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Sample records for parthenolide-depleted feverfew tanacetum

  1. Do monoterpenes released from feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) plants cause airborne Compositae dermatitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, E.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Compositae plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) is an important sensitizer in Europe and has been suspected of causing airborne Compositae dermatitis. A previous investigation of substances emitted from feverfew plants detected no sesquiterpene lactones, however, but mainly monoterpenes...... airborne dermatitis, mimicking photosensitivity, and the disappearance of symptoms upon removal of feverfew plants suggest monoterpenes as a possible contributing factor. Similar associations between doubtful positive monoterpene reactions and clinical patterns, fragrance/colophonium allergy and relevance...

  2. Antimicrobial activity of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. and feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Izadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: The essential oil of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. and feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L. are frequently used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of the essential oils of chamomile and chamomile and feverfew. Methods: This experimental study was conducted in 2012 at Hamedan University of Medical Sciences. Essential oils of two medicinal plants species including chamomile and feverfew were obtained by hydrodistillation their constituents were analyzed by GC and GC/MS using retention indices and fragmentation patterns. The antimicrobial effects (MIC and MBC of the essential oils were assessed on a number of microorganisms including gram positive and gram negative bacteria by microdilution technique. The interaction of plant essential oils against microorganisms through differential inhibition index was also evaluated. Data were analyzed by Duncan's multiple range test statistic Results: The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the oils were 0.22-4 and 0.09-1 mg/mlfor chamomile and feverfew respectively. Moreover, the combination of the plants essential oils confirmed synergistic against L. monocytogenes, B. subtilis and B. cereus and additive activities against S. aureus, E. coli and S. typhimorium. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the application of these essential oils is recommended in combination as an efficients and complementary method for controlling microorganisms. Key words: Chamomile, Feverfew, Antimicrobial Effect

  3. Development of enteric coated tablets from spray dried extract of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L:

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    Juliana Siqueira Chaves

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Tanacetum parthenium (feverfew is an herb that is commercialized worldwide as a therapeutic treatment for migraine. Its pharmacological effect is mainly due to the presence of the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide as well as of flavonoids. So far, there are no studies on standardization of pre-formulations or phytomedicines containing this herb. The present study aimed at developing a pre-formulation using a standardized spray-dried extract of feverfew and further designing and standardizing enteric coated tablets. In this work, the spray-dried extract of feverfew was evaluated for its parthenolide, santin and total flavonoid content, parthenolide solubility, particle size, tapped density, hygroscopicity, angle of repose and moisture content. Tablets containing the spray-dried extract were tested for their average weight, friability, hardness, and disintegration time. The total flavonoid and parthenolide contents in the spray-dried extract were 1.31 % and 0.76% w/w, respectively. The spray-dried extract presented consistent pharmacotechnical properties and allowed its tableting by direct compression. Tablet properties were in accordance with the proposed specifications. The procedures described herein can be used to prepare and evaluate pre-formulations of feverfew with adequate properties for the development of a high-quality phytomedicine.Tanacetum parthenium (tanaceto é uma planta medicinal comercializada no mundo todo para tratamento de enxaqueca. Seu efeito farmacológico é creditado principalmente à lactona sesquiterpênica partenolídeo e flavonóides. Até o momento não existem estudos sobre a padronização de pré-formulações ou o desenvolvimento de fitoterápicos com tanaceto. Logo, o objetivo deste trabalho foi obter comprimidos de revestimento entérico a partir de extrato seco e padronizado de tanaceto. Neste trabalho, o extrato seco do tanaceto obtido pelo método de spray drying foi avaliado quanto ao teor de partenol

  4. Elucidation of the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthetic pathway in feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Parthenolide is the major bioactive compound of feverfew and has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Chapter 1gives an overview of the history and current status of research on parthenolide in feverfew. As a promising anti-cancer drug, parthenolide has attracted a lot of

  5. Elucidation of the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthetic pathway in feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Parthenolide is the major bioactive compound of feverfew and has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Chapter 1gives an overview of the history and current status of research on parthenolide in feverfew. As a promising anti-cancer drug, parthenolide has attracted a lot of attention from medical institutes and companies. A search with ‘parthenolide’ in Google patents yields more than 2000 hits on extraction of parthenolide or its use in treating cancer or other diseases. However, infor...

  6. Nature's Migraine Treatment: Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Parthenolide from "Tanacetum parthenium"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Emma L.; Ashe, Siobhan; Walsh, John J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to provide students with the essential skills and knowledge required to perform the extraction, isolation, and structural elucidation of parthenolide from "Tanacetum parthenium" or feverfew. Students are introduced to a background of the traditional medicinal uses of parthenolide, while more modern applications of…

  7. Feverfew

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the plant may cause skin irritation. Keep in Mind Tell all your health care providers about any ... Privacy and Policies Accessibility en Español FOIA Site Map Contact Us U.S. Department of Health & Human Services , ...

  8. Rapid evaluation and comparison of natural products and antioxidant activity in calendula, feverfew, and German chamomile extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Babazadeh Ortakand, Davoud; Morton, David W; Yusof, Ahmad P

    2015-03-13

    The present study describes a simple high performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method for the simultaneous quantification of apigenin, chamazulene, bisabolol and the use of DPPH free radical as a post-chromatographic derivatization agent to compare the free radical scavenging activities of these components in leaf and flower head extracts from feverfew, German chamomile and marigold from the Asteraceae family. Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) leaves have been traditionally used in the treatment of migraine with parthenolide being the main bioactive compound. However, due to similar flowers, feverfew is sometimes mistaken for the German chamomile (Matricaria recutita). Bisabolol and chamazulene are the main components in chamomile essential oil. Marigold (Calendula officinalis) was included in the study for comparison, as it belongs to the same family. Parthenolide was found to be present in all leaf extracts but was not detected in calendula flower extract. Chamazulene and bisabolol were found to be present in higher concentrations in chamomile and Calendula flowers. Apigenin was detected and quantified only in chamomile extracts (highest concentration in flower head extracts). Antioxidant activity in sample extracts was compared by superimposing the chromatograms obtained after post-chromatographic derivatization with DPPH and post-chromatographic derivatization with anisaldehyde. It was found that extracts from chamomile flower heads and leaves have the most prominent antioxidant activity, with bisabolol and chamazulene being the most effective antioxidants. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Patch test reactivity to feverfew-containing creams in feverfew-allergic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Fretté, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    with feverfew contact allergy were patch tested with two creams containing the feverfew extract. Subsequently, the creams were analysed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to detect parthenolide. Results: Four of the patients tested positive to one of the creams; reactivity was associated......-sensitive patients. The reactivity may be enhanced by simultaneous testing with parthenolide, but the reactivity is lost over time, probably because of degradation of parthenolide....

  10. Environmental adaptibility of tansy ( Tanacetum vulgare L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ecological role of essential oils is reflected in the interaction of plants with environmental factors. Environmental adaptability of the plants can be assumed from essential oil contents. Essential oils are agents, which communicate with the plant environment. Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.) was selected for laboratory research ...

  11. Environmental adaptibility of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Ecological role of essential oils is reflected in the interaction of plants with environmental factors. Environmental adaptability of the plants can be assumed from essential oil contents. Essential oils are agents, which communicate with the plant environment. Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.) was selected for.

  12. Paraphoma crown rot of pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moslemi, Azin; Ades, Peter Kevin; Groom, Tim; Crous, Pedro; Nicolas, Marc Edward; Taylor, Paul William James

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium) is commercially cultivated for the extraction of natural pyrethrin insecticides from the oil glands inside seeds. Yield-decline has caused significant yield losses in Tasmania during the last decade. A new pathogen of pyrethrum causing crown rot and reduced

  13. Crescimento e metabolismo em artemísia em função do nível de irradiância Growth and metabolism of feverfew plants in response to the irradiance level

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    Luciana M de Carvalho

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Artemísia [Tanacetum parthenium (L. Schultz-Bip.] é uma planta medicinal fortemente aromática, cujo princípio ativo característico é a lactona sesquiterpênica partenolídeo. Entre os fatores que afetam o cultivo das plantas medicinais destaca-se a irradiância luminosa. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo verificar efeitos de três níveis de irradiância luminosa (730, 523 e 382 µmol de fótons m-2 s-1 na altura, área foliar, número de folhas, teor de açúcares, de amido e de partenolídeo em artemísia. As plantas cresceram a pleno sol e com 30 e 50% de redução na irradiância por 105 dias. A redução na irradiância foi obtida por meio de sombreamento artificial, com a utilização de telas de polietileno pretas. A redução na irradiância incidente causou aumento na altura e na área foliar total de cada planta, mas não alterou o número de folhas. Houve diminuição nos teores de açúcares e de amido em função do sombreamento, mas os teores de partenolídeo não foram alterados significativamente.Feverfew [Tanacetum parthenium (L. Schultz-Bip.] is a strongly aromatic medicinal plant, whose active principle is the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide. Irradiance ranks among the most important factors that affect growth of medicinal plants. The effect of three irradiance levels (730, 523 and 382 µmol of fotons m-2 s-1 were assessed on feverfew plants height, leaf area, and leaf number, as well as on the contents of sugar, starch, and parthenolide. Plants grew on full sunshine and under 30 and 50% of irradiance reduction, for 105 days. Irradiance was controlled by shadowing plants with a black polyethylene screen. Reduction on irradiance increased plant height and total leaf area, but had no effect on leaf number. A reduction in sugar and starch contents in association with shadowing was observed. Nevertheless, shadowing did not affect significantly the parthenolide content.

  14. Biosynthesis of Sesquiterpene Lactones in Pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramirez, A.M.; Saillard, N.; Yang, T.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The daisy-like flowers of pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium) are used to extract pyrethrins, a botanical insecticide with a long history of safe and effective use. Pyrethrum flowers also contain other potential defense compounds, particularly sesquiterpene lactones (STLs), which represent

  15. Biosynthesis of sesquiterpene lactones in pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Aldana M; Saillard, Nils; Yang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    The daisy-like flowers of pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium) are used to extract pyrethrins, a botanical insecticide with a long history of safe and effective use. Pyrethrum flowers also contain other potential defense compounds, particularly sesquiterpene lactones (STLs), which represent...... these reported bioactivities and industrial significance, the biosynthetic origin of pyrethrum sesquiterpene lactones remains unknown. In the present study, we show that germacratrien-12-oic acid is most likely the central precursor for all sesquiterpene lactones present in pyrethrum. The formation...... of the lactone ring depends on the regio- (C6 or C8) and stereo-selective (α or β) hydroxylation of germacratrien-12-oic acid. Candidate genes implicated in three committed steps leading from farnesyl diphosphate to STL and other oxygenated derivatives of germacratrien-12-oic acid were retrieved from a pyrethrum...

  16. The content of parthenolide and its yield per plant during the growth of Tanacetum parthenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H; Anderson-Wildeboer, Y.; Bos, R.; Woerdenbag, H.J.

    During the growth of Tanaceum parthenium (L.) Schultz-Bip. Feverfew, Asteraceae) the percentage of parthenolide was the highest at an early stage (just before the formation of stems), The yield of parthenolide per individual plant gradually increased from about 10 mg at the beginning of the study to

  17. Tanacetum parthenium leaf extract mediated survival protection in lethally irradiated Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Prashanth; Pooja, S.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Shetty, Jayaram; Peter, Alex John; Jose, Jerish M.

    2016-01-01

    Search for less-toxic radioprotectors has spurred interest in the development of natural products. In Ayurveda, the traditional medicine, Tanacetum species have been used to treat ailments since ancient times throughout the world. Effects of the administration of different concentrations of Tanacetum parthenium leaf aqueous extract (TPLA), Tanacetum parthenium leaf ethanolic extract (TPLE) were investigated in Swiss albino mice. Mice (20-25 g) were randomly divided into 8 groups of ten animals each. The control group and the radiation group were treated daily with oral administration of saline for 15 days. Each subgroups of TPLA and TPLE were treated with doses of 50, 100 and 250 mg/kg daily for 15 days. On the 15th day, all were irradiated with 10 Gy whole body irradiation. Survival was observed daily up to 30th post-irradiation day. Data were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The significance difference in survival between control, radiation and treatment groups were observed (P < 0.001). Current studies revealed the protective effect of Tanacetum parthenium rendering high survivability in lethally irradiated mice. (author)

  18. Cytotoxic and antibacterial activities of sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Tanacetum praeteritum subsp praeteritum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goren, N; Woerdenbag, HJ; BozokJohansson, C

    1996-01-01

    Ten sesquiterpene lactones and one sesquiterpene isolated from Tanacetum praeteritum subsp. praeteritum: 1 alpha,6 alpha-dihydroxyisocostic acid methyl ester (2), 1 alpha-hydroxy-1-deoxoarglanine (3), douglanin (5), santamarin (6), reynosin (7), 1-epi-tatridin B (8), ludovicin A (10), armexin (12),

  19. Essential Oil Constituents of Tanacetum cilicicum: Antimicrobial and Phytotoxic Activities

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    Zeynep Ulukanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerial parts of Tanacetum cilicicum were hydrodistillated for 3 h using Clevenger. Essential oil (EO yield was 0.4% (v/w. According to the GC/MS analyses, EO of T. cilicicum consisted of monoterpenes [α-pinene (2.95 ± 0.19%, sabinene (2.32 ± 0.11%, and limonene (3.17 ± 0.25], oxygenated monoterpenes [eucalyptol (5.08 ± 0.32%, camphor (3.53 ± 0.27%, linalool (7.01 ± 0.32%, α-terpineol (3.13 ± 0.23%, and borneol (4.21 ± 0.17%], and sesquiterpenes [sesquisabinene hydrate (6.88 ± 0.41%, nerolidol (4.90 ± 0.33%, α-muurolol (4.57%  ± 0.35, spathulanol (2.98 ± 0.12%, juniper camphor (2.68 ± 0.19%, (--caryophyllene oxide (2.64 ± 0.19%, 8-hydroxylinalool (2.62 ± 0.15%, and Δ-cadinene (2.48 ± 0.16%]. In the antimicrobial assay, MIC/MBC values of the EO were the most significant on B. subtilis (0.39/0.78 µL/mL and B. cereus (0.78/1.56 µL/mL. The most prominent phytotoxic activities of the EO were observed on L. sativa, L. sativum, and P. oleracea. The results of the present study indicated that EO of T. cilicicum includes various medicinally and industrially crucial phytoconstituents that could be in use for industrial applications. The finding of this study is the first report on this species from the East Mediterranean region.

  20. Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Tanacetum Sonbolii (Asteraceae on Pain-related Behaviors during Formalin Test in Mice

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    Mohammad Sofiabadi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tanacetum sonbolii (Asteraceae is an endemic species in Iran. In the present study, we examined the effects of Tanacetum sonbolii hydroalcoholic extract on the formalin test in mice. Methods: 126 Swiss albino mice weighing 230-280g were used as subjects. The formalin test was performed on two control groups (marked as intact and saline groups n = 6 in each group and an experimental group. In all groups, the formalin test was recorded for 60 min after administration of extract and drugs in mice. Results: The results showed that Tanacetum sonbolii (150 and 300 mg/kg produced significant antinociception in phase 2. In addition, different doses of Tanacetum sonbolii extract (600, 900 and 1200 mg/kg also induced antinociceptive effects in phase1 and phase 2. On the other hand, morphine could induce antinociception in a dose-dependent manner. Diclofenac (10 mg/kg failed to affect the pain scores compared to Tanacetum sonbolii (300 mg/kg group. Discussion: It seems that administration of hydroalcoholic extract of Tanacetum sonbolii has the potential to relieve pain through both central and peripheral mechanisms in persistent inflammatory nociception.

  1. Can protoplast production from in vitro cultured shoots of Tanacetum vary during the season?

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    M. KESKITALO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Two different experiments were carried out to study the production of protoplasts and the variation of protoplast yield from in vitro cultured shoot tips of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L. and pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium (Trevir. Schiltz-Bip. In the first experiment, light had more pronouced effect for tansy than for pyrethrum. When the donor tissues of tansy were cultured under high light intensity the leaves contained anthocyanin and became brown during enzyme maceration. In contrast, donor tissues cultured under low light intensity produced leaves without anthocyanin. Depending on the light intensity of donor tissues, on average 5.8 - 6.8 x 106 and 3.4 - 4.3 x 106 protoplasts were isolated from one gram of mesophyll leaves of tansy and pyrethrum, respectively. In the second experiment, the production of protoplasts from tansy and pyrethrum varied seasonally. The most successful season for the production of protoplasts from in vitro cultured shoot tips was between December and April, when also the highest number of protoplasts could be isolated. It was not possible to state whether Tanacetum species have rhythms, which could cause physiological or chemical changes for the in vitro grown shoot tips. However, some external or internal, possible seasonal-dependent stimuli may have caused variation in the number of protoplasts isolated from tansy and pyrethrum and favoured protoplast production during winter and spring.

  2. Effects of light, hydropriming and abiotic stress on seed germination, and shoot and root growth of pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Jongsma, M.A.; Wang, C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Poor germination and seedling establishment are major problems in arid and semi-arid environments, and these characteristics are considered to be important factors in later plant growth and yield. Laboratory experiments were conducted on freshly harvested pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium) seeds

  3. Bioassay-guided isolation of apigenin with GABA-benzodiazepine activity from Tanacetum parthenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna Katharina; Krydsfeldt, Katrine; Rasmussen, Hasse Bonde

    2009-01-01

    Extracts of Tanacetum parthenium are used in the prophylactic treatment of migraine and have also been used in Danish folk medicine for the treatment of epilepsy. An ethanol extract of T. parthenium showed high affinity for the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine site. An ethanol extract of T. parthenium was ...

  4. The Insecticidal Activity of Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Schultz Bip. Extracts Obtained by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Hydrodistillation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavela, R.; Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena; Bárnet, M.; Karban, Jindřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2010), s. 449-454 ISSN 0926-6690 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : botanical insecticides * spodoptera littoralis * tanacetum parthenium Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.507, year: 2010

  5. Comparative Anatomical Investigations on six Endemic Tanacetum (Asteraceae) Taxa from Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekin, M.; Kartal, C.

    2016-01-01

    Tanacetum is one of the large genera, belonging to the Anthemideae tribe of Asteraceae family and has numerous medicinal plants and widely usage in folk medicine. In this study, anatomical features of six endemic species to Turkey viz. Tanacetum albipannosum, T. argenteum subsp. argenteum, T. cappadocicum, T. densum subsp. sivasicum, T. haussknechtii and T. heterotomum, were investigated for the first time. The specimens were collected from their natural habitats in Sivas province (Turkey). Transverse sections of root, stem, petiole and leaflet were observed under light microscope for various anatomical features. The results showed that, root included periderm in the outer. There were parenchymatous cortex, endodermis and pericycle under the periderm respectively. Primary xylem ridges were triarch in T. albipannosum, T. densum subsp. sivasicum, T. haussknechtii and T. heterotomum, pentarch in T. cappadocicum and hexarch in T. argenteum subsp. argenteum, and pith was filled with xylem elements. Stem was made up epidermis, parenchymatous cortex, endodermis, vascular bundles and parenchymatous pith from exterior to interior. T. heterotomum had a cavity formed by the disintegration of the cells in the center. The amphistomatic leaflets had a single layered epidermis with usually silvery or whitish tomentose indumentum and equifacial mesophyll. Stomata are anomocytic. There were significant difference among examined taxa in respect to contour of petiole, structure of cortex parenchyma and organization of vascular bundles. The anatomical characteristic features of petiole proved to be a useful tool for the taxonomic discrimination of the six studied taxa. (author)

  6. Hepatoprotective effect of methanolic Tanacetum parthenium extract on CCl4-induced liver damage in rats

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    Yavar Mahmoodzadeh

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Tanacetum Parthenium Extract (TPE on Lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes, biochemical factors, and liver enzymes in the rats damaged by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4.54 male Wistar rats were divided into 9 groups each consisting of 6 rats. Two of the groups were control groups (normal and damage control groups, 4 of them were exposure groups which were respectively administered with 40, 80, and 120 mg/kg of TPE and silymarin for 14 days before being damaged by CCl4, and the other 3 groups were post-treatment groups which received 80 and 120 mg/kg of TPE and silymarin 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after being injected with CCl4. At the end of the study, biochemical factors, serum liver enzymes, malondialdehyde level, antioxidant enzymes, and liver morphology were assayed.Pre- and post-treatment with TPE could significantly decrease ALT, AST, ALP, TG, LDL, TC, and glucose levels and increase HDL, and albumin levels and catalase, SOD, and GPx activities compared to the CCl4-damaged control group.The results of this study are indicative of the antioxidant activity of TPE, its potential hepatoprotective effects, and its probable therapeutic properties for laboratory animals damaged by CCl4. Keywords: Tanacetum parthenium, Carbon tetrachloride, Oxidative stress, Antioxidant enzymes, Liver damage

  7. Foliar flavonoids from Tanacetum vulgare var. boreale and their geographical variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Ayumi; Akiyama, Shinobu; Iwashina, Tsukasa

    2015-03-01

    Foliar flavonoids of Tanacetum vulgare var. boreale were isolated. Eight flavonoid glycosides, 7-O-glucosides of apigenin, luteolin, scutellarein and 6- hydroxyluteolin, and 7-O-glucuronides of apigenin, luteolin, chrysoeriol and eriodictyol were identified. Moreover, eight flavonoid aglycones, apigenin, luteolin, hispidulin, nepetin, eupatilin, jaceosidin, pectolinarigenin and axillarin were also isolated and identified. The flavonoid composition of two varieties of T. vulgare, i.e. var. boreale and var. vulgare, were compared. All samples of var. boreale and one sample of var. vulgare had the same flavonoid pattern, and could be distinguished from almost all the samples of var. vulgare. Thus, the occurrence of chemotypes, which are characterized by either the presence or absence of scutellarein 7-O-glucoside, eriodictyol 7-O-glucuronide and pectolinarigenin was shown in T. vulgare sensu lato.

  8. Comparative studies on the antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of Tanacetum vulgare L. essential oil and methanol extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Devrnja, Nina; Anđelković, Boban; Aranđelović, Sandra; Radulović, Siniša; Soković, Marina; Krstić Milošević, Dijana; Ristić, Mihailo; Ćalić, Dušica

    2017-01-01

    Chemical composition of essential oil (EO) and methanol extracts (MEs) from different parts of Tanacetum vulgare L. plant was analyzed and investigated for potential biological activities and correlated with the main constituents detected in EO and MEs. The EO was characterized by a high content of oxygenated monoterpenes with trans-chrysanthenyl acetate as major compound. All MEs were characterized by neochlorogenic, 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic and caffeoylquinic acids. High phenolic content in M...

  9. Tanacetum vulgare as a bioindicator of trace-metal contamination: a study of a naturally colonized open-pit lignite mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasion, Mateusz; Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra; Kolon, Krzysztof; Kempers, Alexander J

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the possibility of use of Tanacetum vulgare (tansy) as an ecological indicator of metal concentration in a naturally colonized open-pit lignite mine in Bełchatów (Poland). Tanacetum vulgare is the only species growing abundantly and spontaneously in the lignite mine waste dumps. Metal concentrations in roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and soil were measured in dump sites differing in type and time of reclamation and therefore differing in pollution levels. Tanacetum vulgare appeared to be an accumulator of chromium and iron in roots, whereas highest concentrations of manganese and zinc were found in leaves. A high bioaccumulation factor for cadmium (Cd) was observed in dumps and control sites, indicating that even small amounts of Cd in the environment may result in significant uptake by the plant. The lowest concentrations of metals were found in plants from sites situated on dumps reclaimed with argillaceous limestone.

  10. Fatty Acid Composition and Biological Activities of Tanacetum zahlbruckneri (Náb. Grierson Growing in Turkey

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    Pinar Caglar Eyol

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available n-H exane extracts of the roots, stems and flowers of Tanacetum zahlbruckneri (Náb. Grierson (Asteraceae were analysed for their fatty acid contents by Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS method and their antimicrobial and insecticidal activities were evaluated as well. Total FAMEs percentages of the n-hexane extracts were detected as 69.94, 73.72 and 87.29 in the roots, in the stems and in the flowers, respectively. While palmitic acid was found as a major component for roots (26.12 % and stems (21.28 %, flowers contain 33.78 % of linoleic acid as a major component. Roots and stems also contain considerable amount of α-linoleic acid as 15.30 % and 18.09 %, respectively. Additionally, α-linolenic acid percentage was found as 17.17 in the stems. Single dose screening insecticidal activity tests with Sitophilus granarius (L. showed that n-hexane root extract has a considerably high bioactivity (83 % mortality at 100 g/L dose after 48 h. While antibacterial activity results ranged between 0.625-1.25 mg/mL for all three extracts, the antifungal activity was observed of the flowers as 0.156 mg/mL, against C. parapsilosis and C. albicans.

  11. Antibacterial, anticandidal and antioxidant properties of Tanacetum argenteum (Lam.) Willd. subsp. flabellifolium (Boiss. & Heldr.) Grierson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Yavuz Bulent; Iscan, Gokalp; Goger, Fatih; Demirci, Betul; Elmacı, Ceren

    2017-11-01

    In the present study hydrodistilled essential oil and total methanol extracts of Tanacetum argenteum subsp. flabellifolium have been evaluated for their antimicrobial and antioxidant effects. The chemical composition of the oil and the crude extract were determined by GC/FID, GC/MS and LC/DAD/ESI-MS systems respectively. β-thujone (47.1%), α-pinene (19.1%) and α-thujone (10.5%) were the main compounds of the essential oil while the 5-Ocaffeoylquinic acid, 1,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid were identified as flavonoid content of the crude extract. The oil and the methanol extract were demonstrated moderate antimicrobial effects (MIC range; 0,062-2,0 mg/mL) against 21 different pathogenic micro organism. Total phenolic content was determined as 63 mg GAE in g extract and the DPPH radical scavenging effect was determined as 0.16 mg/mL (IC 50 ) and TEAC was determined as 0.21mMol.

  12. Chemical composition, larvicidal, and biting deterrent activity of essential oils of two subspecies of Tanacetum argenteum (Asterales: Asteraceae) and individual constituents against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water distilled essential oils from the air dried aerial parts of Tanacetum argenteum (Lam.) Willd. subsp. argenteum (Lam.) and T. argenteum (Lam.) Willd. subsp. canum (C. Koch) Grierson were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Twenty-seven and 3...

  13. Effects of herbicide and nitrogen fertilizer on non-target plant reproduction and indirect effects on pollination in Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Yoko Luise; Strandberg, Beate; Damgaard, Christian Frølund

    2018-01-01

    and nitrogen fertilizer on reproductive features of Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae). The study was carried out in an experimental set-up, in which plots of 7x7 m were treated with one of six treatments: four levels of the herbicide glyphosate (0%, 1%, 5%, and 25% of label rate of 1440 g a.i. ha-1) without...

  14. Antibacterial activity and the variation of Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Schultz Bip. essential oils from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polatoglu, Kaan; Demirci, Fatih; Demirci, Betül; Gören, Nezhun; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can

    2010-01-01

    Water-distilled essential oils from herbal parts of Tanacetum parthenium from two different localities in Turkey were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The essential oil of T. parthenium collected from Davutpasa-Istanbul location were characterized with camphor 49%, trans-chrysanthenyl acetate 22.1% and camphene 9.4%. Second plant sample is collected from the remote east end of the country Savşat-Ardahan location. The essential oil from this location was characterized with camphor 60.8% and camphene 6.8%. Unlike the former this sample contains trans-chrysanthenyl acetate in trace amount and cis- chrysanthenyl acetate in very small amount (0.6%) which is not present in the first sample. Antibacterial activity of the oils were evaluated for five Gram (+) and five Gram (-) bacteria by using a broth microdilution assay. The highest activity was observed on Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S.aureus however when compared with positive control oils showed higher MIC values. The oil of Istanbul-sample showed highest activity on B. subtilis (125 microg/mL) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (125 microg/mL) which is two fold concentration when compared with the positive control chloramphenicol (62.5 microg/mL). The oil of Ardahan sample showed the highest activity on S. aureus (125 microg/mL) which is likewise two fold concentration of the positive control chloramphenicol (62.5 microg/mL). DPPH scavenging activity was 59.3% of the oil from Davutpasa at 15 mg/mL concentration. When compared to positive control alpha-tocopherol (94.6%) Savşat oil (28.2%) showed low and Davutpasa oil showed medium DPPH scavenging activity. All of the oils showed toxicity to Vibrio fischeri in the TLC-bioluminescence assay.

  15. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing; Manzano, David; Tanić, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew tha...

  16. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Tanacetum walteri (Anthemideae-Asteraceae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Airin; Sonboli, Ali

    2018-02-06

    The composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Tanacetum walteri were studied. Aerial flowering parts of plant were collected from North Khorasan Province of Iran and the essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analysed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was determined by disc diffusion and MIC and MBC determination. Thirty-five compounds were identified in the oil of T. walteri accounting for 94.4% of the total oil. Thymol (22.5%), 1,8-cineole (8.2%), umbellulone (6.9%), α-bisabolol (6.3%) and camphor (5.3%) were as the principal constituents. The highest antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Klebsiella pneumoniae with MIC value of 0.63 mg/mL. The inhibitory effect of the essential oil of T. walteri could be attributed mainly to the high levels of phenolic compound thymol and oxygenated terpenes in essential oil.

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Herbal Extract (Rosa canina, Tanacetum vulgare and Urtica dioica) on Rat Model of Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Parvaneh; Saliminejad, Kioomars; Dehghan Shasaltaneh, Marzieh; Kamali, Koorosh; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Nazari, Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease (SAD) is caused by genetic risk factors, aging and oxidative stresses. The herbal extract of Rosa canina (R. canina), Tanacetum vulgare (T. vulgare) and Urtica dioica (U. dioica) has a beneficial role in aging, as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agent. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of this herbal extract in the rat model of SAD was investigated. The rats were divided into control, sham, model, herbal extract -treated and ethanol-treated groups. Drug interventions were started on the 21(st) day after modeling and each treatment group was given the drugs by intraperitoneal (I.P.) route for 21 days. The expression levels of the five important genes for pathogenesis of SAD including Syp, Psen1, Mapk3, Map2 and Tnf-α were measured by qPCR between the hippocampi of SAD model which were treated by this herbal extract and control groups. The Morris Water Maze was adapted to test spatial learning and memory ability of the rats. Treatment of the rat model of SAD with herbal extract induced a significant change in expression of Syp (p=0.001) and Psen1 (p=0.029). In Morris Water Maze, significant changes in spatial learning seen in the rat model group were improved in herbal-treated group. This herbal extract could have anti-dementia properties and improve spatial learning and memory in SAD rat model.

  18. Repellent and Fumigant Activities of Tanacetum nubigenum Wallich. ex DC Essential Oils against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, S Zafar; Mohan, Manindra; Pandey, Abhay K; Singh, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The repellent and fumigant toxicity of essential oils of Tanacetum nubigenum Wallich. ex DC collected from three different habitats (Gothing, Burphu and Glacier) of Uttarakhand Himalayas, India named as TNG, TNB and TNM respectively, were investigated against the adults of red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst). Among the three samples tested, TNG was found to more potent exhibiting more repellent effect towards the insects and with LC50 values by fumigant bioassay were 13.23 and 8.32 µl per 0.25 L air at 24 and 48 h exposure of insects to the essential oil respectively. In between other two oil samples, TNM was superior in potency showed LC50 value of 14.22 (24 h) & 8.82 µl per 0.25 L air (48 h). During in vivo study all the essential oil samples significantly protected 500 g of wheat grains for 6 months from insect infestation as compared to non fumigated grains and order of efficacy was TNG>TNM>TNB. There were no side effects of essential oils on germination rate of grains (essential oil of T. nubigenum can be explored as novel natural fumigants for the control of stored product insects.

  19. Anthelmintic Activity of Crude Extract and Essential Oil of Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae against Adult Worms of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyana Silva Godinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease caused by trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, affects more than 200 million people worldwide, and its control is dependent on a single drug, praziquantel. Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae is used in folk medicine as a vermifuge. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro schistosomicidal activity of the crude extract (TV and the essential oil (TV-EO from the aerial parts of T. vulgare. TV-EO was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/MS, which allowed the identification of β-thujone (84.13% as the major constituent. TV and TV-EO, at 200 μg/mL, decreased motor activity and caused 100% mortality of all adult worms. At 100 and 50 μg/mL, only TV caused death of all adult worms, while TV-EO was inactive. TV (200 μg/mL was also able to reduce viability and decrease production of developed eggs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed morphological alterations in the tegument of the S. mansoni surface after incubation with TV (50 and 100 μg/mL. Quantitative analysis on the schistosomes tegument showed that TV caused changes in the numbers of tubercles of S. mansoni male worms in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest that T. vulgare is a potential source of schistosomicidal compounds.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant, Antibiotic, and Cytotoxic Activities of Tanacetum vulgare L. Essential Oil and Its Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héloïse Coté

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tanacetum vulgare L. (Asteraceae is a perennial herb that has been used to treat multiple ailments. Regional variability of the chemical composition of T. vulgare essential oils is well-known. Despite these regional chemotypes, most relevant studies did not analyze the complete chemical composition of the T. vulgare essential oil and its constituents in relation to their biological activities. Here, we assess the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and cytotoxic activities of T. vulgare collected from northern Quebec (Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean, Canada. Methods: Essential oil was extracted from plants by steam distillation and analyzed using GC-FID. Biological activities of essential oil and its main constituents were evaluated in vitro. Results: We identified the major compounds as camphor, borneol, and 1,8-cineole. The oil possesses anti-inflammatory activity inhibiting NO production. It also inhibits intracellular DCFH oxidation induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide. Anti-inflammatory activity of essential oil appears driven mainly by α-humulene while antioxidant activity is provided by α-pinene and caryophyllene oxide. Essential oil from T vulgare was active against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with camphor and caryophyllene oxide responsible for antibacterial activity. Finally, T. vulgare essential oil was slightly cytotoxic against the human healthy cell line WS1 while α-humulene and caryophyllene oxide were moderately cytotoxic against A-549, DLD-1, and WS1. Conclusion: We report, for the first time, links between the specific compounds found in T. vulgare essential oil and anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and cytotoxic activities. T. vulgare essential oil possesses interesting biological properties.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant, Antibiotic, and Cytotoxic Activities of Tanacetum vulgare L. Essential Oil and Its Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Héloïse; Boucher, Marie-Anne; Pichette, André; Legault, Jean

    2017-05-25

    Background: Tanacetum vulgare L. (Asteraceae) is a perennial herb that has been used to treat multiple ailments. Regional variability of the chemical composition of T. vulgare essential oils is well-known. Despite these regional chemotypes, most relevant studies did not analyze the complete chemical composition of the T. vulgare essential oil and its constituents in relation to their biological activities. Here, we assess the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and cytotoxic activities of T. vulgare collected from northern Quebec (Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean), Canada. Methods: Essential oil was extracted from plants by steam distillation and analyzed using GC-FID. Biological activities of essential oil and its main constituents were evaluated in vitro. Results: We identified the major compounds as camphor, borneol, and 1,8-cineole. The oil possesses anti-inflammatory activity inhibiting NO production. It also inhibits intracellular DCFH oxidation induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide. Anti-inflammatory activity of essential oil appears driven mainly by α-humulene while antioxidant activity is provided by α-pinene and caryophyllene oxide. Essential oil from T vulgare was active against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with camphor and caryophyllene oxide responsible for antibacterial activity. Finally, T. vulgare essential oil was slightly cytotoxic against the human healthy cell line WS1 while α-humulene and caryophyllene oxide were moderately cytotoxic against A-549, DLD-1, and WS1. Conclusion: We report, for the first time, links between the specific compounds found in T. vulgare essential oil and anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and cytotoxic activities. T. vulgare essential oil possesses interesting biological properties.

  2. Sitophilus granarius L. (Coleoptera) Toxicity and Biological Activities of the Essential Oils of Tanacetum macrophyllum (Waldst. & Kit.) Schultz Bip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polatoğlu, Kaan; Karakoç, Ömer Cem; Demirci, Betül; Gören, Nezhun; Can Başer, Kemal Hüsnü

    2015-01-01

    Insecticides of the natural origin are an important alternative to the synthetic insecticides that are being employed for the preserving stored products. The volatiles obtained from T. cinerariifolium (=Pyrethrum cinerariifolium) is being used for many types of insecticidal applications; however there is a very little information on the insecticidal activity of the essential oils of other Tanacetum species. The main purpose of the present study is to determine the chemical composition of T. macrophyllum (Waldst. & Kit.) Schultz Bip. essential oils and evaluate their insecticidal activity against S. granarius as well as its other beneficial biological activities. Highest contact toxicity was observed in the leaf oil of (88.93%) against S. granarius. The flower oil showed considerable fumigant toxicity against L. minor at 10 mg/mL application concentration (61.86 %) when compared with other samples at the same concentration. The highest DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) scavenging activity (47.7%) and phosphomolybdenum reducing activity was observed also for the flower oil of T. macrophyllum at 10 mg/mL concentration. The essential oils were analyzed by GC, GC/MS. The flower and leaf oils were characterized with γ-eudesmol 21.5%, (E)-sesquilavandulol 20.3%, copaborneol 8.5% and copaborneol 14.1%, 1,8-cineole 11%, bornyl acetate 9.6%, borneol 6.3% respectively. AHC analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data obtained from the essential oil composition of the T. macrophyllum essential oil from the present research and previous reports pointed out that two different chemotypes could be proposed with current findings which are p-methyl benzyl alcohol/ cadinene and eudesmane chemotypes.

  3. Tanacetum vulgare L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... The highest amount of lead (Pb) was in leaves (14.1 mg/kg) and in essential ... Heavy metals interact with ... metals, both essential (copper (Cu), zinc (Zn)) and non- ... effect of mercury on mineral levels was more pronounced.

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Herbal Extract (Rosa canina, Tanacetum vulgare and Urtica dioica) on Rat Model of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Parvaneh; Saliminejad, Kioomars; Dehghan Shasaltaneh, Marzieh; Kamali, Koorosh; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Nazari, Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease (SAD) is caused by genetic risk factors, aging and oxidative stresses. The herbal extract of Rosa canina (R. canina), Tanacetum vulgare (T. vulgare) and Urtica dioica (U. dioica) has a beneficial role in aging, as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative agent. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of this herbal extract in the rat model of SAD was investigated. Methods: The rats were divided into control, sham, model, herbal extract -treated and ethanol-treated groups. Drug interventions were started on the 21st day after modeling and each treatment group was given the drugs by intraperitoneal (I.P.) route for 21 days. The expression levels of the five important genes for pathogenesis of SAD including Syp, Psen1, Mapk3, Map2 and Tnf-α were measured by qPCR between the hippocampi of SAD model which were treated by this herbal extract and control groups. The Morris Water Maze was adapted to test spatial learning and memory ability of the rats. Results: Treatment of the rat model of SAD with herbal extract induced a significant change in expression of Syp (p=0.001) and Psen1 (p=0.029). In Morris Water Maze, significant changes in spatial learning seen in the rat model group were improved in herbal-treated group. Conclusion: This herbal extract could have anti-dementia properties and improve spatial learning and memory in SAD rat model. PMID:27563424

  5. Essential oil composition and antibacterial activity of Tanacetum argenteum (Lam.) Willd. ssp. argenteum and T. densum (Lab.) Schultz Bip. ssp. amani heywood from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polatoğlu, Kaan; Demirci, Fatih; Demirci, Betül; Gören, Nezhun; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can

    2010-01-01

    Water-distilled essential oils from aerial parts of Tanacetum argenteum ssp. argenteum and T. densum ssp. amani from Turkey were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The essential oil of T. argenteum ssp. argenteum was characterized with alpha-pinene 36.7%, beta-pinene 27.5% and 1,8-cineole 9.8%. T. densum ssp. amani was characterized with beta-pinene 27.2%, 1,8-cineole 13.1%, alpha-pinene 9.7% and p-cymene 8.9%. Antibacterial activity of the oils were evaluated for five Gram-positive and five Gram-negative bacteria by using a broth microdilution assay. The highest inhibitory activity was observed against Bacillus cereus for T. argenteum ssp. argenteum oil (125 microg/mL) when compared with positive control chloramphenicol it showed the same inhibition potency. However, the same oil showed lower inhibitory activity against B. subtilis when compared. The oil of T. densum ssp. amani did not show significant activity against the tested microorganisms. DPPH radical scavenging activity of the T. argenteum ssp. argenteum oil was investigated for 15 and 10 mg/mL concentrations. However, the oil did not show significant activity when compared to positive control alpha-tocopherol. Both oils showed toxicity to Vibrio fischeri in the TLC-bioluminescence assay.

  6. Genomic and transcriptomic alterations following intergeneric hybridization and polyploidization in the Chrysanthemum nankingense×Tanacetum vulgare hybrid and allopolyploid (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiangyu; Wang, Haibin; Song, Aiping; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

    2018-01-01

    Allopolyploid formation involves two major events: interspecific hybridization and polyploidization. A number of species in the Asteraceae family are polyploids because of frequent hybridization. The effects of hybridization on genomics and transcriptomics in Chrysanthemum nankingense×Tanacetum vulgare hybrids have been reported. In this study, we obtained allopolyploids by applying a colchicine treatment to a synthesized C. nankingense × T. vulgare hybrid. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP), and high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technologies were used to investigate the genomic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic alterations in both the hybrid and allopolyploids. The genomic alterations in the hybrid and allopolyploids mainly involved the loss of parental fragments and the gain of novel fragments. The DNA methylation level of the hybrid was reduced by hybridization but was restored somewhat after polyploidization. There were more significant differences in gene expression between the hybrid/allopolyploid and the paternal parent than between the hybrid/allopolyploid and the maternal parent. Most differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed down-regulation in the hybrid/allopolyploid relative to the parents. Among the non-additive genes, transgressive patterns appeared to be dominant, especially repression patterns. Maternal expression dominance was observed specifically for down-regulated genes. Many methylase and methyltransferase genes showed differential expression between the hybrid and parents and between the allopolyploid and parents. Our data indicate that hybridization may be a major factor affecting genomic and transcriptomic changes in newly formed allopolyploids. The formation of allopolyploids may not simply be the sum of hybridization and polyploidization changes but also may be influenced by the interaction between these processes.

  7. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Airborne Compositae dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Jakobsen, Henrik Byrial; Paulsen, E.

    1999-01-01

    The air around intact feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) plants was examined for the presence of airborne parthenolide and other potential allergens using a high-volume air sampler and a dynamic headspace technique. No particle-bound parthenolide was detected in the former. Among volatiles emitted f...... for airborne Compositae dermatitis. Potential allergens were found among the emitted monoterpenes and their importance in airborne Compositae dermatitis is discussed....

  9. The Chemopreventive Effect of Tanacetum Polycephalum Against LA7-Induced Breast Cancer in Rats and the Apoptotic Effect of a Cytotoxic Sesquiterpene Lactone in MCF7 Cells: A Bioassay-Guided Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Karimian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tanacetum polycephalum L. Schultz-Bip is a member of the Asteraceae family. This study evaluated the chemopreventive effect of a T. polycephalum hexane extract (TPHE using in in vivo and in vitro models. Methods and Results: Five groups of rats: normal control, cancer control, TPHE low dose, TPHE high dose and positive control (tamoxifen were used for the in vivo study. Histopathological examination showed that TPHE significantly suppressed the carcinogenic effect of LA7 tumour cells. The tumour sections from TPHE-treated rats demonstrated significantly reduced expression of Ki67 and PCNA compared to the cancer control group. Using a bioassay-guided approach, the cytotoxic compound of TPHE was identified as a tricyclic sesquiterpene lactone, namely, 8β- hydroxyl- 4β, 15- dihydrozaluzanin C (HDZC. Signs of early and late apoptosis were observed in MCF7 cells treated with HDZC and were attributed to the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway based on the up-regulation of Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. HDZC induced cell cycle arrest in MCF7 cells and increased the expression of p21 and p27 at the mRNA and protein levels. Conclusion: This results of this study substantiate the anticancer effect of TPHE and highlight the involvement of HDZC as one of the contributing compounds that act by initiating mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

  10. Toxic essential oils. Part V: Behaviour modulating and toxic properties of thujones and thujone-containing essential oils of Salvia officinalis L., Artemisia absinthium L., Thuja occidentalis L. and Tanacetum vulgare L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Niko S; Genčić, Marija S; Stojanović, Nikola M; Randjelović, Pavle J; Stojanović-Radić, Zorica Z; Stojiljković, Nenad I

    2017-07-01

    Neurotoxic thujones (α- and β-diastereoisomers) are common constituents of plant essential oils. In this study, we employed a statistical approach to determine the contribution of thujones to the overall observed behaviour-modulating and toxic effects of essential oils (Salvia officinalis L., Artemisia absinthium L., Thuja occidentalis L. and Tanacetum vulgare L.) containing these monoterpene ketones. The data from three in vivo neuropharmacological tests on rats (open field, light-dark, and diazepam-induced sleep), and toxicity assays (brine shrimp, and antimicrobial activity against a panel of microorganisms), together with the data from detailed chemical analyses, were subjected to a multivariate statistical treatment to reveal the possible correlation(s) between the content of essential-oil constituents and the observed effects. The results strongly imply that the toxic and behaviour-modulating activity of the oils (hundreds of constituents) should not be associated exclusively with thujones. The statistical analyses pinpointed to a number of essential-oil constituents other than thujones that demonstrated a clear correlation with either the toxicity, antimicrobial effect or the activity on CNS. Thus, in addition to the thujone content, the amount and toxicity of other constituents should be taken into consideration when making risk assessment and determining the regulatory status of plants in food and medicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sesquiterpene lactones from the Yugoslavian wild growing plant families Asteraceae and Apiaceae (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILUTIN STEFANOVIC

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available 1. Introduction 2. Results 3. Asteraceae 3.1. Genus Artemisia L. 3.1.1. Artemisia annua L. 3.1.2. Artemisia vulgaris L. 3.1.3. Artemisia absinthium L. (warmwood 3.1.4. Artemisia scoparia W. et K. 3.1.5. Artemisia camprestris L. 3.2. Genus Ambrosia L. 3.2.1. Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. (the common rag weed 3.3. Genus Tanacetum L. (syn. Chrysanthemum L. 3.3.1. Tanacetum parthenium L. (feverfew 3.3.2. Tanacetum serotinum L. 3.3.3. Tanacetum vulgare L. (tansy 3.3.4. Tanacetum macrophyllum Willd. 3.3.5. Tanacetum corymbosum L. 3.4. Genus Telekia Baumg. 3.4.1. Telekia speciosa (Schreb. Baumg. 3.5. Genus Inula L. 3.5.1. Inula helenium L. 3.5.2. Inula spiraeifolia L. 3.6. Genus Eupatorium L. 3.6.1. Eupatorium cannabinum L. 3.7. Genus Achillea L. 3.7.1. Achillea abrotanoides Vis. 3.7.2. Achillea millefolium subsp. pannonica 3.7.3. Achillea crithmifolia W. et K. 3.7.4. Achillea clypeolata Sibth. et Sm. 3.7.5. Achillea serbica Nyman 3.7.6. Achillea depressa Janka 3.8. Genus Anthemis L. 3.8.1. Anthemis carpatica Willd. 3.8.2. Anthemis cretica L. subsp. cretica 3.9. Genus Centaurea L. 3.9.1. Centaurea derventana Vis. et Panc. 3.9.2. Centaurea kosaninii Hayek 3.9.3. Centaurea solstitialis L. 4. Apiaceae 4.1. Genus Laserpitium L. 4.1.1. Laserpitium siler L. 4.1.2. Laserpitium marginatum L. 4.1.3. Laserpitium latifolium L. 4.1.4. Laserpitium alpinum W. K. 4.2. Genus Angelica L. 4.2.1. Angelica silvestris L. 4.3. Genus Peucedanum L. 4.3.1. Peucedanum austriacum (Jacq. Koch

  12. A systematic review of the effects of Iranian pharmaceutical plant extracts on Giardia lamblia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Ziaei Hezarjaribi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to provide a systematic review regarding anti-Giardia effect of different Iranian plant extracts used in vivo and in vitro on cysts and trophozoites. Many reports indicated that most of plant extracts used as anti-Giardia were obtained from Liliaceae, Apiaceae, Asteraceae, and Myrtaceae. These extracts included different fractions such as aqueous, alcoholic and chloroform extracts as well as Soxhlet extraction of juice or essence. The findings of this review showed that hydroalcoholic extract of asafoetida, Chenopodium botrys, and chloroformic extract of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium have the maximum effect (100% efficacy on in vitro application against Giardia. However, the highest in vivo effect of 100% therapeutic significance was recorded for the extract of Allium sativum at 80 mg/mL concentration. Given the plant species richness of Iran in terms of herbal medicines with fewer side effects, it can be a good alternative to chemical drugs used to treat giardiasis.

  13. Chemical Diversity and Biological Potential of Tanacetum praeteritum subsp. praeteritum Essential Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Özek, Gülmira

    2018-01-01

    Two samples of Tanacetumpraeteritum (Horwood) Heywood subsp. praeteritum(Horwood) were collected in flowering period and subjected separately tohydrodistillation to yield the essential oils (A and B). The oils wereinvestigated for chemical composition with GC-FID and GC/MS techniques andevaluated against acetylcholinesterase and a-amylase enzymes andfree radicals (DPPH• and ABTS•+) using microtiter plateassays. Both of the oils were characterized with high abundance of oxygenatedmonoterpenes....

  14. Herbal medicines in migraine prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeWeerdt, CJ; Bootsma, HPR; Hendriks, H

    The efficacy of feverfew capsules on migraine prophylaxis was investigated in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study in which 50 patients, who had not used feverfew before, participated. The capsules were filled with a dried alcoholic extract of feverfew on microcristalline

  15. [Compositae dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Marina; Poljacki, Mirjana

    2003-01-01

    Compositae dermatitis is an allergic contact dermatitis caused by plant species of the Compositae family. The first report of a cutaneous reaction to the Chrysanthemum genus was made by Howe JS in 1887. In 1895 Maiden JH reported about skin lesions among men working with Tagetes minuta. Case reports of contact allergic-ragweed dermatitis appeared in the American literature as early as 1919. The North American feverfew--Parthenium Hysterophorus was brought to India from America in 1956 and it caused thousands of cases of so-called parthenium dermatitis. Ragweed and parthenium dermatitis became prototypes for the classic, so-called "airborne" Compositae dermatitis, that affects primarily exposed skin surfaces, and produces a universal erythroderma. The frequency of contact allergy to Compositae in Europe is higher than previously believed. It occurs most frequently in middle-aged and elderly persons, but also in all age groups. During the two past decades a more equal sex ratio has been established. The prevalence varies from 0.7-1.4% in the general population, up to 4.5% among occupationally exposed persons. Compositae allergy is among the top ten contact sensitivities in Europe. In North Europe plants were the cause of 4.4% cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS: Among cultivated Compositae plants, Chrysanthemum is considered to be a major sensitizer in Europe (60%). Among the edible types, it is lettuce--Lactuca sativa and endive Cichorium endivia (20-30%), and wild-growing feverfew--Tanace--tum parthenium (70-90%), tansy--Tanacetum vulgare (54%), and dandelion--Taraxacum officinale (65%). Sesquiterpene lactones are the main sensitizers of the Compositae family. Other components, thiophenes and acetylenes are said to elicit only phytophotodermatitis, but recent studies have demonstrated that some thiophenes and benzofuran derivates possess not only phototoxic activity, but also sensitizing properties. Photosensitivity is

  16. Terpenoids for medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischedick, Justin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is concerns research on monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and diterpenoids with medicinal properties. Terpenoids from commond herbs as well as Cannabis sativa, Inula britannica, Tanacetum parthenium, and Salvia officinalis were investigated

  17. Compositae dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Mirjana; Poljački Mirjana N.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction Compositae dermatitis is an allergic contact dermatitis caused by plant species of the Compositae family. The first report of a cutaneous reaction to the Chrysanthemum genus was made by Howe JS in 1887. In 1895 Maiden JH reported about skin lesions among men working with Tagetes minute Case reports of contact allergic-ragweed dermatitis appeared in the American literature as early as 1919. The North American feverfew - Parthenium Hysterophorus was brought to India from America in...

  18. Pyrethrum flowers and pyrethroid insecticides.

    OpenAIRE

    Casida, J E

    1980-01-01

    The natural pyrethrins from the daisy-like flower, Tanacetum or Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium, are nonpersistent insecticides of low toxicity to mammals. Synthetic analogs or pyrethroids, evolved from the natural compounds by successive isosteric modifications, are more potent and stable and are the newest important class of crop protection chemicals. They retain many of the favorable properties of the pyrethrins.

  19. Evaluation of anticancer properties of a new α-methylene-δ-lactone DL-249 on two cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomorska Dorota K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer activity of a new synthetic α-methylene-δ-lactone DL-249 was reported in leukemia HL-60 and breast cancer MCF-7 cells and compared with the activity of a natural α-methylene-γ-lactone from Tanacetum parthenium, parthenolide.

  20. Biosynthesis, localization and ecological role of pyrethrins and linked secondary metabolites in pyrethrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.A.; Ramirez, A.

    2017-01-01

    The perennial herbaceous plant Tanacetum cinerariifolium, also known as pyrethrum, is a daisy-like flower with an inherent ability to produce considerable amounts of biologically active metabolites, especially pyrethrins, probably intended for self-defence. The discovery of pyrethrin toxicity

  1. Environmental impact quantification and correlation between site ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to quantify the most significant impact from the polluted environment and to review the correlation between pollution indicators and the content and structures of Tanacetum vulgare L. (Tansy). Heavy metals as mercury, lead, cadmium, chromium and nickel are considered as pollution indicators.

  2. Environmental impact on morphological and anatomical structure of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphological and anatomical structure of Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.) from two specific locations in one town, depending on environmental conditions, were carried out: anthropogenic Ada Huja (polluted zone) and non anthropogenic Topcider park (unpolluted). Study included the diferences in the structure of leaves, ...

  3. Observations on antifertility and abortifacient herbal drugs | Shah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plur., Buddleja asiatica Lour, Chrysanthemum parthenium (L.) Bernh, Justacia adhatod L., Ricinus communis L., Zingiber officinale Roscol., Daucus crota L., Momordica charantia L., Plumbago zeylanica L., Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn., Plantago ovata Forssk, Tanacetum vulgare and Arctium lappa L. The most widely used ...

  4. Vegetation and Grazing in the St. Katherine Protectorate, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plants were surveyed in the St. Katherine Protectorate of South Sinai, Egypt. The most frequently recorded plant species include: Artemisia herba-alba, Artemisia judaica, Fagonia arabica, Fagonia mollis, Schismus barbatus, Stachys aegyptiaca, Tanacetum sinaicum, Teucrium polium and Zilla spinosa. Dominant plant ...

  5. An overview of herbal supplement utilization with particular emphasis on possible interactions with dental drugs and oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worku

    2003-01-01

    Herbal medication in the United States is a popular form of therapy. This paper provides an overview of the utilization of herbal supplements with particular emphasis on possible interactions with oral health drugs and oral manifestations. Herbal supplements are regulated by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which limits their regulation by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A number of studies indicate that there is a progressive increase in the utilization of herbal supplements. The majority of consumers of these products are white, middle-aged women who have some college education. Many of the consumers use pharmaceutical drugs concurrently, but most do not inform their health-care providers about their use of herbal supplements. Various herbal supplements have been reported or are suspected to interact with certain oral health drugs, the most important one being 1) bromelain, cayenne, chamomile, feverfew, dong quai, eleuthro/Seberian ginseng, garlic, ginkgo, ginger, ginseng and licorice interacting with aspirin; 2) aloe latex, ephedra, ginseng, rhubarb, cascara sagrada, licorice, and senna interacting with corticosteriods; 3) kava, St. John's wort, chamomile, and valerian interacting with central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs; and 4) herbs acting on the gastrointestinal system, altering the absorption of several orally administered drugs. Further, the use of some herbal supplements has been reported to be associated with oral manifestations, including aphthous ulcers, lip and tongue irritation, and swelling with feverfew; gingival bleeding with feverfew and ginkgo; tongue numbness with echinacea; xerostomia with St. John's wort; oral and lingual dyskinesia with kava; and salivation with yohimbe. These potential effects of herbal supplements in conjunction with factors related to regulation restrictions suggest that the use of these products may be associated with various adverse reactions that can affect oral health and

  6. Compositae dermatitis from airborne parthenolide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, E.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    of the HIVAS extract by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry detected PHL in a concentration of 510 ng mL(-1) in the HIVAS extract. Testing with a dilution series of PHL showed positive reactions down to 8.1 ng in selected patients. None of the 12 patients tested positive to monoterpenes or sesquiterpenes......, obtained by fractionation of ether extracts, dynamic headspace and high-volume air sampler (HIVAS) technique, respectively. RESULTS: Among 12 feverfew-allergic patients, eight had positive patch-test reactions to a HIVAS filter extract, while two tested positive to a headspace extract. Subsequent analysis...

  7. Effects of medicinal plant extracts on growth of Leishmania (L. amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi Efeito de extratos de plantas medicinais no crescimento de Leishmania (L. amazonensis e Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Shima Luize

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the screening of extracts obtained from 19 species of plants used in Brazilian traditional medicine for treatment of a variety of diseases. The extracts were tested against axenic amastigote and promastigote forms of Leishmania (L. amazonensis, and epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro at a concentration of 100 mg/ml. Baccharis trimera, Cymbopogon citratus, Matricaria chamomilla, Mikania glomerata, Ocimum gratissimum, Piper regnellii, Prunus domestica, Psidium guajava, Sambucus canadensis, Stryphnodendron adstringens, Tanacetum parthenium, and Tanacetum vulgare showed significant effects against one or both parasites, with a percentage of growth inhibition between 49.5 and 99%. The extracts showed no cytotoxic effect on sheep erythrocytes. These medicinal plants may be sources of new compounds that are clinically active against L. amazonensis and T. cruzi.Este estudo descreve a triagem de extratos obtidos de 19 espécies de plantas usadas na medicina tradicional brasileira para o tratamento de várias doenças. Os extratos foram testados contra formas amastigota axênica e promastigota de Leishmania (L. amazonensis, e formas epimastigota de Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro na concentração de 100 mg/ml. Baccharis trimera, Cymbopogon citratus, Matricaria chamomilla, Mikania glomerata, Ocimum gratissimum, Piper regnellii, Prunus domestica, Psidium guajava, Sambucus canadensis, Stryphnodendron adstringens, Tanacetum parthenium, e Tanacetum vulgare apresentaram efeito significante contra um ou ambos parasitas, com a porcentagem de inibição de crescimento entre 49,5 e 99%. Os extratos não mostraram efeito citotóxico em hemácias de carneiro. Essas plantas medicinais podem ser fontes alternativas de novos compostos clinicamente ativos contra L. amazonensis e T. cruzi.

  8. Drug Plant Seed Viability Preservation by Cryoconservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sh. Dodonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the possibility of cryopreservation of seeds of several species of drug plants in Central Kazakhstan – Tanacetum ulutavicum, Niedzwedzkia semiretschenskia, Rhaponticum carthamoides. To increase the amount of viable seeds after liquid nitrogen freezing, we used different defrosting temperatures, deposited seeds with different moisture contents and used different containers for cryopreservation. Recommendations, concerning conditions of cryopreservation of seeds of these drug plant species were developed, basing on the obtained results.

  9. Enrichment ratios of elements in selected plant species from black coal mine dumps in Lower Silesia (Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samecka-Cymerman, A.; Kempers, A.J. [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2003-07-01

    Concentration of the metals Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn and V as well as N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe and S were measured in soils and in two tree species (leaves of Betula pendula and Salix caprea) and two herbs (whole above-ground parts of Solidago canadensis and Tanacetum vulgare) sampled from dumps in the Walbrzych coal mine area (Lower Silesia, SW Poland). These plants, as used to evaluate the distribution of elements in the examined dumps, contained elevated levels of Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. Especially the highest levels of Mn in Betula pendula seriously exceed background values. Betula pendula characterized also the highest enrichment ratio for Mn, Salix caprea for Ni and Sr and Tanacetum vulgare for Cu. Test-t indicated that from both herbs Tanace-tum vulgare accumulated much more K, N, S and Zn than Solidago canadensis and of both trees Salix caprea accumulated significantly more Cd, Cu, K and Ca than Betula pendula, while this last species accumulated significantly more Fe and Mn than Salix caprea. A post hoc LSD test indicated that all examined plants had similar enrichment ratios for Al, Pb and V.

  10. Nutraceuticals in Acute and Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Oved; Mauskop, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    People who suffer from headaches often prefer nutraceutical treatment over traditional pharmacological approaches, due to fear of possible side effects, drug dependence, or addiction. Since treatment with nutraceuticals does not require a doctor's prescription, many patients rely on their own judgment as to when and which one to take, often without consultation or guidance from their physician. Some physicians could provide information about potential efficacy and side effects of various products, but many are not familiar with the nutraceuticals. Widespread skepticism persists among doctors about the effectiveness of these treatments. This is largely due to the lack of rigorous clinical studies. However, even when incontrovertible scientific evidence exists, many physicians remain distrustful of the evidence. The following review summarizes randomized controlled trials of some of the most commonly used non-pharmacological treatments, including magnesium, coenzyme Q10, riboflavin (vitamin B2), petasites, and feverfew (Table 1).

  11. Nutraceuticals in Migraine: A Summary of Existing Guidelines for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Thilinie; Pringsheim, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    The use of nutraceuticals or food/herbal products for health benefits is expanding in adults with migraine as they seek relief from pain in an effective and tolerable manner not always afforded by current conventional pharmacologic therapies. Guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology/American Headache Society, Canadian Headache Society, and European Federation of Neurological Societies have discussed nutraceuticals in varying degrees of detail with at times conflicting recommendations. This review serves to provide a summary of existing guidelines for the use of certain nutraceuticals including riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, magnesium, butterbur, feverfew, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The review will also discuss the regulation of nutraceuticals in North America and the current controversy regarding butterbur and its safety. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  12. Covalent Modification of Human Serum Albumin by the Natural Sesquiterpene Lactone Parthenolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Plöger

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of parthenolide (PRT, a natural sesquiterpene lactone from Tanacetum parthenium (Asteraceae, with human serum albumin (HSA was studied by UHPLC/+ESI-QqTOF MS analysis after tryptic digestion of albumin samples after incubation with this compound. It was found that the single free cysteine residue, C34, of HSA (0.6 mM reacted readily with PRT when incubated at approximately 13-fold excess of PRT (8 mM. Time-course studies with PRT and its 11β,13-dihydro derivative at equimolar ratios of the reactants revealed that PRT under the chosen conditions reacts preferably with C34 and does so exclusively via its α-methylene-γ-lactone moiety, while the epoxide structure is not involved in the reaction.

  13. The effect of glyphosate and nitrogen on plant communities and the soil fauna in terrestrial biotopes at field margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Strandberg, Beate; Dupont, Yoko

    were assessed at the ecosystem level by measuring biodiversity and functional traits. We have obtained an increased understanding of the causal relationship between plant communities and the soil fauna at the ecosystem level and increased knowledge on how and by what mechanisms important drivers...... that are known to affect plant communities may affect pollination and the soil fauna. The combined use of plant trait and soil fauna trait data in a full-factorial field experiment of glyphosate and nitrogen has never been explored before. The focus on plant and soil fauna traits rather than species enabled...... nitrogen, generally, resulted in increasing total plant cover and biomass, especially of fast-growing and competitive species as grasses and a few herbs such as Tanacetum vulgare. Using plant traits we found that increase in nitrogen promoted an increase in the average specific leaf area (SLA) and canopy...

  14. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  15. Evaluation of Pyrethrin Formulations on Dengue/Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Vectors in the Laboratory and Sublethal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sulaiman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia, Aedes aegypti (L. has been incriminated as principal vector of dengue viruses and Ae. albopictus as the secondary vector of dengue fever. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three for-mula¬tions of pyrethrin derived from Tanacetum cinerariaefolium against the dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the laboratory. The testings employed 2 methodologies: the WHO Larval Bioassay and WHO Adult Bioassay. The results showed that all the three pyrethrin formulations had larvicidal and adulticidal activi-ties. The impact of the sublethal doses of pyrethrin formulations on Aedes spp. larvae resulted in 4-6% of alive adult emergence compared to 90% of Ae. aegypti emerging adults and 96% Ae. albopictus alive adult emergence in the control. The impact of sublethal doses of the pyrethrin formulations caused very low fecundity on both Aedes spp. compared to the control (P< 0.05.

  16. Enantiomeric Distribution of Some Linalool Containing Essential Oils and Their Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hüsnü Can Başer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The enantiomeric composition of linalool was determined in 42 essential oils using chiral columns. Essential oils were analyzed by multidimentional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a non-chiral and chiral FSC columns combination with modified g -cyclodextrine (Lipodex E as the chiral stationary phase without previous isolation of the compound from the mixture. The essential oils of Achillea, Ballota, Calamintha, Micromeria, Hedychium, Tanacetum, Coriandrum, Xanthoxylum, Ocimum, Thymus, Lavandula, Elettaria, Cinnamomum, Salvia, Origanum, Satureja, Nepeta, Stachys were used as source material for enantiomeric separation of linalool. Enantiomeric distribution of linalool showed (--linalool was much more common than the (+-linalool in the essential oils in this study. (-- and (+-linalool enantiomers were evaluated for antimicrobial, antifungal and antimalarial activities. Both enantiomers demonstrated approximately 50% growth inhibition of Botrytis cinerea at 48 hrs.

  17. Natural considerations for skin of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Leslie; Rodriguez, David; Taylor, Susan C; Wu, Jessica

    2006-12-01

    Changing US demographics indicate that dermatologists will treat an increasing number of individuals of color. Early research on cutaneous anatomy and physiology was performed mostly in white populations. However, new research is elucidating similarities and differences in skin of color and white skin with regard to skin barrier, pigmentation, and sensitivity. Two of the most important issues are skin lightening and brightening. Products for use on skin of color typically should be gentle because of the proclivity of more deeply pigmented skin to develop pigmentary abnormalities in response to skin irritation or trauma. Increasing patient interest in natural remedies has been matched by research on the use of natural ingredients in dermatology. The relative gentleness of many of these products, coupled with excellent efficacy, makes natural ingredients such as soy and licorice excellent choices in the treatment of disorders such as postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) and melasma. For daily skin care, ingredients such as oatmeal and feverfew are good choices for gentle cleansing and moisturizing of dry, sensitive, or ashy skin. Sun protection is an increasing concern due to rising rates of melanoma. Several botanical products are useful in augmenting photoprotection with conventional sunscreens.

  18. Natural advances in eczema care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Fowler, Joseph F; Rigel, Darrell S; Taylor, Susan C

    2007-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing dermatitis characterized by increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and subjective symptoms of pruritus, inflammation, skin sensitivity, and dryness. AD is a frequent issue for individuals of color, though it may be underrecognized. Therapy for AD is based on reducing pruritus and inflammation, and normalizing skin surface lipids, particularly ceramides. Topical corticosteroids are the gold-standard treatment for controlling disease flares, but a variety of active natural ingredients can be used adjunctively to help control itch, inflammation, and dryness. Oatmeal, particularly avenanthramides, a newly discovered oat fraction, may be of particular value in restoring the cutaneous barrier and reducing symptoms of AD. Feverfew, licorice, and dexpanthenol also have been shown to be effective in the management of inflammation. Licorice, which has some skin-lightening activity, may be helpful in patients with postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). The compromised skin barrier in AD is especially vulnerable to UV radiation exposure. Several new long-lasting photostable sunscreen ingredients provide longer durations of protection with improved cosmetic attributes.

  19. Innovations in natural ingredients and their use in skin care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F; Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Waldorf, Heidi; Saini, Ritu

    2010-06-01

    Natural ingredients have been used traditionally for millennia and their application in topical creams, lotions and preparations within the traditional medicines and healing traditions of many cultures has been observed. Over the last 20 years, clinical and laboratory studies have identified the benefits of an array of natural ingredients for skin care. Consequently, a number of these ingredients and compounds are today being developed, used or considered not only for anti-aging effects, but also for use in dermatologic disorders. Certain ingredients, such as colloidal oatmeal and aloe vera, have been identified as beneficial in the treatment of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, respectively, due to their anti-inflammatory properties. For combating acne and rosacea, green tea, niacinamide and feverfew are considered efficacious. As to hyperpigmentation and antioxidative capabilities, licorice, green tea, arbutin, soy, acai berry, turmeric and pomegranate are among those plants and compounds found to be most beneficial. Additional research is needed to determine to confirm and elucidate the benefits of these ingredients in the prevention and management of skin disease.

  20. Occupational dermatitis in Danish gardeners and greenhouse workers (III). Compositae-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, E; Søgaard, J; Andersen, K E

    1998-03-01

    The clinical part of the study aimed at describing epidemiological and diagnostic aspects of occupational Compositae dermatitis. Patch testing with the sesquiterpene lactone (SL) and Compositae mixes, feverfew extract and supplementary allergens in 250 selected gardeners showed Compositae allergy in 25, 17 females and 8 males. 24 were possibly occupationally sensitized. The mean age was lower and the preponderance of women higher compared to classical Compositae dermatitis, and the distribution and course of the dermatitis most often did not differ from other occupational plant dermatoses. The Compositae mix detected 2x as many as the SL mix, and the overall detection rate with both was 76%, making aimed patch testing necessary. Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema), marguerite daisy (Argyranthemum frutescens) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were frequent sensitizers. Occupational type I allergy to Compositae comprised sensitization to Gerbera, chrysanthemum, lettuce, Senecio cruentus and Aster. Among 1657 respondents in the questionnaire part of the study, 824 had worked with Compositae, and 160 (19%) reported occupational Compositae-related symptoms of skin and mucous membranes. Possible risk factors for the development of these were assessed in a stepwise logistic regression model and a history of childhood eczema, hay fever and duration of exposure were significantly associated with Compositae-related irritant and allergic symptoms in both sexes.

  1. Efeito de extratos de plantas utilizadas na medicina popular no crescimento e diferenciação celular de Herpetomonas samuelpessoai (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae cultivada em meio definido Effect of plant extracts used in folk medicine on cell growth and differentiation of Herpetomonas samuelpessoai (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae cultivated in defined medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Barbieri Holetz

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, verificou-se o efeito de 15 plantas medicinais no crescimento e diferenciação celular de Herpetomonas samuelpessoai, um tripanosomatídeo não patogênico utilizado como modelo biológico, que apresenta antígenos semelhantes aos do Trypanosoma cruzi. Extratos brutos (1.000 g/ml ou óleo essencial (250 µg/ml foram adicionados ao meio definido. O crescimento celular foi determinado pela contagem em câmara de Newbauer e a diferenciação celular examinada por microscopia ótica. Ocimum gratissimum, Lippia alba, Piper regnellii, Stryphnodendron adstringens, e Tanacetum vulgare mostraram atividade antiprotozoário, Psidium guajava e Punica granatum menor atividade e Achillea millefolium, Eugenia uniflora, Mikania glomerata, Plantago major, e Spilanthes acmella não apresentaram atividade. Por outro lado, Arctium lappa, Erythrina speciosa, e Sambucus canadensis estimularam o crescimento de H. samuelpessoai e L. alba e S. acmella a diferenciação celular deste flagelado. Estes resultados indicam que plantas medicinais possuem princípios ativos contra H. samuelpessoai, o qual parece ser útil como modelo para seleção de plantas que contém drogas tripanomicidasThis work reports the effect of 15 medicinal plants on cell growth and differentiation of Herpetomonas samuelpessoai, a non-pathogenic trypanosomatid, used as biological model for its similar antigens to Trypanosoma cruzi. Crude extracts (1,000 g/ml or essential oil (250 g/ml were added in a defined medium. Cell growth was estimated by counting in Neubauer’s chamber and cell differentiation was examined by light microscope. Ocimum gratissimum, Lippia alba, Piper regnellii, Stryphnodendron adstringens, and Tanacetum vulgare showed antiprotozoan activity, Psidium guajava and Punica granatum a lower activity and Achillea millefolium, Eugenia uniflora, Mikania glomerata, Plantago major, and Spilanthes acmella had no activity. In contrast, Arctium lappa, Erythrina

  2. The effect of technogenic emissions on the heavy metals accumulation by herbaceous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplygin, Victor; Minkina, Tatiana; Mandzhieva, Saglara; Burachevskaya, Marina; Sushkova, Svetlana; Poluektov, Evgeniy; Antonenko, Elena; Kumacheva, Valentina

    2018-02-07

    The effect of technogenic emissions on the input of Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, Mn, Cr, and Ni into plants from the Poaceae and Asteraceae families has been studied. Soil and plant contamination by anthropogenic emissions from industrial enterprises leads the decreasing of crop quality; therefore, the monitoring investigation of plants and soils acquires special importance. The herbaceous plants may be used as bioindicators for main environmental changes. It was found that the high level of anthropogenic load related to atmospheric emissions from the power plant favors the heavy metal (HM) accumulation in herbaceous plants. Contamination with Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni was revealed in plants growing near the power plant. Heavy metals arrive to plants from the soil in the form of mobile compounds. Plant family is one of the main factors affecting the HM distribution in the above- and underground parts of plants. Plants from the Poaceae family accumulate less chemical elements in their aboveground parts than the Asteraceae plants. Ambrosia artemisiifolia and Artemisia austriaca are HM accumulators. For assessing the stability of plants under contamination with HMs, metal accumulation by plants from soil (the bioconcentration factor) and metal phytoavailability from plants above- and underground parts (the acropetal coefficient) were calculated. According to the bioconcentration factor and translocation factor values, Poaceae species are most resistant to technogenic contamination with HMs. The translocation factor highest values were found for Tanacetum vulgare; the lowest bioconcentration factor values were typical for Poa pratensis.

  3. Screening of some plants used in the Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases

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    Fabíola Barbiéri Holetz

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of 13 Brazilian medicinal plants were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts. Of these, 10 plant extracts showed varied levels of antibacterial activity. Piper regnellii presented a good activity against Staphylococus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, a moderate activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a weak activity against Escherichia coli. Punica granatum showed good activity on S. aureus and was inactive against the other standard strains. Eugenia uniflora presented moderate activity on both S. aureus and E. coli. Psidium guajava,Tanacetum vulgare, Arctium lappa, Mikania glomerata, Sambucus canadensis, Plantago major and Erythrina speciosa presented some degree of antibacterial activity. Spilanthes acmella, Lippia alba, and Achillea millefolium were considered inactive. Five of the plant extracts presented compounds with Rf values similar to the antibacterial compounds visible on bioautogram. Of these, three plants belong to the Asteraceae family. This may mean that the same compounds are responsible for the antibacterial activity in these plants. Anticandidal activity was detected in nine plant extracts (P. guajava, E. uniflora, P. granatum, A. lappa, T. vulgare, M. glomerata, L. alba, P. regnellii, and P. major. The results might explain the ethnobotanical use of the studied species for the treatment of various infectious diseases.

  4. Multiple cues for winged morph production in an aphid metacommunity.

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    Mohsen Mehrparvar

    Full Text Available Environmental factors can lead individuals down different developmental pathways giving rise to distinct phenotypes (phenotypic plasticity. The production of winged or unwinged morphs in aphids is an example of two alternative developmental pathways. Dispersal is paramount in aphids that often have a metapopulation structure, where local subpopulations frequently go extinct, such as the specialized aphids on tansy (Tanacetum vulgare. We conducted various experiments to further understand the cues involved in the production of winged dispersal morphs by the two dominant species of the tansy aphid metacommunity, Metopeurum fuscoviride and Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria. We found that the ant-tended M. fuscoviride produced winged individuals predominantly at the beginning of the season while the untended M. tanacetaria produced winged individuals throughout the season. Winged mothers of both species produced winged offspring, although in both species winged offspring were mainly produced by unwinged females. Crowding and the presence of predators, effects already known to influence wing production in other aphid species, increased the percentage of winged offspring in M. tanacetaria, but not in M. fuscoviride. We find there are also other factors (i.e. temporal effects inducing the production of winged offspring for natural aphid populations. Our results show that the responses of each aphid species are due to multiple wing induction cues.

  5. Screening of some plants used in the Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holetz, Fabíola Barbiéri; Pessini, Greisiele Lorena; Sanches, Neviton Rogério; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Filho, Benedito Prado Dias

    2002-10-01

    Extracts of 13 Brazilian medicinal plants were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts. Of these, 10 plant extracts showed varied levels of antibacterial activity. Piper regnellii presented a good activity against Staphylococus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, a moderate activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a weak activity against Escherichia coli. Punica granatum showed good activity on S. aureus and was inactive against the other standard strains. Eugenia uniflora presented moderate activity on both S. aureus and E. coli. Psidium guajava,Tanacetum vulgare, Arctium lappa, Mikania glomerata, Sambucus canadensis, Plantago major and Erythrina speciosa presented some degree of antibacterial activity. Spilanthes acmella, Lippia alba, and Achillea millefolium were considered inactive. Five of the plant extracts presented compounds with Rf values similar to the antibacterial compounds visible on bioautogram. Of these, three plants belong to the Asteraceae family. This may mean that the same compounds are responsible for the antibacterial activity in these plants. Anticandidal activity was detected in nine plant extracts (P. guajava, E. uniflora, P. granatum, A. lappa, T. vulgare, M. glomerata, L. alba, P. regnellii, and P. major). The results might explain the ethnobotanical use of the studied species for the treatment of various infectious diseases.

  6. Evaluation of an Immunomodulator Drug as a Radioprotectant on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes In Vitro

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    Zahra Sattarpour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: IMOD™, a selenium enriched extract of the plants Tanacetum vulgare, Urtica dioica, and Rosa canina, has an excellent effect on oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of this immunomodulatory drug on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods: Peripheral blood samples obtained from venipuncture of the brachial vein were treated with IMOD™ (5, 10, 15, 20 μl for 30 min and Cobalt 60 γ-rays (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 Gy as the test groups and cultured with the control. We used the micronuclei assay, cell death detection, and cell toxicity assay to analyze the treatment effects. Results: The frequency of micronuclei were 1.66 (0 Gy, 5.33 (0.25 Gy, 9.67 (0.5 Gy, 17.67 (1 Gy, and 23.67 (2 Gy in the irradiated lymphocytes (P<0.001. The percentage of micronuclei frequency reduced to 20%, 26.83%, 37.68%, 16%, and 20.47% with IMOD™. Apoptosis and necrosis decreased significantly in the IMOD™ treated groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: IMOD™ may protect these cells against ionizing radiation.

  7. Diversity of MAPs in some plant communities of Stara Planina

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    Obratov-Petković Dragica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The high floristic diversity of Stara Planina was the starting base for the research of medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs in individual forest and meadow communities. The sites Javor and Prelesje, forest community Fagetum moesiacae montanum B. Jov. 1953, pioneer community of birch Betuletum verrucosae s.l. and meadow community Agrostietum vulgaris (capillaris Pavlović, Z. 1955, were researched as follows: soil types, floristic composition and structure of the community, percentage of MAPs, as well as the selection of species which, according to the predetermined criteria can be recommended for further exploitation. The study shows that the soil of the forest communities is eutric brown, and meadow soils are dystric and eutric humus-siliceous. The percentage of MAPs in the floristic structure of the study sites in forest and meadow communities is 32.35%. The following species can be recommended for the collection and utilisation: Hypericum perforatum L., Asperula odorata L., Dryopteris filix-mas (L Schott. Urtica dioica L., Euphorbia amygdaloides L., Prunella grandiflora L. Tanacetum vulgare L., Achillea millefolium L., Rumex acetosa L., Campanula glomerata L., Stachys officinalis (L Trevis., Plantago lanceolata W. et K., Potentilla erecta (L Rauchel, Chamaespartium sagittale (L P. Gibbs. Cynanchum vincetoxicum (L Pers., Euphrasia stricta Host., Fagus moesiaca (Matt Liebl. and Fragaria vesca L.

  8. Antimicrobial activity and essential oil composition of a new T. argyrophyllum (C. Koch) Tvzel var. argyrophyllum chemotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polatoglu, Kaan; Demirci, Fatih; Demirci, Betül; Gören, Nezhun; Can Baser, Kemal Hüsnü

    2010-01-01

    Water-distilled essential oils from flowers and stems of Tanacetum argyrophyllum var. argyrophyllum from Turkey were analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The flower oil of T. argyrophyllum var. argyrophyllum was characterized with camphor 29.7%, borneol 12.0%, 1,8-cineole 8.4% and bornyl acetate 6.1%. Stem oil was characterized with camphor 26.6%, 1,8-cineole 17.5%, and borneol 15.0%. Our previous research and literature on the essential oil of this plant reported oils with high thujone content unlike the present study. Antibacterial activity of the oils were evaluated for five Gram-positive and five Gram-negative bacteria by using a broth microdilution assay. The highest inhibitory activity was observed against Bacillus cereus for stem oil (125 microg/mL) when compared with positive control chloramphenicol it showed the same inhibition potency. However, the same oil showed lower inhibitory activity against B. subtilis. The flower oil did not show significant activity against the tested microorganisms. DPPH radical scavenging activity of the T. argyrophyllum var. argyrophyllum oil was investigated at 15 and 10 mg/mL concentrations. However, the oils did not show any significant activity when compared to positive control alpha-tocopherol. Both of the oils showed toxicity to Vibrio fischeri in the TLC-bioluminescence assay.

  9. Investigations on the Effects of Five Different Plant Extracts on the Two-Spotted Mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Arachnida: Tetranychidae

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    Pervin Erdogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-spotted mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Arac.: Tetranychidae, is an economic pest worldwide including Turkey, causing serious damage to vegetables, flowers, and fruit crops. In recent years, broad-spectrum insecticides/miticides have been used to control this pest in Turkey. Control is difficult mainly due to resistance to conventional pesticides. This study was conducted to determine efficacy of pesticides extracted from five different plants [i.e., Allium sativum L. (Amaryllidaceae, Rhododendron luteum S. (Ericaceae, Helichrysum arenarium L. (Asteraceae, Veratrum album L. (Liliaceae, and Tanacetum parthenium L. (Asteraceae] against this mite. Bioassays were tested by two different methods to determine the effects of varying concentrations. Experiments were performed using 3 cm diameter leaf disk from unsprayed bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. In addition, the effects of the extracts on reproduction and oviposition were investigated. The extract yielded high mortality. In the lowest-concentration bioassays, the adult mites laid lower numbers of eggs compared to the untreated control. No ovicidal effect was observed.

  10. Update on the prophylaxis of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürks, Markus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Goadsby, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Migraine prophylaxis is a stepwise procedure with lifestyle advice followed by consideration of medications. Patients should be advised to try to maintain a regular lifestyle, with regular sleep, meals, exercise, and management of stress, perhaps through relaxation techniques or other ways that are sensible for them. If this regimen does not adequately control their migraines, preventatives are indicated. Patients can choose between evidence-based nutraceuticals such as riboflavin, feverfew, butterbur, or coenzyme Q10, or more traditional pharmacotherapeutics. Medicine choices are somewhat limited by what is available in each country, but from the full range, the medicines of first choice are beta-adrenoceptor blockers, flunarizine, topiramate, and valproic acid. Beta-adrenoceptor blockers are particularly useful in patients also suffering from hypertension or tachycardia. Following recent studies, topiramate has become a first choice for episodic as well as chronic migraine. It is the only prophylactic drug that may lead to weight loss, but it is sometimes associated with adverse cognitive effects. Valproic acid and flunarizine also have very good prophylactic properties. However, valproic acid is often associated with adverse effects, and flunarizine is unavailable in many countries, including the United States. If sequential monotherapies are ineffective, combinations of first-line drugs should be tried before advancing to drugs of second choice, which are associated with more adverse effects or have less well-established prophylactic properties. Amitriptyline should be used carefully because of its anticholinergic effects, although it is useful in comorbid tension-type headache, depression, and sleep disorders. Methysergide is very effective, but it has been supplanted or even made unavailable in many countries because of its well-described association with retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pizotifen has a slightly better safety profile but is unavailable in the United

  11. Ethnobotanical study on medicinal plants in villages of Çatak (Van-Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mükemre, Muzaffer; Behçet, Lütfi; Çakılcıoğlu, Uğur

    2015-05-26

    (Stapf.) Edmondson, Stachys kurdica Boiss. & Hohen var. kurdica, Tanacetum kotschyi (Boiss.) Grierson, Tanacetum zahlbruckneri (Nâb.) Grierson, Turanecio eriospermus (DC.) Hamzaoğlu, Verbascum pyramidatum M.Bieb. Names of local plants in Turkey vary especially due to vernaculars. The plants that the locals of Çatak use are called with the same or different local names in various parts of Anatolia. We found out that locals living in the research area use for therapeutic purpose 78 plants taxa which belong to 22 families. Turkish citizens with different ethnic backgrounds took the questionnaire. These people use these wild plants in treatment of several diseases. Comparison of the data obtained in this study with the experimental data obtained in the previous laboratory studies on the wild plants which grow in Çatak proved ethnobotanical usages to a great extent. Literature review indicated that the therapeutic plants that grow in Çatak are used in different parts of the world for the treatment of similar diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biosynthesis of monoterpenes: Stereochemistry of the coupled isomerization and cyclization of geranyl pyrophosphate to camphane and isocamphane monoterpenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croteau, R.; Gershenzon, J.; Wheeler, C.J.; Satterwhite, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    The conversion of geranyl pyrophosphate to (+)-bornyl pyrophosphate and (+)-camphene is considered to proceed by the initial isomerization of the substrate to (-)-(3R)-linalyl pyrophosphate and the subsequent cyclization of this bound intermediate. In the case of (-)-bornyl pyrophosphate and (-)-camphene, isomerization of the substrate to the (+)-(3S)-linalyl intermediate precedes cyclization. The geranyl and linalyl precursors were shown to be mutually competitive substrates (inhibitors) of the relevant cyclization enzymes isolated from Salvia officinalis (sage) and Tanacetum vulgare (tansy) by the mixed substrate analysis method, demonstrating that isomerization and cyclization take place at the same active site. Incubation of partially purified enzyme preparations with (3R)-[1Z-3H]linalyl pyrophosphate plus [1-14C]geranyl pyrophosphate gave rise to double-labeled (+)-bornyl pyrophosphate and (+)-camphene, whereas incubation of enzyme preparations catalyzing the antipodal cyclizations with (3S)-[1Z-3H]-linalyl pyrophosphate plus [1-14C]geranyl pyrophosphate yielded double-labeled (-)-bornyl pyrophosphate and (-)-camphene. Each product was then transformed to the corresponding (+)- or (-)-camphor without change in the 3H:14C isotope ratio, and the location of the tritium label was deduced in each case by stereoselective, base-catalyzed exchange of the exo-alpha-hydrogen of the derived ketone. The finding that the 1Z-3H of the linalyl precursor was positioned at the endo-alpha-hydrogen of the corresponding camphor in all cases, coupled to the previously demonstrated retention of configuration at C1 of the geranyl substrate in these transformations, confirmed the syn-isomerization of geranyl pyrophosphate to linalyl pyrophosphate and the cyclization of the latter via the anti,endo- conformer

  13. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Arab, Nafiseh; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance to investigate both

  14. Evaluation of cytotoxic effect of methanolic extracts isolated from endemic plants of Chaharmahal va Bakhtiari province on PC-3, MCF-7, Hep G2, CHO and B16-F10 cell lines

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    Z. Tayarani-Najaran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: To date, thousands of secondary metabolites have been isolated from plants and microorganisms and there is an unprecedented attention towards potential biomedical applications of natural compounds. In this study, cytotoxic properties of methanol extracts of Stachys obtusicrena, Aristolochia olivieri, Linum album, Dionysia sawyeri, Ajuga chamaecistus, Achillea kellalensis, Nepeta glomerulosa, Phlomis aucheria, Tanacetum dumosum, Dianthus orientalis, Scutellaria multicaulis, Cicer oxyodon and Picris oligocephalum which are widely grown in Iran, were investigated on PC-3 (prostat cancer, MCF-7 (breast cancer, Hep-G2 (liver cancer, CHO (ovarian cancer and B16-F10 (melanoma cell lines. Methods: The cancer cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 and incubated with different concentrations of the plant extracts. Cell viability was quantitated by Alamar blue® assay. The apoptotic cells were determined by PI coloring and Flow Cytometry (Sub-G1 peak. Results: The methanol extracts of D. sawyeri, S. obtusicrena, and C. oxyodon significantly decreased the viability of CHO cells. The Methanol extract of D. sawyer and L. album had cytotoxic effects on B16-F10 cells, whereas no toxicity was observed in MCF-7, Hep-G2 and PC-3 cell lines after incubation of the cancer cells with the plant extracts. The PI staining results showed that D. sawyeri, S. obtusicrena, and C. oxyodon in CHO cancer cells could induce apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion: Screening plants to find the most cytotoxic extract showed D. sawyeri, S. obtusicrena, C. oxyodon and L. album had the potential for further analysis toward finding active phytochemicals with cytotoxic activity.

  15. Influence of water infusion of medicinal plants on larvae of Strongyloides papillosus (Nematoda, Strongyloididae

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    A. A. Boyko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common nematodes of ruminants is Strongyloides papillosus (Wedl, 1856. Disease caused by these parasites brings economic losses to livestock operations. Therefore it is necessary to control their numbers. The eggs and three larval stages of S. papillosus live in the environment, while the fourth, fifth and mature individuals live in host organisms. Control of these parasites is necessary at all stages of development, including the free-living stage. An experiment on changes in the number strongiloids under the influence of environmental factors was carried out using aqueous extracts of medicinal plants. In the laboratory experiment we researched the effect on the survival of invasive and noninvasive types of S. papillosus larvae of 24 hours exposure at different doses to Artemisia absinthium Linnaeus, 1753, Artemisia annua Linnaeus, 1753, Echinacea purpurea (Linnaeus, 1753 Moench, 1794, Matricaria chamomilla Linnaeus, 1753, Tanacetum vulgare Linnaeus, 1753, Salvia sclarea Linnaeus, 1753, Levisticum officinale W.D.J. Koch, 1824, Petroselinum crispum (Miller, 1768 Nyman ex A.W. Hill, 1925. The death of 50% of S. papillosus invasive larvae was registered at 464 ± 192 mg/l concentration of aqueous extract of S. sclarea inflorescences. The greatest effect up-on the non-invasive larvae was caused by aqueous extracts of inflorescences of S. sclarea, M. chamomilla and seeds of P. crispum: at concentrations of 327 ± 186, 384 ± 155 and 935 ± 218 mg/l, respectively, 50% of non-invasive larvae died. According to the results of the research, we suggest further study of the nematocidal activity of combinations, contained in the aboveground parts, of clary sage (S. sclarea, camomile (M. chamomilla and seeds of parsley (P. crispum, and also experimental usage of these species in the fodder compound for cattle, sheep, goats and pigs on experimental farms.

  16. Xanthatin and xanthinosin from the burs of Xanthium strumarium L. as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Erosa, Irving; Huang, Yaoge; Hickie, Robert A; Sutherland, Ronald G; Barl, Branka

    2007-11-01

    Xanthatin and xanthinosin, 2 sesquiterpene lactones isolated from the burs of Xanthiun strumarium L. (cocklebur), showed moderate to high in vitro cytotoxic activity in the human cancer cell lines WiDr ATCC (colon), MDA-MB-231 ATCC (breast), and NCI-417 (lung). Xanthatin and xanthinosin were purified as the result of a multi-screening bioassay-guided study of wild plant species of the family Asteraceae, collected from various sites in Saskatchewan, Canada. Seventy-five extracts at a single concentration of 100 microg/mL were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity to the human cancer cell lines used. The chloroform extract of Carduus nutans L. (nodding thistle) aerial parts (IC50, 9.3 microg/mL) and the hexane extract of Echinacea angustifolia DC. (narrow-leaved purple coneflower) root (IC50, 4.0 microg/mL) were moderately to highly cytotoxic to the lung cancer cell line. The chloroform extracts of X. strumarium L. burs and Tanacetum vulgare L. (tansy) aerial parts exhibited the highest cytotoxicity for all cell lines tested; their IC50 values, obtained from multidose testing, ranged from 0.1 to 6.2 microg/mL (X. strumarium) and from 2.4 to 9.1 microg/mL (T. vulgare). Further purification of the chloroform fraction of X. strumarium yielded xanthatin and xanthinosin in high yields. This is the first time that these compounds have been reported in the burs of X. strumarium. Their IC50 values are also reported herein.

  17. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Mahdavi-Arab

    Full Text Available Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance

  18. The Content of Mercury in Herbal Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodziak-Dopierała, Barbara; Fischer, Agnieszka; Szczelina, Wioletta; Stojko, Jerzy

    2018-01-17

    The dietary supplement market in Poland has been growing rapidly, and the number of registered products and their consumption increases steadily. Among the most popular and the easiest to get are herbal supplements, available in any supermarket. The aim of this paper was to investigate the mercury content in the herbal supplements. The dietary supplements that have been examined (24) are available on the Polish market and contain one or more herbal ingredients. Supplements were pulverized in porcelain mortar and identified by AMA 254 atomic absorption spectrometer. The range of variations for all tested supplements was within 0.02-4293.07 μg/kg. The arithmetic mean of the total result was 193.77 μg/kg. A higher mercury content then this mean was found in preparations-bamboo shoots and alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The studies have shown that mercury is present in every examined herbal supplement, and its content exceeds in two preparations (with bamboo and alga) the permissible limit of 0.10 mg/kg. There were statistically significant differences in the occurrence of mercury depending on the herbal ingredient in the supplement. The lowest content was found in the preparation with Tanacetum parthenium and the highest with bamboo shoots. The mercury content in the tested herbal supplements was statistically significant in the form of a supplement-a tablet and a capsule. Daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly consumption of mercury with examined supplements was calculated-the results did not exceed the PTWI-provisional tolerable weekly intake of mercury. To increase consumer safety, it is imperative to conduct further research on dietary supplements and implement a stricter quality control of the dietary supplements.

  19. Disponibilidade de água no solo e crescimento de artemísia

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    Carvalho Luciana M. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantas de artemísia (Tanacetum parthenium L. Schultz-Bip., cultivadas em vasos com substrato mantido na capacidade de campo, a 90%, a 70% e a 50% da capacidade de campo foram comparadas quanto à altura, acúmulo de massa fresca na parte aérea, teor relativo de clorofila e teor de prolina. O teor relativo de clorofila foi estimado por meio do clorofilômetro SPAD-502, enquanto o teor de prolina foi determinado por colorimetria. Verificou-se reduções de 16% na altura e de 22,5% no acúmulo de massa fresca nas plantas crescidas a 50% da capacidade de campo, em relação àquelas crescidas a 90% da capacidade de campo. O teor relativo de clorofila nas folhas, em quaisquer dos níveis hídricos, decresceu com o tempo, indicando tendência à senescência. Apesar da redução contínua nos níveis de clorofila, as plantas mantidas a 50% da capacidade de campo tiveram, durante todo o tempo acompanhado, teor relativo de clorofila cerca de 30% mais alto comparado às plantas mantidas a 90% da capacidade de campo. O teor de prolina também foi maior nessas plantas, indicando ocorrência de estresse por deficiência hídrica e ajuste osmótico. O maior teor relativo de clorofila e de prolina nas folhas expandidas das plantas sob deficiência hídrica pode ser utilizado como indicativo de estresse.

  20. ДОПОЛНЕНИЕ К ФЛОРЕ АЛТАЙСКОГО КРАЯ

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    M. M. Silantyeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available В статье приведены сведения о флористических находках в равнинной части Алтайского края (на Кулундинской равнине и Приобском плато. Впервые указаны для Алтайского края два вида – Tanacetum achilleifolium (Bieb. Sch. Bip. и Dasystephana cruciata (L. Zuev. Для 14 редких видов приведены новые сведения о распространении на территории края.

  1. HOMEMADE SLOW-ACTION FERTILIZERS, AS AN ECONOMIC SOLUTION FOR ORGANIC FOOD PRODUCTION

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    Tomasz Ciesielczuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic plant cultivation, especially those intended for human consumption, poses new requirements for gardening. It is recommended to use organic slow-action fertilizers, which provide doses of nutrients essential for plants for a long time. Particularly valuable fertilizers are those that arise within the household, due to their high quality and the absence of costs associated with their purchase and transport. Organic matter contained in the food industry waste or arising in households, in the absence of contamination by other types of waste, can be used for self-production of organic fertilizer. The paper presents the results of testing organic fertilizers, which you can make yourself, destined for the cereal plants. The experimental fertilizers were made from coffee spent grounds (CSG and ash from the thermal conversion of biomass (A, and the components limiting the amount of pests in the form of leaves and flowers of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.. The fertilizer can be used at the time of planting and sowing, because of the slow release of nutrients. Moreover, the addition of leaves and flowers of tansy helps to protect the seedling due to the content of essential oils. As a comparison, the horse manure and rabbit droppings fertilizers were used. Such fertilizers can be prepared independently, which leads not only to reducing the weight of biodegradable and mineral waste, but also provides the ability to generate financial savings of the household and promote organic gardening. Fertilizers made from a mixture of CSG and A support the implementation of good agricultural practice and sustainable development.

  2. Estudo da concordância das citações de uso e importância das espécies e famílias utilizadas como medicinais pela comunidade do bairro Ponta Grossa, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Secretti Vendruscolo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Ferramentas para quantificar dados etnobotânicos estão sendo usadas como complementares aos levantamentos sobre a utilização de plantas por populações. Neste trabalho são utilizadas técnicas para avaliar a concordância das citações de uso e a importância das espécies e famílias para as 51 pessoas entrevistadas no bairro Ponta Grossa, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul. Para tal, foram utilizados os cálculos de Valor de Uso (UV e a porcentagem corrigida de Concordância quanto aos Usos Principais (CUPc para as 142 espécies mencionadas no levantamento. As espécies Aloe arborescens Mill., Citrus × aurantium L., Achyrocline satureioides (Lam. DC., Foeniculum vulgare Mill, Eugenia uniflora L., Cunila microcephala Benth., Citrus limon (L. Osveck, Plectranthus barbatus Andrews, Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf, Psidium guajava L., Artemisia absinthium L., Ocimum basilicum L., Plantago tomentosa Lam., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Persea americana Mill., Aloysia citrodora Palau, Sambucus australis Cham. & Schltdl., Cuphea carthagenensis (Jacq. J.F. Macbr., Petroselinum crispum (Mill. Nyman ex A.W. Hill, Ocimum selloi Benth. e Tanacetum vulgare L., nesta ordem de Valor de Uso, foram consideradas como as mais importantes para a população estudada. As famílias mais importantes foram Asphodelaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Rutaceae e Lythraceae. Para o cálculo da porcentagem a corrigida de Concordância quanto aos Usos Principais (CUPc foram consideradas como espécies principais as que apresentaram valores acima de 24%: Eugenia uniflora, Achyrocline satureioides, Psidium guajava, Cunila microcephala, Plectranthus barbatus, Citrus × aurantium, Citrus limon, Cymbopogon citratus, Punica granatum L., Sechium edule (Jacq. Sw., Sphagneticola trilobata (L. Pruski, Aloysia citrodora, Foeniculum vulgare, Plectranthus neochilus Schltr., Artemisia absinthium, Lippia alba (Mill. N.E. Br., Mikania laevigata Sch. Bip ex Baker, Aloe arborescens e Petroselinum

  3. Analysis of landslide overgrowing rates at Vaskiny Dachi key site, Central Yamal, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomutov, A.

    2009-04-01

    Equiesetum arvense ssp. boreale were presented, pioneer moss species (Bryum sp., Ceratodon purpureus appropriate for disturbed habitats appeared. In the "frontal zone" transformed initial communities were observed and sedge communities with Carex glareosa were developing (Rebristaya et al. 1995). In 2005 landslide shear surface was characterized by abundance of pioneer grass and chamomile-grass with herb communities on rather dry portions (Deschampsia borealis, Puccinellia sibirica, Draba hirta, Tanacetum bipinnatum, Senecio congestus), and sedge (Carex glaerosa, Carex bigelowii ssp. arctisibirica) or cottongrass (Eriophorum angustifolium, Eriophorim vaginatum) meadows in depressions, but edges of gentle troughs were overgrowing poorly. On the landslide body, initial moss cover did not recover, on separate blocks crustose lichens developed. However, everywhere in more stable herb-shrub communities with Salix polaris typical moss cover formed. In "frontal zone" sedge bogs appeared. Some activation of overgrowing was noted in 2007-2008 in connection with favorable weather conditions with warm summers in preceding 2005-2006 and relatively high summer precipitation, but shear surfaces of majority of landslides got overgrown by 30-40 % because of poorly developed organic horizon and high erosion liability of these surfaces, as well as shear surfaces of small landslides on steep slopes. Different are landslides on gentle southern slopes. Their shear surfaces got overgrown by herb, cotton grass and sedge communities by 90% while communities on landslide bodies are similar to those on surrounding undisturbed slopes. Specific are landslides with actively developing thermoerosion on shear surface. Overgrowing and thermoerosion are developing simultaneously at such landslides. At one of such landslides depth of thermoerosion gully reached to 2 m in 2008. At the same time shear surface around the gully got overgrown by pioneer grass and chamomile-grass communities with equisetum and

  4. Bioavailability of heavy metals, germanium and rare earth elements at Davidschacht dump-field in mine affected area of Freiberg (Saxony)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midula, Pavol; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    with the other elements from this group. High amounts of As, Cd, Pb in mould horizons were proved. The surprisingly highest concentrations were determined for As (in average 3328 mg kg-1). The results of the pH measurement indicates acid conditions (in average 4.86, min. 3.89) for whole mine heap. Due to the mobility of Cd and Pb in acid environment, a high mobility of Cd in mobile soil fractions (in average 0.58 mg kg-1) was found, that seems to be responsible for the Cd pollution of Freiberger Mulde river, situated near the dump-field in the East direction from the studied area. The Pb content was in the average 1513 mg kg-1. SE analyses shows, that only the minor amounts of these metals were accounted in fractions I - IV (As: 7.75 %, Pb: 5.48 %, Cd: 26.77 %). The total Ge content in soil samples was 2.7 mg.kg-1in average. The concentrations of Nd and Ce were 17.7 mg kg-1and 38.5 mg kg-1, which is even lower than the average Nd and Ce contents in the Earth crust. However, the concentration of Ge was roughly a factor of two higher, than this average showing a large pool of Ge that could be accessed by phytoextraction. The SE analyses shows, that the average in fractions I - IV is even much lower, than in the case of the above mentioned heavy metals in comparison with Ge (1.75 %), Nd (3.28 %) and Ce (3.12 %). The BCF calculated for plants shows, that the only element, which could be possibly used as the object of phytoaccumulation is Cd (the BCF > 1) in species Populus tremula (3.0, 1.7), Spirea douglasii (1.4, 2.2) and Tanacetum vulgare (3.2, 1.3) at the most sampling places. Since these species represent the natural occurring vegetation of the dump, the use of these species together with soil amendments enhancing the plant availability of elements in soil fractions hold promise for phytoextraction of economically valuable metalloids and consequently an in situ bioremediation of the dump field. This work was realised with the support of Christin Jahns on behalf of the