveband during in vitro germination. Inhibition of germination was noted in this pollen compared to samples treated identically except for the exclusion of the UV-B portion of the spectrum. Levels similar to maximum solar UV-B found in temperate-latitude areas failed to inhibit pollen germination significantly, while levels similar to maximum solar UV-B found in equatorial alpine locations caused partial inhibition of germination in three of the four taxa examined

  8. Evaluation of a three-dimensional ultrasound localisation system incorporating probe pressure correction for use in partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E J; Symonds-Taylor, R; Treece, G M; Gee, A H; Prager, R W; Brabants, P; Evans, P M

    2009-10-01

    This work evaluates a three-dimensional (3D) freehand ultrasound-based localisation system with new probe pressure correction for use in partial breast irradiation. Accuracy and precision of absolute position measurement was measured as a function of imaging depth (ID), object depth, scanning direction and time using a water phantom containing crossed wires. To quantify the improvement in accuracy due to pressure correction, 3D scans of a breast phantom containing ball bearings were obtained with and without pressure. Ball bearing displacements were then measured with and without pressure correction. Using a single scan direction (for all imaging depths), the mean error was <1.3 mm, with the exception of the wires at 68.5 mm imaged with an ID of 85 mm, which gave a mean error of -2.3 mm. Precision was greater than 1 mm for any single scan direction. For multiple scan directions, precision was within 1.7 mm. Probe pressure corrections of between 0 mm and 2.2 mm have been observed for pressure displacements of 1.1 mm to 4.2 mm. Overall, anteroposterior position measurement accuracy increased from 2.2 mm to 1.6 mm and to 1.4 mm for the two opposing scanning directions. Precision is comparable to that reported for other commercially available ultrasound localisation systems, provided that 3D image acquisition is performed in the same scan direction. The existing temporal calibration is imperfect and a "per installation" calibration would further improve the accuracy and precision. Probe pressure correction was shown to improve the accuracy and will be useful for the localisation of the excision cavity in partial breast radiotherapy.

  9. Multidisciplinary approach of early breast cancer: The biology applied to radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgier, Céline; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Azria, David

    2010-01-01

    Early breast cancer treatment is based on a multimodality approach with the application of clinical and histological prognostic factors to determine locoregional and systemic treatments. The entire scientific community is strongly involved in the management of this disease: radiologists for screening and early diagnosis, gynecologists, surgical oncologists and radiation oncologists for locoregional treatment, pathologists and biologists for personalized characterization, genetic counselors for BRCA mutation history and medical oncologists for systemic therapies. Recently, new biological tools have established various prognostic subsets of breast cancer and developed predictive markers for miscellaneous treatments. The aim of this article is to highlight the contribution of biological tools in the locoregional management of early breast cancer

  10. Radiation therapy planning of a breast cancer patient with in situ pacemaker-challenges and lessons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Dinshaw, Ketayun A [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Dayananda [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2008-02-15

    A postmenopausal lady with an in situ pacemaker developed a lump in the left breast and was diagnosed to have breast cancer. The patient underwent breast conservative surgery and was planned for post operative radiotherapy. The location of the tumor relative to the pacemaker provided a unique challenge in planning radiotherapy and the patient had an uneventful post radiotherapy course. A literature review revealed that modern generation pacemakers are very sensitive to radiation compared to their older counterparts. The present article makes suggestions towards reducing dose in radiotherapy planning in pacemaker patients

  11. Radiation therapy planning of a breast cancer patient with in situ pacemaker-challenges and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Dinshaw, Ketayun A.; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Dayananda

    2008-01-01

    A postmenopausal lady with an in situ pacemaker developed a lump in the left breast and was diagnosed to have breast cancer. The patient underwent breast conservative surgery and was planned for post operative radiotherapy. The location of the tumor relative to the pacemaker provided a unique challenge in planning radiotherapy and the patient had an uneventful post radiotherapy course. A literature review revealed that modern generation pacemakers are very sensitive to radiation compared to their older counterparts. The present article makes suggestions towards reducing dose in radiotherapy planning in pacemaker patients

  12. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in breast cancer patients with radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondrup, K.; Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Rose, C.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients without signs of recurrent disease at least 60 months after radiotherapy (RT). Clinically, 35% (95% confidence limits: 25-47%) had RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-36%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%), assessment of a definite level was not possible. In most, symptoms began during or immediately after RT, thus being without significant latency. Numbness or paresthesias (71%, 52-86%) and pain (43%, 25-62%) were the most prominent symptoms, while the most prominent objective signs were decreased or absent muscle stretch reflexes (93%, 77-99%) closely followed by sensory loss (82%, 64-93%) and weakness (71%, 52-86%). Neurophysiological investigations were carried out in 46 patients (58%). The most frequent abnormalities in patients with RBP were signs of chronic partial denervation with increased mean duration of individual motor unit potentials, and decreased amplitude of compound muscle and sensory action potentials. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. (author)

  13. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in breast cancer patients with radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondrup, K.; Olsen, N.K. (Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Odense Unviersity Hospital (Denmark)); Pfeiffer, P.; Rose, C. (Department of Oncology R, Odense University Hospital (Denmark))

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients without signs of recurrent disease at least 60 months after radiotherapy (RT). Clinically, 35% (95% confidence limits: 25-47%) had RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-36%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%), assessment of a definite level was not possible. In most, symptoms began during or immediately after RT, thus being without significant latency. Numbness or paresthesias (71%, 52-86%) and pain (43%, 25-62%) were the most prominent symptoms, while the most prominent objective signs were decreased or absent muscle stretch reflexes (93%, 77-99%) closely followed by sensory loss (82%, 64-93%) and weakness (71%, 52-86%). Neurophysiological investigations were carried out in 46 patients (58%). The most frequent abnormalities in patients with RBP were signs of chronic partial denervation with increased mean duration of individual motor unit potentials, and decreased amplitude of compound muscle and sensory action potentials. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. (author).

  14. Investigation of absorbed radiation dose in refraction-enhanced breast tomosynthesis by a Laue case analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, H.; Ando, M.; Shimao, D.

    2011-01-01

    An early diagnosis system for breast cancer using refraction-enhanced breast tomosynthesis is under development. Tomograms of breast specimens based on refraction-contrast were demonstrated using the simplest shift-and-add tomosynthesis algorithm. Raw projection image data of breast specimens for tomosynthesis were acquired for a total of 51 views over an angle of 50 deg., in increments of 1 deg., by rotating the object. The incident X ray was monochromatic synchrotron radiation with 20 keV. The purpose of this study was to estimate the absorbed dose of a new X-ray imaging method. As breast cancer almost always arises in glandular breast tissue, the average absorbed dose in such glandular tissue should be measured to estimate the radiation risk associated with mammography. The absorbed dose of the mammary gland due to monochromatic X rays was calculated by the Monte Carlo method, and the optimal X ray energy range for refraction-enhanced breast tomosynthesis was investigated through actual measurements. Compared with the conventional method, it was found to be below one-sixth per inspection. (authors)

  15. Quantitative proteomics reveals middle infrared radiation-interfered networks in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Li, Ming-Hua; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Lee, Si-Chen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-02-06

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancer-related causes of death worldwide. Treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is complex and challenging, especially when metastasis has developed. In this study, we applied infrared radiation as an alternative approach for the treatment of TNBC. We used middle infrared (MIR) with a wavelength range of 3-5 μm to irradiate breast cancer cells. MIR significantly inhibited cell proliferation in several breast cancer cells but did not affect the growth of normal breast epithelial cells. We performed iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS analysis to investigate the MIR-triggered molecular mechanisms in breast cancer cells. A total of 1749 proteins were identified, quantified, and subjected to functional enrichment analysis. From the constructed functionally enriched network, we confirmed that MIR caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, remodeled the microtubule network to an astral pole arrangement, altered the actin filament formation and focal adhesion molecule localization, and reduced cell migration activity and invasion ability. Our results reveal the coordinative effects of MIR-regulated physiological responses in concentrated networks, demonstrating the potential implementation of infrared radiation in breast cancer therapy.

  16. Murine partial-body radiation exposure model for biodosimetry studies - Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, William F., E-mail: blakely@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Sandgren, David J., E-mail: Sandgren@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Nagy, Vitaly, E-mail: nagy@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Kim, Sung-Yop, E-mail: kimy@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Ossetrova, Natalia I., E-mail: ossetrova@afrri.usuhs.mil [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Scientific Research Department, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of the present study was to establish a murine partial-body radiation exposure model for studies supporting the identification and validation of novel biological dosimetry diagnostic assays. A lead shielding - Plexiglas irradiation apparatus with cutouts to permit irradiation of single-mouse-holder constrained CD2F1 male mice to total-body (3/3), mid- and lower-body (2/3), mid-body only (1/3), and 100% lead shielding sham-treated (0 Gy) controls (0/3) with a 250-kVp X-ray source (dose: 6 Gy, dose rate: 0.50 Gy min{sup -1}) was used. Doses and dose uniformity were measured using alanine - electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and ionization chambers. Dosimetry mapping results showed {approx}2 and {approx}12% non-uniformity in the radiation fields for the two smaller (1/3, 2/3) and one larger (3/3) fields, respectively. Hematology results showed no marked differences in neutrophil and platelet counts 1 and 2 days (d) after irradiation. The lymphocyte counts, as expected, demonstrate a progressive decline below baseline levels 1 and 2 d after irradiation with increasing fraction of the body exposed, while the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratios show the inverse effect, with a progressive increase with the fraction of body exposed. The bone marrow biomarker, Flt3 ligand, demonstrated a progressive increase in values with increasing fraction of the body exposed; the 2 d response was enhanced compared to 1 d. The radioresponse 1 d after irradiation for the acute phase reactant protein biomarker, serum amyloid A (SAA) that is synthesized by the liver, was significantly influenced depending on whether the mouse head was in the radiation field. Use of multiple biomarkers based on hematology and proteomic targets provide an enhancement in early-phase partial-body radiation exposure assessment.

  17. Isolated lung events following radiation for early stage breast cancer: incidence and predictors for primary lung vs metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Buren, Teresa A; Harris, Jay R; Sugarbaker, David J; Schneider, Lindsey; Healey, Elizabeth A

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: 1) To define the incidence of isolated lung events in a cohort of women treated with conservative surgery (CS) and radiation therapy (RT) for early stage breast cancer. 2) Among such patients, to define the relative distribution of primary lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and indeterminate lesions; and to identify any predictors for a diagnosis of lung vs metastatic breast cancer. 3) To examine the cohort with respect to whether a higher than expected incidence of lung cancer is seen following breast irradiation. Materials and Methods: Between 1968 and 1986, 1865 patients with clinical stage I-II breast cancer were treated with CS and RT; the median follow-up for surviving patients is 129 months. The study population was limited to patients who developed a subsequent isolated lung event as the first site of distant disease. Isolated lung event was defined as disease limited to the thoracic cavity, without evidence of either uncontrolled local breast disease or metastatic disease elsewhere. Diagnosis of the lung event as a primary lung cancer, a metastatic breast lesion, or an indeterminate lesion was documented from the viewpoint of 1) the pathologic analysis and 2) the clinical impression at the time of the lung event. Results: Sixty six of the 1865 patients (3.5%) developed an isolated lung event. The relative distribution of the pathologic and clinical diagnoses is shown below: The 66 lung events were characterized either as a solitary pulmonary nodule (27), multiple nodules (23), pleural effusion alone (10), unknown (2), or miscellaneous other findings (4). Among the 47 patients for whom pathology was available, the diagnosis remained indeterminate for 24 (51%). For patients with a definitive pathologic diagnosis, 69% ((9(13))) of smokers had a new lung cancer compared to 20% ((2(10))) of non-smokers (p=0.036), and 67% ((10(15))) of patients with a solitary pulmonary nodule had lung cancer compared to 14% ((1(7))) for other lung presentations (p

  18. Continuous Arc Rotation of the Couch Therapy for the Delivery of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Treatment Planning Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We present a novel form of arc therapy: continuous arc rotation of the couch (C-ARC) and compare its dosimetry with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). C-ARC, like VMAT, uses a modulated beam aperture and dose rate, but with the couch, not the gantry, rotating. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients previously treated with APBI using 3D-CRT were replanned with (1) C-ARC, (2) IMRT, and (3) VMAT. C-ARC plans were designed with one medial and one lateral arc through which the couch rotated while the gantry was held stationary at a tangent angle. Target dose coverage was normalized to the 3D-CRT plan. Comparative endpoints were dose to normal breast tissue, lungs, and heart and monitor units prescribed. Results: Compared with 3D-CRT, C-ARC, IMRT, and VMAT all significantly reduced the ipsilateral breast V50% by the same amount (mean, 7.8%). Only C-ARC and IMRT plans significantly reduced the contralateral breast maximum dose, the ipsilateral lung V5Gy, and the heart V5%. C-ARC used on average 40%, 30%, and 10% fewer monitor units compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: C-ARC provides improved dosimetry and treatment efficiency, which should reduce the risks of toxicity and secondary malignancy. Its tangent geometry avoids irradiation of critical structures that is unavoidable using the en face geometry of VMAT.

  19. Sci—Thur PM: Planning and Delivery — 04: Respiratory margin derivation and verification in partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirk, S; Conroy, L; Smith, WL

    2014-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) following breast-conserving surgery is emerging as an effective means to achieve local control and reduce irradiated breast volume. Patients are planned on a static CT image; however, treatment is delivered while the patient is free-breathing. Respiratory motion can degrade plan quality by reducing target coverage and/or dose homogeneity. A variety of methods can be used to determine the required margin for respiratory motion in PBI. We derive geometric and dosimetric respiratory 1D margin. We also verify the adequacy of the typical 5 mm respiratory margin in 3D by evaluating plan quality for increasing respiratory amplitudes (2–20 mm). Ten PBI plans were used for dosimetric evaluation. A database of volunteer respiratory data, with similar characteristics to breast cancer patients, was used for this study. We derived a geometric 95%-margin of 3 mm from the population respiratory data. We derived a dosimetric 95%-margin of 2 mm by convolving 1D dose profiles with respiratory probability density functions. The 5 mm respiratory margin is possibly too large when 1D coverage is assessed and could lead to unnecessary normal tissue irradiation. Assessing margins only for coverage may be insufficient; 3D dosimetric assessment revealed degradation in dose homogeneity is the limiting factor, not target coverage. Hotspots increased even for the smallest respiratory amplitudes, while target coverage only degraded at amplitudes greater than 10 mm. The 5 mm respiratory margin is adequate for coverage, but due to plan quality degradation, respiratory management is recommended for patients with respiratory amplitudes greater than 10 mm

  20. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy: 12-year update of a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos; Sulyok, Zoltan; Somogyi, Andras; Loevey, Katalin; Nemeth, Gyoergy; Kasler, Miklos

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report the 12-year updated results of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) using multicatheter interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT). Patients and methods: Forty-five prospectively selected patients with T1N0-N1mi, nonlobular breast cancer without the presence of an extensive intraductal component and with negative surgical margins were treated with APBI after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) using interstitial HDR BT. A total dose of 30.3 Gy (n = 8) and 36.4 Gy (n = 37) in seven fractions within 4 days was delivered to the tumour bed plus a 1-2 cm margin. The median follow-up time was 133 months for surviving patients. Local and regional control, disease-free (DFS), cancer-specific (CSS), and overall survival (OS), as well as late side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: Four (8.9%) ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences were observed, for a 5-, 10-, and 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%, 9.3%, and 9.3%, respectively. A total of two regional nodal failures were observed for a 12-year actuarial rate of 4.4%. The 12-year DFS, CSS, and OS was 75.3%, 91.1%, and 88.9%, respectively. Grade 3 fibrosis was observed in one patient (2.2%). No patient developed grade 3 teleangiectasia. Fat necrosis requiring surgical intervention occurred in one woman (2.2%). Cosmetic results were rated excellent or good in 35 patients (77.8%). Conclusions: Twelve-year results with APBI using HDR multicatheter interstitial implants continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local tumour control, survival, and cosmetic results with a low-rate of late side effects.

  1. Radiation induced cardiotoxicity in left sided breast cancer - Where do we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Alice Kingsley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the commonest cancer in women, with around a million new cases diagnosed each year worldwide. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT is an important component of therapy for many women with early-stage breast cancer. With improving survival rates following breast cancer, patients are increasingly likely to die of other causes. As a result, long-term adverse effects of treatment are of major concern. To determine which treatment is optimal, clinician need to be aware of long-term risks and benefits of adjuvant therapies. An awareness of the potential cardiotoxicity of RT led to the application of improved RT techniques that minimize the irradiation to the heart. Although new techniques, including intensity-modulated RT combined with free breathing gating and helical tomotherapy may further reduce radiation-induced cardiac toxicities, the most important factors in limiting cardiac radiation are associated with the techniques used and the skill of the radiation oncologist.

  2. Radiation dosimetry from breast milk excretion of radioiodine and pertechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrick, W.R.; Di Simone, R.N.; Keen, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements were made of the activity in samples of breast milk obtained from a patient with postpartum thyroiditis following administration of [ 123 I]sodium iodide and subsequently [99mTc]pertechnetate 24 hr later. Both 123 I and 99mTc were found to be excreted exponentially with an effective half-life of 5.8 hr and 2.8 hr, respectively. Less than 10% of the activity was incorporated into breast-milk protein. After administration of [ 123 I]sodium iodide breast feeding should be discontinued for 24-36 hr to reduce the absorbed dose to the child's thyroid

  3. Effectiveness of virtual reality simulation software in radiotherapy treatment planning involving non-coplanar beams with partial breast irradiation as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, S; Warfel, B; Price, J; Sinacore, J; Albuquerque, K

    2012-10-01

    Virtual reality simulation software (VRS - FocalSim Version 4.40 with VRS prototype, Computerized Medical Systems, St. Louis, MO) is a new radiation dose planning tool that allows for 3D visualization of the patient and the machine couch (treatment table) in relationship to the linear accelerator. This allows the radiation treatment planner to have a "room's-eye-view" and enhances the process of virtual simulation. The aim of this study was to compare VRS to a standard planning program (XiO - Version 4.50, Computerized Medical Systems, St. Louis, MO) in regards to the time it took to use each program, the angles chosen in each, and to determine if there was a dosimetric benefit to using VRS. Ten patients who had undergone left-sided lumpectomies were chosen to have treatment plans generated. A partial breast irradiation (PBI) treatment plan by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was generated for each patient using two different methods. In the first method the full plan was generated using XiO software. In the second method beam angles were chosen using the VRS software, those angles were transferred to XiO, and the remaining part of the plan was completed using XiO (since VRS does not allow dose calculations). On average, using VRS to choose angles took about 10 minutes longer than XiO. None of the five gantry angles differed significantly between the two programs, but four of the five couch angles did. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data showed a significantly better conformality index, and trends toward decreased hot spots and increased coverage of the planed treatment volume (PTV) when using VRS. However, when angels were chosen in VRS a greater volume of the ipsilateral breast received a low dose of radiation (between 3% and 50% of the prescribed dose) (VRS = 23.06%, XiO = 19.57%, p < 0.0005). A significant advantage that VRS provided over XiO was the ability to detect potential collisions prior to actual treatment of the patient in three of the ten patients

  4. Current technological clinical practice in breast radiotherapy; results of a survey in EORTC-Radiation Oncology Group affiliated institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Hurkmans, Coen W; Kuten, Abraham; Westenberg, Helen A

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the current technological clinical practice of radiation therapy of the breast in institutions participating in the EORTC-Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey was conducted between August 2008 and January 2009 on behalf of the Breast Working

  5. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  6. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  7. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto, E-mail: arojasmtz@gmail.com, E-mail: augusto.rojasm@uanl.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. (author)

  8. The Effect of Dose-Volume Parameters and Interfraction Interval on Cosmetic Outcome and Toxicity After 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Kara Lynne; Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Wazer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose-volume parameters and the interfraction interval (IFI) as they relate to cosmetic outcome and normal tissue effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients were treated by the use of 3D-CRT to deliver APBI at our institutions from 2003-2010 in strict accordance with the specified dose-volume constraints outlined in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 (NSABP-B39/RTOG 0413) protocol. The prescribed dose was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions delivered twice daily. Patients underwent follow-up with assessment for recurrence, late toxicity, and overall cosmetic outcome. Tests for association between toxicity endpoints and dosimetric parameters were performed with the chi-square test. Univariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of interfraction interval (IFI) with these outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up time of 32 months, grade 2-4 and grade 3-4 subcutaneous fibrosis occurred in 31% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Subcutaneous fibrosis improved in 5 patients (6%) with extended follow-up. Fat necrosis developed in 11% of women, and cosmetic outcome was fair/poor in 19%. The relative volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% (V5-V100) of the prescribed dose was associated with risk of subcutaneous fibrosis, and the volume receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% (V50-V100) was associated with fair/poor cosmesis. The mean IFI was 6.9 hours, and the minimum IFI was 6.2 hours. The mean and minimum IFI values were not significantly associated with late toxicity. Conclusions: The incidence of moderate to severe late toxicity, particularly subcutaneous fibrosis and fat necrosis and resulting fair/poor cosmesis, remains high with continued follow-up. These toxicity endpoints are associated with several dose-volume parameters. Minimum and mean IFI values were

  9. WE-DE-209-00: Practical Implementation of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques for Breast Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Breast radiation therapy is associated with some risk of lung toxicity as well as cardiac toxicity for left-sided cases. Radiation doses to the lung and heart can be reduced by using the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique, in which the patient is simulated and treated during the deep inspiration phase of the breathing cycle. During DIBH, the heart is usually displaced posteriorly, inferiorly, and to the right, effectively expanding the distance between the heart and the breast/chest wall. As a result, the distance between the medial treatment field border and heart/lung is increased. Also, in a majority of DIBH patients, the air drawn into the thoracic cavity increases the total lung volume. The DIBH was discussed by an AAPM Task Group 10 years ago in the AAPM TG 76 report. However, DIBH is still not the standard of care in many clinics, which may be partially due to challenges associated with its implementation. Therefore, this seccion will focus primarily on how to clinically implement four different DIBH techniques: (1) Active Breathing Control, (2) Spirometric Motion Management, (3) 3D Surface Image-Guided, and (4) Self-held Breath Control with Respiratory Monitoring and Feedback Guidance. Learning Objectives: Describe the physical displacement of the heart and the change in lung volume during DIBH and discuss dosimetric consequences of those changes. Provide an overview of the technical aspects. Describe work flow for patient simulation and treatment. Give an overview of commissioning and routine. Provide practical tips for clinical implementation.

  10. WE-DE-209-00: Practical Implementation of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques for Breast Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiation therapy is associated with some risk of lung toxicity as well as cardiac toxicity for left-sided cases. Radiation doses to the lung and heart can be reduced by using the deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique, in which the patient is simulated and treated during the deep inspiration phase of the breathing cycle. During DIBH, the heart is usually displaced posteriorly, inferiorly, and to the right, effectively expanding the distance between the heart and the breast/chest wall. As a result, the distance between the medial treatment field border and heart/lung is increased. Also, in a majority of DIBH patients, the air drawn into the thoracic cavity increases the total lung volume. The DIBH was discussed by an AAPM Task Group 10 years ago in the AAPM TG 76 report. However, DIBH is still not the standard of care in many clinics, which may be partially due to challenges associated with its implementation. Therefore, this seccion will focus primarily on how to clinically implement four different DIBH techniques: (1) Active Breathing Control, (2) Spirometric Motion Management, (3) 3D Surface Image-Guided, and (4) Self-held Breath Control with Respiratory Monitoring and Feedback Guidance. Learning Objectives: Describe the physical displacement of the heart and the change in lung volume during DIBH and discuss dosimetric consequences of those changes. Provide an overview of the technical aspects. Describe work flow for patient simulation and treatment. Give an overview of commissioning and routine. Provide practical tips for clinical implementation.

  11. Cost-effectiveness and radiation risk of breast cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rombach, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Base cost effectiveness risk associated with radiological screening for tuberculosis and lung tumor the Government of Netherlands advised against mass screening. However, mass screening remains an important method in the case of breast cancer

  12. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus whole breast irradiation: 5-year survival analysis of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livi, Lorenzo; Meattini, Icro; Marrazzo, Livia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Pallotta, Stefania; Saieva, Calogero; Paiar, Fabiola; Scotti, Vieri; De Luca Cardillo, Carla; Bastiani, Paolo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Sanchez, Luis; Nori, Jacopo; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta

    2015-03-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been introduced as an alternative treatment method for selected patients with early stage breast cancer (BC). Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the theoretical advantage of a further increase in dose conformity compared with three-dimensional techniques, with more normal tissue sparing. The aim of this randomised trial is to compare the local recurrence and survival of APBI using the IMRT technique after breast-conserving surgery to conventional whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in early stage BC. This study was performed at the University of Florence (Florence, Italy). Women aged more than 40years affected by early BC, with a maximum pathological tumour size of 25mm, were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either WBI or APBI using IMRT. Patients in the APBI arm received a total dose of 30 Gy to the tumour bed in five daily fractions. The WBI arm received 50Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a boost on the tumour bed of 10Gy in five fractions. The primary end-point was occurrence of ipsilateral breast tumour recurrences (IBTRs); the main analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02104895. A total of 520 patients were randomised (260 to external WBI and 260 to APBI with IMRT) between March 2005 and June 2013. At a median follow-up of 5.0 years (Interquartile Range (IQR) 3.4-7.0), the IBTR rate was 1.5% (three cases) in the APBI group (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-3.0) and in the WBI group (three cases; 95% CI 0.0-2.8). No significant difference emerged between the two groups (log rank test p=0.86). We identified seven deaths in the WBI group and only one in the APBI group (p=0.057). The 5-year overall survival was 96.6% for the WBI group and 99.4% for the APBI group. The APBI group presented significantly better results considering acute (p=0.0001), late (p=0.004), and cosmetic outcome (p=0.045). To our knowledge, this is the first randomised

  13. Discordance Between Preoperative and Postoperative Bladder Cancer Location: Implications for Partial-Bladder Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Tucker, Kai; Conway, Robert Greg; He, Jiwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzzo, Thomas [Department of Urology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Malkowicz, S. Bruce [Department of Urology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Christodouleas, John, E-mail: christojo@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is strong interest in partial-bladder radiation whether as a boost or definitive therapy to limit long-term toxicity. It is unclear that a standard preoperative examination can accurately identify all sites of disease within the bladder. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between preoperative localization of bladder tumors with postoperative findings to facilitate partial-bladder radiation techniques when appropriate. Methods and Materials: We examined patients with clinically staged T1-T4 invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or TCC with variant histology with no history of radiation or partial cystectomy undergoing radical cystectomy. Patients were scored as “under-detected” if a bladder site was involved with invasive disease (≥T1) at the time of cystectomy, but not identified preoperatively. Patients were additionally scored as “widely under-detected” if they had postoperative lesions that were not identified preoperatively in a given site, nor in any adjacent site. Rates of under-detected and widely under-detected lesions, as well as univariate and multivariate association between clinical variables and under-detection, were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: Among 222 patients, 96% (213/222) had at least 1 area of discordance. Fifty-eight percent of patients were under-detected in at least 1 location, whereas 12% were widely under-detected. Among 24 patients with a single site of disease on preoperative evaluation, 21/24 (88%) had at least 1 under-detected lesion and 14/24 (58%) were widely under-detected. On multivariate analysis, only solitary site of preoperative disease was associated with increased levels of under-detection of invasive disease (OR = 4.161, 95% CI, 1.368-12.657). Conclusion: Our study shows a stark discordance between preoperative and postoperative localization of bladder tumors. From a clinical perspective, incomplete localization of all sites of disease within the bladder

  14. Nation-Scale Adoption of Shorter Breast Radiation Therapy Schedules Can Increase Survival in Resource Constrained Economies: Results From a Markov Chain Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Atif J., E-mail: atif.j.khan@rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Rafique, Raza [Suleman Dawood School of Business, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Zafar, Waleed [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore (Pakistan); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Vicini, Frank [Michigan HealthCare Professionals, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Jamshed, Arif [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore (Pakistan); Zhao, Yao [Rutgers University School of Business, Newark, New Jersey (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) offer women options for shorter courses of breast radiation therapy. The impact of these shorter schedules on the breast cancer populations of emerging economies with limited radiation therapy resources is unknown. We hypothesized that adoption of these schedules would improve throughput in the system and, by allowing more women access to life-saving treatments, improve patient survival within the system. Methods and Materials: We designed a Markov chain model to simulate the different health states that a postlumpectomy or postmastectomy patient could enter over the course of a 20-year follow-up period. Transition rates between health states were adapted from published data on recurrence rates. We used primary data from a tertiary care hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, to populate the model with proportional use of mastectomy versus breast conservation and to estimate the proportion of patients suitable for APBI. Sensitivity analyses on the use of APBI and relative efficacy of APBI were conducted to study the impact on the population. Results: The shorter schedule resulted in more women alive and more women remaining without evidence of disease (NED) compared with the conventional schedule, with an absolute difference of about 4% and 7% at 15 years, respectively. Among women who had lumpectomies, the chance of remaining alive and with an intact breast was 62% in the hypofractionation model and 54% in the conventional fractionation model. Conclusions: Increasing throughput in the system can result in improved survival, improved chances of remaining without evidence of disease, and improved chances of remaining alive with a breast. These findings are significant and suggest that adoption of hypofractionation in emerging economies is not simply a question of efficiency and cost but one of access to care and patient survivorship.

  15. Nation-Scale Adoption of Shorter Breast Radiation Therapy Schedules Can Increase Survival in Resource Constrained Economies: Results From a Markov Chain Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Atif J.; Rafique, Raza; Zafar, Waleed; Shah, Chirag; Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank; Jamshed, Arif; Zhao, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated whole breast irradiation and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) offer women options for shorter courses of breast radiation therapy. The impact of these shorter schedules on the breast cancer populations of emerging economies with limited radiation therapy resources is unknown. We hypothesized that adoption of these schedules would improve throughput in the system and, by allowing more women access to life-saving treatments, improve patient survival within the system. Methods and Materials: We designed a Markov chain model to simulate the different health states that a postlumpectomy or postmastectomy patient could enter over the course of a 20-year follow-up period. Transition rates between health states were adapted from published data on recurrence rates. We used primary data from a tertiary care hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, to populate the model with proportional use of mastectomy versus breast conservation and to estimate the proportion of patients suitable for APBI. Sensitivity analyses on the use of APBI and relative efficacy of APBI were conducted to study the impact on the population. Results: The shorter schedule resulted in more women alive and more women remaining without evidence of disease (NED) compared with the conventional schedule, with an absolute difference of about 4% and 7% at 15 years, respectively. Among women who had lumpectomies, the chance of remaining alive and with an intact breast was 62% in the hypofractionation model and 54% in the conventional fractionation model. Conclusions: Increasing throughput in the system can result in improved survival, improved chances of remaining without evidence of disease, and improved chances of remaining alive with a breast. These findings are significant and suggest that adoption of hypofractionation in emerging economies is not simply a question of efficiency and cost but one of access to care and patient survivorship.

  16. A case of likely radiation-induced synchronous esophageal and skin carcinoma following post-operative radiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanogawa, Naoya; Shimada, Hideaki; Kainuma, Osamu; Cho, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Itami, Makiko; Nagata, Matsuo

    2009-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman was admitted in January 2008 with on upper thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and a right chest wall skin tumor. When she was 32 years old, she had a radical mastectomy for right breast cancer and received postoperative radiation. Due to the presence of lung adhesions, trans-thoracic esophagectomy could not be done; thus, a blunt dissection was performed. She was discharged on the 19 th postoperative day. On pathology, a pT2N0M0 (pStage II) esophageal tumor was diagnosed. A resection of her skin tumor underwent 79 days after the esophageal surgery; on pathology, the skin tumor was diagnosed as a basal cell carcinoma. Since the esophageal tumor and the skin tumor occurred in the same area that had received radiation therapy, these tumors were diagnosed as being radiation-induced secondary tumors. In the English language medical literature, several reports of radiation-induced esophageal cancer occurring as a second cancer after radiotherapy for breast cancer have been published. Radiation-induced esophageal cancer rates may increase in Japan given the number of women who previously received radiotherapy for breast cancer. (author)

  17. The incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy as a function of dose and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinger, Alfred; Wasserman, Todd H.; Klein, Eric E.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Tracy; Piephoff, James V.; Kucik, Nancy A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: There is an increased incidence of breast cancer following mantle field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease (HD). We reviewed the experience at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) for radiation factors related to the development of breast cancer after mantle field radiation therapy for HD. Methods: The radiation therapy records of 152 women treated with mantle field irradiation for HD at MIR between 1966-1985 were reviewed for the development of breast cancer and treatment-related factors. All patients had a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. The treatment era (1966-1974 vs. 1975-1985), stage of HD, mediastinal dose, axillary dose, maximum dose from the anterior field (anterior d max dose), the anterior-posterior:posterior-anterior (AP:PA) ratio, age at the time of treatment, length of follow-up, and history of splenectomy were analyzed as possible contributing factors for the development of breast cancer. The observed number of breast cancers was compared to the expected number based on age-adjusted incidences from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Results: Ten breast cancers occurred in the population. Eight involved an upper outer quadrant. In a multivariate analysis, the development of breast cancer was significantly associated with axillary dose. Patients in the early treatment era were at an increased risk for the development of breast cancer due to high anterior d max and breast doses from weighting the fields anteriorly on a low energy linear accelerator. The use of current radiation therapy techniques was not related to an increased risk of breast cancer with a median follow-up of 13 years. Conclusions: A high dose to the axilla and the anterior d max point is significantly associated with the development of breast cancer after mantle field irradiation for HD. Efforts to protect the breast from high doses will likely lessen the increased risk of breast cancer in women treated with radiation therapy for HD

  18. Persistent seroma after intraoperative placement of MammoSite for accelerated partial breast irradiation: Incidence, pathologic anatomy, and contributing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Kaufman, Seth A.; Price, Lori Lyn; Cardarelli, Gene; Dipetrillo, Thomas A.; Wazer, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence of, and possible factors associated with, seroma formation after intraoperative placement of the MammoSite catheter for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: This study evaluated 38 patients who had undergone intraoperative MammoSite catheter placement at lumpectomy or reexcision followed by accelerated partial breast irradiation with 34 Gy in 10 fractions. Data were collected regarding dosimetric parameters, including the volume of tissue enclosed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose shells, dose homogeneity index, and maximal dose at the surface of the applicator. Clinical and treatment-related factors were analyzed, including patient age, patient weight, history of diabetes and smoking, use of reexcision, interval between surgery and radiotherapy, total duration of catheter placement, total excised specimen volume, and presence or absence of postprocedural infection. Seroma was verified by clinical examination, mammography, and/or ultrasonography. Persistent seroma was defined as seroma that was clinically detectable >6 months after radiotherapy completion. Results: After a median follow-up of 17 months, the overall rate of any detectable seroma was 76.3%. Persistent seroma (>6 months) occurred in 26 (68.4%) of 38 patients, of whom 46% experienced at least modest discomfort at some point during follow-up. Of these symptomatic patients, 3 required biopsy or complete cavity excision, revealing squamous metaplasia, foreign body giant cell reaction, fibroblasts, and active collagen deposition. Of the analyzed dosimetric, clinical, and treatment-related variables, only body weight correlated positively with the risk of seroma formation (p = 0.04). Postprocedural infection correlated significantly (p = 0.05) with a reduced risk of seroma formation. Seroma was associated with a suboptimal cosmetic outcome, because excellent scores were achieved in 61.5% of women with seroma compared with 83% without seroma

  19. Association between skin phototype and radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Suntan reaction could be a good predictor for radiation pigmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Nishimura, Takuya; Kobayashi, Kana; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Aibe, Norihiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yoshida, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance of skin phototype (suntan or sunburn type) in association with radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer who underwent postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery because phototype could predict sunlight reaction. We divided patients into two phototypes (58 suntan/darkening and 28 sunburn/reddening types) according to self-reports before radiotherapy. We examined skin color changes in 86 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery followed by 50 Gy/25 fractions (median) of radiotherapy with or without boost radiation (10 Gy/5 fractions). Color change was assessed according to CIE L*a*b* space, which is defined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) in 1976 for quantitative color assessment. The patients were also assessed by individual typology angle (ITA deg; indicator of skin color calculated by L*a*b* space) and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event v3.0 (CTCAE v3). Radiation therapy changed all values except the b* value, and the suntan type showed a greater darkening response associated with radiation dermatitis than did the sunburn type in terms of ITA deg value change (p=0.04), whereas the sunburn type did not show higher a* value (reddening). By CTCAE v3 classifications, a Grade 2 reaction appeared in 14% sunburn patients and in 31% of the suntan group, respectively (p=0.16). Suntan type predicted higher pigmentation associated with radiation dermatitis. Self-reported phototype has the potential to be a good predictor of skin sensitivity to radiation exposure for clinical screening. (author)

  20. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  1. Using mortality data to estimate radiation effects on breast cancer incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, D.G.; Dinse, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we combine Japanese data on radiation exposure and cancer mortality with U.S. data on cancer incidence and lethality to estimate the effects of ionizing radiation on cancer incidence. The analysis is based on the mathematical relationship between the mortality rate and the incidence and lethality rates, as well as on statistical models that relate Japanese incidence rates to U.S. incidence rates and radiation risk factors. Our approach assumes that the risk of death from causes other than the cancer does not depend on whether or not the cancer is present, and among individuals with the cancer, the risk of death attributable to the cancer is the same in Japan and the U.S. and is not affected by radiation exposure. In particular, we focus on the incidence of breast cancer in Japanese women and how this incidence is affected by radiation risk factors. The analysis uses Japanese exposure and mortality data from the Radiation Effects Research Foundation study of atomic bomb survivors and U.S. incidence and lethality data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry. Even without Japanese incidence data, we obtain reasonable estimates of the incidence of breast cancer in unexposed Japanese women and identify the radiation risk factors that affect this incidence. Our analysis demonstrates that the age at exposure is an important risk factor, but that the incidence of breast cancer is not affected by the city of residence (Nagasaki versus Hiroshima) or the time since exposure

  2. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindley, Andrew; Zain, Zakiyah; Wood, Lisa; Whitehead, Anne; Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected

  3. Mometasone Furoate Cream Reduces Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Breast Radiation Therapy: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindley, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.hindley@lthtr.nhs.uk [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom); Zain, Zakiyah [College of Arts and Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, Kedah (Malaysia); Wood, Lisa [Department of Social Sciences, Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Whitehead, Anne [Medical and Pharmaceutical Statistics Research Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Sanneh, Alison; Barber, David; Hornsby, Ruth [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We wanted to confirm the benefit of mometasone furoate (MF) in preventing acute radiation reactions, as shown in a previous study (Boström et al, Radiother Oncol 2001;59:257-265). Methods and Materials: The study was a double-blind comparison of MF with D (Diprobase), administered daily from the start of radiation therapy for 5 weeks in patients receiving breast radiation therapy, 40 Gy in 2.67-Gy fractions daily over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was mean modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. Results: Mean RTOG scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.046). Maximum RTOG and mean erythema scores were significantly less for MF than for D (P=.018 and P=.012, respectively). The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score was significantly less for MF than for D at weeks 4 and 5 when corrected for Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire scores. Conclusions: MF cream significantly reduces radiation dermatitis when applied to the breast during and after radiation therapy. For the first time, we have shown a significantly beneficial effect on quality of life using a validated instrument (DLQI), for a topical steroid cream. We believe that application of this cream should be the standard of care where radiation dermatitis is expected.

  4. Effective radiation attenuation calibration for breast density: compression thickness influences and correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jerry A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibrating mammograms to produce a standardized breast density measurement for breast cancer risk analysis requires an accurate spatial measure of the compressed breast thickness. Thickness inaccuracies due to the nominal system readout value and compression paddle orientation induce unacceptable errors in the calibration. Method A thickness correction was developed and evaluated using a fully specified two-component surrogate breast model. A previously developed calibration approach based on effective radiation attenuation coefficient measurements was used in the analysis. Water and oil were used to construct phantoms to replicate the deformable properties of the breast. Phantoms consisting of measured proportions of water and oil were used to estimate calibration errors without correction, evaluate the thickness correction, and investigate the reproducibility of the various calibration representations under compression thickness variations. Results The average thickness uncertainty due to compression paddle warp was characterized to within 0.5 mm. The relative calibration error was reduced to 7% from 48-68% with the correction. The normalized effective radiation attenuation coefficient (planar representation was reproducible under intra-sample compression thickness variations compared with calibrated volume measures. Conclusion Incorporating this thickness correction into the rigid breast tissue equivalent calibration method should improve the calibration accuracy of mammograms for risk assessments using the reproducible planar calibration measure.

  5. Interobserver variability in the delineation of the tumour bed using seroma and surgical clips based on 4DCT scan for external-beam partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Bing; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Xu, Min; Shao, Qian; Zhang, Yingjie; Liang, Chaoqian; Guo, Yanluan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the interobserver variability in the delineation of the tumour bed using seroma and surgical clips based on the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan for external-beam partial breast irradiation (EB-PBI) during free breathing. Patients with a seroma clarity score (SCS) 3 ~ 5 and ≥5 surgical clips in the lumpectomy cavity after breast-conserving surgery who were recruited for EB-PBI underwent 4DCT simulation. Based on the ten sets of 4DCT images acquired, the tumour bed formed using the clips, the seroma, and both the clips and seroma (defined as TB C , TB S and TB C+S , respectively) were delineated by five radiation oncologists using specific guidelines. The following parameters were calculated to analyse interobserver variability: volume of the tumour bed (TB C , TB S , TB C+S ), coefficient of variation (COV C , COV S , COV C+S ), and matching degree (MD C , MD S , MD C+S ). The interobserver variability for TB C and TB C+S and for COV C and COV C+S were statistically significant (p = 0.021, 0.008, 0.002, 0.015). No significant difference was observed for TB S and COV S (p = 0.867, 0.061). Significant differences in interobserver variability were observed for MD C vs MD S , MD C vs MD C+S , MD S vs MD C+S (p = 0.000, 0.032, 0.008), the interobserver variability of MD S was smaller than that of MD C and MD C+S (MD S > MD C+S > MD C ). When the SCS was 3 ~ 5 points and the number of surgical clips was ≥5, interobserver variability was minimal for the delineation of the tumour bed based on seroma

  6. A case of leukoencephalopathy caused by radiation and chemotherapy for brain metastasis of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Shigeru; Sonoo, Hiroshi; Nomura, Tsunehisa; Ohkubo, Sumiko; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    A case of treatment-related leukoencephalopathy is presented. A patient with breast cancer metastasis to the brain, liver, bone and distant lymph nodes was treated with whole brain radiation and docetaxcel. Eleven months after radiation, magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Twenty-two months after radiation, the patient had gait disturbance, parkinsonism, dementia and urinary incontinence. From this experience, stereotactic radiosurgery such as cyber knife and gamma knife therapy, representing a new modality for delivering intense focal radiation, should be come preferred techniques for treating patients with brain metastases, to avoid the potential cognitive side effects of fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy. (author)

  7. GAUSS-SEIDEL AND SUCCESSIVE OVERRELAXATION METHODS FOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampoorna, M.; Bueno, J. Trujillo

    2010-01-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum that is produced by scattering processes contains a wealth of information on the physical conditions and magnetic fields of the solar outer atmosphere, but the modeling of many of its strongest spectral lines requires solving an involved non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer problem accounting for partial redistribution (PRD) effects. Fast radiative transfer methods for the numerical solution of PRD problems are also needed for a proper treatment of hydrogen lines when aiming at realistic time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar chromosphere. Here we show how the two-level atom PRD problem with and without polarization can be solved accurately and efficiently via the application of highly convergent iterative schemes based on the Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation (SOR) radiative transfer methods that had been previously developed for the complete redistribution case. Of particular interest is the Symmetric SOR method, which allows us to reach the fully converged solution with an order of magnitude of improvement in the total computational time with respect to the Jacobi-based local accelerated lambda iteration method.

  8. Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation Methods for Radiative Transfer with Partial Frequency Redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampoorna, M.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2010-04-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum that is produced by scattering processes contains a wealth of information on the physical conditions and magnetic fields of the solar outer atmosphere, but the modeling of many of its strongest spectral lines requires solving an involved non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer problem accounting for partial redistribution (PRD) effects. Fast radiative transfer methods for the numerical solution of PRD problems are also needed for a proper treatment of hydrogen lines when aiming at realistic time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar chromosphere. Here we show how the two-level atom PRD problem with and without polarization can be solved accurately and efficiently via the application of highly convergent iterative schemes based on the Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation (SOR) radiative transfer methods that had been previously developed for the complete redistribution case. Of particular interest is the Symmetric SOR method, which allows us to reach the fully converged solution with an order of magnitude of improvement in the total computational time with respect to the Jacobi-based local accelerated lambda iteration method.

  9. Radiation dosimetry in digital breast tomosynthesis: Report of AAPM Tomosynthesis Subcommittee Task Group 223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis, E-mail: isechop@emory.edu [Departments of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hematology and Medical Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Sabol, John M. [GE Healthcare, Global Diagnostic X-Ray, Mailstop W-701, 3000 North Grandview Boulevard, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Berglund, Johan [Research and Development, Philips Women' s Healthcare, Solna (Sweden); Bolch, Wesley E. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brateman, Libby [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Goodsitt, Mitchell [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Flynn, Michael [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Health System, Radiology Research 2F, 1 Ford Place, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Geiser, William [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States); Kyle Jones, A. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y.; Paul Segars, W. [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States); Nishino, Kazuyoshi [R and D X-ray Products Group, Shimadzu Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Nosratieh, Anita [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, California 95817 (United States); and others

    2014-09-15

    The radiation dose involved in any medical imaging modality that uses ionizing radiation needs to be well understood by the medical physics and clinical community. This is especially true of screening modalities. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has recently been introduced into the clinic and is being used for screening for breast cancer in the general population. Therefore, it is important that the medical physics community have the required information to be able to understand, estimate, and communicate the radiation dose levels involved in breast tomosynthesis imaging. For this purpose, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 223 on Dosimetry in Tomosynthesis Imaging has prepared this report that discusses dosimetry in breast imaging in general, and describes a methodology and provides the data necessary to estimate mean breast glandular dose from a tomosynthesis acquisition. In an effort to maximize familiarity with the procedures and data provided in this Report, the methodology to perform the dose estimation in DBT is based as much as possible on that used in mammography dose estimation.

  10. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offersen, Birgitte V.; Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Kirkove, Carine; Hol, Sandra; Aznar, Marianne C.; Biete Sola, Albert; Kirova, Youlia M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Remouchamps, Vincent; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Arenas, Meritxell; Gabrys, Dorota; Kopek, Neil; Krause, Mechthild; Lundstedt, Dan; Marinko, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. Material and methods: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Results: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5 mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency

  11. Radiation dosimetry in digital breast tomosynthesis: Report of AAPM Tomosynthesis Subcommittee Task Group 223

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Sabol, John M.; Berglund, Johan; Bolch, Wesley E.; Brateman, Libby; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Goodsitt, Mitchell; Flynn, Michael; Geiser, William; Kyle Jones, A.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Paul Segars, W.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Nishino, Kazuyoshi; Nosratieh, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The radiation dose involved in any medical imaging modality that uses ionizing radiation needs to be well understood by the medical physics and clinical community. This is especially true of screening modalities. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has recently been introduced into the clinic and is being used for screening for breast cancer in the general population. Therefore, it is important that the medical physics community have the required information to be able to understand, estimate, and communicate the radiation dose levels involved in breast tomosynthesis imaging. For this purpose, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 223 on Dosimetry in Tomosynthesis Imaging has prepared this report that discusses dosimetry in breast imaging in general, and describes a methodology and provides the data necessary to estimate mean breast glandular dose from a tomosynthesis acquisition. In an effort to maximize familiarity with the procedures and data provided in this Report, the methodology to perform the dose estimation in DBT is based as much as possible on that used in mammography dose estimation

  12. Correlation factor analysis between radiation pneumonitis and chemo-radiotherapy in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huiping; Wang Junjie; Ma Liwen; Zhang Shulan; Deng Huijing; Jia Tingzhen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between radiotherapy-induced lung injury and chemotherapy agents as well as other factors. Methods: A total of 85 breast cancer patients received radiotherapy with sequential or concurrent chemotherapy after surgery were analysed for radiation dose, chemotherapy schedule, age, and lung disease history. Results: Five patients had clinical symptoms of radiation pneumonitis, one of them was necessary to treat and 16 patients developed radiological changes (18.8%). Close relationship was noted between incidence of radiation pneumonitis and radiation dose, timing and drugs used in chemotherapy and lung disease history. Conclusion: